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Sample records for super collider project

  1. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  2. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  3. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  4. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  5. Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovar, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment in the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed.

  6. Electron lenses for super-colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the operating principles and technology of electron lenses in supercolliders.  Electron lenses are a novel instrument for high energy particle accelerators, particularly for the energy-frontier superconducting hadron colliders, including the Tevatron, RHIC, LHC and future very large hadron colliders.  After reviewing the issues surrounding beam dynamics in supercolliders, the book offers an introduction to the electron lens method and its application.  Further chapters describe the technology behind the electron lenses which have recently been proposed, built and employed for compensation of beam-beam effects and for collimation of high-energy high-intensity beams, for compensation of space-charge effects and several other applications in accelerators. The book will be an invaluable resource for those involved in the design, construction and operation of the next generation of hadron colliders.

  7. Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

    1986-06-01

    The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength.

  8. Probing LINEAR Collider Final Focus Systems in SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Thrane, Paul Conrad Vaagen

    2017-01-01

    A challenge for future linear collider final focus systems is the large chromaticity produced by the final quadrupoles. SuperKEKB will be correcting high levels of chromaticity using the traditional scheme which has been also proposed for the CLIC FFS. We present early simulation results indicating that lowering β*у in the SuperKEKB Low Energy Ring might be possible given on-axis injection and low bunch current, opening the possibility of testing chromaticity correction beyond FFTB level, similar to ILC and approaching that of CLIC. CLIC – Note – 1077

  9. Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-22

    In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

  10. Final Report - The Decline and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RIORDAN, MICHAEL

    2011-11-29

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider — at the time the largest pure-science project ever attempted, with a total cost estimated to exceed $10 billion. It was a stunning loss for the US highenergy physics community, which until that moment had perched for decades at the pinnacle of American science. Ever since 1993, this once-dominant scientific community has been in gradual decline. With the 2010 startup of research on the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the 2011 shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron, world leadership in elementary-particle physics has crossed the Atlantic and returned to Europe.

  11. 1994 expected to be year of decision for European Super Collider.

    CERN Document Server

    Sweet, William N

    1994-01-01

    Plans to build Europe's counterpart to the US' Superconducting Super Collider, the Large Hadron Collider, may push through when the CERN Council meets on Apr 15, 1994. The European scientific community is optimistic that the plan will be approved.

  12. The Super DREAM Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigmans, Richard [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Despite the fact that DOE provided only a fraction of the requested funds, the goals we defined in the proposal on which award ER41783 was based were essentially all met. This was partially due to the fact that other funding agencies, which supported our collaborators (especially from Italy and Korea) contributed as well, and partially due to the effective solutions that were developed to compensate for the fact that the detector we had proposed to build had to be scaled down. The performance of the SuperDREAM calorimeter is better than anything that has been built or proposed so far. This has of course not gone unnoticed in the scientific community. Scientists who are preparing experiments for the proposed new generation of particle accelerators (FCCee, CPEC,..) are all very seriously considering the technology developed in this project. Several new collaborations have formed which aim to adapt the dual-readout calorimeter principles to the demands of a 4 environment. Preliminary measurements using silicon photomultipliers as light sensors have already been carried out. This type of readout would make it possible to operate this detector in a magnetic field, and it would also allow for a longitudinal segmentation into electromagnetic and hadronic sections, if so desired. In addition, SiPM readout would eliminate the need for “forests” of fibers sticking out of the rear end of the calorimeter (Figure 1), and obtain an arbitrary fine lateral segmentation, which might be very important for recognizing electrons inside jets. The improvements in our understanding of the fundamental structure of matter and the forces that govern its behavior have always hinged on the availability of detectors that make it possible to explore the possibilities of new, more powerful particle accelerators to the fullest extent. We believe that the SuperDREAM project has created a quantum leap in detector technology, which may turn out to be crucially important for future discoveries in

  13. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Lepton Colliders at the Energy and Luminosity Frontiers Linear Colliders and SuperB Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, Jean Pierre

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of the performance of the various Lepton Colliders presently in operation at the energy and luminosity frontiers, the article describes their possible evolution and the envisaged new projects to improve their performances. Beauty Factories have the potential to extend the present luminosity frontier of Lepton Colliders by two orders of magnitude into the 1036 cm-2 sec-1 range. Linear Colliders have the potential to extend the present energy frontier of Lepton Colliders by one order of magnitude into the Multi-TeV energy range. The ideas and challenges to boost these frontiers in the next future are described as well as the R&D plans to demonstrate their feasibility and/or to prepare projects proposals through engineering design optimisation and industrialisation. Technically driven schedule for their possible fabrication and installation are presented.

  15. The Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Engelen, Joseph J

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will enable proton-proton collisions at an energy of more than fourteen thousand times the proton mass. This allows the discovery of new elementary particles with very large masses, in particular of the Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is crucial for understanding the mechanism that Nature chose to give mass to particles. The Higgs boson has turned out to be very hard to find but the LHC should allow a decisive step into new territory, unveiling one or even more Higgs bosons. The new energy domain of the LHC also inspires speculations about discoveries relevant for understanding dark matter and about the discovery of new space dimensions, so far hidden to us. In the talk an overview of the physics at LHC and a report on the status of the project, accelerator and experiments, will be presented.

  16. Preliminary report on the design of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-01-01

    While a rather detailed Conceptual Design Report will be available in April, an Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) it is appropriate to give a preview, now that the primary parameters for the Conceptual Design Report have been put down. In this preview the leading two chapters give the historical and scientific-technical background for the SSC and deal at somelength with the physics issues to be explored by the SSC. A third chapter reviews briefly the engineering and accelerator physics foundations for the developing SSC design, while the fourth lists the primary design parameters and describes the overall design. The fifth chapter describes briefly the principal engineering systems that will appear in the Conceptual Design Report, including the rather extensive injector system required. A sixth and final chapter outlines the beginnings of a ``construction plan`` put together for the purposes of exploring practical schedules and defining the critical design, development and planning paths for the overall facility and its major sub-systems.

  17. Tests of prototype SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Koepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Lundy, R.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; McInturff, A.; Orr, J.R.

    1987-09-21

    Results are presented from tests of the third full scale development dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider and from a retest of a 4.5 m model magnet of the same design mounted in an SSC cryostat. The 4.5 m magnet shows consistent quench performance between its original tests in boiling liquid helium in a vertical dewar and the current tests in forced flow helium in a horizontal cryostat. Little or no retraining is observed over several thermal cycles. The full length magnet requires 12 quenches to train to its short sample limit of 6800 A and displays a reasonably stable quench plateau following training. This represents a great improvement over the performance of the first two full length magnets. Data are presented on quench behavior as a function of current and temperature and on azimuthal and longitudinal loading of the coil by the support structure. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Object-oriented simulation for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiasheng [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Chung, Moon-Jung [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an object-oriented simulation environment called OZ for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The design applies object-oriented technology to data visualization, behavior modelling, dynamic simulation and version control. A meta class structure is proposed to model different types of objects in large systems by their functionality. OZ provides a direct-manipulation user interface which allows the user to visualize the data as an object in the database and interactively model the component of the system. Modelling can be exercised at different levels of the class hierarchy and then can be dynamically bound into a system for simulation. Inheritance is used to derive new configurations of the system or subsystem from the existing one, and specify an object`s behavior. Delegation is used to construct a system by instantiating existing objects and ``stealing`` their methods by delegators.

  19. Tunnel visions the rise and fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Michael; Kolb, Adrienne W

    2015-01-01

    Starting in the 1950s, US physicists dominated the search for elementary particles; aided by the association of this research with national security, they held this position for decades. In an effort to maintain their hegemony and track down the elusive Higgs boson, they convinced President Reagan and Congress to support construction of the multibillion-dollar Superconducting Super Collider project in Texas-the largest basic-science project ever attempted. But after the Cold War ended and the estimated SSC cost surpassed ten billion dollars, Congress terminated the project in October 1993. Drawing on extensive archival research, contemporaneous press accounts, and over one hundred interviews with scientists, engineers, government officials, and others involved, Tunnel Visions tells the riveting story of the aborted SSC project. The authors examine the complex, interrelated causes for its demise, including problems of large-project management, continuing cost overruns, and lack of foreign contributions. In doi...

  20. Power Tests of a String of Magnets Comprising a Full Cell of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, W.; Cromer, L.; Haenni, D.; Hentges, M.; Jaffrey, T.; Kraushaar, P.; Levin, M.; Mulholland, G.; Richter, D.; Robinson, W.; Weisend II, J.; Zapotek, J.

    1995-06-28

    In this paper we describe the operation and testing of a string of magnets comprising a full cell of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The full cell configuration composed of ten dipoles, two quadrupoles, and three spool pieces is the longest SSC magnet string ever tested. Although the tests of the full cell were undertaken after the SSC project was marked for termination, their completion was deemed necessary and useful to future efforts at other accelerator laboratories utilizing Superconducting magnets. The focus of this work is on the electrical and cryogenic performance of the string components and the quench protection system with an emphasis on solving some of the questions concerning electrical performance raised during the previous two experimental runs involving a half cell configuration.

  1. N=4 Super-Yang-Mills Theory, QCD and Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Z.

    2004-10-04

    We review how (dimensionally regulated) scattering amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory provide a useful testing ground for perturbative QCD calculations relevant to collider physics, as well as another avenue for investigating the AdS/CFT correspondence. We describe the iterative relation for two-loop scattering amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory found in (C. Anastasiou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91:251602 (2003),) and discuss recent progress toward extending it to three loops.

  2. Contracting practices for the underground construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report was prepared by a specially appointed committee under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council to address contracting and associated management issues essential to the successful execution of underground construction for the Superconducting Super Collider.

  3. The Large Hadron Collider, A Megascience Project

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the next particle accelerator built to serve the world's high-energy physics community at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research. Reusing the 26.7-km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the existing LEP collider, the LHC will make use of advanced technology - high-field superconducting magnets operated in superfluid helium - to push the energy frontier up by an order of magnitude, while remaining economically feasible. The LHC demonstrates on a grand scale several typical features of megascience projects, such as the need for international funding, world-wide co-operation and integration in the local environment, which we review in the following.

  4. Super-B Project Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, K.; Donald, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /Pisa U. /CERN

    2010-08-26

    The SuperB project aims at the construction of an asymmetric very high luminosity B-Factory on the Frascati/Tor Vergata (Italy) area, providing a uniquely sensitive probe of New Physics in the flavour sector of the Standard Model. The luminosity goal of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be reached with a new collision scheme with 'large Piwinski angle' (LPA) and the use of 'crab waist sextupoles' (CW). A LPA&CW Interaction Region (IR) has been successfully tested at the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF-Frascati in 2008. The LPA&CW scheme, together with very low {beta}*, will allow for operation with relatively low beam currents and reasonable bunch length, comparable to those of PEP-II and KEKB. In the High Energy Ring (HER), two spin rotators will bring longitudinally polarized beams into collision at the IP. The lattice has been designed with a very low intrinsic emittance and is quite compact, less than 2 km long. The tight focusing requires the final doublet quadrupoles to be very close to the IP and very compact. A Conceptual Design Report was published in March 2007, and beam dynamics and collective effects R&D studies are in progress in order to publish a Technical Design Report by the end of 2010.

  5. Shielding optimization studies for the detector systems of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary shielding optimization studies for the Superconducting Super Collider`s Solenoidal Detector Collaboration detector system were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1993. The objective of the study was to reduce the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes leaving the shield to a level that resulted in insignificant effects on the functionality of the detector system. Steel and two types of concrete were considered as components of the shield, and the shield was optimized according to thickness, weight, and cost. Significant differences in the thicknesses, weights, and costs were noted for the three optimization parameters. Results from the study are presented.

  6. From a {nu} factory to {mu} super + mu super {minus} Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Neuffer

    2000-12-21

    An important feature of a {mu}-storage ring {nu}-source is that it can be extended to the possibility of a future high-energy muon collider. The neutrino source provides a useful physics device that initiates key technologies required for future {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup {minus}} Colliders, but with much less demanding parameter requirements. These technologies include high-intensity {mu}-production, {mu}-capture, {mu}-cooling, {mu}-acceleration and multiturn {mu} storage rings. {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders require a similar number of muons, but they require that the muons be cooled to a much smaller phase space and formed into a small number of bunches, and both positive and negative bunches must be simultaneously captured. These differences are discussed, and the extension of the {nu}-source to {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup {minus}} collider specifications is described.

  7. The SuperB factory, physics potential and project status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiechczynski Jaroslaw

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The SuperB project is an international enterprise aiming at the construction of the high-luminosity asymmetric beam energy electron-positron accelerator, which would be located in the area of Rome. It would exploit several novel features allowing to achieve an unprecedented luminosities and to collect almost a hundred times more data than the current generation of ”B factories”. As for the leptonic colliders, it will maintain a clean, low-background experimental environment that is crucial for numerous measurements on the field of high energy physics

  8. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency

  9. COLLIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Howie Day, Collide, Based on the original parody "Collide" by USLHC, inspired by the original song "Collide" written by Howie Day and Kevin Griffin. Re-record Produced by Mike Denneen Engineered by Patrick DiCenso -Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards- Howie Day -Guitar Patrick DiCenso -Bass- Ed Valuskas -Drums- Dave Brophy

  10. Senate baulks at cost of collider project

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The US Senate has called for NLC research costs to be cut from 14 to 6 million dollars next year. The intention is to end funding altogether in two years after a report showed that the collider would cost the USA about 5 billion dollars (1 page).

  11. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  12. Large Hadron Collider project to study the origins of matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Scientific Information Port (PIC), a technological centre located on the campus of the UAB, recently started work on the first stage of the European project Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator in the world, which has the aim of reproducing conditions similar to those produced during the Big Bang in order to study the origins of matter." (1/2 page)

  13. Measurement of the magnetically-induced QED birefringence of the vacuum and an improved search for laboratory axions: Technical report. Project definition study of the use of assets and facilities of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.A.; Fairbank, W.M. Jr.; Toki, W.H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hall, J.L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Inst. for Lab. Astrophysics]|[National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Kraushaar, P.F. Jr.; Jaffery, T.S. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Waxahachie, TX (United States)

    1994-10-31

    The Colorado State Collaboration has studied the feasibility of a high sensitivity QED birefringence/axion search measurement. The objective of this work is to measure, for the first time, the birefringence induced in the vacuum on a light beam travelling in a powerful magnetic field. The same experimental setup also allows a highly sensitive search for axion or axion-like particles. The experiment would combined custom-designed optical heterodyne interferometry with a string of six SSC prototype superconducting dipole magnets at the N-15 site of the SSC Laboratory. With these powerful laser tools, sensitivity advances of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 9} over previous optical experiments will be possible. The proposed experiment will be able to measure the QED light-by-light scattering effect with a 0.5% accuracy. The increased sensitivity for the axion-two photon interaction will result in a bound on this process rivaling the results based on astrophysical arguments. In the technical report the authors address the scientific significance of these experiments and examine the limiting technical parameters which control their feasibility. The proposed optical/electronic scheme is presented in the context of a background of the known and projected systematic problems which will confront any serious attempt to make such measurements.

  14. Report on the program of 4 K irradiation of insulating materials for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindel, A.

    1993-07-01

    This report is intended to serve as an aid to material selection. The results reported herein are the product of a careful investigation and can be used with confidence in their validity. The selection of materials based on this data, however, is not the responsibility of the author. This report will not approve or disapprove any specific material for use in the Super Collider. The author of this report does not assume any design responsibility or responsibility for material selection for any application. It is, therefore, very important that those with design responsibility use this report wisely. For this reason, the following informational guide to the material selection process has been provided. There are several issues to take into account when evaluating a material for radiation resistance. It is very important that the design criteria and operating loads for the application be known. For many applications the actual loading, and therefore required properties, are unknown. Certain materials have empirically been used successfully in a similar application and those materials have often been selected on that basis. Both percent degradation and the magnitude of the actual properties after irradiation need to be considered. Consider the scenario where two materials are being compared that both have acceptable properties after exposure to 10{sup 9} rads. It is preferable to choose the material with less degradation because degradation tends to be a threshold phenomena with properties declining rapidly with dose after a certain threshold dose. The properties of the initially strong material, therefore, will be extremely sensitive to dose in that dose range and slight magnet-to-magnet differences in dose may, depending on the application, lead to performance variations.

  15. In the loop Large Hadron Collider project - UK engineering firms

    CERN Document Server

    Wilks, N

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the latest measures being taken to boost the level of UK engineering firms' involvement in research at CERN (Centre for Nuclear Research), including its 27 km circular Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. Virtually all of the components on this complex project have had to be custom-made, usually in the form of collaboration. It is part of these collaborations that some UK firms have proved they can shine. However, despite the proven capabilities, the financial return continues to be less than the government's funding. Each of the 20 CERN member states provides funds in proportion to its GDP and the UK is the second largest financial contributor. UK firms become price-competitive where a contract calls for a degree of customisation or product development, project management and tight quality control. Development of the Particle Physics Grid, for dissemination and analysis of data from the LHC, continues to provide major supply opportunities for UK manufacturers.

  16. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Parzefall, U; Clark, A; Ikegami, Y; Hara, K; Garcia, C; Jakobs, K; Dwuznik, M; Terada, S; Barbier, G; Koriki, T; Lacasta, C; Unno, Y; Anghinolfi, F; Cadoux, F; Garcia, S M I; Ferrere, D; La Marra, D; Pohl, M; Dabrowski, W; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1). It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  18. Report of the DOE Review Committee on the baseline validation of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Secretary of Energy directed that an independent review of the current cost and schedule baseline for the SSC be conducted. The purpose of this independent review was to validate the current cost and schedule baseline and to ensure that the project status is accurate as currently reported. Through May 1993, approximately $1.5 billion of the baseline cost of $8.249 billion had been expended, with project completion forecasted on the baseline schedule as of September 1999. This report documents the findings of the SSC Baseline Validation Review Committee (the Committee). The report is organized into five parts. The first section is the Executive Summary. This introduction is followed by a discussion of the project progress/status as determined by the Committee. The next section describes the Committee`s estimate of the cost at completion for the SSC project, followed by an assessment of the adequacy of the business management systems currently being used to manage the project. The final section presents the Committee`s conclusions and recommendations. The main body of the report is followed by the subcommittee reports and appendices.

  19. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%–20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect. It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle

  20. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  1. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084369; Levichev, Evgeny; Piminov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA$\\Phi$NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  2. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

  3. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  4. Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

  5. submitter Projects for ultra-high-energy circular colliders at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomyagkov, A V; Levichev, E B; Piminov, P A; Sinyatkin, S V; Shatilov, D N; Benedict, M; Oide, K; Zimmermann, F

    2016-01-01

    Within the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study launched at CERN in 2014, it is envisaged to construct hadron (FCC-hh) and lepton (FCC-ee) ultra-high-energy machines aimed to replace the LHC upon the conclusion of its research program. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is actively involved in the development of the FCC-ee electron–positron collider. The Crab Waist (CR) scheme of the collision region that has been proposed by INP and will be implemented at FCC-ee is expected to provide high luminosity over a broad energy range. The status and development of the FCC project are described, and its parameters and limitations are discussed for the lepton collider in particular.

  6. The Dismantling Project for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, John

    2002-01-01

    The LEP accelerator was installed in a circular tunnel 27 km in length with nine access points distributed around the circumference in the countryside and villages which surround CERN's sites. The dismantling project involved the removal in less than 15 months of around 29000 tonnes of equipment from the accelerator itself and a further 10000 tonnes from the four experiments - all of which were located at an average depth of 100 m below ground level. There was no contamination risk in the project and less than 3% of the materials removed were classified as radioactive. However, the materials which were classified as radioactive have to be temporarily stored and they consume considerable resources. The major difficulties for the project were in the establishment of the theoretical radiological zoning, implementation of the traceability systems and making appropriate radiation measurements to confirm the zoning. The absence of detailed guidelines from the French authorities, having no threshold levels for relea...

  7. Role of net baryon density on rapidity width of identified particles from the lowest energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron to those at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nur; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb

    2017-08-01

    Widths of the rapidity distributions of various identified hadrons generated with the UrQMD-3.4 event generator at all the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies have been presented and compared with the existing experimental results. An increase in the width of the rapidity distribution of Λ could be seen with both Monte Carlo (MC) and experimental data for the studied energies. Using MC data, the study has been extended to Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies. A similar jump, as observed in the plot of rapidity width versus rest mass at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and all SPS energies, persists even at RHIC and LHC energies, confirming its universal nature from AGS to the highest LHC energies. Such observation indicates that pair production may not be the only mechanism of particle production at the highest LHC energies. However, with MC data, the separate mass scaling for mesons and baryons is found to exist even at the top LHC energy.

  8. Physics at the high-energy frontier - the Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Robert; Evans, David; Gibson, Valerie; Nickerson, Richard; The Royal Society Discussion meeting

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), achieved its first particle collisions in late 2009 and is now running at 7 TeV, the highest energy ever attained in the laboratory, thereby opening the way for the search for many new phenomena. The aim of the meeting is to discuss the scientific, technical, sociological, political and financial challenges of bringing this huge international project to fruition.

  9. Super Polishing of Aluminum 6061-T6 Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative 2D super-polishing process for Aluminum 6061-T6 planar mirrors which removes diamond point turning (DPT) grooves and attains rms surface finishes below...

  10. Sensor System for Super-Pressure Balloon Performance Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-duration balloon flights are an exciting new area of scientific ballooning, enabled by the development of large super-pressure balloons. As these balloons...

  11. A process for selection and training of super-users for ERP implementation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Peter; Sandfeld Hansen, Kenneth; Helt, Mads

    2017-01-01

    The concept of super-users as a means to facilitate ERP implementation projects has recently taken a foothold in practice, but is still largely overlooked in research. In particular, little is known about the selection and training processes required to successfully develop skilled super......-users in practice. To address this research gap, we analyze the case of an ERP implementation program at a large manufacturing company. We combine Katz’s widely accepted skill measurement model with the process observed in practice to describe and test a model of super-user selection and training. The resulting...... model contains a systematic process of super-user development and highlights the specific skillsets required in different phases of the selection and training process. Our results from a comparative assessment of management expectations and super-user skills in the ERP program show that the model can...

  12. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  13. A process for selection and training of super-users for ERP implementation projects

    OpenAIRE

    Danielsen, Peter; Sandfeld Hansen, Kenneth; Helt, Mads; Holm Nielsen, Lasse; Obwegeser, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    The concept of super-users as a means to facilitate ERP implementation projects has recently taken a foothold in practice, but is still largely overlooked in research. In particular, little is known about the selection and training processes required to successfully develop skilled super-users in practice. To address this research gap, we analyze the case of an ERP implementation program at a large manufacturing company. We combine Katz’s widely accepted skill measurement model with the proce...

  14. Project Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility at JINR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekelidze, V. D.; Matveev, V. A.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sorin, A. S.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2017-09-01

    The project of Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) that is under development at JINR (Dubna) is presented. The general goals of the project are experimental studies of both hot and dense baryonic matter and spin physics (in collisions of polarized protons and deuterons). The first program requires providing of heavy ion collisions in the energy range of √ {{s_{NN}}} = 4-11 Gev at average luminosity of L = 1 × 1027 cm-2 s-1 for 197Au79+ nuclei. The polarized beams mode is proposed to be used in energy range of √ {{s_{NN}}} = 12-27 Gev (protons at luminosity of L ≥ 1 × 1030 cm-2 s-1. The report contains description of the facility scheme and its characteristics in heavy ion operation mode. The Collider will be equipped with two detectors—MultiPurpose Detector (MPD), which is in an active stage of construction, and Spin Physics Detector (SPD) that is in the stage of conceptual design. Fixed target experiment "Baryonic matter at Nuclotron" (BM@N) will be performed in very beginning of the project. The wide program of applied researches at NICA facility is being developed as well.

  15. SuperB, the super flavor factory

    OpenAIRE

    Hitlin, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy flavor physics measurements, in particular B and τ physics results from the B Factories, currently provide strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard Model. SuperB, a next generation asymmetric collider with 50 to 100 times the luminosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, provide unique insights into New Physics phenomena seen at those machines.

  16. SuperB, the super flavor factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitlin, D. G.

    2009-06-01

    Heavy flavor physics measurements, in particular B and τ physics results from the B Factories, currently provide strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard Model. SuperB, a next generation asymmetric collider with 50 to 100 times the luminosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, provide unique insights into New Physics phenomena seen at those machines.

  17. SuperWiseNet - a unique network platform to leverage student entrepreneurship projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Frank; Høgsaa, Asger; Tollestrup, Christian H. T.

    2016-01-01

    and an experience-enriched forum consisting of teachers, industry experts, entrepreneurs and specialty consultants. The interaction unfolds as a series of workshops facilitating the progression of the student teams’ four months project work. The students of concern are enrolled in the international Entrepreneurial...... Engineering Master’s Program [1] at Aalborg University, Denmark (120 ECTS credits). The paper will describe and elaborate on the functioning of SuperWiseNet including a discussion of advantages for students, faculty, and industry/externals as well as some challenges with the concept.......The area of interests is the development of a potentially new complementary industry-university component, which has been labelled ‘SuperWiseNet’ for the context of academic entrepreneurial programs. The SuperWiseNet is a network-based platform for interaction between students of entrepreneurship...

  18. Projected sensitivity of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Arnquist, I.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cartaro, C.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fritts, M.; Gerbier, G.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hong, Z.; Hoppe, E.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Iyer, V.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kubik, A.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Poudel, S.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Roberts, A.; Robinson, A. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Speller, D.; Stein, M.; Street, J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Villano, A. N.; von Krosigk, B.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.

    2017-04-07

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB will be a next-generation experiment aimed at directly detecting low-mass (< 10 GeV/c$^2$) particles that may constitute dark matter by using cryogenic detectors of two types (HV and iZIP) and two target materials (germanium and silicon). The experiment is being designed with an initial sensitivity to nuclear recoil cross sections ~ 1 x 10$^{-43}$ cm$^2$ for a dark matter particle mass of 1 GeV/c$^2$, and with capacity to continue exploration to both smaller masses and better sensitivities. The phonon sensitivity of the HV detectors will be sufficient to detect nuclear recoils from sub-GeV dark matter. A detailed calibration of the detector response to low energy recoils will be needed to optimize running conditions of the HV detectors and to interpret their data for dark matter searches. Low-activity shielding, and the depth of SNOLAB, will reduce most backgrounds, but cosmogenically produced $^{3}$H and naturally occurring $^{32}$Si will be present in the detectors at some level. Even if these backgrounds are x10 higher than expected, the science reach of the HV detectors would be over three orders of magnitude beyond current results for a dark matter mass of 1 GeV/c$^2$. The iZIP detectors are relatively insensitive to variations in detector response and backgrounds, and will provide better sensitivity for dark matter particle masses (> 5 GeV/c$^2$). The mix of detector types (HV and iZIP), and targets (germanium and silicon), planned for the experiment, as well as flexibility in how the detectors are operated, will allow us to maximize the low-mass reach, and understand the backgrounds that the experiment will encounter. Upgrades to the experiment, perhaps with a variety of ultra-low-background cryogenic detectors, will extend dark matter sensitivity down to the "neutrino floor", where coherent scatters of solar neutrinos become a limiting background.

  19. Projected sensitivity of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Arnquist, I.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cartaro, C.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fritts, M.; Gerbier, G.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hong, Z.; Hoppe, E.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Iyer, V.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kubik, A.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Poudel, S.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Roberts, A.; Robinson, A. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Speller, D.; Stein, M.; Street, J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Villano, A. N.; von Krosigk, B.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.

    2017-04-01

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB will be a next-generation experiment aimed at directly detecting low-mass particles (with masses ≤ 10 GeV/c^2) that may constitute dark matter by using cryogenic detectors of two types (HV and iZIP) and two target materials (germanium and silicon). The experiment is being designed with an initial sensitivity to nuclear recoil cross sections ~1×10^-43 cm^2 for a dark matter particle mass of 1 GeV/c^2, and with capacity to continue exploration to both smaller masses and better sensitivities. The phonon sensitivity of the HV detectors will be sufficient to detect nuclear recoils from sub-GeV dark matter. A detailed calibration of the detector response to low-energy recoils will be needed to optimize running conditions of the HV detectors and to interpret their data for dark matter searches. Low-activity shielding, and the depth of SNOLAB, will reduce most backgrounds, but cosmogenically produced H-3 and naturally occurring Si-32 will be present in the detectors at some level. Even if these backgrounds are 10 times higher than expected, the science reach of the HV detectors would be over 3 orders of magnitude beyond current results for a dark matter mass of 1 GeV/c^2. The iZIP detectors are relatively insensitive to variations in detector response and backgrounds, and will provide better sensitivity for dark matter particles with masses ≳5 GeV/c^2. The mix of detector types (HV and iZIP), and targets (germanium and silicon), planned for the experiment, as well as flexibility in how the detectors are operated, will allow us to maximize the low-mass reach, and understand the backgrounds that the experiment will encounter. Upgrades to the experiment, perhaps with a variety of ultra-low-background cryogenic detectors, will extend dark matter sensitivity down to the “neutrino floor,” where coherent scatters of solar neutrinos become a limiting background.

  20. Rocket experiments and payloads for Super CAMP. [Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, E.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The super Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP) follow-up project in the summer of 1990 is outlined. In situ measurements of appropriate height resolution are needed in the summer mesosphere at high latitudes to investigate structures and formation processes of polar mesospheric clouds. The rocket measurements from the high latitude site Thule AB in Greenland (76.6 N) are decisive for the understanding of the cold Arctic mesopause. Similar rocket measurements from the European ranges Andenes and Esrange (68 to 69 N) are needed to investigate the latitudinal variability of the parameters relevant for the formation, transport, and loss of mesospheric ice particles. An important aspect of Super CAMP is the study of the heterogeneous chemistry, the loss of electrons on aggregates, and the build-up of horizontal and vertical electric fields in the presence of charged ice particles. Instruments, measurements, and purpose are listed.

  1. Design optimization of 600 A-13 kA current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, D M; Al-Mosawl, M K; Friend, C M; Thacker, P; Ballarino, A

    2001-01-01

    The requirements of the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads have been widely publicized. CERN require hybrid current leads of resistive and HTS materials with current ratings of 600 A, 6 kA and 13 kA. BICC General Superconductors, in collaboration with the University of Southampton, have developed and manufactured prototype current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project. The resistive section consists of a phosphorus de-oxidized copper conductor and heat exchanger and the HTS section is constructed from BICC General's (Pb, Bi)2223 tapes with a reduced thermal conductivity Ag alloy sheath. We present the results of the materials optimization studies for the resistive and the HTS sections. Some results of the acceptance tests at CERN are discussed. (9 refs).

  2. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, J.

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly

  3. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  4. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  5. Probing Sea Quarks and Gluons: The Electron-Ion Collider Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Tanja

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century holds great promise for reaching a new era for unlocking the mysteries of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the nucleons inside it governed by the theory of strong interactions (QCD. In particular, much remains to be learned about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons. One of the main goals of existing and nearly completed facilities is to map out the spin flavor structure of the nucleons in the valence region. A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge.

  6. The Large Hadron Collider and the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN as Tools to Generate Warm Dense Matter and Non–Ideal Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2011-01-01

    The largest accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, has entered into commission- ing phase. It is expected that when this impressive machine will become fully operational, it will generate two counter rotating 7 TeV/c proton beams that will be made to collide, leading to an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm−2s−1. Total energy stored in each LHC beam is about 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is a very critical issue when working with such extremely powerful beams. It is important to know the consequences of an accidental release of the beam energy in order to design protection system for the equipment. For this purpose we have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the interaction of one full LHC beam with copper and graphite targets which are materials of practical importance. Our calculations have shown that the LHC protons will penetrate up to about 35 m in solid copper and 10 m in solid graphite. A very interesting outcome of this work i...

  7. The Large Hadron Collider and the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN as Tools to Generate Warm Dense Matter and Non-Ideal Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Deutsch, C; Gryaznov, V; Lomonosov, I V; Shutov, A; Piriz, A R; Fortov, V E; Geissel, H; Redmer, R

    2011-01-01

    The largest accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, has entered into commissioning phase. It is expected that when this impressive machine will become fully operational, it will generate two counter rotating 7 TeV/c proton beams that will be made to collide, leading to an unprecedented luminosity of 10(34) cm(-2)s(-1). Total energy stored in each LHC beam is about 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is a very critical issue when working with such extremely powerful beams. It is important to know the consequences of an accidental release of the beam energy in order to design protection system for the equipment. For this purpose we have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the interaction of one full LHC beam with copper and graphite targets which are materials of practical importance. Our calculations have shown that the LHC protons will penetrate up to about 35 m in solid copper and 10 m in solid graphite. A very interesting outcome of this work i...

  8. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of

  9. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Jos

    2012-02-28

    In this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly challenging: new detector technologies had to be developed; experimental set-ups that are larger and more complex than ever before had to be constructed; and larger collaborations than ever before had to be organized. Fundamental to the success were: the 'reference' provided by CERN, peer review, signed memoranda of understanding, well-organized resources review boards as an interface to the national funding agencies and collegial, but solidly organized, experimental collaborations.

  10. HADS in the Large Magellanic Cloud: Initial findings from the SuperMACHO project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A

    2009-07-14

    The SuperMACHO Project is a five-year survey toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) aimed at understanding the nature of the populations of lenses responsible for the excess microlensing rates observed by the MACHO project. Survey observations were completed in 2006. A rich side-product of this survey is a catalog of variable sources down to a depth of VR 23, including many classes of pulsating variables such as {delta}-Scuti and RR Lyrae. Through their position in the Period-Luminosity diagram and their light curve characteristics we have identified 2323 high amplitude {delta}-Scuti (HADS) having high quality light curves. sing Fourier decomposition of the HADS light curves, we find that the period-luminosity (PL) relation defined by the firt-overtone (FO) pulsators does not show a clear separation from the PL-relation defined by the fundamental (F) pulsators. This differs from other instability strip pulsators such as type c RR Lyrae. We also present evidence for a larger amplitude, subluminous population of HADS similar to that observed in Fornax.

  11. Optimization of the design of DC-DC converters for improving the electromagnetic compatibility with the Front-End electronic for the super Large Hadron Collider Trackers

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes Rojas, Cristian Alejandro; Blanchot, G

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN sets new challenges for the powering of the detectors. One of the powering schemes under study is based on DC-DC buck converters mounted on the front-end modules. The hard environmental conditions impose strict restrictions to the converters in terms of low volume, radiation and magnetic field tolerance. Furthermore, the noise emission of the switching converters must not affect the performance of the powered systems. A study of the sources and paths of noise of a synchronous buck converter has been made for identifying the critical parameters to reduce their emissions. As proof of principle, a converter was designed following the PCB layout considerations proposed and then used for powering a silicon strip module prototype for the ATLAS upgrade, in order to evaluate their compatibility.

  12. Intelum project: tackling the calorimetry challenge for future high-energy colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Intelum is one of the CERN-coordinated projects funded under H2020. It aims to develop low-cost, radiation-hard scintillating and Cherenkov crystal and glass fibres for the next generation of calorimeter detectors for future high-energy experiments. This new technology could also have important applications in the medical imaging field.     Intelum project partners at the kick-off meeting held on 11 March at CERN.   Intelum is an H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE) project coordinated by CERN. This project was initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN’s RD18 experiment), which has been developing inorganic scintillation materials for novel ionising-radiation detectors for 25 years. Intelum is an international consortium including fifteen institutes and companies from across western and eastern Europe, Japan and the USA, all of which are experts in crystal growth, scintillating mechanisms, radiation damage and dete...

  13. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158  GeV/u In^{49+} ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10^{4} to 10^{7} molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158  GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  14. Super Resolution Image Enhancement for a Flash Lidar: Back Projection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyshev, Alexander; Hines, Glenn; Vanek, Michael; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reisse, Robert; Pierrottet, Diego

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a new image processing technique for flash LIDAR data is presented as a potential tool to enable safe and precise spacecraft landings in future robotic or crewed lunar and planetary missions. Flash LIDARs can generate, in real-time, range data that can be interpreted as a 3-dimensional (3-D) image and transformed into a corresponding digital elevation map (DEM). The NASA Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project is capitalizing on this new technology by developing, testing and analyzing flash LIDARs to detect hazardous terrain features such as craters, rocks, and slopes during the descent phase of spacecraft landings. Using a flash LIDAR for this application looks very promising, however through theoretical and simulation analysis the ALHAT team has determined that a single frame, or mosaic, of flash LIDAR data may not be sufficient to build a landing site DEM with acceptable spatial resolution, precision, size, or for a mosaic, in time, to meet current system requirements. One way to overcome this potential limitation is by enhancing the flash LIDAR output images. We propose a new super-resolution algorithm applicable to flash LIDAR range data that will create a DEM with sufficient accuracy, precision and size to meet current ALHAT requirements. The performance of our super-resolution algorithm is analyzed by processing data generated during a series of simulation runs by a high fidelity model of a flash LIDAR imaging a high resolution synthetic lunar elevation map. The flash LIDAR model is attached to a simulated spacecraft by a gimbal that points the LIDAR to a target landing site. For each simulation run, a sequence of flash LIDAR frames is recorded and processed as the spacecraft descends toward the landing site. Each run has a different trajectory profile with varying LIDAR look angles of the terrain. We process the output LIDAR frames using our SR algorithm and the results show that the achieved level of accuracy and precision of

  15. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, B.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Pous, E.; /Barcelona U.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; /Bergen U.; Asgeirsson, D.; /British Columbia U.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; /Caltech; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; McElrath, B.; /CERN; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; /Cincinnati U.; Blanke, M.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lesiak, T.; /Cracow, INP /DESY /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Glasgow U. /Indiana U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /KEK, Tsukuba /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Lisbon, IST /Ljubljana U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Maryland U. /MIT /INFN, Milan /McGill U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Notre Dame U. /PNL, Richland /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Orsay, LAL /Orsay, LPT /INFN, Pavia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Queen Mary, U. of London /Regensburg U. /Republica U., Montevideo /Frascati /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /Sassari U. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Southern Methodist U. /Tel Aviv U. /Tohoku U. /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Uppsala U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Wayne State U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    SuperB is a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B{sub u,d,s}, D and {tau} decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the {Upsilon}(4S) and {phi}(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over

  16. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  17. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  18. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  19. Muon colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108556; Blondel, Alain; CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    1999-01-01

    Muon Colliders - Prospective Physics (J. Ellis). Muon storage rings can address fundamental issues in neutrino physics, enable precision Higgs physics, and advance the high-energy frontier in lepton-antilepton collisions. In this lecture, the principa with particular emphasis on neutrino and Higgs factories. Muon Colliders (D. Neuffer). In these lectures the concept of a high-energy high-luminosity µ+ - µ- collider is developed. A µ+ - µ- colliderwould provide heavy lepton collisions, with uniqu of Higgs bosons at 100-180 GeV energies, and it could be extended to multi-TeV energies.A µ+-µ- collider requires a high-intensity proton source for ¼-production, a high-acceptance decay channel to collect µ?s from ¼-decay, a µ-cooling system, a r system, and a high-luminosity collider ring for the collisions of short, intense µ+-µ- bunches. Critical problems exist in each of the collider concept components, and in the interaction-region detectors needed to analyze the collisions. These pro within the curr...

  20. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  1. SuperB Progress Report for Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Buonomo, B.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Esposito, M.; Guiducci, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Rotundo, U.; Sanelli, C.; Serio, M.; Stella, A.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, K.; Brachman, A.; /SLAC /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPP /LPSC, Grenoble /IRFU, SPP, Saclay /DESY /Cockroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /U. Liverpool /CERN

    2012-02-14

    This report details the progress made in by the SuperB Project in the area of the Collider since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. With this document we propose a new electron positron colliding beam accelerator to be built in Italy to study flavor physics in the B-meson system at an energy of 10 GeV in the center-of-mass. This facility is called a high luminosity B-factory with a project name 'SuperB'. This project builds on a long history of successful e+e- colliders built around the world, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The key advances in the design of this accelerator come from recent successes at the DAFNE collider at INFN in Frascati, Italy, at PEP-II at SLAC in California, USA, and at KEKB at KEK in Tsukuba Japan, and from new concepts in beam manipulation at the interaction region (IP) called 'crab waist'. This new collider comprises of two colliding beam rings, one at 4.2 GeV and one at 6.7 GeV, a common interaction region, a new injection system at full beam energies, and one of the two beams longitudinally polarized at the IP. Most of the new accelerator techniques needed for this collider have been achieved at other recently completed accelerators including the new PETRA-3 light source at DESY in Hamburg (Germany) and the upgraded DAFNE collider at the INFN laboratory at Frascati (Italy), or during design studies of CLIC or the International Linear Collider (ILC). The project is to be designed and constructed by a worldwide collaboration of accelerator and engineering staff along with ties to industry. To save significant construction costs, many components from the PEP-II collider at SLAC will be recycled and used in this new accelerator. The interaction region will be designed in collaboration with the particle physics detector to guarantee successful mutual use. The accelerator collaboration will consist of several groups at present

  2. The super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L

    2010-01-01

    We review here the prospects of a long-term upgrade programme for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN laboratory's new proton-proton collider. The super-LHC, which is currently under evaluation and design, is expected to deliver of the order of ten times the statistics of the LHC. In addition to a non-technical summary of the principal physics arguments for the upgrade, I present a pedagogical introduction to the technological challenges on the accelerator and experimental fronts, and a review of the current status of the planning.

  3. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  4. GEM Detectors in the Experiments at e+e- Colliders in BINP

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, T V

    2017-01-01

    Micro-pattern gaseous detectors possess a high spatial resolution in tens micron scale together with high rate capability up to 107 cm-2s-1. In addition, they have all advantages of gaseous detectors, such as relatively low costs per unit area, the possibility to equip a large area as well as a high uniformity. Cascaded Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) based detectors are used in the collider experiments at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), and they are being developed for a number of new projects. In this article the review of GEM based detectors for the tagging system of the KEDR experiment at the VEPP-4M collider and for the DEUTERON facility at the VEPP-3 storage ring is presented. The GEM detector application of the CMD-3 detector upgrade at the VEPP-2000 collider and the Super τ Factory detector are discussed.

  5. pp Interaction Regions. [Superconducting super collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, R.; Johnson, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    This group served as the interface between experimenters and accelerator physicists. A start was made on a portfolio of IR's, building on previous studies including the Reference Designs Study (RDS). The group also looked at limits on time structure and luminosity, the clustering of IR's, external beams of secondary particles from the IR's, and various operational issues connected with the IR's. Designs were developed for interaction regions for RDS-B (individual cryostats for two 5-T rings, separated by 60 cm vertically). For a fixed geometry, the quadrupoles have been tuned over a range to give a factor of 100 variation in ..beta..* (1 to 100 m) and thus in luminosity; an even larger variation may well be possible. Variation of the minimum ..beta..* with free space between the quadrupole triplets, for a quad strength of 280 T/m and under the constraint of fixed chromaticity, showed a factor of five decrease in maximum luminosity in going from a high luminosity region with +-20 m free space to a small-angle region with +-100 m. Similar variants of the RDS-A IR were also found.

  6. Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory : tunnel boring

    CERN Multimedia

    SSC Media Production

    1999-01-01

    This film will take you down into the tunnel, show you the technology involved in boring the tunnel, and show what the SSC fmeans to the U.S. in terms of scientific discovery, innovative collaborations with industry and stimulating the job base nation-wide.

  7. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  8. Projections Onto Super-Half-Spaces for Monotone Variational Inequality Problems in Finite-Dimensional Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censor, Yair; Gibali, Aviv

    2008-12-01

    The variational inequality problem (VIP) is considered here. We present a general algorithmic scheme which employs projections onto hyperplanes that separate balls from the feasible set of the VIP instead of projections onto the feasible set itself. Our algorithmic scheme includes the classical projection method and Fukushima's subgradient projection method as special cases.

  9. SuperB Progress Report: Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Donvito, G.; Spinoso, V.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; /INFN, Pavia /Bergamo U., Ingengneria Dept.; Eigen, G.; Fehlker, D.; Helleve, L.; /Bergen U.; Carbone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Galli, D.; Giorgi, F.; Marconi, U.; Perazzini, S.; Sbarra, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Caltech /Carleton U. /Cincinnati U. /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /UC, Irvine /Taras Shevchenko U. /Orsay, LAL /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Frascati /INFN, Legnaro /Orsay, IPN /Maryland U. /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Caltech /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /PNL, Richland /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome2 /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Padua /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /TRIUMF /British Columbia U. /Montreal U. /Victoria U.

    2012-02-14

    This report describes the present status of the detector design for SuperB. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  10. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  11. The Big Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Barna-Alper Productions Inc. Toronto

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is a gigantic particle-smasher, designed to discover the origins of the universe. Awe-inspiring in vision and scope, it’s also the most expensive physics experiment in history with a price-tag of 4 billion dollars.Documentary series "Mega builders" : a fast-paced, character-driven show that focuses on the world’s biggest and most intriguing engineering challenges – the projects that are making history, and the people who are making it happen.

  12. A posteriori inclusion of parton density functions in NLO QCD final-state calculations at hadron colliders: The APPLGRID Project

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, Tancredi; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Gwenlan, Claire; Salam, Gavin P; Siegert, Frank; Starovoitov, Pavel; Sutton, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A method to facilitate the consistent inclusion of cross-section measurements based on complex final-states from HERA, TEVATRON and the LHC in proton parton density function (PDF) fits has been developed. This can be used to increase the sensitivity of LHC data to deviations from Standard Model predictions. The method stores perturbative coefficients of NLO QCD calculations of final-state observables measured in hadron colliders in look-up tables. This allows the posteriori inclusion of parton density functions (PDFs), and of the strong coupling, as well as the a posteriori variation of the renormalisation and factorisation scales in cross-section calculations. The main novelties in comparison to original work on the subject are the use of higher-order interpolation, which substantially improves the trade-off between accuracy and memory use, and a CPU and computer memory optimised way to construct and store the look-up table using modern software tools. It is demonstrated that a sufficient accuracy on the cro...

  13. Multibillion-dolalr collider plans unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    "Particle physicists released an outline design for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) at a meeting in Beijing this morning. The design details the components needed to build the 31 km-long facility and comes with and initial estimate of the collider's cost: a cool $6.5bn for the core project. (1 page)

  14. Niobium Solar Mobile Project — High Strength Niobium Microalloyed Steel as a Solution to Improve Electric Super Scooter and Motorcycle Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Terry; Kauppi, Erik; Flanagan, Lauren; Ribeio, Eduardo A. A. G.; Nogueira, Marcos A. Stuart; McCourtney, Ian

    This paper presents the advantages of replacing mild steel with high strength niobium microalloyed steel in the structure of Electric Super Scooters, Electric Cargo Motorcycles and Solar Charging Stations. The Mini-Fleet-in-a-Box concept was developed by Current Motor to guarantee mobility, efficiency and solar generated electricity. With the adoption of niobium microalloyed high strength steel for more than 90% of the Super Scooter and Motorcycle structures, it was possible to redesign the frame, resulting in a 31% weight reduction and a very modern and functional body. Together with a new powertrain, these changes were responsible for increasing Motorcycle autonomy by more than 15%, depending on average speed. The new frame design reduced the number of high strain points in the frame, increasing the safety of the project. The Solar Charging Station was built using the container concept and designed with high strength niobium microalloyed steel, which resulted in a weight reduction of 25%. CBMM's facility in Araxá, Brazil was selected in the second half of 2013 as the demonstration site to test the efficiency of the Super Scooter and Solar Charging Station. Each Super Scooter has run more than 2,000 km maintenance-free with an autonomy of more than 100 km per charge.

  15. State of hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grannis, P.D. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  16. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  17. Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine emergency basic relief and medical aid mission project (November 2013-February 2014): the role of physiatrists in Super Typhoon Haiyan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganchoon, Filipinas; Bugho, Rommel; Calina, Liezel; Dy, Rochelle; Gosney, James

    2017-06-09

    Physiatrists have provided humanitarian assistance in recent large-scale global natural disasters. Super Typhoon Haiyan, the deadliest and most costly typhoon in modern Philippine history, made landfall on 8 November 2013 resulting in significant humanitarian needs. Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine physiatrists conducted a project of 23 emergency basic relief and medical aid missions in response to Super Typhoon Haiyan from November 2013 to February 2014. The final mission was a medical aid mission to the inland rural community of Burauen, Leyte. Summary data were collected, collated, and tabulated; project and mission evaluation was performed. During the humanitarian assistance project, 31,254 basic relief kits containing a variety of food and non-food items were distributed and medical services including consultation, treatment, and medicines were provided to 7255 patients. Of the 344 conditions evaluated in the medical aid mission to Burauen, Leyte 85 (59%) were physical and rehabilitation medicine conditions comprised of musculoskeletal (62 [73%]), neurological (17 [20%]), and dermatological (6 [7%]) diagnoses. Post-mission and project analysis resulted in recommendations and programmatic changes to strengthen response in future disasters. Physiatrists functioned as medical providers, mission team leaders, community advocates, and in other roles. This physiatrist-led humanitarian assistance project met critical basic relief and medical aid needs of persons impacted by Super Typhoon Haiyan, demonstrating significant roles performed by physiatrists in response to a large-scale natural disaster. Resulting disaster programing changes and recommendations may inform a more effective response by PARM mission teams in the Philippines as well as by other South-Eastern Asia teams comprising rehabilitation professionals to large-scale, regional natural disasters. Implications for rehabilitation Large-scale natural disasters including tropical cyclones can

  18. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application results of a previous and current EU-project on super insulating glazing based on monolithic silica aerogel. Prototypes measuring approx. 55´55 cm2 have been made with 15 mm evacuated aerogel between two layers of low-iron glass. Anti-reflective treatment...

  19. Super B Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the magnet power supplies, the RF system, the digital feedback system, and many vacuum components. This should reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition [13]. This Super B Factory concept is generating substantial interest in the physics community. It may, in fact, be the most promising ...

  20. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yamamoto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) set up the Global Design Effort (GDE) for the design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) in 2005. Drawing on the resources of over 300 national laboratories, universities and institutes worldwide, the GDE produced a Reference Design Report in 2007, followed by a more detailed Technical Design Report (TDR) in 2013. Following this report, the GDE was disbanded. A compact core team, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC), replaced it. This is still under the auspices of ICFA and is directly overseen by the Linear Collider Board, which reports to ICFA. The LCC is charged with continuing the design effort on a much-reduced scale until the Project is approved for construction. An additional mandate of the LCC was to bring together all linear collider work, including the CERN-based Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under one structure in order to exploit synergies between the two studies.

  1. SuperB A High-Luminosity Asymmetric $e^+ e^-$ Super Flavour Factory : Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bona, M.; Grauges Pous, E.; Colangelo, P.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Eigen, G.; Venturini, M.; Soni, N.; Bruschi, M.; De Castro, S.; Faccioli, P.; Gabrieli, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Semprini Cesare, N.; Spighi, R.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J.; Soni, A.; Khan, A.; Barniakov, A.Y.; Barniakov, M.Y.; Blinov, V.E.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Golubev, V.B.; Kononov, S.A.; Koop, I.A.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Nikitin, S.A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Piminov, P.A.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Shatilov, D.N.; Skovpen, Y.I.; Solodov, E.A.; Cheng, C.H.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D.J.; Porter, F.C.; Asner, D.M.; Pham, T.N.; Fleischer, R.; Giudice, G.F.; Hurth, T.; Mangano, M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B.T.; Schwartz, A.J.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soffer, A.; Beard, C.D.; Haas, T.; Mankel, R.; Hiller, G.; Ball, P.; Pappagallo, M.; Pennington, M.R.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Abada, A.; Becirevic, D.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Pene, O.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabresi, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Stancari, G.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Calcaterra, A.; Drago, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Guiducci, S.; Isidori, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.M.; Piccolo, M.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Rama, M.; Vaccarezza, C.; Zallo, A.; Zobov, M.; De Sangro, R.; Buzzo, A.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M.R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Matias, J.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Borzumati, F.; Eyges, V.; Prell, S.A.; Pedlar, T.K.; Korpar, S.; Pestonik, R.; Staric, M.; Neubert, M.; Denig, A.G.; Nierste, U.; Agoh, T.; Ohmi, K.; Ohnishi, Y.; Fry, J.R.; Touramanis, C.; Wolski, A.; Golob, B.; Krizan, P.; Flaecher, H.; Bevan, A.J.; Di Lodovico, F.; George, K.A.; Barlow, R.; Lafferty, G.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.A.; Simi, G.; Patel, P.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Kaidalov, A.; Buras, A.J.; Tarantino, C.; Buchalla, G.; Sanda, A.I.; D'Ambrosio, G.; Ricciardi, G.; Bigi, I.; Jessop, C.P.; Losecco, J.M.; Honscheid, K.; Arnaud, N.; Chehab, R.; Fedala, Y.; Polci, F.; Roudeau, P.; Sordini, V.; Soskov, V.; Stocchi, A.; Variola, A.; Vivoli, A.; Wormser, G.; Zomer, F.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Bonneaud, G.R.; Lombardo, V.; Calderini, G.; Ratti, L.; Speziali, V.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Servoli, L.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Dell'Orso, M.; Forti, F.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Massa, M.; Mazur, M.A.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Braun, V.; Lenz, A.; Adams, G.S.; Danko, I.Z.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gaspero, Mario; Jackson, P.; Martinelli, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Morganti, Silvio; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Silvestrini, L.; Voena, C.; Catani, L.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Messi, R.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Ciuchini, M.; Lubicz, V.; Wilson, F.F.; Godang, R.; Chen, X.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M.; Trivedi, A.; White, R.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Allen, M.T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Brodsky, S.J.; Cai, Y.; Coleman, J.; Convery, M.R.; DeBarger, S.; Dingfelder, J.C.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Haller, G.; Heifets, S.A.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kocian, M.L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Li, N.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D.; Messner, R.; Muller, D.R.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Pivi, M.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Roodman, A.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Snyder, A.; Sullivan, M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W.; Stoeck, H.; Cheng, H.Y.; Li, H.N.; Keum, Y.Y.; Gronau, M.; Grossman, Y.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Gambino, P.; Marchetto, F.; Menichetti, Ezio A.; Mussa, R.; Pelliccioni, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Bernabeu, J.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D.A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paradisi, P.; Pich, A.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Roney, J.M.; Back, J.J.; Gershon, T.J.; Harrison, P.F.; Latham, T.E.; Mohanty, G.B.; Petrov, A.A.; Pierini, M.; INFN

    2007-01-01

    The physics objectives of SuperB, an asymmetric electron-positron collider with a luminosity above 10^36/cm^2/s are described, together with the conceptual design of a novel low emittance design that achieves this performance with wallplug power comparable to that of the current B Factories, and an upgraded detector capable of doing the physics in the SuperB environment.

  2. Overview of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) Project of the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Bilbao de Mendizabal, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The upgrades for the ATLAS Pixel Detector will be staged in preparation for high luminosity LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel Detector will be the construction of a new pixel layer which is currently under construction and will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine, in 2013-14. The new detector, called the Insertable B-layer (IBL), will be installed between the existing Pixel Detector and a new, smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. The IBL required the development of several new technologies to cope with increased radiation and pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance through reduction of the pixel size and a more stringent material budget. Two different silicon sensor technologies, planar n-in-n and 3D, will be used, connected with the new generation 130nm IBM CMOS FE-I4 readout chip via solder bump-bonds. An overview of the IBL project, of the module design, the qualification for these sensor technologies, the integration quality control setups and recent...

  3. Overview of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) Project of the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will upgrade its Pixel Detector with the installation of a new pixel layer in 2013/14. The new sub-detector, named Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be installed between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller diameter beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed and are currently under investigation and production for the IBL. Furthermore, the physics performance should be improved through the reduction of pixel size while targeting for a low material budget, pushing for a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system. An overview of the IBL project, the results of beam tests on different sensor technologies, and testing of pre-series staves made before going into production in order to qualify the assembly procedure, the loaded module electrical integrity, and the read...

  4. Overview of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) Project of the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will upgrade its Pixel Detector with the installation of a new pixel layer in 2013/14. The new subdetector, named Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be installed between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller diameter beam-pipe at a radius of 33 mm. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed and are currently under investigation and production for the IBL. Furthermore, the physics performance should be improved through the reduction of pixel size whereas targeting for a low material budget, pushing for a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system. An overview of the IBL project, the results of beam tests on different sensor technologies, testing of pre-series staves made before going into production in order to qualify the assembly procedure, the loaded module electrical integrity, and the read-ou...

  5. Overview of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) Project of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will upgrade its Pixel Detector with the installation of a new pixel layer in 2014. The new sub-detector, named Insertable B-layer (IBL), will be installed between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while targeting for a low material budget should be imposed, pushing for a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system. An overview of the IBL project as well as the present experience in its construction will be presented, focusing on the staves production, qualification of the assembly procedure, integration of the staves around the beam pipe and commissioning of the detector.

  6. The Impact of SuperB on Flavor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, B.; Blanke, M.; Stocchi, A.; Drutskoy, A.; Cervelli, A.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Perez, A.; Walsh, J.; Hurth, T.; Bevan, A.; Silvestrini, L.; Ciuchini, M.; Tarantino, C.

    2012-02-16

    This report provides a succinct summary of the physics programme of SuperB, and describes that potential in the context of experiments making measurements in flavour physics over the next 10 to 20 years. Detailed comparisons are made with Belle II and LHCb, the other B physics experiments that will run in this decade. SuperB will play a crucial role in defining the landscape of flavour physics over the next 20 years. SuperB is an approved high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider intended to search for indirect and some direct signs of new physics (NP) at low energy, while at the same time, enabling precision tests of the Standard Model (SM). This experiment will be built at a new laboratory on the Tor Vergata campus near Rome, Italy named after Nicola Cabibbo. The project has been described in a Conceptual Design Report, and more recently by a set of three white papers on the accelerator, detector, and physics programme. The main focus of the physics programme rests in the study of so-called Golden Modes, these are decay channels that provide access to measurements of theoretically clean observables that can provide both stringent constraints on models of NP, and precision tests of the SM. A number of ancillary measurements that remain important include those with observables that may not be theoretically clean, and those that can be used to provide stringent constraints on the SM but are not sensitive to NP. The remainder of this section introduces SuperB before discussing the golden modes for SuperB, precision CKM measurement modes, and an outline of the rest of this report.

  7. CERN-BINP Workshop for Young Scientists in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Linssen, Lucie; eCOL 2016

    2017-01-01

    The "CERN-BINP workshop for young scientists in e+e- colliders" is organised in the framework of the EU-funded CREMLIN project. The CREMLIN project aims at strengthening science cooperation between six Russian megascience facilities and related research infrastructure counterparts in Europe. BINP and CERN coordinate a dedicated CREMLIN work package focusing on a future super-charm-tau factory (SCT) at BINP. SCT aims at producing e+e- collisions with up to 5 GeV centre-of-mass energy and at very high luminosity. In parallel CERN is hosting design studies for two possible high-energy e+e- colliders: FCC-ee and CLIC. In matters of physics, design and technologies the BINP and CERN studies address technological and scientific questions of common interest. Similar issues are dealt with in the framework of other flavour factories and energy frontier e+e- colliders worldwide. The 3-day workshop provides young scientists (at the student and postdoc level) opportunities to present their work and exchange experiences. ...

  8. Muon Collider Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-06-02

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter has greatly advanced, over the last decades. The standard theory of fundamental interactions presents us with a theoretically sound picture, which describes with great accuracy known physical phenomena on most diverse energy and distance scales. These range from 10/sup -16/ cm, inside the nucleons, up to large-scale astrophysical bodies, including the early Universe at some nanosecond after the Big-Bang and temperatures of the order of 10/sup 2/ GeV. The picture is not yet completed, however, as we lack the observation of the Higgs boson, predicted in the 100-500 GeV range-a particle associated with the generation of particle masses and with the quantum fluctuations in the primordial Universe. In addition, the standard theory is expected to undergo a change of regime in the 10/sup 3/ GeV region, with the appearance of new families of particles, most likely associated with the onset of a new symmetry (supersymmetry). In 1994, the CERN Council approved the con...

  10. Testing B-violating signatures from exotic instantons in future colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea; Kang, Xian-Wei; Khlopov, Maxim Yu.

    2017-09-01

    We discuss possible implications of exotic stringy instantons for baryon-violating signatures in future colliders. In particular, we discuss high-energy quark collisions and transitions. In principle, the process can be probed by high-luminosity electron-positron colliders. However, we find that an extremely high luminosity is needed in order to provide a (somewhat) stringent bound compared to the current data on NN → ππ,KK. On the other hand, (exotic) instanton-induced six-quark interactions can be tested in near future high-energy colliders beyond LHC, at energies around 20-100 TeV. The Super proton-proton Collider (SppC) would be capable of such measurement given the proposed energy level of 50-90 TeV. Comparison with other channels is made. In particular, we show the compatibility of our model with neutron-antineutron and NN → ππ,KK bounds. A. A.’s work was Supported in part by the MIUR research grant “Theoretical Astroparticle Physics" PRIN 2012CPPYP7. XWK's work is partly Supported by the DFG and the NSFC through funds provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” when he was in Jülich, and by MOST, Taiwan, (104-2112-M-001-022) from April 2017. The work by MK was performed within the framework of the Center FRPP Supported by MEPhI Academic Excellence Project (contract 02.03.21.0005, 27.08.2013), Supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation, project 3.472.2014/K and grant RFBR 14-22-03048

  11. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  12. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  13. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  14. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number...

  15. Tutorial on Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Proceeding from the collision point towards the source, we discuss purpose and design concepts of the various linear-collider subsystems, as well as important mechanisms of emittance dilution, beam diagnostics, and advanced tuning methods. In particular, we address beamstrahlung, linac emittance degradation due to dispersion and wake fields, scaling of damping-ring parameters with collider energy, fast beam-ion and electron-cloud instabilities, coherent synchrotron radiation, and rf guns. Five case studies are examined in detail.

  16. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The internat...

  17. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The interna...

  18. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  19. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Grojean, Christophe; /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; /SLAC; Gao, Yuanning; /Tsinghua U., Beijing, CHEP; Kanemura, Shinya; /Toyama U.; Kim, Hyungdo; /Seoul Natl U.; List, Jenny; /DESY; Nojiri, Mihoko; /KEK, Tsukuba; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Poeschl, Roman; /LAL, Orsay; Reuter, Juergen; /DESY; Simon, Frank; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Tanabe, Tomohiko; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Yu, Jaehoon; /Texas U., Arlington; Wells, James D.; /Michigan U., MCTP; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBNL /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  20. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  1. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  2. The Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-02-28

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron-positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  3. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  4. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2004-01-01

    Monolithic silica aerogel offers the possibility of combining super insulation and high solar energy transmittance, which has been the background for a previous and a current EU project on research and development of monolithic silica aerogel as transparent insulation in windows. Generally, windows...... form the weakest part of the thermal envelope with respect to heat loss coefficient, but on the other hand also play an important role for passive solar energy utilisation. For window orientations other than south, the net energy balance will be close to or below zero. However, the properties...

  5. Workshop on Calorimetery for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab

    1989-03-19

    The international workshop brought together 170 participants to further develop the SSC design and performance specifications of the LAr, Gas, Scintillation, Silicon, and Warm Liquid calorimeter technologies, and to develop the general topics of Requirements, Simulation, and Electronics. Progress was made across a broad front in all areas; at the feasibility level for some and In the fine structure for others. The meeting established areas of agreement, provided some general direction, and helped to quantify some differences at widely varying levels of detector technology development. The workshop helped to level the different understandings of the participants; increased the depth of the generalists and the breadth of the specialists. A high degree of group partitioning limited access to the detailed discussion within some detector groups. The communication was clearly necessary and rewarding, and seemed to meet or exceed the expectations of most participants. This report will deal with: the Liquid Argon detector and, to a lesser extent, the Requirements working groups, an update on uranIum material logistics, and a view of LAr calorimetry by others.

  6. Cryogenics for the superconducting super collider: workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Attendance at the workshop and information meeting on Cryogenics for the SSC held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on January 17 to 19, 1984 consisted of 109 engineers and scientists from 19 industrial organizations and 18 laboratories and universities - CERN, DESY, Grenoble, KEK and Saclay were represented. About one-third of the participants were from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermi National Laboratory. Talks which concentrated on informing the audience of the present status of the SSC research and development activities and progress towards design of the components were given, experience with the cryogenic system of the Tevatron was reported, and a wrap-up session was held on the last day where each of the five workshop leaders gave a summary of their group's discussions and conclusions. A brief summary of these presentations is given, with the detailed information gathered by the group leaders forming the bulk of these proceedings.

  7. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  8. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  9. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  10. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  11. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  12. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... ... I discuss the high energy colliders leading up to LHC and their role in the discovery of these SM particles. Then I discuss the two main physics issues of LHC, i.e. Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. I briefly touch upon Higgs and SUSY searches at LHC along with their cosmological implications.

  13. When stars collide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Pols, O.R.

    2007-01-01

    When two stars collide and merge they form a new star that can stand out against the background population in a star cluster as a blue straggler. In so called collision runaways many stars can merge and may form a very massive star that eventually forms an intermediate mass blackhole. We have

  14. International linear collider reference design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  15. The search for new physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnikov, N V

    2004-01-01

    This is a review of various aspects of the large hadron collider project for the search for new physics (namely, the Higgs boson, supersymmetry, and exotics). The basic parameters of the CMS and ATLAS detectors are also discussed.

  16. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Fan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS super-resolution (SR reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the highresolution (HR image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40 three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method.

  17. Projections onto Convex Sets Super-Resolution Reconstruction Based on Point Spread Function Estimation of Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chong; Wu, Chaoyun; Li, Grand; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem on inaccuracy when estimating the point spread function (PSF) of the ideal original image in traditional projection onto convex set (POCS) super-resolution (SR) reconstruction, this paper presents an improved POCS SR algorithm based on PSF estimation of low-resolution (LR) remote sensing images. The proposed algorithm can improve the spatial resolution of the image and benefit agricultural crop visual interpolation. The PSF of the high-resolution (HR) image is unknown in reality. Therefore, analysis of the relationship between the PSF of the HR image and the PSF of the LR image is important to estimate the PSF of the HR image by using multiple LR images. In this study, the linear relationship between the PSFs of the HR and LR images can be proven. In addition, the novel slant knife-edge method is employed, which can improve the accuracy of the PSF estimation of LR images. Finally, the proposed method is applied to reconstruct airborne digital sensor 40 (ADS40) three-line array images and the overlapped areas of two adjacent GF-2 images by embedding the estimated PSF of the HR image to the original POCS SR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method yields higher quality of reconstructed images than that produced by the blind SR method and the bicubic interpolation method. PMID:28208837

  18. Quantisation of super Teichmueller theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Nezhla [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Mathematics; Pawelkiewicz, Michal; Techner, Joerg [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2015-12-15

    We construct a quantisation of the Teichmueller spaces of super Riemann surfaces using coordinates associated to ideal triangulations of super Riemann surfaces. A new feature is the non-trivial dependence on the choice of a spin structure which can be encoded combinatorially in a certain refinement of the ideal triangulation. By constructing a projective unitary representation of the groupoid of changes of refined ideal triangulations we demonstrate that the dependence of the resulting quantum theory on the choice of a triangulation is inessential.

  19. New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment Through Focused Earth Observation in the MARmara SuperSITE - Project Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral OZel, Nurcan; Necmioǧlu, Öcal; Ergintav, Semih; Ozel, Oǧuz; Favali, Paolo; Bigarre, Pascal; Çakır, Ziyadin; Ozeren, Sinan; Geli, Louis; Douglas, John; Aochi, Hideo; Bossu, Remy; Zülfikar, Can; Şeşetyan, Karin; Erdik, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The MARsite Project, which started in November 2012,funded by the EC/ FP7-ENV.2012 6.4-2 (Grant 308417) identifies the Marmara region as a 'Supersite' within European initiatives to aggregate on-shore, off-shore and space-based observations, comprehensive geophysical monitoring, improved hazard and risk assessments encompassed in an integrated set of activities. MARsite aimed to harmonize geological, geophysical, geodetic and geochemical observations to provide a better view of the post-seismic deformation of the 1999 Izmit earthquake (in addition to the post-seismic signature of previous earthquakes), loading of submarine and inland active fault segments and transient pre-earthquake signals, related to stress loading with different tectonic properties in and around Marmara Sea. This presentation provides an overview of the achievements of MARSite which aimed to coordinate research groups ranging from seismology to gas geochemistry in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed in the Marmara Region based on collection of multidisciplinary data to be shared, interpreted and merged in consistent theoretical and practical models suitable for the implementation of good practices to move the necessary information to the end users in charge of seismic risk management of the region. In addition, processes involved in earthquake generation and the physics of short-term seismic transients, 4D deformations to understand earthquake cycle processes, fluid activity monitoring and seismicity under the sea floor using existing autonomous instrumentation, early warning and development of real-time shake and loss information, real- and quasi-real-time earthquake and tsunami hazard monitoring and earthquake-induced landslide hazard topics are also covered within MARSite. In particular, achievements and progress in the design and building of a multi-parameter borehole system consisting of very wide dynamic range and stable borehole (VBB) broad band seismic sensor, with

  20. Quantization of super Teichmueller spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Nezhla

    2016-08-15

    The quantization of the Teichmueller spaces of Riemann surfaces has found important applications to conformal field theory and N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories. We construct a quantization of the Teichmueller spaces of super Riemann surfaces, using coordinates associated to the ideal triangulations of super Riemann surfaces. A new feature is the non-trivial dependence on the choice of a spin structure which can be encoded combinatorially in a certain refinement of the ideal triangulation. We construct a projective unitary representation of the groupoid of changes of refined ideal triangulations. Therefore, we demonstrate that the dependence of the resulting quantum theory on the choice of a triangulation is inessential. In the quantum Teichmueller theory, it was observed that the key object defining the Teichmueller theory has a close relation to the representation theory of the Borel half of U{sub q}(sl(2)). In our research we observed that the role of U{sub q}(sl(2)) is taken by quantum superalgebra U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2)). A Borel half of U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2)) is the super quantum plane. The canonical element of the Heisenberg double of the quantum super plane is evaluated in certain infinite dimensional representations on L{sup 2}(R) x C{sup 1} {sup vertical} {sup stroke} {sup 1} and compared to the flip operator from the Teichmueller theory of super Riemann surfaces.

  1. Integrated SiC Super Junction Transistor-Diode Devices for High-Power Motor Control ModulesOoperating at 500 C Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monolithic Integrated SiC Super Junction Transistor-JBS diode (MIDSJT) devices are used to construct 500

  2. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  3. The International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Benno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Linear Collider (ILC is a proposed e+e− linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200–500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  4. SuperB Technical Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M; Kolodziej, J; Kucewicz, W; Sapor, M; Jeremie, A; Pous, E Grauges; Bruno, G E; De Robertis, G; Diacono, D; Donvito, G; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Giordano, F; Loddo, F; Loparco, F; Maggi, G P; Manzari, V; Mazziotta, M N; Nappi, E; Palano, A; Santeramo, B; Sgura, I; Silvestris, L; Spinoso, V; Eigen, G; Zalieckas, J; Zhuo, Z; Jenkovszky, L; Balbi, G; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Cafaro, V; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Di Sipio, R; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Gabrielli, A; Galli, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giorgi, F M; Grandi, C; Lax, I; Meo, S Lo; Marconi, U; Montanari, A; Pellegrini, G; Piccinini, M; Rovelli, T; Cesari, N Semprini; Torromeo, G; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Vagnoni, V M; Valentinetti, S; Villa, M; Zoccoli, A; Caron, J -F; Hearty, C; Lu, P F -T; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y -C; Barnyakov, M Yu; Blinov, V E; Botov, A A; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kononov, S A; Kravchenko, E A; Levichev, E B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Shtol, D A; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Cardini, A; Carpinelli, M; Chao, D S -T; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Hanson, J; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Zhu, R Y; Randazzo, N; Burelo, E De La Cruz; Zheng, Y; Campos, P; De Silva, M; Kathirgamaraju, A; Meadows, B; Pushpawela, B; Shi, Y; Sokoloff, M; Castro, G Lopez; Ciaschini, V; Franchini, P; Giacomini, F; Paolini, A; Polania, G A Calderon; Laczek, S; Romanowicz, P; Szybinski, B; Czuchry, M; Flis, L; Harezlak, D; Kocot, J; Radecki, M; Sterzel, M; Szepieniec, T; Szymocha, T; Wójcik, P; Andreotti, M; Baldini, W; Calabrese, R; Carassiti, V; Cibinetto, G; Ramusino, A Cotta; Evangelisti, F; Gianoli, A; Luppi, E; Malaguti, R; Manzali, M; Melchiorri, M; Munerato, M; Padoan, C; Santoro, V; Tomassetti, L; Beretta, M M; Biagini, M; Boscolo, M; Capitolo, E; de Sangro, R; Esposito, M; Felici, G; Finocchiaro, G; Gatta, M; Gatti, C; Guiducci, S; Lauciani, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, M; Raimondi, P; Rama, M; Sanelli, C; Tomassini, S; Fabbricatore, P; Delepine, D; Santos, M A Reyes; Chrzaszcz, M; Grzymkowski, R; Knap, P; Kotula, J; Lesiak, T; Ludwin, J; Michalowski, J; Pawlik, B; Rachwal, B; Stodulski, M; Wiechczynski, J; Witek, M; Zawiejski, L; Zdybal, M; Aushev, V Y; Ustynov, A; Arnaud, N; Bambade, P; Beigbeder, C; Bogard, F; Borsato, M; Breton, D; Brossard, J; Burmistrov, L; Charlet, D; Chaumat, V; Dadoun, O; Berni, M El; Maalmi, J; Puill, V; Rimbault, C; Stocchi, A; Tocut, V; Variola, A; Wallon, S; Wormser, G; Grancagnolo, F; Ben-Haim, E; Sitt, S; Baylac, M; Bourrion, O; Deconto, J -M; Martinez, Y Gomez; Monseu, N; Muraz, J -F; Real, J -S; Vescovi, C; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D; Twedt, E W; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Nderitu, S; Patel, P; Robertson, S H; Swersky, D; Warburton, A; Flores, E Cuautle; Sanchez, G Toledo; Biassoni, P; Bombelli, L; Citterio, M; Coelli, S; Fiorini, C; Liberali, V; Monti, M; Nasri, B; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Sabatini, F; Stabile, A; Berra, A; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Lietti, D; Maino, M; Pessina, G; Prest, M; Martin, J -P; Simard, M; Starinski, N; Taras, P; Drutskoy, A; Makarychev, S; Nefediev, A V; Aloisio, A; Cavaliere, S; De Nardo, G; Della Pietra, M; Doria, A; Giordano, R; Ordine, A; Pardi, S; Russo, G; Sciacca, C; Bigi, I I; Jessop, C P; Wang, W; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Corvo, M; Crescente, A; Corso, F Dal; Dosselli, U; Fanin, C; Gianelle, A; Longo, S; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Morandin, M; Pengo, R; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Stroili, R; Gaioni, L; Manazza, A; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Re, V; Traversi, G; Zucca, S; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Cecchi, C; Germani, S; Lebeau, M; Lubrano, P; Manoni, E; Papi, A; Rossi, A; Scolieri, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Fella, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M; Lilli, L; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paladino, A; Pantaleo, F; Paoloni, E; Perez, A L Perez; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Téllez, A Fernández; Beck, G; Berman, M; Bevan, A; Gannaway, F; Inguglia, G; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Bocci, V; Capodiferro, M; Chiodi, G; Dafinei, I; Drenska, N V; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Gargiulo, C; Gauzzi, P; Luci, C; Lunadei, R; Martellotti, G; Pellegrino, F; Pettinacci, V; Pinci, D; Recchia, L; Ruggeri, D; Zullo, A; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; De Santis, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Felice, V; Di Palma, F; Di Simone, A; Marcelli, L; Messi, R; Moricciani, D; Sparvoli, R; Tammaro, S; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bussino, S; Ciuchini, M; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Ruggieri, F; Spiriti, E; Wilson, F; Monzon, I Leon; Millan-Almaraz, J R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Aston, D; Dey, B; Fisher, A; Jackson, P D; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; MacFarlane, D; McCulloch, M; Metcalfe, S; Novokhatski, A; Osier, S; Prepost, R; Ratcliff, B; Seeman, J; Sullivan, M; Va'vra, J; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W; Altschul, B D; Purohit, M V; Baudot, J; Ripp-Baudot, I; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Bezshyyko, O; Dolinska, G; Soffer, A; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Marcello, S; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cristaudo, P; Lanceri, L; Liberti, B; Rashevskaya, I; Stella, C; Vallazza, E S; Vitale, L; Auriemma, G; Satriano, C; Vidal, F Martinez; de Cos, J Mazorra; Oyanguren, A; Valls, P Ruiz; Beaulieu, A; Dejong, S; Franta, J; Lewczuk, M J; Roney, M; Sobie, R

    2013-01-01

    In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the SuperB detector that was to be installed on the SuperB e+e- high luminosity collider. The SuperB asymmetric collider, which was to be constructed on the Tor Vergata campus near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory, was designed to operate both at the Upsilon(4S) center-of-mass energy with a luminosity of 10^{36} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and at the tau/charm production threshold with a luminosity of 10^{35} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. This high luminosity, producing a data sample about a factor 100 larger than present B Factories, would allow investigation of new physics effects in rare decays, CP Violation and Lepton Flavour Violation. This document details the detector design presented in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) in 2007. The R&D and engineering studies performed to arrive at the full detector design are described, and an updated cost estimate is presented. A combination of a more realistic cost estimates and the unavailability of funds due of the global economic ...

  5. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  6. The CERN SPS proton–antiproton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    2016-01-01

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam–beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  7. The CERN SPS proton-antiproton collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a pbar p collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam-beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  8. European collider's success provides a blueprint for mega-science projects 35 countries contribute labor and money to build a physics facility too costly for any one nation

    CERN Multimedia

    MacDonald, K

    1999-01-01

    Many scientists believe the construction of the LHC could become the blueprint for future international collaborations on large-scale scientific facilities and projects too large and costly for individual countries to fund alone (2 pages).

  9. Demise of Texas collider has made Europe's lab a magnet for scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Had U.S. politics and science meshed more favorably, physicists from around the world would now be flocking to Waxahachie. The defunct Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) should by now have been smashing atoms, but now Europe's top nuclear research lab offers a more picturesque world capital of physics that the prairie south of Dallas

  10. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  11. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  12. swot: Super W Of Theta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupon, Jean; Leauthaud, Alexie; Kilbinger, Martin; Medezinski, Elinor

    2017-07-01

    SWOT (Super W Of Theta) computes two-point statistics for very large data sets, based on “divide and conquer” algorithms, mainly, but not limited to data storage in binary trees, approximation at large scale, parellelization (open MPI), and bootstrap and jackknife resampling methods “on the fly”. It currently supports projected and 3D galaxy auto and cross correlations, galaxy-galaxy lensing, and weighted histograms.

  13. Report of Snowmass 2001 Working Group E2: Electron-Positron Colliders from the Phi to the Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2002-08-07

    We report on the status and plans of experiments now running or proposed for electron-positron colliders at energies between the {phi} and the Z. The e{sup +}e{sup -} B and charm factories we considered were PEP-II/BABAR, KEKB/Belle, superKEK, SuperBABAR, and CESR-c/CLEO-c. We reviewed the programs at the {phi} factory at Frascati and the proposed PEP-N facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We studied the prospects for B physics with a dedicated linear collider Z factory, associated with the TESLA high energy linear collider. In all cases, we compared the physics reach of these facilities with that of alternative experiments at hadron colliders or fixed target facilities.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex instrument ever built for particle physics research. It will, for the first time, provide access to the TeV-energy scale. Numerous technological innovations are necessary to achieve this goal. For example, two counterrotating proton beams are guided and focused by superconducting magnets whose novel two-in-one structure saves cost and allowed the machine to be installed in an existing tunnel. The very high (>8-T) field in the dipoles can be achieved only by cooling them below the transition temperature of liquid helium to the superfluid state. More than 80 tons of superfluid helium are needed to cool the whole machine. So far, the LHC has behaved reliably and predictably. Single-bunch currents 30% above the design value have been achieved, and the luminosity has increased by five orders of magnitude. In this review, I briefly describe the design principles of the major systems and discuss some initial results.

  15. Physics at Hadronic Colliders course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Present and future hadron colliders play an important role in the investigation of fundamental questions of particle physics. After an introductory lecture, tests of the Standard Model and measurements of its parameters (like the mass of the top quark) at hadron colliders are presented. In addition, it will be discussed how the Higgs boson can be searched for at hadron colliders and how "New Physics", i.e. physics beyond the Standard Model, can be explored. Results are presented from the currently ongoing run at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at the US research lab Fermilab. In addition, the rich physics potential of the experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is discussed. Note: Prerequisite Knowledge: - The Standard Model (Lecture by A. Pich) - Beyond The Standard Model (Lecture by E. Kiritsis)

  16. Hyperlenses and metalenses for far-field super-resolution imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Dylan; Liu, Zhaowei

    2012-01-01

    .... Hyperlenses project super-resolution information to the far field through a magnification mechanism, whereas metalenses not only super-resolve subwavelength details but also enable optical Fourier transforms...

  17. Architectural Engineering to Super-Light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Niels Andreas

    with architectural engineering as a starting point. The thesis is based on a two stringed hypothesis: Architectural engineering gives rise to better architecture and Super-Light Structures support and enables a static, challenging architecture. The aim of the thesis is to clarify architectural engineering's impact...... on the work process between architects and engineers in the design development. Using architectural engineering, Super-Light Structures are examined in an architectural context, and it is explained how digital tools can support architectural engineering and design of Super-Light Structures. The experiences...... of implementing a new structural system are described, as well as cases, demonstrating how concept solutions with Super-Light Structures can support architecture. The research in this thesis is carried out in cooperation with architect practice Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), who has allowed the projects...

  18. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; /SLAC; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  19. Calculus super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Calculus I Super Review includes a review of functions, limits, basic derivatives, the definite integral, combinations, and permutations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much you've learned - and where you need more study. Makes an excellent study aid and textbook companion. Great for self-study!DETAILS- From cover to cover, each in-depth topic review is easy-to-follow and easy-to-grasp - Perfect when preparing for

  20. Algebra & trigonometry super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Algebra and Trigonometry Super Review includes sets and set operations, number systems and fundamental algebraic laws and operations, exponents and radicals, polynomials and rational expressions, equations, linear equations and systems of linear equations, inequalities, relations and functions, quadratic equations, equations of higher order, ratios, proportions, and variations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much y

  1. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  2. Quench testing of HTS sub-elements for 13 kA and 600 A leads designed to the specifications for the CERN Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Cowey, L; Krischel, D; Bock, J J

    2000-01-01

    Ability to safely withstand and survive self quench conditions is an important consideration in the design and utilisation of HTS current leads. The provision of a non superconducting shunt path allows current to be diverted in the event of a transition to the normal state. This shunt should allow very rapid transfer of current out of the HTS material and be able to safely support the full load current for the time required to detect the fault and reduce the current to zero. However, the shunt should also be designed to minimise the increased heat load which will result from it's addition to the lead. Test of leads based on melt cast BSCCO 2212 utilising a fully integrated silver gold alloy sheath are described. The HTS sub- elements form part of a full 13 kA lead, designed to the specifications of CERN for the LHC project. The sub-elements proved able to fully comply with and exceed the quench performance required by CERN. The HTS module was quenched at the full design current and continued to maintain this ...

  3. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  4. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  5. Search for Neutral Q-balls in Super-Kamiokande II

    CERN Document Server

    Takenaga, Y; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Ishihara, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Obayashi, Y; Ogawa, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Ueshima, K; Higuchi, I; Ishihara, C; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Mitsuka, G; Nakayama, S; Nishino, H; Okumura, K; Saji, C; Totsuka, Y; Clark, S; Desai, S; Dufour, F; Herfurth, A; Kearns, E; Likhoded, S; Litos, M; Raaf, Jennifer L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Wang, W; Goldhaber, M; Casper, D; Cravens, J P; Dunmore, J; Griskevich, J; Kropp, W R; Liu, D W; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J E; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Scholberg, K; Tanimoto, N; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Guillian, E; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Messier, M D; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwashita, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nitta, K; Oyama, Y; Suzuki, A T; Hasegawa, M; Hiraide, K; Kato, I; Maesaka, H; Nakaya, T; Sasaki, T; Sato, H; Yamamoto, S; Yokoyama, M; Haines, T J; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Svoboda, R; Sullivan, G W; Gran, R; Habig, A; Fukuda, Y; Sato, T; Itow, Y; Koike, T; Jung, C K; Kato, T; Kobayashi, K; Malek, M; McGrew, C; Sarrat, A; Terri, R; Yanagisawa, C; Tamura, N; Sakuda, M; Sugihara, M; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Ishizuka, T; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Seo, H K; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Ishii, H; Nishijima, K; Ishino, H; Watanabe, Y; Koshiba, M; Chen, S; Deng, Z; Liu, Y; Kielczewska, D; Zalipska, J; Berns, H G; Shiraishi, K K; Washburn, K; Wilkes, R J; al, et

    2007-01-01

    A search for Q-balls induced groups of successive contained events has been carried out in Super-Kamiokande II with 541.7 days of live time. Neutral Q-balls would emit pions when colliding with nuclei, generating a signal of successive contained pion events along a track. No candidate for successive contained event groups has been found in Super-Kamiokande II, so upper limits on the possible flux of such Q-balls have been obtained.

  6. Super-Penrose process due to collisions inside ergosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    If two particles collide inside the ergosphere, the energy in the center of mass frame can be made unbound provided at least one of particles has a large negative angular momentum [A. A. Grib and Yu. V. Pavlov, Europhys. Lett. 101 (2013) 20004]. We show that the same condition can give rise to unbounded Killing energy of debris at infinity, i.e. super-Penrose process. Proximity of the point of collision to the black hole horizon is not required.

  7. Factors relating to the feeling of school avoidance among elementary school children: Results from the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Education) Super Shokuiku School Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Masahiro; Sekine, Michikazu; Yamada, Masaaki; Tatsuse, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to evaluate whether lifestyle factors including media use and social and family environments are associated with elementary school children's feeling of school avoidance.Methods Total study population for this study was 2,057 children in 5 elementary schools in Takaoka city, Toyama prefecture, which participated in the MEXT Super Shokuiku School Project. A questionnaire survey was conducted in July 2014 and 1,936 students responded (Response rate: 94.1%). Of those who responded, data from 1,698 respondents were relevant for this study. The questionnaire included questions on lifestyle factors (e.g., eating habits, media use, exercise habits, and sleep), health status, and the social and family environments. Children responded to questions on lifestyle factors, health status, and feeling of school avoidance with their parents. Parents were asked to only respond to the questions on social and family environments. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether the feeling of avoiding school, as the dependent variable, is associated with the independent variables such as social and family environment factors and lifestyle factors. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated.Results The percentage of children who had the feeling of avoiding school was 32.2% in the study sample. In comparison with the 6 th graders, the 1 st , 3 rd , 4 th , and 5 th graders were more likely to have this feeling. Relevant adjusted ORs [95%CI] for Grades 1-5 were found to be 1.48 [1.02-2.13], 1.63 [1.10-2.42], 1.60 [1.08-2.39], and 1.56 [1.03-2.35], respectively. Other factors positively correlated with this feeling were skipping breakfast (OR 1.76, 95%CI [1.12-2.75]), daily snacking (OR 1.64, 95%CI [1.21-2.22]), watching TV for 3 hours or longer (OR 1.55, 95%CI [1.05-2.28]), video gaming for 0.5-2 hours (OR 1.37, 95%CI [1.08-1.74]), feeling sleepy (OR 1.51, 95%CI [1.14-1.99]), not feeling well upon waking up

  8. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  9. [New technology for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1992-08-12

    This report discusses the following topics on research of microwave amplifiers for linear colliders: Context in current microwave technology development; gated field emission for microwave cathodes; cathode fabrication and tests; microwave cathode design using field emitters; and microwave localization.

  10. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  11. US panel backs linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A draft report from a working group examining the future of American particle physics has stated that the US should give top priority to a high energy e-p collider, wherever it is built (2 paragraphs).

  12. Lare Hadron Collider faces today

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN could be delayed after three of the magnets used to focus and manipulate the accelerator's proton beams failed premilinary tests at CERN earlier this week." (1 page)

  13. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  14. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  15. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  16. Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI: New Physics at the Super Flavor Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Hitlin, D.G.; Asner, D.M.; Hurth, T.; McElrath, B.; Shindou, T.; Ronga, F.; Rama, M.; Tosi, S.; Simi, G.; Robertson, S.; Paradisi, P.; Bigi, I.; Stocchi, A.; Viaud, B.; Domingo, F.; Kou, E.; Morandin, M.; Batignani, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Neri, N.; Walsh, J.; Giorgi, M.; Isidori, G.; Lusiani, A.; Bevan, A.; Faccini, R.; Renga, F.; Polosa, A.; Silvestrini, L.; Virto, J.; Ciuchini, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Gambino, P.; Azzolini, V.; Bernabeu, J.; Botella, F.; Branco, G.C.; Lopez March, N.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Pich, A.; Sanchis Lozano, M.A.; Vidal, J.; Vives, O.; Banerjee, Swagato; Roney, J.M.; Gershon, T.

    2008-01-01

    The sixth SuperB Workshop was convened in response to questions posed by the INFN Review Committee, evaluating the SuperB project at the request of INFN. The working groups addressed the capability of a high-luminosity flavor factory that can gather a data sample of 50 to 75 /ab in five years to elucidate New Physics phenomena unearthed at the LHC. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop.

  17. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  18. Calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, Jose [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)]. E-mail: respond@hep.anl.gov

    2007-03-01

    The physics potential of the International Linear Collider depends critically on the jet energy resolution of its detector. Detector concepts are being developed which optimize the jet energy resolution, with the aim of achieving {sigma}{sub jet}=30%/E{sub jet}. Under the assumption that Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs), which combine tracking and calorimeter information to reconstruct the energy of hadronic jets, can provide this unprecedented jet energy resolution, calorimeters with very fine granularity are being developed. After a brief introduction outlining the principles of PFAs, the current status of various calorimeter prototype construction projects and their plans for the next few years will be reviewed.

  19. Calorimetry at the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repond, José

    2007-03-01

    The physics potential of the International Linear Collider depends critically on the jet energy resolution of its detector. Detector concepts are being developed which optimize the jet energy resolution, with the aim of achieving σjet=30%/√{Ejet}. Under the assumption that Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs), which combine tracking and calorimeter information to reconstruct the energy of hadronic jets, can provide this unprecedented jet energy resolution, calorimeters with very fine granularity are being developed. After a brief introduction outlining the principles of PFAs, the current status of various calorimeter prototype construction projects and their plans for the next few years will be reviewed.

  20. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

  1. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  2. SuperB Simulation Production System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, L.; Bianchi, F.; Ciaschini, V.; Corvo, M.; Del Prete, D.; Di Simone, A.; Donvito, G.; Fella, A.; Franchini, P.; Giacomini, F.; Gianoli, A.; Longo, S.; Luitz, S.; Luppi, E.; Manzali, M.; Pardi, S.; Paolini, A.; Perez, A.; Rama, M.; Russo, G.; Santeramo, B.; Stroili, R.

    2012-12-01

    The SuperB asymmetric e+e- collider and detector to be built at the newly founded Nicola Cabibbo Lab will provide a uniquely sensitive probe of New Physics in the flavor sector of the Standard Model. Studying minute effects in the heavy quark and heavy lepton sectors requires a data sample of 75 ab-1 and a peak luminosity of 1036 cm-2 s-1. The SuperB Computing group is working on developing a simulation production framework capable to satisfy the experiment needs. It provides access to distributed resources in order to support both the detector design definition and its performance evaluation studies. During last year the framework has evolved from the point of view of job workflow, Grid services interfaces and technologies adoption. A complete code refactoring and sub-component language porting now permits the framework to sustain distributed production involving resources from two continents and Grid Flavors. In this paper we will report a complete description of the production system status of the art, its evolution and its integration with Grid services; in particular, we will focus on the utilization of new Grid component features as in LB and WMS version 3. Results from the last official SuperB production cycle will be reported.

  3. SuperB Progress Reports - Physics

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, B.; Ramon, M.; Pous, E.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Asgeirsson, D.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; McElrath, B.; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; Blanke, M.; Lesiak, T.; Shindou, T.; Ronga, F.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Rama, M.; Bossi, F.; Guido, E.; Patrignani, C.; Tosi, S.; Davies, C.; Lunghi, E.; Haisch, U.; Hurth, T.; Westhoff, S.; Crivellin, A.; Hofer, L.; Goto, T.; Brown, David Nathan; Branco, G.C.; Zupan, J.; Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Simi, G.; Tackmann, F.J.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Lindemann, D.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Duling, B.; Gemmler, K.; Gorbahn, M.; Jager, S.; Paradisi, P.; Straub, D.M.; Bigi, I.; Asner, D.M.; Fast, J.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Morandin, M.; Rotondo, M.; Ben-Haim, E.; Arnaud, N.; Burmistrov, L.; Kou, E.; Perez, A.; Stocchi, A.; Viaud, B.; Domingo, F.; Piccinini, F.; Manoni, E.; Batignani, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Neri, N.; Walsh, J.; Bevan, A.; Bona, M.; Walker, C.; Weiland, C.; Lenz, A.; Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G.; Faccini, R.; Renga, F.; Polosa, A.; Silvestrini, L.; Virto, J.; Ciuchini, M.; Lubicz, V.; Tarantino, C.; Wilson, F.F.; Carpinelli, M.; Huber, T.; Mannel, T.; Graham, M.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Santoro, V.; Sekula, S.; Shougaev, K.; Soffer, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Gambino, P.; Mussa, R.; Nardecchia, M.; Stal, O.; Bernabeu, J.; Botella, F.; Jung, M.; Lopez March, N.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Pich, A.; Lozano, M.A.Sanchis; Vidal, J.; Vives, O.; Banerjee, S.; Roney, J.M.; Petrov, A.A.; Flood, K.

    2010-01-01

    SuperB is a high luminosity e+e- collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measure...

  4. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2005-01-01

    With Mike Struik (LHC Magnets Interconnection), Pascal Ponsot (LHC Magnet Transport), André Jacquemod (LHC Magnets Interconnection), Jean-Marc Balaguer (Ultrasound Welding), Davide Bozzini (Testing) and Lyn Evans (LHC Project Leader)

  5. Magnetic field measurements of Fermilab/General Dynamics built full scale SSC collider dipole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delchamps, S.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.; Mazur, P.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.; Strait, J.; Wake, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of magnetic field measurements made on a series of 50 mm aperture 15 m long SSC collider dipole magnets designed and manufactured at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) for use in the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) Accelerator System String Test. The magnets were assembled by Fermilab and General Dynamics personnel, and were tested at the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) at Fermilab. Measurements of the dipole field angle, dipole field strength, and field shape parameters at various stages in magnet construction and testing are described.

  6. Nonlinear Super Integrable Couplings of Super Classical-Boussinesq Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhi Xing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear integrable couplings of super classical-Boussinesq hierarchy based upon an enlarged matrix Lie super algebra were constructed. Then, its super Hamiltonian structures were established by using super trace identity. As its reduction, nonlinear integrable couplings of the classical integrable hierarchy were obtained.

  7. Science and technology of the TESLA electron-positron linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, A

    2002-01-01

    Recent analyses of the long term future of particles physics in Asia, Europe, and the U.S.A. have led to the consensus that the next major facility to be built to unravel the secrets of the microcosms is an electron-positron linear collider in the energy range of 500 to 1000 GeV. This collider should be constructed in an as timely fashion as possible to overlap with the Large Hadron Collider, under construction at CERN. Here, the scientific potential and the technological aspects of the TESLA projects, a superconducting collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory, are summarised. (1 refs).

  8. The SuperB Silicon Vertex Tracker and 3D vertical integration

    CERN Document Server

    Re, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    The construction of the SuperB high luminosity collider was approved and funded by the Italian government in 2011. The performance specifications set by the target luminosity of this machine (> 10^36 cm^-2 s^-1) ask for the development of a Silicon Vertex Tracker with high resolution, high tolerance to radiation and excellent capability of handling high data rates. This paper reviews the R&D activity that is being carried out for the SuperB SVT. Special emphasis is given to the option of exploiting 3D vertical integration to build advanced pixel sensors and readout electronics that are able to comply with SuperB vertexing requirements.

  9. Fiscal 1998 research achievement report. Project for promoting development of super-advanced electronic technology; 1998 nendo chosentan denshi gijutsu kaihatsu sokushin jigyo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    For the purpose of establishing super-advanced technologies two generations ahead in the field of electronics and information, research and development was carried out involving ultrafine machining process technology, technologies of ultimate measuring, analysis, and control, and technologies of electronic materials equipped with novel functions. In the study of writing systems in which writing is performed directly by an electron beam, writing technologies using electron beams under single-column and multi-column systems were taken up. In the study of ultrashort wavelength electromagnetic wave patterning systems, studies were made about equimultiple ultrashort wavelength and reduced ultrashort wavelength electromagnetic wave patterning. In the study of ultrahigh precision shielding systems, studies involved high precision in situ measurement and control of writing distortion, and ultrahigh precision and high current density electronic optical technologies. Also carried out were research and development of technologies of super-advanced plasma measurement, analysis, and control, technology of cleaning by ultrafine particle control, technology of ultrahigh sensitivity medium, and technologies of new functional elements and film fabrication. In the overall research and survey, surveys were conducted of the trends of development of technology of semiconductor related lithography. (NEDO)

  10. Fiscal 2000 research achievement report. Super-advanced electronics technologies development promotion project; 2000 nendo kenkyu seika hokokusho. Cho sentan gijutsu kaihatsu sokushin jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    For the construction of a common base of key technologies in the domain of electronics and information with the influence propagating across a wide range of industries, research and development was conducted of technologies of ultrafine working process, technologies of ultimate measurement, analysis, and control, technologies of new functional electronic materials, etc. Studied in the field of electron beam lithography were high precision and large area imaging technology, highly accurate electron optics control system technology, and beam monitoring technology. Studied in the field of ultrashort wavelength electromagnetic wave patterning system technology were proximity ultrashort wavelength electromagnetic wave patterning system technology, reduced ultrashort wavelength electromagnetic wave patterning system technology, and ultrahigh precision new materials patterning technology. Also studied were technologies of super-advanced plasma measurement, analysis, and control, and technology of super-advanced cleaning. In the field of technologies of new functional elements and films, studies were conducted about technologies of highly sensitive GMR (giant magnetoresistive) film and head fabrication process for contact magnetic recording and technologies of a spin-valve head with submicron track width for contact magnetic recording. (NEDO)

  11. Collider project for giant phsyics Lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Timken Company's (NYSE: TKR) steel technology helped Superbolt, Inc. provide equipment to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its large particle physics laboratory located near Geneva, Switzerland."(1,5 page)

  12. Software for the international linear collider: Simulation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the internationalization of the international linear collider project, increasing demands are put on the software, its availability, ease of use, and ease of distrib- ution. Software plays an important role in all aspects of the development of the experimental program at the ILC. Software is used to design optimized detectors,.

  13. Working group report: High energy and collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Rishikesh Vaidya20. 1Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India ... The projects undertaken in the working group I on high energy and collider physics can be classified into (i) Higgs ...... lous couplings for realistic polarization and integrated luminosity at a design LC energy of √s = 500 GeV.

  14. SuperB: A High-Luminosity Asymmetric e+e- Super Flavor Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, M.; /et al.

    2007-05-18

    We discuss herein the exciting physics program that can be accomplished with a very large sample of heavy quark and heavy lepton decays produced in the very clean environment of an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider; a program complementary to that of an experiment such as LHCb at a hadronic machine. It then presents the conceptual design of a new type of e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that produces a nearly two-order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity over the current generation of asymmetric B Factories. The key idea is the use of low emittance beams produced in an accelerator lattice derived from the ILC Damping Ring Design, together with a new collision region, again with roots in the ILC final focus design, but with important new concepts developed in this design effort. Remarkably, SuperB produces this very large improvement in luminosity with circulating currents and wallplug power similar to those of the current B Factories. There is clear synergy with ILC R&D; design efforts have already influenced one another, and many aspects of the ILC Damping Rings and Final Focus would be operationally tested at SuperB. Finally, the design of an appropriate detector, based on an upgrade of BABAR as an example, is discussed in some detail. A preliminary cost estimate is presented, as is an example construction timeline.

  15. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC and ILC, which led to a host of good results and important decisions. The International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) studies both call for cutting-edge technologies. At first glance they may appear to be in competition, but they are in fact complementary and have a common objective – namely to propose a design , as soon as possible and at the lowest possible cost, for the linear accelerator best suited to taking over the baton of physics research at the high-energy frontier after the LHC.

  16. Pulsating stars in SuperWASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2017-09-01

    SuperWASP is one of the largest ground-based surveys for transiting exoplanets. To date, it has observed over 31 million stars. Such an extensive database of time resolved photometry holds the potential for extensive searches of stellar variability, and provide solid candidates for the upcoming TESS mission. Previous work by e.g. [15], [5], [12] has shown that the WASP archive provides a wealth of pulsationally variable stars. In this talk I will provide an overview of the SuperWASP project, present some of the published results from the survey, and some of the on-going work to identify key targets for the TESS mission.

  17. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  18. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  19. Detectors and Physics at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090240

    An electron-positron linear collider is an option for future large particle accelerator projects. Such a collider would focus on precision tests of the Higgs boson properties. This thesis describes three studies related to the optimisation of highly granular calorimeters and one study on the sensitivity of Higgs couplings at CLIC. Photon reconstruction algorithms were developed for highly granular calorimeters of a future linear collider detector. A sophisticated pattern recognition algorithm was implemented, which uses the topological properties of electromagnetic showers to identify photon candidates and separate them from nearby particles. It performs clustering of the energy deposits in the detector, followed by topological characterisation of the clusters, with the results being considered by a multivariate likelihood analysis. This algorithm leads to a significant improvement in the reconstruction of both single photons and multiple photons in high energy jets compared to previous reconstruction softwar...

  20. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fangei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Harwood, Leigh [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, Fulvia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sullivan, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M.-H [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wienands, Uli [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  1. Deforming super Riemann surfaces with gravitinos and super Schottky groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Playle, Sam [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2016-12-12

    The (super) Schottky uniformization of compact (super) Riemann surfaces is briefly reviewed. Deformations of super Riemann surface by gravitinos and Beltrami parameters are recast in terms of super Schottky group cohomology. It is checked that the super Schottky group formula for the period matrix of a non-split surface matches its expression in terms of a gravitino and Beltrami parameter on a split surface. The relationship between (super) Schottky groups and the construction of surfaces by gluing pairs of punctures is discussed in an appendix.

  2. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  3. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  4. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  5. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  6. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  7. Unraveling supersymmetry at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    After a quick review of the current limits on sparticle masses, we outline the prospects for their discovery at future colliders. We then proceed to discuss how precision measurements of sparticle masses can provide information about how SM suprpartners acquire their masses. Finally, we examine how we can proceed to ...

  8. B physics at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  9. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  10. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument. It is being constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest particle physics laboratories.

  11. The very large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  12. When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation of lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This paper briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

  13. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  14. Alignment Challenges for a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, H; Stern, G

    2013-01-01

    The preservation of ultra-low emittances in the main linac and Beam Delivery System area is one of the main challenges for linear colliders. This requires alignment tolerances never achieved before at that scale, down to the micrometre level. As a matter of fact, in the LHC, the goal for the smoothing of the components was to obtain a 1σ deviation with respect to a smooth curve of 0.15 mm over a 150 m long sliding window, while for the CLIC project for example, it corresponds to 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m in the Beam Delivery System area. Two complementary strategies are being studied to fulfil these requirements: the development and validation of long range alignment systems over a few hundreds of metres and short range alignment systems over a few metres. The studies undertaken, with associated tests setups and the latest results will be detailed, as well as their application for the alignment of both CLIC and ILC colliders.

  15. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This report summarises [1] the activities of the working group on ' and collider physics'. Presented are the results of investigations relating to various scenarios of su- persymmetry breaking and their collider signatures and the consequences of violation of. К-parity for both collider signals as well as various -meson decay ...

  16. Shedding Light on Dark Matter at Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter remains one of the most puzzling mysteries in Fundamental Physics of our times. Experiments at high-energy physics colliders are expected to shed light to its nature and determine its properties. This review focuses on recent searches for dark-matter signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, also discussing related prospects in future e+e- colliders.

  17. Higgs and SUSY searches at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/054/04/0499-0518. Keywords. Higgs; supersymmetry; colliders. Abstract. In this talk, I discuss some aspects of Higgs searches at future colliders, particularly comparing and contrasting the capabilities of LHC and next linear collider (NLC), including the aspects of Higgs searches in ...

  18. SuperQuant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    ). Peptides were fragmented with collision-induced dissociation using isolation windows of 1, 2, and 4 Th while recording data both with high-resolution and low-resolution. The results obtained using SuperQuant were compared to those using the conventional ion trap-based approach (low mass accuracy MS2...... spectra), which is known to achieve high identification performance. Compared to the common high-resolution approach, the SuperQuant approach identifies up to 70% more peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs), 40% more peptides, and 20% more proteins at the 0.01 FDR level. It identifies more PSMs and peptides than......SuperQuant is a quantitative proteomics data processing approach that uses complementary fragment ions to identify multiple co-isolated peptides in tandem mass spectra allowing for their quantification. This approach can be applied to any shotgun proteomics data set acquired with high mass accuracy...

  19. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    and aerial imaging to medical image processing, to facial image analysis, text image analysis, sign and number plates reading, and biometrics recognition, to name a few. This has resulted in many research papers, each developing a new super-resolution algorithm for a specific purpose. The current...... comprehensive survey provides an overview of most of these published works by grouping them in a broad taxonomy. For each of the groups in the taxonomy, the basic concepts of the algorithms are first explained and then the paths through which each of these groups have evolved are given in detail, by mentioning...... the contributions of different authors to the basic concepts of each group. Furthermore, common issues in super-resolution algorithms, such as imaging models and registration algorithms, optimization of the cost functions employed, dealing with color information, improvement factors, assessment of super...

  20. SuperSegger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stylianidou, Stella; Brennan, Connor; Nissen, Silas B

    2016-01-01

    Many quantitative cell biology questions require fast yet reliable automated image segmentation to identify and link cells from frame-to-frame, and characterize the cell morphology and fluorescence. We present SuperSegger, an automated MATLAB-based image processing package well......-suited to quantitative analysis of high-throughput live-cell fluorescence microscopy of bacterial cells. SuperSegger incorporates machine-learning algorithms to optimize cellular boundaries and automated error resolution to reliably link cells from frame-to-frame. Unlike existing packages, it can reliably segment micro......, and computing statistics on cellular fluorescence, the location and intensity of fluorescent foci. SuperSegger provides a variety of post-processing data visualization tools for single cell and population level analysis, such as histograms, kymographs, frame mosaics, movies, and consensus images. Finally, we...

  1. Super Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R. W.

    1994-05-01

    Super star clusters represent an extreme in the star formation process. They are very luminous, compact objects with L_V > 10(6) L_{V,sun} and diameters = 100 times higher than normal OB associations and clusters in ``giant H II regions''. Prior to HST about a dozen such objects had been identified in nearby galaxies, but at ground-based resolution they are nearly point sources. We review recent HST observations of individual super star clusters in NGC 1140, 1569, and 1705. They have half-light radii of only 2--3.5 pc, and some show evidence of substructure which should be resolvable with the repaired HST. After allowing for age differences, the surface brightness of NGC 1569-A is over 65 times higher than the core of 30 Doradus in the LMC and 1200 times higher than the mean rich LMC star cluster. In some cases, the energy released by the clusters into their surroundings is sufficient to drive galaxy-wide winds. Their properties make super star clusters good analogues of young globular clusters. In some, though not all, cases super star clusters appear to form in the aftermath of a merger or accretion event. The most impressive examples are the clusters detected by HST in NGC 1275 and 7252, one of which has the extraordinary luminosity ~ 6 times 10(8) L_{V,sun}. M82 affords a nearby view of a post-interaction system. HST imaging has identified over 80 super star clusters in its central regions with mean luminosities of ~ 3 times 10(6) L_{V,sun}. Their close packing and signs of interaction with the well-known supernova-driven wind suggest that they do not evolve independently. Super cluster evolution in starbursts is probably a collective phenomenon.

  2. Raspberry Pi super cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

  3. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CDF Collaboration; Jensen, Hans B.

    1986-02-01

    A description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given. It is a calorimetric detector, which covers almost the complete solid angle around the interaction region with segmented calorimeter "towers". A 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, 3m in diameter and 5m long, provides a uniform magnetic field in the central region for magnetic analysis of charged particles. The magnetic field volume is filled with a large cylindrical drift chamber and a set of Time Projection Chambers. Muon detection is accomplished with drift chambers outside the calorimeters in the central region and with large magnetized steel toroids and associated drift chambers in the forward-backward regions. The electronics has a large dynamic range to allow measurement of both high energy clusters and small energy depositions made by penetrating muons. Interesting events are identified by a trigger system which, together with the rest of the data acquisition system, is FASTBUS based.

  4. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  5. News & Views Evaluation of Projects for Basic Research of Scientific Instruments in 2008 Completed NSFC Former President Tang Ao-qing Passed Away Professor Tang Aoqing and NSFC Carbon Nanotube Film-Based Speaker Developed in Tsinghua University Dinosaur Footprint Fossils Discovered in Xinjiang New Method for Early Cancer Diagnosis New Progress Achieved by NSFC Project in Basic Research of Black Hole Physics New progress in Organic FET 67 NSFC-RFBR Cooperative Projects Approved for 2008 Spin Configuration and Super-exchange Mechanism in Molecular Magnets Observed NSFC Strengthens its Funding in Wenchuan Concerns Go to Disaster's Impact on Economy and Emergency Response Thirty-seven NSFC-KOSEF Cooperative Projects Approved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of Projects for Basic Research of Scientific Instruments in 2008 Completed NSFC Former President Tang Ao-qing Passed Away Professor Tang Aoqing and NSFC Carbon Nanotube Film-Based Speaker Developed in Tsinghua University Dinosaur Footprint Fossils Discovered in Xinjiang New Method for Early Cancer Diagnosis New Progress Achieved by NSFC Project in Basic Research of Black Hole Physics New progress in Organic FET 67 NSFC-RFBR Cooperative Projects Approved for 2008 Spin Configuration and Super-exchange Mechanism in Molecular Magnets Observed NSFC Strengthens its Funding in Wenchuan Concerns Go to Disaster's Impact on Economy and Emergency Response Thirty-seven NSFC-KOSEF Cooperative Projects Approved

  6. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  7. Leptoquarks at Future Lepton Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I summarize the capability of future lepton colliders to discover leptoquarks and to determine their electroweak quantum numbers. This analysis is an updated discussion based on the results presented in the Snowmass 1996 New Phenomena Working Group report as well as some more recent work that has appeared in the literature as a result of the HERA high-$Q^2$ excess.

  8. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  9. Handbook of Super 8 Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Ronnie, Ed.

    This handbook is designed for anyone interested in producing super 8 films at any level of complexity and cost. Separate chapters present detailed discussions of the following topics: super 8 production systems and super 8 shooting and editing systems; budgeting; cinematography and sound recording; preparing to edit; editing; mixing sound tracks;…

  10. Extra dimensions at particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvergsnes, Erik Wolden

    2004-08-01

    This thesis consists of an introduction where we consider different aspects of theories involving extra dimensions, together with four research publications (Papers I-IV) attached at the end. The introductional chapters should serve as background material for better understanding the models on which the articles are based. In Chap. 4 we also present some plots not included in the papers. The topic of Papers I-III is graviton induced Bremsstrahlung. In Paper I we consider the contribution to this process from graviton exchange through gluon-gluon fusion at the LHC, compared to the QED background. Only final-state radiation is considered in Paper I, whereas in Paper II we extend this work to include also the quark-antiquark annihilation with graviton exchange, as well as initial-state radiation for both graviton and Standard Model exchange. Paper III is a study of graviton-induced Bremsstrahlung at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, including both initial- and final-state radiation. Paper IV is devoted to a study of the center-edge asymmetry at hadron colliders, an asymmetry which previously had been studied for e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. The center-edge asymmetry can be used as a method of distinguishing between spin-1 and spin-2 exchange, something which will be of major importance if a signal is observed.

  11. Optimal Super Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    that must be overcome to provide soldiers and sailors full electronic capability without hindrance due to size, weight or operating costs [6]. The...Publishers, 2004. [26] H. Lee, N. Byamba-Ochir, W. Shim, M. Balathanigaimani, and H. Moon , “High- performance super capacitors based on activated

  12. 'SuperMac' Apple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanizadeh, S.; Groleau, Y.; Levasseur, A.; Carisse, O.; Rekika, D.; DeEll, J.; Prive, J.P.; Alli, I.; Kemp, H.

    2006-01-01

    `SuperMac' (Malus xdomestica Borkh) is being released as a replacement for `Spartan', which is presently being grown in Eastern Canada for its excellent shelf life. However, it is susceptibility to scab [Venturia inaequalis (Cke) Wint.], the most common apple disease. This new cultivar produces

  13. Creating a Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpää, Maria; Gasselseder, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    traditionally been dependent on their existing instrumental skills, various technological solutions can be used to reach beyond them. This paper focuses on the possibilities of enhancing composers' and performing pianists' technical and expressive vocabulary in the context of electroacoustic super instrument...

  14. The Large Hadron Collider harvest of run 1

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive volume summarizes and structures the multitude of results obtained at the LHC in its first running period and draws the grand picture of today’s physics at a hadron collider. Topics covered are Standard Model measurements, Higgs and top-quark physics, flavour physics, heavy-ion physics and searches for super symmetry and other extensions of the Standard Model. Emphasis is placed on overview and presentation of the lessons learned. Chapters on detectors and the LHC machine and a thorough outlook into the future complement the book. The individual chapters are written by teams of expert authors working at the forefront of LHC research, typically one from each of the two multi-purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS and one from theory.

  15. ERL Based Electron-Ion Collider eRHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Bai, Mei; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph M; Calaga, Rama; Chang, Xiangyun; Deshpande, Abhay A; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Fedotov, Alexei V; Fischer, Wolfram; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; MacKay, William W; Montag, Christoph; Parker, Brett; Peggs, Steve; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Satogata, Todd; Surrow, Bernd; Tepikian, Steven; Trbojevic, Dejan; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    We present the designs of a future polarized electron-hadron collider, eRHIC* based on a high current super-conducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) with energy of electrons up to 20 GeV. We plan to operate eRHIC in both dedicated (electron-hadrons only) and parallel(with the main hadron-hadron collisions) modes. The eRHIC has very large tunability range of c.m. energies while maintaining very high luminosity up to 1034 cm-2 s-1 per nucleon. Two of the most attractive features of this scheme are full spin transparency of the ERL at all operational energies and the capability to support up to four interaction points. We present two main layouts of the eRHIC, the expected beam and luminosity parameter, and discuss the potential limitation of its performance.

  16. Nonlinear Super Integrable Couplings of Super Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt Hierarchy and Its Super Hamiltonian Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sixing Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear integrable couplings of super Broer-Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy based upon an enlarged matrix Lie super algebra were constructed. Then its super Hamiltonian structures were established by using super trace identity, and the conserved functionals were proved to be in involution in pairs under the defined Poisson bracket. As its reduction, nonlinear integrable couplings of the classical integrable hierarchy were obtained.

  17. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0036 TITLE: Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carol S. Lim University of Utah...Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0036 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Carol S. Lim...ABSTRACT In this final report, we show gene therapy using re-engineered super p53 (p53-CC constructs) kills some ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro

  18. SuperB: An opportunity to study baryons with beauty and bottom super-nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciello, A.

    2012-05-01

    SuperB is an INFN flagship project for a new high-luminosity heavy-flavor factory. Along with its companion detector, it is dedicated to the search for CP violation effects in the B meson sector with the aim of looking for direct and indirect signals of new physics, beyond the Standard Model. However it could offer as well the opportunity for a systematic, high-statistics study of b baryon properties and for a search for bottom super-nuclei, that is bound nuclear systems with an explicit content of beauty.

  19. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-06-05

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide.

  20. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  1. Higgs Measurement at e+e- Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M

    2014-01-01

    Now that the mass of the Higgs boson is known, circular electron positron colliders, able to measure the properties of these particles with high accuracy, are receiving considerable attention. Design studies have been launched (i) at CERN with the Future Circular Colliders (FCC), of which an e+e- collider is a potential first step (FCC-ee, formerly caller TLEP) and (ii) in China with the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC). Hosted in a tunnel of at least 50 km (CEPC) or 80-100 km (FCC), both projects can deliver very high luminosity from the Z peak to HZ threshold (CEPC) and even to the top pair threshold and above (FCC-ee). At the ZH production optimum, around 240 GeV, the FCC-ee (CEPC) will be able to deliver 10 (5) ab-1 integrated luminosity in 5 (10) years with 4 (2) interaction points: hence to produce millions of Higgs bosons through the Higgsstrahlung process and vector boson fusion processes. This sample opens the possibility of subper-cent precision absolute measurements of the Higgs boson cou...

  2. Higgs measurement at $e^+e^-$ circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Manqi

    2016-01-01

    Now that the mass of the Higgs boson is known, circular electron positron colliders, able to measure the properties of these particles with high accuracy, are receiving considerable attention. Design studies have been launched (i) at CERN with the Future Circular Colliders (FCC), of which an e+e- collider is a potential first step (FCC-ee, formerly caller TLEP) and (ii) in China with the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC). Hosted in a tunnel of at least 50 km (CEPC) or 80-100 km (FCC), both projects can deliver very high luminosity from the Z peak to HZ threshold (CEPC) and even to the top pair threshold and above (FCC-ee). At the ZH production optimum, around 240 GeV, the FCC-ee (CEPC) will be able to deliver 10 (5) ab-1 integrated luminosity in 5 (10) years with 4 (2) interaction points: hence to produce millions of Higgs bosons through the Higgsstrahlung process and vector boson fusion processes. This sample opens the possibility of subper- cent precision absolute measurements of the Higgs boson co...

  3. A circular e+e- collider to study H(125) ?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The strategy for future collider projects will be influenced strongly by the discoveries of the LHC. The discovery by ATLAS and CMS of a 125 GeV/c2 boson naturally focuses attention on concepts for a Higgs factory to study in detail the properties of this remarkable particle. Such a machine should be able to go significantly beyond the capabilities of the LHC and its upgrades for Higgs studies, as well as offering other physics possibilities. Circular electron-positron colliders are among the options that merit further study, for a fully-informed decision to be taken at the appropriate time. Options for CERN include LEP3 – capable of collisions at energies up to ~ 240 GeV, that could be located in the LHC tunnel either after exploitation of the LHC or in parallel – and TLEP – a collider in a larger tunnel in the Geneva area that could reach energies above the top threshold. The physics potential of these circular colliders will be presented and compared to that of other options.

  4. Infrastructure for Detector Research and Development towards the International Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kulis, Sz.; Przyborowski, D.; Swientek, K.; Bamberger, A.; Kohli, M.; Lupberger, M.; Renz, U.; Schumacher, M.; Zwerger, Andreas; Calderone, A.; Cussans, D.G.; Heath, H.F.; Mandry, S.; Page, R.F.; Velthuis, J.J.; Attie, D.; Calvet, D.; Colas, P.; Coppolani, X.; Degerli, Y.; Delagnes, E.; Gelin, M.; Giomataris, I.; Lutz, P.; Orsini, F.; Rialot, M.; Senee, F.; Wang, W.; Alozy, J.; Apostolakis, J.; Aspell, P.; Bergsma, F.; Campbell, M.; Formenti, F.; Santos, H.Franca; Garcia, E.Garcia; de Gaspari, M.; Giudice, P.A.; Grefe, Ch.; Grichine, V.; Hauschild, M.; Ivantchenko, V.; Kehrli, A.; Kloukinas, K.; Linssen, L.; Cudie, X.Llopart; Marchioro, A.; Musa, L.; Ribon, A.; Trampitsch, G.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Anduze, M.; Beyer, E.; Bonnemaison, A.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.C.; Cauchois, A.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Jauffret, C.; Jeans, D.; Karar, A.; Mathieu, A.; de Freitas, P.Mora; Musat, G.; Rouge, A.; Ruan, M.; Vanel, J.C.; Videau, H.; Besson, A.; de Masi, G.Claus.R.; Doziere, G.; Dulinski, W.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Morel, F.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Cornebise, P.; Dulucq, F.; Giannelli, M.Faucci; Fleury, J.; Guilhem, G.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Poschl, R.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Benyamna, M.; Bonnard, J.; Carloganu, C.; Fehr, F.; Gay, P.; Mannen, S.; Royer, L.; Charpy, A.; Da Silva, W.; David, J.; Dhellot, M.; Imbault, D.; Ghislain, P.; Kapusta, F.; Pham, T.Hung; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sefri, R.; Dzahini, D.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Bassignana, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Quirion, D.; Fernandez, M.; Jaramillo, R.; Munoz, F.J.; Vila, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Kvasnicka, P.; Aplin, S.; Bachynska, O.; Behnke, T.; Behr, J.; Dehmelt, K.; Engels, J.; Gadow, K.; Gaede, F.; Garutti, E.; Gottlicher, P.; Gregor, I.M.; Haas, T.; Henschel, H.; Koetz, U.; Lange, W.; Libov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mnich, J.; Muhl, C.; Ohlerich, M.; Potylitsina-Kube, N.; Prahl, V.; Reinecke, M.; Roloff, P.; Rosemann, Ch.; Rubinski, Igor; Schade, P.; Schuwalov, S.; Sefkow, F.; Terwort, M.; Volkenborn, R.; Kalliopuska, J.; Mehtaelae, P.; Orava, R.; van Remortel, N.; Cvach, J.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Haensel, S.; Irmler, C.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Valentan, M.; Piemontese, L.; Cotta-Ramusino, A.; Bulgheroni, A.; Jastrzab, M.; Caccia, M.; Re, V.; Ratti, L.; Traversi, G.; Dewulf, J.P.; Janssen, X.; De Lentdecker, G.; Yang, Y.; Bryngemark, L.; Christiansen, P.; Gross, P.; Jonsson, L.; Ljunggren, M.; Lundberg, B.; Mjornmark, U.; Oskarsson, A.; Richert, T.; Stenlund, E.; Osterman, L.; Rummel, S.; Richter, R.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovich, J.; Koffmane, Ch.; Moser, H.G.; Boisvert, V.; Green, B.; Green, M.G.; Misiejuk, A.; Wu, T.; Bilevych, Y.; Carballo, V.M.Blanco; Chefdeville, M.; de Nooij, L.; Fransen, M.; Hartjes, F.; van der Graaf, H.; Timmermans, J.; Abramowicz, H.; Ben-Hamu, Y.; Jikhleb, I.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Sadeh, I.; Schwartz, R.; Stern, A.; Goodrick, M.J.; Hommels, L.B.A.; Ward, R.Shaw.D.R.; Daniluk, W.; Kielar, E.; Kotula, J.; Moszczynski, A.; Oliwa, K.; Pawlik, B.; Wierba, W.; Zawiejski, L.; Bailey, D.S.; Kelly, M.; Eigen, G.; Brezina, Ch.; Desch, K.; Furletova, J.; Kaminski, J.; Killenberg, M.; Kockner, F.; Krautscheid, T.; Kruger, H.; Reuen, L.; Wienemann, P.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Corrin, E.; Haas, D.; Pohl, M.; Diener, R.; Fischer, P.; Peric, I.; Kaukher, A.; Schafer, O.; Schroder, H.; Wurth, R.; Zarnecki, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    The EUDET-project was launched to create an infrastructure for developing and testing new and advanced detector technologies to be used at a future linear collider. The aim was to make possible experimentation and analysis of data for institutes, which otherwise could not be realized due to lack of resources. The infrastructure comprised an analysis and software network, and instrumentation infrastructures for tracking detectors as well as for calorimetry.

  5. High Momentum Resolution tracking In a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M; Oskarsson, A

    2011-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been made within the LCTPC-collaboration, an international collaboration for studying the technical aspects af a possible tracking detector at a linear collider. The collaboration has built a prototype Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for testing the properties of dierent readout structures. A TPC is a tracking detector consisting of a gas lled drift volume placed in a solenoidal magnetic eld where the readout is made using a segmented plane of so called pads. When a char...

  6. Electroweak precision constraints at present and future colliders

    CERN Document Server

    de Blas, Jorge; Franco, Enrico; Mishima, Satoshi; Pierini, Maurizio; Reina, Laura; Silvestrini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the global fit to electroweak precision observables in the Standard Model and present model-independent bounds on several general new physics scenarios. We present a projection of the fit based on the expected experimental improvements at future $e^+ e^-$ colliders, and compare the constraining power of some of the different experiments that have been proposed. All results have been obtained with the HEPfit code.

  7. Performing the Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpaa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The genre of contemporary classical music has seen significant innovation and research related to new super, hyper, and hybrid instruments, which opens up a vast palette of expressive potential. An increasing number of composers, performers, instrument designers, engineers, and computer programmers...... have become interested in different ways of “supersizing” acoustic instruments in order to open up previously-unheard instrumental sounds. Super instruments vary a great deal but each has a transformative effect on the identity and performance practice of the performing musician. Furthermore, composers...... provides the performer extensive virtuoso capabilities in terms of instrumental range, harmony, timbre, or spatial, textural, acoustic, technical, or technological qualities. The discussion will be illustrated by a composition case study involving augmented musical instrument electromagnetic resonator...

  8. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  9. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  10. Physics at the linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Baer, H.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P. M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bagger, J.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brümmer, F.; Choi, S. Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grünewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Höcker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Mönig, K.; Mühlleitner, M. M.; Pöschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stål, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stöckinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G. W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Brau, J.; Ellis, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mnich, J.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an linear collider in the energy range of GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  11. Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    INSTR17, the International Conference on Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics, will be held in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, on 27 February – 4 March, 2017. The conference covers novel methods of particle detection used in various experiments at particle accelerators as well as in astrophysics. It is organized in close relationship with the Vienna Conference on Instrumentation (last held in 2016) and the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors (last held in 2015). The deadline for registration and abstract submission is 15 January. For more details visit the conference website instr17.inp.nsk.su. Will be published in: JINST

  12. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  13. Improving safety in high-speed work zones : a Super 70 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Super 70 was an urban reconstruction project (March-November 2007) along I-70 in the central part of Indianapolis. INDOT : applied in that project several innovative and traditional solutions. This study investigates the safety effect of the solution...

  14. Minimal Super Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antola, M.; Di Chiara, S.; Sannino, F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce novel extensions of the Standard Model featuring a supersymmetric technicolor sector (supertechnicolor). As the first minimal conformal supertechnicolor model we consider N=4 Super Yang-Mills which breaks to N=1 via the electroweak interactions. This is a well defined, economical......, between unparticle physics and Minimal Walking Technicolor. We consider also other N =1 extensions of the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. The new models allow all the standard model matter fields to acquire a mass....

  15. Standard Model Background of the Cosmological Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2017-06-30

    The inflationary universe can be viewed as a "cosmological collider" with an energy of the Hubble scale, producing very massive particles and recording their characteristic signals in primordial non-Gaussianities. To utilize this collider to explore any new physics at very high scales, it is a prerequisite to understand the background signals from the particle physics standard model. In this Letter we describe the standard model background of the cosmological collider.

  16. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  17. Characterising Super-Earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of Super-Earths has formally begun with the detection of transiting low-mass exoplanets CoRoT-7b and GJ 1214b. In the path of characterising super-Earths, the first step is to infer their composition. While the discovery data for CoRoT-7b, in combination with the high atmospheric mass loss rate inferred from the high insolation, suggested that it was a rocky planet, the new proposed mass values have widened the possibilities. The combined mass range 1−10 M⊕ allows for a volatile-rich (and requires it if the mass is less than 4 M⊕ , an Earth-like or a super-Mercury-like composition. In contrast, the radius of GJ 1214b is too large to admit a solid composition, thus it necessarily to have a substantial gas layer. Some evidence suggests that within this gas layer H/He is a small but non-negligible component. These two planets are the first of many transiting low-mass exoplanets expected to be detected and they exemplify the limitations faced when inferring composition, which come from the degenerate character of the problem and the large error bars in the data.

  18. Super-quantum curves from super-eigenvalue models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciosmak, Paweł [Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics, University of Warsaw,ul. Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Hadasz, Leszek [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University,ul. Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Manabe, Masahide [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Sułkowski, Piotr [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    In modern mathematical and theoretical physics various generalizations, in particular supersymmetric or quantum, of Riemann surfaces and complex algebraic curves play a prominent role. We show that such supersymmetric and quantum generalizations can be combined together, and construct supersymmetric quantum curves, or super-quantum curves for short. Our analysis is conducted in the formalism of super-eigenvalue models: we introduce β-deformed version of those models, and derive differential equations for associated α/β-deformed super-matrix integrals. We show that for a given model there exists an infinite number of such differential equations, which we identify as super-quantum curves, and which are in one-to-one correspondence with, and have the structure of, super-Virasoro singular vectors. We discuss potential applications of super-quantum curves and prospects of other generalizations.

  19. Will the XQ "Super Schools" Live Up to Their Name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Halfway through September 2016--roughly a year after the contest was launched--"XQ: The Super School Project" announced its 10 high school design-team winners at a "Facebook Live" event in Washington, D.C. Originally intended to result in just five winners, the XQ project was open to anyone who thought that they could…

  20. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  1. Disentangling heavy flavor at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilten, Philip; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike

    2017-09-01

    We propose two new analysis strategies for studying charm and beauty quarks at colliders. The first strategy is aimed at testing the kinematics of heavy-flavor quarks within an identified jet. Here, we use the SoftDrop jet-declustering algorithm to identify two subjets within a large-radius jet, using subjet flavor tagging to test the heavy-quark splitting functions of QCD. For subjets containing a J /ψ or ϒ , this declustering technique can also help probe the mechanism for quarkonium production. The second strategy is aimed at isolating heavy-flavor production from gluon splitting. Here, we introduce a new FlavorCone algorithm, which smoothly interpolates from well-separated heavy-quark jets to the gluon-splitting regime where jets overlap. Because of its excellent ability to identify charm and beauty hadrons, the LHCb detector is ideally suited to pursue these strategies, though similar measurements should also be possible at ATLAS and CMS. Together, these SoftDrop and FlavorCone studies should clarify a number of aspects of heavy-flavor physics at colliders, and provide crucial information needed to improve heavy-flavor modeling in parton-shower generators.

  2. Pulsating stars in SuperWASP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holdsworth Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SuperWASP is one of the largest ground-based surveys for transiting exoplanets. To date, it has observed over 31 million stars. Such an extensive database of time resolved photometry holds the potential for extensive searches of stellar variability, and provide solid candidates for the upcoming TESS mission. Previous work by e.g. [15], [5], [12] has shown that the WASP archive provides a wealth of pulsationally variable stars. In this talk I will provide an overview of the SuperWASP project, present some of the published results from the survey, and some of the on-going work to identify key targets for the TESS mission.

  3. Future Linear Colliders: Detector R&D, Jet Reconstruction and Top Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2098729; Ros Martinez, Eduardo

    During the 20th century, discoveries and measurements at colliders, combined with progress in theoretical physics, allowed us to formulate the Standard Model of the in- teractions between the constituents of matter. Today, there are two advanced projects for a new installation that will collide electrons and positrons covering an energy range from several hundreds of GeV to the multi-TeV scale, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). These Future Linear Colliders give the opportunity to study the top quark with unprecedented precision. Measurements of top quark properties are of special interest, as the top quark is the heaviest ele- mentary particle of the SM. Precision measurements of top quark properties at e+e colliders promise therefore to be highly sensitive to physics beyond the SM. This thesis has three complementary parts. The first is dedicated to the R&D of the ILD detector concept for future e+e- colliders, more precisely, the innermost region of the de...

  4. Last magnet in place for colossal collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Workers have installed the last magnet for the world's mew highest-energy particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The installation marks an important milestone; however, researchers still may not get the collider completed in time to start it up in November as planned." (1 page)

  5. Physicist pins hopes on particle collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Physicist pins hopes on particle collider By Deseret Morning News Published: Monday, Dec. 31, 27 12:4 a.m. MST FONT Scott Thomas, a 187 State University graduate, is working at the frontiers of science. The theoretical physicist is crafting ways to extract fundamental secrets that seem certain to be uncovered by the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Vertex Tracking at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated physics program at an high energy e+e- linear collider places special emphasis on the accuracy in extrapolating charged particle tracks to their production vertex to tag heavy quarks and leptons. This paper reviews physics motivations and performance requirements, sensor R&D directions and current results of the studies for a vertex tracker at a future linear collider.

  7. Super-heptazethrene

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Wangdong

    2016-05-30

    The challenging synthesis of a laterally extended heptazethrene molecule, the super-heptazethrene derivative SHZ-CF3, is reported. This molecule was prepared using a strategy involving a multiple selective intramolecular Friedel–Crafts alkylation followed by oxidative dehydrogenation. Compound SHZ-CF3 exhibits an open-shell singlet diradical ground state with a much larger diradical character compared with the heptazethrene derivatives. An intermediate dibenzo-terrylene SHZ-2H was also obtained during the synthesis. This study provides a new synthetic method to access large-size quinoidal polycyclic hydrocarbons with unique physical properties.

  8. Modular: The Super Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Malashevich, B.,; Malashevich, D.,

    2006-01-01

    International audience; This article is deals with the history modular arithmetic, based on the rest classes calculus system «Restklassenarithmetik» (RCCS), or Modular Arithmetic, regarding its creation and development in the USSR. Characteristics of the USSR first modular super-computers: “Т-340А”, “К-340А”, “Diamond (Алмаз)” and “5E53” and their development history are briefly considered. A brief analysis of the weakening of interest in the modular arithmetic in the USSR and its subsequent ...

  9. Design of a dependable Interlock System for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nouvel, Patrice

    For high energy accelerators, the interlock system is a key part of the machine protection. The interlock principle is to inhibit the beam either on failure of critical equipment and/or on low beam quality evaluation. The dependability of such a system is the most critical parameter. This thesis presents the design of an dependable interlock system for linear collider with an application to the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project. This design process is based on the IEEE 1220 standard and is is divided in four steps. First, the specifications are established, with a focus on the dependability, more precisely the reliability and the availability of the system. The second step is the design proposal based on a functional analysis, the CLIC and interfaced systems architecture. Third, the feasibility study is performed, applying the concepts in an accelerator facility. Finally, the last step is the hardware verification. Its aim is to prove that the proposed design is able to reach the requirements.

  10. The Large Hadron Collider Present Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), due to be commissioned in 2005, will provide particle physics with the first laboratory tool to access the energy frontier above 1 TeV. In order to achieve this , protons must be accelerated and stored at 7 TeV, colliding with an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The 8.3 Tesla guide field is obtained using conventional NbTi technology cooled to below the lambda point of helium. Considerable modification of the infrastructure around the existing LEP tunnel is needed to house the LHC machine and detectors. The project is advancing according to schedule with most of the major hardware systems including cryogenics and magnets under construction. A brief status report is given and future prospects are discussed.

  11. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  12. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  13. Odd tracks at hadron colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Patrick; Papucci, Michele; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-20

    New physics that exhibits irregular tracks such as kinks, intermittent hits, or decay in flight may easily be missed at hadron colliders. We demonstrate this by studying viable models of light, O(10  GeV), colored particles that decay predominantly inside the tracker. Such particles can be produced at staggering rates, and yet, may not be identified or triggered on at the LHC, unless specifically searched for. In addition, the models we study provide an explanation for the original measurement of the anomalous charged track distribution by CDF. The presence of irregular tracks in these models reconcile that measurement with the subsequent reanalysis and the null results of ATLAS and CMS. Our study clearly illustrates the need for a comprehensive study of irregular tracks at the LHC.

  14. Accelerator physics at the Tevatron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the developments in accelerator physics and technology implemented at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the world’s most powerful accelerator for almost twenty years prior to the completion of the Large Hadron Collider. The book covers the history of collider operation and upgrades, novel arrangements of beam optics and methods of orbit control, antiproton production and cooling, beam instabilities and feedback systems, halo collimation, and advanced beam instrumentation. The topics discussed show the complexity and breadth of the issues associated with modern hadron accelerators, while providing a systematic approach needed in the design and construction of next generation colliders. This book is a valuable resource for researchers in high energy physics and can serve as an introduction for students studying the beam physics of colliders.

  15. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the CERN Large Electron Positron collider for its decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The future installation of the Large Hadron Collider in the tunnel formerly housing the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) required the dismantling of the latter after 11-year operation. As required by the French legislation, an extensive theoretical study was conducted before decommissioning to establish the possible activation paths both in the accelerator and in the four experiments (L3, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI) installed around the ring. The aim was to define which areas may contain activated material and which ones would be completely free of activation. The four major sources of activation in LEP, i.e., distributed and localized beam losses, synchrotron radiation and the super-conducting RF cavities, were investigated. Conversion coefficients from unit lost beam power to induced specific activity were established for a number of materials. A similar study was conducted for the four experiments, evaluating the four potential sources of induced radioactivity, namely e**+e **- annihilation events, two-p...

  16. Probing gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons at high energy hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Kuang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the probe of the gauge-phobic (or nearly gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons (GPHB at high energy hadron colliders including the 14 TeV LHC and the 50 TeV Super Proton–Proton Collider (SppC. We take the process pp→tt¯tt¯, and study it at the hadron level including simulating the jet formation and top quark tagging (with jet substructure. We show that, for a GPHB with MH<800 GeV, MH can be determined by adjusting the value of MH in the theoretical pT(b1 distribution to fit the observed pT(b1 distribution, and the resonance peak can be seen at the SppC for MH=800 GeV and 1 TeV.

  17. Future hadron colliders: From physics perspectives to technology R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Battaglia, Marco, E-mail: MBattaglia@lbl.gov [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Klute, Markus [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mangano, Michelangelo [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Prestemon, Soren [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-11-11

    High energy hadron colliders have been instrumental to discoveries in particle physics at the energy frontier and their role as discovery machines will remain unchallenged for the foreseeable future. The full exploitation of the LHC is now the highest priority of the energy frontier collider program. This includes the high luminosity LHC project which is made possible by a successful technology-readiness program for Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and magnet engineering based on long-term high-field magnet R and D programs. These programs open the path towards collisions with luminosity of 5×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and represents the foundation to consider future proton colliders of higher energies. This paper discusses physics requirements, experimental conditions, technological aspects and design challenges for the development towards proton colliders of increasing energy and luminosity.

  18. Quantitative super-resolution microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkes, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Super-Resolution Microscopy is an optical fluorescence technique. In this thesis we focus on single molecule super-resolution, where the position of single molecules is determined. Typically these molecules can be localized with a 10 to 30nm precision. This technique is applied in four different

  19. Super D-branes revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1998-01-01

    A version of the κ-symmetric super Dp-brane action is presented in which the tension is a dynamical variable, equal to the flux of a p-form world-volume gauge field. The Lagrangian is shown to be invariant under all (super)isometries of the background for appropriate transformations of the

  20. Ultra-super computing; Chodaikibo keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Okuda, H. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    Two projects are presented as challenges to perform ultra-super computing. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, in its ADVENTURE project launched in fiscal 1997, intends to develop a general-purpose finite element analysis system which will solve practical mechanical problems assuming CAD (computer-aided design)-given geometries of 10-100 million degrees of freedom within 1-24 hours. For this purpose, the ministry plans to use a machine capable of 30-100 teraflops that will become available in around 2002. The Science and Technology Agency has been working its Earth Simulator project since fiscal 1997. Under this project, the agency will develop an ultra-super parallel computer Earth Simulator capable of a peak processing speed of 40 teraflops and having a total main memory of 10 terabytes, and an article of huge parallel software for the Earth Simulator. Using them, the agency wants to construct a virtual earth on the computer for the study of various problems surrounding the global environments. GeoFEM is a parallel finite element analysis software system to deal with various problems pertinent to the solid earth, which is one of the items of the huge parallel software for the Earth Simulator. (NEDO)

  1. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...

  2. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor

  3. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kozanecki, W. (DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France))

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  4. Self colliding beams ('migma') and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Maglic, Bogdan C; Mazarakis, M; Miller, R A; Nering, J; Powell, C; Treglio, J

    1975-01-01

    While much of the early work on colliding beams was done in the US, the lead on the development of this technique is now held by Europe. The most spectacular being the only colliding of nuclei in the intersecting storage rings at CERN. The idea of using colliding beams for fusion is nearly as old as is the interest in fusion as a source of power, but the problems of low reaction rate and high Coulomb scattering initially seemed insurmountable. The authors describe recent work done at the Fusion Energy Corporation which attempts to overcome these problems. (9 refs).

  5. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  6. History and Super Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Hawkey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article looks at the perspectives on history amongst adolescent children of different backgrounds living in inner-cities in England and builds on previous research in this area. The current article presents exploratory research which focuses on the views of particular groups of adolescents, namely those from long established settled immigrant communities; those from more recently arrived migrant and immigrant communities; and those from white indigenous communities. An inclusive, perspectival and dynamic approach towards history education is outlined and the underlying view of knowledge and implications for pedagogy of this approach discussed alongside comparisons with other approaches towards the subject. The exploratory work and analysis is used to generate a research agenda through which history for a super diverse society can be developed. Although the research was conducted in the English context, the issues it raises are pertinent elsewhere.

  7. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  8. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN, Physics, Machine, Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphson, C

    2011-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new electron-hadron collider, the LHeC, in which electrons of $60$ to possibly $140$\\,GeV collide with LHC protons of $7000$\\,GeV. With an $ep$ design luminosity of about $10^{33}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, the Large Hadron Electron Collider exceeds the integrated luminosity collected at HERA by two orders of magnitude and the kinematic range by a factor of twenty in the four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements. These are projected to solve a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The LHeC thus becomes the world's cleanest high resolution microscope, designed to continue the path of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering into unknown areas of physics and kinematics. The physics ...

  9. Status and plans of the Compact Linear Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Doebert, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project is exploring the possibility of constructing a multiTeV linear electron-positron collider for high-energy frontier physics studies beyond the LHC era. The CLIC concept is based on high-gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures. The RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is produced by a two-beam acceleration scheme, where power is extracted from a high current drive beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The key ongoing studies involve accelerator parameter optimisation, technical studies and component development, alignment and stability, and include a number of system performance studies in test-facilities around the world. The CLIC physics potential and main detector issues, as well as possible implementation staging, are being studied in parallel. A summary of the progress and status of the corresponding studies will be given, as well as an outline of the preparation and work towards developing a CLIC implementation plan by 2018/19

  10. Super Science Fair Sourcebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iritz, Maxine Haren

    This guide to science fair projects is designed for students and provides clear directions on how to complete a successful science project. Real projects are used as examples and information and advice is provided by teachers, judges, and participants and their families about the process. Topics covered in this book include choosing a science fair…

  11. Nanostructured Super-Black Optical Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA faces difficulties in imaging and characterizing faint astrophysical objects within the glare of brighter stellar sources. Achieving a very low background...

  12. Nanostructured Super-Black Optical Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Need: NASA faces challenges in imaging and characterizing faint astrophysical objects within the glare of brighter stellar sources. Achieving a very low background...

  13. String Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale M_s is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (3000 fb^{-1}) with \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV, and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at \\sqrt{s} = 33 and 100 TeV, respectively. In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and \\gamma + jet are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV), lowest massive Regge exc...

  14. Can we hear black holes collide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, IW

    The focus of this work is the attempt to detect gravitational waves emitted by compact binary coalescences (CBCs) using gravitational wave interferometers. We begin by reviewing the basic theory of gravitational waves and the methods for their detection, focusing on CBCs. We also briefly describe the laser interferometers that are being used to attempt to detect gravitational radiation. We describe in detail the search pipeline that has been used to search for gravitational waves emitted from CBCs in data taken by the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We present the latest results of the all-sky, all-time search and electromagnetically triggered searches. We introduce a fully coherent, multi-detector analysis that can be used to search for CBC signals in coincidence with electromagnetically observed events. Using a number of signal consistency tests, including a coherent extension of the often used x2 test, we demonstrate that the coherent search offers an improvement in sensitivity when compared to the previous search method. Additionally we describe an extension of the coherent search that can be used to search for CBC signals where one of the components has spin. This method is well suited to searches for neutron star, black hole binaries. We introduce a "stochastic" algorithm that can be used to create template banks in arbitrary parameter spaces of arbitrary dimension. We demonstrate this method in a search for super-massive CBCs in the mock LISA data challenge. Finally, we present the black hole hunter game, which has been widely used in outreach projects.

  15. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  16. Physics prospects at a linear -collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The talk described the prospects of studying standard model parameters as well as scenarios beyond the standard model, like the minimal supersymmetric standard model, theories with extra dimensions and theories with extra neutral gauge bosons, at a future linear + - collider.

  17. The collider calamity, publ. by Scientific American

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "For decades, the big guns of American science have been the U.S. Department of Energy's particle collider, which investigate the nature of matter by accelerating subatomic particles and smashing them together." (1 page)

  18. Il Collisore LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    In 2007, in a new Collider in the tunnel of 27km, collisions will be made between very powerful beams of protons and ions. The energies will be very high to try to catch the most tiny particle (1 page)

  19. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  20. Strangeness Production in 19.6 GeV Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Imaging Cherenkov Counter SPS – Super Proton Synchrotron STAR – Solenodial Tracker at RHIC SVT – Silicon Vertex Tracker TPC – Time Projection...detectors in STAR are the RICH (Ring-Imaging Cherenkov Counter), the Silicon Vertex Tracker ( SVT ), and two forward Time Projection Chambers (FTPC’s

  1. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J

    2012-02-27

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  2. Excited quark production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1987-06-01

    Composite models generally predict the existence of excited quark and lepton states. We consider the production and experimental signatures of excited quarks Q* of spin and isospin 1/2 at hadron colliders and estimate the background for those channels which are most promising for Q* identification. Multi-TeV pp-colliders will give access to such particles with masses up to several TeV.

  3. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N., E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Dainese, A. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); D' Enterria, D. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Masciocchi, S. [EMMI and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Roland, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Leeuwen, M. van [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wiedemann, U.A. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  4. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C.A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  5. The Relationship between Home Environment and Children's Dietary Behaviors, Lifestyle Factors, and Health: Super Food Education School Project by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahori, Nobue; Sekine, Michikazu; Yamada, Masaaki; Tatsuse, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The numbers of nuclear families and working women have been increasing. Such changes in the home environment may affect children's dietary behaviors, lifestyle factors, and health. This study aims to clarify the associations between the home environment and children's dietary behaviors, lifestyle factors, and health.Methods In July 2014, we questioned the students and parents of five elementary schools that joined the Super Food Education School Project in Takaoka City, Toyama Prefecture. Of 2057 subjects, 1936 (94.1%) answered and 1719 of these subjects were analyzed. In this study, the phrase "home environment" describes such terms as "mother's employment status", "family structure", "subjective economic state", "communication between parents and children", "having breakfast or supper with family", "household chores by children", "parents' awareness of food education", "regard for balanced nutrition", and "teaching table manners". We performed logistic-regression analyses using children's dietary behaviors, lifestyle factors, and health as dependent variables; the items relating to home environment were independent variables.Results Children with parents who are employed, those who do not have breakfast or supper with family, those who do not help with household chores, and those with parents who are less conscious of food education were more likely to eat fewer vegetables, to have likes and dislikes of foods, to skip breakfast, and to have snacks. Children who have little communication with their parents, who do not help with household chores, and those with parents who are less conscious of food education were less likely to exercise, sleep well, spend less time with television, and spend less time on playing videogames. Children with less affluence, those who have little communication with their parents, those who do not help with household chores, and those with parents who are less conscious of food education were less likely to have high

  6. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  7. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…

  8. Thermo-super-hydrophobic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Jerzy M.

    2012-02-01

    Super-hydrophobic effect involves capture of gas bubbles in pores of solid wall. These bubbles separate moving liquid from the solid surface resulting in a substantial reduction of shear drag experienced by the liquid. The super-hydrophobic effect requires presence of two phases and thus drag reduction can be accomplished only for liquids. Thermo-super-hydrophobic effect takes advantage of the localized heating to create separation bubbles and thus can work with single phase flow systems. Analysis of a simple model problem shows that this effect is very strong in the case of small Re flows such as those found in micro-channels and can reduce pressure drop down to 50% of the reference value if the heating pattern as well as the heating intensity are suitable chosen. The thermo-super-hydrophobic effect becomes marginal when Re increases above a certain critical value.

  9. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  10. String resonances at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes, with gauge bosons due to strings attached to stacks of D-branes and chiral matter due to strings stretching between intersecting D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale Ms is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (integrated luminosity =3000 fb-1) with a center-of-mass energy of √s =14 TeV and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at √s =33 and 100 TeV, respectively (with the same integrated luminosity). In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and γ +jet are completely independent of the details of compactification and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV) lowest massive Regge excitations are open to discovery at the ≥5σ in dijet (γ +jet) HL-LHC data. We also show that for n=1 the dijet discovery potential at HE-LHC and VLHC exceedingly improves: up to 15 TeV and 41 TeV, respectively. To compute the signal-to-noise ratio for n=2 resonances, we first carry out a complete calculation of all relevant decay widths of the second massive level string states (including decays into massless particles and a massive n=1 and a massless particle), where we rely on factorization and conformal field theory techniques. Helicity wave functions of arbitrary higher spin massive bosons are also constructed. We demonstrate that for string scales Ms≲10.5 TeV (Ms≲28 TeV) detection of n =2 Regge recurrences at HE-LHC (VLHC) would become the smoking gun for D

  11. International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee: Second Report, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Gregory

    2003-02-21

    As this report is being published, the international high energy physics (HEP) community finds itself confronting a set of fascinating discoveries and new questions regarding the nature of matter and its fundamental particles and forces. The observation of neutrino oscillations that indicates that neutrinos have mass, measurements of the accelerating expansion of the universe that may be due to dark energy, and evidence for a period of rapid inflation at the beginning of the Big Bang are stimulating the entire field. Looming on the horizon are the potential discoveries of a Higgs particle that may reveal the origin of mass and of a whole family of supersymmetric particles that may be part of the cosmic dark matter. For the HEP community to elucidate these mysteries, new accelerators are indispensable. At this time, after careful deliberations, all three regional organizations of the HEP community (ACFA in Asia, HEPAP in North America, and ECFA in Europe) have reached the common conclusion that the next accelerator should be an electron-positron linear collider with an initial center-of-mass energy of 500 Giga-electronvolts (GeV), later upgradable to higher energies, and that it should be built and operated in parallel with the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN. Hence, this second report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC) comes at a very timely moment. The report was requested by the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) in February 2001 to assess the current technical status of electron-positron linear collider designs in the various regions. Note that the ILC-TRC was not asked to concern itself with either cost studies or the ultimate selection process of a machine. This Executive Summary gives a short outline of the genesis of the report, the charge given to the committee, and its organization. It then presents a brief description of four electron-positron linear collider designs at hand. The

  12. A Bridge Too Far: The Demise of the Superconducting Super Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A combination of fiscal austerity, continuing SSC cost overruns, intense Congressional scrutiny, lack of major foreign contributions, waning Presidential support, and the widespread public perception of mismanagement led to the project’s demise nearly five years after it had begun. Its termination occurred against the political backdrop of changing scientific needs as US science policy shifted to a post-Cold War footing during the early 1990s. And the growing cost of the SSC inevitably exerted undue pressure upon other worthy research, thus weakening its support in Congress and the bro...

  13. Report of the Task Force on detector Research and Development for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-06-01

    This report contains a: Report of the working group on tracking devices; report of the working group on calorimetry; report of the working group on muon, electron and hadron identification; report of the working group on electronics, triggering, data acquisition and computing; report of the working group on superconducting magnets; and report of the working group on Monte Carlo development.

  14. (The design and construction of the proposed L* detector for the Superconducting Super Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugg, W.M.

    1990-10-23

    Dr. William M. Bugg and a group from ORNL had very productive meetings with Professor Sam Ting and other members of the L3 collaboration. The L3 detector system, subsystems, and the associated support facilities were examined in some detail. Discussions were held with scientists involved in planning for the L* detector systems and members of the L3 staff interested in positions at ORNL/UTK. The trip was very successful. A collaborative arrangement was established for UTK and ORNL to become involved in the future design and construction of the L* detector. These include hosting the main meeting of the L* collaboration at ORNL to complete the Expression-of-Interest (EOI) proposal. Several prospective candidates were interviewed and collaborative interactions were started on some detector subsystems for L*.

  15. Cryogenic instrumentation of an SSC (superconducting super collider) magnet test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.; Strait, J.; Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes the system used to acquire cryogenic data for the testing of SSC magnets at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. An array of pressure transducers, resistance thermometers, vapor pressure thermometers, and signal conditioning circuits are used. Readings with time resolution appropriate for quench recording are obtained with a waveform digitizer and steady-state measurements are obtained with higher accuracy using a digital voltmeter. The waveform digitizer is clocked at a 400 Hz sampling rate and these readings are stored in local ring buffers. The system is modular and can be expanded to add more channels. The software for the acquisition, control, logging, and display of cryogenic data consist of two programs which run as separate tasks. These programs (as well as a third program which acquires quench and magnetic data) communicate and pass data using shared global resources. The acquired data are available for analysis via a nationwide DECnet network.

  16. Technical design of a detector to be operated at the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Soleoidal Detector Collaboration: Summary and overview of the detector; physics and detector requirements; central tracking system; superconducting magnet; calorimetry; muon system; electronics; online computing; offline computing; safety; experimental facilities; installation; test and calibration beam plan; and cost and schedule summary.

  17. CO2 emissions from Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emission from the construction of buildings is seldom taken into account because focus is primarily on building operation. New technologies have therefore mainly been developed to reduce the energy consumption connected to operation. Super-light technology is a new structural principle giving...... rise to a substantial reduction of the CO2 emission in the construction phase. The present paper describes how the CO2 emission is reduced when using Super-light technology instead of traditional structural components. Estimations of the CO2 emissions from a number of projects using various...... construction methods suggest that building with Super-light structures may cut the CO2 emission in half, compared to traditional concrete structures, and reduce it to 25% compared to traditional steel structures....

  18. GF-4 Images Super Resolution Reconstruction Based on POCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Lina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The super resolution reconstruction of GF-4 is made by projection on convex sets (POCS. Papoulis-Gerchberg is used to construct reference frame which can reduce iteration and improve algorithm efficiency.Vandewalle is used to estimate motion parameter which is benefit to block process. Tested and analyzed by real GF-4 series images, it shows that sharpness of super resolution result is positive correlatie to frame amount, and signal to noise ratio (SNR is negative correlate to frame amount. After processing by 5 frames, information entropy (IE changes little; sharpness (average gradient increases from 7.803 to 14.386; SNR reduces a little, from 3.411 to 3.336. The experiment shows that after super resolution reconstruction, sharpness and detail information of results can be greatly improved.

  19. Progress on $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Siemann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Physics issues. The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Stanford Linear Collider where many ideas changed and new ones were developed in response to operational experience. the requirements for future linear colliders. The different approaches for reac...

  20. Super Dielectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromille, Samuel; Phillips, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is provided here that a class of materials with dielectric constants greater than 105 at low frequency (dielectric materials (SDM), can be generated readily from common, inexpensive materials. Specifically it is demonstrated that high surface area alumina powders, loaded to the incipient wetness point with a solution of boric acid dissolved in water, have dielectric constants, near 0 Hz, greater than 4 × 108 in all cases, a remarkable increase over the best dielectric constants previously measured for energy storage capabilities, ca. 1 × 104. It is postulated that any porous, electrically insulating material (e.g., high surface area powders of silica, titania, etc.), filled with a liquid containing a high concentration of ionic species will potentially be an SDM. Capacitors created with the first generated SDM dielectrics (alumina with boric acid solution), herein called New Paradigm Super (NPS) capacitors display typical electrostatic capacitive behavior, such as increasing capacitance with decreasing thickness, and can be cycled, but are limited to a maximum effective operating voltage of about 0.8 V. A simple theory is presented: Water containing relatively high concentrations of dissolved ions saturates all, or virtually all, the pores (average diameter 500 Å) of the alumina. In an applied field the positive ionic species migrate to the cathode end, and the negative ions to the anode end of each drop. This creates giant dipoles with high charge, hence leading to high dielectric constant behavior. At about 0.8 V, water begins to break down, creating enough ionic species to “short” the individual water droplets. Potentially NPS capacitor stacks can surpass “supercapacitors” in volumetric energy density. PMID:28788298

  1. New developments of the R & D silicon tracking for linear collider on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. New generation of silicon tracking; new sensors; large area tracking systems for international linear collider; deep sub-micron electronics. ... are discussed. Combined tests with other sub-detectors are finally addressed. This test beam program is inserted in the framework of the EUDET European project.

  2. The Case for a 500 GeV e+e- Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggers, J.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Bauer, U.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Dixon, L.; Fisk, H.E.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Graf, D.; Grannis, P.; Haber, H.E.; Hearty, C.; Hertzbach, S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hollebeek, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Koltick, D.; Kronfeld, A.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Orr, L.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Peskin, M. E.; Porter, F.; Riles, K.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Schumm, B.; Stroynowski, R.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Wells, J.D.; Yamamoto, H.

    2000-07-05

    Several proposals are being developed around the world for an e+e- linear collider with an initial center of mass energy of 500 GeV. In this paper, we will discuss why a project of this type deserves priority as the next major initiative in high energy physics.

  3. THE CASE FOR A 500 GEV E+E- LINEAR COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAGGER,J.; BALTAY,C.; ET AL; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; AMERICAN LINEAR COLLIDER WORKING GROUP

    2000-06-30

    There are now several proposals that have been put forward from around the world for an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider with an initial center of mass energy of 500 GeV. In this paper, the authors discuss why a project of this type deserves priority as the next, major initiative in high energy physics.

  4. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2010-01-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of $10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$, the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4\\% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm x 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R\\&D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  5. Project management case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  6. Druid, event display for the linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M; Musat, G; Jeans, D; Pande, J

    2013-01-01

    Druid is a dedicated event display designed for the future e +e − linear colliders. Druid takes standard linear collider data files and detector geometry description files as input, it can visualize both physics event and detector geometry. Many displaying options are provided by Druid, giving easy access to different information. As a versatile event display, Druid supports all the latest linear collider detector models, Silicon Detector and International Large Detector, as well as the calorimeter prototypes operated in the CALICE test beam experiments. It has been utilized in many studies such as the verification of detector geometry, analysis of the simulated full events and test beam data as well as reconstruction algorithm development and code debugging.

  7. Calorimetry at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090195; Marshall, John

    This thesis describes the optimisation of the calorimeter design for collider experiments at the future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The detector design of these experiments is built around high-granularity Particle Flow Calorimetry that, in contrast to traditional calorimetry, uses the energy measurements for charged particles from the tracking detectors. This can only be realised if calorimetric energy deposits from charged particles can be separated from those of neutral particles. This is made possible with fine granularity calorimeters and sophisticated pattern recognition software, which is provided by the PandoraPFA algorithm. This thesis presents results on Particle Flow calorimetry performance for a number of detector configurations. To obtain these results a new calibration procedure was developed and applied to the detector simulation and reconstruction to ensure optimal performance was achieved for each detector configuration considered. This thesis a...

  8. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  9. Super-Altro 16: a Front-End System on Chip for DSP Based Readout of Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aspell, P.; Franca, H.; Garcia Garcia, E.; Musa, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the architecture, design and test results of an ASIC specifically designed for the readout of gaseous detectors. The primary application is the readout of the Linear Collider Time Projection Chamber. The small area available (4mm2/channel) requires an innovative design, where sensitive analog components and massive digital functionalities are integrated on the same chip. Moreover, shut down (power pulsing) features are necessary in order to reduce the power consumption. The Super-Altro is a 16-channel demonstrator ASIC involving analog and digital signal processing. Each channel contains a low noise Pre-Amplifier and Shaping Amplifier (PASA), a pipeline ADC, and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The PASA is programmable in terms of gain and shaping time and can operate with both positive and negative polarities of input charge. The 10-bit ADC samples the output of the PASA at a frequency up to 40MHz before providing the digitized signal to the DSP which performs baseline subtraction, signa...

  10. Super-Altro 16: A Front-End System on Chip for DSP Based Readout of Gaseous Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspell, Paul; De Gaspari, Massimiliano; França, Hugo; García, Eduardo García; Musa, Luciano

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the architecture, design and test results of an ASIC specifically designed for the readout of gaseous detectors. The primary application is the readout of the Linear Collider Time Projection Chamber. The small area available (4 mm2 /channel) requires an innovative design, where sensitive analog components and massive digital functionalities are integrated on the same chip. Moreover, shut down (power pulsing) features are necessary in order to reduce the power consumption. The Super-Altro is a 16-channel demonstrator ASIC involving analog and digital signal processing. Each channel contains a low noise Pre-Amplifier and Shaping Amplifier (PASA), a pipeline ADC, and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The PASA is programmable in terms of gain and shaping time and can operate with both positive and negative polarities of input charge. The 10-bit ADC samples the output of the PASA at a frequency up to 40 MHz before providing the digitized signal to the DSP which performs baseline subtraction, signal conditioning, drift correction and zero suppression. The chip has been fabricated in a 130 nm CMOS technology. Test measurements show correct functionality of the full system, and demonstrate that, using appropriate design techniques, the extensive digital circuitries produce little or no degradation of analog performance (particularly noise).

  11. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  12. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  13. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  14. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  15. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  16. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, Junji [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.).

  17. A TeV linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hinchliffe, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Various strategies for the development of a linear collider, capable of firing electrons and positrons at each other at collision energies up to about 1 TeV, are discussed. The linear collider's detector will have to detect and precisely measure the energies of electrons, muons, and hadrons. It is suggested that precision must be maintained over the large span of final-state particle energies. Both the superconducting and warm accelerating technologies have demonstrated their viability for a machine starting out with a collision energy of about 500 GeV that could later be upgraded to 1 TeV. (Edited abstract) 9 Refs.

  18. Civil Engineering Feasibility Studies for Future Ring Colliders at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bruning, O; Myers, S; Osborne, J; Rossi, L; Waaijer, C; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    CERN civil engineers are studying the feasibility of several potential ring colliders to complement the LHC: an 80km circular tunnel to house the TLEP and VHE-LHC, and the ring-ring and linac-ring options for the LHeC. The feasibility of these projects is largely dependent on civil design and geotechnical and environmental risks. As civil infrastructure works typically represent one third of the cost of major physics projects, it is critical that the construction costs are well understood from the conceptual stage. This proceeding presents the first results of the feasibility studies for the 80km tunnel and the linac-ring LHeC. Presented at IPAC'13 Shanghai, 12-17 May 2013

  19. Performance Evaluations for Super-Resolution Mosaicing on UAS Surveillance Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Camargo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS have been widely applied for reconnaissance and surveillance by exploiting information collected from the digital imaging payload. The super-resolution (SR mosaicing of low-resolution (LR UAS surveillance video frames has become a critical requirement for UAS video processing and is important for further effective image understanding. In this paper we develop a novel super-resolution framework, which does not require the construction of sparse matrices. The proposed method implements image operations in the spatial domain and applies an iterated back-projection to construct super-resolution mosaics from the overlapping UAS surveillance video frames. The Steepest Descent method, the Conjugate Gradient method and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm are used to numerically solve the nonlinear optimization problem for estimating a super-resolution mosaic. A quantitative performance comparison in terms of computation time and visual quality of the super-resolution mosaics through the three numerical techniques is presented.

  20. Oblique reconstructions in tomosynthesis. II. Super-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: In tomosynthesis, super-resolution has been demonstrated using reconstruction planes parallel to the detector. Super-resolution allows for subpixel resolution relative to the detector. The purpose of this work is to develop an analytical model that generalizes super-resolution to oblique reconstruction planes.Methods: In a digital tomosynthesis system, a sinusoidal test object is modeled along oblique angles (i.e., “pitches”) relative to the plane of the detector in a 3D divergent-beam acquisition geometry. To investigate the potential for super-resolution, the input frequency is specified to be greater than the alias frequency of the detector. Reconstructions are evaluated in an oblique plane along the extent of the object using simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection (FBP). By comparing the amplitude of the reconstruction against the attenuation coefficient of the object at various frequencies, the modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated to determine whether modulation is within detectable limits for super-resolution. For experimental validation of super-resolution, a goniometry stand was used to orient a bar pattern phantom along various pitches relative to the breast support in a commercial digital breast tomosynthesis system.Results: Using theoretical modeling, it is shown that a single projection image cannot resolve a sine input whose frequency exceeds the detector alias frequency. The high frequency input is correctly visualized in SBP or FBP reconstruction using a slice along the pitch of the object. The Fourier transform of this reconstructed slice is maximized at the input frequency as proof that the object is resolved. Consistent with the theoretical results, experimental images of a bar pattern phantom showed super-resolution in oblique reconstructions. At various pitches, the highest frequency with detectable modulation was determined by visual inspection of the bar patterns. The dependency of the highest

  1. From the CERN web: Collide@CERN, Fermilab neutrinos and more

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This new section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...   Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt. (Photo: Matthias H. Risse). Collide@CERN Ars Electronica Award goes to “Semiconductor” 10 August – Collide@CERN Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt, two English artists collaborating under the name Semiconductor, are this year’s recipients of the Collide@CERN Ars Electronica Award. In the coming months, they will begin a two-month residency at CERN.  Continue to read…     Illustration: Fermilab/Sandbox Studio.   Fermilab experiment sees neutrinos change over 500 miles 7 August - Fermilab press release Scientists on the NOvA experiment saw their first evidence of oscillating neutrinos, confirming that the extraordinary detector built for the project not only functions as planned but is also making great p...

  2. Simulation of Head-on Beam-Beam Limitations in Future High Energy Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) project calls for studies in a new regime of beam-beam interactions. While the emittance damping due to synchrotron radiation is still slower than in past or existing lepton colliders, it is significantly larger than in other hadron colliders. The slow reduction of the emittance is profitable for higher luminosity in term of transverse beam size at the interaction points and also to mitigate long-range beam-beam effects, potentially allowing for a reduction of the crossing angle between the beams during the operation. In such conditions, the strength of head-on beam-beam interactions increases, potentially limiting the beam brightness. 4D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations are performed in order to assess these limitations.

  3. Lepton jets and low-mass sterile neutrinos at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Sourabh; Gadkari, Divya; Thalapillil, Arun M.

    2017-09-01

    Sterile neutrinos, if they exist, are potential harbingers for physics beyond the Standard Model. They have the capacity to shed light on our flavor sector, grand unification frameworks, dark matter sector and origins of baryon antibaryon asymmetry. There have been a few seminal studies that have broached the subject of sterile neutrinos with low, electroweak-scale masses (i.e. ΛQCD≪mNR≪mW± ) and investigated their reach at hadron colliders using lepton jets. These preliminary studies nevertheless assume background-free scenarios after certain selection criteria which are overly optimistic and untenable in realistic situations. These lead to incorrect projections. The unique signal topology and challenging hadronic environment also make this mass-scale regime ripe for a careful investigation. With the above motivations, we attempt to perform the first systematic study of low, electroweak-scale, right-handed neutrinos at hadron colliders, in this unique signal topology. There are currently no active searches at hadron colliders for sterile neutrino states in this mass range, and we frame the study in the context of the 13 TeV high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider and the proposed FCC-hh/SppC 100 TeV p p -collider.

  4. Linear Collider partners woo newly opened India

    CERN Multimedia

    Bagla, Pallava

    2006-01-01

    "With the wheels of Air Force One barely off the tarmac following U.S. President George W. Bush's visit, which ended India's 3 decades as a nuclear pariah state, a delegation of U.S. and European physicists arrived here last week to discuss India's involvement in the International Linear Collider."

  5. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the SM Higgs boson it will be therefore, necessary to establish its properties such as hypercharge, CP parity etc. At an e+e− collider the dominant Higgs production processes are e+e− → f ¯fH, which proceed via the VVH coupling with V = W, Z and f any light fermion. Demanding Lorentz invariance, the VVH couplings can.

  6. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  7. Z' Investigations at Future Lepton Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I summarize the capability of future lepton colliders to indirectly discover a new $Z'$ and to determine its couplings to the fermions of the Standard Model. The physics associated with sitting on the $Z'$-pole is also briefly discussed. This analysis is based on the results presented in the Snowmass 1996 New Gauge Boson Working Group report.

  8. Production of electroweak bosons at colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The collider experiments at the Tevatron and LHC are accumulating samples of elec- troweak bosons of unprecedented size. These huge samples can be used to observe rare processes, such as diboson production which have the potential to show enhancements due to new physics. Alternatively, the great ...

  9. Collider Tests of the Little Higgs Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Aaron T

    2002-12-16

    The little Higgs model provides an alternative to traditional candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. The new heavy gauge bosons predicted by this model should be observable at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We discuss how the LHC experiments could test the little Higgs model by studying the production and decay of these particles.

  10. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  11. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  12. Timeline for particle collider in doubt

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The world's most ambitious particle collider - which scientists hope could reveal what matter is made of - might not be fully functional until next year, months after its scheduled startup date, officials at the European Organization for Nuclear Research said Thursday." (2 pages)

  13. Timeline for particle collider in doubt

    CERN Multimedia

    Klapper, Bradley S

    2007-01-01

    "The world's most ambitious particle collider - which scientists hope could reveal what matter is made of - might not be fully functional until next year, months after its scheduled startup date, officiels at the European Organization for Nuclear Reserach said Thursday." (1 page)

  14. Introduction to quantum chromodynamics at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A basic introduction to the application of QCD at hadron colliders is presented. I briefly review the phenomenological and theoretical origins of QCD, and then discuss factorization and infrared safety, parton distributions, the computation of hard scattering amplitudes and applications of perturbative QCD.

  15. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The written reports received are included. Keywords. Higgs boson; supersymmetry; extra dimensions; B-decays. PACS Nos 14.60.St; 14.80.Cp; 13.35.Br. Introduction. It is generally hoped that the Higgs boson, supersymmetric particles, existence of extra dimensions ..... may be discovered at the upcoming colliders. Bulk of ...

  16. Plans for 40 km linear collider unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Particle physicists have released their first tentative design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a multibillin dollar accelerator that could switch on by the middle of the next decade. The plans also state that the machine should be built in two underground tunnels even though it would be much cheaper to use just one (1 page)

  17. Particle collider magnet self-destructs

    CERN Multimedia

    Higgins, Alexander G

    2007-01-01

    "A 43-foot-long magnet for the world's largest particle collider broke "with a loud band and a cloud of dust" during a high-pressure test, and officils said Tuesday they are working to find a replacement part." (1 page)

  18. Search for new physics at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarelli, Giorgio; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-09-01

    In this paper I present the most recent results of the ongoing searches, mainly from Tevatron Collider experiments, for new physics beyond the Standard Model. While no signal has been seen so far, many analyses are reaching the point in which either a discovery will take place or strong limit on currently popular theories will be set.

  19. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some recent studies about the parameter determination of top quarks, bosons, Higgs bosons, supersymmetric particles and in the ADD model of extra dimensions at a linear collider. Author Affiliations. Alfred Bartl1 Stefan Hesselbach1. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, ...

  20. Challenges for highest energy circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01

    A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

  1. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clarifying the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking will be the central problem which we have to solve with the next generation of high energy colliders. In the SM, electroweak symmetry breaking is achieved by the Higgs mechanism. The scalar Higgs boson, also predicted by this mechanism, has not been found so.

  2. Dreams collide with reality for international experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Three weeks ago, an international team released a design and cost estimate for the International Linear Collider (ILC). American physicists want to build the ILC at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, and researchers had hoped to break ground in 2012 and fire up the ILC's beams of electrons and positrons in 2019." (1 page)

  3. Emotions run high in race for collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, E

    2001-01-01

    The head of KEK expressed his dismay that SLAC has entered into a collaboration with 3 other US labs and proposes to build the next linear collider at Fermilab, Ilinois. KEK wants the next accelerator to be built somewhere in the Asian Pacific region (1 page).

  4. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute. Its main purpose and long-term goal is to design an energyfrontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV in a new 80–100 km tunnel. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90–350 GeV highluminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines are being assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed by the end of 2018, in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. This overview summarizes the status of machine designs and parameters, and it discusses the essential technical components being developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets wit...

  5. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  6. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with ...

  7. Initial Performance Studies of a General-Purpose Detector for Multi-TeV Physics at a 100 TeV pp Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S. V. [Argonne; Beydler, M. [Argonne; Kotwal, A. V. [Fermilab; Gray, L. [Fermilab; Sen, S. [Duke U.; Tran, N. V. [Fermilab; Yu, S. -S. [Taiwan, Natl. Central U.; Zuzelski, J. [Michigan State U.

    2016-12-21

    This paper describes simulations of detector response to multi-TeV physics at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) or Super proton-proton Collider (SppC) which aim to collide proton beams with a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. The unprecedented energy regime of these future experiments imposes new requirements on detector technologies which can be studied using the detailed GEANT4 simulations presented in this paper. The initial performance of a detector designed for physics studies at the FCC-hh or SppC experiments is described with an emphasis on measurements of single particles up to 33 TeV in transverse momentum. The reconstruction of hadronic jets has also been studied in the transverse momentum range from 50 GeV to 26 TeV. The granularity requirements for calorimetry are investigated using the two-particle spatial resolution achieved for hadron showers.

  8. "Towards a Future Linear Collider" and "The Linear Collider Studies at CERN"

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN’s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  9. 14th Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T

    2003-01-01

    Hadron colliders probe physics at new energy frontiers and search for new particles and forces. In addition, hadron colliders now provide also an environment for precision physics. The present volume collects the results from recently completed runs at major colliders as well as new ideas about collider physics and techniques. It will serve as the main source of reference in the field for many years to come.

  10. A new jet reconstruction algorithm for lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Boronat, Marça; Vos, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new sequential jet reconstruction algorithm for future lepton colliders at the energy frontier. The Valencia algorithm combines the natural distance criterion for lepton colliders with the greater robustness against backgrounds of algorithms adapted to hadron colliders. Results on a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of $t\\bar{t}$ and $ZZ$ production at future linear $e^+e^-$ colliders (ILC and CLIC) with a realistic level of background overlaid, show that it achieves better performance in the presence of background.

  11. Druid, displaying root module used for linear collider detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the ROOT TEve/TGeo classes and the standard linear collider data structure, a dedicated linear collider event display has been developed. It supports the latest detector models for both International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider as well as the CALICE test beam prototypes. It can be used to visualise event information at the generation, simulation and reconstruction levels. Many options are provided in an intuitive interface. It has been heavily employed in a variety of analyses.

  12. Observation of super-resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D x-ray imaging modality in which tomographic sections of the breast are generated from a limited range of tube angles. Because oblique x-ray incidence shifts the image of an object in subpixel detector element increments with each increasing projection angle, it is demonstrated that DBT is capable of super-resolution (i.e., subpixel resolution). Methods: By convention, DBT reconstructions are performed on planes parallel to the breast support at various depths of the breast volume. In order for resolution in each reconstructed slice to be comparable to the detector, the pixel size should match that of the detector elements; hence, the highest frequency that can be resolved in the plane of reconstruction is the alias frequency of the detector. This study considers reconstruction grids with much smaller pixelation to visualize higher frequencies. For analytical proof of super-resolution, a theoretical framework is developed in which the reconstruction of a high frequency sinusoidal input is calculated using both simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection. To study the frequency spectrum of the reconstruction, its Fourier transform is also determined. The experimental feasibility of super-resolution was investigated by acquiring images of a bar pattern phantom with frequencies higher than the detector alias frequency. Results: Using analytical modeling, it is shown that the central projection cannot resolve frequencies exceeding the detector alias frequency. The Fourier transform of the central projection is maximized at a lower frequency than the input as evidence of aliasing. By contrast, SBP reconstruction can resolve the input, and its Fourier transform is correctly maximized at the input frequency. Incorporating filters into the reconstruction smoothens pixelation artifacts in the spatial domain and reduces spectral leakage in the Fourier domain. It is also demonstrated that the existence of super

  13. The Large Hadron Collider unraveling the mysteries of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Beech, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest engineering project ever undertaken, and one of the most expensive. Why are physicists around the world so excited about it? What secrets of the universe does this gargantuan piece of machinery hope to reveal? What risks are there in operating it? Could the exotic particles that are produced in the collisions—including tiny black holes that should wink into and out of existence— between subatomic particles be a threat not only to humankind but to the planet itself? In this thorough and engaging review of cutting-edge physics and cosmology, you will learn why the collider was built and how it works. You will find out what scientists are hoping to find out and what current aspects of the Standard Model might need to be revised. You will even learn about the quest to identify so-called dark matter and dark energy, which many now feel make up most of what's out there. This is a wild ride into some very unfamiliar and strange territory, but it is well worth your t...

  14. The Linear Collider TPC: Revised Magnetic-field Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Settles, R

    2008-01-01

    A Time Projection Chamber is being developed as central tracker for a detector at the International Linear Collider. The LCTPC has to perform better and to face more complicated event topologies and higher backgrounds than TPC's at previous e+e- colliders: this puts additional requirements on the overall system design. At present the technical design of the ILC machine is considering the use of special magnetic-field elements to guide the beams as they pass along the axis of the detector. Since the B-fields from such elements affect the TPC volume, the present note revisits the requirements on the magnetic field for the LCTPC. It is proposed to replace the original requirement on the homogeneity of the B-field by one on the accuracy of the B-field map. The purpose of this study is to achieve the best possible momentum resolution for the TPC, and it is demonstrated that the goal for the Aleph B-map accuracy is also sufficient for the LCTPC. Simulations should be made to cross-check these ideas, and suggestions...

  15. Super resolution volume rendering hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Marco; Smit, Jaap; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Jeroen

    1995-01-01

    The resolution obtained in volume rendering is greatly increased over known methods through the introduction of super resolution techniques which make it possible to enlarge the view o f the dataset without the introduction of unnecessary positional, gradient and opacity errors. In this paper our

  16. Phase strength and super lattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Powder XRD investigations on dotriacontane-decane and dotriacontane-decanol mixtures are made. Phase strength, phase separation and formation of superlattices are discussed. The role of tunnel-like defects is considered. Keywords. Hydrocarbons; mixtures; phase strength; tunnel-like defects; super lattices. 1.

  17. Super-resolution Phase Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Depeursinge, Christian

    2013-04-21

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) yields reconstructed complex wavefields. It allows synthesizing the aperture of a virtual microscope up to 2π, offering super-resolution phase images. Live images of micro-organisms and neurons with resolution less than 100 nm are presented.

  18. Asteroid impacts on terrestrial planets: the effects of super-Earths and the role of the ν6 resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jeremy L.; Martin, Rebecca G.; Lepp, Stephen; Livio, Mario

    2018-01-01

    With N-body simulations of a planetary system with an asteroid belt, we investigate how the asteroid impact rate on the Earth is affected by the architecture of the planetary system. We find that the ν6 secular resonance plays an important role in the asteroid collision rate with the Earth. Compared to exoplanetary systems, the Solar system is somewhat special in its lack of a super-Earth mass planet in the inner Solar system. We therefore first consider the effects of the presence of a super-Earth in the terrestrial planet region. We find a significant effect for super-Earths with a mass of around 10 M⊕ and a separation greater than about 0.7 au. For a super-Earth which is interior to the Earth's orbit, the number of asteroids colliding with Earth increases the closer the super-Earth is to the Earth's orbit. This is the result of multiple secular resonance locations causing more asteroids to be perturbed on to Earth-crossing orbits. When the super-Earth is placed exterior to Earth's orbit, the collision rate decreases substantially because the ν6 resonance no longer exists in the asteroid belt region. We also find that changing the semimajor axis of Saturn leads to a significant decrease in the asteroid collision rate, though increasing its mass increases the collision rate. These results may have implications for the habitability of exoplanetary systems.

  19. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laenen, E.; Wackeroth, D.

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these

  20. The Large Hadron Collider: lessons learned and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn Smith, Chris

    2012-02-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine and detectors are now working superbly. There are good reasons to hope and expect that the new domain that the LHC is already exploring, operating at 7 TeV with a luminosity of 10(33) cm(-2) s(-1), or the much bigger domain that will be opened up as the luminosity increases to over 10(34) and the energy to 14 TeV, will provide clues that will usher in a new era in particle physics. The arguments that new phenomena will be found in the energy range that will be explored by the LHC have become stronger since they were first seriously analysed in 1984, although their essence has changed little. I will review the evolution of these arguments in a historical context, the development of the LHC project since 1984, and the outlook in the light of reports on the performance of the machine and detectors presented at this meeting.

  1. SINGLE FRAME SUPER RESOLUTION OF NONCOOPERATIVE IRIS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in biometrics, satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. The long range captured iris identification systems often suffer from low resolution and meager focus of the captured iris images. These degrade the iris recognition performance. This paper proposes enhanced iterated back projection (EIBP method to super resolute the long range captured iris polar images. The performance of proposed method is tested and analyzed on CASIA long range iris database by comparing peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and structural similarity index (SSIM with state-of-the-art super resolution (SR algorithms. It is further analyzed by increasing the up-sampling factor. Performance analysis shows that the proposed method is superior to state-of-the-art algorithms, the peak signal-to-noise ratio improved about 0.1-1.5 dB. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is well suited to super resolve the iris polar images captured at a long distance

  2. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  3. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  4. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.

    2010-01-01

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300/fb of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity...... upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10/fb of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because...... harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions....

  5. Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, José, E-mail: repond@hep.anl.gov

    2013-12-21

    To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R and D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

  6. Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repond, José

    2013-12-01

    To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R&D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

  7. Top Quark Production at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaf, Lukas Kaj [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-03-01

    This thesis describes both theoretical and experimental research into top quark production. The theoretical part contains a calculation of the single-top quark production cross section at hadron colliders, at Next to Leading Order (NLO) accuracy. The experimental part describes a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions, at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  8. The Large Hadron Collider Pop Up Book

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Discover the ATLAS experiment in full 3D pop-up in this promotional video for the Large Hadron Collider pop-up book. The book contains 16 pop-ups telling the story of how the experiment works and its quest to understand what the universe is made of. It is now available in English, French and German. Paper engineer Anton Radevsky, texts Emma Sanders.

  9. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  10. BARD: Interpreting new frontier energy collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuteson, Bruce; /MIT; Mrenna, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    No systematic procedure currently exists for inferring the underlying physics from discrepancies observed in high energy collider data. We present Bard, an algorithm designed to facilitate the process of model construction at the energy frontier. Top-down scans of model parameter space are discarded in favor of bottom-up diagrammatic explanations of particular discrepancies, an explanation space that can be exhaustively searched and conveniently tested with existing analysis tools.

  11. Large Hadron Collider The Discovery Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The mammoth machine, after a nine-year construction period, is scheduled (touch wood) to begin producing its beams of particles later this year. The commissioning process is planned to proceed from one beam to two beams to colliding beams; from lower energies to the terascale; from weaker test intensities to stronger ones suitable for producing data at useful rates but more difficult to control.

  12. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  13. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  14. Super gas saver secrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiseman, G.

    2001-02-01

    This book demonstrates how to save money by getting better fuel economy and increase automobile performance through hundreds of fuel saving tips and projects. The book gives practical advise to car drivers on how to reduce travel costs by more than 50 per cent. Conventional ways to save gas include adopting fuel saving habits such as shifting properly, accelerating smoothly, and going easy on the brakes. Some performance booster tips were also presented. These included tips such as turning off the alternator, using moth balls to boost the fuel octane rating, turning the air conditioner off and power boosting the power circuits. A total of 25 tips were provided. An entire section of the book was devoted to tips on making the carburetor more fuel efficient with air bleeds, gasoline preheaters, and fuel pressure regulators. Eagle Research's newly developed electrostatic gas saver was also presented. The final section of the book referred to the potential viability of using homemade fuels such as hydrogen, methane, alcohol and wood gas. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, Eckhard; /DESY; Harrison, Mike; /Brookhaven; Hesla, Leah; /Fermilab; Ross, Marc; /Fermilab; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; /Paris, IN2P3; Takahashi, Rika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Walker, Nicholas; /DESY; Warmbein, Barbara; /DESY; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoya, Kaoru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhang, Min; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2011-11-04

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  16. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Gail G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Snopak, Pavel [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bao, Yu [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  17. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  18. 2001 Report on the Next Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronnberg, J; Breidenbach; Burke, D; Corlett, J; Dombeck, T; Markiewicz, T

    2001-08-28

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  19. Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Organizers of the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    2012-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. This school is a continuation of the series of schools which began six years ago.  The first school was held in 2006 in Sokendai, Japan, the second in 2007 in Erice, Italy, the third in 2008 in Oakbrook Hills, USA, the fourth in 2009 in Huairou, China, the fifth in 2010 in Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, and the sixth in 2011 in Pacific Grove, USA.   The school is organized by the International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE), the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Beam Dynamics Panel. The school this year will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Indore, India from November 27 to December 8, 2012. It is hosted by the Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) and sponsored by a number of funding agencies and institutions around the world including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. National Science...

  20. Searching for dark matter at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Francois [IN2P3/CNRS et Universite Paris-Sud 11 Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann [Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay (France)

    2015-04-01

    Dark Matter (DM) detection prospects at future e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders are reviewed under the assumption that DM particles are fermions of the Majorana or Dirac type. Although the discussion is quite general, one will keep in mind the recently proposed candidate based on an excess of energetic photons observed in the center of our Galaxy with the Fermi-LAT satellite. In the first part we will assume that DM interactions are mediated by vector bosons, Z or Z'. In the case of Z-boson Direct Detection limits force only axial couplings with the DM. This solution can be naturally accommodated by Majorana DM but is disfavored by the GC excess. Viable scenarios can be instead found in the case of Z' mediator. These scenarios can be tested at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders through ISR events, e{sup +}e{sup -} → XX + γ. A sensitive background reduction can be achieved by using highly polarized beams. In the second part scalar particles, in particular Higgs particles, have been considered as mediators. The case of the SM Higgs mediator is excluded by limits on the invisible branching ratio of the Higgs. On the contrary particularly interesting is the case in which the DM interactions are mediated by the pseudoscalar state A in two Higgs-doublet model scenarios. In this last case the main collider signature is e{sup +}e{sup -} → HA, H → hh, A → XX. (orig.)

  1. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  2. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.; Costello, J. T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hirooka, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C2 dimers.

  3. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shboul, K. F. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Costello, J. T. [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  4. DEPFET: A silicon pixel detector for future colliders. Fundamentals, characterization and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marinas Pardo, Carlos Manuel; Vos, Marcel Andre

    2011-01-01

    The future electron-positron colliders, either breaking the energy frontier (like ILC or CLIC) or the luminosity frontier (SuperKEKB), impose unprecedented constraints over the new generation of detectors that will be operated in those facilities. In particular, the vertex detectors must be designed for an efficient flavour tagging and excellent vertex reconstruction. To cope with these requirements, highly pixelated sensors with a fast readout, very low material budget and low power consumption must be developed. Although the combination of these factors is a substantial challenge, the DEPFET Collaboration has developed a new generation of sensors that can be operated in such a harsh environment. The DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) is a pixel sensor that combines detection and internal amplification at the same time. With such configuration, thin detectors with good signal-to-noise ratio and low power consumption can be produced. In this thesis, the optimization and performance of two gen...

  5. BEWARE OF...SUPER GLUES!!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    What happened? A number of accidents have occurred with the use of 'Super Glues'. Some individuals have suffered injuries - severe irritation, or skin bonded together - through getting glue on their face and in their eyes. What are the hazards associated with glues? 'Super Glues' (i.e. cyanoacrylates): Are harmful if swallowed and are chemical irritants to the eyes, respiratory system and skin. Present the risk of polymerization (hardening) leading to skin damage. Be careful ! 'Super Glues' can bond to skin and eyes in seconds. Note: Other glues, resins and hardeners are also chemicals and as such can cause serious damage to the skin, eyes, respiratory or digestive tract. (For example: some components can be toxic, harmful, corrosive, sensitizing agents, etc.). How to prevent accidents in the future? Read the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for all of the glues you work with. Check the label on the container to find out which of the materials you work with are hazardous. Wear the right Per...

  6. Resolution and super-resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J R

    2017-06-01

    Many papers have claimed the attainment of super-resolution, i.e. resolution beyond that achieved classically, by measurement of the profile of a feature in the image. We argue that measurement of the contrast of the image of a dark bar on a bright background does not give a measure of resolution, but of detection sensitivity. The width of a bar that gives an intensity at the center of the bar of 0.735 that in the bright region (the same ratio as in the Rayleigh resolution criterion) is λ/(13.9×numerical aperture) for the coherent case with central illumination. This figure, which compares with λ/(numerical aperture) for the Abbe resolution limit with central illumination, holds for the classical case, and so is no indication of super-resolution. Theoretical images for two points, two lines, arrays of lines, arrays of bars, and grating objects are compared. These results can be used a reference for experimental results, to determine if super-resolution has indeed been attained. The history of the development of the theory of microscope resolution is outlined. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  8. ColliderBit: a GAMBIT module for the calculation of high-energy collider observables and likelihoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba; Buckley, Andy; Dal, Lars A.; Farmer, Ben; Jackson, Paul; Krislock, Abram; Kvellestad, Anders; Murnane, Daniel; Putze, Antje; Raklev, Are; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Weniger, Christoph; White, Martin

    2017-11-01

    We describe ColliderBit, a new code for the calculation of high energy collider observables in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). ColliderBit features a generic interface to BSM models, a unique parallelised Monte Carlo event generation scheme suitable for large-scale supercomputer applications, and a number of LHC analyses, covering a reasonable range of the BSM signatures currently sought by ATLAS and CMS. ColliderBit also calculates likelihoods for Higgs sector observables, and LEP searches for BSM particles. These features are provided by a combination of new code unique to ColliderBit, and interfaces to existing state-of-the-art public codes. ColliderBit is both an important part of the GAMBIT framework for BSM inference, and a standalone tool for efficiently applying collider constraints to theories of new physics.

  9. Near-Threshold Production of W±, Z0, and H0 at a Fixed-Target Experiment at the Future Ultrahigh-Energy Proton Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lansberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We outline the opportunities to study the production of the Standard Model bosons, W±, Z0, and H0, at “low” energies at fixed-target experiments based on possible future ultrahigh-energy proton colliders, that is, the High-Energy LHC, the Super proton-proton Collider, and the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron. These can be indeed made in conjunction with the proposed future colliders designed to reach up to s=100 TeV by using bent crystals to extract part of the halo of the beam which would then impinge on a fixed target. Without disturbing the collider operation, this technique allows for the extraction of a substantial amount of particles in addition to serving for a beam-cleaning purpose. With this method, high-luminosity fixed-target studies at centre-of-mass energies above the W±, Z0, and H0 masses, s≃170–300 GeV, are possible. We also discuss the possibility offered by an internal gas target, which can also be used as luminosity monitor by studying the beam transverse shape.

  10. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  11. Ground vibration measurements for Fermilab future collider projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Baklakov

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of wideband seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, as well as in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite, thought to be a possible geological environment of the Fermilab future accelerators.

  12. The SuperCOSMOS Science Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, N.; Read, M.; Mann, R.; Sutorius, E.; Bond, I.; MacGillivray, H.; Williams, P.; Lawrence, A.

    2004-07-01

    The SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey (SSS {http://www-wfau.roe.ac.uk/sss}; Hambly et al., 2001) consists of digitised scans of Schmidt photographic survey material in a multi-colour (BRI), multi-epoch, uniformly calibrated product. It covers the whole southern hemisphere, with an extension into the north currently underway. Public online access to the 2 Tbytes of SSS pixel data and object catalogues has been available for some time; data are being downloaded at a rate of several gigabytes per week, and many new science results are emerging from community use of the data. In this poster we describe the terabyte-scale SuperCOSMOS Science Archive {http://thoth.roe.ac.uk/ssa} (SSA), which is a recasting of the SSS object catalogue system from flat files into an RDBMS, with an enhanced user interface. We describe some aspects of the hardware and schema design of the SSA, which aims to produce a high performance, VO-compatible database, suitable for data mining by `power users', while maintaining the ease of use praised in the old SSS system. Initially, the SSA will allow access through web forms and a flexible SQL interface. It acts as the prototype for the next generation survey archives to be hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Wide Field Astronomy Unit, such as the WFCAM Science Archive of infrared sky survey data, as well as being a scalability testbed for use by AstroGrid, the UK's Virtual Observatory project. As a result of these roles, it will display subsequently an expanding functionality, as web - and later, Grid - services are deployed on it.

  13. The Large Hadron Collider of CERN and the roadmap toward higher performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is exploring the new frontier of particle physics. It is the largest and most ambitious scientific instrument ever built and 100 years after the Rutherford experiment it continues that tradition of “smashing atoms” to unveil the secret of the infinitely small. LHC makes use of all what we learnt in 40 years of hadron colliders, in particular of ISR and Sp-pbarS at CERN and Tevatron at Fermilab, and it is based on Superconductivity, discovered also 100 years ago. Designing, developing the technology, building and finally commissioning the LHC took more than twenty years. While LHC is now successfully running, we are already preparing the future for the next step. First, by increasing of a factor five the LHC luminosity in ten years from now, and then by increasing its energy by a factor two or more, on the horizon of the next twenty years. These LHC upgrades, in luminosity and energy, will be the super-exploitation of the CERN infrastructure and is the best investment that the HEP...

  14. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 2: Assessing SuperDARN virtual height models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN network of HF coherent backscatter radars form a unique global diagnostic of large-scale ionospheric and magnetospheric dynamics in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Currently the ground projections of the HF radar returns are routinely determined by a simple rangefinding algorithm, which takes no account of the prevailing, or indeed the average, HF propagation conditions. This is in spite of the fact that both direct E- and F-region backscatter and 1½-hop E- and F-region backscatter are commonly used in geophysical interpretation of the data. In a companion paper, Chisham et al. (2008 have suggested a new virtual height model for SuperDARN, based on average measured propagation paths. Over shorter propagation paths the existing rangefinding algorithm is adequate, but mapping errors become significant for longer paths where the roundness of the Earth becomes important, and a correct assumption of virtual height becomes more difficult. The SuperDARN radar at Hankasalmi has a propagation path to high power HF ionospheric modification facilities at both Tromsø on a ½-hop path and SPEAR on a 1½-hop path. The SuperDARN radar at Þykkvibǽr has propagation paths to both facilities over 1½-hop paths. These paths provide an opportunity to quantitatively test the available SuperDARN virtual height models. It is also possible to use HF radar backscatter which has been artificially induced by the ionospheric heaters as an accurate calibration point for the Hankasalmi elevation angle of arrival data, providing a range correction algorithm for the SuperDARN radars which directly uses elevation angle. These developments enable the accurate mappings of the SuperDARN electric field measurements which are required for the growing number of multi-instrument studies of the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  15. Jet observables and stops at a 100 TeV collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, JiJi; Jaiswal, Prerit; Leung, John Shing Chau

    2017-08-01

    A future proton-proton collider with center of mass energy around 100 TeV will have a remarkable capacity to discover massive new particles and continue exploring weak scale naturalness. In this work we will study its sensitivity to two stop simplified models as further examples of its potential power: pair production of stops that decay to tops or bottoms and Higgsinos; and stops that are either pair produced or produced together with a gluino and then cascade down through gluinos to the lightest superpartner (LSP). In both simplified models, super-boosted tops or bottoms with transverse momentum of order TeV will be produced abundantly and call for new strategies to identify them. We will apply a set of simple jet observables, including track-based jet mass, N -subjettiness and mass-drop, to tag the boosted hadronic or leptonic decaying objects and suppress the standard model as well as possible supersymmetric (SUSY) backgrounds. Assuming 10% systematic uncertainties, the future 100 TeV collider can discover (exclude) stops with masses up to 6 (7) TeV with 3 ab-1 of integrated luminosity if the stops decay to Higgsinos. If the stops decay through gluinos to LSPs, due to additional SUSY backgrounds from gluino pair production, a higher luminosity of about 3 ab-1 is needed to discover stops up to 6 TeV. We will also discuss how to use jet observables to distinguish simplified models with different types of LSPs. The boosted top or bottom tagging strategies developed in this paper could also be used in other searches at a 100 TeV collider. For example, the strategy could help discover gluino pair production with gluino mass close to 11 TeV with 3 ab-1 of integrated luminosity.

  16. A Super-resolution Algorithm Based on SURF and POCS for 3D Bionics PTZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyu LI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution algorithm improves image resolution in software. Before image tracking, it needs to enhance image resolution to improve the image tracking accuracy of the bionic eye. The traditional super-resolution reconstruction method can’t satisfy the accuracy and real-time system, so this paper proposes super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm based on SURF (Speeded up Robust Features and POCS (Projections Onto Convex Sets. The algorithm applies SURF algorithm on image registration and uses RANSAC (RANdom SAmple Consensus algorithm to kick out fault feature to improve the accuracy of image registration. After motion estimation, this paper applies POCS algorithm to reconstruct a super-resolution image. Finally, some experiments are performed on the platform of a bionic eye, which show that the algorithm can better improve the image resolution and reach real-time requirements to some extent, and providing basis for the subsequent image tracking.

  17. The fourth generation, linac-ring type colliders, preons and so on

    CERN Document Server

    Sultansoy, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Following a brief review of our contributions to the 2006 European PP Strategy, recent comments on several topics are presented. First of all, it is emphasized that only the simplest version of the fourth chiral generation, namely, minimal SM4 (mSM4) with only one Higgs doublet is in some tension with the recent LHC data on the Higgs boson search. This tension, which follows from the relative strengths of the H --> 4l and Higgs --> {\\gamma}{\\gamma} channels, can be naturally resolved if there is a mechanism to enhance the H-->{\\gamma}{\\gamma} width (although any charged and heavy particle could enhance the H-{\\gamma}-{\\gamma} loop, 2HDM can be given as an example). We then emphasize the possible role of the linac-ring type colliders, especially LHeC (QCD Exploder) and TAC super charm factory. The QCD Explorer will give opportunity to enlighten the origin of the 98.5% portion of the visible universe's mass. Especially the {\\gamma}-nucleus option seems to be very promising for QCD studies. The TAC super charm f...

  18. Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

  19. The dark penguin shines light at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primulando, Reinard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University,Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin [Department of Physics, University of California Davis,Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling — given by the Dark Penguin — in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the 100 TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold for on-shell production of the mediators. We consider both minimal models and models where an additional state beyond the DM is accessible. In the latter case, under the assumption of anarchic flavor structure in the dark sector, the LHC monophoton and diphoton searches will be able to set much stronger bounds than in the minimal scenario. A determination of the mass of the heavier dark fermion might be feasible using the M{sub T2} variable. In addition, if the Dark Penguin flavor structure is almost aligned with that of the DM mass, a displaced signal from the decay of the heavier dark fermion into the DM and photon can be observed. This allows us to set constraints on the mixings and couplings of the model from an existing search for non-pointing photons.

  20. Modeling acquisition geometries with improved super-resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Wileyto, E. Paul; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-03-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a reconstruction is created from multiple x-ray projection images. Our previous work demonstrated that the reconstruction is capable of super-resolution (i.e., subpixel resolution) relative to the detector. In order for super-resolution to yield a reliable improvement in image quality, it should be achievable at all positions in the reconstruction. This paper demonstrates that super-resolution is not achievable at all depths, or at all heights above the breast support. For this purpose, a bar pattern phantom was imaged using a commercial DBT system. A goniometry stand was used to orient the long axis of the parallel bars along an oblique plane relative to the breast support. This setup allowed a single test frequency to be visualized over a continuous range of depths. The orientation of the test frequency was parallel to the direction of x-ray tube motion. An oblique reconstruction in the plane of the bar pattern phantom showed that the existence of super-resolution is depth-dependent. To identify design strategies for optimizing super-resolution, a theoretical model was then developed in which a test frequency higher than the alias frequency of the detector was simulated. Two design modifications that improve super-resolution are identified. In particular, it is shown that reducing the spacing between the x-ray source positions minimizes the number of depths lacking super-resolution. Additionally, introducing detector motion along the direction perpendicular to the breast support allows for more uniform super-resolution throughout the image volume. In conclusion, this work presents strategies for optimizing super-resolution in DBT.

  1. Super-resolution for scanning light stimulation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitzer, L. A.; Neumann, K.; Benson, N., E-mail: niels.benson@uni-due.de; Schmechel, R. [Faculty of Engineering, NST and CENIDE, University of Duisburg-Essen, Bismarckstr. 81, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Super-resolution (SR) is a technique used in digital image processing to overcome the resolution limitation of imaging systems. In this process, a single high resolution image is reconstructed from multiple low resolution images. SR is commonly used for CCD and CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor) sensor images, as well as for medical applications, e.g., magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we demonstrate that super-resolution can be applied with scanning light stimulation (LS) systems, which are common to obtain space-resolved electro-optical parameters of a sample. For our purposes, the Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) was chosen and modified to suit the needs of LS systems. To demonstrate the SR adaption, an Optical Beam Induced Current (OBIC) LS system was used. The POCS algorithm was optimized by means of OBIC short circuit current measurements on a multicrystalline solar cell, resulting in a mean square error reduction of up to 61% and improved image quality.

  2. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  3. Summary of the Superconducting RF Linac for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, J; Geer, S

    2011-01-01

    Project-X is a proposed project to be built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with several potential missions. A primary part of the Project-X accelerator chain is a Superconducting linac, and In October 2009 a workshop was held to concentrate on the linac parameters. The charge of the workshop was to "..focus only on the SRF linac approaches and how it can be used...". The focus of Working Group 2 of this workshop was to evaluate how the different linac options being considered impact the potential realization of Muon Collider (MC) and Neutrino Factory (NF) applications. In particular the working group charge was, "to investigate the use of a multi-megawatt proton linac to target, phase rotate and collect muons to support a muon collider and neutrino factory". To focus the working group discussion, three primary questions were identified early on, to serve as a reference: 1) What are the proton source requirements for muon colliders and neutrino factories? 2) What are the issues with respect to realiz...

  4. Drell-Yan production at collider energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neerven, W.L. Van [Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands)

    1995-07-01

    We present some results of the Drell-Yan cross sections d{sigma}/dm and {sigma}{sub tot} which includes the O ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) contribution to the coefficient function. In particular we study the total cross section {sigma}{sub tot} for vector boson production and d{sigma}/dm for low invariant masses m of the lepton pairs at large hadron collider energies. This study includes a detailed discussion of the dependence of the cross sections on the chosen scheme ({bar M}S versus DIS) and the factorization scale.

  5. Light-Gravitino Production at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Rangarajan, R; Zichichi, Antonino; Kim, Jaewan; Lopez, Jorge L.; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    1998-01-01

    We consider the production of gravitinos ($\\widetilde G$) in association with gluinos ($\\tilde g$) or squarks ($\\tilde q$) at hadron colliders, including the three main sub-processes: $q \\bar q -> \\tilde g\\widetilde G$, $qg -> \\tilde enhanced to the point of being observable for sufficiently light gravitino masses ($m_{\\widetilde G} \\tilde g\\tilde g$. Searches for such events at the Tevatron can impose lower limits on the gravitino mass. In the Appendix, we provide a complete set of Feynman rules for gravitino interactions used in our calculation.

  6. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  7. Systematic analysis of HEP collider data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuteson, Bruce [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)]. E-mail: knuteson@fnal.gov

    2004-11-21

    These proceedings outline steps toward a systematic analysis of frontier energy collider data: specifically, those data collected at Tevatron Runs I and II, LEP Run II, HERA Runs I and II, and the future LHC. Algorithms designed to understand the gross features of the data (VISTA), to systematically and model-independently search for new physics at the electroweak scale (SLEUTH), to automate tests of specific hypotheses against those data (QUAERO), to turn an existing full detector simulation into a fast simulation (TURBOSIM), and to infer the physics underlying any hint observed in the data (BARD) are reviewed. A somewhat non-conventional viewpoint is adopted throughout.

  8. Advanced silicon sensors for future collider experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00437143; Moll, Michael; Mannelli, Marcello

    In this thesis, we address two key technological challenges: the radiation tolerance assessment and timing performance studies of thin planar diodes to be used as sensing technology in the recently approved CMS forward sampling calorimeter for the HL-LHC operation, the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL); and, complementary, we carried out a detailed study of a novel kind of position sensitive microstrip sensors for ionising particles which implements the well established charge-division method to determine the particle impinging position along the microstrip electrode direction; this technology could become an interesting low-material budget solution for the new generation of tracking detectors to be operated in the future lepton collider experiments.

  9. The PHOBOS experiment at the RHIC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzy, Judith M.; Back, B.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.; Betts, R.; Bialas, A.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chang, Y.-H.; Chen, A.E.; Coghen, T.; Czyz, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Friedl, M.; Galuszka, K.; Ganz, R.; Garcia-Solis, E.; George, N.; Godlewski, J.; Gulbrandsen, K.H.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hayes, A.; Heintzelman, G.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Jagadish, U.; Johnson, E.; Kotula, J.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lemler, M.; Lin, W.T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Neal, M.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I.; Pernegger, H.; Plesko, M.; Remsberg, L.P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Stanskas, P.J.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Trzupek, A.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vale, C.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A.; Wyslouch, B.; Zalewski, K

    1999-12-27

    PHOBOS is one of four experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), scheduled to start data collection in fall 1999. Its main goal is to collect events using minimum bias triggers. A search will then be made for interesting, and perhaps rare, classes of events that may indicate the formation of a quark gluon plasma (QGP) or the restoration of chiral symmetry. In this report we describe the PHOBOS detector design and present the first results in detector development. We will also present our expectations from the first year of operation.

  10. Geneva University - Kinematics at Hadron Colliders - POSTPONED!!!

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The seminar is postponed.Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 12 décembre 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Kinematics at Hadron Colliders by Prof. Drew Baden, University of Maryland Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  11. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2017-06-19

    Most of the world’s earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are caused by the continuous motions of the many tectonic plates that make up the Earth’s outer shell. The most powerful of these natural hazards occur in subduction zones, where two plates collide and one is thrust beneath another. The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) “Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide—A USGS Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science” is a blueprint for building the crucial scientific foundation needed to inform the policies and practices that can make our Nation more resilient to subduction zone-related hazards.

  12. Ground Motion Models for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-06-28

    Optimization of the parameters of a future linear collider requires comprehensive models of ground motion. Both general models of ground motion and specific models of the particular site and local conditions are essential. Existing models are not completely adequate, either because they are too general, or because they omit important peculiarities of ground motion. The model considered in this paper is based on recent ground motion measurements performed at SLAC and at other accelerator laboratories, as well as on historical data. The issues to be studied for the models to become more predictive are also discussed.

  13. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-09-01

    A complete scheme for production, cooling, acceleration, and ring for a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider is presented, together with parameters for two higher energy machines. The schemes starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling in long-period helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider and Grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Neil

    2012-02-28

    We present a brief history of the beginnings, development and achievements of the worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid (wLCG). The wLCG is a huge international endeavour, which is itself embedded within, and directly influences, a much broader computing and information technology landscape. It is often impossible to identify true cause and effect, and they may appear very different from the different perspectives (e.g. information technology industry or academic researcher). This account is no different. It represents a personal view of the developments over the last two decades and is therefore inevitably biased towards those things in which the author has been personally involved.

  15. Radiation Field in the Vicinity of the Collider Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-10-26

    The Collider Center and the adjoining cryogenic support building are unique among the buildings close to the collider tunnel because these are locations where the occupancy by non-radiation workers is high. This note describes calculations of the dose equivalent from local beam loss at both the nearest point of these buildings to the collider ring and on the berm in the vicinity of these buildings.

  16. Results from Super-Kamiokande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2000-05-01

    Results from Super-Kamiokande on atmospheric neutrinos and solar neutrinos are presented. The atmospheric neutrino data exhibited a zenith angle dependent deficit of muon neutrinos. Experimental biases and uncertainties in the prediction were unable to explain the data. However, the data were in good agreement with two flavor {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_reversible} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations. The solar neutrino data showed a deficit of the neutrinos. The day-night effect and the energy spectrum of recoil electrons were studied.

  17. Beyond the Large Hadron Collider: a first look at cryogenics for CERN future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Following the first experimental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study, conducted with the collaborative participation of interested institutes world-wide, considers several options for very high energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders to be installed in a quasi-circular underground tunnel in the Geneva basin, with a circumference of 80 km to 100 km. All these machines would make intensive use of advanced superconducting devices, i.e. high-field bending and focusing magnets and/or accelerating RF cavities, thus requiring large helium cryogenic systems operating at 4.5 K or below. Based on preliminary sets of parameters and layouts for the particle colliders under study, we discuss the main challenges of their cryogenic systems and present first estimates of the cryogenic refrigeration capacities req...

  18. The lay-out of the photon collider at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One of the interaction regions at the linear colliders should be compatible both with + - and , modes of operation. In this paper, the differences in requirements and possible design solutions are discussed. Author Affiliations. V I Telnov1. Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. Pramana ...

  19. The polarized electron beam for the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, M.

    1996-10-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been colliding a polarized electron beam with an unpolarized positron beam at the Z{sup 0} resonance for the SLD experiment since 1992. An electron beam polarization of close to 80% has been achieved for the experiment at luminosities up to 8 {center_dot} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This is the world`s first and only linear collider, and is a successful prototype for the next generation of high energy electron linear colliders. This paper discusses polarized beam operation for the SLC, and includes aspects of the polarized source, spin transport and polarimetry.

  20. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  1. Muon colliders, frictional cooling and universal extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Daniel E.

    2011-07-20

    A muon collider combines the advantages of proton-proton and electron-positron colliders, sidestepping many of their disadvantages, and has the potential to make discoveries and precision measurements at high energies. However, muons bring their own technical challenges, largely relating to their instability. We present a summary of the motivations and R and D efforts for a muon collider. We detail a scheme for preparing high-luminosity muon beams on timescales shorter than the muon lifetime, and an experiment to demonstrate aspects of this scheme at the Max Planck Institute for Physics. We also investigate the potentials to discover physics beyond the standard model at a muon collider. (orig.)

  2. Particle dynamics in multistage wakefield collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cheshkov

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of particles in laser pulse-driven wakefields over multistages in a collider is studied. A map of phase space dynamics over a stage of wakefield acceleration induced by a laser pulse (or electron beam is derived. The entire system of a collider is generated with a product of multiple maps of wakefields, drifts, magnets, etc. This systems map may include offsets of various elements of the accelerator, representing noise and errors arising from the operation of such a complex device. We find that an unmitigated strong focusing of the wakefield coupled with the alignment errors of the position (or laser beam aiming of each wakefield stage and the unavoidable dispersion in individual particle betatron frequencies leads to a phase space mixing and causes a transverse emittance degradation. The rate of the emittance increase is proportional to the number of stages, the energy of the particles, the betatron frequency, the square of the misalignment amplitude, and the square of the betatron phase shift over a single stage. The accelerator with a weakened focus in a channel can, therefore, largely suppress the emittance degradation due to errors.

  3. Ntuples for NLO Events at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z.; Febres Cordero, F.; Höche, S.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present an event-file format for the dissemination of next-to-leading-order (NLO) predictions for QCD processes at hadron colliders. The files contain all information required to compute generic jet-based infrared-safe observables at fixed order (without showering or hadronization), and to recompute observables with different factorization and renormalization scales. The files also make it possible to evaluate cross sections and distributions with different parton distribution functions. This in turn makes it possible to estimate uncertainties in NLO predictions of a wide variety of observables without recomputing the short-distance matrix elements. The event files allow a user to choose among a wide range of commonly-used jet algorithms and jet-size parameters. We provide event files for a $W$ or $Z$ boson accompanied by up to four jets, and for pure-jet events with up to four jets. The files are for the Large Hadron Collider with a center of mass energy of 7 or 8 TeV. A C++ library along with a Python in...

  4. Scaling Laws for $e^+ e^-$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Raubenheimer, T O; Wilson, Ian H

    1999-01-01

    Design studies of a future TeV e+e- Linear Collider (TLC) are presently being made by five major laboratories within the framework of a world-wide collaboration. A figure of merit is defined which enables an objective comparison of these different designs. This figure of merit is shown to depend only on a small number of parameters. General scaling laws for the main beam parameters and linac parameters are derived and prove to be very effective when used as guidelines to optimize the linear collider design. By adopting appropriate parameters for beam stability, the figure of merit becomes nearly independent of accelerating gradient and RF frequency of the accelerating structures. In spite of the strong dependence of the wake-fields with frequency, the single bunch emittance preservation during acceleration along the linac is also shown to be independent of the RF frequency when using equivalent trajectory correction schemes. In this situation, beam acceleration using high frequency structures becomes very adv...

  5. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  6. Transverse mode coupling instability of colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In high brightness circular colliders, coherent and incoherent beam dynamics are dominated by beam-beam interactions. It is generally assumed that the incoherent tune spread introduced by the beam-beam interactions is sufficiently large to cure any instabilities originating from impedance. However, as the two counterrotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes and therefore modify the coherent beam dynamics and stability conditions. In this case, coherent beam-beam effects and impedance cannot be treated independently and their interplay should be taken into account in any realistic attempt to study the beam stability of colliding beams. Due to the complexity of these physics processes, numerical simulations become an important tool for the analysis of this system. Two approaches are proposed in this paper: a fully self-consistent multiparticle tracking including particle-in-cell Poisson solver for the beam-beam interactions and a linearized model taking into account finite bunch length effects. To ensure the validity of the results a detailed benchmarking of these models was performed. It will be shown that under certain conditions coherent beam-beam dipole modes can couple with higher order headtail modes and lead to strong instabilities with characteristics similar to the classical transverse mode coupling instability originating from impedance alone. Possible cures for this instability are explored both for single bunch and multibunch interactions. Simulation results and experimental evidences of the existence of this instability at the LHC will be presented for the specific case of offset collisions.

  7. Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-09-01

    A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

  8. The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2014-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavor spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing LEP tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of an idea first proposed by Bob Palmer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1978, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact 2-in-1 structure was essential for the LHC due to both the limited space available in the existing Large Electron-Positron collider tunnel and the cost. The second innovation was the bold move to use superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor. In this article, no attempt is made to give a comprehensive review of the machine design. This can be found in the LHC Design Report {[}1], w...

  9. Commissioning and First Operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2010-01-01

    After some fifteen years of construction, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was commissioned at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research in 2008. This high-energy particle accelerator of 26.7 km circumference – the largest scientific instrument ever built – brings into collision intense beams of protons and ions to probe the structure of matter and study the forces acting on its elementary components at the TeV scale, an order of magnitude higher than the previous stateof-the-art. To guide and focus its particle beams, the LHC uses several thousands high-field superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The project therefore constitutes a technological feat: all its components were developed, industrialized and series produced by industrial companies according to demanding specifications. Started as a CERN undertaking – by decision of the CERN Council and its twenty European member states – the project soon became global with special contributions from Canada, India, Jap...

  10. Classification of Low Dimensional Lie Super-Bialgebras

    OpenAIRE

    Juszczak, Cezary; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    1997-01-01

    A thorough analysis of Lie super-bialgebra structures on Lie super-algebras osp(1|2) and super-e(2) is presented. Combined technique of computer algebraic computations and a subsequent identification of equivalent structures is applied. In all the cases Poisson-Lie brackets on supergroups are found. Possibility of quantizing them in order to obtain quantum groups is discussed. It turns out to be straightforward for all but one structures for super-E(2) group.

  11. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    beginning, the design studies at Jefferson Lab have focused on achieving high collider performance, particularly ultrahigh luminosities up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} per detector with large acceptance, while maintaining high polarization for both the electron and light-ion beams. These are the two key performance requirements of a future electron-ion collider facility as articulated by the NSAC Long Range Plan. In MEIC, a new ion complex is designed specifically to deliver ion beams that match the high bunch repetition and highly polarized electron beam from CEBAF. During the last two years, both development of the science case and optimization of the machine design point toward a medium-energy electron-ion collider as the topmost goal for Jefferson Lab. The MEIC, with relatively compact collider rings, can deliver a luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy up to 65 GeV. It offers an electron energy up to 11 GeV, a proton energy up to 100 GeV, and corresponding energies per nucleon for heavy ions with the same magnetic rigidity. This design choice balances the scope of the science program, collider capabilities, accelerator technology innovation, and total project cost. An energy upgrade could be implemented in the future by adding two large collider rings housed in another large tunnel to push the center-of-mass energy up to or exceeding 140 GeV. After careful consideration of an alternative electron energy recovery linac on ion storage ring approach, a ring-ring collider scenario at high bunch repetition frequency was found to offer fully competitive performance while eliminating the uncertainties of challenging R&D on ampere-class polarized electron sources and many-pass energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). The essential new elements of an MEIC facility at Jefferson Lab are an electron storage ring and an entirely new, modern ion acceleration and storage complex. For the high-current electron collider ring, the upgraded 12 GeV CEBAF SRF

  12. Variable millimetre radiation from the colliding-wind binary Cygnus OB2 #8A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, R.; Fenech, D. M.; Prinja, R. K.; Pittard, J. M.; Morford, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Massive binaries have stellar winds that collide. In the colliding-wind region, various physically interesting processes occur, leading to enhanced X-ray emission, non-thermal radio emission, as well as non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays. Non-thermal radio emission (due to synchrotron radiation) has so far been observed at centimetre wavelengths. At millimetre wavelengths, the stellar winds and the colliding-wind region emit more thermal free-free radiation, and it is expected that any non-thermal contribution will be difficult or impossible to detect. Aims: We aim to determine if the material in the colliding-wind region contributes substantially to the observed millimetre fluxes of a colliding-wind binary. We also try to distinguish the synchrotron emission from the free-free emission. Methods: We monitored the massive binary Cyg OB2 #8A at 3 mm with the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) interferometer of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM). The data were collected in 14 separate observing runs (in 2014 and 2016), and provide good coverage of the orbital period. Results: The observed millimetre fluxes range between 1.1 and 2.3 mJy, and show phase-locked variability, clearly indicating that a large part of the emission is due to the colliding-wind region. A simple synchrotron model gives fluxes with the correct order of magnitude, but with a maximum that is phase-shifted with respect to the observations. Qualitatively this phase shift can be explained by our neglect of orbital motion on the shape of the colliding-wind region. A model using only free-free emission results in only a slightly worse explanation of the observations. Additionally, on the map of our observations we also detect the O6.5 III star Cyg OB2 #8B, for which we determine a 3 mm flux of 0.21 ± 0.033 mJy. Conclusions: The question of whether synchrotron radiation or free-free emission dominates the millimetre fluxes of Cyg OB2 #8A remains open. More detailed

  13. Potential performance for Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-p collisions in a future circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela

    2015-09-09

    The hadron collider studied in the Future Circular Collider (FCC) project could operate with protons and lead ions in similar operation modes as the LHC. In this paper the potential performances in lead-lead, proton-lead and proton-proton collisions are investigated. Based on average lattice parameters, the strengths of intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are evaluated and their effect on the beam and luminosity evolution is presented. Estimates for the integrated luminosity per fill and per run are given, depending on the turnaround time. Moreover, the beam-beam tune shift and bound free pair production losses in heavy-ion operation are addressed.

  14. Potential performance for Pb-Pb, p-Pb, and p-p collisions in a future circular collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Schaumann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hadron collider studied in the future circular collider (FCC project could operate with protons and lead ions in similar operation modes as the LHC. In this paper the potential performances in lead-lead, proton-lead, and proton-proton collisions are investigated. Based on average lattice parameters, the strengths of intrabeam scattering and radiation damping are evaluated and their effect on the beam and luminosity evolution is presented. Estimates for the integrated luminosity per fill and per run are given, depending on the turnaround time. Moreover, the beam-beam tune shift and bound free pair production losses in heavy-ion operation are addressed.

  15. Ending Aging in Super Glassy Polymer Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, CH; Nguyen, PT; Hill, MR; Thornton, AW; Konstas, K; Doherty, CM; Mulder, RJ; Bourgeois, L; Liu, ACY; Sprouster, DJ; Sullivan, JP; Bastow, TJ; Hill, AJ; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2014-04-16

    Aging in super glassy polymers such as poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) (PTMSP), poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) (PMP), and polymers with intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) reduces gas permeabilities and limits their application as gas-separation membranes. While super glassy polymers are initially very porous, and ultra-permeable, they quickly pack into a denser phase becoming less porous and permeable. This age-old problem has been solved by adding an ultraporous additive that maintains the low density, porous, initial stage of super glassy polymers through absorbing a portion of the polymer chains within its pores thereby holding the chains in their open position. This result is the first time that aging in super glassy polymers is inhibited whilst maintaining enhanced CO2 permeability for one year and improving CO2/N-2 selectivity. This approach could allow super glassy polymers to be revisited for commercial application in gas separations.

  16. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration is continuing the work to develop column-parallel CCDs (CPCCD) and CMOS readout chips to be used in the vertex detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The CPCCD achieves several orders of magnitude faster readout than conventional CCDs ...

  17. Higgs physics at future colliders: Recent theoretical developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I review the physics of the Higgs sector in the standard model and its minimal supersymmetric extension, the MSSM. I will discuss the prospects for discovering the Higgs particles at the ungraded Tevatron, at the large hadron collider, and at a future high-energy e + e − linear collider with centre-of-mass energy in the ...

  18. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mail: telnov@inp.nsk.su. Abstract. At linear colliders, the e+e− luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In γγ collisions at the photon collider, these effects are ...

  19. German lab unveils plan to build physicists' next collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    2001-01-01

    An international team of physicists are to propose the construction of a major collider. 'TESLA' - the 'Tera electron volt Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator' will be a linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting resonators. It will be based at DESY and cost around three billion US dollars (2 pages).

  20. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, have demonstrated the power of a pixel vertex detector in experiments at a future high energy linear collider. Silicon CCDs. (charged coupled devices) [1] seemed like the vertex detector sensors of choice for the international linear collider (ILC) until the accelerator technology decision.

  1. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At linear colliders, the + - luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In collisions at the photon collider, these effects are absent, and so smaller emittances are desirable. In the present damping ring designs, nominal DR parameters ...

  2. Effects of high modes on the wind-induced response of super high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruoqiang; Yan, Guirong; Ge, Jinming

    2012-09-01

    For super high-rise buildings, the vibration period of the basic mode is several seconds, and it is very close to the period of the fluctuating wind. The damping of super high-rise buildings is low, so super high-rise buildings are very sensitive to fluctuating wind. The wind load is one of the key loads in the design of super high-rise buildings. It is known that only the basic mode is needed in the wind-response analysis of tall buildings. However, for super high-rise buildings, especially for the acceleration response, because of the frequency amplification of the high modes, the high modes and the mode coupling may need to be considered. Three typical super high-rise projects with the SMPSS in wind tunnel tests and the random vibration theory method were used to analyze the effect of high modes on the wind-induced response. The conclusions can be drawn as follows. First, for the displacement response, the basic mode is dominant, and the high modes can be neglected. Second, for the acceleration response, the high modes and the mode coupling should be considered. Lastly, the strain energy of modes can only give the vibration energy distribution of the high-rise building, and it cannot describe the local wind-induced vibration of high-rise buildings, especially for the top acceleration response.

  3. Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Joram, C; Gregor, I; Dierlamm, A H; Wilson, F F; Sloan, T; Tuboltsev, Y V; Marone, M; Artuso, M; Cindro, V; Bruzzi, M; Bhardwaj, A; Bohm, J; Mikestikova, M; Walz, M; Breindl, M A; Ruzin, A; Marunko, S; Guskov, J; Haerkoenen, J J; Pospisil, S; Fadeyev, V; Makarenko, L; Kaminski, P; Zelazko, J; Pintilie, L; Radu, R; Nistor, S V; Ullan comes, M; Storasta, J V; Gaubas, E; Lacasta llacer, C; Kilminster, B J; Garutti, E; Buhmann, P; Khomenkov, V; Poehlsen, J A; Fernandez garcia, M; Buttar, C; Eklund, L M; Eremin, V; Aleev, A; Modi, B; Sicho, P; Gisen, A J; Nikolopoulos, K; Van beuzekom, M G; Kozlowski, R; Lozano fantoba, M; Leroy, C; Pernegger, H; Del burgo, R; Vila alvarez, I; Palomo pinto, F R; Lounis, A; Eremin, I; Fadeeva, N; Rogozhkin, S; Shivpuri, R K; Arsenovich, T; Ott, J; Abt, M; Loenker, J; Savic, N; Monaco, V; Visser, J; Lynn, D; Horazdovsky, T; Solar, M; Dervan, P J; Meng, L; Spencer, E N; Kazuchits, N; Brzozowski, A; Kozubal, M; Nistor, L C; Marti i garcia, S; Gomez camacho, J J; Fretwurst, E; Hoenniger, F; Schwandt, J; Hartmann, F; Maneuski, D; Mandic, I; Gadda, A; Preiss, J; Macchiolo, A; Nisius, R; Grinstein, S; Marchiori, G; Gonella, L; Slavicek, T; Masek, P; Casse, G; Flores, D; Tuuva, T; Jimenez ramos, M D C; Charron, S; Rubinskiy, I; Jansen, H; Eichhorn, T V; Matysek, M; Andersson-lindstroem, G; Donegani, E; Oshea, V; Muenstermann, D; Holmkvist, C W; Verbitskaya, E; Mitina, D; Grigoriev, E; Zaluzhnyy, A; Mikuz, M; Kramberger, G; Scaringella, M; Ranjeet, R; Jain, A; Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Bomben, M; Allport, P P; Cartiglia, N; Brigljevic, V; Kohout, Z; Quirion, D; Lauer, K; Collins, P; Gallrapp, C; Rohe, T V; Villani, E G; Fox, H; Nikitin, A; Spiegel, L G; Creanza, D M; Menichelli, D; Mcduff, H; Carna, M; Weers, M; Weigell, P; Chauveau, J; Bortoletto, D; Staiano, A; Bellan, R; Szumlak, T; Sopko, V; Pawlowski, M; Pintilie, I; Pellegrini, G; Rafi tatjer, J M; Moll, M; Eckstein, D; Klanner, R; Gomez, G; Shepelev, A; Golubev, A; Lipton, R J; Borgia, A; Zavrtanik, M; Manna, N; Ranjan, K; Chhabra, S; Beyer, J; Korolkov, I; Heintz, U; Sadrozinski, H; Seiden, A; Surma, B; Esteban, S; Kazukauskas, V; Kalendra, V; Mekys, A; Nachman, B P; Tackmann, K; Steinbrueck, G; Pohlsen, T; Bolla, G; Zontar, D; Focardi, E; Seidel, S C; Winkler, A D; Altenheiner, S; Parzefall, U; Moser, H; Calderini, G; Briglin, D L; Sopko, B; Buckland, M D; Vaitkus, J V; Ortlepp, T; Lange, J C

    2002-01-01

    The requirements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN have pushed the present day silicon tracking detectors to the very edge of the current technology. Future very high luminosity colliders or a possible upgrade scenario of the LHC to a luminosity of 10$^{35}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ will require semiconductor detectors with substantially improved properties. Considering the expected total fluences of fast hadrons above 10$^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a possible reduced bunch-crossing interval of $\\approx$10 ns, the detector must be ultra radiation hard, provide a fast and efficient charge collection and be as thin as possible.\\\\ We propose a research and development program to provide a detector technology, which is able to operate safely and efficiently in such an environment. Within this project we will optimize existing methods and evaluate new ways to engineer the silicon bulk material, the detector structure and the detector operational conditions. Furthermore, possibilities to use semiconductor materials othe...

  4. DEPFET active pixel detectors for a future linear $e^+e^-$ collider

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, O; Dieguez, A; Dingfelder, J; Hemperek, T; Kishishita, T; Kleinohl, T; Koch, M; Krueger, H; Lemarenko, M; Luetticke, F; Marinas, C; Schnell, M; Wermes, N; Campbell, A; Ferber, T; Kleinwort, C; Niebuhr, C; Soloviev, Y; Steder, M; Volkenborn, R; Yaschenko, S; Fischer, P; Kreidl, C; Peric, I; Knopf, J; Ritzert, M; Curras, E; Lopez-Virto, A; Moya, D; Vila, I; Boronat, M; Esperante, D; Fuster, J; Garcia Garcia, I; Lacasta, C; Oyanguren, A; Ruiz, P; Timon, G; Vos, M; Gessler, T; Kuehn, W; Lange, S; Muenchow, D; Spruck, B; Frey, A; Geisler, C; Schwenker, B; Wilk, F; Barvich, T; Heck, M; Heindl, S; Lutz, O; Mueller, Th; Pulvermacher, C; Simonis, H.J; Weiler, T; Krausser, T; Lipsky, O; Rummel, S; Schieck, J; Schlueter, T; Ackermann, K; Andricek, L; Chekelian, V; Chobanova, V; Dalseno, J; Kiesling, C; Koffmane, C; Gioi, L.Li; Moll, A; Moser, H.G; Mueller, F; Nedelkovska, E; Ninkovic, J; Petrovics, S; Prothmann, K; Richter, R; Ritter, A; Ritter, M; Simon, F; Vanhoefer, P; Wassatsch, A; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Kodys, P; Kvasnicka, P; Scheirich, J

    2013-01-01

    The DEPFET collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-transparent active pixel detectors for high-performance vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. The characterization of detector prototypes has proven that the key principle, the integration of a first amplification stage in a detector-grade sensor material, can provide a comfortable signal to noise ratio of over 40 for a sensor thickness of 50-75 $\\mathrm{\\mathbf{\\mu m}}$. ASICs have been designed and produced to operate a DEPFET pixel detector with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed, including solutions for mechanical support, cooling and services. In this paper the status of DEPFET R & D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at a future linear $\\mathbf{e^+ e^-}$ collider.

  5. There’s more to particle physics at CERN than colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s scientific programme must be compelling, unique, diverse, and integrated into the global landscape of particle physics. One of the Laboratory’s primary goals is to provide a diverse range of excellent physics opportunities and to put its unique facilities to optimum use, maximising the scientific return.   In this spirit, we have recently established a Physics Beyond Colliders study group with a mandate to explore the unique opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex to address some of today’s outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The study group will provide input to the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The process kicked off with a two-day workshop at CERN on 6 and 7 September, organised by the study group conveners: Joerg Jaeckel (Heidelberg), Mike Lamont (CERN) and Claude Vallée (CPPM Marseille and DESY). Its purpo...

  6. The eRHIC Project

    OpenAIRE

    Burton Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The eRHIC project plans to expand Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with a high-intensity electron beam. Building on the exciting discoveries of RHIC, CERN, HERA and others, eRHIC will break new ground in collider luminosity and will push the frontiers of knowledge in nucleon and nuclear structure and in spin physics. The varied eRHIC physics programme and the proposed machine design will be presented and discussed.

  7. The eRHIC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The eRHIC project plans to expand Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC with a high-intensity electron beam. Building on the exciting discoveries of RHIC, CERN, HERA and others, eRHIC will break new ground in collider luminosity and will push the frontiers of knowledge in nucleon and nuclear structure and in spin physics. The varied eRHIC physics programme and the proposed machine design will be presented and discussed.

  8. Aperture meter for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, G J; Redaelli, S

    2011-01-01

    The control of the high intensity beams of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particular challenging and requires a good modeling of the machine and monitoring of various machine parameters. During operation it is crucial to ensure a minimal distance between the beam edge and the aperture of sensitive equipment, e.g. the superconductingmagnets, which in all cases must be in the shadowof the collimator’s that protect the machine. Possible dangerous situations must be detected as soon as possible. In order to provide the operator with information about the current machine bottlenecks an aperture meter application was developed based on the LHC online modeling toolchain. The calculation of available free aperture takes into account the best available optics and aperture model as well as the relevant beam measurements. This paper describes the design and integration of this application into the control environment and presents results of the usage in daily operation and from validation measurements.

  9. Meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Provisional Agenda for the 111th meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee to be held on Wednesday and Thursday, 26-27 September 2012. Open Session: Wednesday, 26 September at 9 a.m. in the Main Auditorium (Bldg. 500-1-001)  09.00 - 09.20    LHC Machine Status Report  09.30 - 10.00    ATLAS Status Report  10.10 - 10.40    CMS Status Report  10.50 - 11.10    COFFEE BREAK 11.10 - 11.40    LHCb Status Report 11.50 - 12.20   ALICE Status Report 12.30 - 12.50   TOTEM Status Report 13.00 - 13.20   LHCf Status Report

  10. QCD and Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  11. Femtosecond laser technologies for linear collider designs

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    A highly stabilized high-energy femtosecond laser system was developed for Compton X-ray experiments. The laser system is based on the chirped pulse amplification, and each component is actively or passively stabilized. A master oscillator with less than 100 fs timing jitter, two independent oscillators with 300 fs relative timing lag, a new measurement technique of timing fluctuation of low-repetition amplified pulse, and a special designed regenerative amplifier with high quality beam were developed. New technical options for linear collider are proposed based on these expertises. The options are temporally square pulse for low emittance electron generation, a timing stabilized seeder for CO sub 2 amplifier, and multi-pulse high-energy lasers for gamma-gamma collision and for multi-bunch electron generation.

  12. Collide@CERN is looking for mentors

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Collide@CERN Artist-in-Residence Programme is currently seeking CERN scientists interested in engaging in thought-provoking and creative collaborations with visiting artists.     In early 2012, a Digital artist will take up a 2-month residency and a Dance and Performance artist a 3-month residency.  Each artist will be allocated a specially selected science inspiration partner to work with. Both the artists and their mentors will give a public lecture in the Globe of Science and Innovation at the beginning and end of the residencies.  One scientist will be selected for each artist. Mentors and artists will be required to share knowledge by:   ·      Meeting once a week throughout the residency ·      Conducting online communications (such as a blog). If you are interested in becoming a mentor, please send the following information by e-m...

  13. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  14. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew James [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  15. ALPs effective field theory and collider signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brivio, I. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr International Academy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gavela, M.B.; Merlo, L.; Rey, R. del [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Mimasu, K. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Universite Catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); No, J.M. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Sanz, V. [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo-) Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Associated phenomenological signals at colliders are explored for both scenarios, deriving new bounds and analyzing future prospects, including LHC and High Luminosity LHC sensitivities. Mono-Z, mono-W, W-photon plus missing energy and on-shell top final states are most promising signals expected in both frameworks. In addition, non-standard Higgs decays and mono-Higgs signatures are especially prominent and expected to be dominant in non-linear realisations. (orig.)

  16. Weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Talk will cover weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders ATLAS and CMS in particular. ATLAS has measured the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process in a wide mass range around the Z resonance region using dielectron and dimuon final states with $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV data. For the dielectron channel, the measurement includes electrons detected in the forward calorimeter which extends the covered phase space. The result is then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. Uncertainties from the limited knowledge on the parton distribution functions in the proton constitute a significant part of the uncertainty and a dedicated study is performed to obtain a PDF set describing W and Z data measured previously by ATLAS. Similar studies from CMS will be reported.

  17. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  18. Colliding bodies optimization extensions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaveh, A

    2015-01-01

    This book presents and applies a novel efficient meta-heuristic optimization algorithm called Colliding Bodies Optimization (CBO) for various optimization problems. The first part of the book introduces the concepts and methods involved, while the second is devoted to the applications. Though optimal design of structures is the main topic, two chapters on optimal analysis and applications in constructional management are also included.  This algorithm is based on one-dimensional collisions between bodies, with each agent solution being considered as an object or body with mass. After a collision of two moving bodies with specified masses and velocities, these bodies again separate, with new velocities. This collision causes the agents to move toward better positions in the search space.  The main algorithm (CBO) is internally parameter independent, setting it apart from previously developed meta-heuristics. This algorithm is enhanced (ECBO) for more efficient applications in the optimal design of structures...

  19. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  20. Super high-rise buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maryon, J.C.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a super high-rise building for human occupation having at least 100 vertically spaced, human-occupiable stories comprising: a foundation; and a hollow vertical prism of reinforced concrete, mounted on the foundation and being at least 100 stories high, for transmitting to the foundation substantially all loads above at least the 75th floor of the building in a manner such that automatic lateral rigidity, stability, and strength are attained. The sides of the prism have apertures for such purposes as allowing human movement between the inside end and outside of the prism. The portion of substantially any horizontal circumference of the prism which is occupied by the apertures is less than about 25% of the horizontal circumference.

  1. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  2. Annotation: Hyperlexia: disability or superability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Elena L; Klin, Ami; Volkmar, Fred

    2003-11-01

    Hyperlexia is the phenomenon of spontaneous and precocious mastery of single-word reading that has been of interest to clinicians and researchers since the beginning of the last century. An extensive search of publications on the subject of hyperlexia was undertaken and all available publications were reviewed. The literature can be subdivided into discussions of the following issues: (1) whether hyperlexia is a phenomenon that is characteristic only of specific clinical populations (e.g., children with developmental delays) or whether it can also be observed in the general population; (2) whether hyperlexia is a distinct syndrome comorbid with a number of different disorders or whether it is a part of the spectrum of some other clinical condition(s); (3) whether hyperlexia should be defined through single-word reading superiority with regard to reading comprehension, vocabulary, general intelligence, any combination of the three, or all three characteristics; (4) whether there is a specific neuropsychological profile associated with hyperlexia; (5) whether hyperlexia is characterized by a particular developmental profile; and (6) whether hyperlexia should be viewed as a disability (deficit) or superability (talent). We interpret the literature as supporting the view that hyperlexia is a superability demonstrated by a very specific group of individuals with developmental disorders (defined through unexpected single-word reading in the context of otherwise suppressed intellectual functioning) rather than as a disability exhibited by a portion of the general population (defined through a discrepancy between levels of single-word reading and comprehension). We simultaneously argue, however, that multifaceted and multi-methodological approaches to studying the phenomenon of hyperlexia, defined within the research framework of understanding single-word reading, are warranted and encouraged.

  3. Virtual Corrections to Bremsstrahlung in High-Energy Collider Physics LHC and $e^+ e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Yost, S A; Yost, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe radiative corrections to bremsstrahlung and their application to high energy collider physics, focusing on the applications to luminosity measurement, fermion pair production and radiative return. We review the status of one loop radiative corrections in BHLUMI and the KKMC, including cross checks with newer results developed independently for radiative return. We outline a YFS-exponentiated approach to the Drell-Yan process for LHC physics, including a discussion of the relevant radiative corrections.

  4. An Algebraic View of Super-Belnap Logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Albuquerque, H.; Přenosil, Adam; Rivieccio, U.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 6 (2017), s. 1051-1086 ISSN 0039-3215 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Grant - others:EU(XE) PIRSES- GA-2012-31898 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Super-Belnap logics * Four-valued logic * Paraconsistent logic * Belnap–Dunn logic * FDE * Logic of Paradox * Kleene logic * Exactly True logic * De Morgan algebras * Abstract Algebraic Logic * Leibniz filters * Strong versions of logics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.589, year: 2016

  5. Experiments with SuperJANET/SMDS

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Steven; Hutchison, David

    1995-01-01

    A series of measurements of a computer link using the Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), as provided in the United Kingdom SuperJANET network, are described in this paper. The computer link is subject to the effects of using several access networks at the peripheries of SuperJANET, making the measurements valid only in the context of the link from one computer to another, rather than describing any attributes of SuperJANET in general. However, the measurement mechanism is refined seve...

  6. Tracheotomy Outcomes in Super Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ryan V; Haas, Patrick J; Schweinfurth, John M; Replogle, William H

    2016-08-01

    Surgeons need to understand the expected outcomes for super obese patients undergoing tracheotomy to appropriately counsel patients and families about likely risks and benefits. To determine the outcomes, complications, and mortality after tracheotomy in super obese patients (those with a body mass index [BMI] greater than 50). A retrospective review was conducted of billing records from a tertiary care academic medical center from November 1, 2010, through June 30, 2013, to identify patients undergoing tracheotomy. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with a BMI (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) greater than 50 and a control group with a BMI of 30 to 50. Patient characteristics, including BMI, age, race/ethnicity, primary diagnosis for hospitalization, medical comorbidities, and surgical technique, were measured. The primary outcome measure was dependence on tracheostomy at discharge. Secondary outcomes included rates of ventilator dependence, mortality, postoperative complications, and discharge disposition. The super obese population included 31 patients and was predominantly African American (20 patients [65%]) and female (21 patients [68%]). Mean BMI of super obese patients was 64.0 (range, 50.2-95.5). The obese patient population was mainly African American (25 patients [74%]) and female (17 patients [50%]). Twenty-five of 31 super obese patients (81%) were discharged with a tracheotomy tube in place, compared with 16 of 34 obese patients (52%). Seven patients (23%) in the super obese group were ventilator dependent at discharge, compared with 4 patients (13%) in the obese group. Only 2 of the super obese patients (3%) were decannulated before discharge, compared with 15 (44%) in the obese group. In-hospital mortality was similar for the 2 groups (super obese, 4 patients [13%] and obese, 3 patients [9%]). The overall complication rate was 19% in the super obese group (6 patients) compared with 6% in the

  7. New Mexico cloud super cooled liquid water survey final report 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, Nick; Roskovensky, John K.; Ivey, Mark D.

    2010-02-01

    Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories are partners in an effort to survey the super-cooled liquid water in clouds over the state of New Mexico in a project sponsored by the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. This report summarizes the scientific work performed at Sandia National Laboratories during the 2009. In this second year of the project a practical methodology for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water was created. This was accomplished through the analysis of certain MODIS sensor satellite derived cloud products and vetted parameterizations techniques. A software code was developed to analyze multiple cases automatically. The eighty-one storm events identified in the previous year effort from 2006-2007 were again the focus. Six derived MODIS products were obtained first through careful MODIS image evaluation. Both cloud and clear-sky properties from this dataset were determined over New Mexico. Sensitivity studies were performed that identified the parameters which most influenced the estimation of cloud super-cooled liquid water. Limited validation was undertaken to ensure the soundness of the cloud super-cooled estimates. Finally, a path forward was formulized to insure the successful completion of the initial scientific goals which include analyzing different of annual datasets, validation of the developed algorithm, and the creation of a user-friendly and interactive tool for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water.

  8. Civil engineering studies for major projects after LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, John; Perez-Duenas, Eliseo

    2011-01-01

    CERN civil engineers are heavily involved in studying several major potential collider projects to succeed/complement the LHC. Infrastructure works typically represent one third of the cost of major physics projects, so it's critical that the construction costs are well understood from the conceptual stage. For example, CERN are studying infrastructure requirements for the Linear Collider (CLIC & ILC) and the LHeC projects. This paper presents some of the key civil engineering challenges faced in such large scale projects.

  9. New Photocathode materials for electron-ion-colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaszew, Rosa A. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-25

    Our aim has been to explore new photocathode materials and schemes to develop strategies and technologies for next generation nuclear physics accelerator capabilities, particularly for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC). Thus, we investigated thin film deposition and ensuing properties for several adequate magnetic materials applicable to spin-polarized photocathodes. We also implemented a full experimental setup for light incidence at an acute angle onto the photocathode surface in order to excite surface Plasmon resonance hence increasing light absorption by a metallic surface. We successfully tested the setup with a thermionic cathode as well as Plasmonic silver-MgO samples and obtained very encouraging results. Our first results are very encouraging since the photocurrent measured on this preliminary plasmonic Ag-MgO sample under low power (~ 1mW) cw red light from a HeNe laser was 256 pA, thus two orders magnitude larger than that reported by others following also plasmonic approaches. We extended our studies to shorter wavelengths and we also started preliminary work on chemically ordered MnAl thin films –a component of the tertiary Ag-Mn-Al (silmanal) alloy in order to develop spin-polarized photocathodes capable of sustaining surface Plasmon resonance. It is worthwhile mentioning that a graduate student has been directly involved during this project ensuring the training of next generation of scientists in this area of research.

  10. Fabrication of Super Hydrophobic Surfaces by fs Laser Pulses : How to Produce Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, M.N.W.

    2008-01-01

    The chair of Applied Laser Technology of the University of Twente, The Netherlands, is performing research into applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers for micromachining. In a recent project, PhD student Max Groenendijk developed a method for the production of super water repellant surfaces by

  11. Hunting for Cosmic-Ray Origins with SuperTIGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    the atmosphere cause these particles to decay into lower-energy secondary particles upon impact. In addition, the detector must operate for a long time in order to make meaningful abundance measurements: millions of cosmic-ray detections can result in just a few hundreds of detections of heavy-element nuclei.The SuperTIGER team solved these problems by flying their instrument on a high-altitude scientific balloon at 127,000 feet. The project launched in Antarctica, taking advantage of the wind patterns circulating around the pole to maximize the flight time. In the end, SuperTIGER flew for 55 days, shattering the record for longest flight of a heavy-lift scientific balloon (which was previously 42 days). During this time,the experiment detected a whopping50 million cosmic rays.Pinning Down AbundancesMeasured elemental abundances for galactic cosmic rays, from SuperTIGER (orange) and other experiments. [Murphy et al. 2016]Now, in a publication led by Ryan Murphy (Washington University in St. Louis), the team has detailed the results of SuperTIGERs observations. Their measurements represent the tightest constraints on the abundances of galactic cosmic ray nuclei made in this charge and energy range, and the abundances are consistent with a model in which source material consists of a mixture of 19% material from massive stars and 81% normal ISM.These results support the idea that a significant fraction of cosmic-ray material originates in associations of young, massive stars, and that the remainder is made up of solar-system-abundance ISM thats injected and accelerated possibly by supernova shocks into cosmic rays.CitationR. P. Murphy et al 2016 ApJ 831 148. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/831/2/148

  12. Jet Physics at High Energy Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yang-Ting

    The future of new physics searches at the LHC will be to look for hadronic signals with jets. In order to distinguish a hadronic signal from its background, it is important to develop advanced collider physics techniques that make accurate theoretical predictions. This work centers on phenomenological and formal studies of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), including resummation of hadronic observables using Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), calculating anomalous dimensions of multi-Wilson line operators in AdS, and improving jet physics analysis using multiple event interpretations. Hadronic observables usually involve physics at different energy scales, and the calculations depend on large logarithms of the energy ratios. We can prove factorization theorems of observables and resum large logarithms using renormalization-group techniques. The heavy jet mass distribution for e +e- collisions is calculated at next-to-next-to-next-to leading logarithmic order (N3LL), and we measure the strong coupling constant at 0.3% accuracy. We also calculate the jet-mass distribution at partial N2LL in gamma + jet events at the LHC. The effect of non-global logarithms in resummation estimated, and it is significant only at the peak region. Soft QCD interactions among jets can be described by multi-Wilson line operators, with each Wilson line pointing along one of the jet directions. The anomalous dimensions of these operators are key for higher-order resummation. We study these operators using radial quantization and conformal gauge, which leads to a drastic simplification of the two-loop anomalous dimension calculation. We also find that the anomalous dimension calculation is closely related to a corresponding Witten diagram calculation. Jets are complicated objects to identify in high energy collider experiments. A single interpretation of each event can only extract a limited amount of information. We propose telescoping jet algorithms which give multiple event

  13. Acoustic Design of Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Ellehauge; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Brunskog, Jonas

    in a controlled laboratory environment have been conducted with the element in order to evaluate its performance in airborne and impact sound insulation. These results have been employed in simulations of the flanking transmission to estimate the in-situ performance of the super-light slab element. The flanking...... transmission has been done both in a standard room consisting of precast concrete elements and as a parametric study in order to estimate the accuracy of the used model. Experiments on the ultimate limit state regarding moment, shear and pull-out resistance is carried out for the super-light element. As a part...... of the same test series elastic behaviour of the super-light element is also investigated. This is done to verify that requirements and methods supplied by design codes can be applied to the element with sufficient accuracy. In addition, the super-light slab element has been exposed to a standard fire test...

  14. Axial Super-resolution Evanescent Wave Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Pendharker, Sarang; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a 3D nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography (AxSET) method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRF) beyond surface imaging, and achieve tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of three-dimensional fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by 1D (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axi...

  15. Super-resolution imaging in live cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cox, Susan

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable...

  16. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  17. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kozanecki, W. [DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France)

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  18. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  19. Sustainable composite super absorbents made from polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Tang, Mi; Hong, Xiaoting; K. S. Hui

    2016-01-01

    Compared to traditional super absorbent polymers using raw materials from petrochemical industry, natural polymer absorbents are more favorable because they are sustainable and biodegradable. In this study, composite absorbents were developed by crosslinking carrageenan with sodium alginate using calcium chloride. Effect of composition on absorption was tested. Absorption was improved by increasing carrageenan content. The super absorbent exhibited the maximal swelling ratio of 13.1 g/g in 0....

  20. CLIC: Physics potential of a high-energy e+e- collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...