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Sample records for super collider design

  1. Detectors for the Superconducting Super Collider, design concepts, and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    The physics of compensation calorimetry is reviewed in the light of the need of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors. The four major detector types: liquid argon, scintillator, room temperature liquids, and silicon, are analyzed with respect to some of their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, general comments are presented which reflect the reliability of simulation code systems. 29 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    The scientific need for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined, along with the history of the development of the SSC concept. A brief technical description is given of each of the main points of the SSC conceptual design. The construction cost and construction schedule are discussed, followed by issues associated with the realization of the SSC. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory coupled-cavity linac mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starling, W.J.; Cain, T.

    1992-01-01

    A collaboration between the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the engineering and mechanical design of the SSCL Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) has yielded an innovative example of the well known side coupled-cavity type of linear accelerator. The SSCL CCL accelerates an H - beam from 70 MeV to 600 MeV with an rf cavity structure consisting of eight tanks in each of nine modules for a total length of about 112 meters. Magnetically-coupled bridge couplers transfer power from tank to tank within a module. A single rf power input is located at the center bridge coupler of each module. The bridge couplers permit placement along the beam line of combined function focusing/steering electromagnets and diagnostic pods for beam instrumentation. Each tank and bridge coupler is rf frequency stabilized, nominally to 1,283 MHz, by water pumped through integral water passages. Air isolation grooves surround the water passages at each braze joint so that water-to-vacuum interfaces are avoided. Each tank is supported by adjustable spherical bearing rod end struts to permit alignment and accommodate thermal expansion and contraction of the rf structure. Tank struts, electromagnet/diagnostic pod support frames, vacuum manifolds and utilities are all mounted to a girder-and-leg support stand running the full length of the CCL. (Author) tab., fig

  4. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  5. Review of the abort dump shown in the SSC [superconducting super collider] conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1987-04-01

    This report details the design of the abort dump for the Superconducting Super-Collider (SSC). The dump is made from graphite and designed to absorb the maximum beam energy of 400 MJ. The report considers long time activation effects of the dump components. The report concludes that the basic design of the abort dump is well defined

  6. Design of the multilayer insulation system for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm dipole cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1991-03-01

    The development of the multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 50 mm collider dipole cryostat is an ongoing extension of work conducted during the 40 mm cryostat program. While the basic design of the MLI system for the 50 mm cryostat resembles that of the 40 mm cryostat, results from measurements of MLI thermal performance below 80K have prompted a re-design of the MLI system for the 20K thermal radiation shield. Presented is the design of the MLI system for the 50 mm collider dipole cryostat, with discussion focusing on system performance, blanket geometry, cost-effective fabrication techniques, and built-in quality control measures that assure consistent thermal performance throughout the SSC accelerator. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Design features of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.; Cottingham, J.; Ganetis, G.

    1989-01-01

    The main ring dipole for the SSC is specified as a high performance magnet that is required to provide a uniform, 6.6 T field in a 4 cm aperture at minimum cost. These design requirements have been addressed in an R ampersand D program in which the coil design, coil mechanical support, yoke and shell structure, trim coil and beam tube design, and a variety of new instrumentation, have been developed. The design of the magnet resulting from this intensive R ampersand D program, including various measurements from both 1.8 m and 17 m long models, is reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs

  8. Structural performance of the first SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] Design B dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1989-09-01

    The first Design B Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet has been successfully tested. This magnet was heavily instrumented with temperature and strain gage sensors in order to evaluate its adherence to design constraints and design calculations. The instrumentation and associated data acquisition system allowed monitoring of the magnet during cooldown, warmup, and quench testing. This paper will focus on the results obtained from structural measurements on the suspension system during normal and rapid cooldowns and during quench studies at full magnet current. 4 refs., 9 figs

  9. Report of the DOE Review Committee on the conceptual design of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The review of the conceptual design of the Superconducting Super Collider includes a review of the scientific basis of the facility and an overview of its technical systems, conventional systems, environment and safety, and reliability. The technical systems are evaluated, including the accelerator physics, injector systems, magnets, and cryogenic and vacuum systems. An overall review and evaluation is given with respect to the cost estimate, construction schedule, and funding profile. Subcommittee reports are appended for accelerator physics, injector systems, magnets, cryogenics and vacuum, other technical systems, conventional facilities, management support, and environment and safety. Cost estimates of the Conceptual Design Group and the DOE are compared by work breakdown structure

  10. Design and results of the radio frequency quadrupole RF system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippe, J.; Marsden, E.; Marrufo, O.; Regan, A.; Rees, D.; Ziomek, C.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) entered into a joint venture to design and develop a 600 kW amplifier and its low-level controls for use in the Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating cavity of the SSC. The design and development work has been completed. After being tested separately, the high power amplifier and low level RF control system were integrated and tested on a test cavity. Results of that tests are given. Tests were then carried out on the actual RFQ with and without the presence of the accelerated beam. Results of these tests are also given, along with the phase and amplitude information

  11. Report of the reference designs study group on the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In December, 1983, the directors of the US high energy accelerator laboratories chartered the National SSC Reference Designs Study to review in detail the technical and economic feasibility of various options for creating the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) facility, a 20 TeV on 20 TeV proton-proton collider having a luminosity up to 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 . The primary objective of the study was to help the DOE, the high energy physics community, and the scientific community as a whole to decide how best to proceed with SSC R and D directed toward improving the cost effectiveness of applicable accelerator technology. We have concluded that the basic principles of design used successfully for existing accelerators can be conservatively extended to a proton collider having the SSC primary specifications of energy and luminosity. Furthermore, each of the three reference magnet styles studied could serve as the foundation for an SSC facility meeting these specifications. A vigorous R and D program of approximately three years duration will be required to refine the cost estimates for the magnets, to determine their actual performance, to determine their manufacturability and reliability, and to develop cost-effective methods for their assembly and quality assurance. It is anticipated that the magnet options can be narrowed to a single one during an early phase of the R and D program. An important R and D goal will be to produce, using mass-production methods, a significant number of magnets of the chosen style. These magnets would then be thoroughly tested under conditions simulating actual accelerator operations

  12. Siting the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.; Rooney, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering established the Super Collider Site Evaluation Committee to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites for the Superconducting Super Collider. Thirty-six proposals were examined by the committee. Using the set of criteria announced by DOE in its Invitation for Site Proposals, the committee identified eight sites that merited inclusion on a ''best qualified list.'' The list represents the best collective judgment of 21 individuals, carefully chosen for their expertise and impartiality, after a detailed assessment of the proposals using 19 technical subcriteria and DOE's life cycle cost estimates. The sites, in alphabetical order, are: Arizona/Maricopa; Colorado; Illinois; Michigan/Stockbridge; New York/Rochester; North Carolina; Tennessee; and Texas/Dallas-Fort Worth. The evaluation of these sites and the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this book

  13. Collarless, close-in, shaped iron aperture designs for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.C.; Morgan, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The nominal-design SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole encloses the coil in an iron yoke having a circular aperture. The radial gap between the coil and the iron is about 15 mm to provide space for a strong annular collar around the coil, and also to reduce the effects of iron saturation on central field harmonics. The 15 mm gap also reduces the desirable dipole field contributed by the iron. The present paper gives a coil and aperture configuration in which the gap is reduced to 5 mm at the midplane, in which the aperture is shaped to reduce the unwanted effects of iron saturation. The transfer function is increased about 5% at 6.6 Tesla and the unwanted harmonics are within SSC tolerances at all field levels. These designs would require that the yoke and containment vessel absorb the stresses due to assembly and magnetic forces. A short magnet is being built with a close-in shaped iron aperture and existing coil geometry to assess the benefits of this concept. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Report of the Reference Designs Study Group on the Superconducting Super Collider. Appendix A. Design details

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    Designs are presented for magnets, cryogenics, vacuum systems, main power supply and quench protection system, correction element power supplies, radio-frequency system, injection system, beam abort system, beam instrumentation, control system, site safety, injector, survey and alignment

  15. Report of the Reference Designs Study Group on the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The study was based on three different styles of superconducting magnets, each emphasizing a different configuration aimed at sharply decreasing the cost of producing the needed magnet system below that achievable with existing designs. In the study three key areas were addressed: technical feasibility; economic feasibility; and identification of specific R and D needs. Primary emphasis was on estimating the cost range within which SSC construction can confidently be expected to fall. In doing this, attention was focused on the cost of creating the collider itself. The costs of research equipment, preconstruction R and D, and possible site acquisition are not included in this study. The report of the Reference Designs Study is meant neither as a proposal for SSC construction, nor as a site preference statement. We have concluded that the basic principles of design used successfully for existing accelerators can be conservatively extended to a proton collider having the SSC primary specifications of energy and luminosity. Furthermore, each of the three reference magnet styles studied could serve as the foundation for an SSC facility meeting these specifications. A vigorous R and D program of approximately three years duration will be required to refine the cost estimates for the magnets, to determine their actual performance, to determine their manufacturability and reliability, and to develop cost-effective methods for their assembly and quality assurance. It is anticipted that the magnet options can be narrowed to a single one during an early phase of the R and D program. An important R and D goal will be to produce, using mass-production methods, a significant number of magnets of the chosen style. These magnets would then be thoroughly tested under conditions simulating actual accelerator operations

  16. Considerations on the design of front-end electronics for silicon calorimetry for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Bauer, M.L.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Todd, R.A.; Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations are described for the design of a silicon-based sampling calorimetry detector for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The use of silicon as the detection medium allows fast, accurate, and fine-grained energy measurements -- but for optimal performance, the front-end electronics must be matched to the detector characteristics and have the speed required by the high SSC interaction rates. The relation between the signal-to-noise ratio of the calorimeter electronics and the charge collection time, the preamplifier power dissipation, detector capacitance and leakage, charge gain, and signal shaping and sampling was studied. The electrostatic transformer connection was analyzed and found to be unusable for a tightly arranged calorimeter because of stray capacitance effects. The method of deconvolutional sampling was developed as a means for pileup correction following synchronous sampling and analog storage. 3 refs., 6 figs

  17. Report of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research Review Committee on the site-specific conceptual design of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    After it was established in early 1989, the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) began to prepare a detailed site-specific SSC conceptual design, including cost and schedule estimates. As detailed in the SSC Site-Specific Conceptual Design Report (SCDR), this design builds upon the design in the March 1986 SSC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and takes into account characteristics of the SSC site, results of continuing magnet R ampersand D, and advances in accelerator design

  18. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm aperture dipole magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, T.H. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Tsavalas, Y.P. (General Electric Co., Florence, SC (USA). Medical Systems)

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Cline, D.B.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.A.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Lee, Y.; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.-Y.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y. [Brookhaven Nat. Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)]|[BINP, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)]|[Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4815 (United States)]|[Center for Advanced Accelerators, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1547 (United States)]|[CEBAF, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)]|[University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States)]|[KEK, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-Ken 305 (Japan)]|[DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677 (United States)]|[SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States)]|[Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)]|[Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)]|[Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06430-5195 (United States)]|[UC Berkele

    1996-11-01

    The construction principles of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-colliders are discussed. After a presentation of the properties of some collider ring candidate designs, the methods for {mu}{sup {+-}} production are described. Then the principles of beam cooling for such colliders are considered. Finally the components of a collider storage rings are described, whereby also polarization is considered. (HSI).

  20. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal's photo multiplier tube (PMT)

  1. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  2. Checking the numbers for the labyrinths shown in the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1987-04-01

    Reviewed are the designs for access labyrinths presently shown in the Conceptual Design Report to see if they are reasonable for radiation protection purposes. This matter was previously studied two years ago in a Fermilab TM (Co85a). The methods used are based upon scaling the results of calculations done by Gollon and Awschalom. Confidence in the results has been fortified by a successful experimental test. The Conceptual Design Report shows two types of access labyrinths which are significantly different. The first type is that at a Sector Service Area, while the second is that provided for personnel entry to the Interaction Regions

  3. Super collider egress spacing and life safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemens, P.L.; Mohr, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    For the 53-mile tunnel of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), egress points are planned at an unprecedented spacing of five miles. In studying egress spacing with regard to life safety, no codes were found dealing specifically with accelerator tunnels. General codes were found which specify egress spacing not greater than several hundred feet. However, these general codes are neither for occupancies like the SSC nor do they credit the many overlapping safety features found in SSC conceptual design. A search for standards in counterpart underground activities disclosed a safety code for non-coal mines which prescribes egress requirements that the SSC surpasses. Egress-related risks for SSC hazards were cataloged and found less profound than those for mining. Thus, the SSC egress-related injury rate should be less than that currently accepted in the mining industry. (The overall injury rate in mining is below the national average for industry at large). As a further check, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory was used as an extrapolation model for an egress-related injury rate study. Fermilab, with a statistically relevant database, has an injury rate below the national average. Of all accelerator tunnel injuries over its 18-year history, there were none for which probability of occurrence or severity of outcome would have been affected had egress spacing been either reduced from the present 800 ft. or increased by several miles. If the injury history experienced at Fermilab is acceptable, and if the extent to which the SSC surpasses non-coal mine requirements is satisfactory, there should be no reason to alter SSC egress spacing from the five-mile intervals now planned. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Conceptual design report for a superconducting coil suitable for use in the large solenoid detector at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Krebs, H.J.; Kephart, R.D.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) was done at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 1.7 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictability of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Our conceptual design of the magnet and calorimeter has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology and is therefore feasible. The principal difficulties anticipated are those associated with the very large physical dimensions and stored energy of the magnet. 5 figs

  5. Electron lenses for super-colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the operating principles and technology of electron lenses in supercolliders.  Electron lenses are a novel instrument for high energy particle accelerators, particularly for the energy-frontier superconducting hadron colliders, including the Tevatron, RHIC, LHC and future very large hadron colliders.  After reviewing the issues surrounding beam dynamics in supercolliders, the book offers an introduction to the electron lens method and its application.  Further chapters describe the technology behind the electron lenses which have recently been proposed, built and employed for compensation of beam-beam effects and for collimation of high-energy high-intensity beams, for compensation of space-charge effects and several other applications in accelerators. The book will be an invaluable resource for those involved in the design, construction and operation of the next generation of hadron colliders.

  6. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipole coil production tooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs

  7. Modeling large underground experimental halls for the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, F.; Mrugala, M.

    1993-01-01

    Geomechanical aspects of the excavation design, and analysis of two large underground experimental halls for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), being built in Texas, have been extensively investigated using computer modeling. Each chamber, measuring approximately 350 ft long, 110 ft wide, and 190 ft high, is to be excavated mainly through soft marl and overlying competent limestone. Wall stability is essential not only for ensuring excavation safety but also for meeting strict requirements for chamber stability over the 30-yr design life of the facility. Extensive numerical modeling has played a significant role in the selection of excavation methods, excavation sequence, and rock reinforcement systems. (Author)

  8. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and LHC [Large Hadron Collider] experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs

  10. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084369; Levichev, Evgeny; Piminov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA$\\Phi$NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  11. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bogomyagkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DAΦNE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DAΦNE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  12. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] site evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    With this report, the SSC Site Task Force forwards to the Director, Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE), its evaluation of the technical criteria and life-cycle costs for the proposed SSC sites judged to be the best qualified. The criteria against which each site was evaluated are those set forth in the Invitation for Site Proposals for the Superconducting Super Collider (DOE/ER-0315) (Invitation) which was prepared by the Task Force and issued in April 1987. The methodology followed by the Task Force in this report and in all other phases of the proposal evaluation has been consistent with the SSC site selection process approved by DOE's Energy System Acquisition Advisory Board (ESAAB). The goal of the site selection process is to identify a site that will permit the highest level of research productivity and overall effectiveness of the SSC at a reasonable cost of construction and operation and with minimial impact on the environment. The Task Force acknowledges that all seven sites are, indeed, highly qualified locations for the construction and operation of the SSC on the basis of technical and cost considerations. In performing its evaluation, which is presented in this paper, the Task Force took an in-depth look at each site on the basis of site visits and extensive technical analyses. A consensus rating for each technical evaluation criterion and subcriterion was developed for each site

  13. Dealing with abort kicker prefire in the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Baishev, I.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; Parker, B.; Richardson, R.D.; Zhou, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses a single-turn extraction abort system to divert the circulating beam to a massive graphite absorber at normal termination of the operating cycle or in case of any of a number of predefined fault modes. The Collider rings must be designed to be tolerant to abort extraction kicker prefires and misfires because of the large circulating beam energy. We have studied the consequences of beam loss in the accelerator due to such prefires and misfires in terms of material heating and radiation generation using full scale machine simulations and Monte-Carlo energy deposition calculations. Some results from these calculations as well as possible protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of kicker prefire and misfire are discussed in this paper

  14. Object-oriented simulation for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jiasheng; Chung, Moon-Jung

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an object-oriented simulation environment called OZ for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The design applies object-oriented technology to data visualization, behavior modelling, dynamic simulation and version control. A meta class structure is proposed to model different types of objects in large systems by their functionality. OZ provides a direct-manipulation user interface which allows the user to visualize the data as an object in the database and interactively model the component of the system. Modelling can be exercised at different levels of the class hierarchy and then can be dynamically bound into a system for simulation. Inheritance is used to derive new configurations of the system or subsystem from the existing one, and specify an object's behavior. Delegation is used to construct a system by instantiating existing objects and ''stealing'' their methods by delegators

  15. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  16. Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1989-02-01

    Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment of the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed. 27 refs., 15 figs

  17. Systems engineering at the Superconducting Super Collider (one year later)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonte, J.

    1991-03-01

    After one year of systems engineering at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the project baseline of costs, schedule milestones, and top-level (point design) physics parameters has been accepted by the Department of Energy (DOE). This paper describes the role of systems engineering in developing the baseline and in establishing requirements specifications, change control, and methods of tracking to a baseline. The differences between the Department of Defense and DOE--specifically at the SSC Laboratory (SSCL)--in application of systems engineering disciplines and tools are discussed. The aim of the paper is to inform participating industries of the anticipated requirements format and of the emphasis that will be placed on physics requirements as opposed to procedures. Industry subcontractors should have a better understanding of the systems engineering expected by the SSCL. 3 figs

  18. Muon Collider Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed

  19. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  20. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  1. Computer protection plan for the Superconducing Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current unclassified computer security program practices, Policies and procedures for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). This document includes or references all related policies and procedures currently implemented throughout the SSCL. The document includes security practices which are planned when the facility is fully operational.

  2. Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

    1986-06-01

    The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength

  3. SSC collider dipole magnet end mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delchamps, S.W.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.; Ewald, K.; Fulton, H.; Kerby, J.; Koska, W.; Strait, J.; Wake, S.M. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Leung, K.K. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the ends of Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnets to be constructed and tested at Fermilab. Coil end clamps, end yoke configuration, and end plate design are discussed. Loading of the end plate by axial Lorentz forces is discussed. Relevant data from 40 mm and 50 mm aperture model dipole magnets built and tested at Fermilab are presented. In particular, the apparent influence of end clamp design on the quench behavior of model SSC dipoles is described. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Superconducting Super Collider: Final environmental impact statement: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides as much information as possible at this stage of the project development regarding the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) at each of the site alternatives. However, the DOE recognizes that further review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required prior to construction and operation of the proposed SSC project at the selected site based on more detailed design and to identify specific mitigation measures which can be incorporated into final design. Accordingly, following selection of a site for the proposed SSC, the DOE will prepare a Supplemental EIS to address in more detail the impacts of constructing and operating the proposed SSC at the selected site and alternatives for mitigating those impacts. To measure the effects of constructing the SSC at any of the seven alternative sites, the DOE determined which aspects of the human environment would be significantly affected. The EIS describes the baseline conditions at each of the seven site alternatives, the trends underway resulting in changes, the potential environmental impacts expected if the SSC were sited, possible mitigations of adverse impacts, and resulting residual adverse impacts

  5. Vacuum technology issues for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joestlein, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider, to be built in Texas, will provide an energy of 40 TeV from colliding proton beams. This energy is twenty times higher than currently available from the only other cryogenic collider, the Fermilab Tevatron, and will allow experiments that can lead to a better understanding of the fundamental properties of matter. The energy scale and the size of the new machine pose intriguing challenges and opportunities for the its vacuum systems. The discussion will include the effects of synchrotron radiation on cryogenic beam tubes, cold adsorption pumps for hydrogen, methods of leak checking large cryogenic systems, the development of cold beam valves, and radiation damage to components, especially electronics. 9 figs., 1 tab

  6. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Yunhai; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli; Gerity, James; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-09-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  7. Computing needs of the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebold, R.

    1984-01-01

    Following a brief description of the SSC, the computing needs are discussed for both the accelerator design and the experimentation. The computing power required is considerably beyond that being used at present facilities, and parallel processing is expected to play an important role in supplying these needs

  8. Superconducting Super Collider silicon tracking subsystem research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.O.; Thompson, T.C.; Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.

    1990-12-01

    The Alamos National Laboratory Mechanical Engineering and Electronics Division has been investigating silicon-based elementary particle tracking device technology as part of the Superconducting Super Collider-sponsored silicon subsystem collaboration. Structural, materials, and thermal issues have been addressed. This paper explores detector structural integrity and stability, including detailed finite element models of the silicon wafer support and predictive methods used in designing with advanced composite materials. The current design comprises a magnesium metal matrix composite (MMC) truss space frame to provide a sparse support structure for the complex array of silicon detectors. This design satisfies the 25-μm structural stability requirement in a 10-Mrad radiation environment. This stability is achieved without exceeding the stringent particle interaction constraints set at 2.5% of a radiation length. Materials studies have considered thermal expansion, elastic modulus, resistance to radiation and chemicals, and manufacturability of numerous candidate materials. Based on optimization of these parameters, the MMC space frame will possess a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near zero to avoid thermally induced distortions, whereas the cooling rings, which support the silicon detectors and heat pipe network, will probably be constructed of a graphite/epoxy composite whose CTE is engineered to match that of silicon. Results from radiation, chemical, and static loading tests are compared with analytical predictions and discussed. Electronic thermal loading and its efficient dissipation using heat pipe cooling technology are discussed. Calculations and preliminary designs for a sprayed-on graphite wick structure are presented. A hydrocarbon such as butane appears to be a superior choice of heat pipe working fluid based on cooling, handling, and safety criteria

  9. pp Interaction Regions. [Superconducting super collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, R.; Johnson, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    This group served as the interface between experimenters and accelerator physicists. A start was made on a portfolio of IR's, building on previous studies including the Reference Designs Study (RDS). The group also looked at limits on time structure and luminosity, the clustering of IR's, external beams of secondary particles from the IR's, and various operational issues connected with the IR's. Designs were developed for interaction regions for RDS-B (individual cryostats for two 5-T rings, separated by 60 cm vertically). For a fixed geometry, the quadrupoles have been tuned over a range to give a factor of 100 variation in ..beta..* (1 to 100 m) and thus in luminosity; an even larger variation may well be possible. Variation of the minimum ..beta..* with free space between the quadrupole triplets, for a quad strength of 280 T/m and under the constraint of fixed chromaticity, showed a factor of five decrease in maximum luminosity in going from a high luminosity region with +-20 m free space to a small-angle region with +-100 m. Similar variants of the RDS-A IR were also found.

  10. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] magnet technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.

    1987-09-01

    To minimize cost of the SSC facility, small-bore high field dipole magnets have been developed;some of the new technology that has been developed at several U.S. national laboratories and in industry is summarized. Superconducting wire with high J/sub c/ and filaments as small as 5μm diameter is not produced iwht mechanical properties suitable for reliable cable production. A variety of collar designs of both aluminum and stainless steel have been used in model magnets. A low-heat leak post-type cryostat support system is used and a system for accurate alignment of coil-collar-yoke in the cryostat has been developed. Model magnets of 1-m, 1.8 m, 4.5 m, and 17 m lengths have been build during the past two years. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  11. A bipolar monolithic preamplifier for high-capacitance SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] silicon calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Bugg, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a preamplifier designed and fabricated specifically to address the requirements of silicon calorimetry for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The topology and its features are discussed in addition to the design methodology employed. The simulated and measured results for noise, power consumption, and speed are presented. Simulated an measured data for radiation damage effects as well as data for post-damage annealing are also presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. 1994 expected to be year of decision for European Super Collider.

    CERN Multimedia

    Sweet, William N

    1994-01-01

    Plans to build Europe's counterpart to the US' Superconducting Super Collider, the Large Hadron Collider, may push through when the CERN Council meets on Apr 15, 1994. The European scientific community is optimistic that the plan will be approved.

  13. The prototype message broadcast system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, K.; Skegg, R.

    1990-11-01

    A prototype unified message broadcast system to handle the site-wide distribution of all control system messages for the Superconducting Super Collider is presented. The messages are assembled in the control room area and encapsulated for transmission via a general fiber-optic link system to devices distributed throughout 70 miles of tunnels. An embedded timing signal is used by the distribution system to ensure that messages arrive at all devices simultaneously. Devices receive messages using a special receiver sub-system. A simple version of this system is to be used in the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) at the SSC site in 1991. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. Muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B.; Muon Collider Collaboration

    1998-01-01

    Parameters are given of machines with center-of-mass (CoM) energies of 3 TeV and 400 GeV but, besides a comment on neutrino radiation, the paper concentrates on progress on the design of a machine to operate at a light Higgs mass, assumed, for this study, to be 100 GeV (CoM).

  15. Optimization of the design of DC-DC converters for improving the electromagnetic compatibility with the Front-End electronic for the super Large Hadron Collider Trackers

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes Rojas, Cristian Alejandro; Blanchot, G

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN sets new challenges for the powering of the detectors. One of the powering schemes under study is based on DC-DC buck converters mounted on the front-end modules. The hard environmental conditions impose strict restrictions to the converters in terms of low volume, radiation and magnetic field tolerance. Furthermore, the noise emission of the switching converters must not affect the performance of the powered systems. A study of the sources and paths of noise of a synchronous buck converter has been made for identifying the critical parameters to reduce their emissions. As proof of principle, a converter was designed following the PCB layout considerations proposed and then used for powering a silicon strip module prototype for the ATLAS upgrade, in order to evaluate their compatibility.

  16. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.; Gerity, J.; Mann, T.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N. J.; Satttarov, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated superconducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  17. Physics goals of the Superconducting SuperCollider (SSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1980s a strong concensus emerged that the physical goals of the Superconducting SuperCollider (SSC) were clear enough to justify making it the highest priority scientifically of the US particle physics community. That these goals could be achieved followed from the research of a number of people, and in turn was founded on the success of the Standard Model of particle physics. This article reviews these goals, including the impact of recent new data, ideas and calculations. At every stage, results from the Snowmass workshops (each three weeks long, with several hundred participants, in 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988 and 1990) have greatly clarified our understanding. Because of the validity of the Standard Model, we know that some fundamental new results will be obtained at the SSC even though we do not know what form those results will take. (Author)

  18. Development of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] trim coil beam tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses ≅9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development

  19. SuperB A High-Luminosity Asymmetric $e^+ e^-$ Super Flavour Factory : Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bona, M.; Grauges Pous, E.; Colangelo, P.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Eigen, G.; Venturini, M.; Soni, N.; Bruschi, M.; De Castro, S.; Faccioli, P.; Gabrieli, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Semprini Cesare, N.; Spighi, R.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J.; Soni, A.; Khan, A.; Barniakov, A.Y.; Barniakov, M.Y.; Blinov, V.E.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Golubev, V.B.; Kononov, S.A.; Koop, I.A.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Nikitin, S.A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Piminov, P.A.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Shatilov, D.N.; Skovpen, Y.I.; Solodov, E.A.; Cheng, C.H.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D.J.; Porter, F.C.; Asner, D.M.; Pham, T.N.; Fleischer, R.; Giudice, G.F.; Hurth, T.; Mangano, M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B.T.; Schwartz, A.J.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soffer, A.; Beard, C.D.; Haas, T.; Mankel, R.; Hiller, G.; Ball, P.; Pappagallo, M.; Pennington, M.R.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Abada, A.; Becirevic, D.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Pene, O.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabresi, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Stancari, G.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Calcaterra, A.; Drago, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Guiducci, S.; Isidori, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.M.; Piccolo, M.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Rama, M.; Vaccarezza, C.; Zallo, A.; Zobov, M.; De Sangro, R.; Buzzo, A.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M.R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Matias, J.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Borzumati, F.; Eyges, V.; Prell, S.A.; Pedlar, T.K.; Korpar, S.; Pestonik, R.; Staric, M.; Neubert, M.; Denig, A.G.; Nierste, U.; Agoh, T.; Ohmi, K.; Ohnishi, Y.; Fry, J.R.; Touramanis, C.; Wolski, A.; Golob, B.; Krizan, P.; Flaecher, H.; Bevan, A.J.; Di Lodovico, F.; George, K.A.; Barlow, R.; Lafferty, G.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.A.; Simi, G.; Patel, P.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Kaidalov, A.; Buras, A.J.; Tarantino, C.; Buchalla, G.; Sanda, A.I.; D'Ambrosio, G.; Ricciardi, G.; Bigi, I.; Jessop, C.P.; Losecco, J.M.; Honscheid, K.; Arnaud, N.; Chehab, R.; Fedala, Y.; Polci, F.; Roudeau, P.; Sordini, V.; Soskov, V.; Stocchi, A.; Variola, A.; Vivoli, A.; Wormser, G.; Zomer, F.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Bonneaud, G.R.; Lombardo, V.; Calderini, G.; Ratti, L.; Speziali, V.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Servoli, L.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Dell'Orso, M.; Forti, F.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Massa, M.; Mazur, M.A.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Braun, V.; Lenz, A.; Adams, G.S.; Danko, I.Z.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gaspero, Mario; Jackson, P.; Martinelli, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Morganti, Silvio; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Silvestrini, L.; Voena, C.; Catani, L.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Messi, R.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Ciuchini, M.; Lubicz, V.; Wilson, F.F.; Godang, R.; Chen, X.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M.; Trivedi, A.; White, R.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Allen, M.T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Brodsky, S.J.; Cai, Y.; Coleman, J.; Convery, M.R.; DeBarger, S.; Dingfelder, J.C.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Haller, G.; Heifets, S.A.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kocian, M.L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Li, N.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D.; Messner, R.; Muller, D.R.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Pivi, M.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Roodman, A.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Snyder, A.; Sullivan, M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W.; Stoeck, H.; Cheng, H.Y.; Li, H.N.; Keum, Y.Y.; Gronau, M.; Grossman, Y.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Gambino, P.; Marchetto, F.; Menichetti, Ezio A.; Mussa, R.; Pelliccioni, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Bernabeu, J.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D.A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paradisi, P.; Pich, A.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Roney, J.M.; Back, J.J.; Gershon, T.J.; Harrison, P.F.; Latham, T.E.; Mohanty, G.B.; Petrov, A.A.; Pierini, M.; INFN

    2007-01-01

    The physics objectives of SuperB, an asymmetric electron-positron collider with a luminosity above 10^36/cm^2/s are described, together with the conceptual design of a novel low emittance design that achieves this performance with wallplug power comparable to that of the current B Factories, and an upgraded detector capable of doing the physics in the SuperB environment.

  20. SuperB Technical Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M.; Kolodziej, J.; Kucewicz, W.; Sapor, M.; Jeremie, A.; Grauges Pous, E.; Bruno, G.E.; De Robertis, G.; Diacono, D.; Donvito, G.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giordano, F.; Loddo, F.; Loparco, F.; Maggi, G.P.; Manzari, V.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Nappi, E.; Palano, A.; Santeramo, B.; Sgura, I.; Silvestris, L.; Spinoso, V.; Eigen, G.; Zalieckas, J.; Zhuo, Z.; Jenkovszky, L.; Balbi, G.; Boldini, M.; Bonacorsi, D.; Cafaro, V.; D'Antone, I.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Di Sipio, R.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Gabrielli, A.; Galli, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Giorgi, F.M.; Grandi, C.; Lax, I.; Lo Meo, S.; Marconi, U.; Montanari, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Piccinini, M.; Rovelli, T.; Semprini Cesari, N.; Torromeo, G.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Vagnoni, V.M.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Caron, J. -F.; Hearty, C.; Lu, P. F. -T.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R. Y.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Blinov, V.E.; Botov, A.A.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Golubev, V.B.; Kononov, S.A.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Onuchin, A.P.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Shtol, D.A.; Skovpen, Y.I.; Solodov, E.P.; Cardini, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Chao, D. S. -T.; Cheng, C.H.; Doll, D.A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Hanson, J.; Hitlin, D.G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.C.; Zhu, R.Y.; Randazzo, N.; De La Cruz Burelo, E.; Zheng, Y.; Campos, P.; De Silva, M.; Kathirgamaraju, A.; Meadows, B.; Pushpawela, B.; Shi, Y.; Sokoloff, M.; Lopez Castro, G.; Ciaschini, V.; Franchini, P.; Giacomini, F.; Paolini, A.; Calderon Polania, G. A.; Laczek, S.; Romanowicz, P.; Szybinski, B.; Czuchry, M.; Flis, L.; Harezlak, D.; Kocot, J.; Radecki, M.; Sterzel, M.; Szepieniec, T.; Szymocha, T.; Wójcik, P.; Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Gianoli, A.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Manzali, M.; Melchiorri, M.; Munerato, M.; Padoan, C.; Santoro, V.; Tomassetti, L.; Beretta, M.M.; Biagini, M.; Boscolo, M.; Capitolo, E.; de Sangro, R.; Esposito, M.; Felici, G.; Finocchiaro, G.; Gatta, M.; Gatti, C.; Guiducci, S.; Lauciani, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Rama, M.; Sanelli, C.; Tomassini, S.; Fabbricatore, P.; Delepine, D.; Reyes Santos, M. 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L.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Beck, G.; Berman, M.; Bevan, A.; Gannaway, F.; Inguglia, G.; Martin, A.J.; Morris, J.; Bocci, V.; Capodiferro, M.; Chiodi, G.; Dafinei, I.; Drenska, N.V.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Luci, C.; Lunadei, R.; Martellotti, G.; Pellegrino, F.; Pettinacci, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Ruggeri, D.; Zullo, A.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; De Santis, C.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Felice, V.; Di Palma, F.; Di Simone, A.; Marcelli, L.; Messi, R.; Moricciani, D.; Sparvoli, R.; Tammaro, S.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Bussino, S.; Ciuchini, M.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Ruggieri, F.; Spiriti, E.; Wilson, F.; Leon Monzon, I.; Millan-Almaraz, J.R.; Podesta-Lerma, P.L.M.; Aston, D.; Dey, B.; Fisher, A.; Jackson, P.D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Luitz, S.; MacFarlane, D.; McCulloch, M.; Metcalfe, S.; Novokhatski, A.; Osier, S.; Prepost, R.; Ratcliff, B.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Va'vra, J.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W.; Altschul, B.D.; Purohit, M.V.; Baudot, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Bezshyyko, O.; Dolinska, G.; Soffer, A.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Marcello, S.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cristaudo, P.; Lanceri, L.; Liberti, B.; Rashevskaya, I.; Stella, C.; Vallazza, E.S.; Vitale, L.; Auriemma, G.; Satriano, C.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Mazorra de Cos, J.; Oyanguren, A.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Beaulieu, A.; Dejong, S.; Franta, J.; Lewczuk, M.J.; Roney, M.; Sobie, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this Technical Design Report (TDR) we describe the SuperB detector that was to be installed on the SuperB e+e- high luminosity collider. The SuperB asymmetric collider, which was to be constructed on the Tor Vergata campus near the INFN Frascati National Laboratory, was designed to operate both at the Upsilon(4S) center-of-mass energy with a luminosity of 10^{36} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and at the tau/charm production threshold with a luminosity of 10^{35} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. This high luminosity, producing a data sample about a factor 100 larger than present B Factories, would allow investigation of new physics effects in rare decays, CP Violation and Lepton Flavour Violation. This document details the detector design presented in the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) in 2007. The R&D and engineering studies performed to arrive at the full detector design are described, and an updated cost estimate is presented. A combination of a more realistic cost estimates and the unavailability of funds due of the global economic ...

  1. A liquid nitrogen temperature SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAshan, M.S.; VanderArend, P.

    1987-04-01

    Under the assumption that new developments in the science of superconductivity will lead to dipole magnets suitable for the SSC that have the same properties with regard to field, field quality, size and cost as those in the present conception of the collider, but operating at 77 K rather than 4.35 K; the initial cost of the collider facility is found to be less by $213 M out of the $2,000 M actual construction cost for the collider technical systems and the conventional facilities estimated in the Conceptual Design Report. EDI and contingency is not included in these figures. Operation at the higher temperature is not, however, an unequivocal advantage. The beam line vacuum system in the 77 K case presents problems that will require a larger magnet aperture for satisfactory solution. The costs of this together with the cost of the development and construction of the new vacuum system required is estimated to be $156 M. The net capital cost saving associated with the higher temperature operation is thus found to be $57 M or about 3% of the estimated cost. In addition it is estimated that the operating cost of the facility will under conditions be less by $27.5 M per year in the steady-state including an allowance for the greater availability of the simpler cryogenic system. 14 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  2. Magnetic field measurements of model SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Gilbert, W.S.; Green, M.I.; Barale, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    To qualify for use in the Superconducting Super Collider, the 8000 or so 16 m long dipole magnets must pass a series of tests. One of these will be a set of warm measurements of field quality, which must be precise to about 0.001% of the 100 G field produced by 10 A, the maximum current the coils are allowed to carry for an extended period at room temperature. Field measurements of better than this accuracy have already been carried out on 1 m long model dipoles. These measurements have included determinations of the dipole fields and the higher harmonics in the central or two dimensional region and in the total magnet. In addition, axial scans of the dipole and higher harmonic magnetic fields have been made to determine the local variations, which might reflect fabrication and assembly tolerances. This paper describes the equipment developed for these measurements, the results of a representative set of measurements of the central and integral fields and axial scans, and a comparison between warm and cold measurements. Reproducibility, accuracy and precision will be described for some of the measurements. The significance of the warm measurements as a part of the certification process for the SSC dipoles will be discussed

  3. Application of system safety engineering techniques for hazard prevention at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A primary goal of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is to establish an exemplary safety program. Achieving this goal requires leadership, planning, coordination, and technical know-how. To ensure that safety is an inherent part of the design, the Environment, Safety and Health Office employs a systems engineering discipline and process known as System Safety. The goal of System Safety - hazard prevention - is accomplished by analyzing systems to identify hazards and to evaluate design and procedural options and countermeasures to prevent, eliminate, mitigate, or control hazards and risks. Establishment of safety and human factors design criteria at the outset of the project prevents unsafe designs and safety violations, reduces risks, and helps in avoiding costly design changes later. This process requires a considerable amount of coordination with a variety of technical disciplines and safety professionals to integrate methods of hazard prevention, mitigation, and risk reduction throughout the system life-cycle

  4. Critical issues concerning tunnel ventilation in the super conducting super collider ring tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egilsrud, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses the problem of designing a ventilation system for the SSC Collider Ring Tunnel. The history of ventilation of tunnels is briefly reviewed and the types of systems used for ventilation of rail, transit and highway tunnels are described in detail. Next, the ventilation system prepared for the Collider Ring Tunnel in the RTK conceptual conventional design report is described. The author questions this design from a safety and practical standpoint. He offers several other solutions which provided a more powerful system for emergencies. One supplies fresh outside air uniformly along the tunnel length. All suggested systems increase costs over the RTK proposed system. The possible problem of troublesome condensation forming on equipment in the tunnel and tunnel walls in hot, humid weather is also a major concern. 5 figs

  5. Review of scientific and technical options for the Superconducting Super Collider Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombeck, T.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a review of options for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Program. It is the result of an informal study by an ad-hoc working group consisting of Laboratory physicists and engineers who investigated the physics and technical implications of a number of possible alternative SSC programs. Previous studies have shown, and early in this study it was confirmed, that a collider of approximately 20 TeV protons on 20 TeV protons with a luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} at each interaction region is needed to support a physics program that is guaranteed to answer existing particle physics questions and make new discoveries. Therefore, all options considered in this document were consistent with attainment of these original goals for the SSC. One promising option considered was a program of colliding anti-protons on protons as a possible means to reduce the cost of the SSC by eliminating one of the Collider rings. However, the luminosity requirements to obtain the SSC physics goals remains the same as for protons colliding with protons and this study confirms that even though progress has been made over the last ten years in obtaining the high intensity anti-proton beams necessary, a luminosity higher than 10{sup 32} cannot be guaranteed. Other options were examined to see what advantages could be derived by departing from the SSC baseline program, either in schedule, in parameters, by staging, or by combinations of these options. Even though we considered re-examination of the cost of the baseline program to be beyond the scope of this document, differential cost savings were estimated. Finally, a brief survey of progress over the last ten years in various technical areas that might lead to more cost effective engineering designs was included in this study, such as higher magnetic field magnets resulting from lower operating temperatures or higher current-carrying superconducting materials.

  6. Review of scientific and technical options for the Superconducting Super Collider Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombeck, T.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a review of options for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Program. It is the result of an informal study by an ad-hoc working group consisting of Laboratory physicists and engineers who investigated the physics and technical implications of a number of possible alternative SSC programs. Previous studies have shown, and early in this study it was confirmed, that a collider of approximately 20 TeV protons on 20 TeV protons with a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 s -1 at each interaction region is needed to support a physics program that is guaranteed to answer existing particle physics questions and make new discoveries. Therefore, all options considered in this document were consistent with attainment of these original goals for the SSC. One promising option considered was a program of colliding anti-protons on protons as a possible means to reduce the cost of the SSC by eliminating one of the Collider rings. However, the luminosity requirements to obtain the SSC physics goals remains the same as for protons colliding with protons and this study confirms that even though progress has been made over the last ten years in obtaining the high intensity anti-proton beams necessary, a luminosity higher than 10 32 cannot be guaranteed. Other options were examined to see what advantages could be derived by departing from the SSC baseline program, either in schedule, in parameters, by staging, or by combinations of these options. Even though we considered re-examination of the cost of the baseline program to be beyond the scope of this document, differential cost savings were estimated. Finally, a brief survey of progress over the last ten years in various technical areas that might lead to more cost effective engineering designs was included in this study, such as higher magnetic field magnets resulting from lower operating temperatures or higher current-carrying superconducting materials

  7. Test results from recent 1.8-m SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] model dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.; Cottingham, J.G.; Dahl, P.

    1988-01-01

    We report results from four 1.8 m-long dipoles built as part of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) RandD program. Except for length, these models have the features of the SSC design, which is based on a two-layer cosine theta coil with 4 cm aperture. As compared to the 17 m design length SSC dipoles, these 1.8 m magnets are a faster and more economical way of testing design changes in field shape, conductor support in the coil straight-section and ends, etc. The four magnets reported here all reach fields in excess of 7.5T with little training and have excellent field shape. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Contracting practices for the underground construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report was prepared by a specially appointed committee under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council to address contracting and associated management issues essential to the successful execution of underground construction for the Superconducting Super Collider.

  9. Data acquisition and online processing requirements for experimentation at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.; Barsotti, E.; Gaines, I.

    1989-07-01

    Differences in scale between data acquisition and online processing requirements for detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider and systems for existing large detectors will require new architectures and technological advances in these systems. Emerging technologies will be employed for data transfer, processing, and recording. 9 refs., 3 figs

  10. Contracting practices for the underground construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report was prepared by a specially appointed committee under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council to address contracting and associated management issues essential to the successful execution of underground construction for the Superconducting Super Collider

  11. A Bridge Too Far: The Demise of the Superconducting Super Collider, 1989-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider -- at over 10 billion the largest and costliest basic-science project ever attempted. It was a disastrous loss for the nation's once-dominant high-energy physics community, which has been slowly declining since then. With the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, Europe has assumed world leadership in this field. A combination of fiscal austerity, continuing SSC cost overruns, intense Congressional scrutiny, lack of major foreign contributions, waning Presidential support, and the widespread public perception of mismanagement led to the project's demise nearly five years after it had begun. Its termination occurred against the political backdrop of changing scientific needs as US science policy shifted to a post-Cold War footing during the early 1990s. And the growing cost of the SSC inevitably exerted undue pressure upon other worthy research, thus weakening its support in Congress and the broader scientific community. As underscored by the Higgs boson discovery, at a mass substantially below that of the top quark, the SSC did not need to collide protons at 40 TeV in order to attain its premier physics goal. The selection of this design energy was governed more by politics than by physics, given that Europeans could build the LHC by eventually installing superconducting magnets in the LEP tunnel under construction in the mid-1980s. In hindsight, there were good alternative projects the US high-energy physics community could have pursued that did not involve building a gargantuan, multibillion-dollar machine at a green-field site in Texas. Research supported by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, and the Richard Lounsbery Foundation.

  12. International linear collider reference design report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R and D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade

  13. International linear collider reference design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  14. Final Report - The Decline and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RIORDAN, MICHAEL

    2011-11-29

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider — at the time the largest pure-science project ever attempted, with a total cost estimated to exceed $10 billion. It was a stunning loss for the US highenergy physics community, which until that moment had perched for decades at the pinnacle of American science. Ever since 1993, this once-dominant scientific community has been in gradual decline. With the 2010 startup of research on the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the 2011 shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron, world leadership in elementary-particle physics has crossed the Atlantic and returned to Europe.

  15. Shielding optimization studies for the detector systems of the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary shielding optimization studies for the Superconducting Super Collider`s Solenoidal Detector Collaboration detector system were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1993. The objective of the study was to reduce the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes leaving the shield to a level that resulted in insignificant effects on the functionality of the detector system. Steel and two types of concrete were considered as components of the shield, and the shield was optimized according to thickness, weight, and cost. Significant differences in the thicknesses, weights, and costs were noted for the three optimization parameters. Results from the study are presented.

  16. Long term prediction and the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talman, R.

    1990-09-01

    Successful operation of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) will depend on the stable circulation of particles for tens of millions of turns around the rings, in the presence of small nonlinear deflecting fields. One design challenge is to set specifications for the maximum allowable field imperfections of this sort, consistent with the required. stability. Another challenge is to plan for the inclusion of field compensating elements that will ameliorate the effects of errors. The tools'' available for projecting the long term stability are theoretical, both analytic and numerical, and experimental. These aspects are reviewed. 19 refs.

  17. Cryogenics for the superconducting super collider: workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Attendance at the workshop and information meeting on Cryogenics for the SSC held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on January 17 to 19, 1984 consisted of 109 engineers and scientists from 19 industrial organizations and 18 laboratories and universities - CERN, DESY, Grenoble, KEK and Saclay were represented. About one-third of the participants were from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermi National Laboratory. Talks which concentrated on informing the audience of the present status of the SSC research and development activities and progress towards design of the components were given, experience with the cryogenic system of the Tevatron was reported, and a wrap-up session was held on the last day where each of the five workshop leaders gave a summary of their group's discussions and conclusions. A brief summary of these presentations is given, with the detailed information gathered by the group leaders forming the bulk of these proceedings

  18. Workshop on Calorimetery for the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab

    1989-03-19

    The international workshop brought together 170 participants to further develop the SSC design and performance specifications of the LAr, Gas, Scintillation, Silicon, and Warm Liquid calorimeter technologies, and to develop the general topics of Requirements, Simulation, and Electronics. Progress was made across a broad front in all areas; at the feasibility level for some and In the fine structure for others. The meeting established areas of agreement, provided some general direction, and helped to quantify some differences at widely varying levels of detector technology development. The workshop helped to level the different understandings of the participants; increased the depth of the generalists and the breadth of the specialists. A high degree of group partitioning limited access to the detailed discussion within some detector groups. The communication was clearly necessary and rewarding, and seemed to meet or exceed the expectations of most participants. This report will deal with: the Liquid Argon detector and, to a lesser extent, the Requirements working groups, an update on uranIum material logistics, and a view of LAr calorimetry by others.

  19. Radiation damage testing at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.; Thun, R.

    1990-06-01

    A Task Force on Radiation Damage Testing met at the SSC Laboratory on March 5--6, 1990. This Task Force was asked to assess the availability of appropriate facilities for radiation damage tests of SSC detector materials and components. The Task Force was also instructed to review the techniques and standards for conducting such tests. Semiconductors were considered separately from other detector materials. Radiation damage test of electronic devices generally require exposures to both ionizing radiation and neutrons, whereas non-electric components such as plastic scintillating materials, adhesives, cable insulation, and other organic polymers are adequately tested with ionizing radiation only. Test standards are discussed with respect to irradiation techniques, environmental factors, dosimetry, and mechanisms whereby various materials are damaged. It is emphasized that radiation sources should be chosen to duplicate as much as possible the expected SSC environment and that the effects from ionizing particles and from neutrons be investigated separately. Radiation damage tests at reactors must be designed with particular care complex spectra of neutrons and gamma rays are produced at such facilities. It is also essential to investigate dose-rate effects since they are known to be important in many cases. The required irradiations may last several months and are most easily carried out with dedicated radioactive sources. Environmental factors such as the presence of oxygen when testing plastic scintillators, or temperature when measuring semiconductor annealing effects, must also be taken into account. The importance of reliable dosimetry is stressed and suitable references cited. Finally, it is noted that an understanding of the mechanisms for radiation damage in semiconductor and other materials is important in planning irradiations and evaluating results

  20. The 12-GeV/c beam transfer and absorber lines for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, N.; McGill, J.; Gerig, R.; Brown, K.

    1994-08-01

    The beam optics of the 12-GeV/c proton beam transfer line between the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) at the Superconducting Super Collider is presented. The beam is extracted from the LEB vertically and is injected into the MEB through a vertical Lambertson magnet and a horizontal kicker. The beamline has high flexibility for amplitude and dispersion function matching. Effects of various errors in the transfer line are studied, and a beam position correction scheme is proposed. The beam optics of the 12-GeV/c absorber line transporting the beam from the LEB to an absorber during the LEB commissioning is also presented

  1. An expression of interest in a Super Fixed Target Beauty Facility (SFT) at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a Super Fixed Target Beauty Facility (SFT) which uses a relatively low intensity 20 TeV proton beam as a generator of very high momenta B's is an exciting prospect which is very competitive with other B factory ideas. The yields of B's in such a facility are quite high (3 x 10 10 → 10 11 B's per year). At this level of statistics, CP violation measurements will be possible in many modes. In addition, the fixed target configuration, because of the high momenta of the produced B's and the resulting long decay lengths, facilitates the detection and reconstruction of B's and offers unique opportunities for observation of the B decays. The limited solid angle coverage required for the fixed target spectrometer makes the cost of the facility much cheaper than other e + e - or hadron collider options under consideration. The relatively low intensity 20 TeV beam (1 → 2 x 10 8 protons/second) needed for the SFT makes it possible to consider an extraction system which operates concurrently and in a non-interfering manner with the other collider experiments. One possible method for generating such a beam, crystal channeling, is discussed

  2. Linear collider RF structure design using ARGUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok Ko

    1991-01-01

    In a linear collider, both the driving system (klystrons) and the accelerating system (linac) consists of RF structures that are inherently three-dimensional. These structures which are responsible for power input/output, have to satisfy many requirements in order that instabilities, beam or RF related, are to be avoided. At the same time, system efficiencies have to be maintained at optimal to minimize cost. Theoretical analysis on these geometrically complex structures are difficult and until recently, numerical solutions have been limited. At SLAC, there has been a continuing and close collaboration among accelerator physicists, engineers and numericists to integrate supercomputing into the design procedure which involves 3-D RF structures. The outcome is very encouraging. Using the 3-D/electromagnetic code ARGUS (developed by SAIC) on the Cray computers at NERSC in conjunction with supporting theories, a wide variety of critical components have been simulated and evaluated. Aside from structures related to the linear collider, the list also includes the RF cavity for the proposed Boson Factory and the anode circuit for the Cross-Field Amplifier, once considered as an alternative to the klystron as a possible power source. This presentation will focus on two specific structures: (1) the klystron output cavity; and (2) the linac input coupler. As the results demonstrate, supercomputing is fast becoming a viable technology that could conceivably replace actual cold-testing in the near future

  3. Micro vertex detector design for collider geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Crennell, D.; Fisher, C.M.; Hughes, P.; Kurtz, N.

    1984-05-01

    Previously the analysis of fixed target jet events using a scintillating optical fibre target to provide a projection of the topology on the plane transverse to the event axis has been considered. It was argued that this transverse plane projection is optimal for the detection of charm or beauty particle decay vertices. The idea is generalised to a jet analysis in a collider geometry particularly when associated with a high Psub(perpendicular to) or missing Esub(T) trigger. This report proposes a simple arrangement of fibres to give high precision track elements in the transverse plane projection coupled with a fast read-out capability. The principle physics aim of the design is to provide a tag for selecting top quark jets by detecting a beauty flavoured particle in the jet. (U.K.)

  4. Femtosecond laser technologies for linear collider designs

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    A highly stabilized high-energy femtosecond laser system was developed for Compton X-ray experiments. The laser system is based on the chirped pulse amplification, and each component is actively or passively stabilized. A master oscillator with less than 100 fs timing jitter, two independent oscillators with 300 fs relative timing lag, a new measurement technique of timing fluctuation of low-repetition amplified pulse, and a special designed regenerative amplifier with high quality beam were developed. New technical options for linear collider are proposed based on these expertises. The options are temporally square pulse for low emittance electron generation, a timing stabilized seeder for CO sub 2 amplifier, and multi-pulse high-energy lasers for gamma-gamma collision and for multi-bunch electron generation.

  5. Construction of cold mass assembly for full-length dipoles for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.; Cottingham, J.; Garber, M.

    1986-10-01

    Four of the initial six 17m long demonstration dipole magnets for the proposed Superconducting Super Collider have been constructed, and the first one is now being tested. This paper describes the magnet design and construction of the cold mass assembly. The magnets are cold iron (and cold bore) 1-in-1 dipoles, wound with partially keystoned current density-graded high homogeneity NbTi cable in a two-layer cos θ coil of 40 mm inner diameter. The magnetic length is 16.6 m. The coil is prestressed by 15 mm wide stainless steel collars, and mounted in a circular, split iron yoke of 267 mm outer diameter, supported by a cylindrical yoke (and helium) containment vessel of stainless steel. The magnet bore tube assembly incorporates superconducting sextupole trim coils produced by an industrial, automatic process akin to printed circuit fabrication

  6. DOENEWS: Address of John S. Herrington, Secretary of Energy, at the National symposium on the superconducting super collider in Denver, Colorado, December 3, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrington, J.S.

    1987-12-01

    In this address, the President's support for basic science is briefly discussed, and support for the Superconducting Super Collider in particular is emphasized. Perceived benefits of the Super Collider are discussed, including benefits to the world, training for scientists, maintaining American competitiveness. Federal support of science, including Congressional action, is discussed briefly

  7. Performance of six 4.5 m SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipole model magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Cottingham, J.

    1986-01-01

    Six 4.5 m long dipole models for the proposed Superconducting Super Collider have been successfully tested. The magnets are cold-iron (and cold bore) 1-in-1 dipoles, wound with current density-graded high homogeneity NbTi cable in a two-layer cos θ coil of 40 mm inner diameter. The coil is prestressed by 15 mm wide stainless steel collars, and mounted in a circular, split iron yoke of 267 mm outer diameter, supported in a cylindrical yoke containment vessel. At 4.5 K the magnets reached a field of about 6.6 T with little training, or the short sample limit of the conductor, and in subcooled (2.6 - 2.4 K) liquid, 8 T was achieved. The allowed harmonics were close to the predicted values, and the unallowed harmonics small. The sextupole trim coil operated well above the required current with little training

  8. An experimental study of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] magnet aperture criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merminga, N.; Edwards, D.; Finley, D.

    1988-01-01

    A beam dynamics experiment, performed in the Fermilab Tevatron, that was mainly motivated by planning for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is described. Nonlinearities are introduced in the Tevatron by special sextupoles in order to stimulate the SSC environment. ''Smear'' is one of the parameters used to characterize the deviation from linear behavior. Smear is extracted from experimental data and compared with calculation over a wide range of conditions. The agreement is excellent. The closed orbit at injection trajectory reveal no deterioration even at the highest sextupole excitations. Measurements of the dynamic aperture are in general agreement with prediction. Particles captured on nonlinear resonance islands are directly observed and measurements are performed for the first time. The stability of the islands under tune modulation is investigated. 4 refs., 8 figs

  9. Tunnel visions the rise and fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Michael; Kolb, Adrienne W

    2015-01-01

    Starting in the 1950s, US physicists dominated the search for elementary particles; aided by the association of this research with national security, they held this position for decades. In an effort to maintain their hegemony and track down the elusive Higgs boson, they convinced President Reagan and Congress to support construction of the multibillion-dollar Superconducting Super Collider project in Texas-the largest basic-science project ever attempted. But after the Cold War ended and the estimated SSC cost surpassed ten billion dollars, Congress terminated the project in October 1993. Drawing on extensive archival research, contemporaneous press accounts, and over one hundred interviews with scientists, engineers, government officials, and others involved, Tunnel Visions tells the riveting story of the aborted SSC project. The authors examine the complex, interrelated causes for its demise, including problems of large-project management, continuing cost overruns, and lack of foreign contributions. In doi...

  10. Acoustic Design of Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Ellehauge; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Brunskog, Jonas

    aggregate (leca) along with a newly developed technology called pearl-chain reinforcement, which is a system for post-tensioning. Here, it is shown how to combine these technologies within a precast super-light slab element, while honoring the requirements of a holistic design. Acoustic experiments...... in a controlled laboratory environment have been conducted with the element in order to evaluate its performance in airborne and impact sound insulation. These results have been employed in simulations of the flanking transmission to estimate the in-situ performance of the super-light slab element. The flanking...... of the same test series elastic behaviour of the super-light element is also investigated. This is done to verify that requirements and methods supplied by design codes can be applied to the element with sufficient accuracy. In addition, the super-light slab element has been exposed to a standard fire test...

  11. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  12. Building the Superconducting Super Collider, 1989-1993: The Problem of Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Michael

    2011-04-01

    In attempting to construct the Superconducting Super Collider, US particle physicists faced a challenge unprecedented in the history of science. The SSC was the biggest and costliest pure scientific project ever, comparable in overall scale to the Manhattan Project or the Panama Canal - an order of magnitude larger than any previous particle accelerator or collider project. Managing such an enormous endeavor involved coordinating conventional-construction, magnet-manufacturing, and detector-building efforts costing over a billion dollars apiece. Because project-management experience at this scale did not exist within the physics community, the Universities Research Association and the US Department of Energy turned to companies and individuals from the military-industrial complex, with mixed results. The absence of a strong, qualified individual to serve as Project Manager throughout the duration of the project was a major problem. I contend that these problems in its project management contributed importantly to the SSC's 1993 demise. Research supported by NSF Award No. 823296.

  13. Applying rule ensembles to the search for super-symmetry at the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, Jan; Tegenfeldt, Fredrik

    2006-01-01

    In this note we give an example application of a recently presented predictive learning method called Rule Ensembles. The application we present is the search for super-symmetric particles at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, we consider the problem of separating the background coming from top quark production from the signal of super-symmetric particles. The method is based on an expansion of base learners, each learner being a rule, i.e. a combination of cuts in the variable space describing signal and background. These rules are generated from an ensemble of decision trees. One of the results of the method is a set of rules (cuts) ordered according to their importance, which gives useful tools for diagnosis of the model. We also compare the method to a number of other multivariate methods, in particular Artificial Neural Networks, the likelihood method and the recently presented boosted decision tree method. We find better performance of Rule Ensembles in all cases. For example for a given significance the amount of data needed to claim SUSY discovery could be reduced by 15% using Rule Ensembles as compared to using a likelihood method

  14. A conceptual design of Final Focus Systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.

    1987-06-01

    Linear colliders are a relatively recent development in the evolution of particle accelerators. This report discusses some of the approaches that have been considered for the design of Final Focus Systems to demagnify the beam exiting from a linac to the small size suitable for collisions at the interaction point. The system receiving the most attention is the one adopted for the SLAC Linear Collider. However, the theory and optical techniques discussed should be applicable to the design efforts for future machines

  15. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  16. Thermal and structural performance of a single tube support post for the Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnet cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Ruschman, M.K.; Schoo, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    The reentrant support post currently incorporated in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole cryostat has been shown to meet the structural and thermal requirements of the cryostat, both in prototype magnet assemblies and through component testing. However, the reentrant post design has two major drawbacks: tight dimensional control on all components, and cost driven by these tolerance constraints and a complex assembly procedure. A single tube support post has been developed as an alternative to the reentrant post design. Several prototype assemblies have been fabricated and subjected to structural testing. Compressive, tensile, and bending forces were applied to each assembly with deflection measured at several locations. A prototype support post has also been thermally evaluated in a heat leak measurement facility. Heat load to 4.2 K was measured with the intermediate post intercept operating at various temperatures while thermometers positioned along the conductive path of the post mapped thermal gradients. Results from these measurements indicate the single tube support post meets the design criteria for the SSC dipole magnet cryostat support system

  17. Photon-counting monolithic avalanche photodiode arrays for the super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishaque, A.N.; Castleberry, D.E.; Rougeot, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    In fiber tracking, calorimetry, and other high energy and nuclear physics experiments, the need arises to detect an optical signal consisting of a few photons (in some cases a single photoelectron) with a detector insensitive to magnetic fields. Previous attempts to detect a single photoelectron have involved avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operated in the Geiger mode, the visible light photon counter, and a photomultiplier tube with an APD as the anode. In this paper it is demonstrated that silicon APDs, biased below the breakdown voltage, can be used to detect a signal of a few photons with conventional pulse counting circuitry at room temperature. Moderate cooling, it is further argued, could make it possible to detect a single photoelectron. Monolithic arrays of silicon avalanche photodiodes fabricated by Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) were evaluated for possible use in the Super Collider detector systems. Measurements on 3 element x 3 element (2 mm pitch) APD arrays, using pulse counting circuitry with a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) and a Gaussian filter, are reported and found to conform to a simple noise model. The model is used to obtain the optimal operating point. Experimental results are described in Section II, modeling results in Section III, and the conclusions are summarized in Section IV

  18. Technical assessment of environmental and cost implications of superconducting super collider decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Opelka, J.H.; Chambers, W.C.; Stavrou, J.

    1988-07-01

    Potential environmental and cost implications of decommissioning the proposed Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are examined. One decommissioning alternative is selected for general assessment. That alternative includes removal of the major sources of radioactivity induced during operation and temporary entombment of remaining underground facilities. On the suface, the campus complex would be left in place for future use, but most other aboveground features would be dismantled and removed. Because of the low level of radioactivity that would be induced in SSC components during system operation, potential radiological impacts to the environment from decommissioning would be benign, and the estimated total occupational radiation dose to workers would be less that 5 person-rem. Potential nonradiological impacts of decommissioning are not evaluated because of the lack of site-specific data. The total estimated cost of decommissioning operations is $38 million. Although few current regulations are explicitly applicable, the SSC decommissioning operation should not encounter any difficulty in complying with potentially applicable regulatory constraints. Upon completion of decommissioning, the SSC site surface could be returned to unrestricted use, but it is recommended that a degree of institutional control and environmental monitoring be carried out for a short period following decommissioning. 11 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  19. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  20. Signatures for fourth-generation quarks and a heavy top quark at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.; Barger, V.; Goldberg, H.; Ohnemus, J.

    1988-01-01

    We examine methods for detection of new heavy quarks at the Superconducting Super Collider where the heavy quark could be either one of a fourth generation of quarks (a,v), or a very massive (/similar to/50 GeV) top quark. The signals can be classified according to number of leptons in the final state. Requiring the presence of a single fast isolated lepton along with ≥ jets and pX/sub T/ allows one to separate the a,v, or t signal from backgrounds. Heavy-quark pairs are produced with sufficient hemispheric separation to allow the direction of one of the quarks to be tagged by the transverse momentum of the isolated high-p/sub T/ lepton. A distinct enhancement is then observed at the heavy-quark mass in the cluster mass spectrum of all jets moving opposite to the lepton. A fourth-generation quark should also be visible in the two isolated lepton channel, and its mass resolvable. Additional signals from multilepton events would then also be present, though these channels may not yield a heavy-quark mass determination

  1. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI [multilayer insulation] system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroski, W.N.; Gonczy, J.D.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) were conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) under three experimental test arrangements. Each experiment measured the thermal performance of a 32-layer MLI blanket instrumented with twenty foil sensors to measure interstitial layer temperatures. Heat leak values and sensor temperatures were monitored during transient and steady state conditions under both design and degraded insulating vacuums. Heat leak values were measured using a heatmeter. MLI interstitial layer temperatures were measured using Cryogenic Linear Temperature Sensors (CLTS). Platinum resistors monitored system temperatures. High vacuum was measured using ion gauges; degraded vacuum employed thermocouple gauges. A four-wire system monitored instrumentation sensors and calibration heaters. An on-line computerized data acquisition system recorded and processes data. This paper reports on the instrumentation and experimental preparation used in carrying out these measurements. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head, but with the title extension 'Part 2: Laboratory results (300K--80K). 13 refs., 7 figs

  2. Super liquid density target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.L.; Bailey, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    The success of laser fusion depends on obtaining near isentropic compression of fuel to very high densities and igniting this fuel. To date, the results of laser fusion experiments have been based mainly on the exploding pusher implosion of fusion capsules consisting of thin glass microballoons (wall thickness of less than 1 micron) filled with low density DT gas (initial density of a few mg/cc). Maximum DT densities of a few tenths of g/cc and temperatures of a few keV have been achieved in these experiments. We will discuss the results of LASNEX target design calculations for targets which: (a) can compress fuel to much higher densities using the capabilities of existing Nd-glass systems at LLL; (b) allow experimental measurement of the peak fuel density achieved

  3. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  4. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  5. Mechanical design and analysis of the 2D cross-section of the SSC collider dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, J.; Kerby, J.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the two dimensional cross-section of the base-line collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider. The components described here are the collar laminations, the tapered keys that lock the upper and lower collars, the yoke laminations, the cold mass shell. We describe in detail the shape of the outer surface of the collars which defines the yoke-collar interface, and the shape of the collar interior, which defines the conductor placement. Other features of the collar and yoke will be described in somewhat less detail. 20 refs., 12 figs. , 6 tabs

  6. Mechanical design and analysis of the 2D cross-section of the SSC collider dipole magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, J.; Kerby, J.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the two dimensional cross-section of the base-line collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider. The components described here are the collar laminations, the tapered keys that lock the upper and lower collars, the yoke laminations, the cold mass shell. We describe in detail the shape of the outer surface of the collars which defines the yoke-collar interface, and the shape of the collar interior, which defines the conductor placement. Other features of the collar and yoke will be described in somewhat less detail. 20 refs., 12 figs. , 6 tabs.

  7. Design of the muon collider lattice: Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, A.; Courant, E.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-05-01

    The last component of a muon collider facility, as presently envisioned, is a colliding-beam storage ring. Design studies on various problems for this ring have been in progress over the past year. In this paper we discuss the current status of the design. The projected muon currents require very low beta values at the IP, β* = 3 mm, in order to achieve the design luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The beta values in the final-focus quadrupoles are roughly 400 km. To cancel the corresponding chromaticities, sextupole schemes for local correction have been included in the optics of the experimental insertion. The hour-glass effect constraints the bunch length to be comparable too. To obtain such short bunches with reasonable rf voltage requires a very small value of the momentum compaction a, which can be obtained by using flexible momentum compaction (FMC) modules in the arcs. A preliminary design of a complete collider ring has now been made; it uses an experimental insertion and arc modules as well as a utility insertion. The layout of this ring is shown schematically, and its parameters are summarized. Though some engineering features are unrealistic, and the beam performance needs some improvement, we believe that this study can serve as the basis for a workable collider design. The remaining sections of the paper will describe the lattice, show beam behaviour, and discuss future design studies

  8. Report of the DOE Office of Energy Research review committee on the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    At the request of Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, a technical review committee was assembled to perform a peer review of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) from October 26 to October 30, 1992, at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). The Energy Research Review Committee (ERC) evaluated the technical feasibility, the estimated cost, the proposed construction schedule, and the management arrangements for the SDC detector as documented in the SDC Technical Design Report, SDC Project Cost/Schedule Summary Book, SDC draft Project Management Plan, and other materials prepared for and presented to the Committee by the SDC management. The SDC detector is one of two major detector facilities anticipated at the SSC. The SDC project will be carried out by a worldwide collaboration of almost 1000 scientists, engineers, and managers from over 100 universities, national laboratories, and industries. The SDC will construct a state-of-the-art, general-purpose detector weighing over 26,000 tons and the size of an eight-story building, to perform a broad class of high energy physics experiments at the SSC beginning in the fall of 1999. The design of the SSC detector emphasizes tracking in a strong solenoidal magnetic field to measure charged-particle momenta and to assist in providing good electron and muon identification; identification of neutrinos and other penetrating particles using a hermetic calorimeter; studies of jets of hadrons using both calorimeter and tracking systems; and studies of short-lived particles, such as B mesons, and pattern recognition within complex events using a silicon-based vertex tracking system. These capabilities are the result of the intensive research, development, and design activities undertaken since 1989 by this very large and capable collaboration

  9. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S., E-mail: Sergio.Gonzalez.Sevilla@cern.ch [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Barbier, G. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Anghinolfi, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cadoux, F.; Clark, A. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dabrowski, W.; Dwuznik, M. [AGH University of Sceince and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Ferrere, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Garcia, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ikegami, Y. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hara, K. [University of Tsukuba, School of Pure and Applied Sciences, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Jakobs, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kaplon, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koriki, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Lacasta, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); La Marra, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Marti i Garcia, S. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pohl, M. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Terada, S. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-04-21

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown.

  10. Vacuum design for a superconducting mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Monteiro, S.

    1991-01-01

    The phi factory (Superconducting Mini-Collider or SMC) proposed for construction at UCLA is a single storage ring with circulating currents of 2 A each of electrons and positrons. The small circumference exacerbates the difficulties of handling the gas load due to photodesorption from the chamber walls. The authors analyze the vacuum system for the phi factory to specify design choices

  11. A Novel Final Focus Design for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-05-30

    The length, complexity and cost of the present Final Focus designs for linear colliders grows very quickly with the beam energy. In this letter, a novel final focus system is presented and compared with the one proposed for NLC. This new design is simpler, shorter and cheaper, with comparable bandwidth, tolerances and tunability. Moreover, the length scales slower than linearly with energy allowing for a more flexible design which is applicable over a much larger energy range.

  12. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%–20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect. It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle

  13. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  14. Advanced composite materials and processes for the manufacture of SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider] superconducting magnets used at cryogenic temperatures in a high radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Presently, BNL work on superconducting magnets centers mainly on the development of 17 meter length dipoles for the Superconducting Super Collider Project, approved for construction at Waxahatchie, Texas and 9.7 meter dipoles and quadrupoles for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a BNL project to start construction next year. This paper will discuss the role of composites in the manufacture of magnets, their operational requirements in cryogenic and radiation environments, and the benefits derived from their use. 13 figs

  15. Design of a dependable Interlock System for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nouvel, Patrice

    For high energy accelerators, the interlock system is a key part of the machine protection. The interlock principle is to inhibit the beam either on failure of critical equipment and/or on low beam quality evaluation. The dependability of such a system is the most critical parameter. This thesis presents the design of an dependable interlock system for linear collider with an application to the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project. This design process is based on the IEEE 1220 standard and is is divided in four steps. First, the specifications are established, with a focus on the dependability, more precisely the reliability and the availability of the system. The second step is the design proposal based on a functional analysis, the CLIC and interfaced systems architecture. Third, the feasibility study is performed, applying the concepts in an accelerator facility. Finally, the last step is the hardware verification. Its aim is to prove that the proposed design is able to reach the requirements.

  16. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e^{+}e^{-} collider rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Oide

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider-e^{+}e^{-} (FCC-ee. The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007, p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called “tapering” of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC’16, 9–13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016.] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2% has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this paper is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. A number of issues

  17. General method for final focus system design for circular colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo de Maria

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Colliders use final focus systems to reduce the transverse beam sizes at the interaction point in order to increase collision event rates. The maximum focal strength (gradient of the quadrupoles, and the maximum beam size in them, together limit the beam size reduction that is possible. The goal of a final focus system design is to find the best compromise between quadrupole aperture and quadrupole gradient, for the magnet technology that is used. This paper develops a design method that identifies the intrinsic limitations of a final focus system, validates the results of the method against realistic designs, and reports its application to the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider final focus.

  18. Development and applications of super high energy collider accelerators. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evaluation of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab, and the large harden collider (LHD) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 Kilometer tunnel of the large electron positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 Kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachile in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particles. 12 figs., 1 tab

  19. Symmetric achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Morozov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new symmetry-based concept for an achromatic low-beta collider interaction region design. A specially designed symmetric chromaticity compensation block (CCB induces an angle spread in the passing beam such that it cancels the chromatic kick of the final focusing quadrupoles. Two such CCBs placed symmetrically around an interaction point allow simultaneous compensation of the 1st-order chromaticities and chromatic beam smear at the IP without inducing significant 2nd-order aberrations to the particle trajectory. We first develop an analytic description of this approach and explicitly formulate 2nd-order aberration compensation conditions at the interaction point. The concept is next applied to develop an interaction region design for the ion collider ring of an electron-ion collider. We numerically evaluate performance of the design in terms of momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture. The advantages of the new concept are illustrated by comparing it to the conventional distributed-sextupole chromaticity compensation scheme.

  20. Design Issues of TeV Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame work of a world-wide collabora-tion, various possible approaches for Linear Colliders in the TeV energy range (TLC) and high luminosity (~ 1034 cm-2 sec-1) are explored in different laboratories and periodically compared in international workshops. The main accelerator physics issues required to meet the requested performance improvement by three orders of magnitude in luminosity and by a factor 10 in beam energy with respect to the unique linear collider presently operational, the SLC at SLAC, are reviewed, pointing out the main challenges common to all designs as well as the possible technological choices. Corresponding designs based on the improve-ment of present standard or the development of new tech-nologies are presented, emphasizing their main issues and specific challenges. The main goals of ambitious test facilities presently set-up to study the feasibility and cost of the various schemes in the next few years are introduced.

  1. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures

  2. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  3. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor

  4. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  5. Design and Principles of Synchrotrons and Circular Colliders: Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    CERN

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '6.10 Beam Cooling' of the Chapter '6 Design and Principles of Synchrotrons and Circular Colliders' with the content: 6.10 Beam Cooling 6.10.1 Introduction 6.10.2 Beam Cooling Techniques 6.10.2.1 Radiation Cooling 6.10.2.2 Microwave Stochastic Cooling 6.10.2.3 Electron Cooling 6.10.2.4 Laser Cooling 6.10.2.5 Ionisation Cooling 6.10.2.6 Cooling of Particles in Traps

  6. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given

  7. SSC collider quadrupole cold mass design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, R.A.; Murray, F.S.; Jonas, P.A.; Mischler, W.R.; Blecher, L.

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 1,664 focussing and defocussing superconducting quadrupoles are required for the two SSC collider rings. Collider quadruple magnets (CQMS) must satisfy stringent performance, reliability, life and low cost criteria. Performance requirements include field uniformity, training, quench, tracking, thermal cycling and alignment. The CQM cold mass design presented incorporates lessons IGC and Alsthom Intermagnetics S.A. (AISA), our joint venture with GEC-Alsthom, learned in the design, development and manufacture of 500 MRI, 160 high-field custom and 126 HERA quadruple superconducting magnets. This baseline design reflects careful quantitative assessment of coil winding placement and collar material, evaluation of field uniformity and mechanical performance of the magnet coil ends using 3-D modeling and analysis, and considers tolerance and process variability. Selected CQM cold mass design highlights and a proposed prototype development program that allows incorporation of test feedback into the design to minimize risk are detailed in this paper. This information may be helpful to SSCL in the design and development of prototype CQM'S

  8. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan

  9. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  10. Analysis of tritium production in the vicinity of Linac and LEB tunnels at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabelssi, B.K.

    1994-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed to estimate the tritium production in groundwater around the Linear Accelerator (Linac) and the Low Energy Booster (LEB) tunnels at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). The calculations were performed using the new version of the Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) code system (SUPERHET). Most of the tritium activity was found to occur in a zone extending 2 m from the tunnel wall. The calculated tritium production rate was used to derive the. maximum allowable beam losses that would result in an average groundwater concentration in the activation zone of 20 pCi/cm 3 , the federal maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium in drinking water. The maximum allowable beam losses were found to be about 4% and 2% of the maximum operating be.-un for the Linac at 1 GeV and the LEB at 11 GeV, resnectively. These percentages are well in excess of typical operational losses at existing highenergy accelerators. The results are in good agreement with previously reported calculations. Tritium saturation activity in water pipes resultina, from the derived maximum allowable beam loss was found to be 355 pCi/cm 3 in the Linac operating at 600 MeV and 363 pCi/cm 3 in the LEB operating at 11 GeV. Accidental tritium releases from water pipes were found to cause an inhalation dose rate of less than 0.013 (Linac at 600 MeV) and 0.009 mrem/hr (LEB at 11 Gev) in the tunnels. These dose rates are well within the laboratory's design limit of 0.1 mrem/hr for controlled areas. Accidental beam losses were found to cause activation in excess of the MCL only after an irradiation time of more than 557 hours in the Linac at 600 MeV and 69 hours in the LEB at 11 GeV. A full-beam accident lasting more than one hour is considered unlikely

  11. Report on the analysis of the large propagation velocities observed in the full-length SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.

    1990-09-01

    Very large propagation velocities have been observed in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 17-m dipoles: from 75 m/s to 225 m/s, depending on the current. These velocities are much larger than those predicted by the classical conduction theory of normal zone propagation. A plausible explanation for such rapid propagation is hydrodynamic mechanism called thermal hydraulic quenchback (THQ) that has been proposed by Luongo et al. This report supplies an approximate analytic theory of THQ, which is used to analyze the data taken on the SSC 17-m dipoles. It is concluded that THQ in the helium in the interstices of the cable can explain the large propagation velocities observed. Additional experiments are proposed to test the hydrodynamic explanation. 17 refs., 5 figs

  12. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI [multilayer insulation] system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonczy, J.D.; Boroski, W.N.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    The plastic materials used in the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets of the superconducting magnets of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are comprised entirely of polyesters. This paper reports on tests conducted in three separate experimental blanket arrangements. The tests explore the thermal performance of two candidate blanket joint configurations each employing a variation of a stepped-butted joint nested between sewn blanket seams. The results from the joint configurations are compared to measurements made describing the thermal performance of the basic blanket materials as tested in an ideal joint configuration. Twenty foil sensors were incorporated within each test blanket to measure interstitial layer and joint layer temperatures. Heat flux and thermal gradients are reported for high and degraded insulating vacuums, and during transient and steady state conditions. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head but with the title extension 'Part 1: Instrumentation and experimental preparation (300K-80K)'. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Proposal of 99.99%-aluminum/7N01-Aluminum clad beam tube for high energy booster of Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Hajime

    1994-01-01

    Proposal of 99.99% pure aluminum/7N01 aluminum alloy clad beam tube for high energy booster in Superconducting Super Collider is described. This aluminum clad beam tube has many good performances, but a eddy current effect is large in superconducting magnet quench collapse. The quench test result for aluminum clad beam tube is basically no problem against magnet quench collapse. (author)

  14. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider [RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    In August 1984 Brookhaven National Laboratory submitted a proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to the US Department of Energy. A Conceptual Design Report for the RHIC facility was completed in May 1986 after detailed reviews of the machine design, and of the requirements of the physics research program. Since that time an extensive R ampersand D program has been initiated and considerable work has been carried out to refine the design and specification of the major accelerator components, as well as the needs for research detectors, and to prepare the project for construction. This document is an update of the Conceptual Design Report, incorporating the results of work carried out since the beginning of Fiscal Year 1987 when a formal R ampersand D program for the RHIC project funded by DOE was initiated

  15. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  16. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  17. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fujii, Keisuke [National Lab. for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tokai (Japan); Gao, Yuanning [Unlisted; Hoang, Andre [Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Logan, Heather E. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Nomerotski, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pöschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL); Reuter, Jürgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Savoy-Navarro, Aurore [CNRS/IN2P3. Univ. Paris (France). Observatoire de Paris. AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC); Servant, Geraldine [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tait, Tim P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  18. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Servant, Geraldine; Tait, Tim M P

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  19. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Burrows, Philip N.; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  20. A damping ring design for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Gabella, W.E.; Morton, P.L.; Lee, M.J.; Rivkin, L.Z.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-03-01

    In this paper we present a preliminary design of a damping ring for the TeV Linear Collider (TLC), a future linear collider with an energy of 1/2 to 1 TeV in the center of mass. Because of limits on the emittance, repetition rate and longitudinal impedance, we use combined function FODO cells with wigglers in insertion regions; there are approximately 22 meters of wigglers in the 155 meter ring. The ring has a normalized horizontal emittance, including the effect of intrabeam scattering, which is less than 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ and an emittance ratio of ε/sub x/ ∼ 100ε/sub y/. It is designed to damp bunches for 7 vertical damping times while operating at a repetition rate of 360 Hz. Because of these requirements on the emittance and the damping per bunch, the ring operates at 1.8 GeV and is relatively large, allowing more bunches to be damped at once. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Report of the Error and Emittance Task Force on the superconducting super collider: Part 1, Resistive machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    A review of the design and specifications of the resistive accelerators in the SSC complex was conducted during the past year. This review was initiated in response to a request from the SSC Project Manager. The Error and Emittance Task Force was created October 30, 1992, and charged with reviewing issues associated with the specification of errors and tolerances throughout the injector chain and in the Collider, and to optimize the global error budget. Effects which directly impact the emittance budget were of prime importance. The Task Force responded to three charges: Examination of the resistive accelerators and their injection and extraction systems; examination of the connecting beamlines and the overall approach taken in their design; and global filling, timing, and synchronization issues. The High Energy Booster and the Collider were deemed to be sufficiently different from the resistive accelerators that it was decided to treat them as a separate group. They will be the subject of a second part to this report

  2. The LEP collider, from design to approval and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the design, approval, construction, and commissioning of the Large Electron-Positron storage ring (LEP) collider. The contribution of John Adams is highlighted both during his years as CERN's Director General and later as an active member of the LEP Machine Advisory Committee. The first injection into LEP took place in July 1989, first collisions for physics being about a month later. After one year of operation the LEP luminosity has reached more than half of the design value, and more than 900,000 Z 0 particles have been generated, detected, and analysed. The major factors relating to each significant improvement in performance are described. The present-day limitations to performance are analysed, and the foreseen improvements aimed at raising the performance are discussed. In addition, the time schedule and performance estimates for the planned upgrade in LEP energy to allow study of W pair production are reported. (orig.)

  3. Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This document presents the scientific justification and the conceptual design for the {open_quotes}Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator{close_quotes} (NLCTA) at SLAC. The goals of the NLCTA are to integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and rf systems being developed for the Next Linear Collider, to measure the growth of the {open_quotes}dark current{close_quotes} generated by rf field emission in the accelerator, to demonstrate multi-bunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, and to measure any transverse components of the accelerating field. The NLCTA will be a 42-meter-long beam line consisting, consecutively, of a thermionic-cathode gun, an X-band buncher, a magnetic chicane, six 1.8-meter-long sections of 11.4-GHz accelerator structure, and a magnetic spectrometer. Initially, the unloaded accelerating gradient will be 50 MV/m. A higher-gradient upgrade option eventually would increase the unloaded gradient to 100 MV/m.

  4. Design study for a staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Limon et al.

    2001-06-26

    Advancing accelerator designs and technology to achieve the highest energies has enabled remarkable discoveries in particle physics. This report presents the results of a design study for a new collider at Fermilab that will create exceptional opportunities for particle physics--a two-stage very large hadron collider. In its first stage, the machine provides a facility for energy-frontier particle physics research, at an affordable cost and on a reasonable time scale. In a second-stage upgrade in the same tunnel, the VLHC offers the possibility of reaching 100 times the collision energy of the Tevatron. The existing Fermilab accelerator complex serves as the injector, and the collision halls are on the Fermilab site. The Stage-1 VLHC reaches a collision energy of 40 TeV and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC, using robust superferric magnets of elegant simplicity housed in a large-circumference tunnel. The Stage-2 VLHC, constructed after the scientific potential of the first stage has been fully realized, reaches a collision energy of at least 175 TeV with the installation of high-field magnets in the same tunnel. It makes optimal use of the infrastructure developed for the Stage-1 machine, using the Stage-1 accelerator itself as the injector. The goals of this study, commissioned by the Fermilab Director in November 2000, are: to create reasonable designs for the Stage-1 and Stage-2 VLHC in the same tunnel; to discover the technical challenges and potential impediments to building such a facility at Fermilab; to determine the approximate costs of the major elements of the Stage-1 VLHC; and to identify areas requiring significant R and D to establish the basis for the design.

  5. Design of an intense positron source for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, H.; Yamada, K.; Funahashi, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Japan Linear Collider (JLC) requires an intense positron source of 8x10 11 particles per rf-pulse. A computer simulation reveals the possibility of such an intense positron source using 'conventional' technology. In order to relax the limitation of the incident electron energy density due to thermal stress in the converter target, the incident beam radius is enlarged within the range so as not to reduce the positron capture efficiency. A pre-damping ring and beam transport system to the pre-damping ring, which have a large transverse acceptance, play important roles for a high capture efficiency. A prototype positron source has been designed and installed at downstream of 1.54 GeV S-band linac in Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in order to carry out experiments to develop the essential technology for JLC. The simulated results will be tested in experiments with the prototype positron source. (author)

  6. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  7. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources

  8. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources

  9. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  10. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Foster, Brian; Fuster, Juan; Harrison, Mike; McEwan Paterson, James; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    A review is given about the planned International Linear Collider. Especially described are the technical design, the accelerator layout and design, the R and D during the technical design phase, and the detectors. (HSI)

  11. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Foster, Brian; Fuster, Juan; Harrison, Mike; McEwan Paterson, James; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Hitoshi (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    A review is given about the planned International Linear Collider. Especially described are the technical design, the accelerator layout and design, the R and D during the technical design phase, and the detectors. (HSI)

  12. Design studies for the next generation electron ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal [BNL; Bogacz, Slawomir A. [JLAB; Krafft, Geoffrey A. [JLAB

    2014-04-01

    The next generation Electron Ion Collider (EIC) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) utilizes a figure-8 shaped ion and electron rings. EIC has the ability to preserve the ion polarization during acceleration, where the electron ring matches in footprint with a figure-8 ion ring. The electron ring is designed to deliver a highly polarized high luminous electron beam at interaction point (IP). The main challenges of the electron ring design are the chromaticity compensation and maintaining high beam polarization of 70% at all energies 3–11 GeV without introducing transverse orbital coupling before the IP. The very demanding detector design limits the minimum distance between the final focus quadrupole and the interaction point to 3.5 m which results in a large β function inside the final focus quadrupoles leading to increased beam chromaticity. In this paper, we present a novel chromaticity compensation scheme that mitigates IP chromaticity by a compact chromaticity compensation section with multipole magnet components. In addition, a set of spin rotators are utilized to manipulate the polarization vector of the electron beam in order to preserve the beam polarization. The spin rotator solenoids introduce undesired coupling between the horizontal and vertical betatron motion of the beam. We introduce a compact and modular orbit decoupling insert that can fit in the limited space of the straight section in the figure-8 ring. We show a numerical study of the figure-8 ring design with the compact straight section, which includes the interaction region, chromaticity compensation section, and the spin rotators, the figure-8 design performance is evaluated with particle tracking.

  13. The design, construction and commissioning of the CERN Large Electron-Positron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.; Picasso, E.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the most important parameters considered in the design of the CERN Large Electron-Positron collider. It is shown how these parameters affect the collider performance and how they have been optimised with respect to the cost of the project. The functioning of each major subsystem is described with respect to its role as part of the collider. Finally, the planning, testing and initial commissioning of LEP is described and possible future developments are outlined. (author)

  14. An overview of the multilayer insulation system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroski, W.; Nicol, T.; Schoo, C.J.

    1991-08-01

    The MLI system for the SSC is designed to meet strict performance requirements over the 25 year life of the accelerator. Thermal measurements at 80K and 20K have been used to create an MLI system that limits heat flow to design values while incorporating features that permit the use of large-scale fabrication techniques. The result is a cost-effective means of mass-producing MLI blankets of consistent geometry and thermal performance

  15. A high gradient quadrupole magnet for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.; Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Wandesforde, A.

    1987-03-01

    A quadrupole magnet for the SSC has been designed with a gradient of 234 T/m at 6500 A. Coil ID is 40 mm. The two-layer windings have 9 inner turns and 13 outer turns per pole with a wedge-shaped spacer in each layer. The 30-strand cable is identical to that used in the outer layer of the SSC dipole magnet. Interlocking aluminum alloy collars are compressed around the coils using a four-way press and are locked with four keys. The collared coil is supported and centered in a cold split iron yoke. A one-meter model was constructed and tested. Design details including quench behavior are presented.

  16. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  17. SSC 50 MM collider dipole cryostat single tube support post conceptual design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet cold masses are connected to the cryostat vacuum vessel at five places equally spaced along their length. Five supports limit sag of the cold assembly due to its own weight to a level consistent with the final magnet alignment specifications. The design essentially consists of two composite tubes nested within each other as a means of maximizing the thermal path length. In addition it provides an ideal way to utilize materials best suited for the temperature range over which they must operate. Filament wound S-glass is used between 300K and 80K. Filament wound graphite fiber is used between 80K and 20K and between 20K and 4.5K. S-glass is a better thermal performer above approximately 40K. Graphite composites are ideally suited for operation below 40K. The designs for the 50 mm reentrant supports are well documented in the literature. The current design of the reentrant support has two major drawbacks. First, it requires very tight dimensional control on all components; composite tubes and metal attachment parts. Second, it is expensive, with cost being driven by both the tolerance constraints and by a complex assembly procedure. It seems clear that production magnets will require a support structure which is considerably less expensive than that which is currently used. It seems clear that a design alternate for reentrant support posts will be required for production dipoles primarily due to their cost. It seems less clear that injection molded composite materials are the ideal choice. This report describes the conceptual design for a support post whose function is identical to that of the current reentrant design, which requires very few modifications to surrounding cryostat components, is thermally equivalent to the current 50 mm support post, and is nearly equivalent structurally

  18. Concept and design of super junction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Wentong; Qiao, Ming; Zhan, Zhenya; Li, Zhaoji

    2018-02-01

    The super junction (SJ) has been recognized as the " milestone” of the power MOSFET, which is the most important innovation concept of the voltage-sustaining layer (VSL). The basic structure of the SJ is a typical junction-type VSL (J-VSL) with the periodic N and P regions. However, the conventional VSL is a typical resistance-type VSL (R-VSL) with only an N or P region. It is a qualitative change of the VSL from the R-VSL to the J-VSL, introducing the bulk depletion to increase the doping concentration and optimize the bulk electric field of the SJ. This paper firstly summarizes the development of the SJ, and then the optimization theory of the SJ is discussed for both the vertical and the lateral devices, including the non-full depletion mode, the minimum specific on-resistance optimization method and the equivalent substrate model. The SJ concept breaks the conventional " silicon limit” relationship of R on∝V B 2.5, showing a quasi-linear relationship of R on∝V B 1.03.

  19. Design of textured surfaces for super-hydrophobicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although the Cassie–Baxter and Wenzel equations predict contact angles for relative dimensions of micro-pillars on textured surfaces, the absolute pillar dimensions are determined by trial and error. Alternatively, geometries of natural super-hydrophobic surfaces are often imitated to design textured surfaces. Knowing the ...

  20. Medical surveillance of employee health at the superconducting super collider laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    Medical surveillance can best be defined as conducting specific, targeted medical examinations at predetermined intervals for the purpose of assessing whether individuals have suffered work-related illness or injury. The objectives of the medical examinations are to determine if there is any evidence of illness or injury and to determine whether any illness or injury found is occupationally related. If illness or injury is found, the employee under medical surveillance can be referred for immediate treatment. Other employees in the same work group can be examined, and any hazardous defects in the workplace can be corrected. Additional objectives of these periodic examinations are to determine whether the employee's health status and physical fitness continue to be compatible with the safe performance of his assigned job tasks; to contribute to employee health maintenance by providing the opportunity for early detection, treatment, and prevention of disease or injuries; and to provide a documented record of health status that can be used in analysis of the health of the work group as a whole. Medical surveillance is one of several measures used in a good occupational health and safety program to prevent occupational illness or injury. A heirarchy of preventive health and safety programs is offered: system safety-design review; health and safety procedures; operational readiness review; management safety awareness; employee safety awareness; periodic professional inspections of industrial hygiene, health physics, safety, fire, medical; industrial hygiene/health physics monitoring; medical surveillance examinations; epidemiologic analysis. The earlier in the list a program appears, the more basic it is to the prevention effort and the more likely it is to prevent occupational illness and injuries with the least risk and least expense. A good occupational safety and health program contains all of these elements

  1. Meeting to discuss laser cavity design for photon linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The motivation to use a cavity at the photon linear collider (PLC) is that there are 1010 electrons in each electron bunch. The small cross-section for the Compton scattering process dictates having at least 1019 photons in the laser pulse to obtain an efficient conversion of the incoming beam. This means that less than 1 in ...

  2. Design study for a 500 GeV linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, T.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of a 500 GeV c.m. linear collider has been studied, which is based almost entirely on conventional rf-technology. The basic components are S-band travelling wave, constant-gradient accelerating structures and 130 MW klystrons. 3 GeV damping rings are used to produce extremely small emittances in both planes which are in the same range than these of the next generation synchrotron light sources. In both cases, the envisaged methods concerning stability and feedback give rise to the assumption, that the proposed values can be reached today. Also very strong focusing and a dedicated chromatic correction scheme near the interaction region is necessary to reach spot sizes that have riot been produced yet. The author presents a status report of the investigations that have recently been started. Already at this early stage of the studies it seems that such a collider is technically feasible and could indeed be built in this decade

  3. Design Study for a Staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex W.

    2002-02-27

    Particle physics makes its greatest advances with experiments at the highest energy. The only sure way to advance to a higher-energy regime is through hadron colliders--the Tevatron, the LHC, and then, beyond that, a Very Large Hadron Collider. At Snowmass-1996 [1], investigators explored the best way to build a VLHC, which they defined as a 100 TeV collider. The goals in this study are different. The current study seeks to identify the best and cheapest way to arrive at frontier-energy physics, while simultaneously starting down a path that will eventually lead to the highest-energy collisions technologically possible in any accelerator using presently conceivable technology. This study takes the first steps toward understanding the accelerator physics issues, the technological possibilities and the approximate cost of a particular model of the VLHC. It describes a staged approach that offers exciting physics at each stage for the least cost, and finally reaches an energy one-hundred times the highest energy currently achievable.

  4. Design studies of high-luminoisty ring-ring- eletron-ion collider at CEBAF.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Bruell, A.; Cardman, L.; Delayen, J.; Ostroumov, P.; Derbenev, Y.; Ent, R.; Evtushenko, P.; Grames, J.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Merminga, L.; Musson, J.; Poelker, M.; Thomas, A.; Wojteshowski, B.; Yunn, B.; Zhang, Y.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Dudnikov, V.; Belov, A.; Derenchuk, V.; Physics; Jefferson Lab.; BNL; BTG; INR; IUCF

    2007-08-01

    Experimental studies of fundamental structure of nucleons require an electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with both beams polarized. A CEBAF-based collider of 9 GeV electrons/positrons and 225 GeV ions is envisioned to meet this science need and as a next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. A ring-ring scheme of this collider developed recently takes advantage of the existing polarized electron CW beam from the CEBAF and a green-field design of an ion complex with electron cooling. We present a conceptual design and report design studies of this high-luminosity collider.

  5. Meshed-Pumpkin Super-Pressure Balloon Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Yavrouian, Andre

    2003-01-01

    An improved, lightweight design has been proposed for super-pressure balloons used to carry scientific instruments at high altitudes in the atmosphere of Earth for times as long as 100 days. [A super-pressure balloon is one in which the pressure of the buoyant gas (typically, helium) is kept somewhat above ambient pressure in order to maintain approximately constant density and thereby regulate the altitude.] The proposed design, called "meshed pumpkin," incorporates the basic concept of the pumpkin design, which is so named because of its appearance. The pumpkin design entails less weight than does a spherical design, and the meshed-pumpkin design would reduce weight further. The basic idea of the meshed-pumpkin design is to reinforce the membrane of a pumpkin balloon by attaching a strong, lightweight fabric mesh to its outer surface. The reinforcement would make it possible to reduce the membrane mass to one-third or less of that of the basic pumpkin design while retaining sufficient strength to enable the balloon to remain at approximately constant altitude for months.

  6. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

  7. Advances in the Design of the SuperB Final Doublet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paoloni, E.; Carmignani, N.; Pilo, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Musenich, R.; /INFN, Genoa; Bosi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; /Frascati; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-26

    SuperB is an asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) peak with a design peak luminosity of 10{sup 36} Hz/cm{sup 2} to be built in Italy in the very near future. The design luminosity is almost a factor hundred higher than that of the present generation comparable facilities. To get the design luminosity a novel collision scheme, the so called 'large Piwinski angle with crab waist', has been designed. The scheme requires a short focus final doublet to reduce the vertical beta function down to {beta}*{sub y} = 0.2mm at the interaction point (IP). The final doublet will be composed by a set of permanent and superconducting (SC) quadrupoles. The SC quadrupole doublets QD0/QF1 will be placed as close to the IP as possible. This layout is critical because the space available for the doublets is very small. An advanced design of the quadrupole has been developed, based on the so-called helical coil concept. The paper discusses the design concept, the construction and the results of test of a model of the superconducting quadrupole based on NbTi technology. Future developments are also presented.

  8. Design Specification for Supporting and Alignment systems of a Linear Particle Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nousiainen, Risto; Riddone, G

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes a design specification for supporting and alignment systems of a linear particle collider. The Compact linear collider study at the European organization for nuclear research carried out by international collaborations aims at showing the feasibility of a multi TeV electron - positron linear collider with an acceleration gradient of 100 MV/m before year 2010. The accelerator units should be aligned within 14 μm at 1σ Furthermore, accelerator requires stabilization to nanometer level above four Hz for some components. This work aims at setting the baseline for the mechanical design of the complete supporting and alignment systems of the accelerator. The work consist of the background to the project,definition of the demanded requirements and an overview to theories, methodologies and methods of design. Following the selected method of Pahl & Beitz, a design specification was made including both a requirement list and a schematic layout for the supporting and alignment sy...

  9. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Helene Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  10. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  11. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  13. The effect of muon decay on the design of dipoles and quadrupoles for a muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    The decay of muons to neutrinos and electrons can cause heating in the superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles in the muon collider acceleration rings and the colliding beam ring. The problem is particularly acute in the colliding beam ring where heating in the magnets can be high as 2.4 kW per meter in the bending magnets of muon collider ring with 2 TeV mu minus beams with 2.22x10 12 particles per bunch at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The energy deposited within the helium temperature region must be reduced at least three orders of magnitude in order for the refrigeration system to begin to keep up with the heat load. Beam heating from muon decay will require changes in dipole design from traditional cosine theta (or intersecting ellipse) design used in the SSC magnets. Some dipole and quadrupole design options are presented in this report for both the accelerator rings and the colliding beam rings

  14. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  15. The cryogenics design of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, M. I.; Bauer, D. A.; Dhuley, R. C.; Lukens, P.; Martin, L. D.; Ruschman, M. K.; Schmitt, R. L.; Tatkowski, G. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) experiment is a direct detection dark matter experiment intended for deployment to the SNOLAB underground facility in Ontario, Canada. With a payload of up to 186 germanium and silicon crystal detectors operating below 15 mK, the cryogenic architecture of the experiment is complex. Further, the requirement that the cryostat presents a low radioactive background to the detectors limits the materials and techniques available for construction, and heavily influences the design of the cryogenics system. The resulting thermal architecture is a closed cycle (no liquid cryogen) system, with stages at 50 and 4 K cooled with gas and fluid circulation systems and stages at 1 K, 250 mK and 15 mK cooled by the lower temperature stages of a large, cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. This paper describes the thermal design of the experiment, including details of the cooling systems, mechanical designs and expected performance of the system under operational conditions.

  16. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  17. The super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L

    2010-01-01

    We review here the prospects of a long-term upgrade programme for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN laboratory's new proton-proton collider. The super-LHC, which is currently under evaluation and design, is expected to deliver of the order of ten times the statistics of the LHC. In addition to a non-technical summary of the principal physics arguments for the upgrade, I present a pedagogical introduction to the technological challenges on the accelerator and experimental fronts, and a review of the current status of the planning.

  18. Cooling water for SSC experiments: Supplemental Conceptual Design Report (SCDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on cooling water design on the superconducting super collider; low conductivity water; industrial cooling water; chilled water systems; and radioactive water systems

  19. Physics and design issues of asymmetric storage ring colliders as B-factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1989-08-01

    This paper concentrates on generic R ampersand D and design issues of asymmetric colliders via a specific example, namely a 9 GeV x 3 GeV collider based on PEP at SLAC. An asymmetric e + -e - collider at the Y(4s) and with sufficiently high luminosity (10 33 -10 34 cm -2 s -1 ) offers the possibility of studying mixing, rare decays, and CP violation in the B bar B meson system, as well as ''beautiful'' tau-charm physics, and has certain qualitative advantages from detection and machine design points of view. These include: the energy constraint; clean environment (∼25% B + B - , B 0 bar B 0 ); large cross section (1 nb); vertex reconstruction (from the time development of space-time separated B and bar B decays due to moving center-of-mass); reduced backgrounds; greatest sensitivity to CP violation in B → CP eigenstate; the possibility of using higher collision frequencies, up to 100 MHz, in a head-on colliding mode using magnetic separation. It is estimated that for B → ΨK s , an asymmetric collider has an advantage equivalent to a factor of five in luminosity relative to a symmetric one. There are, however, questions with regard to the physics of the asymmetric beam-beam coulomb interaction that may limit the intrinsic luminosity and the possibility of realizing the small beam pipes necessary to determine the vertices. 16 refs., 2 figs

  20. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-01-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper

  1. Progress on the design of a high luminosity μ+μ- collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Tollestrup, A.

    1996-06-01

    Parameters are presented for a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The design is not optimized for performance, neither for cost; however, it does suffice to allow one to make a credible case that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics, that could open up the realm of physics above the 1 TeV scale, allowing, for example, copious production of supersymmetric particles or a detailed study of the strongly-interacting scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking

  2. submitter Can you afford to wait? Designing the collider of the future

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Designing a future circular collider is a next step in humanity’s quest to explain the world. This effort is not only about striving for a profound understanding of nature, but also about creating an exciting perspective for future generations.

  3. Core design of super LWR with double tube water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor with double tube water rods is developed. • Double-row fuel rod assembly and out-in fuel loading pattern are applied. • Separation plates in peripheral assemblies increase average outlet temperature. • Neutronic and thermal design criteria are satisfied during the cycle. - Abstract: Double tube water rods are employed in core design of super LWR to simplify the upper core structure and refueling procedure. The light water moderator flows up in the inner tube from the bottom of the core, then, changes the flow direction at the top of the core into the outer tube and flows out at the bottom of the core. It eliminates the moderator guide/distribution tubes into the single tube water rods from the top dome of the reactor pressure vessel of the previous super LWR design. Two rows of fuel rods are filled between the water rods in the fuel assembly. Out-in refueling pattern is adopted to flatten radial power distribution. The peripheral fuel assemblies of the core are divided into four flow zones by separation plates for increasing the average core outlet temperature. Three enrichment zones are used for axial power flattening. The equilibrium core is analyzed based on neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled model. The results show that, by applying the separation plates in peripheral fuel assemblies and low gadolinia enrichment, the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is limited to 653 °C with the average outlet temperature of 500 °C. The inherent safety is satisfied by the negative void reactivity effects and sufficient shutdown margin

  4. Meeting to discuss laser cavity design for photon linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design is fairly insensitive to displacements transverse to the beam but very sensitive to change in length of the cavity (as the power enhancement of the laser cavity is lost). In fact an accuracy of less than 1 nm is required, which implies that adaptive optics are required to maintain the cavity enhancement. Power deposit ...

  5. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  6. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kotnig, C

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets' refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  7. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  8. arXiv Proton Colliders at the Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael

    Since the CERN ISR, hadron colliders have defined the energy frontier. Noteworthy are the conversion of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) into a proton-antiproton collider, the Tevatron collider, as well as the abandoned SSC in the United States. Hadron colliders are likely to determine the pace of particle-physics progress also during the next hundred years. Discoveries at past hadron colliders were essential for establishing the so-called Standard Model of particle physics. The world's present flagship collider, the LHC, including its high-luminosity upgrade HL-LHC, is set to operate through the second half of the 2030's. Further increases of the energy reach during the 21st century require another, still more powerful hadron collider. Three options for a next hadron collider are presently under investigation. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) study, hosted by CERN, is designing a 100 TeV collider, to be installed inside a new 100 km tunnel in the Lake Geneva basin. A similar 100 km collider, called SppC,...

  9. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The design presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume one covers the following: the introduction; electron source; positron source; NLC damping rings; bunch compressors and prelinac; low-frequency linacs and compressors; main linacs; design and dynamics; and RF systems for main linacs.

  10. Radiation protection considerations in the design of the LHC, CERN's large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Huhtinen, M.; Moritz, L.E.; Nakashima, H.; Potter, K.M.; Rollet, S.; Stevenson, G.R.; Zazula, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the radiological concerns which are being taken into account in the design of the LHC (CERN's future Large Hadron Collider). The machine will be built in the 27 km circumference ring tunnel of the existing LEP collider at CERN. The high intensity of the circulating beams (each containing more than 10 14 protons at 7 TeV) determines the thickness specification of the shielding of the main-ring tunnel, the precautions to be taken in the design of the beam dumps and their associated caverns and the radioactivity induced by the loss of protons in the main ring by inelastic beam-gas interactions. The high luminosity of the collider is designed to provide inelastic collision rates of 10 9 per second in each of the two principal detector installations, ATLAS and CMS. These collisions determine the shielding of the experimental areas, the radioactivity induced in both the detectors and in the machine components on either side of the experimental installations and, to some extent, the radioactivity induced in the beam-cleaning (scraper) systems. Some of the environmental issues raised by the project will be discussed. (author)

  11. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The design presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume one covers the following: the introduction; electron source; positron source; NLC damping rings; bunch compressors and prelinac; low-frequency linacs and compressors; main linacs; design and dynamics; and RF systems for main linacs

  12. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u $In^{49+}$ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, Edgar; Hansen, Jan; Page, Eric; Vincke, H

    2004-01-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 7/ molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the super proton synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental ...

  13. Neutral technicolor pseudo Goldstone bosons production and QCD (quantum chromodynamics) background at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Wang-Chuang.

    1990-09-21

    The production of the neutral technicolor pseudo Goldstone bosons, P{sup 0}{prime}and P{sub 8}{sup 0}{prime}, at large transverse momentum in pp collisions, pp {yields} g(q)P{sup 0}{prime} (P{sub 8}{sup 0}{prime})X has been investigated in reactions at a high energy collider such as the SSC. The major two-body and three-body decay modes in tree diagrams are investigated in detail. The t{bar t} decay channel would dominate both the decays of P{sup 0}{prime} and P{sub 8}{sup 0}{prime} if it is allowed. Otherwise, gg and 3g will be the dominant decay modes unless the mass of the P{sup 0}{prime} and P{sub 8}{sup 0}{prime} are below 40 GeV, where b{bar b} becomes dominant. According to the QCD backgrounds, which we have also investigated in detail in this work, the signal for t{bar t} is much larger than the background and will be the ideal signal for detecting these bosons. However, in the absence of the t{bar t} channel, the {tau}{bar {tau}} mode can be used to identify P{sup 0}{prime} up to m{sub P} = 300 GeV in the transverse momentum range P{sub {perpendicular}} {approx lt} 100 GeV. Similarly, the b{bar b} decay mode can serve us a signal to identify P{sub 8}{sup 0}{prime} up to m{sub P} = 300 GeV for P{sub {perpendicular}} between 500 and 700 GeV. Our results show that these high transverse momentum production processes are useful for the searching for the P{sub 8}{sup 0}{prime} at the SSC. 63 refs.

  14. Neutral technicolor pseudo Goldstone bosons production and QCD [quantum chromodynamics] background at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Wang-Chuang.

    1990-01-01

    The production of the neutral technicolor pseudo Goldstone bosons, P 0 'and P 8 0 ', at large transverse momentum in pp collisions, pp → g(q)P 0 ' (P 8 0 ')X has been investigated in reactions at a high energy collider such as the SSC. The major two-body and three-body decay modes in tree diagrams are investigated in detail. The t bar t decay channel would dominate both the decays of P 0 ' and P 8 0 ' if it is allowed. Otherwise, gg and 3g will be the dominant decay modes unless the mass of the P 0 ' and P 8 0 ' are below 40 GeV, where b bar b becomes dominant. According to the QCD backgrounds, which we have also investigated in detail in this work, the signal for t bar t is much larger than the background and will be the ideal signal for detecting these bosons. However, in the absence of the t bar t channel, the τ bar τ mode can be used to identify P 0 ' up to m P = 300 GeV in the transverse momentum range P perpendicular approx-lt 100 GeV. Similarly, the b bar b decay mode can serve us a signal to identify P 8 0 ' up to m P = 300 GeV for P perpendicular between 500 and 700 GeV. Our results show that these high transverse momentum production processes are useful for the searching for the P 8 0 ' at the SSC. 63 refs

  15. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The ``design`` presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume II covers the following: collimation systems; IP switch and big bend; final focus; the interaction region; multiple bunch issues; control systems; instrumentation; machine protection systems; NLC reliability considerations; NLC conventional facilities. Also included are four appendices on the following topics: An RF power source upgrade to the NLC; a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron; ground motion: theory and measurement; and beam-based feedback: theory and implementation.

  16. Towards the conceptual design of the cryogenic system of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorowski, M.; Correia Rodrigues, H.; Delikaris, D.; Duda, P.; Haberstroh, C.; Holdener, F.; Klöppel, S.; Kotnig, C.; Millet, F.; Polinski, J.; Quack, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    Following the update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study considers several options for very high-energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders. From the cryogenics point of view, the most challenging option is the hadron-hadron collider (FCC-hh) for which the conceptual design of the cryogenic system is progressing. The FCC-hh cryogenic system will have to produce up to 120 kW at 1.8 K for the superconducting magnet cooling, 6 MW between 40 and 60 K for the beam-screen and thermal-shield cooling as well as 850 g/s between 40 and 290 K for the HTS current-lead cooling. The corresponding total entropic load represents about 1 MW equivalent at 4.5 K and this cryogenic system will be by far the largest ever designed. In addition, the total mass to be cooled down is about 250’000 t and an innovative cool-down process must be proposed. This paper will present the proposed cryogenic layout and architecture, the cooling principles of the main components, the corresponding cooling schemes, as well as the cryogenic plant arrangement and proposed process cycles. The corresponding required development plan for such challenging cryogenic system will be highlighted.

  17. Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir; Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir; Brindza, Paul; Bruell, Antje; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Ent, Rolf; Krafft, Geoffrey; Merminga, Nikolitsa; Musson, John; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yunn, Byung; Zhang, Yuhong; Qiang, Ji; Li, Rui

    2008-06-01

    An electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 1035 cm-2s-1 with both beams highly polarized is essential for exploring the new QCD frontier of strong color fields in nuclear and precisely imaging the sea-quarks and gluons in the nucleon. A conceptual design of a ring-ring collider based on CEBAF (ELIC) with energies up to 9 GeV for electrons/positrons and up to 225 GeV for protons and 100 GeV/u for ions has been proposed to fulfill the science desire and to serve as the next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. Here, we summarize recent design progress for the ELIC complex with four interaction points (IP); including interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation scheme and complete lattices for the Figure-8 collider rings. Further optimization of crab crossing angles at the IPs, simulations of beam-beam interactions, and electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring and its matching at

  18. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The ''design'' presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume II covers the following: collimation systems; IP switch and big bend; final focus; the interaction region; multiple bunch issues; control systems; instrumentation; machine protection systems; NLC reliability considerations; NLC conventional facilities. Also included are four appendices on the following topics: An RF power source upgrade to the NLC; a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron; ground motion: theory and measurement; and beam-based feedback: theory and implementation

  19. Alignment and vibration issues in TeV linear collider design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of public-beam-derived placement information are mentioned. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  1. The ERL-based Design of Electron-Hadron Collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, Vadim [et al.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments of the ERL-based design of future high-luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC focused on balancing technological risks present in the design versus the design cost. As a result a lower risk design has been adopted at moderate cost increase. The modifications include a change of the main linac RF frequency, reduced number of SRF cavity types and modified electron spin transport using a spin rotator. A luminosity-staged approach is being explored with a Nominal design ($L \\sim 10^{33} {\\rm cm}^2 {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that employs reduced electron current and could possibly be based on classical electron cooling, and then with the Ultimate design ($L \\gt 10^{34} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that uses higher electron current and an innovative cooling technique (CeC). The paper describes the recent design modifications, and presents the full status of the eRHIC ERL-based design.

  2. Development of a custom monolithic device for data acquisition from a scintillating calorimeter at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenberg, T.; Dawson, J.W.; Talaga, R.L.; Stevens, A.E.; Haberichter, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    A clock-driven continuous sequential write/random read data acquisition architecture for a scintillating calorimeter at the SSC is presented. Simplicity of design and operation as well as potentially dead time-less operation are the motivations of this effort. The architecture minimizes the number of fast control signals, thereby reducing pickup from digital control lines by sensitive analog circuits in the front-end device. This architecture also reduces the logic necessary on the front-end device improving reliability and easing design and operation. Operation and design of the front-end device are discussed. 3 refs., 7 figs

  3. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  4. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  5. Beam transfer between the coupled cavity linac and the low energy booster synchrotron for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, R.K.; Penner, S.

    1990-09-01

    Ion optical design of the transfer line, which will be used to inject H - beam at 600 MeV from the Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) into the Low Energy Booster (LEB) synchrotron, is described. Space charge effects of up to 50 mA average beam current have been taken into account

  6. Technical design of a detector to be operated at the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Soleoidal Detector Collaboration: Summary and overview of the detector; physics and detector requirements; central tracking system; superconducting magnet; calorimetry; muon system; electronics; online computing; offline computing; safety; experimental facilities; installation; test and calibration beam plan; and cost and schedule summary.

  7. Technical design of a detector to be operated at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Soleoidal Detector Collaboration: Summary and overview of the detector; physics and detector requirements; central tracking system; superconducting magnet; calorimetry; muon system; electronics; online computing; offline computing; safety; experimental facilities; installation; test and calibration beam plan; and cost and schedule summary

  8. Forward tracking at the next $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider part II: experimental challenges and detector design

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, S.; Dannheim, D.; Duarte, J.; Gaede, F.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Sailer, A.; Valentan, M.; Vila, I.; Vos, M.

    2013-06-01

    We present the second in a series of studies into the forward tracking system for a future linear e+e− collider with a center-of-mass energy in the range from 250 GeV to 3 TeV. In this note a number of specific challenges are investigated, which have caused a degradation of the tracking and vertexing performance in the forward region in previous experiments. We perform a quantitative analysis of the dependence of the tracking performance on detector design parameters and identify several ways to mitigate the performance loss for charged particles emitted at shallow angle.

  9. Interaction Region Design for the Electron-Ion Collider eRHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Tepikian, Steven; Wang, Dong

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at high luminosities, adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accomodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region is presented.

  10. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  11. The Large Hadron Collider and the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN as Tools to Generate Warm Dense Matter and Non–Ideal Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2011-01-01

    The largest accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, has entered into commission- ing phase. It is expected that when this impressive machine will become fully operational, it will generate two counter rotating 7 TeV/c proton beams that will be made to collide, leading to an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm−2s−1. Total energy stored in each LHC beam is about 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is a very critical issue when working with such extremely powerful beams. It is important to know the consequences of an accidental release of the beam energy in order to design protection system for the equipment. For this purpose we have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the interaction of one full LHC beam with copper and graphite targets which are materials of practical importance. Our calculations have shown that the LHC protons will penetrate up to about 35 m in solid copper and 10 m in solid graphite. A very interesting outcome of this work i...

  12. Design of textured surfaces for super-hydrophobicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prithvi Raj Jelia

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... viour of a droplet on super-hydrophobic surfaces, an ana- lytical model is proposed in which a single droplet is assumed to rest on a surface bearing an array of square pillars. The objective of the model is to optimize the a b c. Figure 1. Model showing microscopic square pillars arranged in square array.

  13. Three-dimensional Core Design of a Super Fast Reactor with a High Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ju, Haitao

    2010-01-01

    The SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) pursues high power density to reduce its capital cost. The fast spectrum SCWR, called a super fast reactor, can be designed with a higher power density than thermal spectrum SCWR. The mechanism of increasing the average power density of the super fast reactor is studied theoretically and numerically. Some key parameters affecting the average power density, including fuel pin outer diameter, fuel pitch, power peaking factor, and the fraction of seed assemblies, are analyzed and optimized to achieve a more compact core. Based on those sensitivity analyses, a compact super fast reactor is successfully designed with an average power density of 294.8 W/cm 3 . The core characteristics are analyzed by using three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupling method. Numerical results show that all of the design criteria and goals are satisfied

  14. Choke-mode damped structure design for the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design to waveguide damped structures for the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. Choke-mode structures have the potential for lower pulsed temperature rise and simpler and less expensive fabrication. An equivalent circuit model based on transmission line theory for higher-order-mode damping is presented. Using this model, a new choke geometry is proposed and the wakefield performance is verified using Gdfidl. This structure has a comparable wakefield damping effect to the baseline design which uses waveguide damping. A prototype structure with the same iris dimensions and accelerating gradient as the nominal CLIC design, but with the new choke geometry, has been designed for high-power tests.

  15. Design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure made from two halves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Milling on two longitudinally split halves is one method to manufacture accelerating structures. This method is simple and allows one to avoid electromagnetic fields at bonding joints, making it attractive in manufacturing high-gradient accelerating structures. An X-band structure design with strong wakefield damping based on this manufacturing approach is studied in this work as an alternative design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac accelerating structures. The geometry of the structure is optimized to greatly reduce the surface fields, improve the efficiency, and suppress the wakefield. This structure features the baseline design of the CLIC main linac with additional advantages. This study may serve as a reference for designing other high frequency-band corrugated structures.

  16. Choke-mode damped structure design for the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Grudiev, Alexej; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design to waveguide damped structures for the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for lower pulsed temperature rise and simpler and less expensive fabrication. An equivalent circuit model based on transmission line theory for higher-order-mode damping is presented. Using this model, a new choke geometry is proposed and the wakefield performance is verified using GDFIDL. This structure has a comparable wakefield damping effect to the baseline design which uses waveguide damping. A prototype structure with the same iris dimensions and accelerating gradient as the nominal CLIC design, but with the new choke geometry, has been designed for high-power tests. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.122003

  17. SuperB, the super flavor factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitlin, D. G.

    2009-06-01

    Heavy flavor physics measurements, in particular B and τ physics results from the B Factories, currently provide strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard Model. SuperB, a next generation asymmetric collider with 50 to 100 times the luminosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, provide unique insights into New Physics phenomena seen at those machines.

  18. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  19. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  20. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  1. Design optimization of the International Linear Collider Final Focus System with a long L*

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, Fabien

    This Master's Thesis work has been done in the Aerospace Engineering master's programme framework and carried out at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It was conducted under the 500 GeV e-e+ International Linear Collider (ILC) study and focused on the design and performance optimization of the Final Focus System (FFS). The purpose of the final focus system of the future linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) is to demagnify the beam to the required transverse size at the interaction point (IP). The FFS is designed for a flat-beam in a compact way based on a local chromaticity correction which corrects both horizontal and vertical chromaticities simultaneously. An alternative FFS configuration based on the traditional scheme with two dedicated chromatic correction sections for horizontal and vertical chromaticities and a long L * option has been developed. A longer free space between the last quadrupole and the IP allows to place the last quadrupole on a stable ground, with fewer engineering ...

  2. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 1: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Foster, Brian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fuster, Juan [Univ. of Valencia (Spain); Harrison, Mike [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Paterson, James McEwan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Peskin, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanitzki, Marcel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Walker, Nicholas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  3. Fundamental Design Principles of Linear Collider Damping Rings, with an Application to CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Potier, J P

    2000-01-01

    Damping Rings for Linear Colliders have to produce very small normalised emittances at a high repetition rate. A previous paper presented analytical expressions for the equilibrium emittance of an arc cell as a function of the deflection angle per dipole. In addition, an expression for the lattice parameters providing the minimum emittance, and a strategy to stay close to this, were proposed. This analytical approach is extended to the detailed design of Damping Rings, taking into account the straight sections and the damping wigglers. Complete rings, including wiggler and injection insections, were modelled with the MAD [1] program, and their performance was found to be in good agreement with the analytical calculation. With such an approach it is shown that a Damping Ring corresponding to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) parameters at 0.5 and 1 TeV centre-of-mass energy, and tunable for two different sets of emittance and injection repetition rate, can be designed using the same ring layout.

  4. Radiation calculations and shielding considerations for the design of the Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; Vylet, V.

    1996-11-01

    The authors describe some of the work that they have done as a contribution to the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR), with specific emphasis placed on radiation-protection issues. However, because of the very nature of this machine--namely, extremely-small beam spots of high intensity--a new approach in accelerator radiation-protection philosophy appears to be warranted. Accordingly, the presentation will first take a look at recent design studies directed at protecting the machine itself, since this has resulted in a much better understanding of the very short exposure times involved whenever beam is lost and radiation sources are created. At the end of the paper, the authors suggest a Beam Containment System (BCS) that would provide an independent, redundant guarantee that exposure times are, indeed, kept very short. This, in turn, has guided them in the determination of the transverse shield thickness for the machine

  5. Conceptual design of a high luminosity 510 MeV collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cornacchia, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the magnetic lattice design of a high luminosity 510 MeV electron-positron collider, based on high field superconduction bending dipoles. The design criteria are flexibility in the choice of the tune and beta functions at the interaction point, horizontal emittance larger than 1 mm mrad to produce a luminosity larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , large synchrotron radiation damping rate, and large momentum compaction. The RF system parameter are chosen to provide a short bunch length also when the beam energy spread is determined by the microwave instability. A satisfactory ring dynamic aperature, and a simultaneous small value of the horizontal and vertical beta function at the interaction point, the authors expect will be achieved by using Cornacchia-Halbach modified sextupoles

  6. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 μs, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at ∼ 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 μs pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz

  7. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  8. Design and fabrication procedures of Super-Phenix fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclere, J.; Vialard, J.-L.; Delpeyroux, P.

    1975-01-01

    For Super-Phenix fuel assemblies, Phenix technological arrangements will be used again, but they will be simplified as far as possible. The maximum fuel can temperature has been lowered in order to obtain a good behavior of hexagonal tubes and cans at high irradiation levels. An important experimental programme and the experience gained from Phenix operation will confirm the merits of the options retained. The fuel element fabrication is envisaged to take place in the plutonium workshop at Cadarache. Usual procedures will be employed and both reliability and automation will be increased [fr

  9. Experimental investigation of undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape super-pressure balloon designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, W. W.

    2004-01-01

    Excess in skin material of a pneumatic envelope beyond what is required for minimum enclosure of a gas bubble is a necessary but by no means sufficient condition for the existence of multiple equilibrium configurations for that pneumatic envelope. The very design of structurally efficient super-pressure balloons of the pumpkin shape type requires such excess. Undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape balloons have been observed on experimental pumpkin shape balloons. These configurations contain regions with stress levels far higher than those predicted for the cyclically symmetric design configuration under maximum pressurization. Successful designs of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons do not allow such undesired stable equilibria under full pressurization. This work documents efforts made so far and describes efforts still underway by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program Office to arrive on guidance on the design of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons that guarantee full and proper deployment.

  10. Analog front-end electronics for the outer layers of the SuperB SVT: Design and expected performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombelli, Luca; Fiorini, Carlo; Nasri, Bayan; Trigilio, Paolo; Citterio, Mauro; Neri, Nicola

    2013-08-01

    The Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) of the new SuperB collider will be composed of 6 different detector layers [1]. The innermost layer (L0) will be composed by striplets or pixels [2]; the other 5 detector layers will be double-sided long-strip detectors. The strip geometries and the foreseen hit-rates will change according to the different layers. As a consequence, different optimization of the analog read-out electronics is needed in order to provide high detection-efficiency and low noise level in the different layers. Two readout ASICs are currently developed, one for layers 0-3, another for layers 4 and 5; they differ mainly in the analog front-end. In this work, we present the design and the expected performances of the analog front-end for layers 4 and 5. For these layers, the strip detectors show a very high stray capacitance and high series resistance. In this condition, the noise optimization is our primary concern. A necessary compromise on the best peaking time to achieve an acceptable noise level together with efficiency and timing accuracy has been found. We will present the design of preamplifier and shaper and the results of simulation of noise performance and efficiency (with the expected background rates). In addition, the design of the time-over-threshold and its use to correct the time-walk of the event trigger is discussed as well as the achievable timing accuracy of the circuit.

  11. Super B Factories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Heavy-flavor physics, in particular B and τ physics results from the B fac- tories, currently provides strong constraints on models of physics beyond the Standard. Model. A new generation of colliders, Super B Factories, with 50 to 100 times the lumi- nosity of existing colliders, can, in a dialog with LHC and ILC, ...

  12. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator R&D in the Technical Design Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Hélène Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  13. Third harmonic cavity design and RF measurements for the Frascati DAΦNE collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Third harmonic passive RF cavities have been proposed for installation in both rings of the DAΦNE factory collider to improve the Touschek lifetime and to increase the Landau damping. This paper illustrates the design of the harmonic cavities. The main requirements were to obtain a relatively low R/Q factor and a quality factor Q as high as possible to satisfy beam dynamics requirements and to damp all the higher order mode (HOM to a harmless level in order to avoid multibunch instabilities. A spherical shape of the cavity central body has been chosen as an optimum compromise between a high Q resonator and a low R/Q factor. HOM suppression has been provided by a ferrite ring damper designed for the superconducting cavities of the high energy ring of the KEK-B factory. The design and electromagnetic properties of the resonant modes have been studied with MAFIA and HFSS codes. Cavities have been made of aluminum and the RF measurements have been performed to characterize them. The measurements are in a good agreement with numerical simulations results, demonstrating a satisfactory HOM damping.

  14. Conceptual design and modeling of a six-dimensional bunch merging scheme for a muon collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A high luminosity muon collider requires single, intense, muon bunches with small emittances: just one of each sign. An efficient front end and a cooling channel have been designed and simulated within the collaboration of the Muon Accelerator Program. The muons are first bunched and phase rotated into 21 bunches, and then cooled in six dimensions. When they are cool enough, they are merged into single bunches: one of each sign. The bunch merging scheme has been outlined with preliminary simulations in previous studies. In this paper we present a comprehensive design with its end-to-end simulation. The 21 bunches are first merged in longitudinal phase space into seven bunches. These are directed into seven “trombone” paths with different lengths, to bring them to the same time, and then merged transversely in a collecting “funnel” into the required single larger bunches. Detailed numerical simulations show that the 6D emittance of the resulting bunch reaches the parameters needed for high acceptance into the downstream cooling channel.

  15. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; Béjar Alonso, I.; Brüning, O.; Lamont, M.; Rossi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.

  16. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Béjar Alonso, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Brüning, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Lamont, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-12-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.

  17. Design and investigation of photo-induced super-hydrophilic materials for car mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiamchai, Pitak; Chindaudom, Pongpan; Horprathum, Mati; Patthanasettakul, Viyapol; Limsuwan, Pichet

    2009-01-01

    During the past decades, interests in various properties in titanium dioxide thin films have been growing rapidly. There have been several reports for TiO 2 thin films prepared on various media with photocatalytic and hydrophilic properties, in order to function as self-cleaning and/or anti-fogging materials. An obvious application is usually found in side-view car mirrors in the automobile industries. In this study, a number of photocatalytic TiO 2 films are prepared on soda-lime glasses for car mirrors by an electron-beam evaporation. The designs and development of the photocatalytic TiO 2 films, based on crystallinity, deposition rate, film thickness, film structure, and surface roughness are discussed. In comparison to the commercialized products, a systematic investigation procedure for the super-hydrophilic properties of the light-induced TiO 2 films for car mirrors has been developed, based on super-hydrophilicity, sustainability, self-cleaning property, and degradation of the samples. In addition, physical characterization by X-ray diffraction and surface roughness are also discussed. It has been found that most commercial products attain super-hydrophilicity only after exposed to ultraviolet and solar irradiation in less than 1 h. They can also maintain hydrophilicity after rigorous cleaning process. On the other hand, our prepared TiO 2 thin films demonstrate super-hydrophilic and photocatalytic properties after exposed to ultraviolet light for more than 2 h. According to the study, their anatase crystallinity, small grain size, and surface conditions all contributes to the excellent results. However, the prepared samples do not attain sufficient retention property to maintain their hydrophilicity. Conclusively, the designs of the TiO 2 films on car mirrors prove adequate to produce super-hydrophilic materials, which still degrade over normal usage. Nevertheless, our proposed investigation methods prove useful in quality evaluation in order to

  18. Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L

    2009-05-01

    The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

  19. Low emittance design of the electron gun and the focusing channel of the Compact Linear Collider drive beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dayyani Kelisani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN, the power for the main linacs is extracted from a drive beam generated from a high current electron source. The design of the electron source and its subsequent focusing channel has a great impact on the beam dynamic considerations of the drive beam. We report the design of a thermionic electron source and the subsequent focusing channels with the goal of production of a high quality beam with a very small emittance.

  20. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Technical Design Report V. 0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Béjar Alonso I.; Brüning O.; Fessia P.; Lamont M.; Rossi L.; Tavian L.

    2017-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a newenergy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists work-ing in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. Tosustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase itsinstantaneous luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integratedluminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely opti-mised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. Thenew configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), relies on a number of key innovations that pushaccelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting mag-nets, compact superconduc...

  1. Physics requirements for the design of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, T S

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are discovery experiments. Thus, the aim was to make them sensitive to the widest possible range of new physics. New physics is likely to reveal itself in addressing questions such as: how do particles acquire mass; what is the particle responsible for dark matter; what is the path towards unification; do we live in a world with more space–time dimensions than the familiar four? The detection of the Higgs boson, conjectured to give mass to particles, was chosen as a benchmark to test the performance of the proposed experiment designs. Higgs production is one of the most demanding hypothesized processes in terms of required detector resolution and background discrimination. ATLAS and CMS feature full coverage, 4π-detectors to measure precisely the energies, directions and identity of all the particles produced in proton–proton collisions. Realizing this goal has required the collaborative efforts of enormous teams of people from around the wo...

  2. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, G; Béjar Alonso, I; Brüning, O; Lamont, M; Rossi, L

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cav...

  3. Beam dynamics design of the Compact Linear Collider Drive Beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajari, Sh. Sanaye; Shaker, H.; Doebert, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the RF power for the acceleration of the Main Beam is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel to the main linac. The longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics of the Drive Beam injector has been studied in detail and optimized. The injector consists of a thermionic gun followed by a bunching system, some accelerating structures, and a magnetic chicane. The bunching system contains three sub-harmonic bunchers, a prebuncher, and a traveling wave buncher all embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The main characteristic of the Drive Beam injector is the phase coding process done by the sub-harmonic bunching system operating at half the acceleration frequency. This process is essential for the frequency multiplication of the Drive Beam. During the phase coding process the unwanted satellite bunches are produced that adversely affects the machine power efficiency. The main challenge is to reduce the population of particles in the satellite bunches in the presence of strong space-charge forces due to the high beam current. The simulation of the beam dynamics has been carried out with PARMELA with the goal of optimizing the injector performance compared to the existing model studied for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The emphasis of the optimization was on decreasing the satellite population, the beam loss in the magnetic chicane and limiting the beam emittance growth in transverse plane

  4. Conceptual design report for the scientific program of the super-FRS experiment collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the plans of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration for a variety of experiments, which build on the versatile high-resolution separator and spectrometer performance of the Super-FRS. The characteristic feature of these experiments is the fact that they use the separator as an integral part of the measurement. These experiments build on the experience of the collaboration and their scientific program pursued at the FRS in the last 25 years, but also includes recently developed novel topics. Under these premises, the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration has identified ten major topics of current interest and with far-reaching scientific potential. In this CDR, the scientific case is briefly recapitulated and the conceptual design of the experiments, the setups and their implementation are described. Much of the needed equipment is already available or, if not, will be realized with new, additional resources and efforts outside the FAIR Cost Books. The related R and D works and some pilot experiments can be carried out at the existing FRS of GSI in FAIR Phase-0. On the midterm, the science program of this collaboration can start at the commissioning phase of the Super-FRS and will continue on the long term with the established full performance. Accordingly, the prototype equipment and other already existing devices can be tested and used at the FRS and can later, when completed or upgraded, be moved to the Super-FRS. The related developments and organization of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration are described,and the collaboration partners and institutes are listed. The Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration is formally and firmly established and is a comprising part of the NUSTAR Collaboration. A large variety of modern nuclear physics experiments with new scientific possibilities and outstanding scientific potential were presented in the scientific program (GSI-Report 2014-4), which was very positively evaluated and

  5. Theoretical design and advanced microstructure in super high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, F.G.; Santofimia, M.J.; Garcia-Mateo, C.; Chao, J.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical design procedure based on phase transformation theory alone has been successfully applied to design steels with a microstructure consisting of a mixture of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. Using thermodynamics and kinetics models, a set of four carbide free bainitic steels with a 0.3 wt.% carbon content were designed and manufactured following a thermomechanical treatment consisting of hot rolling and two-step cooling. The designed steels present significant combinations of strength and ductility, with tensile strengths ranging from 1500 to 1800 MPa and total elongations over 15%. However, a carbon content of 0.3 wt.% is still high for in-use properties such as weldability. In this sense, a reduction in the average carbon content of advanced bainitic steels was proposed. Improved bainitic steels with a carbon content of 0.2 wt.% reached combinations of strength and ductility comparable to those in TRIP assisted steels.

  6. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  7. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  8. Design Evolution and Methodology for Pumpkin Super-Pressure Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Rodger

    The NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program has had many technical development issues discovered and solved along its road to success as a new vehicle. It has the promise of being a sub-satellite, a means to launch up to 2700 kg to 33.5 km altitude for 100 days from a comfortable mid-latitude launch point. Current high-lift long duration ballooning is accomplished out of Antarctica with zero-pressure balloons, which cannot cope with the rigors of diurnal cycles. The ULDB design is still evolving, the product of intense analytical effort, scaled testing, improved manufacturing, and engineering intuition. The past technical problems, in particular the s-cleft deformation, their solutions, future challenges, and the methodology of pumpkin balloon design will generally be described.

  9. Super conducting fault current limiter and inductor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.; Boenig, H.; Chowdhuri, P.; Schermer, R.; Weldon, D.; Wollan, J.

    1983-01-01

    A superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) that uses a biased superconducting inductor in a diode or thyristor bridge circuit was analyzed for transmission systems in 69, 138, and 230 rms kV utility transmission systems. The limiter was evaluated for costs with all components--superconducting coil, diode and/or SCR power electronics, high voltage insulation, high voltage bushings and vapor cooled leads, dewar, and refrigerator--included. A design was undertaken for the superconducting cable and coils for both diode and SCR 69 kV limiter circuits

  10. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J.L.; Akay, A.N.; Aksakal, H.; Albacete, J.L.; Alekhin, S.; Allport, P.; Andreev, V.; Appleby, R.B.; Arikan, E.; Armesto, N.; Azuelos, G.; Bai, M.; Barber, D.; Bartels, J.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Belyaev, A.S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Bernard, N.; Bertolucci, S.; Bettoni, S.; Biswal, S.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Bogacz, A.; Bracco, C.; Brandt, G.; Braun, H.; Brodsky, S.; Buning, O.; Bulyak, E.; Buniatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Cakir, I.T.; Cakir, O.; Calaga, R.; Cetinkaya, V.; Ciapala, E.; Ciftci, R.; Ciftci, A.K.; Cole, B.A.; Collins, J.C.; Dadoun, O.; Dainton, J.; De Roeck, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Dudarev, A.; Eide, A.; Enberg, R.; Eroglu, E.; Eskola, K.J.; Favart, L.; Fitterer, M.; Forte, S.; Gaddi, A.; Gambino, P.; Garcia Morales, H.; Gehrmann, T.; Gladkikh, P.; Glasman, C.; Godbole, R.; Goddard, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Guffanti, A.; Guzey, V.; Gwenlan, C.; Han, T.; Hao, Y.; Haug, F.; Herr, W.; Herve, A.; Holzer, B.J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jeanneret, B.; Jimenez, J.M.; Jowett, J.M.; Jung, H.; Karadeniz, H.; Kayran, D.; Kilic, A.; Kimura, K.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kluge, T.; Kocak, F.; Korostelev, M.; Kosmicki, A.; Kostka, P.; Kowalski, H.; Kramer, G.; Kuchler, D.; Kuze, M.; Lappi, T.; Laycock, P.; Levichev, E.; Levonian, S.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Lombardi, A.; Maeda, J.; Marquet, C.; Mellado, B.; Mess, K.H.; Milanese, A.; Moch, S.; Morozov, I.I.; Muttoni, Y.; Myers, S.; Nandi, S.; Nergiz, Z.; Newman, P.R.; Omori, T.; Osborne, J.; Paoloni, E.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pascaud, C.; Paukkunen, H.; Perez, E.; Pieloni, T.; Pilicer, E.; Pire, B.; Placakyte, R.; Polini, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pupkov, Y.; Radescu, V.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rinol, L.; Rohini, R.; Rojo, J.; Russenschuck, S.; Sahin, M.; Salgado, C.A.; Sampei, K.; Sassot, R.; Sauvan, E.; Schneekloth, U.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schulte, D.; Senol, A.; Seryi, A.; Sievers, P.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Smith, W.; Spiesberger, H.; Stasto, A.M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Sun, Y.P.; Surrow, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Taels, P.; Tapan, I.; Tasci, T.; Tassi, E.; Ten Kate, H.; Terron, J.; Thiesen, H.; Thompson, L.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomas Garcia, R.; Tommasini, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuckmantel, J.; Turkoz, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tywoniuk, K.; Unel, G.; Urakawa, J.; VanMechelen, P.; Variola, A.; Veness, R.; Vivoli, A.; Vobly, P.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Wallon, S.; Watt, G.; Weiss, C.; Wiedemann, U.A.; Wienands, U.; Willeke, F.; Xiao, B.W.; Yakimenko, V.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmermann, F.; Zlebcik, R.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  11. LHC - Large Hadon Collider Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will accelerate two proton beams to an energy corresponding to about 7,000 times their mass (7000 GeV). The collision of the two beams reproduces the conditions in the Universe when it was about 10 -1 2 sec old. Many innovative techniques - such as cooling with superfluid helium, the extensive use of high temperature superconducting cables, the two-in-one design for super-conducting dipole magnets, and new ultra-high vacuum technologies - had to be developed to make its construc-tion possible.

  12. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must

  13. Conceptual design and performance simulations of super-compact electromagnetic calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Skoda Libor

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of particle production at forward rapidities in high energy p-p, p-A and A-A collisions provide access to physics processes at very low Bjorken x. These measurements will allow to study the gluon saturation scale and improve our knowledge of parton distribution in nuclei. Specific requirements must be fulfilled for a calorimeter to successfully operate in high-multiplicity forward region within often stringent space limits. Here we present a study of a conceptual design of super-...

  14. Cooling water for SSC experiments: Supplemental Conceptual Design Report (SCDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, R.E.

    1989-10-20

    This paper discusses the following topics on cooling water design on the superconducting super collider; low conductivity water; industrial cooling water; chilled water systems; and radioactive water systems. (LSP)

  15. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  16. The Photon Collider at Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badelek, B.; Blöchinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkmann, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chyla, J.; Çiftçi, A. K.; Decking, W.; de Roeck, A.; Fadin, V.; Ferrario, M.; Finch, A.; Fraas, H.; Franke, F.; Galynskii, M.; Gamp, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godbole, R.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Gounaris, G.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, L.; Heuer, R.-D.; Heusch, C.; Illana, J.; Ilyin, V.; Jankowski, P.; Jiang, Y.; Jikia, G.; Jönsson, L.; Kalachnikow, M.; Kapusta, F.; Klanner, R.; Klassen, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Kon, T.; Kotkin, G.; Krämer, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Kuang, Y. P.; Kuraev, E.; Kwiecinski, J.; Leenen, M.; Levchuk, M.; Ma, W. F.; Martyn, H.; Mayer, T.; Melles, M.; Miller, D. J.; Mtingwa, S.; Mühlleitner, M.; Muryn, B.; Nickles, P. V.; Orava, R.; Pancheri, G.; Penin, A.; Potylitsyn, A.; Poulose, P.; Quast, T.; Raimondi, P.; Redlin, H.; Richard, F.; Rindani, S. D.; Rizzo, T.; Saldin, E.; Sandner, W.; Schönnagel, H.; Schneidmiller, E.; Schreiber, H. J.; Schreiber, S.; Schüler, K. P.; Serbo, V.; Seryi, A.; Shanidze, R.; da Silva, W.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Spira, M.; Stasto, A. M.; Sultansoy, S.; Takahashi, T.; Telnov, V.; Tkabladze, A.; Trines, D.; Undrus, A.; Wagner, A.; Walker, N.; Watanabe, I.; Wengler, T.; Will, I.; Wipf, S.; Yavaş, Ö.; Yokoya, K.; Yurkov, M.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zerwas, P.; Zomer, F.

    High energy photon colliders (γγ,γe) are based on e-e- linear colliders where high energy photons are produced using Compton scattering of laser light on high energy electrons just before the interaction point. This paper is a part of the Technical Design Report of the linear collider TESLA.1 Physics program, possible parameters and some technical aspects of the photon collider at TESLA are discussed.

  17. Muon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert B. Palmer; A. Sessler; A. Skrinsky; A. Tollestrup; A.J. Baltz; P. Chen; W-H. Cheng; Y. Cho; E. Courant; Richard C. Fernow; Juan C. Gallardo; A. Garren; M. Green; S. Kahn; H. Kirk; Y. Y. Lee; F. Mills; N. Mokhov; G. Morgan; David Neuffer; R. Noble; J. Norem; M. Popovic; L. Schachinger; G. Silvestrov; D. Summers; I. Stumer; M. Syphers; Yagmur Torun; D. Trbojevic; W. Turner; A. Van Ginneken; T. Vsevolozhskaya; R. Weggel; E. Willen; David Winn; J. Wurtele

    1994-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity(mu)(sup+)(mu)(sup -) colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  18. Collider Scaling and Cost Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with collider cost and scaling. The main points of the discussion are the following ones: 1) scaling laws and cost estimation: accelerating gradient requirements, total stored RF energy considerations, peak power consideration, average power consumption; 2) cost optimization; 3) Bremsstrahlung considerations; 4) Focusing optics: conventional, laser focusing or super disruption. 13 refs

  19. Radiation protection design for the Super-FRS and SIS100 at the international FAIR facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlova Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The new accelerator SIS100 and the Super-FRS will be built at the international Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research FAIR. The synchrotron SIS100 is a core part of the FAIR facility which serves for acceleration of ions like Uranium up to 2.7 GeV/u with intensities of 3x1011 particles per second or protons up to 30 GeV with intensities of 5x1012 particles per second. The Super-FRS is a superconducting fragment separator, it will be able to separate all kinds of nuclear projectile fragments of primary heavy ion beams including Uranium with energies up to 1.5 GeV/u and intensities up to 3x1011 particles per second. During operation activation of several components, especially the production target and the beam catchers will take place. For handling of highly activated components it is foreseen to have a hot cell with connected storage place. All calculations for the optimisation of the shielding design of the SIS100, the Super-FRS and the hot cell were performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA, results are presented.

  20. URBAN COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO VISUAL APPROPRIATE THEMATIC DESIGN, SUPER HERO PARK BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Duhita

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Parks is one of city public area that serves as a communal place for city community. On another perspective, parks is an architectural design that is designed with an aesthetic element to attract. Bandung, since a few years was to make improvements in various sectors, especially in the public space. Through the slogan Creative City, Bandung City Government revived communities part of the citizens by providing place for a activities, creation and production. Thematic Parks became one of the alternative approaches responsive design as part of creative cities development. Object of research study object is Super Hero park. The purpose of research is to analyzing the response of communities to design a thematic park. The study was conducted with a qualitative approach through participation observation method. The scope of the research includes visual appropriate and city community response. The conclussion obtain that visual appropriate are in accordance with the theme. Urban Community was able to respond well the identity of Super Hero park with visual appropriate design.

  1. Design and Installation Challenges of the Neutral Beam Absorbers for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Vélez, Óscar

    2005-01-01

    El CERN (Consejo Europeo de Investigación Nuclear) está construyendo su nuevo acelerador de partículas en la frontera franco-suiza. Actualmente en la fase de instalación, El Large Hadron Collider (LHC), con 26,7 kilómetros de longitud a 100 metros bajo tierra, será el mayor y más potente acelerador de partículas jamás construido. A su llegada al CERN, cada uno de casi 2000 imanes superconductores que formarán parte del acelerador debe ser verificado, ensamblado y transportado hasta ...

  2. Current status of International Linear Collider Project in Technical Design stage and activities of Japan Society of Civil Engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In order to invite the International Linear Collider (ILC) in Japan, Japan Society of Civil Engineers (JSCE) established the Linear Collider Subcommittee of JSCE (LC subcommittee) in April, 2006. Abstracts of the activities and objects of LC subcommittee are stated. The LC subcommittee consists of five working groups. Each working group investigated the previous reports of 2006 and 2007 and reported some important notices. The working group on planning and project and management reported the site conditions of Japan, tunnels and facilities. The working group on geological survey, test and environmental design stated the earthquake, fault, ground water, water quality, long-term displacement and survey methods. The working group on structural and environmental design described the tunnel design in fault and fracture zone, hollow, beam tunnel and service tunnel. The working group on construction and maintenance reported some examples of troubles in granite zone, survey for steering, shaft and inclined shaft. The working group on information investigation of ILC described analysis of reference materials, construction of LHC, beam tunnel and some points under consideration. (S.Y.)

  3. Core design and fuel rod analyses of a super fast reactor with high power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Haitao; Cao, Liangzhi; Lu, Haoliang; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    A Super Fast Reactor is a pressure-vessel type, fast spectrum SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR) that is presently researched in a Japanese project. One of the most important advantages of the Super Fast Reactor is the higher power density compared to the thermal spectrum SCWR, which reduces the capital cost. A preliminary core has an average power density of 158.8W/cc. In this paper, the principle of improving the average power density is studied and the core design is improved. After the sensitivity analyses on the fuel rod configurations, the fuel assembly configurations and the core configurations, an improved core with an average power density of 294.8W/cc is designed by 3-D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled calculations. This power density is competitive with that of typical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). In order to ensure the fuel rod integrity of this core design, the fuel rod behaviors on the normal operating condition are analyzed using FEMAXI-6 code. The power histories of each fuel rod are taken from the neutronics calculation results in the core design. The cladding surface temperature histories are taken from the thermal-hydraulic calculation results in the core design. Four types of the limiting fuel rods, with the Maximum Cladding Surface Temperature (MCST), Maximum Power Peak(MPP), Maximum Discharge Burnup(MDB) and Different Coolant Flow Pattern (DCFP), are chosen to cover all the fuel rods in the core. The available design range of the fuel rod design parameters, such as initial gas plenum pressure, gas plenum position, gas plenum length, grain size and gap size, are found out in order to satisfy the following design criteria: (1) Maximum fuel centerline temperature should be less than 1900degC. (2) Maximum cladding stress in circumstance direction should be less than 100MPa. (3) Pressure difference on the cladding should be less than 1/3 of buckling collapse pressure. (4) Cumulative damage faction (CDF) of the cladding should be

  4. Computer utilization for design and operation of the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selph, F.B.; Spence, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    The in-house constructed computer codes at the SuperHILAC can be divided into three main categories: (1) accelerator and component design; (2) control and operation; and (3) performance and diagnostics. The first category includes design programs of rf cavities, magnets, and beam optics. The second group contains programs for administration and logbook entries, machine parameter specifications, and openloop parameter control. Programs in the third category are those which directly or indirectly test the mechanical design and geometry of the machine, such as magnet testing, drift-tube-alignment, beam behavior and diagnostics. The present conversion of the SuperHILAC to computer control and a dual-ion time-sharing mode of operation is outlined in context with the complexities of operating this multi-ion, variable energy accelerator. Routines are discussed from the user's standpoint, covering such topics as on-line/off-line implementation, expected gain, actual results, and differences in characteristics which determine the method of computation. (U.S.)

  5. Quadrupole-free detector optics design for the Compact Linear Collider final focus system at 3 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Plassard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to simplify the machine detector interface of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, a new detector model has been designed allowing the last quadrupole QD0 of the final focus system (FFS to be located outside of the experiment with a distance L^{*} from the interaction point of 6 m. In this paper, the beam delivery system (BDS has been reoptimized, offering a luminosity performance that exceeds the design requirements by 11% for the total luminosity and by 7% in the energy peak. A simulation campaign has been carried out and has proved the feasibility of recovering the luminosity under realistic transverse misalignments of the FFS optics, by means of different orbit and aberration correction techniques, making this long L^{*} design a realistic candidate for the future CLIC BDS.

  6. Quadrupole-free detector optics design for the Compact Linear Collider final focus system at 3 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Fabien; Latina, Andrea; Marin, Eduardo; Tomás, Rogelio; Bambade, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Aiming to simplify the machine detector interface of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a new detector model has been designed allowing the last quadrupole QD0 of the final focus system (FFS) to be located outside of the experiment with a distance L* from the interaction point of 6 m. In this paper, the beam delivery system (BDS) has been reoptimized, offering a luminosity performance that exceeds the design requirements by 11% for the total luminosity and by 7% in the energy peak. A simulation campaign has been carried out and has proved the feasibility of recovering the luminosity under realistic transverse misalignments of the FFS optics, by means of different orbit and aberration correction techniques, making this long L* design a realistic candidate for the future CLIC BDS.

  7. Lattice design and beam optics calculations for the new large-scale electron-positron collider FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Haerer, Bastian; Prof. Dr. Schmidt, Ruediger; Dr. Holzer, Bernhard

    Following the recommendations of the European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics, CERN launched the Future Circular Collider Study (FCC) to investigate the feasibility of large-scale circular colliders for future high energy physics research. This thesis presents the considerations taken into account during the design process of the magnetic lattice in the arc sections of the electron-positron version FCC-ee. The machine is foreseen to operate at four different centre-of-mass energies in the range of 90 to 350 GeV. Different beam parameters need to be achieved for every energy, which requires a flexible lattice design in the arc sections. Therefore methods to tune the horizontal beam emittance without re-positioning machine components are implemented. In combination with damping and excitation wigglers a precise adjustment of the emittance can be achieved. A very first estimation of the vertical emittance arising from lattice imperfections is performed. Special emphasis is put on the optimisation of the ...

  8. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158  GeV/u In^{49+} ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10^{4} to 10^{7} molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158  GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  9. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology : CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aicheler, M [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Draper, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Garvey, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Lebrun, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Peach, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Phinney, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schmickler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schulte, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Toge, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-02-13

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from the CLIC test facility at CERN (CTF3). Both the machine and detector/physics studies for CLIC have primarily focused on the 3 TeV implementation of CLIC as a benchmark for the CLIC feasibility. This report also includes specific studies for an initial 500 GeV machine, and some discussion of possible intermediate energy stages. The performance and operation issues related to operation at reduced energy compared to the nominal, and considerations of a staged construction program are included in the final part of the report. The CLIC accelerator study is organized as an international collaboration with 43 partners in 22 countries. An associated report describes the physics potential and experiments at CLIC and a shorter report in preparation will focus on the CLIC implementation strategy, together with a plan for the CLIC R&D studies 2012–2016. Critical and important implementation issues such as cost, power and schedule will be addressed there.

  10. Design considerations for the semi-digital hadronic calorimeter (SDHCAL) for future leptonic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pingault, Antoine

    2016-07-29

    The first technological SDHCAL prototype having been successfully tested, a new phase of R&D, to validate completely the SDHCAL option for the International Linear Detector (ILD) project of the International Linear Collider (ILC), has started with the conception and the realisation of a new prototype. The new one is intended to host few but large active layers of the future SDHCAL. The new active layers, made of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) with sizes larger than 2m^2 will be equipped with a new version of the electronic readout, fulfilling the requirements of the future ILD detector. The new GRPC are conceived to improve the homogeneity with a new gas distribution scheme. Finally the mechanical structure will be achieved using the electron beam welding technique. The progress realised will be presented and future steps will be discussed.

  11. Design considerations for the semi-digital hadronic calorimeter (SDHCAL) for future leptonic colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingault, A.

    2016-01-01

    The first technological SDHCAL prototype having been successfully tested, a new phase of R and D, to validate completely the SDHCAL option for the International Linear Detector (ILD) project of the International Linear Collider (ILC), has started with the conception and the realisation of a new prototype. The new one is intended to host few but large active layers of the future SDHCAL. The new active layers, made of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) with sizes larger than 2 m 2 will be equipped with a new version of the electronic readout, fulfilling the requirements of the future ILD detector. The new GRPC are conceived to improve the homogeneity with a new gas distribution scheme. Finally the mechanical structure will be achieved using the electron beam welding technique. The progress realised will be presented and future steps will be discussed.

  12. Dynamic imperfections and optimized feedback design in the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    CERN Document Server

    Eliasson, Peder

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac is sensitive to dynamic imperfections such as element jitter, injected beam jitter, and ground motion. These effects cause emittance growth that, in case of ground motion, has to be counteracted by a trajectory feedback system. The feedback system itself will, due to jitter effects and imperfect beam position monitors (BPMs), indirectly cause emittance growth. Fast and accurate simulations of both the direct and indirect effects are desirable, but due to the many elements of the CLIC main linac, simulations may become very time consuming. In this paper, an efficient way of simulating linear (or nearly linear) dynamic effects is described. The method is also shown to facilitate the analytic determination of emittance growth caused by the different dynamic imperfections while using a trajectory feedback system. Emittance growth expressions are derived for quadrupole, accelerating structure, and beam jitter, for ground motion, and for noise in the feedback BPMs. Fina...

  13. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  14. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  15. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  16. Search for and selection of novel heavy scintillator crystals for calorimeter design for future high-energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrere, D.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of some particles (Higgs, top,..) foreseen by theoretical models should be achieved at future colliders allowing to reach an energy scale of about 1 TeV. Efficient detectors must be designed to handle the very high luminosity of the LHC collider at CERN. In the intermediate mass region, M Z -2M Z , the diphoton decay mode of a Higgs boson produced inclusively or in association with W boson or a toponium gives good chance of observation. A very high resolution calorimeter with photon angle reconstruction and pion identification capability should detect a Higgs signal with high probability. So a homogeneous crystal calorimeter seems to be suitable. Because of the high luminosity and the high radiation level, a search for a new heavy scintillator has been undertaken. It must have a good radiation hardness (>0.5 MRad in a year) and a fast luminescence decay time (<30 ns). Among 50 crystals or glasses of specific chemical composition tested in transmission, luminescence, decay time, γ/neutrons radiation and light yield, cerium fluoride seems best suited for LHC. The necessity to have a good photon resolution in the intermediate Higgs mass region led us to optimise by Monte Carlo simulations the geometry of the calorimeter, the uniformisation of the light collection and crystal intercalibration parameters. (orig.)

  17. Super Energy Efficiency Design (S.E.E.D.) Home Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Weitzel, E.; Springer, D.

    2012-12-01

    This report describes the results of evaluation by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) Building America team of the 'Super Energy Efficient Design' (S.E.E.D) home, a 1,935 sq. ft., single-story spec home located in Tucson, AZ. This prototype design was developed with the goal of providing an exceptionally energy efficient yet affordable home and includes numerous aggressive energy features intended to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads such as structural insulated panel (SIP) walls and roof, high performance windows, an ERV, an air-to-water heat pump with mixed-mode radiant and forced air delivery, solar water heating, and rooftop PV. Source energy savings are estimated at 45% over the Building America B10 Benchmark. System commissioning, short term testing, long term monitoring and detailed analysis of results was conducted to identify the performance attributes and cost effectiveness of the whole house measure package.

  18. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  19. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The internat...

  20. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The interna...

  1. SuperHERO: Design of a New Hard X-Ray Focusing Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Elsner, Ronald; Ramsey, Brian; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Tennant, Allyn; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Kiranmayee, Kilaru; Swartz, Douglas; Seller, Paul; hide

    2015-01-01

    SuperHERO is a hard x-ray (20-75 keV) balloon-borne telescope, currently in its proposal phase, that will utilize high angular-resolution grazing-incidence optics, coupled to novel CdTe multi-pixel, fine-pitch (250 micrometers) detectors. The high-resolution electroformed-nickel, grazing-incidence optics were developed at MSFC, and the detectors were developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, and are being readied for flight at GSFC. SuperHERO will use two active pointing systems; one for carrying out astronomical observations and another for solar observations during the same flight. The telescope will reside on a light-weight, carbon-composite structure that will integrate the Wallops Arc Second Pointer into its frame, for arcsecond or better pointing. This configuration will allow for Long Duration Balloon flights that can last up to 4 weeks. This next generation design, which is based on the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) and HERO to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payloads, will be discussed, with emphasis on the core telescope components.

  2. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, B.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Pous, E.; /Barcelona U.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; /Bergen U.; Asgeirsson, D.; /British Columbia U.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; /Caltech; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; McElrath, B.; /CERN; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; /Cincinnati U.; Blanke, M.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lesiak, T.; /Cracow, INP /DESY /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Glasgow U. /Indiana U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /KEK, Tsukuba /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Lisbon, IST /Ljubljana U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Maryland U. /MIT /INFN, Milan /McGill U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Notre Dame U. /PNL, Richland /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Orsay, LAL /Orsay, LPT /INFN, Pavia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Queen Mary, U. of London /Regensburg U. /Republica U., Montevideo /Frascati /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /Sassari U. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Southern Methodist U. /Tel Aviv U. /Tohoku U. /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Uppsala U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Wayne State U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    SuperB is a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B{sub u,d,s}, D and {tau} decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the {Upsilon}(4S) and {phi}(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over

  3. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, B.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.

    2012-01-01

    SuperB is a high luminosity e + e - collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B u,d,s , D and τ decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin 2 θ W . In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the Υ(4S) and φ(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over-constraints of the unitarity triangle through

  4. Super Energy Efficient Design (S.E.E.D.) Home Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Weitzel, E. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report describes the results of evaluation by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) Building America team of the “Super Energy Efficient Design” (S.E.E.D) home, a 1,935 sq. ft., single-story spec home located in Tucson, AZ. This prototype design was developed with the goal of providing an exceptionally energy efficient yet affordable home and includes numerous aggressive energy features intended to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads such as structural insulated panel (SIP) walls and roof, high performance windows, an ERV, an air-to-water heat pump with mixed-mode radiant and forced air delivery, solar water heating, and rooftop PV. Source energy savings are estimated at 45% over the Building America B10 Benchmark. System commissioning, short term testing, long term monitoring and detailed analysis of results was conducted to identify the performance attributes and cost effectiveness of the whole house measure package.

  5. Design of Super Narrowband DWDM Filters Based on the Effect of Spectral Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C Q; Chen, M [College of Physics and Electronics, Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, Yueyang 414006 (China); Liu, J; Wan, Z M; Luo, Z M [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, Yueyang 414006 (China); Tian, P, E-mail: namecqh@yahoo.com.cn [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A novel approach is proposed to design super narrowband DWDM Filters consisting of multiple quantum wells (MQWs) by employing photonic crystals. Numerical investigations prove that the closed-cavity MQWs are more suitable for DWDM systems compared with the open-cavity MQWs. It is shown that different confined states could emerge from photonic band gap, which can be used as high-frequency carriers one-to-one. It is also found that these proposed MQWs could split the single spectral lines into multiples based on the effect of spectral splitting, and the number of the splitting is just equal to the number of the wells. In this way, the density of carriers can be increased multiplicatively in the same wave band, and thus the spectral efficiency can be improved multiplicatively. These results provide the prospects of channel density maximization and effective bandwidth optimization for optical communication.

  6. The design of self-collapsed super-strong nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2010-09-01

    The study reported in this paper suggests that the influence of the surrounding nanotubes in a bundle is nearly identical to that of a liquid having surface tension equal to the surface energy of the nanotubes. This surprising behaviour is supported by the calculation of the polygonization and especially of the self-collapse diameters, and related dog-bone configurations, of nanotubes in a bundle, in agreement with atomistic simulations and nanoscale experiments. Accordingly, we have evaluated the strength of the nanotube bundle, with or without collapsed nanotubes, assuming a sliding failure: the self-collapse can increase the strength up to a value of about ˜30%, suggesting the design of self-collapsed super-strong nanotube bundles. Other systems, such as peapods and fullerites, can be similarly treated, including the effect of the presence of a liquid, as reported in the appendices.

  7. Progress of criticality experiments and nuclear design studies on Erbia-bearing super high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Kuroishi, Takeshi; Takeda, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Akio; Unesaki, Hironobu; Sano, Tadafumi; Mori, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    To cope with the '5wt% enrichment barrier', the development project on Erbia bearing super high-burnup fuel with high uranium enrichment, such as critical experiments with fully Erbia loaded core in KUCA, criticality safety analyses against simple shapes, physicochemical properties measurement and so on, is under going. Following the three experiments of fully-Er-loaded core, the result of the fourth core of higher content of Erbia is presented. As a second topic, fuel design using isotopically modified Erbia, such as a) Er-166 removed from Erbium content, b) Only Er-167 used, is shown. In use of isotopically modified Erbia, the ECOS diagram, which shows minimum Erbia contents that should be mixed into above 5wt% enriched fuel, so that the criticality safety will be equivalent to that with the conventional below 5wt% enriched fuel, should be modified in order to correspond to various Erbia isotope vectors. (author)

  8. Supercollider design submitted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The research and development programme for the proposed US Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) passed a major milestone on schedule with the submission of a conceptual design report to the US Department of Energy (DOE) on 31 March. Since then, the design has been favourably reviewed by DOE officials

  9. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  10. Magnetic field measurements of Fermilab/General Dynamics built full scale SSC collider dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchamps, S.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.; Strait, J.; Wake, M.; Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of magnetic field measurements made on a series of 50 mm aperture 15 m long SSC collider dipole magnets designed and manufactured at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) for use in the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) Accelerator System String Test. The magnets were assembled by Fermilab and General Dynamics personnel, and were tested at the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) at Fermilab. Measurements of the dipole field angle, dipole field strength, and field shape parameters at various stages in magnet construction and testing are described

  11. Optimization design of foundation excavation for Xiluodu super-high arch dam in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixiang Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With better understanding of the quality and physico-mechanical properties of rocks of dam foundation, and the physico-mechanical properties and structure design of arch dam in association with the foundation excavation of Xiluodu arch dam, the excavation optimization design was proposed for the foundation surface on the basis of feasibility study. Common analysis and numerical analysis results demonstrated the feasibility of using the weakly weathered rocks III1 and III2 as the foundation surface of super-high arch dam. In view of changes in the geological conditions at the dam foundation along the riverbed direction, the design of extending foundation surface excavation area and using consolidating grouting and optimizing structure of dam bottom was introduced, allowing for harmonization of the arch dam and foundation. Three-dimensional (3D geomechanics model test and finite element analysis results indicated that the dam body and foundation have good overload stability and high bearing capacity. The monitoring data showed that the behaviors of dam and foundation correspond with the designed patterns in the construction period and the initial operation period.

  12. Design of an extended range long counter using super Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazunga, Mohamed; Li, Taosheng; Li, Yanan; Hong, Bing; Wang, Yongfeng; Ji, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    We have designed an extended range neutron long counter on the basis of work optimized using SuperMC code. The problem of the existing traditional long counters is that their response function falls rapidly above 5 MeV. We proposed a new designed by adding two layers of converter material inside the polyethylene moderator. The relatively low density chromium and high density lead metals convert high energy neutron by (n, xn) spallation reaction. This produces more neutrons of lower energies, which have higher probability of being detected by thermal 3 He-counter. The response function at lower neutron energies was improved by inserting small polyethylene cylinder in front of 3 He counter. In this design we achieved to extent the flat response function of the long counter from few keV up to 150 MeV. The total fluctuation of response curve is less than ±9% over the entire energy range. The designed long counter is suitable to be used as neutron monitor for monitoring neutron fluence at high-energy neutron source. (authors)

  13. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  14. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  15. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; /SLAC; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  16. Optics Design and Performance of an Ultra-Low Emittance Damping Ring for the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Korostelev, M S

    2006-01-01

    A high-energy (0.5-3.0 TeV centre of mass) electron-positron Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is being studied at CERN as a new physics facility. The design study has been optimized for 3 TeV centre-of-mass energy. Intense bunches injected into the main linac must have unprecedentedly small emittances to achieve the design luminosity 1035cm-2s-1 required for the physics experiments. The positron and electron bunch trains will be provided by the CLIC injection complex. This thesis describes an optics design and performance of a positron damping ring developed for producing such ultra-low emittance beam. The linear optics of the CLIC damping ring is optimized by taking into account the combined action of radiation damping, quantum excitation and intrabeam scattering. The required beam emittance is obtained by using a TME (Theoretical Minimum Emittance) lattice with compact arcs and short period wiggler magnets located in dispersionfree regions. The damping ring beam energy is chosen as 2.42 GeV. The lattice featu...

  17. The optical design of the spin manipulation system for the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.H.

    1989-03-01

    The optical design of the beam transport lines between the SLAC Linac and the electron damping ring and the design of part of the Linac lattice itself will be modified to accommodate three superconducting solenoids for the purpose of manipulating the polarization of the electron beam. In order to allow arbitrary orientation of the polarization vector, this design will be capable of compensating the fields of two independent solenoids for arbitrary strengths ranging to 7.0 T-m. The method of dealing with the coupling of the betatron functions and the method of handling both the electron and positron beams in the common region are discussed. 8 refs., 5 figs

  18. SuperB Progress Report for Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Buonomo, B.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Esposito, M.; Guiducci, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Rotundo, U.; Sanelli, C.; Serio, M.; Stella, A.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, K.; Brachman, A.; /SLAC /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPP /LPSC, Grenoble /IRFU, SPP, Saclay /DESY /Cockroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /U. Liverpool /CERN

    2012-02-14

    This report details the progress made in by the SuperB Project in the area of the Collider since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. With this document we propose a new electron positron colliding beam accelerator to be built in Italy to study flavor physics in the B-meson system at an energy of 10 GeV in the center-of-mass. This facility is called a high luminosity B-factory with a project name 'SuperB'. This project builds on a long history of successful e+e- colliders built around the world, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The key advances in the design of this accelerator come from recent successes at the DAFNE collider at INFN in Frascati, Italy, at PEP-II at SLAC in California, USA, and at KEKB at KEK in Tsukuba Japan, and from new concepts in beam manipulation at the interaction region (IP) called 'crab waist'. This new collider comprises of two colliding beam rings, one at 4.2 GeV and one at 6.7 GeV, a common interaction region, a new injection system at full beam energies, and one of the two beams longitudinally polarized at the IP. Most of the new accelerator techniques needed for this collider have been achieved at other recently completed accelerators including the new PETRA-3 light source at DESY in Hamburg (Germany) and the upgraded DAFNE collider at the INFN laboratory at Frascati (Italy), or during design studies of CLIC or the International Linear Collider (ILC). The project is to be designed and constructed by a worldwide collaboration of accelerator and engineering staff along with ties to industry. To save significant construction costs, many components from the PEP-II collider at SLAC will be recycled and used in this new accelerator. The interaction region will be designed in collaboration with the particle physics detector to guarantee successful mutual use. The accelerator collaboration will consist of several groups at present

  19. Design of arc power supply for neutral beam injection system based on super capacitor energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Puqiong; Xuan Weimin; Cao Jianyong; Li Qing; Liu Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    The arc power supply is one of the most important equipment for neutral beam injection system. The stability of arc discharge and the quality of ion beam extraction were determined by its performance. For improving stability of the arc discharge, reducing the power network capacity and decreasing impulse on power network, the topology of the arc power supply applied the structure of DC/DC converter based on technology of super capacitor energy storage and switching power supply. Several IGBT power modules are operated in parallel, and it can improve the arc power supply's operating frequency and dynamic response. A filter circuit and a current fast transferring circuit were designed based on a detailed analysis on working process of the arc power sup- ply. According to the requirements and parameters of the arc power supply, and the current response of RL first order circuit, the minimum filter inductances were accurately calculated. Finally, using the model and Matlab, the performance of the arc power supply was simulated and verified, and it meets the design requirement. (authors)

  20. Conceptual design and performance simulations of super-compact electromagnetic calorimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoda Libor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of particle production at forward rapidities in high energy p-p, p-A and A-A collisions provide access to physics processes at very low Bjorken x. These measurements will allow to study the gluon saturation scale and improve our knowledge of parton distribution in nuclei. Specific requirements must be fulfilled for a calorimeter to successfully operate in high-multiplicity forward region within often stringent space limits. Here we present a study of a conceptual design of super-compact electromagnetic calorimeter being developed at Czech Technical University in Prague. The design of the sampling calorimeter is based on a sandwich structure of thin tungsten and scintillator layers oriented in parallel to the beam. Used optical readout of individual scintillator pads guaranties the required high radiation hardness of the detector. We present simulation of the expected performance of the optical pad readout together with overall detector performance. It is aimed for the detector to allow measuring of high energy photons (1

  1. Research overview of design method of super light multi-hole class- honeycomb sandwich structure materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang LI

    Full Text Available With the sandwich structure materials' application and promotion in the field of engineering continuously, existing sandwich structure material gradually cannot meet the design requirements. It is very urgent to develop new sandwich structure materials of high efficiency, energy saving and easy to process. The project puts forward and constructs a new kind of class-honeycomb sandwich structure material combined with important application backgrounds that super light and high strength metal sandwich structure materials are applied into the high weight and high energy consumption equipments of automobile, aerospace and machinery and so on. This research involve: mechanical properties equivalent method for the class-honeycomb sandwich structure and its core; Strength, stiffness and inherent frequency characteristic and failure criterions of the class-honeycomb sandwich structure; based on the failure criterions constructing the multiple-constraint models of the class-honeycomb sandwich structure. The research tries to put forward a new method for innovative design of lightweight material and structure and new ideas of lightweight technology research in theory and practice.

  2. Design of model alloys for martensitic/ferritic super heat-resistant 650 C steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, V.; Vilk, J.; Inden, G.; Sauthoff, G.; Agamennone, R.; Blum, W.

    2001-07-01

    The key to high creep strength of steels, besides solid solution strengthening, are fine distributions of stable precipitates which block the movement of subgrain boundaries and dislocations and delay coarsening of microstructure. The aim of the present study is to design new super heat-resistant 12%Cr ferritic steels using basic principles and concepts of physical metallurgy, to test and optimise model alloys and to investigate and clarify their behaviour under long-term creep conditions with emphasis on microstructural stability. Taking into consideration recent world-wide developments of 9-12%Cr steels with screening of available data, a series of model alloys is designed, which is supported by theoretical calculations and simulations of the expected phase transformations and precipitation processes. The alloys are prepared and tested mechanically. The effects of different types of precipitates as well as alloying elements on mechanical long-term properties are investigated. In particular the Laves phase is studied, which precipitates during service and which is to strengthen the alloys when M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitate particles besides finely distributed other carbides and nitrides become less effective. The effects of various austenite-forming alloying elements are also studied. (orig.)

  3. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: Physics at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; /SLAC /Tokyo U. /Victoria U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Tel Aviv U. /Birmingham U. /Annecy, LAPP /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /DESY /Royal Holloway, U. of London /CERN /Pusan Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Notre Dame U. /Frascati /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Oxford U. /Hefei, CUST /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Fermilab

    2011-11-14

    The triumph of 20th century particle physics was the development of the Standard Model and the confirmation of many of its aspects. Experiments determined the particle constituents of ordinary matter, and identified four forces that hold matter together and transform it from one form to another. Particle interactions were found to obey precise laws of relativity and quantum theory. Remarkable features of quantum physics were observed, including the real effects of 'virtual' particles on the visible world. Building on this success, particle physicists are now able to address questions that are even more fundamental, and explore some of the deepest mysteries in science. The scope of these questions is illustrated by this summary from the report Quantum Universe: (1) Are there undiscovered principles of nature; (2) How can we solve the mystery of dark energy; (3) Are there extra dimensions of space; (4) Do all the forces become one; (5) Why are there so many particles; (6) What is dark matter? How can we make it in the laboratory; (7) What are neutrinos telling us; (8) How did the universe begin; and (9) What happened to the antimatter? A worldwide program of particle physics investigations, using multiple approaches, is already underway to explore this compelling scientific landscape. As emphasized in many scientific studies, the International Linear Collider is expected to play a central role in what is likely to be an era of revolutionary advances. Discoveries from the ILC could have breakthrough impact on many of these fundamental questions. Many of the scientific opportunities for the ILC involve the Higgs particle and related new phenomena at Terascale energies. The Standard Model boldly hypothesizes a new form of Terascale energy, called the Higgs field, that permeates the entire universe. Elementary particles acquire mass by interacting with this field. The Higgs field also breaks a fundamental electroweak force into two forces, the electromagnetic

  4. Design of the injection kicker magnet system for CERN's 14 TeV proton collider LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducimetiere, L.; Jansson, U.; Schroeder, G.H.; Vossenberg, E.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Wait, G.D.

    1995-08-01

    Two counter-rotating proton beams will be injected into the LHC at an energy of 450 GeV by two kicker magnet systems, producing magnetic field pulses of approximately 750 ns rise time and 6.6 micros flat top duration. To avoid dilution of the beam emittance during injection, a stringent design requirement of the system is a flat top ripple of the magnetic field of less than ±0.5%. Both injection systems are composed of 4 travelling wave kicker magnets of 2.17 m length each, powered by pulse forming networks (PFN's) and matched to their characteristic impedance. To achieve the high required kick strength of 1.2 Tm, for a compact and cost efficient design, a comparably low characteristic impedance of 5 Ω has been chosen. The electrical circuit of the system is being designed with the help of PSpice computer modeling. Most known parasitic elements are included in the model to obtain a realistic pulse response prediction. The present paper reports on design and modeling results of the LHC injection kicker magnet system that has several novel and demanding design requirements

  5. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  6. A bottom collider vertex detector design, Monte-Carlo simulation and analysis package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, P.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed simulation of the BCD vertex detector is underway. Specifications and global design issues are briefly reviewed. The BCD design based on double sided strip detector is described in more detail. The GEANT3-based Monte-Carlo program and the analysis package used to estimate detector performance are discussed in detail. The current status of the expected resolution and signal to noise ratio for the ''golden'' CP violating mode B d → π + π - is presented. These calculations have been done at FNAL energy (√s = 2.0 TeV). Emphasis is placed on design issues, analysis techniques and related software rather than physics potentials. 20 refs., 46 figs

  7. Problems in the design of a proton driver for a {mu}-{mu} collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mils, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    Design details are given for accelerator physics issues, technical components and final beam bunching. Discussed physics issues include: space charge tune shift, microwave instability of bunched beam, transverse resistive wall instability, head-tail instability, cavity beam loading, and lattice design. The use of technical components to minimize beam impedance is investigated. Several alternatives to the ISIS-type wire of rod cage were considered: vacuum, magnets, rf cavities, and injection. The two final beam bunching schemes considered were: chicane and an assembler ring with linear induction buncher.

  8. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  9. Colliding muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Is a muon-muon collider really practical? That is the question being asked by Bob Palmer. Well known in particle physics, Palmer, with Nick Samios and Ralph Shutt, recently won the American Physical Society's Panofsky Prize for their 1964 discovery of the omega minus. As well as contributing to other major experiments, both at CERN and in the US, he has contributed ideas to stochastic cooling and novel acceleration schemes

  10. Overview of the data acquisition electronics system design for the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    The SLD Detector will contain five major electronics subsystems: Vertex, Drift, Liquid Argon Calorimeter, Cerenkov Ring Imaging, and Warm Iron Calorimeter. To implement the approximately 170,000 channels of electronics, extensive miniaturization and heavy use of multiplexing techniques are required. Design criteria for each subsystem, overall system architecture, and the R and D program are described

  11. Prediction and design of first super-strong liquid-crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the details of the theoretical prediction and design (atom by atom, bond by bond) of the molecule chemical structures of the first candidate super-strong liquid-crystalline polymers (SS LCPs). These LCPs are the first LCPs designed to have good compressive strengths, as well as to have tensile strengths and tensile moduli significantly larger than those of existing strong LCPs (such as Kevlar). The key feature of this new class of LCPs is that the exceptional strength is three dimensional on a microscopic, molecular level (thus, on a macroscopic level), in contrast to present LCPs (such as Kevlar) with their one-dimensional exceptional strength. These SS LCPs also have some solubility and processing advantages over existing strong LCPs. These SS LCPs are specially-designed combined LCPs such that the side chains of a molecule interdigitate with the side chains of other molecules. This paper also presents other essential general and specific features required for SS LCPs. Considerations in the design of SS LCPs include the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in submolecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and side chains for easy alignment

  12. The Brazier Effect and its Influence in the Design of Beampipes for Particle Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Knaster, J R; Veness, R J M

    2001-01-01

    The Brazier effect describes the influence of ovalisation on the buckling of thin shells. Ovalisation can be enhanced by applied bending moments and internal or external pressure. This can limit the design of vacuum chambers, requiring the addition of supports or changes in wall thickness. Since this is a non-linear effect, finite elements packages can fail to give good results. A theoretical and empirical approach is performed showing the results and conclusions of the tests.

  13. Transceiver Design for CMUT-Based Super-Resolution Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnamfar, Parisa; Molavi, Reza; Mirabbasi, Shahriar

    2016-04-01

    A recently introduced structure for the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) has focused on the applications of the asymmetric mode of vibration and has shown promising results in construction of super-resolution ultrasound images. This paper presents the first implementation and experimental results of a transceiver circuit to interface such CMUT structures. The multiple input/multiple output receiver in this work supports both fundamental and asymmetric modes of operation and includes transimpedance amplifiers and low-power variable-gain stages. These circuit blocks are designed considering the trade-offs between gain, input impedance, noise, linearity and power consumption. The high-voltage transmitter can generate pulse voltages up to 60 V while occupying a considerably small area. The overall circuit is designed and laid out in a 0.35 μm CMOS process and a four-channel transceiver occupies 0.86 × 0.38 mm(2). The prototype chip is characterized in both electrical and mechanical domains. Measurement results show that each receiver channel has a nominal gain of 110 dBΩ with a 3 dB bandwidth of 9 MHz while consuming 1.02 mW from a 3.3 V supply. The receiver is also highly linear, with 1 dB compression point of minimum 1.05 V which is considerably higher than the previously reported designs. The transmitter consumes 98.1 mW from a 30 V supply while generating 1.38 MHz, 30 V pulses. The CMOS-CMUT system is tested in the transmit mode and shows full functionality in air medium.

  14. SuperB: A High-Luminosity Asymmetric e+e- Super Flavor Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, M.; /et al.

    2007-05-18

    We discuss herein the exciting physics program that can be accomplished with a very large sample of heavy quark and heavy lepton decays produced in the very clean environment of an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider; a program complementary to that of an experiment such as LHCb at a hadronic machine. It then presents the conceptual design of a new type of e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that produces a nearly two-order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity over the current generation of asymmetric B Factories. The key idea is the use of low emittance beams produced in an accelerator lattice derived from the ILC Damping Ring Design, together with a new collision region, again with roots in the ILC final focus design, but with important new concepts developed in this design effort. Remarkably, SuperB produces this very large improvement in luminosity with circulating currents and wallplug power similar to those of the current B Factories. There is clear synergy with ILC R&D; design efforts have already influenced one another, and many aspects of the ILC Damping Rings and Final Focus would be operationally tested at SuperB. Finally, the design of an appropriate detector, based on an upgrade of BABAR as an example, is discussed in some detail. A preliminary cost estimate is presented, as is an example construction timeline.

  15. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired δp/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200μ resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10 6 A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A

  16. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  17. Preliminary design of CERN Future Circular Collider tunnel: first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Infantino Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of its post-LHC high energy physics program, CERN is conducting a study for a new proton-proton collider, called Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh, running at center-of-mass energies of up to 100 TeV in a new 100 km tunnel. The study includes a 90-350 GeV lepton collider (FCC-ee as well as a lepton-hadron option (FCC-he. In this work, FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation was extensively used to perform a first evaluation of the radiation environment in critical areas for electronics in the FCC-hh tunnel. The model of the tunnel was created based on the original civil engineering studies already performed and further integrated in the existing FLUKA models of the beam line. The radiation levels in critical areas, such as the racks for electronics and cables, power converters, service areas, local tunnel extensions was evaluated.

  18. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  19. Design and test properties of super water reducers in Portland cement concrete : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    Recently, new concrete admixtures (super water reducers) have been developed and marketed by private industry. These admixtures permit the mixing and placement of very low water-cement ratio (0.32 to 0.38) concretes at conventional consistencies (slu...

  20. Technical report on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the super-FRS of FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, H.; Winkler, M.; Weick, H. [and others

    2005-04-01

    In this report the construction of the super-FRS is described. Especially described are the ion-optical lay-out, the production targets, the magnets, the beam dumps, the degrader systems and the ion catcher, detectors and data-acquisition systems, as well as the safety aspects. (HSI)

  1. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  2. HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    A plausible ''straw-man'' scenario and collider ring parameter sets are presented for future energy frontier muon colliders in symbiotic facilities with e + e - and hadron colliders: 1.6-10 TeV ''mu-linear colliders'' (mu-LC) where the muons are accelerated in the linacs of a TeV-scale linear e + e - collider, and a 100 TeV Very Large Muon Collider (VLMC) that shares a facility with a 200 TeV Very Large Hadron collider (VLHC) and a 140 TeV muon-proton collider

  3. Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

  4. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  5. Design Studies and Optimization of High-Field Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Magnets for a Future Very High Energy PP Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V. V. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    High filed accelerator magnets with operating fields of 15-16 T based on the $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor are being considered for the LHC energy upgrade or a future Very High Energy pp Collider. Magnet design studies are being conducted in the U.S., Europe and Asia to explore the limits of the $Nb_3Sn$ accelerator magnet technology while optimizing the magnet design and performance parame-ters, and reducing magnet cost. The first results of these studies performed at Fermilab in the framework of the US-MDP are reported in this paper.

  6. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  7. SuperB Progress Report: Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauges, E.; Donvito, G.; Spinoso, V.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Eigen, G.; Fehlker, D.; Helleve, L.; Cheng, C.; Chivukula, A.; Doll, D.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; Thomas, M.; Zhu, R.; Tatishvili, G.; Andreassen, R.; Fabby, C.; Meadows, B.; Simpson, A.; Sokoloff, M.; Tomko, K.; Fella, A.; Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Gianoli, A.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Santoro, V.; Tomassetti, L.; Stoker, D.; Bezshyyko, O.; Dolinska, G.; Arnaud, N.; Beigbeder, C.; Bogard, F.; Breton, D.; Burmistrov, L.; Charlet, D.; Maalmi, J.; Perez Perez, L.; Puill, V.; Stocchi, A.; Tocut, V.; Wallon, S.; Wormser, G.; Brown, D.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the present status of the detector design for SuperB. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  8. SuperB Progress Report: Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Donvito, G.; Spinoso, V.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; /INFN, Pavia /Bergamo U., Ingengneria Dept.; Eigen, G.; Fehlker, D.; Helleve, L.; /Bergen U.; Carbone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Galli, D.; Giorgi, F.; Marconi, U.; Perazzini, S.; Sbarra, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Caltech /Carleton U. /Cincinnati U. /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /UC, Irvine /Taras Shevchenko U. /Orsay, LAL /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Frascati /INFN, Legnaro /Orsay, IPN /Maryland U. /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Caltech /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /PNL, Richland /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome2 /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Padua /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /TRIUMF /British Columbia U. /Montreal U. /Victoria U.

    2012-02-14

    This report describes the present status of the detector design for SuperB. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

  9. Analysis and Design of a Bidirectional Isolated DC-DC Converter for Fuel Cell and Super-Capacitor Hybrid System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Ouyang, Ziwei; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    Electrical power system in future uninterruptible power supply (UPS) or electrical vehicle (EV) may employ hybrid energy sources, such as fuel cells and super-capacitors. It will be necessary to efficiently draw the energy from these two sources as well as recharge the energy storage elements...... by the DC bus. In this paper, a bidirectional isolated DC-DC converter controlled by phase-shift and duty cycle for the fuel cell hybrid energy system is analyzed and designed. The proposed topology minimizes the number of switches and their associated gate driver components by using two high frequency...

  10. Handbook of Super 8 Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Ronnie, Ed.

    This handbook is designed for anyone interested in producing super 8 films at any level of complexity and cost. Separate chapters present detailed discussions of the following topics: super 8 production systems and super 8 shooting and editing systems; budgeting; cinematography and sound recording; preparing to edit; editing; mixing sound tracks;…

  11. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  12. New particle signals at the SSC and at an upgraded Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, R.M.; Hollebeek, R.J.; White, A.P.; Yoh, J.; Baer, H.A.; Barnett, B.A.; Eichten, E.; Freeman, J.E.; Gamberini, G.; Grifols, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the production and detection of several types of new particles at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and at three possible upgrades of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We compare the physics potential of the SSC with that of an upgraded collider, and we discuss in depth the relative capabilities of the three Tevatron Collider upgrades. From a physics standpoint, we suggest that one of the proposed upgrades has several advantages. 34 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Hadron Collider Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incandela, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments are being prepared at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider that promise to deliver extraordinary insights into the nature of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and the role of supersymmetry in the universe. This article reviews the goals, challenges, and designs of these experiments. The first hadron collider, the ISR at CERN, has to overcome two initial obstacles. The first was low luminosity, which steadily improved over time. The second was the broad angular spread of interesting events. In this regard Maurice Jacob noted (1): The answer is ... sophisticated detectors covering at least the whole central region (45 degree le θ le 135 degree) and full azimuth. This statement, while obvious today, reflects the major revelation of the ISR period that hadrons have partonic substructure. The result was an unexpectedly strong hadronic yield at large transverse momentum (p T ). Partly because of this, the ISR missed the discovery of the J/ψ and later missed the Υ. The ISR era was therefore somewhat less auspicious than it might have been. It did however make important contributions in areas such as jet production and charm excitation and it paved the way for the SPS collider, also at CERN

  14. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  15. Multibillion-dolalr collider plans unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    "Particle physicists released an outline design for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) at a meeting in Beijing this morning. The design details the components needed to build the 31 km-long facility and comes with and initial estimate of the collider's cost: a cool $6.5bn for the core project. (1 page)

  16. NETL Super Computer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NETL Super Computer was designed for performing engineering calculations that apply to fossil energy research. It is one of the world’s larger supercomputers,...

  17. The International Linear Collider Progress Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yamamoto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) set up the Global Design Effort (GDE) for the design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) in 2005. Drawing on the resources of over 300 national laboratories, universities and institutes worldwide, the GDE produced a Reference Design Report in 2007, followed by a more detailed Technical Design Report (TDR) in 2013. Following this report, the GDE was disbanded. A compact core team, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC), replaced it. This is still under the auspices of ICFA and is directly overseen by the Linear Collider Board, which reports to ICFA. The LCC is charged with continuing the design effort on a much-reduced scale until the Project is approved for construction. An additional mandate of the LCC was to bring together all linear collider work, including the CERN-based Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under one structure in order to exploit synergies between the two studies.

  18. Design, simulation, fabrication, and preliminary tests of 3D CMS pixel detectors for the super-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koybasi, Ozhan; /Purdue U.; Bortoletto, Daniela; /Purdue U.; Hansen, Thor-Erik; /SINTEF, Oslo; Kok, Angela; /SINTEF, Oslo; Hansen, Trond Andreas; /SINTEF, Oslo; Lietaer, Nicolas; /SINTEF, Oslo; Jensen, Geir Uri; /SINTEF, Oslo; Summanwar, Anand; /SINTEF, Oslo; Bolla, Gino; /Purdue U.; Kwan, Simon Wing Lok; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Super-LHC upgrade puts strong demands on the radiation hardness of the innermost tracking detectors of the CMS, which cannot be fulfilled with any conventional planar detector design. The so-called 3D detector architectures, which feature columnar electrodes passing through the substrate thickness, are under investigation as a potential solution for the closest operation points to the beams, where the radiation fluence is estimated to reach 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Two different 3D detector designs with CMS pixel readout electronics are being developed and evaluated for their advantages and drawbacks. The fabrication of full-3D active edge CMS pixel devices with p-type substrate has been successfully completed at SINTEF. In this paper, we study the expected post-irradiation behaviors of these devices with simulations and, after a brief description of their fabrication, we report the first leakage current measurement results as performed on wafer.

  19. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  20. A new design for the CERN-Fréjus neutrino Super Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Longhin, A

    2011-01-01

    We present an optimization of the hadron focusing system for a low-energy high-intensity conventional neutrino beam (Super-Beam) proposed on the basis of the HP-SPL at CERN with a beam power of 4 MW and an energy of 4.5 GeV. The far detector would be a 440 kton Water Cherenkov detector (MEMPHYS) located at a baseline of 130 km in the Fr\\'ejus site. The neutrino fluxes simulation relies on a new GEANT4 based simulation coupled with an optimization algorithm based on the maximization of the sensitivity limit on the $\\theta_{13}$ mixing angle. A new configuration adopting a multiple horn system with solid targets is proposed which improves the sensitivity to $\\theta_{13}$ and the CP violating phase $\\delta_{CP}$.

  1. Control sample design using a geodemographic discriminator: An application of Super Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J. B.; McCulloch, Peter G.; Williams, Evelyn M. I.; Ashurst, Darren C.

    The development and application of an innovative sampling framework for use in a British study of the early detection of gastric cancer are described. The Super Profiles geodemographic discriminator is used in the identification of geographically distinct control and contrast areas from which samples of cancer registry case records may be drawn for comparison with the records of patients participating in the gastric cancer intervention project. Preliminary results of the application of the framework are presented and confirm its effectiveness in satisfactorily reflecting known patterns of variation in cancer occurrence by age, gender and social class. The method works well for cancers with a known and clear social gradient, such as lung and breast cancer, moderately well for gastric cancer and somewhat less well for oesophageal cancer, where the social class gradient is less clear.

  2. Super-resolution imaging using multi- electrode CMUTs: theoretical design and simulation using point targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wei; Cretu, Edmond; Rohling, Robert

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigates a low computational cost, super-resolution ultrasound imaging method that leverages the asymmetric vibration mode of CMUTs. Instead of focusing on the broadband received signal on the entire CMUT membrane, we utilize the differential signal received on the left and right part of the membrane obtained by a multi-electrode CMUT structure. The differential signal reflects the asymmetric vibration mode of the CMUT cell excited by the nonuniform acoustic pressure field impinging on the membrane, and has a resonant component in immersion. To improve the resolution, we propose an imaging method as follows: a set of manifold matrices of CMUT responses for multiple focal directions are constructed off-line with a grid of hypothetical point targets. During the subsequent imaging process, the array sequentially steers to multiple angles, and the amplitudes (weights) of all hypothetical targets at each angle are estimated in a maximum a posteriori (MAP) process with the manifold matrix corresponding to that angle. Then, the weight vector undergoes a directional pruning process to remove the false estimation at other angles caused by the side lobe energy. Ultrasound imaging simulation is performed on ring and linear arrays with a simulation program adapted with a multi-electrode CMUT structure capable of obtaining both average and differential received signals. Because the differential signals from all receiving channels form a more distinctive temporal pattern than the average signals, better MAP estimation results are expected than using the average signals. The imaging simulation shows that using differential signals alone or in combination with the average signals produces better lateral resolution than the traditional phased array or using the average signals alone. This study is an exploration into the potential benefits of asymmetric CMUT responses for super-resolution imaging.

  3. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.

    2007-01-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies √s (ge) 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R and D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R and D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R and D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R and D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel

  4. Mechanical and electromagnetic analysis of 50 millimeter designs for the SSC dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, J.; Leung, K.; Nobrega, F.; Orrell, D.; Sanger, P.; Snitchler, G.; Spigo, G.; Turner, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Gupta, R.; Kahn, S.; Morgan, G.; Willen, E.; Kerby, J.; Strait, J.; Schermer, R.

    1990-09-01

    Several designs for the Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnet have been analyzed. This note discusses the mechanical and electromagnetic features of each design. Electromagnetic and Mechanical analyses were performed using hand, computer programs and finite element techniques to evaluate the design. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  5. The potential of pyrolysis technology in climate change mitigation – influence of process design and –parameters, simulated in SuperPro Designer Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Bruun, Esben

    This report investigates whether or not it would be possible to produce carbon-negative energy from pyrolysis of wheat straw in a series of Danish agricultural scenarios. A combination of process simulation in SuperPro Designer software, correlations derived from literature studies and experimental...... work, and overall balance calculations has been applied in the process. The study deviates from other studies of pyrolysis and biochar production by the inclusion of substitution energy impact on the overall carbon-balance. Substitution energy is integrated to account for the gap between the energy...

  6. SETI and muon collider

    OpenAIRE

    Silagadze, Z. K.

    2008-01-01

    Intense neutrino beams that accompany muon colliders can be used for interstellar communications. The presence of multi-TeV extraterrestrial muon collider at several light-years distance can be detected after one year run of IceCube type neutrino telescopes, if the neutrino beam is directed towards the Earth. This opens a new avenue in SETI: search for extraterrestrial muon colliders.

  7. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  8. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex instrument ever built for particle physics research. It will, for the first time, provide access to the TeV-energy scale. Numerous technological innovations are necessary to achieve this goal. For example, two counterrotating proton beams are guided and focused by superconducting magnets whose novel two-in-one structure saves cost and allowed the machine to be installed in an existing tunnel. The very high (>8-T) field in the dipoles can be achieved only by cooling them below the transition temperature of liquid helium to the superfluid state. More than 80 tons of superfluid helium are needed to cool the whole machine. So far, the LHC has behaved reliably and predictably. Single-bunch currents 30% above the design value have been achieved, and the luminosity has increased by five orders of magnitude. In this review, I briefly describe the design principles of the major systems and discuss some initial results.

  10. Martensitic/ferritic super heat-resistant 650 C steels - design of model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, V.; Sauthoff, G. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Tempered martensitic/ferritic 9-12%Cr steels are now recognized to be the most potential materials for 650 C ultra super critical (USC) Power Plants. The degradation of long-term creep strength, as a result of microstructural changes during long-term exposure at the elevated temperature, is the main problem for this group of steels. Therefore, to achieve sufficient creep resistance during the entire service life it is necessary to stabilize the microstructure by alloying with elements which provide enough solid solution and precipitation strengthening and slow down diffusion. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of different types of precipitates as well as alloying elements on mechanical long-term properties of new ferritic 12%Cr steels. Fine distributions of stable precipitates which block the movement of subgrain boundaries (M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, Laves phase) and dislocations (MX carbonitrides) and delay coarsening of microstructure is the key to high creep strength of such steels. Furthermore, additional Laves phase, which precipitates during service, is to strengthen the alloys when M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles become less effective. Addition of Co is to achieve an initially 100% martensitic microstructure and moreover to slow down diffusion processes and consequently coarsening of particles. The partial substitution of Co by Cu and Mn is also investigated to reduce costs. The first results of mechanical tests of the studied model alloys have shown positive effects of the addition of W as Laves phase forming element, as well as of the MX forming elements Ta and Ti. Alloying with Co has also shown beneficial effects on the creep strength of model alloys. Further optimisation of composition and microstructure is in progress. (orig.)

  11. Structural Verification of the Space Shuttle's External Tank Super LightWeight Design: A Lesson in Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Neil

    1997-01-01

    The Super LightWeight Tank (SLWT) team was tasked with a daunting challenge from the outset: boost the payload capability of the Shuttle System by safely removing 7500 lbs. from the existing 65,400 lb. External Tank (ET). Tools they had to work with included a promising new Aluminum Lithium alloy, the concept of a more efficient structural configuration for the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank, and a highly successful, mature Light Weight Tank (LWT) program. The 44 month schedule which the SLWT team was given for the task was ambitious by any measure. During this time the team had to not only design, build, and verify the new tank, but they also had to move a material from the early stages of development to maturity. The aluminum lithium alloy showed great promise, with an approximately 29% increase in yield strength, 15% increase in ultimate strength, 5 deg/O increase in modulus and 5 deg/O decrease in density when compared to the current 2219 alloy. But processes had to be developed and brought under control, manufacturing techniques perfected, properties characterized, and design allowable generated. Because of the schedule constraint, this material development activity had to occur in parallel with design and manufacturing. Initial design was performed using design allowable believed to be achievable with the Aluminum Lithium alloy system, but based on limited test data. Preliminary structural development tests were performed with material still in the process of iteration. This parallel path approach posed obvious challenges and risks, but also allowed a unique opportunity for interaction between the structures and materials disciplines in the formulation of the material.

  12. Conceptual & Engineering Design of Plug-in Cryostat Cylinder for Super-Conducting Central Solenoid of SST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Prabal; Santra, Prosenjit; Vasava, Kirit; Jayswal, Snehal; Parekh, Tejas; Chauhan, Pradeep; Patel, Hitesh; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-04-01

    SST-1, country’s first indigenously built steady state super-conducting tokamak is planned to be equipped with an Nb3Sn based superconducting central solenoid, which will replace the existing copper conductor TR1 coil for the purpose of Ohmic breakdown. This central solenoid (CS) of four layers with each layer having 144 turns with an OD of 573 mm, ID of 423 mm length of 2483 mm will be housed inside a high vacuum, CRYO compatible plug-in cryostat thin shell having formed from SS 304L plate duly rolled and welded to form cylinder along with necessary accessories like LN2 bubble panel, current lead chamber, coil and cylinder support structure etc. This paper will present the design drivers, material selection, advantages and constraints of the plug-in cryostat concept, sub-systems of plug-in cryostat, its conceptual and engineering design, CAD models, finite element analysis using ANSYS, safety issues and diagnostics, on-going works about fabrication, quality assurance/control and assembly/integration aspects with in the existing SST-1 machine bore.

  13. Linear collider systems and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the systems and sub-systems involved in so-called ''conventional'' e + e - linear colliders and to study how their design affects the overall cost of these machines. There are presently a total of at least six 500 GeV c. of m. linear collider projects under study in the world. Aside from TESLA (superconducting linac at 1.3 GHz) and CLIC (two-beam accelerator with main linac at 30GHz), the other four proposed e + e - linear colliders can be considered ''conventional'' in that their main linacs use the proven technique of driving room temperature accelerator sections with pulsed klystrons and modulators. The centrally distinguishing feature between these projects is their main linac rf frequency: 3 GHz for the DESY machine, 11.424 GHz for the SLAC and JLC machines, and 14 GHz for the VLEPP machine. The other systems, namely the electron and positron sources, preaccelerators, compressors, damping rings and final foci, are fairly similar from project to project. Probably more than 80% of the cost of these linear colliders will be incurred in the two main linacs facing each other and it is therefore in their design and construction that major savings or extra costs may be found

  14. The principles and construction of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1986-09-01

    The problems posed to the designers and builders of high-energy linear colliders are discussed. Scaling laws of linear colliders are considered. The problem of attainment of small interaction areas is addressed. The physics of damping rings, which are designed to condense beam bunches in phase space, is discussed. The effect of wake fields on a particle bunch in a linac, particularly the conventional disk-loaded microwave linac structures, are discussed, as well as ways of dealing with those effects. Finally, the SLAC Linear Collider is described. 18 refs., 17 figs

  15. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e + - e - collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are

  16. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  17. Decoupling schemes for the SSC Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-05-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper

  18. Decoupling schemes for the SCC Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-01-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper

  19. Initial performance studies of a general-purpose detector for multi-TeV physics at a 100 TeV pp collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S. V.; Beydler, M.; Kotwal, A. V.; Gray, L.; Sen, S.; Tran, N. V.; Yu, S. -S.; Zuzelski, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes simulations of detector response to multi-TeV physics at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) or Super proton-proton Collider (SppC) which aim to collide proton beams with a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. The unprecedented energy regime of these future experiments imposes new requirements on detector technologies which can be studied using the detailed GEANT4 simulations presented in this paper. The initial performance of a detector designed for physics studies at the FCC-hh or SppC experiments is described with an emphasis on measurements of single particles up to 33 TeV in transverse momentum. The reconstruction of hadronic jets has also been studied in the transverse momentum range from 50 GeV to 26 TeV. The granularity requirements for calorimetry are investigated using the two-particle spatial resolution achieved for hadron showers.

  20. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  1. Factors Affecting the Design and Development of a Personal Learning Environment: Research on Super-Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Helene; Kop, Rita

    2011-01-01

    After speculation in literature about the nature of Personal Learning Environments, research in the design and development of PLEs is now in progress. This paper reports on the first phase of the authors' research on PLE, the identification process of what potential users would consider important components, applications, and tools in a PLE. The…

  2. Cryogenic system design of 11 GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer superconducting magnets at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul; Lassister, Steven; Fowler, Mike

    2012-06-01

    The design of the cryogenic system for the 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented. A description of the cryogenic control reservoir and the cryogenic transfer line is given. Details of the cryogenic control reservoirs, cryogenic transfer lines, and pressure piping are summarized. Code compliance is ensured through following the requirements of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code and Pressure Piping Code. An elastic-plastic-analysis-based combined safety factor approach is proposed to meet the low stress requirement of ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 so that Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact testing can be avoided through analysis. Material toughness requirements in ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 are adopted as CVN impact testing rules of stainless steel 304 piping at 4.2 K and 77 K. A formula-based combined safety factor approach for pressure piping is also proposed to check whether the impact testing can be avoided due to low stress. Analysis and calculation have shown that no CVN impact testing of base metal and heat affected zones is required for the helium reservoir, nitrogen reservoir, and their relevant piping. Total heat loads to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are studied also. The total heat load to LHe for SHMS is estimated to be 137 W, and the total load to LN2 is calculated to be 420 W.

  3. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used.

  4. Design of an hybrid source with fuel cell and super-capacitors; Conception d'une source hybride utilisant une pile a combustible et des supercondensateurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thounthong, Ph.

    2005-12-15

    The design and testing of a purely super-capacitor energy storage device as auxiliary power source in electrical vehicle applications having a PEM fuel cell as main source are presented. The two control strategies are explained. The control algorithms are that fuel cell is simply operating in almost steady state conditions in order to lessen the mechanical stresses of fuel cell and to ensure a good synchronization between fuel flow and fuel cell current. Super-capacitors are functioning during absence of energy from fuel cell, transient energy delivery or transient energy recovery. The system utilizes two modules of SAFT super-capacitive storage device. This device is connected to a 42 V DC bus by a 2-quadrant dc/dc converter, and fuel cell is connected to the dc bus by a boost converter. The system structure is realized by analogical current loops and digital control (dSPACE) for voltage loops and estimation algorithms. Experimental results with a 500 W PEM fuel cell point out the slow dynamics naturally of fuel cell because of thermodynamic and mechanical operation, and also substantiate that the super-capacitors can improve dynamics and power conditioning for automotive electrical system. (author)

  5. Super differential forms on super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konisi, Gaku; Takahasi, Wataru; Saito, Takesi.

    1994-01-01

    Line integral on the super Riemann surface is discussed. A 'super differential operator' which possesses both properties of differential and of differential operator is proposed. With this 'super differential operator' a new theory of differential form on the super Riemann surface is constructed. We call 'the new differentials on the super Riemann surface' 'the super differentials'. As the applications of our theory, the existency theorems of singular 'super differentials' such as 'super abelian differentials of the 3rd kind' and of a super projective connection are examined. (author)

  6. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  8. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  9. The Impact of SuperB on Flavor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, B.; Blanke, M.; Stocchi, A.; Drutskoy, A.; Cervelli, A.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Perez, A.; Walsh, J.; Hurth, T.; Bevan, A.; Silvestrini, L.; Ciuchini, M.; Tarantino, C.

    2012-02-16

    This report provides a succinct summary of the physics programme of SuperB, and describes that potential in the context of experiments making measurements in flavour physics over the next 10 to 20 years. Detailed comparisons are made with Belle II and LHCb, the other B physics experiments that will run in this decade. SuperB will play a crucial role in defining the landscape of flavour physics over the next 20 years. SuperB is an approved high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider intended to search for indirect and some direct signs of new physics (NP) at low energy, while at the same time, enabling precision tests of the Standard Model (SM). This experiment will be built at a new laboratory on the Tor Vergata campus near Rome, Italy named after Nicola Cabibbo. The project has been described in a Conceptual Design Report, and more recently by a set of three white papers on the accelerator, detector, and physics programme. The main focus of the physics programme rests in the study of so-called Golden Modes, these are decay channels that provide access to measurements of theoretically clean observables that can provide both stringent constraints on models of NP, and precision tests of the SM. A number of ancillary measurements that remain important include those with observables that may not be theoretically clean, and those that can be used to provide stringent constraints on the SM but are not sensitive to NP. The remainder of this section introduces SuperB before discussing the golden modes for SuperB, precision CKM measurement modes, and an outline of the rest of this report.

  10. Super families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, N.; Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1989-01-01

    The study on phenomena in the super high energy region, Σ E j > 1000 TeV revealed events that present a big dark spot in central region with high concentration of energy and particles, called halo. Six super families with halo were analysed by Brazil-Japan Cooperation of Cosmic Rays. For each family the lateral distribution of energy density was constructed and R c Σ E (R c ) was estimated. For studying primary composition, the energy correlation with particles released separately in hadrons and gamma rays was analysed. (M.C.K.)

  11. CERN-BINP Workshop for Young Scientists in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Linssen, Lucie; eCOL 2016

    2017-01-01

    The "CERN-BINP workshop for young scientists in e+e- colliders" is organised in the framework of the EU-funded CREMLIN project. The CREMLIN project aims at strengthening science cooperation between six Russian megascience facilities and related research infrastructure counterparts in Europe. BINP and CERN coordinate a dedicated CREMLIN work package focusing on a future super-charm-tau factory (SCT) at BINP. SCT aims at producing e+e- collisions with up to 5 GeV centre-of-mass energy and at very high luminosity. In parallel CERN is hosting design studies for two possible high-energy e+e- colliders: FCC-ee and CLIC. In matters of physics, design and technologies the BINP and CERN studies address technological and scientific questions of common interest. Similar issues are dealt with in the framework of other flavour factories and energy frontier e+e- colliders worldwide. The 3-day workshop provides young scientists (at the student and postdoc level) opportunities to present their work and exchange experiences. ...

  12. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  13. Conceptual Design of the Cryogenic System for the High-luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.; Van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This paper will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  14. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  15. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”, or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh.

  16. Design, fabrication, and test of a 5-cm aperture, 1-m long superconducting dipole prototype for high energy hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintomi, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Maehata, K.; Wake, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Devred, A.

    1990-09-01

    A 1-m long superconducting dipole prototype with an aperture of 5 cm and a rated field of 6.6 T was built and tested. This model was based on a two-layer cosine-theta coil clamped by stainless steel collars inside a laminated iron yoke, with a large keystone-angle cable and no wedge. The cold mass was encased in an outer stainless steel skin. The magnet was instrumented with voltage taps, which allow the location of the quench start, and with strain gauges, which allow the measurement of the coil stress variations during assembly, cool-down, and energization. Prior to the assembly, several tests were carried out in order to understand the mechanical properties of the coil and to determine a proper calibration for the strain gauges. This paper reports these design studies, with emphasis on the calibration problem, followed by a discussion of the magnet assembly and quench performance in light of the mechanical measurements

  17. Design, fabrication, and test of a 5-cm aperture, 1-m long superconducting dipole prototype for high energy hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintomi, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Maehata, K.; Wake, M.; Hirabayashi, H. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Devred, A. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan) Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A 1-m long superconducting dipole prototype with an aperture of 5 cm and a rated field of 6.6 T was built and tested. This model was based on a two-layer cosine-theta coil clamped by stainless steel collars inside a laminated iron yoke, with a large keystone-angle cable and no wedge. The cold mass was encased in an outer stainless steel skin. The magnet was instrumented with voltage taps, which allow the location of the quench start, and with strain gauges, which allow the measurement of the coil stress variations during assembly, cool-down, and energization. Prior to the assembly, several tests were carried out in order to understand the mechanical properties of the coil and to determine a proper calibration for the strain gauges. This paper reports these design studies, with emphasis on the calibration problem, followed by a discussion of the magnet assembly and quench performance in light of the mechanical measurements.

  18. Proposal for the award of a blanket purchase contract for the design, supply, installation and maintenance of automatic fire-detection, fire-protection and voice-alarm systems for the Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a blanket purchase contract for the design, supply, installation and maintenance of automatic fire-detection, fire-protection and voice-alarm systems for the Super Proton Synchrotron

  19. Computing requirements for S.S.C. accelerator design and studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragt, A.; Talman, R.; Siemann, R.; Dell, G.F.; Leemann, B.; Leemann, C.; Nauenberg, U.; Peggs, S.; Douglas, D.

    1984-01-01

    We estimate the computational hardware resources that will be required for accelerator physics studies during the design of the Superconducting SuperCollider. It is found that both Class IV and Class VI facilities (1) will be necessary. We describe a user environment for these facilities that is desirable within the context of accelerator studies. An acquisition scenario for these facilities is presented

  20. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  1. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  2. SLAC linear collider and a few ideas on future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    This paper comes in two parts. The first part is a progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) with emphasis on those systems which are of special interest to linear accelerator designers; it sets the stage for a number of contributed papers on specific topics which are also presented at this conference. The second part presents some ideas which are of interest to the design of future linear colliders of higher energies

  3. Near-Threshold Production of W±, Z0, and H0 at a Fixed-Target Experiment at the Future Ultrahigh-Energy Proton Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lansberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We outline the opportunities to study the production of the Standard Model bosons, W±, Z0, and H0, at “low” energies at fixed-target experiments based on possible future ultrahigh-energy proton colliders, that is, the High-Energy LHC, the Super proton-proton Collider, and the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron. These can be indeed made in conjunction with the proposed future colliders designed to reach up to s=100 TeV by using bent crystals to extract part of the halo of the beam which would then impinge on a fixed target. Without disturbing the collider operation, this technique allows for the extraction of a substantial amount of particles in addition to serving for a beam-cleaning purpose. With this method, high-luminosity fixed-target studies at centre-of-mass energies above the W±, Z0, and H0 masses, s≃170–300 GeV, are possible. We also discuss the possibility offered by an internal gas target, which can also be used as luminosity monitor by studying the beam transverse shape.

  4. Design of SSC collider structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsees, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The authors would like to set the record straight. To date, underground construction contracts on the SSC main ring have been bid at a savings of $77 million dollars or 33 percent below the baseline cost estimate. The SSC is the largest single underground project ever built anywhere in the world. When completed it will have approximately 70 miles of tunnels, 60 shafts, two huge underground experiment halls -- each the size of a football stadium -- and numerous other structures, each of which would be considered a major facility on any other project

  5. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  6. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  7. Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ''tabletop'' scale is also discussed

  8. DESIGN OF DYADIC-INTEGER-COEFFICIENTS BASED BI-ORTHOGONAL WAVELET FILTERS FOR IMAGE SUPER-RESOLUTION USING SUB-PIXEL IMAGE REGISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Chopade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents image super-resolution scheme based on sub-pixel image registration by the design of a specific class of dyadic-integer-coefficient based wavelet filters derived from the construction of a half-band polynomial. First, the integer-coefficient based half-band polynomial is designed by the splitting approach. Next, this designed half-band polynomial is factorized and assigned specific number of vanishing moments and roots to obtain the dyadic-integer coefficients low-pass analysis and synthesis filters. The possibility of these dyadic-integer coefficients based wavelet filters is explored in the field of image super-resolution using sub-pixel image registration. The two-resolution frames are registered at a specific shift from one another to restore the resolution lost by CCD array of camera. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT obtained from the designed coefficients is applied on these two low-resolution images to obtain the high resolution image. The developed approach is validated by comparing the quality metrics with existing filter banks.

  9. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  10. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  11. Measurement of the magnetically-induced QED birefringence of the vacuum and an improved search for laboratory axions: Technical report. Project definition study of the use of assets and facilities of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.A.; Fairbank, W.M. Jr.; Toki, W.H.; Kraushaar, P.F. Jr.; Jaffery, T.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Colorado State Collaboration has studied the feasibility of a high sensitivity QED birefringence/axion search measurement. The objective of this work is to measure, for the first time, the birefringence induced in the vacuum on a light beam travelling in a powerful magnetic field. The same experimental setup also allows a highly sensitive search for axion or axion-like particles. The experiment would combined custom-designed optical heterodyne interferometry with a string of six SSC prototype superconducting dipole magnets at the N-15 site of the SSC Laboratory. With these powerful laser tools, sensitivity advances of 10 7 to 10 9 over previous optical experiments will be possible. The proposed experiment will be able to measure the QED light-by-light scattering effect with a 0.5% accuracy. The increased sensitivity for the axion-two photon interaction will result in a bound on this process rivaling the results based on astrophysical arguments. In the technical report the authors address the scientific significance of these experiments and examine the limiting technical parameters which control their feasibility. The proposed optical/electronic scheme is presented in the context of a background of the known and projected systematic problems which will confront any serious attempt to make such measurements

  12. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  13. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  14. The Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R and D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R and D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  15. "Towards a Future Linear Collider" and "The Linear Collider Studies at CERN"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN’s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  16. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  17. Performing the Super Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallionpaa, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The genre of contemporary classical music has seen significant innovation and research related to new super, hyper, and hybrid instruments, which opens up a vast palette of expressive potential. An increasing number of composers, performers, instrument designers, engineers, and computer programmers...... provides the performer extensive virtuoso capabilities in terms of instrumental range, harmony, timbre, or spatial, textural, acoustic, technical, or technological qualities. The discussion will be illustrated by a composition case study involving augmented musical instrument electromagnetic resonator...

  18. New physics hints in B decays and collider outlook

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B physics; flavor; CP violation; beyond Standard Model; rare decays; super- symmetry; fourth generation; collider. ... For the penguin-dominated b → s process such as B0 → φK0, within 3-generation Standard Model (SM3) one expects ..... the possibility of accounting (at least partially) for eq. (1), sin 2ΦBs ∼ −0.2 to −0.6.

  19. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    or ¯pp collider is a synchrotron machine, where the particle and antiparticle beams are accelerated inside the same vacuum pipe (figure 1) using the same set of bending mag- nets and accelerating cavities (not shown). Thanks to their equal mass and opposite charge, the two beams go round in identical orbits on top of ...

  20. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  1. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  2. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  3. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  4. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  5. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  6. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  7. Calorimetry at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090195; Marshall, John

    This thesis describes the optimisation of the calorimeter design for collider experiments at the future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The detector design of these experiments is built around high-granularity Particle Flow Calorimetry that, in contrast to traditional calorimetry, uses the energy measurements for charged particles from the tracking detectors. This can only be realised if calorimetric energy deposits from charged particles can be separated from those of neutral particles. This is made possible with fine granularity calorimeters and sophisticated pattern recognition software, which is provided by the PandoraPFA algorithm. This thesis presents results on Particle Flow calorimetry performance for a number of detector configurations. To obtain these results a new calibration procedure was developed and applied to the detector simulation and reconstruction to ensure optimal performance was achieved for each detector configuration considered. This thesis a...

  8. B factory with hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The opportunities to study B physics in a hadron collider are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the technological developments necessary for these experiments. The R and D program of the Bottom Collider Detector group is reviewed. (author)

  9. Superconducting muon collider concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    High energy colliding beam machines for elementary particle research have grown so costly that funding for them has become problematical. The physics they would explore, however, remains compelling, so that new methods must be found to reach high energy if this physics is to be studied. One such new approach is the muon collider. This machine could reach multi-TeV collision energies with good luminosity at an affordable cost. The scenario for producing μ + μ - collisions is shown schematically in a figure. A high intensity proton synchrotron delivers protons in sharply defined bunches onto a stationary target with an energy of 30 GeV. Many pions are produced that decay into muons; both are collected in a solenoid magnet system with useful energies in the range 0.1--1.0 GeV. The muons are then cooled, i.e. their transverse momentum as well as the spread in their longitudinal momentum is reduced. In this way, a bunch of protons is turned into a bunch of positive or negative muons suitable for acceleration and collision. The energy of the muons at this stage is only 0.02 GeV. Acceleration is accomplished in a series of recirculating linac accelerators, similar to the approach used in CEBAF. Upon reaching 2,000 GeV (2 TeV) of energy, the muons are transferred into a ring where positive and negative muons, transferred in successive bunches, collide and the collisions studied in a suitable detector. About 25% of the muons originally collected survive into the collider ring, and here they live for an average of ∼ 1,000 revolutions. At this point, the surviving muons are dumped and new bunches are injected. This paper describes in abbreviated form the main features and parameters of the presently envisioned muon collider, most of it taken from the latter two reports

  10. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  11. Optical computer utilization at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.B.; Woosley, J.K.; Fennelly, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Optical computer systems offer the possibility of extremely high-speed, high efficiency processing for the SSC. The state of the art in optical computer system is described, with emphasis on the problems of timing, digitization, data readout, and storage. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential of utilizing detector optical signal readouts as a real-time trigger in a signal-rich environment (two to ten events per 16ns bunch crossing). A comparison of projected optical computer technology growth during the next decade and the capabilities required of SSC detectors and off-line processors is performed

  12. Signals for supersymmetry at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    Progress is reviewed in setting mass limits for supersymmetric particles. Since missing energy is a prime signal for supersymmetry, we have calculated several sources of ''fake'' missing energy in ordinary events. The techniques for finding squark-squark and gluino-gluino production are examined and constrasted for √s = 0.63, 2, and 40 TeV; methods of reducing backgrounds are described. The branching ratios of scalar quarks to the lightest supersymmetric particle are calculated with full gaugino mixing. We have considered signals and backgrounds involving hard photons from photino decay and other sources. The process H → H → Higgsino 0 zino 0 with H → Higgsino 0 → gamma photino and zino 0 → ee photino was examined in detail and found to have few backgrounds, and to provide a means of detecting a heavy Higgs particle. The direct production of charginos and neutralinos was calculated. Gluinos are considered as constituents of the proton

  13. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At linear colliders, the + - luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In collisions at the photon collider, these effects are absent, and so smaller emittances are desirable. In the present damping ring designs, nominal DR parameters ...

  14. Polarized electronic sources for future e+/e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    Polarized electron beams will play a crucial role in maximizing the physics potential for future e + /e - linear colliders. We will review the SLC polarized electron source (PES), present a design for a conventional PES for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), and discuss the physics issues of a polarized RF gun

  15. Design of China Leading Energy Efficiency Program (LEP) for equipment and appliances and comparative study of international experience on super-efficient products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiuying; Zhu, Chunyan

    2017-11-01

    With rising global emphasizes on climate change and sustainable development, how to accelerate the transformation of energy efficiency has become an important question. Designing and implementing energy-efficiency policies for super-efficient products represents an important direction to achieve breakthroughs in the field of energy conservation. On December 31, 2014, China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) jointly six other ministerial agencies launched China Leading Energy Efficiency Program (LEP), which identifies top efficiency models for selected product categories. LEP sets the highest energy efficiency benchmark. Design of LEP took into consideration of how to best motivate manufacturers to accelerate technical innovation, promote high efficiency products. This paper explains core elements of LEP, such as objectives, selection criteria, implementation method and supportive policies. It also proposes recommendations to further improve LEP through international policy comparison with Japan’s Top Runner Program, U.S. Energy Star Most Efficient, and SEAD Global Efficiency Medal.

  16. The potential of pyrolysis technology in climate change mitigation - influence of process design and - parameters, simulated in SuperPro Designer software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, T.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Bruun, E.W.; Ahrenfeldt, J.

    2011-01-15

    This report investigates whether or not it would be possible to produce carbon-negative energy from pyrolysis of wheat straw in a series of Danish agricultural scenarios. A combination of process simulation in SuperPro Designer software, correlations derived from literature studies and experimental work, and overall balance calculations has been applied in the process. The study deviates from other studies of pyrolysis and biochar production by the inclusion of substitution energy impact on the overall carbon-balance. Substitution energy is integrated to account for the gap between the energy production from the pyrolysis and the full energy potential of the biomass, quantified by complete conversion in either combustion or gasification systems. It was concluded that it is feasible to produce carbon-negative energy under a variation of different settings, but also that the negative carbon-balance is only robust for the slow pyrolysis scenario. The CO{sub 2} benefit of the most carbon-negative slow pyrolysis process is estimated to be around 10 % of the atmospheric carbon stored in the original biomass when natural gas is applied for energy substitution. This process avoids the emission of around 150-200 kg CO{sub 2}/ton wheat straw with substitution energy with a Denmark 2007 average carbon-intensity. This result is weighted against the net emissions of the carbon-'neutral' process of conventional combustion. This emission is in this report estimated to be around 50 - 150 kg CO{sub 2}/ton straw depending on scenario settings. The final results of the study have been compared to another study with convincing results. Results concluded that the primary force of the pyrolysis technology is the recalcitrant char product and not the pyrolysis oil. Based on this, the study suggests that despite the trend in commercial pyrolysis technology that focuses on fast pyrolysis processes with maximized bio-oil production, the twin challenge of climate mitigation and

  17. Progress on $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Siemann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Physics issues. The physics program will be reviewed for e+e- linear colliders in the TeV energy range. At these prospective facilities central issues of particle physics can be addressed, the problem of mass, unification and structure of space-time. In this context the two lectures will focus on analyses of the Higgs mechanism, supersymmetry and extra space dimensions. Moreover, high-precision studies of the top-quark and the gauge boson sector will be discussed. Combined with LHC results, a comprehensive picture can be developed of physics at the electroweak scale and beyond. Designs and technologies (R. Siemann - 29, 30, 31 May) The physics and technologies of high energy linear colliders will be reviewed. Fundamental concepts of linear colliders will be introduced. They will be discussed in: the context of the Stanford Linear Collider where many ideas changed and new ones were developed in response to operational experience. the requirements for future linear colliders. The different approaches for reac...

  18. DEPFET: A silicon pixel detector for future colliders. Fundamentals, characterization and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marinas Pardo, Carlos Manuel; Vos, Marcel Andre

    2011-01-01

    The future electron-positron colliders, either breaking the energy frontier (like ILC or CLIC) or the luminosity frontier (SuperKEKB), impose unprecedented constraints over the new generation of detectors that will be operated in those facilities. In particular, the vertex detectors must be designed for an efficient flavour tagging and excellent vertex reconstruction. To cope with these requirements, highly pixelated sensors with a fast readout, very low material budget and low power consumption must be developed. Although the combination of these factors is a substantial challenge, the DEPFET Collaboration has developed a new generation of sensors that can be operated in such a harsh environment. The DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) is a pixel sensor that combines detection and internal amplification at the same time. With such configuration, thin detectors with good signal-to-noise ratio and low power consumption can be produced. In this thesis, the optimization and performance of two gen...

  19. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, N.

    1992-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has begun a new era of operation with the SLD detector. During 1991 there was a first engineering run for the SLD in parallel with machine improvements to increase luminosity and reliability. For the 1992 run, a polarized electron source was added and more than 10,000 Zs with an average of 23% polarization have been logged by the SLD. This paper discusses the performance of the SLC in 1991 and 1992 and the technical advances that have produced higher luminosity. Emphasis will be placed on issues relevant to future linear colliders such as producing and maintaining high current, low emittance beams and focusing the beams to the micron scale for collisions. (Author) tab., 2 figs., 18 refs

  20. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  1. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  2. Dreams collide with reality for international experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Three weeks ago, an international team released a design and cost estimate for the International Linear Collider (ILC). American physicists want to build the ILC at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, and researchers had hoped to break ground in 2012 and fire up the ILC's beams of electrons and positrons in 2019." (1 page)

  3. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  5. Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.; Weggel, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 micros at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration

  6. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  7. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Irwing, J.

    1992-01-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread , bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, are described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC are given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). (Author) 16 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Irwin, J.

    1992-08-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We will outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We will discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread, bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, will be described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC will be given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC)

  9. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  10. QCD for Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Skands, Peter

    2011-01-01

    These lectures are directed at a level suitable for graduate students in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics. They are intended to give an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as it is used in collider physics applications. The aim is to bring the reader to a level where informed decisions can be made concerning different approaches and their uncertainties. The material is divided into four main areas: 1) fundamentals, 2) perturbative QCD, ...

  11. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  12. The Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e + e - linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e - ) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z 0 boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10 30 cm -2 s -1 and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed

  13. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  14. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute. Its main purpose and long-term goal is to design an energyfrontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV in a new 80–100 km tunnel. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90–350 GeV highluminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines are being assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed by the end of 2018, in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. This overview summarizes the status of machine designs and parameters, and it discusses the essential technical components being developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets wit...

  15. Design study of the large hadron electron collider and a rapid cycling synchrotron as alternative to the PS booster upgrade at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, Miriam

    2013-02-22

    With the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the exploration of particle physics at center of mass energies at the TeV scale has begun. To extend the discovery potential of the LHC, a major upgrade is foreseen around 2020 of the LHC itself and the LHC injectors - the chain of accelerators preparing the beam for the LHC. One of the injectors - the second one in the chain - is the Proton Synchrotron (PS) Booster. Its performance is currently limited by the space-charge effect, which is the effect of the electromagnetic field of the particle beam on itself. This effect becomes weaker with higher energy, and therefore an energy upgrade of the PS Booster to 2 GeV maximum beam energy is foreseen. As the PS Booster is with its 40 years already an old machine, the construction of a new accelerator, a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), to replace the PS Booster has been proposed. In this thesis different options for the beam guidance in the RCS - referred to as lattice and optics - are studied, followed by a more general comparison of different lattices and optics and their performance under consideration of the space-charge effect. To further complement the LHC physics program, also the possibility of deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering at the LHC has been suggested, referred to as Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC). In this case the proton beam of the LHC collides with the electron beam, which is accelerated in a separate newly built machine. Two options are considered as electron accelerator: a new energy recovery linac - the Linac-Ring option - and the installation of an electron ring in the existing LHC tunnel - the Ring-Ring option. One of the main challenges of the Ring-Ring option is the integration of the electron ring in the current LHC tunnel. A layout, lattice and optics of the electron accelerator is developed in this thesis, which meets the requirements with regard to integration and reaches the beam parameters demanded by the particle physics experiments.

  16. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  17. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  18. “Stereoscopic” 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based covalent organic framework: Design, synthesis and selective sorption towards uranium at high acidic condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhao, Xiaosheng; Li, Bo; Bai, Chiyao; Li, Yang; Wang, Lei; Wen, Rui; Zhang, Meicheng; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian, E-mail: sjli000616@scu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Phosphorus element was first introduced into covalent organic frameworks (COFs). • Monomer in C{sub 3}-like spatial configuration was first used to construct COF materials. • A new 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based sorbent (MPCOF) was synthesized. • Separation of U (VI) by MPCOF at high acidic media (up to 1M HNO{sub 3}) was achieved. • Selectivity for U (VI) separation from multi-ion solution can reach unreported 92%. - Abstract: So far, only five primary elements (C, H, O, N and B) and two types of spatial configuration (C{sub 2}–C{sub 4}, C{sub 6} and T{sub d}) are reported to build the monomers for synthesis of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which have partially limited the route selection for accessing COFs with new topological structure and novel properties. Here, we reported the design and synthesis of a new “stereoscopic” 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based covalent organic framework (MPCOF) by using hexachorocyclotriphosphazene (a P-containing monomer in a C{sub 3}-like spatial configuration) and p-phenylenediamine (a linker). The as-synthesized MPCOF shows high crystallinity, relatively high heat and acid stability and distinctive super-microporous structure with narrow pore-size distributions ranging from 1.0–2.1 nm. The results of batch sorption experiments with a multi-ion solution containing 12 co-existing cations show that in the pH range of 1–2.5, MPCOF exhibits excellent separation efficiency for uranium with adsorption capacity more than 71 mg/g and selectivity up to record-breaking 92%, and furthermore, an unreported sorption capacity (>50 mg/g) and selectivity (>60%) were obtained under strong acidic condition (1 M HNO{sub 3}). Studies on sorption mechanism indicate that the uranium separation by MPCOF in acidic solution is realized mainly through both intra-particle diffusion and size-sieving effect.

  19. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  20. Super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    A mathematically rigorous notion of supermanifold is presented and used to develop the theory of super Riemann surfaces. Super Riemann surfaces describe superconformal equivalence classes of supergravity geometries in two dimensions and therefore provide a powerful formalism for studying fermionic string theory. They also provide a convenient description of spin structures and half-forms on ordinary Riemann surfaces. I prove the uniformization theorem for super Riemann surfaces, determine the dimension and global structure of super Teichmueller space, and show that the super modular group is isomorphic to the ordinary modular (mapping class) group. Quasisuperconformal mappings and the super Beltrami equations are briefly discussed. 32 refs

  1. Demise of Texas collider has made Europe's lab a magnet for scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Had U.S. politics and science meshed more favorably, physicists from around the world would now be flocking to Waxahachie. The defunct Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) should by now have been smashing atoms, but now Europe's top nuclear research lab offers a more picturesque world capital of physics that the prairie south of Dallas

  2. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number. The right-handed triplet Higgs boson Δ, responsible for such breaking, can be copiously produced at the LHC through the Higgs portal in the gluon fusion and less so in gauge mediated channels. At Δ masses below the opening of the V V decay channel, the two observable modes are pair-production of heavy neutrinos via the triplet gluon fusion gg → Δ → NN and pair production of triplets from the Higgs h → ΔΔ → 4 N decay. The latter features tri- and quad same-sign lepton final states that break lepton number by four units and have no significant background. In both cases up to four displaced vertices may be present and their displacement may serve as a discriminating variable. The backgrounds at the LHC, including the jet fake rate, are estimated and the resulting sensitivity to the Left-Right breaking scale extends well beyond 10 TeV. In addition, sub-dominant radiative modes are surveyed: the γγ, Zγ and lepton flavour violating ones. Finally, prospects for Δ signals at future e + e - colliders are presented.

  3. The Large Hadron Collider of CERN and the roadmap toward higher performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is exploring the new frontier of particle physics. It is the largest and most ambitious scientific instrument ever built and 100 years after the Rutherford experiment it continues that tradition of “smashing atoms” to unveil the secret of the infinitely small. LHC makes use of all what we learnt in 40 years of hadron colliders, in particular of ISR and Sp-pbarS at CERN and Tevatron at Fermilab, and it is based on Superconductivity, discovered also 100 years ago. Designing, developing the technology, building and finally commissioning the LHC took more than twenty years. While LHC is now successfully running, we are already preparing the future for the next step. First, by increasing of a factor five the LHC luminosity in ten years from now, and then by increasing its energy by a factor two or more, on the horizon of the next twenty years. These LHC upgrades, in luminosity and energy, will be the super-exploitation of the CERN infrastructure and is the best investment that the HEP...

  4. Architectural Engineering to Super-Light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Niels Andreas

    The increasing global urbanisation creates a great demand for new buildings. In the aim to honour this, a new structural system, offering flexibility and variation at no extra cost appears beneficial. Super-Light Structures constitute such a system. This PhD thesis examines Super-Light Structures...... with architectural engineering as a starting point. The thesis is based on a two stringed hypothesis: Architectural engineering gives rise to better architecture and Super-Light Structures support and enables a static, challenging architecture. The aim of the thesis is to clarify architectural engineering's impact...... on the work process between architects and engineers in the design development. Using architectural engineering, Super-Light Structures are examined in an architectural context, and it is explained how digital tools can support architectural engineering and design of Super-Light Structures. The experiences...

  5. The design of fast analog channels for the readout of strip detectors in the inner layers of the SuperB SVT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.

    2013-08-01

    Six layers of microstrip detectors are foreseen in the present baseline design of the SuperB Silicon Vertex Tracker. Different strip pitches and lengths will be used in the various SVT layers; however, the capability of standing a high background rate and of operating with high hit detection efficiency will be a common feature of the innermost layers. These requirements set the need for a readout chip with analog channels with a short signal shaping time (25-200 ns in layers 0-3) to achieve an adequate time stamp resolution and a small pulse overlap. These channels are also required to provide a 4-bit hit amplitude resolution for dE / dx measurements. A new chip is being designed in a 130 nm CMOS process to comply with these specifications. This paper discusses the solutions that are adopted in this chip for the various blocks of the analog channels, and will present the simulation results for the current design along with the expected performance in terms of parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, linearity, power dissipation.

  6. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  7. Test of QCD at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations measure QCD processes in a wide kinematic range using proton--proton colliding data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A variety of recent results is presented. The results provide validation of the current understanding of QCD, such as the proton structure and interactions and radiations of partons.

  8. Vanilla Technicolor at Linear Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Jarvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the reach of Linear Colliders (LC)s for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that LCs can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, till the maximum energy in the center-of-mass of the colliding leptons...

  9. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  10. Optimal Super Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    can potentially be optimized to create capacitors with unprecedented energy density. 14. SUBJECT TERMS capacitor , supercapacitor, super ... Capacitor -Increase Area (A)............8 b. Multi-layer Ceramic Capacitor -Decrease Thickness (d) .......10 c. Super Dielectric Material-Increase...EDLC and far above ceramic capacitors , after [5] ............................................9 Table 3. Super Dielectric Material Capacitors from

  11. Challenges in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2002-01-01

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e/sup -/e /sup +/ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e/sup -/e/sup + / linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the "Future Linear Collider " (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomi...

  12. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  13. Mechanical and Cooling Design Studies for an Integrated Stave Concept for Silicon Strip Detectors for the Super LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cepeda, M; Gilchriese, M G D; Haber, C; Miller, W K; Miller, W O; Post, R

    2008-01-01

    Design studies for the mechanical and thermal performance of an integrated stave concept for large-area silicon-strip detector support and cooling are described. The fabrication and test of small-scale prototypes are also presented. Finite-element and other calculations have been completed to develop the design concept and to compare with the measurements on prototypes.

  14. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make

  15. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  16. Design, Construction and Commissioning of the CMS Tracker at CERN and Proposed Improvements for Detectors at the Future International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bergauer, T

    The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) detector is a huge particle physics experiment located at one of the four proton-proton interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Geneva, Switzerland). With 27 km circumference it is the not only the largest particle accelerator in size, but with a center of mass energy of 2x7 TeV it will also set the world record in terms of energy. The inner tracking system of the CMS experiment has a diameter of 2.4 m and a length of 5.4 m and is representing the largest silicon tracker ever built. About 15,000 detector modules consisting of more than 24,000 silicon sensors create a silicon area of 206 m2 to detect charged particles from proton collisions. They are placed on a rigid carbon fibre structure in the center of the experiment, and have to operate reliably within a harsh radiation environment and the working conditions of a 3.8 Tesla solenoid magnetic field at -10 degree C temperature. This thesis was conducted ...

  17. Prospects for physics at e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, G.J.

    1988-03-01

    The present thinking on high-energy e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// linear colliders is reviewed, stressing those points that have consequences for detector design and physics analyses. Detector requirements are discussed. Experimental aspects of the physics that can be done at these colliders are discussed: first the general physics environment, then a standard process, W/sup /plus// W/sup /minus// detection, and finally four examples of the discovery potential of these colliders /emdash/ heavy quarks, heavy leptons, standard Higgs bosons, and charged Higgs bosons. The conclusions of this study will be stated. 23 refs., 40 figs

  18. The RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider] lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Claus, J.; Courant, E.D.; Dell, G.F.; Hahn, H.; Parzen, G.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    An antisymmetric lattice for the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is presented. It has been designed to have an energy range from 7 GeV/amu up to 100 GeV/amu; a good tunability of Β* and betatron tune; capability of operating unequal species, for example, proton on gold. Suppression of structure resonances is achieved by proper choice of the phase advances across the insertions and the arc cells. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  19. Collimation systems in the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merminga, N.; Irwin, J.; Helm, R.; Ruth, R.D.

    1991-02-01

    Experience indicates that beam collimation will be an essential element of the next generation e + E - linear colliders. A proposal for using nonlinear lenses to drive beam tails to large amplitudes was presented in a previous paper. Here we study the optimization of such systems including effects of wakefields and optical aberrations. Protection and design of the scrapers in these systems are discussed. 9 refs., 7 figs

  20. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs

  2. R&D towards the module and service structure design for the ATLAS inner tracker at the super LHC (SLHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Ikegami, Y; Cadoux, F; Clark, A; Ferrere, D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Hara, K; Kohriki, T; La Marra, D; Pelleriti, G; Terada, S; Unno, Y; Weber, M

    2010-01-01

    We have designed modules and a service structure of silicon microstrip detectors as a part of the ATLAS inner tracker for the SLHC project on the basis of a modular and replaceable concept. Six modules have been completed with common components and by similar procedures. Single module tests and four-module combined tests were performed at each site and have been compared for crosschecking. Details of the module design and electrical performance are presented. A half-module was irradiated up to 5 × 1014 1-MeV neq/cm2 using 24-GeV protons at the CERN PS. Its electrical performance was investigated before and after irradiation. The design of an eight-module structure, which is insertable to and is replaceable from the overall structure, has also been reported

  3. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  4. SuperFormLab: showing SuperFormLab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    3D-printing in clay and ceramic objects shaped by your own sounds and movements! Digital form transferred via CNC-milling to ornamental ceramic wall-cladding. Brave New World… Students and their teacher at SuperFormLab, the new ceramic workshop of the School of Design at the Royal Danish Academy...... of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, will be showing results of their investigations into the potential of combining digital technologies with ceramic materials. It is now possible to shape the most complex mathematical, virtual 3D objects through the use of advanced software-programs. And more than that – you can...... now get these objects out of the computer and be able to hold and experience them with your hands. Even made in clay. At SuperFormLab, workshop for the new education in Ceramic Design at the School of Design, the integration of digital technologies in relation to the ceramic materials and techniques...

  5. Molecular design of ¿super¿ hydrogelators: understanding the gelation process of azobenzene-based sugar derivatives in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Friggeri, A.; Koumoto, Kazuya; Amaike, Masato; Shinkai, Seiji; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    As an attempt to rationally design aqueous organogelators, a bolaamphiphilic azobenzene derivative (1) bearing two sugar groups was synthesized. Compound 1 formed a gel in water even at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt % (0.65 mM). Spectroscopic studies and electron-micrographic observations have

  6. Technology transfer considerations for the collider dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodzeit, C.; Fischer, R.

    1991-03-01

    The R ampersand D program at the national laboratories has resulted in significant advances in design and fabrication methods for the Collider Dipole Magnets. The status of the transfer of the technology developed by the laboratories is reviewed. The continuation of the technology transfer program is discussed with a description of: (1) the relation of technology transfer activities to collider dipole product development; (2) content of the program relating to key magnet performance issues; and (3) methods to implement the program. 5 refs

  7. The standard model and colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated

  8. Vanilla technicolor at linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Järvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    We analyze the reach of linear colliders for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that linear colliders can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, until the maximum energy in the center of mass of the colliding leptons. In particular we analyze the Drell-Yan processes involving spin-one intermediate heavy bosons decaying either leptonically or into two standard model gauge bosons. We also analyze the light Higgs production in association with a standard model gauge boson stemming also from an intermediate spin-one heavy vector.

  9. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  10. FPGA Design of the digital acquisition chain to test and implement ALPS, the new Beam Position Monitor for the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Degl'Innocenti, Irene; Boccardi, Andrea

    This thesis presents the firmware design and the data analysis to test and implement part of the acquisition chain of ALPS (A Logarithmic Position Monitor), the new beam position monitor of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. CERN provides particle accelerators and detectors to accelerate beams of particles and observe their collisions and the SPS is the second larger circular machine in the accelerator complex. The SPS beam position monitor, the system that measures the transverse position of the accelerated particle beams along the pipe, is now under redesign. In the BPM acquisition chain the signal from the sensor is first conditioned by the analog front-end, then digitalised in the digital front-end and transmitted to the back-end for being processed. The goal of the thesis is the conception of firmware modules and analysis tools integrated with the acquisition chain, aiming to acquire and analyse data to qualify the system and finally implement ...

  11. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  12. Connectivity among computer-aided engineering methods, procedures, and tools used in developing the SSC collider magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallas, N.; Jalloh, A.R.

    1992-03-01

    The accomplishment of functional productivity for the computer aided engineering (CAE) environment at the magnet engineering department (ME) of the magnet systems divisions (MSD) at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) involves most of the basic aspects of information engineering. It is highly desirable to arrive at a software and hardware topology that offers total, two-way (back and forth), automatic and direct software and hardware connectivity among computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), analysis codes, and office automation tools applicable to the disciplines involved. This paper describes the components, data flow, and practices employed in the development of the CAE environment from a systems engineering aspect rather than from the analytical angle. When appropriate, references to case studies are made in order to demonstrate the connectivity of the techniques used

  13. Belle II Technical Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, K; Ahn, S; Aihara, H; Akai, K; Aloi, M; Andricek, L; Aoki, K; Arai, Y; Arefiev, A; Arinstein, K; Arita, Y; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Barberio, E; Barvich, T; Belous, K; Bergauer, T; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Brovchenko, O; Browder, T E; Cao, G; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, K -F; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C -C; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Choi, S -K; Chung, K; Comerma, A; Cooney, M; Cowley, D E; Critchlow, T; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dieguez, A; Dierlamm, A; Dillon, M; Dingfelder, J; Dolenec, R; Dolezal, Z; Drasal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dungel, W; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Enomoto, A; Epifanov, D; Esen, S; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Garcia, M Fernandez; Fifield, T; Fischer, P; Flanagan, J; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Freixas, L; Frey, A; Friedl, M; Fruehwirth, R; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Fukuma, Y; Funakoshi, Y; Furukawa, K; Fuster, J; Gabyshev, N; Cueto, A Gaspar de Valenzuela; Garmash, A; Garrido, L; Geisler, Ch; Gfall, I; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Gorton, I; Grzymkowski, R; Guo, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Haruyama, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashi, K; Hayashii, H; Heck, M; Heindl, S; Heller, C; Hemperek, T; Higuchi, T; Horii, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, C -H; Hwang, S; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iglesias, C; Iida, Y; Iijima, T; Imamura, M; Inami, K; Irmler, C; Ishizuka, M; Itagaki, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwai, G; Iwai, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Iwata, S; Jang, H; Ji, X; Jinno, T; Jones, M; Julius, T; Kageyama, T; Kah, D H; Kakuno, H; Kamitani, T; Kanazawa, K; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, M; Kawai, Y; Kawasaki, T; Kennedy, J; Kichimi, H; Kikuchi, M; Kiesling, C; Kim, B K; Kim, G N; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J -B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, S K; Kim, K T; Kim, T Y; Kinoshita, K; Kishi, K; Kisielewski, B; van Dam, K Kleese; Knopf, J; Ko, B R; Koch, M; Kodys, P; Koffmane, C; Koga, Y; Kohriki, T; Koike, S; Koiso, H; Kondo, Y; Korpar, S; Kouzes, R T; Kreidl, Ch; Kreps, M; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Krueger, H; Kruth, A; Kuhn, W; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kupper, S; Kuzmin, A; Kvasnicka, P; Kwon, Y -J; Lacasta, C; Lange, J S; Lee, I -S; Lee, M J; Lee, M W; Lee, S -H; Lemarenko, M; Li, J; Li, W D; Li, Y; Libby, J; Limosani, A; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Liventsev, D; Virto, A Lopez; Makida, Y; Mao, Z P; Marinas, C; Masuzawa, M; Matvienko, D; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Miyoshi, T; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Mori, T; Morita, A; Morita, Y; Moser, H -G; Martin, D Moya; Mueller, T; Muenchow, D; Murakami, J; Myung, S S; Nagamine, T; Nakamura, I; Nakamura, T T; Nakano, E; Nakano, H; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nam, S -H; Natkaniec, Z; Nedelkovska, E; Negishi, K; Neubauer, S; Ng, C; Ninkovic, J; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Novikov, E; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohmi, K; Ohnishi, Y; Ohshima, T; Ohuchi, N; Oide, K; Olsen, S L; Ono, M; Ono, Y; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, H; Park, H K; Peak, L S; Peng, T; Peric, I; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Petric, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Prim, M; Prothmann, K; Regimbal, K; Reisert, B; Richter, R H; Riera-Babures, J; Ritter, A; Ritter, A; Ritter, M; Roehrken, M; Rorie, J; Rosen, M; Rozanska, M; Ruckman, L; Rummel, S; Rusinov, V; Russell, R M; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Sakai, K; Sakai, Y; Santelj, L; Sasaki, T; Sato, N; Sato, Y; Scheirich, J; Schieck, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwenker, B; Seljak, A; Senyo, K; Seon, O -S; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shiizuka, S; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Simonis, H J; Singh, J B; Sinha, R; Sitarz, M; Smerkol, P; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Suetsugu, Y; Sugihara, S; Sugimura, T; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Takagaki, H; Takasaki, F; Takeichi, H; Takubo, Y; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, S; Taniguchi, N; Tarkovsky, E; Tatishvili, G; Tawada, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Tsunada, K; Tu, Y -C; Uchida, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S; Valentan, M; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vazquez, P; Vila, I; Vilella, E; Vinokurova, A; Visniakov, J; Vos, M; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wassatch, A; Watanabe, M; Watase, Y; Weiler, T; Wermes, N; Wescott, R E; White, E; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Williams, K M; Won, E; Xu, H; Yabsley, B D; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, H; Yamaoka, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yin, Y; Yoon, H; Yu, J; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zander, D; Zdybal, M; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, L; Zhao, Z; Zhilich, V; Zhou, P; Zhulanov, V; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A; Zyukova, O

    2010-01-01

    The Belle detector at the KEKB electron-positron collider has collected almost 1 billion Y(4S) events in its decade of operation. Super-KEKB, an upgrade of KEKB is under construction, to increase the luminosity by two orders of magnitude during a three-year shutdown, with an ultimate goal of 8E35 /cm^2 /s luminosity. To exploit the increased luminosity, an upgrade of the Belle detector has been proposed. A new international collaboration Belle-II, is being formed. The Technical Design Report presents physics motivation, basic methods of the accelerator upgrade, as well as key improvements of the detector.

  14. Design report on the SSCL prototype 80 K Synchrotron Radiation Liner System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Q.S.; Barts, T.; Chou, W. [and others

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the effort to develop a viable design for an SSC prototype 80 K Synchrotron Radiation Liner System. This liner is designed to be tested in the Superconducting Super Collider Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) facility. The liner is one method under consideration to minimize the presence of photodesorbed gases in the particle beam line vacuum environment. Secondly, the liner is aimed at improving the Collider cryogenic thermal efficiency which would allow a potential luminosity upgrade. The SSC Collider is the first proton superconducting accelerator designed to operate at an energy of 20 TeV (each beam) and a beam current of 72 mA. The Collider will produce a synchrotron power of 0.14 W/m and a total of 18 kW into 4.2 K for the two rings. This radiated power may trigger a serious impact of photodesorbed gases on the operational availability of the Collider. The interaction between beam particle and photodesorbed gases may greatly reduce the beam lifetime and the scattered beam power may lead to quenching of the superconducting magnets. Collider availability may be unacceptable if this concern is not properly addressed. The liner is one method under consideration to minimize the presence of photodesorbed gases in the particle beam line vacuum. Secondly, the liner is aimed improving the Collider`s cryogenic thermal efficiency which would allow a potential luminosity upgrade. The ultimate goal is to require no more than one machine warm up per year for vacuum maintenance during operation of the SSC Collider.

  15. Maintenance and repair of LMFBR steam generators. II. Design philosophy of maintenance and repair for Super Phenix 1 steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verriere, P.; Alanche, J.; Minguet, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Creys Malville steam generators have been the subject of a number of papers presented at this congress. However, the general design of the components are outlined, and the in-service monitoring systems and protective devices they are equipped with are briefly described. The methods used in the event of leakage, are described for: leak location, steam generator inspection, steam generator repair, and putting the affected loop back into service

  16. Imaging hadron calorimetry for future Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repond, José, E-mail: repond@hep.anl.gov

    2013-12-21

    To fully exploit the physics potential of a future Lepton Collider requires detectors with unprecedented jet energy and dijet-mass resolution. To meet these challenges, detectors optimized for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) are being designed and developed. The application of PFAs, in turn, requires calorimeters with very fine segmentation of the readout, so-called imaging calorimeters. This talk reviews progress in imaging hadron calorimetry as it is being developed for implementation in a detector at a future Lepton Collider. Recent results from the large prototypes built by the CALICE Collaboration, such as the Scintillator Analog Hadron Calorimeter (AHCAL) and the Digital Hadron Calorimeters (DHCAL and SDHCAL) are being presented. In addition, various R and D efforts beyond the present prototypes are being discussed.

  17. Test of two 1.8 M SSC model magnets with iterated design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.; Cottingham, J.G.; Dahl, P.

    1989-01-01

    We report results from two 1.8 m-long dipoles built as part of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) RandD program. These magnets contain design changes made on both the 1.8 m and the full-length 17 m dipoles to improve quench performance, magnetic field uniformity, and manufacturability. The magnets reach 8 T with little training. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Evolution of facility layout requirements and CAD [computer-aided design] system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.

    1990-06-01

    The overall configuration of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) including the infrastructure and land boundary requirements were developed using a computer-aided design (CAD) system. The evolution of the facility layout requirements and the use of the CAD system are discussed. The emphasis has been on minimizing the amount of input required and maximizing the speed by which the output may be obtained. The computer system used to store the data is also described

  19. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacan, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  20. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  1. US panel backs linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A draft report from a working group examining the future of American particle physics has stated that the US should give top priority to a high energy e-p collider, wherever it is built (2 paragraphs).

  2. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  3. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  4. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  5. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  6. Super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Alice

    1990-01-01

    A super Riemann surface is a particular kind of (1,1)-dimensional complex analytic supermanifold. From the point of view of super-manifold theory, super Riemann surfaces are interesting because they furnish the simplest examples of what have become known as non-split supermanifolds, that is, supermanifolds where the odd and even parts are genuinely intertwined, as opposed to split supermanifolds which are essentially the exterior bundles of a vector bundle over a conventional manifold. However undoubtedly the main motivation for the study of super Riemann surfaces has been their relevance to the Polyakov quantisation of the spinning string. Some of the papers on super Riemann surfaces are reviewed. Although recent work has shown all super Riemann surfaces are algebraic, some areas of difficulty remain. (author)

  7. Proceedings of the workshop on the PS-spin collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yoshiharu

    1993-05-01

    This volume is a record of the PS-Spin Collider Workshop which was held at KEK, Jan. 31-Feb.1, 1992. As a future project of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron (KEK-PS), the hadron collider (PS-Collider), has been under discussion. Originally, the PSC was designed for heavy ion beam collisions with the energy range of 5-7 GeV/u. If polarized protons are accelerated in PSC, 19 x 19 GeV collisions are possible. This workshop was proposed to bring together interested experimentalists and accelerator physicists to discuss the case that could be made for polarization physics and the technical feasibility at the PS Spin Collider. More than 30 physicists participated in the workshop and very interesting and useful discussions took place. (author)

  8. Analysis and design of SSC underground structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and design of underground structures for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Project. A brief overview of the SSC Project and the types of underground structures are presented. Engineering properties and non-linear behavior of the geologic materials are reviewed. The three-dimensional sequential finite element rock-structure interaction analysis techniques developed by the author are presented and discussed. Several examples of how the method works, specific advantages, and constraints are presented. Finally, the structural designs that resulted from the sequential interaction analysis are presented

  9. Test results of pre-production prototype distributed ion pump design for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdener, F.R.; Behne, D.; Hathaway, D. [and others

    1995-04-24

    We have built and tested a plate-type pre-production distributed Ion Pump (DIP) for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring (HER). The design has been an earlier design to use less materials and to costs. Penning cell hole sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm have been tested in a uniform magnetic field of 0.18 T to optimize pumping speed. The resulting final DIP design consisting of a 7-plate, 15 mm basic cell size anode was magnetic field of the HER dipole. A description of the final optimized DIP design will be presented along with the test results of the pumping speed measurements.

  10. Supermanifolds and super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    The theory of super Riemann surfaces is rigorously developed using Rogers' theory of supermanifolds. The global structures of super Teichmueller space and super moduli space are determined. The super modular group is shown to be precisely the ordinary modular group. Super moduli space is shown to be the gauge-fixing slice for the fermionic string path integral

  11. Very large lepton collider in the Very Large Hadron Collider tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaji Sen

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Very Large Hadron Collider design is converging on a program where a 233 km circumference tunnel would first be occupied by a low field dipole system producing 40 TeV in the center of mass, followed by a higher field magnet system producing nearly 200 TeV in the center of mass. We consider the possibility of first using the tunnel for a large e^{+}e^{-} collider. We assume that the total radiated synchrotron power will be limited to 100 MW. We describe the design strategy, the luminosity and energy reach, the factors that limit the machine performance, the scaling laws that apply to its design, and the technology that would be required for its implementation.

  12. Calculus super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Calculus I Super Review includes a review of functions, limits, basic derivatives, the definite integral, combinations, and permutations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much you've learned - and where you need more study. Makes an excellent study aid and textbook companion. Great for self-study!DETAILS- From cover to cover, each in-depth topic review is easy-to-follow and easy-to-grasp - Perfect when preparing for

  13. Algebra & trigonometry super review

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Get all you need to know with Super Reviews! Each Super Review is packed with in-depth, student-friendly topic reviews that fully explain everything about the subject. The Algebra and Trigonometry Super Review includes sets and set operations, number systems and fundamental algebraic laws and operations, exponents and radicals, polynomials and rational expressions, equations, linear equations and systems of linear equations, inequalities, relations and functions, quadratic equations, equations of higher order, ratios, proportions, and variations. Take the Super Review quizzes to see how much y

  14. Super-Penrose process due to collisions inside ergosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    If two particles collide inside the ergosphere, the energy in the center of mass frame can be made unbound provided at least one of particles has a large negative angular momentum [A. A. Grib and Yu. V. Pavlov, Europhys. Lett. 101 (2013) 20004]. We show that the same condition can give rise to unbounded Killing energy of debris at infinity, i.e. super-Penrose process. Proximity of the point of collision to the black hole horizon is not required.

  15. Upgrading the ATLAS barrel tracker for the super-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed to increase the luminosity of the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN by an order of magnitude, with the upgraded machine dubbed super-LHC. The ATLAS experiment will require a new tracker for this high-luminosity operation due to radiation damage and event density. In order to cope with the order of magnitude increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all-silicon tracker is being designed. The new strip detector will use significantly shorter strips than the current silicon tracker in order to minimize the occupancy. As the increased luminosity will mean a corresponding increase in radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation-hard silicon detectors is required. An R and D program is underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness. New front-end electronics and readout systems are being designed to cope with the higher data rates. The challenges facing the sensors and the cooling and mechanical support will be discussed. A possible tracker layout will be described.

  16. Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Organizers of the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    2012-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. This school is a continuation of the series of schools which began six years ago.  The first school was held in 2006 in Sokendai, Japan, the second in 2007 in Erice, Italy, the third in 2008 in Oakbrook Hills, USA, the fourth in 2009 in Huairou, China, the fifth in 2010 in Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, and the sixth in 2011 in Pacific Grove, USA.   The school is organized by the International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE), the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Beam Dynamics Panel. The school this year will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Indore, India from November 27 to December 8, 2012. It is hosted by the Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) and sponsored by a number of funding agencies and institutions around the world including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. National Science...

  17. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  18. Linear collider IR and final focus introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Burke, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Linear Collider subgroup of the Accelerator Physics working group concerned itself with all aspects of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design from the end of the accelerating structure to and through the interaction region. Within this region are: (1) a collimation section, (2) muon protection (of the detector from the collimator), (3) final focus system, (4) interaction point physics, and (5) detector masking from synchrotron radiation and beam-beam pair production. These areas of study are indicated schematically in Fig. 1. The parameters for the Next Linear Collider are still in motion, but attention has settled on a handful of parameter sets. Energies under consideration vary from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV in the center of mass, and luminosities vary from 10 33 to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . To be concrete we chose as a guide for our studies the parameter sets labeled F and G, Table 1 from Palmer. These cover large and small crossing angle cases and 0.4 m to 1.8 m of free length at the interaction point

  19. Progress on the CLIC Linear Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Guignard, Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC study aims at a multi-TeV, high luminosity e+e- linear collider design. Beam acceleration uses high frequency (30 GHz), normal conducting structures operating at high accelerating gradients, in order to reduce the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. The cost-effective RF power production scheme, based on the so-called Two-beam Acceleration method, enables electrons and positrons to be collided at energies ranging from ~ 0.1 TeV up to a maximum of 5 TeV, in stages. A road map has been drawn up to indicate the research and development necessary to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a 3 TeV centre-of-mass collider with a luminosity of 1035 cm-2s-1. Considerable progress has been made in meeting the challenges associated with the CLIC technology and the present paper briefly reviews some of them. In particular, the status is given of the studies on the CLIC high-gradient structures, the dynamic time-dependent effects, the stabilisation of the vibration and the beam delivery system. T...

  20. Conceptual design of novel IP-conveyor-belt Weissenberg-mode data-collection system with multi-readers for macromolecular crystallography. A comparison between Galaxy and Super Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, N; Sakabe, K; Sasaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Galaxy is a Weissenberg-type high-speed high-resolution and highly accurate fully automatic data-collection system using two cylindrical IP-cassettes each with a radius of 400 mm and a width of 450 mm. It was originally developed for static three-dimensional analysis using X-ray diffraction and was installed on bending-magnet beamline BL6C at the Photon Factory. It was found, however, that Galaxy was also very useful for time-resolved protein crystallography on a time scale of minutes. This has prompted us to design a new IP-conveyor-belt Weissenberg-mode data-collection system called Super Galaxy for time-resolved crystallography with improved time and crystallographic resolution over that achievable with Galaxy. Super Galaxy was designed with a half-cylinder-shaped cassette with a radius of 420 mm and a width of 690 mm. Using 1.0 A incident X-rays, these dimensions correspond to a maximum resolutions of 0.71 A in the vertical direction and 1.58 A in the horizontal. Upper and lower screens can be used to set the frame size of the recorded image. This function is useful not only to reduce the frame exchange time but also to save disk space on the data server. The use of an IP-conveyor-belt and many IP-readers make Super Galaxy well suited for time-resolved, monochromatic X-ray crystallography at a very intense third-generation SR beamline. Here, Galaxy and a conceptual design for Super Galaxy are described, and their suitability for use as data-collection systems for macromolecular time-resolved monochromatic X-ray crystallography are compared.