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Sample records for sup13c nuclear magnetic

  1. Ethanol reassimilation and ethanol tolerance in Pitchia stipitis CBS 6054 as studied by [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

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    Skoog, K.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Degn, H.; Jacobsen, H.S.; Jacobsen, J.P. (Univ. of Odense (Denmark))

    1992-08-01

    Ethanol reassimilation in Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 was studied by using continuous cultures, and the oxidation of [1-[sup 13]C] ethanol was monitored by in vivo and in vitro [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Acetate was formed when ethanol was reassimilated. The ATP/ADP ratio and the carbon dioxide production decreased, whereas the malate dehydrogenase activity increased, in ethanol-reassimilating cells. The results are discussed in terms of the low ethanol tolerance in P. stipitis compared with that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Conditions to obtain precise and true measurements of the intramolecular {sup 13}C distribution in organic molecules by isotopic {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

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    Bayle, Kevin [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Gilbert, Alexis [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth–Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Julien, Maxime [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J.; Akoka, Serge [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth–Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Evaluation of the trueness and precision criteria of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. • Use of bi-labelled [1,2-{sup 13}C{sub 2}]acetic acid to determine the performance of the instrumental response. • Inter-calibration of the {sup 13}C intramolecular composition of acetic acid using the technique GC-Py–irm-MS. - Abstract: Intramolecular {sup 13}C composition gives access to new information on the (bio) synthetic history of a given molecule. Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry provides a general tool for measuring the position-specific {sup 13}C content. As an emerging technique, some aspects of its performance are not yet fully delineated. This paper reports on (i) the conditions required to obtain satisfactory trueness and precision for the determination of the internal {sup 13}C distribution, and (ii) an approach to determining the “absolute” position-specific {sup 13}C content. In relation to (i), a precision of <1% can be obtained whatever the molecule on any spectrometer, once quantitative conditions are met, in particular appropriate proton decoupling efficiency. This performance is a prerequisite to the measurement of isotope fractionation either on the transformed or residual compound when a chemical reaction or process is being studied. The study of the trueness has revealed that the response of the spectrometer depends on the {sup 13}C frequency range of the studied molecule, i.e. the chemical shift range. The “absolute value” and, therefore, the trueness of the {sup 13}C NMR measurements has been assessed on acetic acid and by comparison to the results obtained on the fragments from COOH and CH{sub 3} by isotopic mass spectrometry coupled to a pyrolysis device (GC-Py–irm-MS), this technique being the reference method for acetic acid. Of the two NMR spectrometers used in this work, one gave values that corresponded to those obtained by GC-Py–irm-MS (thus, the “true” value) while the other showed a bias, which was

  3. Site-specific {sup 13}C content by quantitative isotopic {sup 13}C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

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    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst [Firmenich SA, Corporate R and D Division, P.O. Box 239, 1211 Geneva 8 (Switzerland); Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Pagelot, Alain [Bruker Biospin SAS, 34 rue de l‘Industrie, 67166 Wissembourg Cedex (France); Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor [Bruker Biospin AG, Industriestrasse 26, 8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Schleucher, Jürgen [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude [European Commission, Joint Research Centre – Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the {sup 13}C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic {sup 13}C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ{sup 13}C{sub i} profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ{sup 13}C{sub i} in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  4. Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of soil humic fractions

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    Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Hawkins, B.L.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize humic fractions isolated from different soils. The humic acid fractions are more aromatic than the humin fractions, probably due to the higher polysaccharide content of humins. However, fulvic acid fractions are more aromatic than the corresponding humic acid and humin fractions. These results can be interpreted in terms of the isolation procedure, because the high affinity of Polyclar AT for phenols results in higher aromaticities as compared with other isolation methods (e.g. charcoal).

  5. Dereplication of depsides from the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea by centrifugal partition chromatography combined to {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition

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    Oettl, Sarah K. [Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80–82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Hubert, Jane, E-mail: jane.hubert@univ-reims.fr [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (UMR CNRS 7312), SFR CAP' sANTE, UFR de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nuzillard, Jean-Marc [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (UMR CNRS 7312), SFR CAP' sANTE, UFR de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Stuppner, Hermann [Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80–82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Renault, Jean-Hugues [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (UMR CNRS 7312), SFR CAP' sANTE, UFR de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Rollinger, Judith M. [Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80–82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • The major depsides of a lichen extract were directly identified within mixtures. • The initial extract was rapidly fractionated by CPC in the pH-zone refining mode. • Hierarchical clustering of {sup 13}C NMR signals resulted in the identification of depside molecular skeletons. • {sup 13}C chemical shift clusters were assigned to structures using a {sup 13}C NMR database. • Six depsides were unambiguously identified by this approach. - Abstract: Lichens produce a diversity of secondary metabolites, among them depsides comprised of two or more hydroxybenzoic acid units linked by ester, ether, or C-C-bonds. During classic solid support-based purification processes, depsides are often hydrolyzed and in many cases time, consuming procedures result only in the isolation of decomposition products. In an attempt to avoid extensive purification steps while maintaining metabolite structure integrity, we propose an alternative method to identify the major depsides of a lichen crude extract (Pseudevernia furfuracea var. ceratea (Ach.) D. Hawksw., Parmeliaceae) directly within mixtures. Exploiting the acidic character of depsides and differences in polarity, the extract was fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography in the pH-zone refining mode resulting in twelve simplified mixtures of depsides. After {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the produced fractions, the major molecular structures were directly identified within the fraction series by using a recently developed pattern recognition method, which combines spectral data alignment and hierarchical clustering analysis. The obtained clusters of {sup 13}C chemical shifts were assigned to their corresponding molecular structures with the help of an in-house {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift database, resulting in six unambiguously identified compounds, namely methyl β-orcinolcarboxylate (1), atranorin (2), 5-chloroatranorin (3), olivetol carboxylic acid (4), olivetoric acid (5

  6. Comparison of /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance and /sup 14/C tracer studies of hepatic metabolism. [Rats and mice

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    Cohen, S.M. (Merck Inst. for Therapeutic Research, Rathway, NJ); Rognstad, R.; Shulman, R.G.; Katz, J.

    1981-04-10

    The gluconeogenic pathway from /sup 13/C-labeled substrates, each of which contained the /sup 14/C-labeled counterpart at a tracer level, has been followed in isolated rat liver cells and in isolated perfused mouse liver. The gluconeogenic flux from glycerol, the synthesis of glycogen, the synthesis of glycogen, the stimulation of glycogenolysis by glucagon, the recycling of triacylglycerol, and an increase in pentose cycle activity under the influence of phenazine methosulfate were all observed directly in the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of perfused liver or isolated hepatocytes. The relative concentrations of /sup 13/C label at specific carbons measured by the NMR spectra under these conditions agreed closely with /sup 14/C isotopic distributions measured in extracts of the same doubly labeled samples for specific activities of greater than or equal to 3%. The label distributions measured by both methods were the same to within the experimental errors, which ranged from +-2% to +-7% in these experiments.

  7. Possibilities and limitations of sup 1 H and sup 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the identification and the quantitative determination of some naturally occurring carcinogenic risk factors. [Senecio vulgaris; Senecio vernalis; Senecio jacobaea; Euphorbia ingens

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    Pieters, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a phytochemical screening method for some selected carcinogenic or tumor-promoting principles in higher plants. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids from some Senecio species (Compositae or Asteraceae), and the diterpene ester from Croton tiglium L. and Euphorbia ingens E. Mey (Euphorbiaceae) were chosen as representatives of both groups. The possibilities and limitations of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR) for the analysis of mixtures of carcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids were compared with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography was well as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Senecio vulgaris L., Senecio vernalis Waldst. and Kit. and Senecio jacobaea L. were investigated.

  8. Sensitive {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation spectra of amyloid fibrils at very high spinning frequencies and magnetic fields

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    Weingarth, Markus [Utrecht University (Netherlands); Masuda, Yuichi; Takegoshi, K. [Kyoto University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Tekely, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.tekely@ens.fr [Ecole Normale Superieure, Departement de Chimie (France)

    2011-06-15

    Sensitive 2D solid-state {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation spectra of amyloid {beta} fibrils have been recorded at very fast spinning frequencies and very high magnetic fields. It is demonstrated that PARIS-xy recoupling using moderate rf amplitudes can provide structural information by promoting efficient magnetization transfer even under such challenging experimental conditions. Furthermore, it has been shown both experimentally and by numerical simulations that the method is not very sensitive to dipolar truncation effects and can reveal direct transfer across distances of about 3.5-4A.

  9. Unambiguous assigning of the signals of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C of monoterpenes using computational methods; Asignacion inequivoca de las senales del espectro de resonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1} H y {sup 13} C de monoterpenos empleando metodos computacionales

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    Cortes, F.; Cuevas, G.; Tenorio, J.; Rochin, A.L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Quimica, A.P. 70213, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Ab initio calculations, within the frame of Density Functional Theory were carried out on camphene and {alpha}-pinene. The {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C shifts were estimated according to the recently developed Sum-Over-States Density Functional Perturbation Theory (SOS-DFPT) as implemented in a modified deMon-KS program. The calculations not only reproduced the observed NMR chemical shifts, quantitatively in the case of {sup 1} H nuclei and qualitatively in the case of {sup 13} C nuclei, but also allow assigning unambiguously the signal on these spectra. (Author)

  10. Study and validity of {sup 13}C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and {sup 2}H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

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    Cotte, J.F. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Casabianca, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Lheritier, J. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Perrucchietti, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Sanglar, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Waton, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France)]. E-mail: mf.grenier-loustalot@sca.cnrs.fr

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The {delta} {sup 13}C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H){sub I} ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C{sub 4} syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C{sub 4} syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  11. Determination of {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios with (d, p) nuclear reactions

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    Wang, Y.Q., E-mail: yqwang@lanl.go [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States); Zhang, J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Gansu 730000 (China); Tesmer, J.R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States); Li, Y.H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Gansu 730000 (China); Greco, R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States); Grim, G.P.; Obst, A.W. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States); Rundberg, R.S.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87544 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Stable isotope ratios such as {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C play an important role in many applications including environment and energy research. Since many surface analysis techniques are plagued with unavoidable hydrocarbon contamination issues during analysis, it is highly desirable that {sup 13}C and {sup 12}C isotopes be measured simultaneously especially in specimens with a minute amount of {sup 13}C, in order to reliably determine {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios. In this paper, we report that deuterium induced proton particle reactions, {sup 13}C(d, p){sup 14}C and {sup 12}C(d, p){sup 13}C, provide a convenient and reliable approach for {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio determination. Optimizations on experimental considerations and potential interferences from other common light isotopes are discussed as well as results from the application of this technique to diagnose the performance of a target debris collection in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment.

  12. ({sup 1} H, {sup 13} C and {sup 31} P) NMR of phosphonic acid derivatives; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear ({sup 1} H, {sup 13} C, {sup 31} P) de derivados do acido fosfonico

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    Campos, Valdevino; Costa, Valentim E. Uberti [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1991-12-31

    In the last years the development of phosphates analogues in the medical and agricultural pesticides has being very expressive. {sup 1} H, {sup 13} C and mainly {sup 31} P NMR are used for stereochemical and conformational analysis, and reactivity studies on the compounds resulting from those chemical processes 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

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    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  14. Synthesis of /sup 13/C-labelled medroxyprogesterone acetate with three /sup 13/C isotopes (1)

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    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M. (Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, San Antonio, TX (USA))

    1982-03-01

    17..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone was condensed with phenyl acetate /sup 13/C/sub 2/ in the presence of sodium hydride. Treatment with acetic and hydrochloric acids and acetylation gave 17..cap alpha..-acetoxyprogesterone /sup 13/C/sub 2/. Treatment with tetrabromomethane /sup 13/C and hydrogenation yielded medroxyprogesterone acetate with three /sup 13/C isotopes.

  15. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis of Brazilian cretaceous ambers

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    Pereira, Ricardo; Azevedo, Debora A., E-mail: ricardopereira@iq.ufrj.b, E-mail: debora@iq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Geoquimica Organica Molecular e Ambiental; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de RMN de Solidos; Carvalho, Ismar S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia; Fernandes, Antonio Carlos S. [Museu Nacional (MN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia e Paleontologia

    2011-07-01

    {sup 13}C cross polarization with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C CPMAS NMR) spectra have been obtained for the first time to three Cretaceous amber samples from South America. The samples were dated to Lower Cretaceous and collected in sediments from the Amazonas, Araripe and Reconcavo basins, Brazil. All samples have very similar spectra, consistent with a common paleobotanical source. Some aspects of the spectra suggest a relationship between Brazilian ambers and Araucariaceae family, such as intense resonances at 38-39 ppm. All samples are constituted by polylabdane structure associated to Class Ib resins, constituted by polymers of labdanoid diterpenes. Finally, information concerning some structural changes during maturation, such as isomerization of {Delta}{sup 8(17)} and {Delta}{sup 12(13)} unsaturations, were obtained by {sup 13}C NMR analyses. The results concerning botanical affinities are in accordance with previous results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (author)

  16. Metabolic origin of the {delta}{sup 13}C of respired CO{sub 2} in roots of Phaseolus vulgaris

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    Bathellier, C.; Tcherkez, G.; Cornic, G.; Ghashghaie, J. [Laboratoire d' Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution - ESE, CNRS-UMR 8079 - IFR 87, Batiment 362, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay Cedex (France); Tcherkez, G. [Plateforme Metabolisme-Metabolome, IFR87 La Plante et son Environnement, Institut de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Batiment 630, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay Cedex (France); Bligny, R.; Gout, E. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale CEA-Grenoble 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-07-01

    - Root respiration is a major contributor to soil CO{sub 2} efflux, and thus an important component of ecosystem respiration. But its metabolic origin, in relation to the carbon isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C), remains poorly understood. - Here, {sup 13}C analysis was conducted on CO{sub 2} and metabolites under typical conditions or under continuous darkness in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) roots. {sup 13}C contents were measured either under natural abundance or following pulse-chase labeling with {sup 13}C-enriched glucose or pyruvate, using isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. - In contrast to leaves, no relationship was found between the respiratory quotient and the {delta}{sup 13}C of respired CO{sub 2}, which stayed constant at a low value (c. -27.5 per thousand) under continuous darkness. With labeling experiments, it is shown that such a pattern is explained by the {sup 13}C-depleting effect of the pentose phosphate pathway; and the involvement of the Krebs cycle fueled by either the glycolytic input or the lipid/protein recycling. The anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activity sustained glutamic acid (Glu) synthesis, with no net effect on respired CO{sub 2}. - These results indicate that the root {delta}{sup 13}C signal does not depend on the availability of root respiratory substrates and it is thus plausible that, unless the {sup 13}C photosynthetic fractionation varies at the leaf level, the root {delta}{sup 13}C signal hardly changes under a range of natural environmental conditions. (authors)

  17. NMR study of the 1-{sup 13}C glucose colon bacterial metabolism; Etude du metabolisme bacterien colique du 1-{sup 13}C glucose par RMN

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    Briet, F.; Flourie, B.; Pochart, P.; Rambaud, J.C.; Desjeux, J.F. [Hopital Saint-Lazare, 75 - Paris (France); Dallery, L. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France); Grivet, J.P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    1994-12-31

    The aim of the study is to examine in-vitro and by nuclear magnetic resonance the biological pathways for the fermentation of the 1-{sup 13}C labelled glucose (99 atoms percent) by human colon bacteria. The preparation of the bacterial suspension and the glucose degradation kinetics are presented; the NMR analysis sensitivity and quantification features are discussed and results are presented. 2 figs., 1 ref.

  18. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

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    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  19. {sup 13}C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

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    Santos, J.V. dos, E-mail: mangrich@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Mangrich, A.S. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia: Energia e Ambiente, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pereira, B.F. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Pillon, C.N. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Estacao Experimental Cascata; Novotny, E.H. [EMBRAPA Solos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Abbt-Braun, G.; Frimmel, F.H. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, TH (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand {sup 13}C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO{sup 2+} correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the {sup 13}C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  20. Neutron orbital radii in {sup 13} C; Radios orbitales neutronicos en {sup 13} C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Murillo, G.; Ramirez, J.J.; Avila, O.L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1988-01-15

    In this work its were carried out experimental measurements of the reaction {sup 12}C(d,p) {sup 13}C at low energy. Preliminary results of a DWBA analysis of the data are presented, and the possibility of using this reaction to obtain the orbital radius of the transferred neutron is investigated. (Author)

  1. Impact of radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion on the release of {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl implanted into nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behaviour of {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl in gas cooled graphite moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncoffre, N., E-mail: nathalie.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Toulhoat, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Silbermann, G. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); and others

    2016-04-15

    Graphite finds widespread use in many areas of nuclear technology based on its excellent moderator and reflector qualities as well as its strength and high temperature stability. Thus, it has been used as moderator or reflector in CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG, MAGNOX, and AGR. However, neutron irradiation of graphite results in the production of {sup 14}C (dose determining radionuclide) and {sup 36}Cl (long lived radionuclide), these radionuclides being a key issue regarding the management of the irradiated waste. Whatever the management option (purification, storage, and geological disposal), a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide's location and speciation has to be made. During reactor operation, the effects of radiolysis are likely to promote the radionuclide release especially at the gas/graphite interface. Radiolysis of the coolant is mainly initiated through γ irradiation as well as through Compton electrons in the graphite pores. Radiolysis can be simulated in laboratory using γ irradiation or ion irradiation. In this paper, {sup 13}C, {sup 37}Cl and {sup 14}N are implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate respectively the presence of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and nitrogen, a {sup 14}C precursor. Different irradiation experiments were carried out using different irradiation devices on implanted graphite brought into contact with a gas simulating the coolant. The aim was to assess the effects of gas radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion induced by γ or He{sup 2+} irradiation at the gas/graphite interface in order to evaluate their role on the radionuclide release. Our results allow inferring that radiolytic corrosion has clearly promoted the release of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}N located at the graphite brick/gas interfaces and open pores.

  2. Measurement of carbonyl chemical shifts of excited protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy: comparison between uniformly and selectively {sup 13}C labeled samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Hansen, D. Flemming; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2008-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for quantifying chemical shifts of excited protein states. For many applications of the technique that involve the measurement of relaxation rates of carbon magnetization it is necessary to prepare samples with isolated {sup 13}C spins so that experiments do not suffer from magnetization transfer between coupled carbon spins that would otherwise occur during the CPMG pulse train. In the case of {sup 13}CO experiments however the large separation between {sup 13}CO and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts offers hope that robust {sup 13}CO dispersion profiles can be recorded on uniformly {sup 13}C labeled samples, leading to the extraction of accurate {sup 13}CO chemical shifts of the invisible, excited state. Here we compare such chemical shifts recorded on samples that are selectively labeled, prepared using [1-{sup 13}C]-pyruvate and NaH{sup 13}CO{sub 3,} or uniformly labeled, generated from {sup 13}C-glucose. Very similar {sup 13}CO chemical shifts are obtained from analysis of CPMG experiments recorded on both samples, and comparison with chemical shifts measured using a second approach establishes that the shifts measured from relaxation dispersion are very accurate.

  3. {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C NOESY spectra of a 480 kDa protein: solution NMR of ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzapetakis, Manolis; Turano, Paola [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry, CERM (Italy); Theil, Elizabeth C. [Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, CeBIC (Council for BioIron at CHORI) (United States); Bertini, Ivano [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry, CERM (Italy)], E-mail: ivanobertini@cerm.unifi.it

    2007-07-15

    Molecular size has limited solution NMR analyses of proteins. We report {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C NOESY experiments on a 480 kDa protein, the multi-subunit ferritin nanocage with gated pores. By exploiting {sup 13}C-resonance-specific chemical shifts and spin diffusion effects, we identified 75% of the amino acids, with intraresidue C-C connectivities between nuclei separated by 1-4 bonds. These results show the potential of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C NOESY for solution studies of molecular assemblies >100 kDa.

  4. A single-quantum methyl {sup 13}C-relaxation dispersion experiment with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Vallurupalli, Pramodh [University of Toronto, Departments of Medical Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada); Religa, Tomasz L. [Medical Research Council Centre for Protein Engineering (United Kingdom); Dahlquist, Frederick W. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Medical Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2007-05-15

    A pulse sequence is described for recording single-quantum {sup 13}C-methyl relaxation dispersion profiles of {sup 13}C-selectively labeled methyl groups in proteins that offers significant improvements in sensitivity relative to existing approaches where initial magnetization derives from {sup 13}C polarization. Sensitivity gains in the new experiment are achieved by making use of polarization from {sup 1}H spins and {sup 1}H {sup {yields}} {sup 13}C {sup {yields}} {sup 1}H type magnetization transfers. Its utility has been established by applications involving three different protein systems ranging in molecular weight from 8 to 28 kDa, produced using a number of different selective labeling approaches. In all cases exchange parameters from both {sup 13}C{sup {yields}}{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H {sup {yields}} {sup 13}C {sup {yields}} {sup 1}H classes of experiment are in good agreement, with gains in sensitivity of between 1.7 and 4-fold realized using the new scheme.

  5. Mass spectrometry and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of compounds modeling the glycopeptide linkage of glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumberg, K.; Bush, C.A.

    1982-01-15

    The properties of several compounds useful as models for three-dimensional conformational studies and the investigation of the chemical degradation of glycopeptide linkages both of the N- and O-glycosidic type are described. Using the method of differential chemical shift in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O as solvents, the carbon NMR spectrum of N-acetylglucosaminylasparagine, 1-N-acetyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranosylamine, and 1-N-acetyl-2-acetamido-..beta..-D-glycopyranosylamine has been assigned. Electron impact mass spectra of the peracetylated derivatives of the latter two compounds show a peak apparently unique to glycopyranosylamides at m/e = 269, no analog of which is observed in the mass spectra of other peracetylated sugars. As models of the ..cap alpha..-O-glycosidic linkage, fully assigned carbon NMR spectra of ..cap alpha..-methyl-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), ..cap alpha..-methyl-3-O-methyl GalNAc, and -GlcNAc as well as the disaccharide Glc-..beta..-l ..-->.. 3 GalNAc are reported. Because certain anomalies in the chemical shifts and /sup 1/J/sub CH/ observed in the disaccharide and in O-glycosylated glycoproteins are not observed in the simple model compounds, they may result from conformational interactions in the glycopeptides.

  6. Coherent control of a {sup 13}C NV{sup -} center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Nemoto, Kae [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan); Munro, William J. [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the theoretically achievable fidelity for coherently controlling an effective three qubit system consisting of a negatively charged NV center in diamond coupling via an hyperfine interaction to one nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin using only micro- and radio wave pulses. With its long coherence times and comparatively simple optical accessibility, already the 'bare' NV{sup -} center has an interesting potential in quantum computing related applications. Although a number of experiments have already been conducted using NV centers with one or more {sup 13}C nearby, fidelity achieved are limited not only by experimental inaccuracies but a lack of theoretical understanding of the system dynamics. We seek to redress this by fully modelling the NVC systems behaviour in the ground state manifold, including all hyperfine interactions (between N and V as well as C and V) and dissipation where parameters are taken from previous experimental work as well as theoretical ab-initio studies. We show that for close-by carbons, the strong hyperfine interaction leads to unwanted mixing of levels which ultimately limits fidelity in single-qubit driving and entanglement generation to less than 99% in the experimentally interesting weak magnetic fields regime.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of ({sup 13}C-4) to ({sup 13}C-5)-glutamate, ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-alanine or ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-lactate produced when ({sup 13}C-2)-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  8. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes with defined {sup 13}C content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, C.; Loeffler, M.; Ruemmeli, M.; Grueneis, A.; Schoenfelder, R.; Gemming, T.; Pichler, T.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State Research, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Jost, O. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    The synthesis of high quality isotope engineered SWCNT by means of laser ablation and the use of Pt-Rh-Re catalyst mixtures has been established. Optical absorption and Raman spectroscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy are utilized to characterize the obtained SWCNTs with regard to purity and yield. The absence of any ferromagnetic materials, as well as the remarkably low abundance of amorphous carbon renders this material ideal for magnetic studies. The controlled augmentation of {sup 13}C is conveniently confirmed by phonon softening and broadening observed in Raman spectroscopy. Isotope labelling at constant sample quality was achieved in the whole range from 1% {sup 13}C up to 98% {sup 13}C. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed acetate - water oxygen exchange studied by /sup 13/C-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Etten, R.L.; Dayton, B.; Cortes, S.

    1986-05-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen exchange reaction between (l-/sup 13/C,/sup 18/O/sub 2/)acetate and H/sub 2//sup 16/O catalyzed by homogeneous acetyl-cholinesterase from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, was studied using the /sup 18/O-isotope-induced shift on /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for the exchange reactions were determined at pH values from 4.5 to 8. The exchange reaction exhibits a maximum at pH 5.8. The apparent catalytic rate constant for the exchange reaction is 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/ times smaller than that for the deacylation of the acetyl-enzyme intermediate over the pH range tested. Oxygen exchange occurs by a random sequential pathway rather than by multiple (coupled) exchange. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by sodium acetate showed a sigmoidal dependence on pH, with K/sub i/ increasing 2.5 orders of magnitude over the pH range. Protonation of an active site residue having an apparent pKa of 6.8 is associated with an increase in acetate binding. Deacylation also exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on (H/sup +/). The experimental data fits titration curves with inflection points at 5.0 +/- 0.3 and 6.7 +/-0.1. Results support the role of histidine in acetylation of the active site serine, but the conjugate base of another active site residue with a pKa of 5.0 appears necessary for maximal catalytic activity in both the deacylation and exchange reactions.

  11. {sup 13}C relaxation in an RNA hairpin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, G.C. [Univ. of South Wales, Kensington (Australia)]|[Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Akratos, C. [Univ. of South Wales, Kensington (Australia); Xi, Z.; Michnica, M.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This initial survey of {sup 13}C relaxation in the {triangle}TAR RNA element has generated a number of interesting results that should prove generally useful for future studies. The most readily comparable study in the literature monitored {sup 13}C relaxation of the methyl groups from unusual bases in tRNA{sup Phe}. The study, which used T{sub 1} and NOE data only, reported order parameters for the methyl group axis that ranged between 0.51 and 0.97-a range similar to that observed here. However, they reported a breakdown of the standard order parameter analysis at higher (118-MHz {sup 13}C) frequencies, which should serve to emphasize the need for a thorough exploration of suitable motional models.

  12. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  13. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. (Intermagnetics General Corporation, Guilderland, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  14. Control of coherence among the spins of a single electron and the three nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclei of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimo-Oka, T.; Miwa, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizuochi, N., E-mail: mizuochi@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kato, H.; Yamasaki, S. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Jelezko, F. [Institut für Quantenoptik, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    Individual nuclear spins in diamond can be optically detected through hyperfine couplings with the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center; such nuclear spins have outstandingly long coherence times. Among the hyperfine couplings in the NV center, the nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the largest coupling strength. Nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the potential to perform fastest gate operations, providing highest fidelity in quantum computing. Herein, we report on the control of coherences in the NV center where all three nearest neighbor carbons are of the {sup 13}C isotope. Coherence among the three and four qubits are generated and analyzed at room temperature.

  15. {sup 13}C solid-state n.m.r. spectroscopy of fossil sporopollenins: variation in composition independent of diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsley, A.R.; Barrie, P.J.; Scott, A.C. [University of London, Egham (United Kingdom). Royal Holloway, Dept. of Biology and Geology

    1995-07-01

    {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of sporopollenin from extant and extinct lycopods and gymnosperms shows that this material differs in composition between these major groups. The relative amounts of unsaturated carbon species are lower in the gymnsopersms than in the lycopods in both the modern and fossil material. This suggests that the proportion of unsaturated carbon species present in the fossils is related to that of the original material. Since the fossil material used in this study was obtained from single rock samples, this largely eliminates the possibility that the observed differences in n.m.r. characteristics in fossil spore exines from different species can be attributed to different diagenetic histories. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  16. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with {sup 13}C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled {sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingzhu, E-mail: wangjingzhu@chinada.cn [National Anti-Doping Laboratory, China Anti-Doping Agency, Beijing (China); Yang, Rui [Sport Science College, Beijing Sport University Beijing, Beijing (China); Yang, Wenning [School of Pharmacy, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing (China); Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi; Xu, Youxuan [National Anti-Doping Laboratory, China Anti-Doping Agency, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • {sup 13}C labeled testosterone can be used to adjust the isotope ratio of testosterone. • The novel testosterone cannot be detected by the regular IRMS method in doping test. • A method was explored to remove the labeled {sup 13}C. • The established method can be used to detect the manipulated testosterone. - Abstract: Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ{sup 13}C value). However, {sup 13}C labeled standards can be used to control the δ{sup 13}C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the {sup 13}C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ{sup 13}C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD}, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different {sup 13}C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD} post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD} for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-{sup 13}C labeled standards.

  17. A combined HNCA/HNCO experiment for {sup 15}N labeled proteins with {sup 13}C at natural abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupce, Eriks [Varian Inc. (United Kingdom); Muhandiram, D.R.; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Protein Engineering Network Centers of Excellence and Departments of Medical Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2003-10-15

    A triple resonance NMR experiment is presented for the simultaneous recording of HNCA and HNCO data sets on {sup 15}N, natural abundance {sup 13}C samples. The experiment exploits the fact that transfers of magnetization from {sup 15}N to {sup 13}CO and from {sup 15}N to {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} (and back) proceed independently for samples that are not enriched in {sup 13}C. A factor of 2 in measuring time is gained by recording the two data sets simultaneously with no compromise in spectral quality. An application to a 0.5 mM {sup 15}N labeled sample of protein-L is presented with all expected correlations observed in spectra recorded with a cryogenic probe at 500 MHz.

  18. Selective carbon 13 enrichment of side chain carbons of ginkgo lignin traced by carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture); Robert, D.R. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee); Terashima, N. (Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States))

    Although carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([sup 13]C-NMR) is widely used in lignin structural studies, serious difficulties are encountered in the assignments of [sup 13]C signals because of their extensive overlaps resulting from the complex structure of lignin and of delicate detection of minor structures. To overcome these difficulties, specifically [sup 13]C-enriched precursors of lignin biosynthesis, coniferin-[side chain-[beta]-[sup 13]C] and coniferin-[side chain-[gamma]-[sup 13]C], were administered to growing stems of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). The NMR analysis of the milled wood lignins isolated from the newly formed xylem showed that selective enrichment of specific carbons of protolignin in the cell wall was achieved without seriously disturbing the lignin biosynthesis. The presence of saturated methylene side chains in the protolignin was shown for the first time by this selective enrichment technique in combination with NMR analysis. (authors). 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Fractional {sup 13}C enrichment of isolated carbons using [1-{sup 13}C]- or [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose facilitates the accurate measurement of dynamics at backbone C{sup {alpha}} and side-chain methyl positions in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik [University of Toronto, Departments of Medical Genetics and Chemistry (Canada); Teilum, Kaare; Carstensen, Tommy [Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry (Sweden); Bezsonova, Irina [University of Toronto, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Wiesner, Silke [University of Toronto, Department of Biochemistry (Canada); Hansen, D. Flemming [University of Toronto, Departments of Medical Genetics and Chemistry (Canada); Religa, Tomasz L. [Medical Research Council Centre for Protein Engineering (United Kingdom); Akke, Mikael [Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry (Sweden); Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Medical Genetics and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2007-07-15

    A simple labeling approach is presented based on protein expression in [1-{sup 13}C]- or [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose containing media that produces molecules enriched at methyl carbon positions or backbone C{sup {alpha}} sites, respectively. All of the methyl groups, with the exception of Thr and Ile({delta}1) are produced with isolated {sup 13}C spins (i.e., no {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C one bond couplings), facilitating studies of dynamics through the use of spin-spin relaxation experiments without artifacts introduced by evolution due to large homonuclear scalar couplings. Carbon-{alpha} sites are labeled without concomitant labeling at C{sup {beta}} positions for 17 of the common 20 amino acids and there are no cases for which {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 13}CO spin pairs are observed. A large number of probes are thus available for the study of protein dynamics with the results obtained complimenting those from more traditional backbone {sup 15}N studies. The utility of the labeling is established by recording {sup 13}C R{sub 1{rho}} and CPMG-based experiments on a number of different protein systems.

  20. s-PROCESSING IN AGB STARS REVISITED. II. ENHANCED {sup 13}C PRODUCTION THROUGH MHD-INDUCED MIXING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E. [Department of Physics, University of Perugia, and INFN, Section of Perugia, via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nucci, M. C., E-mail: oscar.trippella@fisica.unipg.it [Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Perugia, via Vanvitelli, I-06123 Perugia and INFN, Section of Perugia, via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2016-02-20

    Slow neutron captures are responsible for the production of about 50% of elements heavier than iron, mainly occurring during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (1 ≲ M/M{sub ⊙} ≲ 3), where the main neutron source is the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction. This last reaction is activated from locally produced {sup 13}C, formed by partial mixing of hydrogen into the He-rich layers. We present here the first attempt to describe a physical mechanism for the formation of the {sup 13}C reservoir, studying the mass circulation induced by magnetic buoyancy without adding new free parameters to those already involved in stellar modeling. Our approach represents the application to the stellar layers relevant for s-processing of recent exact analytical 2D and 3D models for magneto-hydrodynamic processes at the base of convective envelopes in evolved stars in order to promote downflows of envelope material for mass conservation during the occurrence of a dredge-up phenomenon. We find that the proton penetration is characterized by small concentrations, but is extended over a large fractional mass of the He-layers, thus producing {sup 13}C reservoirs of several 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}. The ensuing {sup 13}C-enriched zone has an almost flat profile, while only a limited production of {sup 14}N occurs. In order to verify the effects of our new findings we show how the abundances of the main s-component nuclei can be accounted for in solar proportions and how our large {sup 13}C-reservoir allows us to solve a few so far unexplained features in the abundance distribution of post-AGB objects.

  1. Analysis of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of cysteine and cystine residues in proteins: a quantum chemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Osvaldo A.; Villegas, Myriam E.; Vila, Jorge A. [Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (Argentina); Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.ed [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Cysteines possess a unique property among the 20 naturally occurring amino acids: it can be present in proteins in either the reduced or oxidized form, and can regulate the activity of some proteins. Consequently, to augment our previous treatment of the other types of residues, the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of 837 cysteines in disulfide-bonded cystine from a set of seven non-redundant proteins, determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, were computed at the DFT level of theory. Our results indicate that the errors between observed and computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts of such oxidized cysteines can be attributed to several effects such as: (a) the quality of the NMR-determined models, as evaluated by the conformational-average (ca) rmsd value; (b) the existence of high B-factor or crystal-packing effects for the X-ray-determined structures; (c) the dynamics of the disulfide bonds in solution; and (d) the differences in the experimental conditions under which the observed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts and the protein models were determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR-spectroscopy. These quantum-chemical-based calculations indicate the existence of two, almost non-overlapped, basins for the oxidized and reduced -SH {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, but not for the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, chemical shifts, in good agreement with the observation of 375 {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and 337 {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances from 132 proteins by Sharma and Rajarathnam (2000). Overall, our results indicate that explicit consideration of the disulfide bonds is a necessary condition for an accurate prediction of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of cysteines in cystines.

  2. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Vaisman, N. (Kaplan Hospital, Rehovot (Israel)); Mandel, H. (Rambam Hospital, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  3. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  4. [sup 13]C NMR on C[sub 60] single-crystal. RMN du [sup 13]C sur un monocristal de C[sub 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkoud, R.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Godard, J.; Jerome, D. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique des Solides); Lambert, J.M.; Bernier, P. (Montpellier-1 Univ., 34 (France))

    1994-01-01

    The authors report a [sup 13]C NMR study performed on a C[sub 60] single crystal (8% enriched in [sup 13]C) grown by sublimation. Molecular motions are tested by spin-lattice relaxation data and spectral shapes below and above the structural transition at T[sub c] = 262 K. The sharpness of this transition and the long relaxation times at low temperature, compared to previous data on powdered samples, confirm the high purity of the crystal.

  5. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  6. Application of {sup 13}C isotopic analysis to the characterization of petroleum fractions; Application de l`analyse isotopique {sup 13}C a la caracterisation de coupes petrolieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fixari, B.; Le Perchec, P.; Bigois, M.; Casabianca, H.; Jame, P. [CNRS, 69 - Vernaison (France)

    1994-12-31

    As a {sup 12}C-{sup 12}C bond is thermally more fragile than a {sup 12}C-{sup 13}C bond, it is observed that, after thermolysis, aromatics are enriched with {sup 13}C while light aliphatics are depleted. Using an isotopic mass spectrometry technique combined with a thermal analysis (FRACTEL analyzer) or a gas chromatography method, detailed isotopic compositions of heavy oils produced in different geological deposits and their thermal conversion products, are derived. 3 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs.

  7. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR assignments of isojuripidine from Solanum asterophorum Mart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tania M.S.; Costa, Rodrigo A.; Oliveira, Eduardo J.; Barbosa-Filho, Jose M.; Agra, Maria F.; Camara, Celso A. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica]. E-mail: sarmento@ltf.ufpb.br

    2005-11-15

    Isojuripidine was isolated from the aerial parts of Solanum astherophorum Mart. Its structure was determined using a combination of homo- (1D {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR-HBBD and {sup 13}C NMRDEPT) and heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-COSY, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-NOESY, HSQC, HMBC), and HREIMS. The unambiguous assignments of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR data of derivatives 3-N,6-Odiacetyl- isojuripidine and 3-N-cinnamoyl-isojuripidine are described. (author)

  8. Synthesis of {sup 14}C-labeled levamisole and {sup 13}C-labeled tetramisole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feil, V.J. [US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Biosciences Research Lab., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The syntheses of {sup 14}C-ring labeled levamisole ([-]-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenyl [{sup 14}C]-UL imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole) from acetophenone-ring-UL-{sup 14}C in 5 steps plus resolution with a 7.5% overall yield, and {sup 13}C{sub 6}-ring labeled tetramisole ([{+-}]-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenyl [{sup 13}C{sub 6}]imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole) from benzene-{sup 13}C{sub 6} in 6 steps with a 9.0% overall yield are described. (author).

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear da D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzil penicilina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1995-12-31

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using {sup 13} C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Identification of Zinc-ligated Cysteine Residues Based on {sup 13}C{alpha} and {sup 13}C{beta} Chemical Shift Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Snyder, David; Moseley, Hunter N. B.; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Rutgers University, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (United States)], E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu

    2006-04-15

    Although a significant number of proteins include bound metals as part of their structure, the identification of amino acid residues coordinated to non-paramagnetic metals by NMR remains a challenge. Metal ligands can stabilize the native structure and/or play critical catalytic roles in the underlying biochemistry. An atom's chemical shift is exquisitely sensitive to its electronic environment. Chemical shift data can provide valuable insights into structural features, including metal ligation. In this study, we demonstrate that overlapped {sup 13}C{beta} chemical shift distributions of Zn-ligated and non-metal-ligated cysteine residues are largely resolved by the inclusion of the corresponding {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift information, together with secondary structural information. We demonstrate this with a bivariate distribution plot, and statistically with a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Using 287 {sup 13}C{alpha}/{sup 13}C{beta} shift pairs from 79 proteins with known three-dimensional structures, including 86 {sup 13}C{alpha} and{sup 13}C{beta} shifts for 43 Zn-ligated cysteine residues, along with corresponding oxidation state and secondary structure information, we have built a logistic regression model that distinguishes between oxidized cystines, reduced (non-metal ligated) cysteines, and Zn-ligated cysteines. Classifying cysteines/cystines with a statisical model incorporating all three phenomena resulted in a predictor of Zn ligation with a recall, precision and F-measure of 83.7%, and an accuracy of 95.1%. This model was applied in the analysis of Bacillus subtilis IscU, a protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. The model predicts that all three cysteines of IscU are metal ligands. We confirmed these results by (i) examining the effect of metal chelation on the NMR spectrum of IscU, and (ii) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. To gain further insight into

  11. Increased resolution of aromatic cross peaks using alternate {sup 13}C labeling and TROSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbradt, Alexander G. [AstraZeneca Discovery Sciences, Structure and Biophysics UK (United Kingdom); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biomedicinal Information Research Center and Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Hagn, Franz; Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-07-15

    For typical globular proteins, contacts involving aromatic side chains would constitute the largest number of distance constraints that could be used to define the structure of proteins and protein complexes based on NOE contacts. However, the {sup 1}H NMR signals of aromatic side chains are often heavily overlapped, which hampers extensive use of aromatic NOE cross peaks. Some of this overlap can be overcome by recording {sup 13}C-dispersed NOESY spectra. However, the resolution in the carbon dimension is rather low due to the narrow dispersion of the carbon signals, large one-bond carbon–carbon (C–C) couplings, and line broadening due to chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). Although it has been noted that the CSA of aromatic carbons could be used in TROSY experiments for enhancing resolution, this has not been used much in practice because of complications arising from large aromatic one-bond C–C couplings, and 3D or 4D carbon dispersed NOESY are typically recorded at low resolution hampering straightforward peak assignments. Here we show that the aromatic TROSY effect can optimally be used when employing alternate {sup 13}C labeling using 2-{sup 13}C glycerol, 2-{sup 13}C pyruvate, or 3-{sup 13}C pyruvate as the carbon source. With the elimination of the strong one-bond C–C coupling, the TROSY effect can easily be exploited. We show that {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C TROSY spectra of alternately {sup 13}C labeled samples can be recorded at high resolution, and we employ 3D NOESY aromatic-TROSY spectra to obtain valuable intramolecular and intermolecular cross peaks on a protein complex.

  12. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by {sup 13}C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hass, Mathias A. S. [Leiden University, Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Yilmaz, Ali [University of Copenhagen, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Denmark); Christensen, Hans E. M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)], E-mail: led@kiku.dk

    2009-08-15

    The use of {sup 13}C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically {sup 13}C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from {sup 15}N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed.

  13. Structure of UC{sub 2} and U{sub 2}C{sub 3}:XRD, {sup 13}C NMR and EXAFS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvajal Nuñez, U. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eloirdi, R., E-mail: rachel.eloirdi@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Prieur, D.; Martel, L. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); López Honorato, E. [Centro de Investigatión y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalúrgica 1062, Ramos Arizpe, Coahuila 25900 (Mexico); Farnan, I. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN (United Kingdom); Vitova, T. [Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), P.O. Box 3640, D- 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A structural investigation of UC{sub 2} and U{sub 2}C{sub 3} phases was made with XRD, NMR and EXAFS. • Heat treatment of a pulverised UC{sub 2} ingot, repressed into a pellet yields a U{sub 2}C{sub 3} phase coexisting with UC{sub 2−z}. • Heat treatment of UC{sub 2} as cast ingots results in a partial decomposition to UC. • EXAFS data confirmed the CaC{sub 2} and Pu{sub 2}C{sub 3} type structure for UC{sub 2} and U{sub 2}C{sub 3} respectively. • {sup 13}C MAS NMR identified a contribution of a well and less ordered phases in UC{sub 2}. -- Abstract: In this study, uranium dicarbide (UC{sub 2}) has been prepared by arc melting and heat treated under vacuum to form uranium sequicarbide (U{sub 2}C{sub 3}) in the presence of a second phase UC{sub 2−z}. Both samples, as cast and heat treated, have been characterised by chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 13}C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The composition, the purity, the various environments of both U and C atoms as well as the bonds length with the coordination number have been determined. By combining a long-range order method (XRD) and short-range order spectroscopy techniques (EXAFS and NMR), a unique view on the microstructure of UC{sub 2}, before and after heat treatment, and of U{sub 2}C{sub 3} phase has been achieved.

  14. Stereochemical investigation of selegiline HCl with /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podanyi, B. (CHINOIN Gyogyszer- es Vegyeszeti Termekek Gyara, Budapest (Hungary))

    1982-12-01

    Selegiline HCl, the bioactive substance of the antiparkinsonic medicine, JUMEX was investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The dominant conformer was determined. Optically active shift-reagent was used for the determination of optical purity. The /sup 13/C spectrum was analyzed, and molecular dynamics was investigated at different temperatures.

  15. Phenyl galactopyranosides – {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR and conformational analysis using genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wałejko, Piotr, E-mail: pwalejko@uwb.edu.pl [University of Bialystok, Institute of Chemistry, Pilsudskiego 11/4, 15-443 Bialystok (Poland); Paradowska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.paradowska@wum.edu.pl [Medical University of Warsaw, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Physical Chemistry, Banacha 1, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Bukowicki, Jarosław [Medical University of Warsaw, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Physical Chemistry, Banacha 1, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Witkowski, Stanisław [University of Bialystok, Institute of Chemistry, Pilsudskiego 11/4, 15-443 Bialystok (Poland); Wawer, Iwona [Medical University of Warsaw, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Physical Chemistry, Banacha 1, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-08-18

    Highlights: • The structures of phenyl galactosides were studied by {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR. • The GAAGS method was used in conformational analysis of phenyl galactosides. • The rotation of the aglycone was investigated. • {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR supported by GIAO DFT calculations was used as a verification method. - Abstract: Structural analyses of four compounds (phenyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (1), phenyl β-D-galactopyranoside (2), phenyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (3) and phenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4)) have been performed using solid-state {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Conformational analysis involved grid search and genetic algorithm (GAAGS). Low-energy conformers found by GAAGS were further optimized by DFT and chemical shifts were calculated using GIAO/DFT approach. {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR chemical shift of carbon C2 is indicative of the glycoside torsional angle. Separated or merged resonances of C2 and C6 suggest free rotation of phenyl ring in the solid phase.

  16. Multilinear relations between {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts of aliphatic halides; Relacoes lineares multiplas entre deslocamentos quimicos em RMN {sup 13} C de haletos alifaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyama, Julio Toshimi [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Quimica e Bioquimica; Tornero, Maria Teresinha Trovarelli [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Bioestatistica; Yoshida, Massayoshi [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica

    1999-07-01

    The {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts of the {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} and {delta} carbons of 17 sets of aliphatic halides (F, Cl, Br and I), including mono, bi and tricyclic compounds, can be reproduced by a linear equation composed with two constants and two variables: {delta}{sub RX} = A{sup *} {delta}{sub R-X2}, where A and B are constants derived from multilinear regression of {sup 13} C chemical shifts observed; {delta}{sub R-X}, the chemical shifts of aliphatic halide (R-X); and {delta}{sub R-X1}, {delta}{sub R-X2} the chemical shifts of other halides. It was observed a better correlation for aliphatic bromides (R-X) by using data of aliphatic fluorides (R-X 1) and aliphatic iodides (R-X 2), resulting R{sup 2} of 0.9989 and average absolute deviation (AVG) of 0.39 ppm. For the chlorides (R-X), the better correlation was observed by using data of bromides (R-X 1) was observed better correlation with data of bromides (R-X 1) and iodides (R-X 2), R{sup 2} of 0.997 and AVG of 1.10 ppm. For the iodides (R-X) was observed better correlation with data of fluorides (R-X 1) and bromides (R-X 2), R{sup 2} of 0.9972 and AVG of 0.60 ppm. (author)

  17. Stereoselective synthesis of stable isotope labeled L-[alpha]-amino acids: synthesis of L-[4-[sup 13]C] and L-[3,4,-[sup 13]C[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodwig, S.N. (Centralia College, WA (United States). Science Div.); Unkefer, C.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-02-01

    We have developed a stereoselective route to isotopically labeled L-aspartic acid using L-serine as a chiral precursor. Labeled serine, prepared biosynthetically was N-protected by conversion to the N-t-Boc derivative. (N-t-Boc)-[3-[sup 13]C]Serine is cyclized to its [beta]-lactone which was treated with potassium [[sup 13]C]cyanide to yield L-[beta]-[3,4-[sup 13]C[sub 2

  18. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Tamim A., E-mail: tamim.darwish@ansto.gov.au [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J. [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); James, Michael [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual {sup 1}H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D{sub 2}O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary {sup 13}C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing {sup 13}C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve {sup 13}C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H) resolves closely separated quaternary {sup 13}C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. - Graphical abstract: The relative intensities of quaternary {sup 13}C {"1H,"2H} resonances are equal despite the different relaxation delays, allowing the relative abundance of the different deuterated isotopologues to be calculated using NMR fast

  19. Proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy, E-mail: ramamoor@umich.edu [Biophysics and Department of Chemistry, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1055 (United States); Nishiyama, Yusuke [JEOL RESONANCE Inc., Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); RIKEN CLST-JEOL Collaboration Center, RIKEN, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivities, and proximities of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H and 2D {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H proximity and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between {sup 13}C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H{sub 2}O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  20. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  1. sup 13 C and sup 31 P NMR studies of myocardial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The fluxes through two enzyme systems have been measured in perfused or in in vivo heart using NMR: phosphocreatine kinase, and glycogen synthase and phosphorylase. The rates of synthesis and degradation of glycogen were monitored in vivo in fed, fasted, and diabetic rat heart during infusions of {sup 13}C-1-glucose and insulin using proton-decoupled {sup 13}C-NMR at 1.9 and 4.7 tesla. The enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase were also measured in this tissue which had been freeze clamped at the end of the experiment, for comparison with the synthetic rates. For normal fed, fasted, and diabetic animals, synthesis rates were 0.28, 0.16, and 0.15 {mu}mol/min.gww respectively. Glycogen synthase i activity was 0.23, 0.14, and 0.14 {mu}mol/min.gww in these hearts at the end of the experiment, when measured at appropriate substrate and activator concentrations, and follow activation time courses that are consistent with being the main rate determinant for net synthesis in all cases. Turnover of glycogen was studied by observing the preformed {sup 13}C-1-glycogen signal during infusion of {sup 12}C-glucose and insulin, and was found to be close to zero. Extracted phosphorylase a activity was approximately ten times that of synthase i under these circumstances. In order to fully interpret the turnover studies, glycogenolysis of preformed {sup 13}C-glycogen was observed after a bolus of glucagon. The glycogen had either been synthesized from {sup 13}C-1-glucose for a single hour, or during an hour of {sup 13}C-glucose and a subsequent hour of {sup 12}C-glucose infusion. The author observed that breakdown follows an exponential time course related to the phosphorylase a activation state and that the last synthesized glycogen breaks down at the rate of 2.5 {mu}mol/min.gww, five times faster than that synthesized an hour earlier.

  2. Synthesis of (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)olivetolic acid, methyl (1'-/sup 13/C)olivetolate and (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)cannabigerolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porwoll, J.P.; Leete, E. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1985-03-01

    Potential advanced intermediates in the biosynthesis of delta/sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive principle of marijuana, have been synthesized labeled with two contiguous /sup 13/C atoms and /sup 14/C. Methyl (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)olivetolate was prepared from lithium (/sup 13/C/sub 2/)acetylide and dimethyl (2-/sup 14/C)malonate. Reaction with geranyl bromide afforded methyl (5,6-/sup 13/C/sub 2/, 1-/sup 14/C)cannabigerolate, and hydrolysis of these methyl esters with lithium propyl mercaptide yielded the corresponding labeled acids. The /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C couplings observable in the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of these /sup 13/C-enriched compounds and their synthetic precursors are recorded. Methyl (1'-/sup 14/C)olivetolate was prepared from /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ to confirm assignments of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts in the pentyl side chain of these compounds.

  3. Stable carbon isotope analysis ({delta}{sup 13}C values) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their UV-transformation products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfelder, Natalie; Bendig, Paul [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry (170b), Garbenstr. 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Vetter, Walter, E-mail: walter.vetter@uni-hohenheim.de [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry (170b), Garbenstr. 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are frequently detected in food and environmental samples. We used compound specific isotope analysis to determine the {delta}{sup 13}C values of individual PBDEs in two technical mixtures. Within the same technical product (DE-71 or DE-79), BDE congeners were the more depleted in {sup 13}C the higher brominated they were. In contrast, the products of light-induced hydrodebromination of BDE 47 and technical DE-79 were more enriched in {sup 13}C because of more stable bonds between {sup 13}C and bromine. As a result, the {delta}{sup 13}C values of the irradiated solution progressed diametrically compared to those of the technical synthesis. The ratio of the {delta}{sup 13}C values of BDE 47 to BDE 99 and of BDE 99 to BDE 153 are thus suggested as indicators to distinguish native technical products from transformation products. Ratios <1 are typical for native congeners (e.g. in DE-71) while the reversed ratio (>1) is typical of transformation products. - Highlights: > {delta}{sup 13}C values of PBDEs were determined by means of compound specific isotope analysis. > PBDEs in technical mixtures were the more depleted in {sup 13}C the higher they were brominated. > Solutions of individual PBDEs and technical PBDE mixtures were irradiated by UV light. > {delta}{sup 13}C values of irradiated PBDEs and technical PBDEs progressed diametrically. > Ratios of the {delta}{sup 13}C values were used to distinguish native from transformed PBDEs. - Diametrically progressing {delta}{sup 13}C values in technical mixtures and UV-transformation products of DE-79 may be useful for source appointment of PBDEs in environmental samples

  4. Analysis of hydrocarbon chain conformation using double quantum coherence /sup 13/C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillippi, M.A. (Clorox Technical Center, Pleasanton, CA); Wiersema, R.J.; Brainard, J.R.; London, R.E.

    1982-12-15

    The recent development of a double quantum coherence method for the observation of /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar coupling constants without the need for isotopic labeling provides an alternative approach to the hydrocarbon chain conformation problem. The method is particularly suitable for this application since one-, two-, and three-bond carbon-carbon coupling constant values in hydrocarbons are typically of significantly different magnitudes, and observation of coupling constants of selected magnitude may be enhanced by the appropriate choice of pulse intervals. Consequently, J/sub CC/ values, which are dependent on the subtended dihedral angle, can be selectively observed. In order to evaluate the potential of this approach, studies on a 90% octanol-10% benzene-d/sub 6/ solution, with the latter serving for the deuterium lock were carried out. A representative /sup 13/C double quantum coherence spectrum of the region containing the octanol C-7 resonances with pulse intervals chosen to optimize couplings with magnitude close to 4.0 Hz is illustrated.

  5. {sup 17}O NQR and {sup 13}C NMR study of hydrogen-bonded organic ferroelectric croconic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, Janez [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST Centre of Excellence, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Plavec, Janez [EN-FIST Centre of Excellence, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Slovenian NMR Center, National Institute of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sket, Primoz [EN-FIST Centre of Excellence, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Slovenian NMR Center, National Institute of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zagar, Veselko; Blinc, Robert [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-09-15

    The {sup 1}H-{sup 17}O nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectrum and the {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of polycrystalline croconic acid, H{sub 2}C{sub 5}O{sub 5}, have been studied at room temperature. Croconic acid has been recently shown to have the highest switchable spontaneous polarization of all organic ferroelectrics and stays polarized up to the decomposition point at around 450 K. Both the {sup 13}C NMR and the {sup 17}O nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra show that there are five crystallographically non-equivalent carbon and oxygen positions for a given molecule and that therefore the two O-H..O bonds are non-equivalent. From the dipolar structure of the {sup 17}O quadrupole resonance spectra the O-H distance is determined as being 0.099 {+-} 0.001 nm in both hydrogen bonds. The large {sup 17}O quadrupole coupling constant at the C-O-H as well as at the C=O..H oxygen position and the short O-H distance demonstrate that the O-H..O hydrogen bonds are strongly asymmetric. A correlation of the {sup 17}O-H..O and O-H..{sup 17}O quadrupole coupling constants versus the O..O distance has been observed in several organic acids. The data for croconic acid significantly deviate from this correlation, what may be the result of the strong long range ferroelectric ordering which influences the electron distribution in the hydrogen bonds. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Synthesis of the [beta]-D-glucosyl ester of [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakas, A.; Magnus, V. (Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Horvat, S.; Sandberg, G. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-10-01

    An efficient, operationally simple synthetic approach to 1-O-([carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3'-ylacetyl)-[beta]-D-glucopyranose is described. The synthesis was carried out by fusing a fully benzylated 1-O-glucosylpseudourea intermediate with [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid, followed by hydrogenolytic removal of the protective groups. (Author).

  7. Proton mixing in He-rich layers: the sup 13 C(. alpha. , n) sup 16 O neutron source and associated nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorissen, A.; Arnould, M. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (BE). Inst. d' Astronomie, d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique)

    1989-08-01

    Several evolutionary calculations have revealed the key importance of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O neutron source for heavy element synthesis in various stellar environments, ranging from the outer layers of a core C-burning Population III star to the last thermal pulse of intermediate- or low-mass stars. Since the operation of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O neutron source is largely dependent upon various parameters (temperature, density, initial {sup 12}C/p, {sup 12}C/{sup 4}He, {sup 12}C/{sup 16}O and {sup 18}O/{sup 22}Ne abundance ratios, proton ingestion timescale), a parametrized study using a network extending from {sup 12}C to {sup 28}Si is presented. Four different regimes are identified in the nucleosynthesis process accompanying the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O neutron source. They are characterized by different relative values of the lifetimes of the ingested protons against capture by {sup 12}C, of {sup 13}N against {beta}-decay, and of {sup 13}C against {alpha}-captures. Each regime leads to a more or less efficient heavy element synthesis, as well as to a specific abundance pattern of light nuclei. Simple analytical approximations are provided for three of these regimes, allowing an easy prediction of the number of neutrons captured by heavy seed nucleus in a given stellar environment, as well as the associated {sup 14}N yield. The impact of the uncertainties of various key nuclear reaction rates is also examined. Comparison between CNO abundances resulting from the nucleosynthesis associated with the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O neutron source and those observed in Ba II stars (assuming that {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O was the neutron source in these stars) allows to isolate cases leading to predictions discrepant with observations (e.g. {sup 14}N final more abundant than {sup 12}C).

  8. Measurement of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acids from TROSY intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying Jinfa [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Wang Jinbu [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Structural Biophysics Laboratory (United States); Grishaev, Alex [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Yu Ping; Wang Yunxing [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Structural Biophysics Laboratory (United States); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Analogous to the recently introduced ARTSY method for measurement of one-bond {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in large perdeuterated proteins, we introduce methods for measurement of base {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H RDCs in protonated nucleic acids. Measurements are based on quantitative analysis of intensities in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H TROSY-HSQC spectra, and are illustrated for a 71-nucleotide adenine riboswitch. Results compare favorably with those of conventional frequency-based measurements in terms of completeness and convenience of use. The ARTSY method derives the size of the coupling from the ratio of intensities observed in two TROSY-HSQC spectra recorded with different dephasing delays, thereby minimizing potential resonance overlap problems. Precision of the RDC measurements is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio, S/N, achievable in the 2D TROSY-HSQC reference spectrum, and is approximately given by 30/(S/N) Hz for {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H and 65/(S/N) Hz for {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H. The signal-to-noise ratio of both {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C spectra greatly benefits when water magnetization during the experiments is not perturbed, such that rapid magnetization transfer from bulk water to the nucleic acid, mediated by rapid amino and hydroxyl hydrogen exchange coupled with {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H NOE transfer, allows for fast repetition of the experiment. RDCs in the mutated helix 1 of the riboswitch are compatible with nucleotide-specifically modeled, idealized A-form geometry and a static orientation relative to the helix 2/3 pair, which differs by ca 6 Degree-Sign relative to the X-ray structure of the native riboswitch.

  9. Conformational study of C8 diazocine turn mimics using {sup 3}J{sub CH} coupling constants with {sup 13}C in natural abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, J.W.; Briand, J.; Burgess, J.L.; Callahan, J.F. [SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The conformations of two diazocine turn mimics, which were later incorporated into GPIIb/IIIa peptide antagonists, were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The two compounds, methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosylguanidino-propyl)-4-methyl-octahydro-1,4-dazocin-1-yl)acetate (1) and methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosyl-guanidino-propyl)-octahydro-1,5-diazocin-1-yl)acetate (2), differ only in their substituent at the diazocine position 4 nitrogen, yet this substitution results in a marked difference in the affinity of the resulting analogs for the GPIIb/IIIa receptor. It was of interest to determine if the difference observed in the antagonistic potency between these analogs was related to constitutional or, perhaps, conformational differences. The backbone conformations of these two molecules can be determined by measuring vicinal coupling constants along the trimethylene portion of the C8 ring backbone and by measuring interproton NOE intensities between the diazocine methine proton and the protons of the trimethylene group. For compound 1, {sup 3}J{sub HH} values measured from a P.E.COSY spectrum and interproton distances calculated from ROESY buildup curves indicated the presence of a single C8 ring backbone conformation where the trimethylene bridge adopted a staggered conformation and the H{alpha}1 and H{gamma}1 protons of the trimethylene group were 2.2 A from the methine proton. For compound 2, however, partial overlap of the central H{beta}1 and H{beta}2 protons made it impossible to measure {sup 3}J{sub HH} values from the P.E.COSY spectrum. We therefore used a {sup 13}C-filtered TOCSY experiment to measure the {sup 3}J{sub CH} values in both compounds 1 and 2. These heteronuclear vicinal coupling constants measured with {sup 13}C in natural abundance in conjunction with measured interproton NOE intensities indicate that these compounds share a common C8 ring backbone conformation.

  10. Conformational dependence of {sup 13}C shielding and coupling constants for methionine methyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfoss, Glenn L. [New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (United States); DeRose, Eugene F.; Gabel, Scott A.; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Joseph M.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Zheng Xunhai; London, Robert E., E-mail: London@niehs.nih.go [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH, Laboratory of Structural Biology (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Methionine residues fulfill a broad range of roles in protein function related to conformational plasticity, ligand binding, and sensing/mediating the effects of oxidative stress. A high degree of internal mobility, intrinsic detection sensitivity of the methyl group, and low copy number have made methionine labeling a popular approach for NMR investigation of selectively labeled protein macromolecules. However, selective labeling approaches are subject to more limited information content. In order to optimize the information available from such studies, we have performed DFT calculations on model systems to evaluate the conformational dependence of {sup 3}J{sub CSCC}, {sup 3}J{sub CSCH}, and the isotropic shielding, {sigma}{sub iso}. Results have been compared with experimental data reported in the literature, as well as data obtained on [methyl-{sup 13}C]methionine and on model compounds. These studies indicate that relative to oxygen, the presence of the sulfur atom in the coupling pathway results in a significantly smaller coupling constant, {sup 3}J{sub CSCC}/{sup 3}J{sub COCC} {approx} 0.7. It is further demonstrated that the {sup 3}J{sub CSCH} coupling constant depends primarily on the subtended CSCH dihedral angle, and secondarily on the CSCC dihedral angle. Comparison of theoretical shielding calculations with the experimental shift range of the methyl group for methionine residues in proteins supports the conclusion that the intra-residue conformationally-dependent shift perturbation is the dominant determinant of {delta}{sup 13}C{epsilon}. Analysis of calmodulin data based on these calculations indicates that several residues adopt non-standard rotamers characterized by very large {approx}100{sup o} {chi}{sup 3} values. The utility of the {delta}{sup 13}C{epsilon} as a basis for estimating the gauche/trans ratio for {chi}{sup 3} is evaluated, and physical and technical factors that limit the accuracy of both the NMR and crystallographic analyses are

  11. Galactose oxidation using {sup 13}C in healthy and galactosemic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende-Campanholi, D.R. [Departamento de Puericultura e Pediatria, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Porta, G. [Unidade de Hepatologia Pediátrica, Instituto da Criança Prof. Pedro de Alcântara, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferrioli, E.; Pfrimer, K. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ciampo, L.A. Del; Junior, J.S. Camelo [Departamento de Puericultura e Pediatria, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-20

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-{sup 13}C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate {sup 13}CO{sub 2} enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-{sup 13}C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 12}CO{sub 2} were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of {sup 13}C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies.

  12. {sup 13}C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameda, Tsunenori [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8634 (Japan)

    2005-12-21

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H solid-state NMR. Two strong {sup 13}C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH{sub 2})] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of {sup 13}C spin-lattice relaxation [T{sub 1}(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation [T{sub 1}(H)] values for protons of the CH{sub 3} group and for int-(CH{sub 2}) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T{sub 1}(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T{sub 1{sub {rho}}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH{sub 3} group and for int-(CH{sub 2}) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T{sub 1{sub {rho}}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short {sup 1}H spin-spin relaxation [T{sub 2}(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 deg. C.

  13. Measuring {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible excited states in proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik [Linkoeping University, Molecular Biotechnology/IFM (Sweden); Lin Hong [Hospital for Sick Children, Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-07-15

    A labeling scheme is introduced that facilitates the measurement of accurate {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states of proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy. The approach makes use of protein over-expression in a strain of E. coli in which the TCA cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase is knocked out, leading to the production of samples with high levels of {sup 13}C enrichment (30-40%) at C{sup {beta}} side-chain carbon positions for 15 of the amino acids with little {sup 13}C label at positions one bond removed ({approx}5%). A pair of samples are produced using [1-{sup 13}C]-glucose/NaH{sup 12}CO{sub 3} or [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose as carbon sources with isolated and enriched (>30%) {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} positions for 11 and 4 residues, respectively. The efficacy of the labeling procedure is established by NMR spectroscopy. The utility of such samples for measurement of {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states in exchange with visible, ground conformations is confirmed by relaxation dispersion studies of a protein-ligand binding exchange reaction in which the extracted chemical shift differences from dispersion profiles compare favorably with those obtained directly from measurements on ligand free and fully bound protein samples.

  14. Turnover of carbon in the {sup 13}C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos, E-mail: vladimir@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: ducatti@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: mariana.andreazazi@gmail.com, E-mail: caiocury@hotmail.com, E-mail: juniorbassett@hotmail.com, E-mail: mariar@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of {sup 13}C-urea breath test ({sup 13}C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of {sup 13}C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the {sup 13}C in the {sup 13}C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C in expired CO{sub 2} from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to {sup 13}C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  15. /sup 13/C-trioctanoin: a nonradioactive breath test to detect fat malabsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, J.B. (Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Boston); Schoeller, D.A.; Klein, P.D.; Ott, D.G.; Newcomer, A.D.; Hofmann, A.F.

    1977-09-01

    Fat malabsorption may be accurately detected in adults by measuring the excretion of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in breath following oral administration of a tracer dose of /sup 14/C-labeled triglyceride. In order to detect fat malabsorption in children and in women of child-bearing age without radiation hazard, the use of trioctanoin labeled with the stable, nonradioactive isotope /sup 13/C has been inaugurated and validated for use in this breath test. The validation tests with both /sup 14/C- and /sup 13/C-trioctanoin were conducted in 14 adult patients with varying degrees of fat malabsorption and demonstrated that the labels were excreted at nearly identical rates (r = 0.97). After establishment of dose requirements and measurement of endogenous /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ production rates, nine children aged 3 months to 5 years were evaluated for fat malabsorption. The results obtained with the /sup 13/C-trioctanoin breath test were compared to those obtained by a quantitative 72 hr fat balance study. The cumulative excretion of /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ by 2 hr was 25 +- 2.5% (ave. +- S.D.) of the dose in patients with normal fat absorption and provided a clear differentiation (p < 0.001) from the 3.5 +- 2.5% of the dose excreted by those with steatorrhea due to untreated pancreatic insufficiency resulting from cystic fibrosis. Peak /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ levels occurred at 1.5 hr in both groups with some overlap. Addition of exogenous pancreatic enzymes improved fat absorption and increased /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ excretion fourfold. The correlation between the percent of fat intake excreted and the cumulative /sup 13/CO/sub 2//mmol CO/sub 2/ excreted by 3 hr was very good (r = -0.88) in all patients. These data indicate that the /sup 13/C-trioctanoin breath test provides accurate detection of fat malabsorption in children with pancreatic insufficiency. This noninvasive technique is more convenient than 72 hr stool collection and permits safe and sensitive metabolic studies in children without

  16. Occurrence, biological activities and {sup 13}C NMR data of amides from Piper (Piperaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Jeferson C. do; Paula, Vanderlucia F. de [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Jequie, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e Exatas; David, Jorge M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; David, Juceni P., E-mail: jmdavid@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia

    2012-07-01

    This manuscript describes an update review with up to 285 references concerning the occurrence of amides from a variety of species of the genus Piper (Piperaceae). Besides addressing occurrence, this review also describes the biological activities attributed to extracts and pure compounds, a compiled {sup 13}C NMR data set, the main correlations between structural and NMR spectroscopic data of these compounds, and employment of hyphened techniques such as LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR for analysis of amides from biological samples and crude Piper extracts. (author)

  17. {sup 10}Be({alpha},n){sup 13}C angular distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, J.; Massey, T.N.; O`Donnell, J.E.; Saito, E.F.; Lane, R.O. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1993-10-01

    As a continuation of our investigation of the {sup 14}C system, {sup 10}Be targets have been bombarded with a pulsed beam of alpha particles from the Ohio University Tandem Accelerator. The {sup 10}Be target is in the form of {sup 10}BeO (92 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) deposited on a platinum foil. Neutron time-of-flight spectra were produced with the Beam Swinger facility and a 4.88 in flight path. Fifty-four neutron angular distributions for the {sup 10}Be({alpha},n{sub {circ}}){sup 13}C and {sup 10}Be({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 13}C reactions were obtained at angles 0{degrees} to 160{degrees} for 3.675 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 6.325 MeV. A zero-degree excitation function for alpha particles between 3.5 MeV and 8.5 MeV in 75 keV steps was also produced. A preliminary analysis of the ground state transition shows only a narrow peak of approximately 200 keV FWHM and a broad peak of approximately 1.0 MeV FWHM at E{sub {alpha}} = 4.0 MeV and E{sub {alpha}} = 5.6 MeV, respectively. Details and results of this investigation as well as preliminary R-Matrix calculations will be discussed.

  18. /sup 14/C isotope effects in /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C N. M. R. spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funke, C.W.; Kaspersen, F.M.; Sperling, E.M.G.; Wagenaars, G.N.

    1986-03-15

    Replacement of /sup 12/C by /sup 14/C induces small upfield shifts of the directly bonded /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C nuclei; these shift differences can be used to measure the extent of /sup 14/C labelling.

  19. Environmental relevance of correlations of {delta}{sup 13}C and climate in tree rings of young pines (Pinus silvestris L.); Umweltrelevanz von {delta}{sup 13}C-Klimakorrelationen an Jahrringen rezenter Kiefern (Pinus silvestris L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmann, A.G.

    1993-08-01

    From two groups of trees, 15 damaged ones and 15 healthy ones, tree slices were taken and in these the tree-ring widths, ratios of {delta}{sup 13}C isotopes in cellulose and trace element concentrations were determined. Healthy trees have wider tree-rings over their entire period of life from 1891 to 1986 than the group of trees of damage category 3 (severely damaged). The pattern of tree-ring width development, however, is similar. From eight synchronous {delta}{sup 13}C traces of non-damaged pines a normal chronology was derived. The ontogenesis of some damaged individuals does not correspond to this normal course. In this way the onset of damage can be reconstructed by means of the {delta}{sup 13}C values. A link between the {delta}{sup 13}C values curves and anthropogenously induced changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration could not be established. The yearly variations of the {delta}{sup 13}C values of the normal chronology are climate-sensitive. The established trace element concentrations of the wood samples are neither in the toxic nor in the deficiency range. Their magnitude is abour equal in all radial sections, independently of the damage category. (UWA) [Deutsch] Aus einem Probenkollektiv von 15 ungeschaedigten und 15 geschaedigten Kiefern wurden an repraesentativen Baumscheiben Jahrringbreiten, {delta}{sup 13}C-Isotopenverhaeltnisse der Zellulose, sowie Spurenelementkonzentrationen bestimmt. Die Jahrringe in der Gruppe der ungeschaedigten Individuen sind ueber den gesamten Lebenszeitraum von 1891 bis 1986 breiter als im Kollektiv der Baeume der Schadstufe 3 (stark geschaedigt). Die Entwicklung der Jahrringbreitenmuster verlaeuft jedoch parallel. Aus 8 synchron verlaufenden {delta}{sup 13}C-Kurven ungeschaeigter Kiefern wurde eine Normalchronologie entwickelt. Die Ontogenese einiger geschaedigter Individuen entspricht nicht diesem Normalgang. Hiermit kann der Beginn der aktuellen Schaedigung ueber die {delta}{sup 13}C-Werte rekonstruiert werden

  20. {sup 13}C NMR spectral data and molecular descriptors to predict the antioxidant activity of flavonoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Mariane Balerine; Muramatsu, Eric [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP). Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmauceuticas; Emereciano, Vicente de Paula [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Scotti, Marcus Tullius [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPA), Joao Pessoa, PA (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas e Educacao; Scotti, Luciana; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Silva, Marcelo Sobral da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPA), Joao Pessoa, PA (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica

    2011-04-15

    Tissue damage due to oxidative stress is directly linked to development of many, if not all, human morbidity factors and chronic diseases. In this context, the search for dietary natural occurring molecules with antioxidant activity, such as flavonoids, has become essential. In this study, we investigated a set of 41 flavonoids (23 flavones and 18 flavonols) analyzing their structures and biological antioxidant activity. The experimental data were submitted to a QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationships) study. NMR {sup 13}C data were used to perform a Kohonen self-organizing map study, analyzing the weight that each carbon has in the activity. Additionally, we performed MLR (multilinear regression) using GA (genetic algorithms) and molecular descriptors to analyze the role that specific carbons and substitutions play in the activity. (author)

  1. Synthesis and quality control of {sup 13}C-enriched urea for Helicobacter pylori (HP) diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant Ana Filho, Carlos R.; Tavares, Claudineia R.O.; Ferreira, Andre V.; Prestes, Cleber V.; Bendassolli, Jose A., E-mail: jab@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to synthesize the urea ({sup 13}CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}), with 99% {sup 13}C atoms, and to perform a quality analysis for the diagnosis (breath test) of Helicobacter pylori. Furthermore, the process was submitted to economic analysis. The reaction was performed in a stainless steel reactor, lined with polytetrafluoroethylene, under low pressure and temperature. The synthesis method was shown to be appropriate (2.35 g; 81.9% yield), evidenced by physico-chemical and microbiological results, according to Brazilian legislation. The production and diagnosis costs were competitive compared with national and international market values, rendering this a valuable tool in clinical medicine. (author)

  2. {sup 13}C-urea breath test analyzed with infrared isotope spectrometry for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori; {sup 13}C-urea-pusteproeve som dagnostisk metode ved Helicobacter pylori-infeksjon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, M.; Schoensby, H. [Aker Sykehus, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-10-01

    The authors have evaluated a {sup 13}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The {sup 13}C-test was analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry and compared with a {sup 14}C-urea breath test and the urease test in gastric mucosal biopsies. 46 patients were analyzed with breath tests, 23 patients were negative and 22 patients were positive with both methods. One patients was positive with {sup 14}C-method and negative with the {sup 13}C-urea breath test. 61 patients were analyzed with the {sup 13}C-urea breath test and the urease test. 30 patients were negative and 30 patients were positive with both methods, whereas one patient with a negative urease test had a positive breath test. {sup 13}C-urea breath test analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry is a fast, simple, non-radioactive, non-invasive, convenient and reliable method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Perdeuteration and methyl-selective {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-labeling by using a Kluyveromyces lactis expression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi [Japan Biological Informatics Consortium, Research and Development Department (Japan); Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biomedicinal Information Research Center (Japan); Takano, Toshiaki; Sugiki, Toshihiko [Japan Biological Informatics Consortium, Research and Development Department (Japan); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takahashi, Hideo, E-mail: hid@tsurumi.yokohama-cu.ac.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biomedicinal Information Research Center (Japan)

    2013-10-22

    The production of stable isotope-labeled proteins is critical in structural analyses of large molecular weight proteins using NMR. Although prokaryotic expression systems using Escherichia coli have been widely used for this purpose, yeast strains have also been useful for the expression of functional eukaryotic proteins. Recently, we reported a cost-effective stable isotope-labeled protein expression using the hemiascomycete yeast Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis), which allow us to express exogenous proteins at costs comparable to prokaryotic expression systems. Here, we report the successful production of highly deuterated (>90 %) protein in the K. lactis system. We also examined the methyl-selective {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-labeling of Ile, Leu, and Val residues using commonly used amino acid precursors. The efficiency of {sup 1}H- {sup 13}C-incorporation varied significantly based on the amino acid. Although a high level of {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-incorporation was observed for the Ile δ1 position, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-labeling rates of Val and Leu methyl groups were limited due to the mitochondrial localization of enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and the lack of transporters for α-ketoisovalerate in the mitochondrial membrane. In line with this notion, the co-expression with branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase in the cytosol significantly improved the incorporation rates of amino acid precursors. Although it would be less cost-effective, addition of {sup 13}C-labeled valine can circumvent problems associated with precursors and achieve high level {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-labeling of Val and Leu. Taken together, the K. lactis system would be a good alternative for expressing large eukaryotic proteins that need deuteration and/or the methyl-selective {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-labeling for the sensitive detection of NMR resonances.

  4. Photoinduced ESR signals from the primary electron donors in deuterated highly /sup 13/C enriched photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Norris, J.R.; Crespi, H.L.; Harper, J.

    1981-12-16

    In purple photosynthetic bacteria such as Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides the oxidized primary donar P865/sup +/ exhibits a single Gaussian ESR signal posessing a line width that is narrowed by 1/%2 relative to that of monomeric BChl a/sup +/ in vitro. Data show that P700/sup +/ from the green plant photosystem I donor is a single oxidized Chl a type macrocycle. New data confirm that P865/sup +/ is a dimer of a BChl a type macrocycle. A method that accounts for the entire spin is needed in order to count the number of spins per macrocycle. The solution to this problem is to make each carbon atom of the ..pi.. system over which the electron is distributed magnetic resonance active. This requires that each position in the ..pi.. framework be highly enriched in /sup 13/C. Under these conditions the total ESR line width is the sum of the hyperfine lines due to each carbon atom of the ..pi.. system. Data indicate that the spin in P700/sup +/ is located on only one Chl a type macrocycle whereas that of P865/sup +/ is shared between two BChl a type macrocycles. (MWF)

  5. Effects of side-chain orientation on the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of antiparallel {beta}-sheet model peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Myriam E.; Vila, Jorge A. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas y Naturales, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, CONICET (Argentina); Scheraga, Harold A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)], E-mail: has5@cornell.edu

    2007-02-15

    The dependence of the {sup 13}C chemical shift on side-chain orientation was investigated at the density functional level for a two-strand antiparallel {beta}-sheet model peptide represented by the amino acid sequence Ac-(Ala){sub 3}-X-(Ala){sub 12}-NH{sub 2} where X represents any of the 17 naturally occurring amino acids, i.e., not including alanine, glycine and proline. The dihedral angles adopted for the backbone were taken from, and fixed at, observed experimental values of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet. We carried out a cluster analysis of the ensembles of conformations generated by considering the side-chain dihedral angles for each residue X as variables, and use them to compute the {sup 13}C chemical shifts at the density functional theory level. It is shown that the adoption of the locally-dense basis set approach for the quantum chemical calculations enabled us to reduce the length of the chemical-shift calculations while maintaining good accuracy of the results. For the 17 naturally occurring amino acids in an antiparallel {beta}-sheet, there is (i) good agreement between computed and observed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively; (ii) significant variability of the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts as a function of {chi}{sup 1} for all amino acid residues except Ser; and (iii) a smaller, although significant, dependence of the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts on {chi}{sup {xi}} (with {xi} {>=} 2) compared to {chi}{sup 1} for eleven out of seventeen residues. Our results suggest that predicted {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, based only on backbone ({phi},{psi}) dihedral angles from high-resolution X-ray structure data or from NMR-derived models, may differ significantly from those observed in solution if the dihedral-angle preferences for the side chains are not taken into

  6. {sup 2}H NMR and {sup 13}C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, {sup 18}O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: International collaborative study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Freddy [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, BP42301, 44323 Nantes (France); Jamin, Eric, E-mail: ericjamin@eurofins.com [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, BP42301, 44323 Nantes (France)

    2009-09-01

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring {delta}{sup 13}C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per mille , and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per mille . As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring {delta}{sup 18}O were found to be similar

  7. Relaxation-optimised Hartmann-Hahn transfer using a specifically Tailored MOCCA-XY16 mixing sequence for carbonyl-carbonyl correlation spectroscopy in {sup 13}C direct detection NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felli, Isabella C.; Pierattelli, Roberta [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Glaser, Steffen J.; Luy, Burkhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Chemistry (Germany)], E-mail: Burkhard.Luy@ch.tum.de

    2009-03-15

    Isotropic mixing sequences are one of the key methods to achieve efficient coherence transfer. Among them, the MOCCA-XY16, which keeps the magnetization longitudinal for a significant amount of time, is characterised by favourable relaxation properties. We show here that its adapted version is particularly suited for carbonyl-carbonyl correlations in {sup 13}C direct detection NMR experiments.

  8. Comparison of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-determined parameters of mobility in melittin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Lingyang [University Indianapolis, Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue (United States); Prendergast, Franklyn G. [Mayo Foundation, Department of Pharmacology (United States); Kemple, Marvin D. [University Indianapolis, Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue (United States)

    1998-07-15

    Backbone and tryptophan side-chain mobilities in the 26-residue, cytolytic peptide melittin (MLT) were investigated by {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C NMR. Specifically, inverse-detected {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and steady-state NOE measurements were made at 30 and 51 MHz on MLT at 22 deg. C enriched with {sup 15}N at six amide positions and in the Trp{sup 19} side chain. Both the disordered MLT monomer (1.2 mM peptide at pH 3.6 in neat water) and {alpha}-helical MLT tetramer (4.0 mM peptide at pH 5.2 in 150 mM phosphate buffer) were examined. The relaxation data were analyzed in terms of the Lipari and Szabo model-free formalism with three parameters: {tau}{sub m}, the correlation time for the overall rotation; S{sup 2}, a site-specific order parameter which is a measure of the amplitude of the internal motion; and {tau}{sub e}, a local, effective correlation time of the internal motion. A comparison was made of motional parameters from the {sup 15}N measurements and from {sup 13}C measurements on MLT, the latter having been made here and previously [Kemple et al. (1997) Biochemistry, 36, 1678-1688]. {tau}{sub m} and {tau}{sub e} values were consistent from data on the two nuclei. In the MLT monomer, S{sup 2} values for the backbone N-H and C{alpha}-H vectors in the same residue were similar in value but in the tetramer the N-H order parameters were about 0.2 units larger than the C{alpha}-H order parameters. The Trp side-chain N-H and C-H order parameters, and {tau}{sub e} values were generally similar in both the monomer and tetramer. Implications of these results regarding the dynamics of MLT are examined.

  9. Analyzing power measurements for the (. pi. sup + ,. pi. sup 0 ) reaction on a polarized sup 13 C target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goergen, J.J.

    1991-05-01

    The analyzing powers A{sub y} differential cross sections d{sigma}/d{Omega} for the reaction {sup 13}C({pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup 0}){sup 13}N have been measured for forward scattering angles at an incident pion kinetic energy of T{sub pi}{sup +} = 163 MeV by using a transversely polarized target. Analyzing powers and reaction cross sections impose stringent constrains on nuclear reaction models and can be used to test the present understanding of nuclear structure for 1p-shell nuclei. The resulting A{sub y} are compared to the predictions of first-order Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) calculations, which reproduce well the differential cross sections. Although there is qualitative agreement at forward angles, the quantitative agreement is poor, especially at scattering angles larger than 50{degrees}. Since the DWIA calculations do not appear to be strongly sensitive to the assumed nuclear structure model, the discrepancy in describing the analyzing powers suggests that the reaction mechanism may not yet be well understood and higher order corrections may be important. Also measured were the analyzing powers for the elementary charge exchange reaction {pi}{sup {minus}} {bar p} {yields} {pi}{degrees}n over the same angular range and at an incident pion kinetic energy of T{sub pi}{minus} = 161 MeV. The results are compared to the most recents phase shift predictions. Within the experimental uncertainties, phase shift calculations agree with the measured A{sub y} and no changes in the {pi}N phase shifts near the P{sub 33} resonance are needed to describe the data.

  10. Late pleistocene-recent atmospheric [delta][sup 13]C record in C[sub 4] grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toolin, L.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analysis); Eastoe, C. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-01-01

    Samples of Setaria species from packrat middens, herbarium specimens and modern plants preserve a record of [delta][sup 13]C of atmospheric CO[sub 2] from 12,600 Bp to the present. No secular trend is detected between 12,600 and 1,800 Bp, when the mean value of [delta][sup 13]C during that period was [minus]6.5 [plus minus] 0.1[per thousand] (the error is the standard deviation of the mean). The value agrees with [delta][sup 13]C averages of pre-industrial CO[sub 2] from polar ice cores, and differs significantly from modern regional ([minus]8.2 [plus minus] 0.1[per thousand]) and global ([minus]7.7[per thousand]) values, which are higher because of fossil fuel burning.

  11. GFT projection NMR for efficient {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C sugar spin system identification in nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, Hanudatta S. [Indian Institute of Science, NMR Research Centre (India); Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj [State University of New York at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry (United States); Jaipuria, Garima [Indian Institute of Science, NMR Research Centre (India); Beaumont, Victor [State University of New York at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry (United States); Varani, Gabriele [University of Washington, Department of Chemistry (United States); Szyperski, Thomas, E-mail: szypersk@buffalo.edu [State University of New York at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A newly implemented G-matrix Fourier transform (GFT) (4,3)D HC(C)CH experiment is presented in conjunction with (4,3)D HCCH to efficiently identify {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C sugar spin systems in {sup 13}C labeled nucleic acids. This experiment enables rapid collection of highly resolved relay 4D HC(C)CH spectral information, that is, shift correlations of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H groups separated by two carbon bonds. For RNA, (4,3)D HC(C)CH takes advantage of the comparably favorable 1 Prime - and 3 Prime -CH signal dispersion for complete spin system identification including 5 Prime -CH. The (4,3)D HC(C)CH/HCCH based strategy is exemplified for the 30-nucleotide 3 Prime -untranslated region of the pre-mRNA of human U1A protein.

  12. The synthesis of Org 3770 labelled with sup 3 H, sup 13 C and sup 14 C. [Antidepressant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspersen, F.M.; Rooij, F.A.M. van; Sperling, E.G.M.; Wieringa, J.H. (Organon International BV, Oss (Netherlands))

    1989-09-01

    The syntheses of 1,2,3,4,10,14b-hexahydro-2-methylpyrazino(2,1-a)pyrido(2,3-c)(2)benazepine (Org 3770) labelled with {sup 3}H (and {sup 2}H), {sup 13}C and {sup 14}C are described. Tritiated Org 3770 was prepared either by exchange under alkaline conditions with tritiated water or catalytic reductive dehalogenation of a chloro analogue with {sup 3}H{sub 2}. {sup 13}C-labelled material was obtained in a seven-step synthesis starting from {sup 13}C-labelled benzene whereas {sup 14}C-Org 3770 was prepared in a three-step synthesis starting with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. All labelled compounds were analyzed by TLC, HPLC, MS and NMR. (author).

  13. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in {sup 13}C with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Renato; Carbonari, Artur W.; Terremoto, Luis A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: rsemmler@ipen.br; carbonar@ipen.br; laaterre@ipen.br; Goncalez, Odair L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados]. E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br

    2007-07-01

    Photoneutrons cross sections measurements of {sup 13}C have been obtained in energy interval between 5,3 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 - 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (2MW) research reactor. The sample have been irradiated inside a 4p geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm{sup 3}, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A methodology for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, have been used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma lines energies of the capture targets). The cross sections were compared with experimental data, reported by other authors, using different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed between in this work and reported in the literature. (author)

  14. Mapping protein-protein interaction by {sup 13}C'-detected heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Ivano, E-mail: ivanobertini@cerm.unifi.it; Felli, Isabella C. [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Gonnelli, Leonardo [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Pierattelli, Roberta [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Spyranti, Zinovia; Spyroulias, Georgios A. [University of Patras, Department of Pharmacy (Greece)

    2006-10-15

    The copper-mediated protein-protein interaction between yeast Atx1 and Ccc2 has been examined by protonless heteronuclear NMR and compared with the already available {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC information. The observed chemical shift variations are analyzed with respect to the actual solution structure, available through intermolecular NOEs. The advantage of using the CON-IPAP spectrum with respect to the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC resides in the increased number of signals observed, including those of prolines. CBCACO-IPAP experiments allow us to focus on the interaction region and on side-chain carbonyls, while a newly designed CEN-IPAP experiment on side-chains of lysines. An attempt is made to rationalize the chemical shift variations on the basis of the structural data involving the interface between the proteins and the nearby regions. It is here proposed that protonless{sup 13}C direct-detection NMR is a useful complement to {sup 1}H based NMR spectroscopy for monitoring protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions.

  15. Level study of {sup 14}C via neutron scattering to the unbound levels of {sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, E.F.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this work is to measure the {sup 13}C differential neutron scattering cross section in order to provide a better understanding of the {sup 14}C level structure using R-Matrix analysis and shell model calculations. The experimental simulation code which was needed to extract cross sections from complex spectra is also presented. Using the beam-swinger and time-of-flight tunnel of the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory, neutron scattering cross sections to the bound and unbound levels of {sup 13}C were measured for 8.7 {<=} E{sub n} {<=} 11.2 MeV. The data were corrected for air scattering, sample attenuation, sample contaminants, multiple scattering, secondary neutrons, and elastic and inelastic scattering from the sample of the neutron source continuum and contaminants. These were the first measurements of neutron scattering to the unbound levels of {sup 13}C. With all of the {sup 13}C + n channel measured, an estimation of the {sup 13}C(n, {alpha}){sup 10}Be cross section was made. The experimental data were modeled using R-Matrix analysis. Using the beam-swinger with the time-of-flight tunnel and the experimental simulation code, measurements of very small deep inelastic neutron scattering cross sections can now be performed. The results of R-Matrix analyses of scattering to the unbound levels of {sup 13}C revealed a 2{sup {minus}} or 3{sup {minus}} level at an E{sub x} of approximately 9 MeV in {sup 14}C and a 3{sup +} or 4{sup +} level at an E{sub x} of approximately 19 MeV in {sup 14}C.

  16. Determination of {sup 19} F - {sup 13} C coupling constants and their use in mono fluoro benzaldehyde derivatives conformational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, Jose Daniel Figueroa [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1995-12-31

    The element fluorine is extremely important in medicinal chemistry. In order to research the possible molecular alterations introduced for the substitution of hydrogen for fluorine, the study of {sup 19} F-{sup 13} C coupling constants is necessary. In this work, ortho- and para-fluorine-substituted benzaldehydes and some other aromatic fluoro compounds were studied using {sup 1} H, {sup 13} C and {sup 19} F NMR. The long range C-F coupling constants were measured from the PND spectra and compared with the long range values of H-C coupling constants, so as to, at first, determine their importance in conformational analysis 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. {delta}{sup 13}C in Tibetan juniper trees - climate trends through the past 1600 years; {delta}{sup 13}C in tibetischen Wacholdern - Klimaentwicklung der letzten 1600 Jahre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, B.

    1998-09-01

    A {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-chronology of juniper tree cellulose from the upper treeline covering the last 1600 years was set up. The tree site is situated close to Qamdo in southeast Tibet at an altitude of 4350 m a.s.l. The southwest slope gets rain during the Indian summer monsoon. Ten trees have been sampled either by coring or by cutting of trunc-sections in pentad sampling interval. Three trees were analysed in two different radial directions. The very positive {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-data generally varying around -18,75 permille show the typical low fractionation of high mountain plants. Different interpretations are suggested for data before and after 1800 A.D. (orig.) [Deutsch] An Zellulose von Wacholdern der oberen Waldgrenze in Suedost-Tibet wurde eine 1600-jaehrige {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-Chronologie aufgestellt. Der Standort liegt in 4350 m ue.M. in der Naehe von Qamdo, ist nach Suedwest geneigt und erhaelt Niederschlaege in den Sommermonaten durch den Indischen-Suedwest-Monsun. Zehn Baeume wurden anhand von Kernen und Stammscheiben in Abschnitten von fuenf Jahren beprobt. An drei Baeumen konnten zwei Segmente desselben Baumes untersucht werden. Die im Mittel sehr positiven {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-Daten um -18,75 permille deuten auf eine fuer Hochgebirgspflanzen typische geringere Fraktionierung hin. Unterschiedliche Interpretationswege werden fuer die Daten vor und nach 1800 verfolgt. (orig.)

  18. Nondispersive isotope-selective infrared spectroscopy: A new analytical method for {sup 13}C-urea breath tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braden, B.; Schaefer, F.; Caspary, W.F.; Lembcke, B. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1996-05-01

    Currently, stable isotope techniques in breath tests using {sup 13}C-labeled substrates are limited to a few centers equipped with expensive and complex isotope spectrometry (IRMS). Although breath samples can be mailed to these centers, widespread application of {sup 13}C-breath tests would be more feasible with a cheaper and more practicable analysis system at hand. The authors therefore tested the newly developed nondispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer (NDIRS) with reference to IRMS in a clinical setting, comparing the results of both techniques in 538 consecutive {sup 13}C-urea breath tests performed for the detection of helicobacter pylori infection. With NDIRS five false-positive and three false-negative results were observed; that is, the sensitivity of NDIRS was 98.3%, and the specificity was 98.6%. When running this large number of breath tests in 3 days, the NDIRS proved to be a reliable, stable, and easy-to-operate analytical tool, which is well qualified for gastroenterologic application in the diagnostic routine. Both the price and the easy handling of NDIRS will facilitate the widespread use of the noninvasive stable isotope technique for {sup 13}C breath test. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Modified oligosaccharides. Pt. 1. Analysis of the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of some keto derivatives of disaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temeriusz, A.; Piekarska, B.; Radomski, J.; Stepinski, J. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Podstawowych Problemow Chemii)

    1980-01-01

    The /sup 13/C-NMR spectra of substituted disaccharides and their keto derivatives are analyzed and discussed. The peaks have been assigned by correlating the spectra of disaccharides with those of the constituent monosaccharides. Substituent effects caused by the formation of a new glycosyl bond are described.

  20. Routes And Rates Of Carbon Input In A Temperate Forest Demonstrated By A Large Scale {sup 13}C Tracer Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keel, S.G.; Koerner, Ch. [University of Basel (Switzerland); Siegwolf, R.T.W.

    2005-03-01

    The fate of recently assimilated carbon in mature deciduous trees, which are exposed to elevated and {sup 13}C depleted CO{sub 2}, was traced within the Swiss Canopy Crane (SCC) project. Our findings suggest that substantial amounts of carbon are allocated into short living pools. Therefore, increased carbon storage under rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} is unlikely. (author)

  1. Structural characteristics of marine sedimentary humic acids by CP/MAS sup(13)C NMR spectroscopy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Wahidullah, S.

    stream_size 34319 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Oceanol_Acta_21_543.pdf.txt stream_source_info Oceanol_Acta_21_543.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 OCEANOLOGICA ACTA... components of the: hydrolysate. 545 S. SARDESSAI, S. WAHlDULLAH 3.3 Nuclear magnetic resonance ~pe~t~Q~cQQy The cross-polarization technique with magic angle spin- ning (CP/MAS) was used to obtain 13C NMR spectra. Samples were thoroughly freeze...

  2. NMR studies of bent DNA using {sup 13}C-enriched samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, D.P.; Crothers, D.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Bending of the DNA double helix can be brought about by introducing runs of adenines (A-tracts) in phase with the helical repeat of the DNA. The requirements for bending of DNA by A-tracts are that the length of the A-tract be greater than 3 base pairs and that the A-tracts must be in phase with the helical repeat (every 10 or 11 bp). Other factors, such as the number of adenines in the run, flanking sequences, and whether the A-tracts are phased with respect to the 5{prime}A or the 3{prime}A, have effects upon the degree of bending as assayed by electrophoretic mobility on native polyacrylamide gels. There are a number of models for bending A-tract DNA. The junction-bending model postulates that the structure of A-tracts is similar to the fiber diffraction structure of poly A, in which there is a significant degree of base pair tilt with respect to the helix axis. In this model, bending occurs at the junction between the A-tract and the B-form helix to allow favorable stacking interactions to occur. The bend of the helix could arise as a result of some other perturbation of B-form DNA by A-tracts, such as propeller twist; bending also could be due to a combination of factors. Our goal is to find the structural features of A-tracts responsible for bending of the helix by performing NMR on oligonucleotides containing A-tracts to obtain higher resolution structural data. One of the problems encountered in NMR structure determination of nucleic acids and other macromolecules is the assignment of resonances to nuclei. This procedure can be greatly facilitated through the use of {sup 13}C-enriched nucleic acid samples. We are developing a technique for the enzymatic synthesis of labeled DNA for NMR. The technique we are developing is similar to RNA labeling techniques already in use. The technique involves growth of methylotrophic bacteria on {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH.

  3. Structure of /sup 13/C studied by pion scattering near the (3,3) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seestrom-Morris, S.J.

    1981-09-01

    Good resolution (..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup +/') and (..pi../sup -/,..pi../sup -/') data were obtained for many states in /sup 13/C using the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Differential cross sections were measured for angles between 20/sup 0/ and 105/sup 0/ at an incident pion energy of 162 MeV for the elastic scattering as well as for states at excitation energies of 3.09, 3.68, 3.85, 7.55, 8.86, 9.5, 11.82, 16.05, 17.92, 21.37, and 21.6 MeV. Excitation functions were measured at momentum transfers of q = 1.1 h fm /sup -1/ and q = 1.4 h fm/sup -1/, for energies between 100 and 300 MeV. A sigma(..pi../sup -/)/sigma(..pi../sup +/) ratio of 9:1 was observed for the first time, indicating a pure neutron particle-hole excitation of a high spin state (J/sup ..pi../ = 9/2/sup +/). Strikingly different energy dependences were found for ..delta..S = 0 and ..delta..S = 1 transitions. Data for all states were compared with the microscopic model calculations of Lee and Kurath. Very good agreement was found between experiment and theory for the strongly excited states and the 9/2/sup +/ state at 9.5 MeV, in sharp contrast to the disagreement for weak transitions. The excitation function data and comparisons with the microscopic model calculations were used to identify the states at 16.05, 17.92, 21.37, and 21.6 MeV as either 7/2/sup +/ or 9/2/sup +/ states. The elastic scattering data were analyzed with an optical modeland the results were found to be consistent with neutron and proton distributions having equal rms radii. The optical potentials generated were used in a collective model analysis of the 3/2/sup -/ (3.68 MeV) and 5/2/sup -/ (7.55 MeV) states. The reduced transition probabilities (B(E2)) derived from the proton parts of the transition strength are in agreement with those determined from electromagnetic measurements.

  4. High resolution {sup 13}C NMR spectra on oriented lipid bilayers: From quantifying the various sources of line broadening to performing 2D experiments with 0.2-0.3 ppm resolution in the carbon dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soubias, O.; Saurel, O.; Reat, V.; Milon, A. [Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale (France)], E-mail: alain.milon@ipbs.fr

    2002-09-15

    {sup 13}C NMR spectra routinely performed on oriented lipid bilayers display linewidth of 1-2 ppm, although T{sub 2} measurements indicate that 0.1-0.2 ppm could be obtained. We have prepared a DMPC - {sup 13}C{sub 4}-cholesterol (7/3) sample, and oriented the lipid bilayers between glass plates so that the bilayer normal makes an angle of 90 deg. (or of the magic angle) with B{sub 0}. We have measured T{sub 2}s, CSAs, and linewidths for the choline {sup 13}C-{gamma}-methyl, the cholesterol-C{sub 4} carbons and the lipid head group phosphorus, at both angles and 313 K. The magnetic field distribution within the sample was calculated using the surface current formalism. The line shapes were simulated as a function of B{sub 0} field inhomogeneities and sample mosaic spread. Both effects contribute to the experimental linewidth. Using three signals of different CSA, we have quantified both contributions and measured the mosaic spread accurately. Direct shimming on a sample signal is essential to obtain sharp resonances and {sup 13}C labelled choline methyl resonance of DMPC is a good candidate for this task. After optimisation of the important parameters (shimming on the choline resonance, mosaic spread of {+-} 0.30 deg.), {sup 13}C linewidth of 0.2-0.3 ppm have been obtained. This newly achieved resolution on bilayers oriented at 90 deg., has allowed to perform two 2D experiments, with a good sensitivity: 2D PELF (correlation of carbon chemical shifts and C-H dipolar couplings) and 2D D-resolved experiment (correlation of carbon chemical shifts and C-C dipolar couplings). A C-C dipolar coupling of 35 {+-} 2 Hz between the choline methyl carbons was determined.

  5. Evaluation of natural rubber from IAC series clones by solid state {sup 13}C NMR; Avaliacao da borracha natural de clones da serie IAC por {sup 13}C RMN no estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Maria A.; Moreno, Rogerio M.B.; Goncalves, Paulo S. [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Cafe e Plantas Tropicais. Programa Seringueira]. E-mails: paulog@iac.sp.gov.br; mariaalice@cnpdia.embrapa.br; Forato, Lucimara A.; Colnago, Luiz A.; Mattoso, Luiz H.C. [EMBRAPA Instrumentacao Agropecuaria, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: colnago@cnpdia.embrapa.br; forato@cnpdia.embrapa.br; rogerio@cnpdia.embrapa.br; mattoso@cnpdia.embrapa.br; Job, Aldo E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia

    2005-07-01

    Agronomic Institute (IAC) and EMBRAPA Agricultural Instrumentation (EMBRAPA/CNPDIA) have been studied Hevea species in order to increase the production of the natural rubber and to develop new clones more appropriated to Brazil's soil and climate. Structural characterization of natural rubber [Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. ex Adr. de Juss.) Muell. - Arg.] from new clones of the IAC series (IAC 300, 301, 302, 303, 35, 40, and 56) and from RRIM 600 clone has been studied by high-resolution solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and by single pulse technique. The results have shown that the application of solid-state {sup 13}C NMR using the single pulse technique is a powerful tool to study natural rubber. The spectra obtained through this technique confirmed that natural rubber from all clones studied are cis-1,4-polyisoprene (author) form.(author)

  6. STELLAR ORIGINS OF EXTREMELY {sup 13}C- AND {sup 15}N-ENRICHED PRESOLAR SIC GRAINS: NOVAE OR SUPERNOVAE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O’D.; Wang, Jianhua [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Pignatari, Marco [E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); José, Jordi [Department de Fisica, EUETIB, Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain); Nguyen, Ann, E-mail: nliu@carnegiescience.edu [Robert M. Walker Laboratory for Space Science, Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Extreme excesses of {sup 13}C ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 10) and {sup 15}N ({sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < 20) in rare presolar SiC grains have been considered diagnostic of an origin in classical novae, though an origin in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has also been proposed. We report C, N, and Si isotope data for 14 submicron- to micron-sized {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-enriched presolar SiC grains ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 16 and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < ∼100) from Murchison, and their correlated Mg–Al, S, and Ca–Ti isotope data when available. These grains are enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N, but with quite diverse Si isotopic signatures. Four grains with {sup 29,30}Si excesses similar to those of type C SiC grains likely came from CCSNe, which experienced explosive H burning occurred during explosions. The independent coexistence of proton- and neutron-capture isotopic signatures in these grains strongly supports heterogeneous H ingestion into the He shell in pre-supernovae. Two of the seven putative nova grains with {sup 30}Si excesses and {sup 29}Si depletions show lower-than-solar {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S ratios that cannot be explained by classical nova nucleosynthetic models. We discuss these signatures within the CCSN scenario. For the remaining five putative nova grains, both nova and supernova origins are viable because explosive H burning in the two stellar sites could result in quite similar proton-capture isotopic signatures. Three of the grains are sub-type AB grains that are also {sup 13}C enriched, but have a range of higher {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N. We found that {sup 15}N-enriched AB grains (∼50 < {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N < ∼100) have distinctive isotopic signatures compared to putative nova grains, such as higher {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N, lower {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, and lack of {sup 30}Si excess, indicating weaker proton-capture nucleosynthetic environments.

  7. Early functional recovery for a graft after hepatic transplantation: interest of the aminopyrine-{sup 13}C breath test; Reprise precoce de fonction du greffon apres transplantation hepatique: interet du test respiratoire a l`aminopyrine-{sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mion, F.; Queneau, P.E.; Boillot, O.; Minaire, Y.; Delafosse, B. [Hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Rousseau, M. [Inbiomed, 69 - Lyon (France); Brazier, J.L. [LEACM, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1994-12-31

    {sup 13}C-aminopyrine breath tests were carried out on 8 patients, just after liver transplantation, in order to examine the recovery of the graft metabolic functions. Test results are compared to usual data from hepatic biology and histology. Quantitative measures on hepatic functional mass are obtained. The relative sensitivity of the test could allow for detection of moderate hepatic dysfunctions. 4 figs., 8 refs.

  8. Determination of the {delta}{sup 13}C (per mille) isotopic rate of the Brazilian beer pilsen type; Determinacao da razao isotopica {delta}{sup 13}C (per mille) de cerveja clara tipo pilsen nacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossete, Alexssandra L.R.M.; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Lopes, Fabio [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Ecologia Isotopica; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio [Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada

    2002-07-01

    Beer has been consumed in Brazil since the XIX century. However, at that time, this beverage was imported from England, and the first Brazilian breweries just appeared at the end of the XX century. Basically, beer is made from: malt of barley, Humulus lupulus, water and yeast. In this work, twenty brands of national beer (Pilsen type), and also two different cereals, barley, a C3 metabolism plant, corn, a C4 plant, were analysed to determine their isotope composition {delta}{sup 13} C (per mille) utilizing a mass spectrometer Delta Plus Finigam and Anca S.L. An aliquot of each sample was transferred using a capillary of glass to a tin capsule contends a small amount of sorbitol. The isotope compositions, {delta}{sup 13} C, of barley and corn samples determined were -27.2 and -11.5 per mille, respectively. These results were used to calculate the equation of mixture model. Considering the beer samples, the {delta}{sup 13} C ranged from -18.3 to -23.1 per mille; this result means that the percentage of C3 plant is from 43.3 to 73.9 per mille. In this manner, it is possible to concluded that all beer samples has malted cereals (C4 plant), as far as the low values of C3 plants were presented in these samples as shown through the equation of mixtures model. (author)

  9. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeMaster, D.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  10. Determination of the {sup 13}C contents of organic acids and sugars in fruit juices: an inter-comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillou, C. [JCR-ISPRA, Environment Institute, Food and Drug Analysis and Consumer Protection Unit, TP740, via Fermi 2, 21020 Ispra (Italy); Koziet, J. [Pernod Ricard, 120, av du Marechal Foch, 94015 Creteil cedex (France); Rossmann, A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Chemie und Biochemie, TUM, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Martin, G.J. [CEAIS, Site de la Geraudiere, Rue PA Bobierre, BP 72304, 44323 3 Nantes cedex (France)

    1999-05-03

    The determination of the repeatability (r) and reproducibility (R) of the ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) measurement in sugars and organic acids contained in different fruit juices was conducted on an international basis involving 17 laboratories. The mean values of rper thousand (Rper thousand) for acids and sugars are, respectively, equal to 0.58 (1.75) and 0.34 (0.71) and the relatively large values observed for R of acid determinations are related to the preparation step. However, the least significant difference computed for several pairs of natural and spiked juices indicate that the {sup 13}C method can be applied for detecting fruit juice adulteration. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  12. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Silva, Aline Nazare; Matos, Priscilla Mendonca; Silva, Eder Henrique da; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes [Universidade de Franca, Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, Joao Luis Callegari [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCFRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Sass, Daiane Cristina, E-mail: vheleno_05@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables (author)

  13. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 14}C labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, B.

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by {sup 13}C-and {sup 14}C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [{sup 13}C]acetate, it was shown that glial cells export {approx}60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [{sup 13}C]glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of {sup 13}CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs.

  14. Characterization of bile acid metabolism in man using bile acids labeled with stable isotopes. [/sup 13/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A.F. Klein, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    Bile acids labeled with stable isotopes in the steroid moiety can be used to characterize bile acid metabolism in man. Isotope dilution studies give information on pool size and input. Biotransformations are easily characterized. Stable isotopically labeled bile acids offer the advantage of freedom from radiation hazard, and also offer the possibility of monitoring all pools simultaneously, since all bile acids are separated by gas chromatography before isotope measurements are made. Further, since the proportion of the pool labeled with stable isotopes is greater than that achieved when radioactive isotopes are used, stable isotopes may permit isotope dilution studies to be done on serum samples in which the absolute concentration of bile acids is very low. A major disadvantage is the complex technology required for stable isotope measurement which often makes remote processing necessary. Bile acid labeled with /sup 13/C in the amino acid moiety, e.g. cholylglycine-1-/sup 13/C can be used for detection of increased bile acid deconjugation by intestinal bacteria, since the glycine-/sup 13/C, when liberated, is rapidly converted to /sup 13/CO/sub 2/, which is expired in breath. Bile acids labeled with stable isotopes may also be used for quantitation by inverse isotope dilution, but the technique is still in the development stage and seems unlikely to compete successfully with radioimmunoassay.

  15. High resolution 4D HPCH experiment for sequential assignment of {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs via phosphodiester backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland); Cevec, Mirko; Plavec, Janez [National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenian NMR Centre (Slovenia); Koźmiński, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    The three-dimensional structure determination of RNAs by NMR spectroscopy requires sequential resonance assignment, often hampered by assignment ambiguities and limited dispersion of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts, especially of C4′/H4′. Here we present a novel through-bond 4D HPCH NMR experiment involving phosphate backbone where C4′–H4′ correlations are resolved along the {sup 1}H3′–{sup 31}P spectral planes. The experiment provides high peak resolution and effectively removes ambiguities encountered during assignments. Enhanced peak dispersion is provided by the inclusion of additional {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H3′ dimensions and constant-time evolution of chemical shifts. High spectral resolution is obtained by using non-uniform sampling in three indirect dimensions. The experiment fully utilizes the isotopic {sup 13}C-labeling with evolution of C4′ carbons. Band selective {sup 13}C inversion pulses are used to achieve selectivity and prevent signal dephasing due to the C4′–C3′ and C4′–C5′ homonuclear couplings. Multiple quantum line narrowing is employed to minimize sensitivity loses. The 4D HPCH experiment is verified and successfully applied to a non-coding 34-nt RNA consisting typical structure elements and a 14-nt RNA hairpin capped by cUUCGg tetraloop.

  16. Biosynthesis of 24-methylsterols from (1,2-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) acetate; dihydrobrassicasterol and campesterol in tissue cultures of Physalis peruviana and ergosterol in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, S.; Uomori, A.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takeda, K. (Shionogi and Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Research Lab.)

    1984-09-01

    The /sup 13/C labelling patterns of the two methyl groups at C-25 of dihydrobrassicasterol biosynthesized from (1,2-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) acetate differ from those of campesterol and 24-methylenecholesterol obtained from cultured cells of Physalis peruviana and ergosterol from yeast.

  17. The {sup 13}C-pocket structure in AGB models: constraints from zirconium isotope abundances in single mainstream SiC grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, Torino I-10125 (Italy); Savina, Michael R., E-mail: lnsmile@uchicago.edu [Chicago Center for Cosmochemistry, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different {sup 13}C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar {sup 92}Zr/{sup 94}Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a {sup 13}C-pocket with a flat {sup 13}C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth {sup 13}C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat {sup 13}C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  18. Morphological study of chitin from Xiphopenaeus kroyeri exoskeletons by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and CPMAS {sup 13} C NMR; Estudo morfologico de quitina da exocuticula de Xiphopenaeus kroyeri por AFM e por CPMAS {sup 13} C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, K.M.; Tavares, M.I.; Andrade, C.T. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Simao, R.A. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    1999-07-01

    A sample of {alpha} chitin was isolated from exoskeletons of Xiphopenaeus kroyeri. This sample ws dissolved in phosphoric acid and recovered as a fibrous precipitate. Atomic force microscopy was used in noncontact mode to obtain images of the native chitin sample. Different morphological features were observed, including rigid rod crystals 200-300 nm wide. Solid state {sup 13} C NMR techniques were used to investigate chitin samples, and revealed molecular order in both samples. The differences observed in the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame, T{sup H1}{sub p} were attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds in preferential sites in the samples. (author)

  19. Correlation analysis of the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of some para-substituted benzaldehyde oximes and their anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkovskii, G.V.; Zmeikov, V.P.

    1987-06-20

    For the case of the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of a series of para-substituted benzaldehyde oximes and their anions it was shown that to describe the chemical shifts of all the carbon atoms of the benzene ring and the exocyclic CH group it is necessary to use three-parameter equations with the parameters F and R (which characterize the inductive and resonance effects respectively of the substituents), and Q (which corresponds to the paramagnetic interaction between the substituents and the carbon atoms).

  20. Metabolism and transport studies of exogenous compounds thanks to {sup 13}C uniform isotopic enrichment; Etude du metabolisme et du transport de composes exogenes grace a l'enrichissement isotopique uniforme au {sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravin, F.

    2008-12-15

    The study of many exogenous compounds does not raise difficulties when they are isolated, purified and in quantities sufficient for the usual detection methods used in biology (Chromatography, NMR, Mass Spectrometry, etc). When they are found in a biological fluid (blood, urines,..), they are often in infinitesimal amount such as the effect of their biological matrices or the background noise that make their detection and their quantification very delicate. The use of internal standards uniformly enriched with carbon 13 and/or nitrogen 15 makes it possible to obtain a signal more easily recognizable and identifiable thanks to the presence of the isotopes (peaks shifted in a mass spectrum for example). This is why, complementary to the analytical and biochemical studies of zearalenone (ZEN) metabolism, we were interested in building mass spectra of molecules enriched (rates between 0 and 1) by various isotopes ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H). In parallel we studied the influence of the {sup 13}C enrichment on the reactivity of a given molecule, from a theoretical and an experimental point of view. (author)

  1. A study of the carbon dynamics of Japanese grassland and forest using {sup 14}C and {sup 13}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuno, Kazumi, E-mail: katsuno@nenv.k.u-tokyo.ac.j [University of Tokyo, Department of Natural Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Miyairi, Yosuke [University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Tamura, Kenji [University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, 1-1-1 Tennnodai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Fukuda, Kenji [University of Tokyo, Department of Natural Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    We quantified the carbon contents of grassland and forest soil using conventional methods and studied the changes in their dynamics by measuring delta{sup 13}C and DELTA{sup 14}C. Soil samples were taken from a neighboring Miscanthus sinensis grassland and Pinus densiflora forest in central Japan. Both had been maintained as grassland until the 1960s, when the latter was abandoned and became a pine forest by natural succession. The soil carbon content of the forest was much lower than that of the grassland, implying that the soil carbon decreased as the grassland became forest. The delta{sup 13}C values were very similar in the grassland and forest, at approximately -20 per mille , suggesting that M. sinensis (a C4 plant) contributed to carbon storage, whereas there was little carbon accumulation from P. densiflora (a C3 plant) in forest soil. The DELTA{sup 14}C values and calculated soil carbon mean residence time (MRT) showed that the soil carbon in the upper A horizon was older, and that in the lower A horizon was younger in forest than in grassland. From these results, we conclude that young, fast-MRT soil carbon is decomposed in the upper A horizon, and old, stable soil carbon was decomposed in the lower A horizon after the pine invasion.

  2. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For {sup 2}H,{sup 15}N and {sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  3. Correlation between the synthetic origin of methamphetamine samples and their {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C stable isotope ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billault, Isabelle [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France)]. E-mail: Isabelle.Billault@univ-nantes.fr; Courant, Frederique [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Pasquereau, Leo [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Derrien, Solene [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Robins, Richard J. [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France); Naulet, Norbert [Laboratoire d' Analyse Isotopique et Electrochimique de Metabolismes, CNRS UMR6006, University of Nantes, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes (France)

    2007-06-12

    The active ingredient of ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methyldioxyphenylisopropylamine (MDMA) can be manufactured by a number of easy routes from simple precursors. We have synthesised 45 samples of MDMA following the five most common routes using N-precursors from 12 different origins and three different precursors for the aromatic moiety. The {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N contents of both the precursors and the MDMA samples derived therefrom were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). We show that within-pathway correlation between the {sup 15}N content of the precursor and that of the derived MDMA can be strong but that no general pattern of correlation can be defined. Rather, it is evident that the {delta} {sup 15}N values of MDMA are strongly influenced by a combination of the {delta} {sup 15}N values of the source of nitrogen used, the route by which the MDMA is synthesised, and the experimental conditions employed. Multivariate analysis (PCA) based on the {delta} {sup 15}N values of the synthetic MDMA and of the {delta} {sup 15}N and {delta} {sup 13}C values of the N-precursors leads to good discrimination between the majority of the reaction conditions tested.

  4. Conformational exchange of aromatic side chains characterized by L-optimized TROSY-selected {sup 13}C CPMG relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, Ulrich; Respondek, Michal; Akke, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.akke@bpc.lu.se [Center for Molecular Protein Science, Lund University, Department of Biophysical Chemistry (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Protein dynamics on the millisecond time scale commonly reflect conformational transitions between distinct functional states. NMR relaxation dispersion experiments have provided important insights into biologically relevant dynamics with site-specific resolution, primarily targeting the protein backbone and methyl-bearing side chains. Aromatic side chains represent attractive probes of protein dynamics because they are over-represented in protein binding interfaces, play critical roles in enzyme catalysis, and form an important part of the core. Here we introduce a method to characterize millisecond conformational exchange of aromatic side chains in selectively {sup 13}C labeled proteins by means of longitudinal- and transverse-relaxation optimized CPMG relaxation dispersion. By monitoring {sup 13}C relaxation in a spin-state selective manner, significant sensitivity enhancement can be achieved in terms of both signal intensity and the relative exchange contribution to transverse relaxation. Further signal enhancement results from optimizing the longitudinal relaxation recovery of the covalently attached {sup 1}H spins. We validated the L-TROSY-CPMG experiment by measuring fast folding-unfolding kinetics of the small protein CspB under native conditions. The determined unfolding rate matches perfectly with previous results from stopped-flow kinetics. The CPMG-derived chemical shift differences between the folded and unfolded states are in excellent agreement with those obtained by urea-dependent chemical shift analysis. The present method enables characterization of conformational exchange involving aromatic side chains and should serve as a valuable complement to methods developed for other types of protein side chains.

  5. Probing slowly exchanging protein systems via {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}-CEST: monitoring folding of the Im7 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Alexandar L.; Bouvignies, Guillaume; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    A {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical exchange saturation transfer based experiment is presented for the study of protein systems undergoing slow interconversion between an 'observable' ground state and one or more 'invisible' excited states. Here a labeling strategy whereby [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose is the sole carbon source is exploited, producing proteins with {sup 13}C at the C{sup {alpha}} position, while the majority of residues remain unlabeled at CO or C{sup {beta}}. The new experiment is demonstrated with an application to the folding reaction of the Im7 protein that involves an on-pathway excited state. The obtained excited state {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts are cross validated by comparison to values extracted from analysis of CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles, establishing the utility of the methodology.

  6. Atypical delta sup(13) C signature in Globigerina bulloides at the ODP site 723A (Arabian Sea): Implications of environmental changes caused by upwelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Niitsuma, N.

    for nearly 10% of shell carbon. Therefore, the combination the foraminifera of faster calcification and involvement of respired CO sub(2) would induce more negative delta sup(13) C in G. bulloides compared to other foraminifera. Apart from vital effects...

  7. Reconstruction of past variations of {delta}{sup 13}C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} from i vertical distribution observed in the firn at Dome Fuji, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, S. [Miyagi Univ. of Education, Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Earth Science; Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies; Hashida, G. [National Inst. of Polar Research (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    Temporal variations of {delta}{sup 13}C of atmospheric CO{sub 2} in the past have been reconstructed from the {delta}{sup 13}C values of CO{sub 2} observed in firn at Dome Fuji, Antarctica. The effective diffusivities of CO{sub 2} in firn were estimated for Dome Fuji and another Antarctic site, H72. The age distributions of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in firn were first calculated by using a one-dimensional diffusion model, and then the past values of the atmospheric {delta}{sup 13}C were derived by using an iterative procedure so that the calculated and observed vertical profiles of {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in firn agreed with each other. This reconstruction method was also applied to the CH{sub 4} concentration to confirm its validity. The values of the atmospheric {delta}{sup 13}C thus estimated were in good agreement with those from direct atmospheric measurements at Syowa Station, Antarctica, even for the levelling off of the secular decrease observed in the first half of the 1990s. The statistical uncertainty of the iterative procedure was examined by adding normal pseudo-random numbers to the observed {delta}{sup 13}C values in firn. We also calculated the {delta}{sup 13}C values for firn at H72 using the reconstructed history of the atmospheric {delta}{sup 13}C, and its vertical profile was found to be in close agreement with the observational result.

  8. Reconstruction of past variations of (delta){sup 13}C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} from i vertical distribution observed in the firn at Dome Fuji, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, S. [Miyagi Univ. of Education, Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Earth Science; Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies; Hashida, G. [National Inst. of Polar Research (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    Temporal variations of (delta){sup 13}C of atmospheric CO{sub 2} in the past have been reconstructed from the (delta){sup 13}C values of CO{sub 2} observed in firn at Dome Fuji, Antarctica. The effective diffusivities of CO{sub 2} in firn were estimated for Dome Fuji and another Antarctic site, H72. The age distributions of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in firn were first calculated by using a one-dimensional diffusion model, and then the past values of the atmospheric (delta){sup 13}C were derived by using an iterative procedure so that the calculated and observed vertical profiles of (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in firn agreed with each other. This reconstruction method was also applied to the CH{sub 4} concentration to confirm its validity. The values of the atmospheric (delta){sup 13}C thus estimated were in good agreement with those from direct atmospheric measurements at Syowa Station, Antarctica, even for the levelling off of the secular decrease observed in the first half of the 1990s. The statistical uncertainty of the iterative procedure was examined by adding normal pseudo-random numbers to the observed (delta){sup 13}C values in firn. We also calculated the (delta){sup 13}C values for firn at H72 using the reconstructed history of the atmospheric (delta){sup 13}C, and its vertical profile was found to be in close agreement with the observational result.

  9. Porcine cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase reconstituted with (4 prime - sup 13 C)pyridoxal phosphate. pH- and ligand-induced changes of the coenzyme observed by sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, Tsuyoshi (Kumamoto Univ. College of Medical Science (Japan) Kumamoto Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Tanase, Sumio; Nagashima, Fujio; Morino, Yoshimasa (Kumamoto Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Scott, A.I.; Williams, H.J.; Stolowich, N.J. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-03-05

    Apoenzyme samples of aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) purified from the cytosolic fraction of pig heart were reconstituted with (4{prime}-{sup 13}C)pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (pyridoxal-P). The {sup 13}C NMR spectra of AspAT samples thus generated established the chemical shift of 165.3 ppm for C4{prime} of the coenzyme bound as an internal aldimine with lysine 258 of the enzyme at pH 5. In the absence of ligands the chemical shift of C4{prime} was shown to be pH dependent, shifting 5 ppm upfield to a constant value of 160.2 ppm above pH 8, the resulting pK{sub a} of 6.3 in agreement with spectrophotometric titrations. The addition of the competitive inhibitor succinate to the internal aldimine raises the pK{sub a} of the imine to 7.8, consistent with the theory of charge neutralization in the active site. In the presence of saturating concentrations of 2-methylaspartic acid the C4{prime} signal of the coenzyme was shown to be invariant with pH and located at 162.7 ppm, midway between the observed chemical shifts of the protonated and unprotonated forms of the internal aldimine. Finally, the line widths of the C4{prime} resonance under the various conditions were measured and qualitatively compared. The results are discussed in terms of the current mechanism and molecular models of the active site of AspAT.

  10. Utilization of {sup 13}C-enriched substrates for the NMR study of the channelling of Krebs cycle intermediates in glioma C6; Utilisation de substrats enrichis en {sup 13}C pour l`etude par RMN de la canalisation des intermediaires du cycle de Krebs dans le gliome C6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle, M.; Peron, M.; Valeins, H.; Canioni, P. [Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (France)

    1994-12-31

    Unequal enrichments are observed for the C2 and C3 carbons of glutamate (C2>C3) and of aspartate (C3>C2) during incubation of C6 cells with (1-{sup 13} C) glucose. In order to study if this result is the result of an entry of {sup 13}C at the oxalo-acetate level or of another phenomenon, the enrichment distribution on asparte C1 and C4 carbons of C6 cells incubated with (1-{sup 13} C) glucose and the enrichment of C2 and C3 carbons of glutamate during cell incubation with (2-{sup 13} C) acetate, i.e. cases where the entry of {sup 13}C in the cycle, via the activity of the pyruvate carboxylase, is very unlikely, are examined. 4 figs., 1 tab., 1 ref.

  11. A magnetic tunnel to shelter hyperpolarized fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milani, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.milani@epfl.ch; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Miéville, Pascal; Mottier, Roger [Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Batochime, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jannin, Sami [Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Batochime, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bruker BioSpin AG, Industriestrasse 26, CH-8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Batochime, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Département de Chimie, École Normale Supérieure-PSL Research University, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7203 LBM, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-02-15

    To shield solutions carrying hyperpolarized nuclear magnetization from rapid relaxation during transfer through low fields, the transfer duct can be threaded through an array of permanent magnets. The advantages are illustrated for solutions containing hyperpolarized {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclei in a variety of molecules.

  12. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamone, Salvatore, E-mail: s.mamone@soton.ac.uk; Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H., E-mail: mhl@soton.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  13. Effects of elevated ozone on leaf {delta}{sup 13}C and leaf conductance of plant species grown in semi-natural grassland with or without irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeggi, M. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, CH-8046 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: maya.jaeggi@psi.ch; Saurer, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Volk, M. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, CH-8046 Zurich (Switzerland); Fuhrer, J. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, CH-8046 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C) and leaf conductance (g{sub s}) were measured (2002, 2003) in Holcus lanatus L., Plantago lanceolata L. Ranunculus friesianus (Jord.), and Trifolium pratense L. at two levels of ozone (O{sub 3}) with or without irrigation. In non-irrigated control plots, R. friesianus showed the least negative {delta}{sup 13}C, and the smallest response to the treatments. Irrigation caused more negative {delta}{sup 13}C, especially in H. lanatus. Irrespective of irrigation, O{sub 3} increased {delta}{sup 13}C in relationship to a decrease in g{sub s} in P. lanceolata and T. pratense. The strongest effect of O{sub 3} on {delta}{sup 13}C occurred in the absence of irrigation, suggesting that under field conditions lack of moisture in the top soil does not always lead to protection from O{sub 3} uptake. It is concluded that in species such as T. pratense plants can maintain stomatal O{sub 3} uptake during dry periods when roots can reach deeper soil layers where water is not limiting. - Under natural field conditions, lack of precipitation may not protect semi-natural vegetation from O{sub 3} effects on leaf gas exchange.

  14. A simple strategy for {sup 13}C,{sup 1}H labeling at the Ile-{gamma}2 methyl position in highly deuterated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschak, Amy M.; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.c [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    A straightforward approach for the production of highly deuterated proteins labeled with {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H at Ile-{gamma}2 methyl positions is described. The utility of the methodology is illustrated with an application involving the half proteasome (360 kDa). High quality 2D Ile {sup 13}C{sup {gamma}2},{sup 1}H{sup {gamma}2} HMQC data sets, exploiting the methyl-TROSY principle, are recorded with excellent sensitivity and resolution, that compare favorably with Ile {sup 13}C{sup {delta}1},{sup 1}H{sup {delta}1} spectra. This labeling scheme adds to a growing list of different approaches that are significantly impacting the utility of solution NMR spectroscopy in studies of supra-molecular systems.

  15. Positional enrichment by proton analysis (PEPA). A one-dimensional {sup 1}H-NMR approach for {sup 13}C stable isotope tracer studies in metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Yanes, Oscar [Department of Electronic Engineering-Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Reus (Spain); Rodriguez, Miguel A.; Capellades, Jordi [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Reus (Spain); Aivio, Suvi; Stracker, Travis H. [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (Spain); Gomez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau [Department of Electronic Engineering-, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of {sup 13}C-satellite peaks using 1D-{sup 1}H-NMR spectra. In comparison with {sup 13}C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of {sup 13}C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of {sup 1}H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  16. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR assignments and anti fungal activity of two 8-hydroxy flavonoids in mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johann, Susana; Smania Junior, Artur [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia e Parasitologia. Lab. de Antibioticos; Pizzolatti, Moacir G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Schripsema, Jan; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais. Lab. de Quimica e Funcao de Proteinas e Peptideos (LQFPP); Branco, Alexsandro [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Saude. Lab. de Fitoquimica]. E-mail: branco@uefs.br

    2007-06-15

    A mixture of the two new flavonols 8-hydroxy-3, 4', 5, 6, 7-pentamethoxyflavone (1) and 8-hydroxy-3, 3', 4', 5, 6, 7-hexamethoxyflavone (2) was isolated from a commercial sample of Citrus aurantifolia. An array of one- ({sup 1}H NMR, {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} {sup -13}C NMR, and APT{sup -13}C NMR) and two-dimensional NMR techniques (COSY, NOESY, HMQC and HMBC) was used to achieve the structural elucidation and the complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments of these natural compounds. In addition, the antifungal activity of these compounds against phytopathogenic and human pathogenic fungi was investigated. (author)

  17. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  18. {sup 13}C NMR detects conformational change in the 100-kD membrane transporter ClC-ec1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Cheng, Ricky C.; Chew, Thomas A.; Khantwal, Chandra M. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology (United States); Liu, Corey W. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (United States); Gong, Shimei; Nakamoto, Robert K. [University of Virginia, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics (United States); Maduke, Merritt, E-mail: maduke@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    CLC transporters catalyze the exchange of Cl{sup −} for H{sup +} across cellular membranes. To do so, they must couple Cl{sup −} and H{sup +} binding and unbinding to protein conformational change. However, the sole conformational changes distinguished crystallographically are small movements of a glutamate side chain that locally gates the ion-transport pathways. Therefore, our understanding of whether and how global protein dynamics contribute to the exchange mechanism has been severely limited. To overcome the limitations of crystallography, we used solution-state {sup 13}C-methyl NMR with labels on methionine, lysine, and engineered cysteine residues to investigate substrate (H{sup +}) dependent conformational change outside the restraints of crystallization. We show that methyl labels in several regions report H{sup +}-dependent spectral changes. We identify one of these regions as Helix R, a helix that extends from the center of the protein, where it forms the part of the inner gate to the Cl{sup −}-permeation pathway, to the extracellular solution. The H{sup +}-dependent spectral change does not occur when a label is positioned just beyond Helix R, on the unstructured C-terminus of the protein. Together, the results suggest that H{sup +} binding is mechanistically coupled to closing of the intracellular access-pathway for Cl{sup −}.

  19. Plant diversity moderates drought stress in grasslands: Implications from a large real-world study on {sup 13}C natural abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus, Valentin H., E-mail: v.klaus@uni-muenster.de [Münster University, Institute for Landscape Ecology, Heisenbergstr. 2, 48149 Münster (Germany); Hölzel, Norbert [Münster University, Institute for Landscape Ecology, Heisenbergstr. 2, 48149 Münster (Germany); Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara [University of Bern, Institute of Plant Sciences, Altenbergrain 21, 3013 Bern (Switzerland); Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Solly, Emily F. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry, Hans-Knöll-Str. 10, 07745 Jena (Germany); Hänsel, Falk [University Marburg, Environmental Informatics, Faculty of Geography, Deutschhausstr. 12, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Fischer, Markus [University of Bern, Institute of Plant Sciences, Altenbergrain 21, 3013 Bern (Switzerland); Kleinebecker, Till [Münster University, Institute for Landscape Ecology, Heisenbergstr. 2, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Land-use change and intensification play a key role in the current biodiversity crisis. The resulting species loss can have severe effects on ecosystem functions and services, thereby increasing ecosystem vulnerability to climate change. We explored whether land-use intensification (i.e. fertilization intensity), plant diversity and other potentially confounding environmental factors may be significantly related to water use (i.e. drought stress) of grassland plants. Drought stress was assessed using δ{sup 13}C abundances in aboveground plant biomass of 150 grassland plots across a gradient of land-use intensity. Under water shortage, plants are forced to increasingly take up the heavier {sup 13}C due to closing stomata leading to an enrichment of {sup 13}C in biomass. Plants were sampled at the community level and for single species, which belong to three different functional groups (one grass, one herb, two legumes). Results show that plant diversity was significantly related to the δ{sup 13}C signal in community, grass and legume biomass indicating that drought stress was lower under higher diversity, although this relation was not significant for the herb species under study. Fertilization, in turn, mostly increased drought stress as indicated by more positive δ{sup 13}C values. This effect was mostly indirect by decreasing plant diversity. In line with these results, we found similar patterns in the δ{sup 13}C signal of the organic matter in the topsoil, indicating a long history of these processes. Our study provided strong indication for a positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship with reduced drought stress at higher plant diversity. However, it also underlined a negative reinforcing situation: as land-use intensification decreases plant diversity in grasslands, this might subsequently increases drought sensitivity. Vice-versa, enhancing plant diversity in species-poor agricultural grasslands may moderate negative effects of future

  20. Other compounds isolated from Simira glaziovii and the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments of new 1-epi-castanopsol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Marcelo F. de; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas; Carvalho, Mario G. de, E-mail: mgeraldo@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPPN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Nucleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais

    2012-07-01

    A new triterpene, 1-epi-castanopsol, besides eleven known compounds: sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, lupeol, lupenone, simirane B, syringaresinol, scopoletin, isofraxidin, 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and harman, were isolated from the wood of Simira glaziovii. The structures of the known compounds were defined by 1D, 2D {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectra data analyses and comparison with literature data. The detailed spectral data analyses allowed the definition of the structure of the new 1-epi isomer of castanopsol and performance of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments. (author)

  1. Increase resolution of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of humic acids in solution by previous treatment with 0,03 mol L{sup -1} KCl; Aumento da resolucao de espectros de RMN {sup 13}C de acidos humicos em solucao atraves do tratamento previo com KCl 0,03 mol L{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Luciano Pasqualoto; Guridi, Fernando; Santos, Gabriel de A. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Rumjanek, Victor Marcos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica dos Produtos Naturais

    2001-02-01

    High levels of Fe and Mn present in some soils and compost organic matter decrease the resolution of {sup 13} C NMR spectra of humic substances. Addition of K Cl up to a concentration of 0,03 mol L{sub -}{sup 1} to humic substances extracts followed by centrifugation is an efficient method of eliminating clays and minerals containing high levels of paramagnetic metals such as Fe and Mn thus increasing the resolution of {sup 13} C NMR spectra. (author)

  2. {delta}{sup 13}C of Tree-Ring Lignin as an Indirect Measure of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, I. [CSIR Environmentek, Quaternary Dating Research Unit (South Africa)], E-mail: i.robertson@swansea.ac.uk; Loader, N. J.; McCarroll, D. [University of Wales Swansea, Department of Geography (United Kingdom); Carter, A. H. C. [University of Cambridge, Godwin Institute for Quaternary Research (United Kingdom); Cheng, L.; Leavitt, S. W. [University of Arizona, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (United States)

    2004-06-15

    High-resolution paleoclimatic data are an essential requirement for testing numerical models of climate change and the global carbon cycle. If the long tree-ring chronologies, originally established for the purpose of dendrochronology, are to be fully exploited as an indirect measure of past climatic variability, additional techniques are required to obtain this information. The determination of the {delta}{sup 13}C value of tree-ring cellulose has been used successfully to reconstruct past climates. However, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the polysaccharide components of vascular plants (mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses) are more prone to rapid degradation than lignin. This has serious implications for the use of carbon isotope values of tree-ring cellulose as an indirect measure of past climates. An absolutely dated ring-width chronology was established for oaks (Quercus robur L.) growing at Sandringham Park in eastern England. Carbon isotope values were determined on {alpha}-cellulose and 'Klason' lignin isolated from annual latewood samples over the period AD 1895-1999. The carbon isotope values of earlywood lignin are correlated with the latewood carbon isotope values of the previous year, supporting the theory that some of the carbon utilised in earlywood synthesis is assimilated in the previous year. The high-frequency variance in the carbon isotope indices of latewood lignin and cellulose is highly correlated with combined July and August environmental variables, indicating that they were formed at similar times. There was no evidence of secondary lignification. These results demonstrate that the determination of carbon isotope values of latewood lignin offers the potential to obtain unambiguous proxy climatic data covering several millennia.

  3. A 2D {sup 13}C-CEST experiment for studying slowly exchanging protein systems using methyl probes: an application to protein folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    A 2D {sup 13}C Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) experiment is presented for studying slowly exchanging protein systems using methyl groups as probes. The utility of the method is first established through studies of protein L, a small protein, for which chemical exchange on the millisecond time-scale is not observed. Subsequently the approach is applied to a folding exchange reaction of a G48M mutant Fyn SH3 domain, for which only cross-peaks derived from the folded ('ground') state are present in spectra. Fits of {sup 15}N and methyl {sup 13}C CEST profiles of the Fyn SH3 domain establish that the exchange reaction involves an interchange between folded and unfolded conformers, although elevated methyl {sup 13}C transverse relaxation rates for some of the residues of the unfolded ('invisible, excited') state indicate that it likely exchanges with a third conformation as well. In addition to the kinetics of the exchange reaction, methyl carbon chemical shifts of the excited state are also obtained from analysis of the {sup 13}C CEST data.

  4. The influence of fish cage culture on δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N of filter-feeding Bivalvia (Mollusca)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedito, E.; Takeda, A.M., E-mail: eva@nupelia.uem.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Limnologia, Ictiologia e Aquicultura; Figueroa, L. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia de Ambientes Aquaticos Continentais; Manetta, GI. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Biologia Comparada

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Oreochromis niloticus cage culture promoted variations in the δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N in Corbicula fluminea (Mollusca; Bivalvia) and in the sediment of an aquatic food web. Samples were taken before and after net cage installation in the Rosana Reservoir (Paranapanema River, PR-SP). Samples of specimens of the bivalve filter C. fluminea and samples of sediment were collected using a modified Petersen grab. All samples were dried in an oven (60 °C) for 72 hours, macerated to obtain homogenous fine powders and sent for carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) isotopic value analysis in a mass spectrometer. There were significant differences in the δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of the invertebrate C. fluminea between the beginning and the end of the experiment. There were no differences between the δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of sediment. These results indicate that the installation of fish cage culture promoted impacts in the isotopic composition of the aquatic food web organisms, which could exert influence over the native species and the ecosystem. (author)

  5. Study of ketone body kinetics in children by a combined perfusion of /sup 13/C and /sup 2/H3 tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougneres, P.F.; Ferre, P.

    1987-11-01

    Ketone body kinetics were quantified in six children (3-5 yr old), who were fasted for 13-22 h, by a combined perfusion of (3-/sup 13/C)acetoacetate ((/sup 13/C)AcAc) and D-(-)-beta-(4,4,4-/sup 2/H3)hydroxybutyrate (beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results were analyzed according to the single-pool (combined enrichments) or the two-accessible pools models. After 20-22 h of fasting, ketone body turnover rate was 30-50 mumol.kg-1.min-1, a rate achieved after several days of fasting in adults. At low ketosis, acetoacetate was the ketone body preferentially synthesized de novo and utilized irreversibly. When ketosis increased, acetoacetate irreversible disposal was not enhanced, since it was largely converted into beta-OHB, whereas beta-OHB irreversible disposal was very much increased. The single-pool and two-pool models gave similar ketone body turnover rates when (/sup 13/C)AcAc was the tracer, whereas the use of beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB gave some more divergent results, especially at low ketosis. These studies demonstrate that ketogenesis is very active in short-term fasted children and that the use of a combined infusion of (/sup 13/C)AcAc and beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB is a convenient way to give insight into individual ketone body kinetics.

  6. High-resolution solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy of pyrazole and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole adsorbed on alumina and silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Parrilla, F.; Limbach, H.H. [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain); Claramunt, R.M. [Instituto de Quimica Medica, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Using pyrazole and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole mixtures with alumina and silica, high-resolution solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N CPMAS NMR was performed to compare the spectra. The NH-N proton tautomers resulting depend strongly on the environment. 70 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. {sup 13}C structuring shifts for the analysis of model {beta}-hairpins and {beta}-sheets in proteins: diagnostic shifts appear only at the cross-strand H-bonded residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Irene; Scian, Michele; Stewart, James M.; Kier, Brandon L.; Andersen, Niels H., E-mail: andersen@chem.washington.edu [University of Washington, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The present studies have shown that {sup 13}C=O, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} of H-bonded strand residues in {beta}-hairpins provide additional probes for quantitating the extent of folding in {beta}-hairpins and other {beta}-sheet models. Large differences in the structuring shifts (CSDs) of these {sup 13}C sites in H-bonded versus non-H-bonded sites are observed: the differences between H-bonded and non-H-bonded sites are greater than 1.2 ppm for all three {sup 13}C probes. This prompts us to suggest that efforts to determine the extent of hairpin folding from {sup 13}C shifts should be based exclusively on the observation at the cross-strand H-bonded sites. Furthermore, the statistics suggest the {sup 13}C Prime and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}CSDs will provide the best differentiation with 100 %-folded CSD values approaching -2.6 and +3 ppm, respectively, for the H-bonded sites. These conclusions can be extended to edge-strands of protein {beta}-sheets. Our survey of reported {sup 13}C shifts in {beta}-proteins indicates that some of the currently employed random coil values need to be adjusted, particularly for ionization-induced effects.

  8. {sup 13}C-METHYL FORMATE: OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS INCLUDING ORION-KL AND SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, Cécile; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.; Neill, Justin L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Carvajal, Miguel [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, E-21071 Huelva (Spain); Field, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bisschop, Suzanne E. [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Brouillet, Nathalie; Despois, Didier; Baudry, Alain [Univ. Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270, Floirac (France); Kleiner, Isabelle [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), CNRS, UMR 7583, Université de Paris-Est et Paris Diderot, 61, Av. du Général de Gaulle, F-94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Margulès, Laurent; Huet, Thérèse R.; Demaison, Jean, E-mail: cfavre@umich.edu, E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille I, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2015-01-01

    We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic center for methyl formate, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and its isotopologues H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4-287.4 GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} toward the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr B2(N-LMH), NGC 6334 IRS 1, W51 e2, and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1 mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward the Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4 ± 10.1 and 71.4 ± 7.8, respectively) are, for both the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}, presented in this study, have made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time.

  9. Structure determination of uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Hajime [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Egawa, Ayako [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Kido, Kouki [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Kameda, Tomoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Demura, Makoto, E-mail: demura@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn{sup 2+} mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library.

  10. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labeled substrates simultaneously

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, Lars M. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Applied Microbiology - iAMB, Aachen Biology and Biotechnology - ABBt, Aachen (Germany); Desphande, Rahul R. [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Michigan State University, Department of Plant Biology, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schmid, Andreas [TU Dortmund University, Laboratory of Chemical Biotechnology, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, Dortmund (Germany); Hayen, Heiko [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V, Dortmund (Germany); University of Wuppertal, Department of Food Chemistry, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly {sup 13}C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously - i.e., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N - in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with {sup 13}C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both {sup 13}C-labeled glucose and {sup 15}N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. (orig.)

  11. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozar, O. [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucureşti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania); Filip, C.; Tripon, C. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M. [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucureşti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  12. Impact of carbohydrate supply on stem growth, wood and respired CO{sub 2} {delta}{sup 13}C : assessment by experimental girdling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunoury-Danger, F. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay Cedex (France). Laboratoire Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orsay CEDEX (France); AgroParisTech, Paris (France); Paul Verlaine-Metz Univ., Metz (France). Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes; Fresneau, C.; Eglin, T.; Berveiller, D.; Francois, C.; Damesin, C. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay Cedex (France). Laboratoire Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orsay CEDEX (France); AgroParisTech, Paris (France); Lelarge-Trouverie, C. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay Cedex (France). Inst. de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Plateforme Metabolisme-Metabolome

    2010-07-15

    In trees, carbohydrate storage and remobilization may affect the carbon isotope signals of sugars exported from leaves, tree organic matter and respired carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This study characterized the impact of a change in the carbon (C) source used for stem functioning on the {delta}{sup 13} C of stem organic matter and respired CO{sub 2}. Girdling experiments were carried out on 2-year old oaks that consisted in removing the bark and phloem around the stem so that the sap would cease to flow. The stem was therefore forced to use its own C reserves to maintain metabolic activity. Trees were girdled at 3 different periods, notably just after budburst, during stem growth, and just after cessation of stem radial growth. Stem radial growth and respiration rate were measured throughout the year. Other measured variables included {delta}{sup 13} C of respired CO{sub 2} and contents of starch and water-soluble fraction in stems and leaves. The study showed that girdling stopped growth, even early in the growing season, leading to a decrease in stem CO{sub 2} efflux. The study demonstrated that leaf carbohydrate supply versus reserve use could be an important factor controlling stem growth and {delta}{sup 13} C of both ring and stem CO{sub 2} efflux. 69 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  13. Application of {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N stable isotope probing to characterize RDX degrading microbial communities under different electron-accepting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States); Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Condee, Charles W. [CB& I Federal Services, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States); Chu, Kung-Hui, E-mail: kchu@civil.tamu.edu [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • SIP characterized RDX-degrading communities under different e-accepting conditions. • Dominant RDX degradation pathways differed under different e-accepting conditions. • More complete detoxification of RDX occurred under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions than under manganese(IV) and iron(III)-reducing conditions. - Abstract: This study identified microorganisms capable of using the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or its metabolites as carbon and/or nitrogen sources under different electron-accepting conditions using {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N stable isotope probing (SIP). Mesocosms were constructed using groundwater and aquifer solids from an RDX-contaminated aquifer. The mesocosms received succinate as a carbon source and one of four electron acceptors (nitrate, manganese(IV), iron(III), or sulfate) or no additional electron acceptor (to stimulate methanogenesis). When RDX degradation was observed, subsamples from each mesocosm were removed and amended with {sup 13}C{sub 3}- or ring-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-, nitro-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-, or fully-labeled {sup 15}N{sub 6}-RDX, followed by additional incubation and isolation of labeled nucleic acids. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA sequences, clustering in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, and Actinobacteria, were detected in the {sup 13}C-DNA fractions. A total of twenty seven sequences were derived from different {sup 15}N-DNA fractions, with the sequences clustered in α- and γ-Proteobacteria, and Clostridia. Interestingly, sequences identified as Desulfosporosinus sp. (in the Clostridia) were not only observed to incorporate the labeled {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N from labeled RDX, but also were detected under each of the different electron-accepting conditions. The data suggest that {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-SIP can be used to characterize microbial communities involved in RDX biodegradation, and that the dominant pathway of RDX biodegradation may differ under different

  14. Experimental study of radiative pion capture on /sup 13/C, /sup 20/Ne, /sup 90/Zr, /sup 19/F and /sup 12/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martoff, C.J.

    1980-11-01

    Photon spectra for 50 < E/sub ..gamma../ < 135 MeV have been measured from the radiative capture of stopped negative pions by the nuclides /sup 13/C, /sup 19/F, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 90/Zr. The e/sup +/e/sup -/ pair spectrometer system used has resolution 850 keV fwhm and photon detection efficiency 5 x 10/sup -6/. The total radiative capture branching ratios measured are /sup 13/C (1.66 +- 0.25)%, /sup 19/F (2.40 +- 0.48)%, /sup 20/Ne (1.60 +- 0.24)%, and /sup 90/Zr (2.1 +- 0.5)%. The partial radiative capture branching ratios to four bound states and two resonances in /sup 20/F, and two bound states and three resonances in /sup 13/B have also been measured. The branching ratio for /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B g.s. is (6.1 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -4/. Comparison of this result with the beta decay rate of /sup 13/B shows that (84 +- 16)% of the pion capture amplitude is accounted for by the Gamow-Teller matrix element. Further analysis suggests that much of the remaining strength is E2. The measured branching ratios to resonant states in /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B are shown to be in agreement with detailed shell model calculations. The total single-particle strength in these transitions is shown to be approximately half as large as that of the T = 3/2 part of the E1 photoresonance (the Giant Dipole Resonance) in /sup 13/C. The branching ratio for /sup 20/Ne(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 20/F (T = 1, J/sup ..pi../ = 1/sup +/, E/sub x/ = 1.06 MeV) is 0.91 +- 0.52).10/sup -4/. Comparison with the electroexcitation of the analog giant M1 state in /sup 20/Ne (11.24 MeV) shows that the M1 transition amplitude is less than (46 +- 14)% Gamow-Teller. This result is in agreement with detailed shell model calculations of the M1 transition. The photon spectrum for radiative pion capture from flight (reaction /sup 12/C(..pi../sup +/ T = 44 MeV, ..gamma.. at 90/sup 0/)) has been measured. 13 figures, 12 tables.

  15. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  16. Resonance analysis of the {sup 12}C,{sup 13}C({alpha},n) reactions and evaluation of neutron yield data of the reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Toru [AITEL Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The {sup 12}C({alpha},n){sup 15}O reaction and the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction were analyzed with a resonance formula in the incident {alpha}-particle energy range of 1.0 to 16.0 MeV. With the obtained resonance parameters, branching ratios of the emitted neutrons to the several levels of the residual nucleus and their angular distributions were calculated to obtain the energy spectrum of emitted neutrons. Thick target neutron yield of carbon were also calculated and compared with the experimental data. (author)

  17. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and {delta}{sup 13}C values across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current between New Zealand and Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enricomaria [Univ. of Parma, (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Giglio, Federico; Langone, Leonardo; Lenaz, Renzo; Ori, Carlo [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Inst. of Marine Sciences, Marine Geology Section

    2007-02-15

    Measurements of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations were repeatedly carried out on the vessel 'Italica' of the Italian National Research Program in Antarctica, during cruises from Italy to Antarctica. Discrete air samples were also collected in 4-L Pyrex flasks during these cruises in order to carry out {delta}{sup 13}C analyses on atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The results acquired between New Zealand and Antarctica are reported here. The mean growth rate of the CO{sub 2} concentration from 1996 to 2003 in this area of the Southern Oceans is of about 1.8 ppmv/yr, in good agreement with NOAA/CMDL measurements. The rates of increase from cruise to cruise are rather variable. From 1996-1997 to 1998-1999 cruise the yearly growth rate is 2.75 ppmv/yr, close to the large growth rates measured in several areas and mainly related to the most severe El Nino event of the last years. The other yearly growth rates are of about 1.3 and 2 ppmv for the periods 1998-1999 to 2001-2002 and 2001-2002 to 2003-2004, respectively. The large difference between these two values is probably related to the uncertainty on the only two 2001-2002 discrete measurements of CO{sub 2} concentration in this area. The measured {delta}{sup 13}C values show two completely different distributions and a large interannual variability. The 1998-1999, 2002-2003, and 2003-2004 results obtained between about 55 deg S and 65 deg S across the Antarctic Polar Front show a marked negativization of up to more than 0.2% when compared to the background values. The results are related to local source regions of CO{sub 2}, as frequently found in the Southern Ocean by several authors; the negative {delta}{sup 13}C values are tentatively related to the possible contribution of different causes. Among them, the southward negative gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C of the dissolved inorganic carbon, the contribution from upwelling deep waters and from subsurface processes between the Northern SubAntarctic Front and the

  18. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and (delta){sup 13}C values across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current between New Zealand and Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enricomaria [Univ. of Parma, (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Giglio, Federico; Langone, Leonardo; Lenaz, Renzo; Ori, Carlo [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Inst. of Marine Sciences, Marine Geology Section

    2007-02-15

    Measurements of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations were repeatedly carried out on the vessel 'Italica' of the Italian National Research Program in Antarctica, during cruises from Italy to Antarctica. Discrete air samples were also collected in 4-L Pyrex flasks during these cruises in order to carry out (delta){sup 13}C analyses on atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The results acquired between New Zealand and Antarctica are reported here. The mean growth rate of the CO{sub 2} concentration from 1996 to 2003 in this area of the Southern Oceans is of about 1.8 ppmv/yr, in good agreement with NOAA/CMDL measurements. The rates of increase from cruise to cruise are rather variable. From 1996-1997 to 1998-1999 cruise the yearly growth rate is 2.75 ppmv/yr, close to the large growth rates measured in several areas and mainly related to the most severe El Nino event of the last years. The other yearly growth rates are of about 1.3 and 2 ppmv for the periods 1998-1999 to 2001-2002 and 2001-2002 to 2003-2004, respectively. The large difference between these two values is probably related to the uncertainty on the only two 2001-2002 discrete measurements of CO{sub 2} concentration in this area. The measured (delta){sup 13}C values show two completely different distributions and a large interannual variability. The 1998-1999, 2002-2003, and 2003-2004 results obtained between about 55 deg S and 65 deg S across the Antarctic Polar Front show a marked negativization of up to more than 0.2% when compared to the background values. The results are related to local source regions of CO{sub 2}, as frequently found in the Southern Ocean by several authors; the negative (delta){sup 13}C values are tentatively related to the possible contribution of different causes. Among them, the southward negative gradient of (delta){sup 13}C of the dissolved inorganic carbon, the contribution from upwelling deep waters and from subsurface processes between the Northern SubAntarctic Front and the

  19. Seasonal variations of {sup 14}C and δ{sup 13}C for cave drip waters in Ryugashi Cave, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Masayo, E-mail: minami@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kato, Tomomi [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Horikawa, Keiji [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry, Toyama University, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshio [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-11-01

    Speleothem {sup 14}C has recently emerged as a potentially powerful proxy for hydrology changes in comparison with atmospheric {sup 14}C calibration curve, rather than as a direct dating tool, apart from a time marker using bomb peak of {sup 14}C. Some possible causes for the relationship between speleothem {sup 14}C content (or dead carbon fraction: DCF) and karst hydrology have been proposed, such as changes in temperature, precipitation, drip water flow dynamics, cave air ventilation, soil air pCO{sub 2}. In this study, we investigated seasonal variation in {sup 14}C and δ{sup 13}C of drip water in Ryugashi Cave, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan, to examine the causes of the {sup 14}C and δ{sup 13}C variations in a speleothem. The results show that different {sup 14}C concentrations and δ{sup 13}C values of drip water from the Ryugashi Cave, were exhibited at different sites of the Caves No. 1, No. 3, and No. 4, which have different temperature, air pCO{sub 2}, and flow paths. Further, the {sup 14}C and δ{sup 13}C of drip waters showed seasonal variations at all sites, which were lower in fall and winter, and higher in spring and summer, though the extent of the variations was different among the sites. The {sup 14}C in drip waters tended to be correlated with the drip rates: {sup 14}C tended to be higher in drip waters with higher drip rates, and also correlated with rainfall amount around the Ryugashi Cave, especially for the drip waters in Cave No. 3, which are considered to have simpler flow paths. The increase in rainfall amount could bring the increase in drip rate of drip water, and then the decrease in interaction between solution and karst, resulting in {sup 14}C increase (DCF decrease) in drip water. Accordingly, the reconstruction of precipitation could be performed using {sup 14}C variation in a speleothem formed by drip water with simple flow dynamics.

  20. More than a century of Grain for Green Program is expected to restore soil carbon stock on alpine grassland revealed by field {sup 13}C pulse labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Dongdong; Zhao, Liang [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Yang, Xue [Department of Education of Qinghai Province, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Xu, Shixiao [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Zhao, Xinquan, E-mail: xqzhao@nwipb.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Adaptation and Evolution of Plateau Biota, Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, Qinghai (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 10041, Sichuan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Anthropogenic changes in land use/cover have altered the vegetation, soil, and carbon (C) cycling on the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP) over the last ~ 50 years. As a result, the Grain for Green Program (GfGP) has been widely implemented over the last 10 years to mitigate the impacts of cultivation. To quantify the effects of the GfGP on C partitioning and turnover rates at the ecosystem scale, an in situ {sup 13}C pulse labeling experiment was conducted on natural and GfGP grasslands in an agro-pastoral ecotone in the Lake Qinghai region on the QTP. We found that there were significant differences in the C stocks of all the considered pools in both the natural and GfGP grasslands, with higher CO{sub 2} uptake rates in the GfGP grassland than that in the natural grassland. Partitioning of photoassimilate (% of recovered {sup 13}C) in C pools of both grasslands was similar 25 days after labeling, except in the roots of the 0–15 and 5–15 cm soil layer. Soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate in the GfGP grassland was 11.59 ± 1.89 g C m{sup −2} yr{sup −1} significantly greater than that in the natural grassland. The results confirmed that the GfGP is an efficient approach for grassland restoration and C sequestration. However, it will take more than a century (119.19 ± 20.26 yr) to restore the SOC stock from the current cropland baseline level to the approximate level of natural grassland. We suggest that additional measures are needed in the selection of suitable plant species for vegetation restoration, and in reasonable grazing management. - Highlights: • Grain for Green Project initiated in 1999 converts cropland to grassland/shrubland. • Impact of Grain for Green on carbon cycling on Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau is unknown. • Effects on carbon partitioning and turnover were accessed by {sup 13}CO{sub 2} pulse labeling. • Different mass of {sup 13}C in excess, similar {sup 13}C partitioning are shown in grasslands. • Soil organic carbon of

  1. Chemotaxonomy of three genera of the Annonaceae family using self-organizing maps and {sup 13}C NMR data of diterpenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, Luciana; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Silva, Marcelo Sobral da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Falcao, Emanuela Viana; Silva, Luana de Morais e; Soares, Gabriela Cristina da Silva; Scotti, Marcus Tullius, E-mail: mtscotti@ccae.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia e Meio Ambiente

    2012-07-01

    The Annonaceae family is distributed throughout Neotropical regions of the world. In Brazil, it covers nearly all natural formations particularly Annona, Xylopia and Polyalthia and is characterized chemically by the production of sources of terpenoids (mainly diterpenes), alkaloids, steroids, polyphenols and, flavonoids. Studies from {sup 13}C NMR data of diterpenes related with their botanical occurrence were used to generate self-organizing maps. Results corroborate those in the literature obtained from morphological and molecular data for three genera and the model can be used to project other diterpenes. Therefore, the model produced can predict which genera are likely to contain a compound. (author)

  2. Isotopic variations ({delta}{sup 13} C and {delta}{sup 18} O) in Siderastrea stellata (Cnidaria-Anthozoa), Itamaraca island, State of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Valderez P.; Sial, Alcides N. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Mayeal, Elga M.; Exner, Marco Antonio [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia. Lab. de Macro e Megabentos

    1998-12-01

    Isotopic determinations for O and C were performed in coral skeletons collected in beach rocks from two localities (Orange and Catuama), Itamaraca Island, north littoral of the State of pernambuco, northeastern Brazil. Large variations of {delta}{sup 18} O and {delta}{sup 13} C in corals from both localities are found, the largest ones being observed at the Orange locality {delta}{sup 13} C in this locality varies from -0.8 to +1.8% PDB and {delta}{sup 1.8} O from -5.3 to -1.8% PDB, while at the Catuama locality, they vary from -1.8 to 0.1% PDB and -3.8 to -2.7% PDB, respectively. Large variations in {delta}{sup 18} O (up to 2.5%) coupled with weakly defined positive correlation between {delta}{sup 18} O and {delta}{sup 13} C, can be attributed to temperature variations as consequence of climatic perturbations. Temperature estimates, calculated from {delta}{sup 18} O values, assuming isotopic equilibrium with seawater, yield values between 24.9 deg C and 43.1 deg C at Orange, and from 28.4 deg C to 35 deg C at Catuama, all of them (expect one growth band from one sample) are high enough for the full development of the coral colony. Temperature average is 31.4 deg C at Orange, which is a little bit higher than that at Catuama, but both of them indicate thermal stress conditions. In all analyzed specimens, expect for one, at Orange, T increases was accompanied by decreasing in the organic activity, as suggested by corresponding negative {delta}{sup 13} C anomaly. Therefore, the observed bleaching is possibly related to thermal stress and the high T may be related to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warning event. On the other hand, anthropogenic action at Orange, local of intense tourism throughout the year, coupled with high rate of sedimentation in the region, may contribute to the observed coral bleaching. (author)

  3. /sup 13/C NMR spectra of cyclic nitrones. 1. 2-substituted 4-methyl- and 4-phenyl-1-hydroxy-5,5-dimethyl-3-imidazoline 3-oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor' ev, I.A.; Martin, V.V.; Shchukin, G.I.; Mamatyuk, V.I.; Volodarskii, L.B.

    1985-08-01

    The introduction of an N-oxide oxygen atom into azomethines leads to an upfield shift of the signals for the carbon atom of the C=N group in the /sup 13/C NMR spectra by 30-33 ppm. This is consistent with the increase in the electron density on this atom. The signal of the nitrone carbon atom is observed in the region of 140-147 ppm, depending on the nature of the substituent at the C/sub (2)/ atom of the 3-imidazoline 3-oxide ring.

  4. Auto-inducing media for uniform isotope labeling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthertz, Nicolas [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Structural Biology (United Kingdom); Klopp, Julia; Winterhalter, Aurélie; Fernández, César; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Auto-inducing media for protein expression offer many advantages like robust reproducibility, high yields of soluble protein and much reduced workload. Here, an auto-inducing medium for uniform isotope labelling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and/or {sup 2}H in E. coli is presented. So far, auto-inducing media have not found widespread application in the NMR field, because of the prohibitively high cost of labeled lactose, which is an essential ingredient of such media. Here, we propose using lactose that is only selectively labeled on the glucose moiety. It can be synthesized from inexpensive and readily available substrates: labeled glucose and unlabeled activated galactose. With this approach, uniformly isotope labeled proteins were expressed in unattended auto-inducing cultures with incorporation of {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N of 96.6 % and {sup 2}H, {sup 15}N of 98.8 %. With the present protocol, the NMR community could profit from the many advantages that auto-inducing media offer.

  5. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N. [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Kay, Lewis E. [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, One King’s College Circle (Canada); Lundström, Patrik, E-mail: patlu@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts using Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s{sup −1}, despite the small fraction of {sup 13}Cα–{sup 13}Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using {sup 13}Cα spin probes.

  6. {sup 37}Cl, {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C isotopic analysis of common agro-chemicals for identifying non-point source agricultural contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annable, W.K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: wkannabl@uwaterloo.ca; Frape, S.K. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Shouakar-Stash, O. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Shanoff, T. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Drimmie, R.J. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Harvey, F.E. [School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0517 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The isotopic compositions of commercially available herbicides were analyzed to determine their respective {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl signatures for the purposes of developing a discrete tool for tracing and identifying non-point source contaminants in agricultural watersheds. Findings demonstrate that of the agrochemicals evaluated, chlorine stable isotopes signatures range between {delta}{sup 37}Cl = -4.55 per mille and +3.40 per mille , whereas most naturally occurring chlorine stable isotopes signatures, including those of road salt, sewage sludge and fertilizers, vary in a narrow range about the Standard Mean Ocean Chloride (SMOC) between -2.00 per mille and +1.00 per mille . Nitrogen stable isotope values varied widely from {delta}{sup 15}N = -10.86 per mille to +1.44 per mille and carbon stable isotope analysis gave an observed range between {delta}{sup 13}C = -37.13 per mille and -21.35 per mille for the entire suite of agro-chemicals analyzed. When nitrogen, carbon and chlorine stable isotope analyses were compared in a cross-correlation analysis, statistically independent isotopic signatures exist suggesting a new potential tracer tool for identifying herbicides in the environment.

  7. Ageing processes and soil microbial community effects on the biodegradation of soil {sup 13}C-2,4-D nonextractable residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, T.Z., E-mail: thomas.lerch@grignon.inra.f [BIOEMCO (CNRS-UMPC-AgroParisTech-ENS-INRA), Campus INRA, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); EGC - INRA-AgroParisTech, Campus INRA, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Dignac, M.-F.; Nunan, N. [BIOEMCO (CNRS-UMPC-AgroParisTech-ENS-INRA), Campus INRA, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Barriuso, E. [EGC - INRA-AgroParisTech, Campus INRA, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Mariotti, A. [BIOEMCO (CNRS-UMPC-AgroParisTech-ENS-INRA), Campus INRA, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    2009-11-15

    The biodegradation of nonextractable residues (NER) of pesticides in soil is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of NER ageing and fresh soil addition on the microbial communities responsible for their mineralisation. Soil containing either 15 or 90-day-old NER of {sup 13}C-2,4-D (NER15 and NER90, respectively) was incubated for 90 days with or without fresh soil. The addition of fresh soil had no effect on the mineralisation of NER90 or of SOM, but increased the extent and rate of NER15 mineralisation. The analyses of {sup 13}C-enriched FAME (fatty acids methyl esters) profiles showed that the fresh soil amendment only influenced the amount and structure of microbial populations responsible for the biodegradation of NER15. By coupling biological and chemical analyses, we gained some insight into the nature and the biodegradability of pesticide NER. - Ageing processes influence the NER mineralisation rate and the microbial population involved.

  8. Concentrations and {delta}{sup 13}C values of atmospheric CO{sub 2} from oceanic atmosphere through time: polluted and non-polluted areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enrico [Univ. of Parma (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Lenaz, Renzo; Ori, Carlo [C.N.R., ISMAR, Bologna (Italy). Dept. of Marine Geology

    2005-11-01

    CO{sub 2} is one of the primary agents of global climate changes. The increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is essentially related to human-induced emissions and, particularly, to the burning of fossil fuel whose {delta}{sup 13}C values are quite negative. Consequently, an increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere should be paralleled by a decrease of its {delta}{sup 13}C. Continuous and/or spot measurements of CO{sub 2} concentrations were repeatedly carried out during the last decade and in the same period of the year along hemispheric courses from Italy to Antarctica on a vessel of the Italian National Research Program in Antarctica. During these expeditions, discrete air samples were also collected in 4-l Pyrex flasks in order to carry out precise carbon isotope analyses on atmospheric CO{sub 2} from different areas, including theoretically 'clean' open ocean areas, with the main purpose of comparing these open ocean results with the results obtained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/World Meteorological Organization (NOAA/WMO) at land-based stations. According to the data obtained for these two variables, a relatively large atmospheric pollution is apparent in the Mediterranean area where the CO{sub 2} concentration has reached the value of 384 ppmv while quite negative {delta}{sup 13}C values have been measured only occasionally. In this area, southerly winds probably help to reduce the effect of atmospheric pollution even though, despite a large variability of CO{sub 2} concentrations, these values are consistently higher than those measured in open ocean areas by a few ppmv to about 10 ppmv. A marked, though non-continuous, pollution is apparent in the area of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait where {delta}{sup 13}C values considerably more negative than in the Central and Southern Red Sea were measured. The concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} over the Central Indian Ocean increased from about 361 ppmv at

  9. Concentrations and (delta){sup 13}C values of atmospheric CO{sub 2} from oceanic atmosphere through time: polluted and non-polluted areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enrico [Univ. of Parma (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Lenaz, Renzo; Ori, Carlo [C.N.R., ISMAR, Bologna (Italy). Dept. of Marine Geology

    2005-11-15

    CO{sub 2} is one of the primary agents of global climate changes. The increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is essentially related to human-induced emissions and, particularly, to the burning of fossil fuel whose (delta){sup 13}C values are quite negative. Consequently, an increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere should be paralleled by a decrease of its (delta){sup 13}C. Continuous and/or spot measurements of CO{sub 2} concentrations were repeatedly carried out during the last decade and in the same period of the year along hemispheric courses from Italy to Antarctica on a vessel of the Italian National Research Program in Antarctica. During these expeditions, discrete air samples were also collected in 4-l Pyrex flasks in order to carry out precise carbon isotope analyses on atmospheric CO{sub 2} from different areas, including theoretically 'clean' open ocean areas, with the main purpose of comparing these open ocean results with the results obtained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/World Meteorological Organization (NOAA/WMO) at land-based stations. According to the data obtained for these two variables, a relatively large atmospheric pollution is apparent in the Mediterranean area where the CO{sub 2} concentration has reached the value of 384 ppmv while quite negative (delta){sup 13}C values have been measured only occasionally. In this area, southerly winds probably help to reduce the effect of atmospheric pollution even though, despite a large variability of CO{sub 2} concentrations, these values are consistently higher than those measured in open ocean areas by a few ppmv to about 10 ppmv. A marked, though non-continuous, pollution is apparent in the area of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait where (delta){sup 13}C values considerably more negative than in the Central and Southern Red Sea were measured. The concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} over the Central Indian Ocean increased from about 361 ppmv at

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  11. The interest of the {sup 13}C urea breath test for the diagnostic and monitoring of chronic duodenal ulcer; Interet du test respiratoire a l`uree {sup 13}C dans le diagnostic et le suivi de l`ulcere duodenal chronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau-Tsangaris, M. [INBIOMED, 69 - Lyon (France); Centarti, M.; Mion, F.; Minaire, Y. [Hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Brazier, J.L. [Faculte de Pharmacie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1994-12-31

    Duodenal ulcer is very frequently associated with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) present in the gastric mucous membrane. Breath tests with {sup 13}C-labelled urea have been carried out for the detection of Hp; these tests could be more sensitive than gastric biopsies, because of the heterogenous distribution of the bacteria in the mucous membrane. This breath test may be used repetitively and allows for a non-intrusive monitoring of the Hp eradication after treatment. 12 refs.

  12. Relaxation-compensated difference spin diffusion NMR for detecting {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C long-range correlations in proteins and polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tuo; Williams, Jonathan K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Hong, Mei, E-mail: meihong@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D {sup 1}H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for {sup 13}C T{sub 1} relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ∼200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T{sub 1} relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T{sub 1} relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter

  13. Shell effects in nuclear magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratyev, V.N.; Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    The magnetization of nuclei in strong magnetic fields associated with magnetars' is considered within the shell model. It is demonstrated that the magnetic field gives rise to a phase-shift of the shell-oscillations in nuclear masses shifting significantly the nuclear magic numbers of the iron region towards smaller mass numbers. Shell-effects are found to result in anomalies of the nuclear magnetization. Such anomalies resemble the behavior associated with a phase transition. (author)

  14. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, M., E-mail: mizuno@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science & Technology (Japan); Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T. [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by {sup 2}H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180{sup ∘} flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from {sup 2}H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180{sup ∘} flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  15. Characterization of high boiling fossil fuel distillates via /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR analysis. Quarterly report, July 1, 1978--September 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, K.D.; O' Donnell, D.J.; Sigle, S.

    1978-01-01

    The progress to date under the orginal contract centers around the acquisition and analyses of /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectra of the monoaromatic concentrates and GPC (gel permeation chromatography) fractions of Wilmington 209-76 No. 15, 19, 23 and Gach Saran 206-76 No. 14, 18, 22 distillates (535 to 675/sup 0/C). In addition, the analyses of diaromatic GPC fractions from Wilmington 211-76 No. 19 and Gach Saran 207-76 No. 21 distillates (535 to 675/sup 0/C) have also been initiated. The completion of these objectives has been slowed somewhat by additional requests by DOE for immediate analyses of fractions isolated from recovered lubricating oils. The results of the investigation of these lubricating oil fractions have also been included in this report, though not strictly a part of the original contract.

  16. General method of preparation of uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments for NMR analysis of DNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rene, Brigitte; Masliah, Gregoire; Zargarian, Loussine; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge [UMR 8113 CNRS - LBPA Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, Institut Gustave Roussy, Departement de Biologie et Pharmacologie Structurales (France)], E-mail: sfermand@igr.fr

    2006-11-15

    Summary{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling of biomolecules allows easier assignments of NMR resonances and provides a larger number of NMR parameters, which greatly improves the quality of DNA structures. However, there is no general DNA-labeling procedure, like those employed for proteins and RNAs. Here, we describe a general and widely applicable approach designed for preparation of isotopically labeled DNA fragments that can be used for NMR studies. The procedure is based on the PCR amplification of oligonucleotides in the presence of labeled deoxynucleotides triphosphates. It allows great flexibility thanks to insertion of a short DNA sequence (linker) between two repeats of DNA sequence to study. Size and sequence of the linker are designed as to create restriction sites at the junctions with DNA of interest. DNA duplex with desired sequence and size is released upon enzymatic digestion of the PCR product. The suitability of the procedure is validated through the preparation of two biological relevant DNA fragments.

  17. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) in marine zooplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerleau, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.pomerleau@umanitoba.ca [Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Kivioq 2, Nuuk 3900, Greenland (Denmark); Stern, Gary A.; Pućko, Monika [Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Foster, Karen L. [Foster Environmental, Peterborough, ON K9J 8L2 (Canada); Macdonald, Robie W. [Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Sidney, BC V8L 4B2 (Canada); Fortier, Louis [Québec-Océan, Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as “keystone” species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ{sup 15}N and lower δ{sup 13}C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. - Highlights: • Assessment of Pan-Arctic variability in zooplankton Hg concentrations • Increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea • Zooplankton plays a central role in the Hg pathway within Arctic marine food webs.

  18. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Swarnendu, E-mail: Swarna.bag@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Banerjee, Deb Ranjan, E-mail: debranjan2@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Basak, Amit, E-mail: absk@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Das, Amit Kumar, E-mail: amitk@hijli.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Pal, Mousumi, E-mail: drmpal62@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Guru Nanak Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Banerjee, Rita, E-mail: ritabanerjee@outlook.com [Department of Science and Technology, New Mehrauli Road, New Delhi 110016 (India); Paul, Ranjan Rashmi, E-mail: dr_rsspaul@yahoo.co.in [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Guru Nanak Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy, E-mail: jchatterjee.iitkgp@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India)

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  19. Electronic structures and magnetic/optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shintaro; Suzuki, Atsushi, E-mail: suzuki@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture. 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic / optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes were studied by quantum calculations using density functional theory. Effects of central metal and expansion of π orbital on aromatic ring as conjugation system on the electronic structures, magnetic, optical properties and vibration modes of infrared and Raman spectra of metal phthalocyanines were investigated. Electron and charge density distribution and energy levels near frontier orbital and excited states were influenced by the deformed structures varied with central metal and charge. The magnetic parameters of chemical shifts in {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C-NMR), principle g-tensor, A-tensor, V-tensor of electric field gradient and asymmetry parameters derived from the deformed structures with magnetic interaction of nuclear quadruple interaction based on electron and charge density distribution with a bias of charge near ligand under crystal field.

  20. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  1. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of lipids: Differential line broadening due to cross-correlation effects as a probe of membrane structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, E.; Adebodun, F.; Chung, J.; Montez, B.; Ki Deok Park; Hongbiao Le; Phillips, B. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

    1991-11-19

    The authors have obtained proton-coupled carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a variety of lipid-water and lipid-drug-water systems, at 11.7 T, as a function of temperature, using the 'magic-angle' sample-spinning (MAS) NMR technique. The resulting spectra show a wide range of line shapes, due to interferences between dipole-dipole and dipole-chemical shielding anisotropy interactions. The differential line-broadening effects observed are particularly large for aromatic and olefinic (sp{sup 2}) carbon atom sites. Coupled spectra of the tricyclic antidepressants desipramine and imipramine, in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-water mesophases, show well-resolved doublets having different line shapes for each of the four aromatic methine groups, due to selective averaging of the four C-H dipolar interactions due to rapid motion about the director (or drug C{sub 2}) axis. {sup 2}H NMR spectra of (2,4,6,8-{sup 2}H{sub 4})desipramine (and imipramine) in the same 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-water mesophase exhibit quadrupole splittings of {approximately}0-2 and {approximately}20 kHz, indicating an approximate magic-angle orientation of the C2-{sup 2}H({sup 1}H) and C8-{sup 2}H({sup 1}H) vectors with respect to an axis of motional averaging, in accord with the {sup 13}C NMR results. The good qualitative agreement between {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H NMR results suggests that useful orientational ({sup 2}H NMR like) information can be deduced from natural-abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectra of a variety of mobile solids.

  2. CPMG relaxation dispersion NMR experiments measuring glycine {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts in the 'invisible' excited states of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Hansen, D. Flemming; Lundstroem, Patrik; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR experiments are extremely powerful for characterizing millisecond time-scale conformational exchange processes in biomolecules. A large number of such CPMG experiments have now emerged for measuring protein backbone chemical shifts of sparsely populated (>0.5%), excited state conformers that cannot be directly detected in NMR spectra and that are invisible to most other biophysical methods as well. A notable deficiency is, however, the absence of CPMG experiments for measurement of {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts of glycine residues in the excited state that reflects the fact that in this case the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins form a three-spin system that is more complex than the AX {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}-{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spin systems in the other amino acids. Here pulse sequences for recording {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles derived from glycine residues are presented that provide information from which {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts can be obtained. The utility of these experiments is demonstrated by an application to a mutant of T4 lysozyme that undergoes a millisecond time-scale exchange process facilitating the binding of hydrophobic ligands to an internal cavity in the protein.

  3. Understanding the role of soil erosion on co{sub 2}-c loss using {sup 13}c isotopic signatures in abandoned Mediterranean agricultural land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novara, Agata, E-mail: agata.novara@unipa.it [Department of Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, University of Palermo, viale delle Scienze, ed.4, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Keesstra, Saskia, E-mail: saskia.keesstra@wur.nl [Soil Physics and Land Management Group, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 4, 6708PB Wageningen (Netherlands); Cerdà, Artemio, E-mail: artemio.cerda@uv.es [Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group, Department of Geography, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Pereira, Paulo, E-mail: paulo@mruni.eu [Environmental Management Centre, Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius (Lithuania); Gristina, Luciano [Department of Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, University of Palermo, viale delle Scienze, ed.4, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Understanding soil water erosion processes is essential to evaluate the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) within a landscape and is fundamental to assess the role of soil erosion in the global carbon (C) budget. The main aim of this study was to estimate the C redistribution and losses using {sup 13}C natural abundance. Carbon losses in soil sediment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and CO{sub 2} emission were determined. Four bounded parallel plots were installed on a 10% slope. In the upper part of the plots, C{sub 3}soil was replaced with C{sub 4}soil. The SOC and δ{sup 13}C were measured after 145.2 mm rainfall in the upper (2 m far from C{sub 4}strip), middle (4 m far from C{sub 4}strip) lower (6 m far from C{sub 4}strip) trams of the plot and in the sediments collected in the Gerlach collector at the lower part of the plot. A laboratory incubation experiment was performed to evaluate the CO{sub 2} emission rate of soils in each area. OC was mainly lost in the sediments as 2.08 g{sup −2} of C was lost after 145.2 mm rainfall. DOC losses were only 5.61% of off-site OC loss. Three months after the beginning of the experiment, 15.90% of SOC in the upper tram of the plot had a C{sub 4} origin. The C{sub 4}-SOC content decreased along the 6 m length of the plot, and in the sediments collected by the Gerlach collector. CO{sub 2} emission rate was high in the upper plot tram due to the high SOC content. The discrimination of CO{sub 2} in C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} portion permitted to increase our level of understanding on the stability of SOC and its resilience to decomposition. The transport of sediments along the plot increased SOC mineralization by 43%. Our study underlined the impact of rainfall in C losses in soil and water in abandoned Mediterranean agriculture fields and the consequent implications on the C balance. - Highlights: • The soil C isotopic difference is a useful tracer for erosion processes studies. • The main loss of Carbon was

  4. Partitioning of carbon sources among functional pools to investigate short-term priming effects of biochar in soil: A {sup 13}C study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerré, Bart [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C., E-mail: m.hernandezsoriano@uq.edu.au [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); The University of Queensland, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Smolders, Erik [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2016-03-15

    Biochar sequesters carbon (C) in soils because of its prolonged residence time, ranging from several years to millennia. In addition, biochar can promote indirect C-sequestration by increasing crop yield while, potentially, reducing C-mineralization. This laboratory study was set up to evaluate effects of biochar on C-mineralization with due attention to source appointment by using {sup 13}C isotope signatures. An arable soil (S) (7.9 g organic C, OC kg{sup −1}) was amended (single dose of 10 g kg{sup −1} soil) with dried, grinded maize stover (leaves and stalks), either natural (R) or {sup 13}C enriched (R*), and/or biochar (B/B*) prepared from the maize stover residues (450 °C). Accordingly, seven different combinations were set up (S, SR, SB, SR*, SB*, SRB*, SR*B) to trace the source of C in CO{sub 2} (180 days), dissolved organic-C (115 days) and OC in soil aggregate fractions (90 days). The application of biochar to soil reduced the mineralization of native soil organic C but the effect on maize stover-C mineralization was not consistent. Biochar application decreased the mineralization of the non-enriched maize stover after 90 days, this being consistent with a significant reduction of dissolved organic C concentration from 45 to 18 mg L{sup −1}. However, no significant effect was observed for the enriched maize stover, presumably due to differences between the natural and enriched materials. The combined addition of biochar and enriched maize stover significantly increased (twofold) the presence of native soil organic C or maize derived C in the free microaggregate fraction relative to soil added only with stover. Although consistent effects among C sources and biochar materials remains elusive, our outcomes indicate that some biochar products can reduce mineralization and solubilization of other sources of C while promoting their physical protection in soil particles. - Highlights: • Biochar can reduce native soil organic carbon mineralization.

  5. High resolution infrared and Raman spectra of {sup 13}C{sup 12}CD{sub 2}: The CD stretching fundamentals and associated combination and hot bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Lonardo, G.; Fusina, L., E-mail: luciano.fusina@unibo.it; Canè, E.; Tamassia, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale “Toso Montanari,” Università di Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Martínez, R. Z.; Bermejo, D. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-07

    Infrared and Raman spectra of mono {sup 13}C fully deuterated acetylene, {sup 13}C{sup 12}CD{sub 2}, have been recorded and analysed to obtain detailed information on the C—D stretching fundamentals and associated combination, overtone, and hot bands. Infrared spectra were recorded at an instrumental resolution ranging between 0.006 and 0.01 cm{sup −1} in the region 1800–7800 cm{sup −1}. Sixty new bands involving the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} C—D stretching modes also associated with the ν{sub 4} and ν{sub 5} bending vibrations have been observed and analysed. In total, 5881 transitions have been assigned in the investigated spectral region. In addition, the Q branch of the ν{sub 1} fundamental was recorded using inverse Raman spectroscopy, with an instrumental resolution of about 0.003 cm{sup −1}. The transitions relative to each stretching mode, i.e., the fundamental band, its first overtone, and associated hot and combination bands involving bending states with υ{sub 4} + υ{sub 5} up to 2 were fitted simultaneously. The usual Hamiltonian appropriate to a linear molecule, including vibration and rotation l-type and the Darling–Dennison interaction between υ{sub 4} = 2 and υ{sub 5} = 2 levels associated with the stretching states, was adopted for the analysis. The standard deviation for each global fit is ≤0.0004 cm{sup −1}, of the same order of magnitude of the measurement precision. Slightly improved parameters for the bending and the ν{sub 2} manifold have been also determined. Precise values of spectroscopic parameters deperturbed from the resonance interactions have been obtained. They provide quantitative information on the anharmonic character of the potential energy surface, which can be useful, in addition to those reported in the literature, for the determination of a general anharmonic force field for the molecule. Finally, the obtained values of the Darling–Dennison constants can be valuable for understanding energy flows

  6. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shasha [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhu, Yuanrong, E-mail: zhuyuanrong07@mails.ucas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Meng, Wei, E-mail: mengwei@craes.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); He, Zhongqi [USDA-ARS Southern Regional Research Center, 1100 Robert E Lee Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70124 (United States); Feng, Weiying [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Biomedical and Veterinary Biosciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O–C–O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH{sub 3} and COO/N–C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH{sub 3} and COO/N–C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. - Highlights: • WEOM derived from aquatic macrophytes was characterized. • C and P in WEOM were characterized by solid {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR. • Degradation and transformation of macrophyte-derived C and P were investigated. • Macrophyte-derived WEOM are important source for bioavailable nutrients in lakes.

  7. High precision measurement by mass spectrometry of isotopic ratios {delta} {sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of carbon dioxide; Mesure haute precision par spectrometrie de masse des rapports isotopiques {delta} {sup 13}C et {delta}{sup 18}O du dioxyde de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, Chr.; Ciais, Ph.

    1998-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the second natural greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere, after vapor water. Its concentration levels have been increasing by 25% due to human activities over the past 200 years, thus increasing the radiative forcing at the surface and potentially including major climate change for the next centuries. It is of primary importance to better quantify the role of carbon contained into the oceans and the land biota in moderating the anthropic perturbation. To do so, {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O isotopes are unique tools which allow to estimate indirectly the terrestrial CO{sub 2} fluxes based on atmospheric measurements. The present reports describes the experimental set-up used at the CFR-LMCE laboratory to measure the {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O natural abundance in atmospheric carbon dioxide. This technique requires high levels of both precision and accuracy because the geochemical signal nevertheless consists of very small changes in isotopic composition (on the order of 0.01 permits). Also, given the large number of samples to analyses routinely, it must be run in an automatic mode. Our experiment design consists of 'extraction line' where CO{sub 2} is separated cryogenically from the air, which is coupled to a (Finnigan MAT 252) mass spectrometer. (authors)

  8. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade {sup 15}N-, {sup 13}C- and {sup 2}H-labeled yeast extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan, E-mail: Stephan.Grzesiek@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor.

  9. Incorporation of {sup 13}C-labeled intermediates into developing lignin revealed by analytical pyrolysis and CuO oxidation in combination with IRM-GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglinton, T.I.; Goni, M.A. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Boon, J.J. [FOM Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Tissue samples from Ginkgo shoots (Ginkgo biloba L.) and Rice grass (Oryzasitiva sp.) incubated in the presence of {sup 13}C-labeled substrates such as coniferin (postulated to be biosynthetic intermediates in lignin biosynthesis) were studied using thermal and chemical dissociation methods in combination with molecular-level isotopic measurements. The aim of the study was (1) to investigate dissociation mechanisms, and (2) to examine and quantify the proportions of labeled material incorporated within each sample. Isotopic analysis of specific dissociation products revealed the presence of the label in its original positions, and only within lignin-derived (phenolic) products. Moreover, the distribution and isotopic composition of the dissociation products strongly suggest an origin from newly-formed lignin. These results clearly indicate that there is no {open_quotes}scrambling{close_quotes} of carbon atoms as a result of the dissociation process, thereby lending support to this analytical approach. In addition, the data provide confidence in the selective labeling approach for elucidation of the structure and biosynthesis of lignin.

  10. Solid-state and solution /sup 13/C NMR in the conformational analysis of methadone-hydrochloride and related narcotic analgesics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, S.C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state and solution /sup 13/C NMR have been used to study the conformations of the racemic mixtures and single enantiomers of methadone hydrochloride, alpha and beta methadol hydrochloride, and alpha and beta acetylmethadol hydrochloride. The NMR spectra acquired for the compounds as solids, and in polar and nonpolar solvents are compared, in order to determine the conformation of the molecules in solution. To determine the reliability of assigning solution conformations by comparing solution and solid state chemical shift data, three bond coupling constants measured in solution are compared with those calculated from X-ray data. The conformations of the racemic mixture and plus enantiomer of methadone hydrochloride have been shown to be very similar in the solid state, where minor differences in conformation can be seen by comparing NMR spectra obtained for the solids. Also shown is that the molecules of methadone hydrochloride have conformations in polar and in nonpolar solvents which are very similar to the conformation of the molecules in the solid state.

  11. New ruthenium(II) complexes with pyridylpyrazole ligands. Photosubstitution and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 99/Ru NMR structural studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steel, P.J.; LaHousse, F.; Lerner, D.; Marzin, C.

    1983-05-11

    The preparations and properties of ruthenium (Ru) (II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand (L) 1-(2-pyridyl)-3,5-dimethylpyrazole, are described. The tris complex RuL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ is shown to readily undergo photosubstitution in acetonitrile (CH/sub 3/CN) solution to produce RuL/sub 2/(CH/sub 3/CN)/sub 2//sup 2 +/, which in the presence of other bidentate ligands undergoes thermal substitution of the coordinated acetonitrite. /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 99/Ru NMR spectra are reported for all the complexes. Proton and carbon-13 NMR reveal the CH/sub 3/CN presence of geometrical isomerism, where it exists; proton and ruthenium-99 NMR allow the evaluation of the percentage of these isomers. Ruthenium-99 NMR proves to be an excellent probe of electron density at the metal and is possibly useful to evaluate the amount of ..pi..-back-bonding depending on the ligands. Electronic spectral data and oxidation potential measurements are given for comparison with those of the well-known RU(bipyridine)/sub 3//sup 2 +/ complex but do not lead to consistent results. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Determination of {sup 13}C CSA Tensors: Extension of the Model-independent Approach to an RNA Kissing Complex Undergoing Anisotropic Rotational Diffusion in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranathan, Sapna [National Chemical Laboratory, Central NMR Facility (India)], E-mail: s.ravindranathan@ncl.res.in; Kim, Chul-Hyun [California State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland)

    2005-11-15

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters have been determined for the protonated carbons of the purine bases in an RNA kissing complex in solution by extending the model-independent approach [Fushman, D., Cowburn, D. (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 7109-7110]. A strategy for determining CSA tensor parameters of heteronuclei in isolated X-H two-spin systems (X = {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N) in molecules undergoing anisotropic rotational diffusion is presented. The original method relies on the fact that the ratio {kappa}{sub 2}=R{sub 2}{sup auto}/R{sub 2}{sup cross} of the transverse auto- and cross-correlated relaxation rates involving the X CSA and the X-H dipolar interaction is independent of parameters related to molecular motion, provided rotational diffusion is isotropic. However, if the overall motion is anisotropic {kappa}{sub 2} depends on the anisotropy D{sub parallel} /D{sub -perpendicular} of rotational diffusion. In this paper, the field dependence of both {kappa}{sub 2} and its longitudinal counterpart {kappa}{sub 1}=R{sub 1}{sup auto}/R{sub 1}{sup cross} are determined. For anisotropic rotational diffusion, our calculations show that the average {kappa}{sub av} = 1/2 ({kappa}{sub 1}+{kappa}{sub 2}), of the ratios is largely independent of the anisotropy parameter D{sub parallel} /D{sub -perpendicular}. The field dependence of the average ratio {kappa}{sub av} may thus be utilized to determine CSA tensor parameters by a generalized model-independent approach in the case of molecules with an overall motion described by an axially symmetric rotational diffusion tensor.

  13. Glutamine synthetase activity in solanaceous cell suspensions accumulating alkaloids or not. {sup 13}C NMR and enzymatic assay; Activite de la glutamine synthetase dans des suspensions cellulaires de solanacees productrices ou non d'alcaloides. RMN du {sup 13}C et dosage enzymatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesnard, F.; Marty, D.; Monti, J.P. [Faculte de Pharmacie, 80 - Amiens (France). Laboratoire de Biophysique, Groupe de Recherche des Biomolecules: micro-environnement et Metabolisme; Gillet-Manceau, F.; Fliniaux, M.A. [Faculte de Pharmacie, 80 - Amiens (France). Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie

    1999-09-01

    The metabolism of labelled pyruvate followed by {sup 13}C NMR and the measure of glutamine synthetase (GS) showed, according to previous results, a high activity of this enzyme in suspension cells of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. This activity could derive glutamate from the alkaloidsynthesizing pathways. However, a recent work showed that the rate of the GS gene transcription was inversely proportional to the Gln/Glu ratio. The measures of Gln and Glu concentrations in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells revealed that high GS activity correlates with the weak value of Gln/Glu ratio. Therefore, the hypothesis of GS dysfunction for the non-biosynthesis of alkaloids in N. plumbaginifolia suspension cells can be discarded. This conclusion is strengthened by the results obtained when using a GS inhibitor. (author)

  14. Pentacyclic triterpenoids of Mentha villosa: structural identification and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C resonance assignments; Triterpenoides pentaciclicos de Mentha villosa: identificacao estrutural e atribuicao dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, Francisco J. Queiroz; Oliveira, Eliete F. de [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Braz Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais

    2001-08-01

    The structures of seven oleanene and ursene triterpenoids (1-7) isolated from aerial parts of Mentha villosa were identified. In addition, the complete {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C resonance assignments of these triterpenoids were accomplished using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments. (author)

  15. Possibilities of climate reconstruction in the Holocene using {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 2}H values from annual tree rings on the basis of climate chamber experiments and studies on present-day organisms; Moeglichkeiten der Klimarekonstruktion im Holozaen mit {delta}{sup 13}C- und {delta}{sup 2}H-Werten von Baum-Jahrringen auf der Basis von Klimakammerversuchen und Rezentstudien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, C.

    2002-07-01

    This study deals with the climatic information content of {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C levels in annual tree rings and plant material. The influence of variations in air temperature, relative humidity and water availability on stable isotope ratios in three different C{sub 3} plant species (Brassica oleracea, Eucalyptus globulus, Vicia faba) was studied in climate chamber experiments. Furthermore, calibration studies using {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 2}H time series from Southern German spruce (Picea abies) from two stands (Schussbach, Klosterreichenbach) were performed. Correlations with meteorological data from a nearby meteorological station prove stable isotope ratios to be dependent on weather conditions in the summer months (June through August). Using the {delta}{sup 13}C ''response surfaces'' obtained from these experiments as well as correlations from long gridbox precipitation series it was shown that for the climate mode under study the {delta}{sup 13}C values largely reflect water availability to trees, which is greatly influenced by summer precipitation, especially at the more arid of the two sites. The results of the climate chamber experiments also suggest that the spruce {delta}{sup 2}H values largely reflect the isotope variation in soil water and hence the {delta}{sup 2}H fluctuations in summer precipitation. The study closes with a discussion of methodological approaches to creating long isotope series from annual tree rings of subfossil oak trees.

  16. Sedimentary records of δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N and organic matter accumulation in lakes receiving nutrient-rich mine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widerlund, Anders, E-mail: Anders.Widerlund@ltu.se; Chlot, Sara; Öhlander, Björn

    2014-07-01

    Organic C and total N concentrations, C/N ratios, δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C values in {sup 210}Pb-dated sediment cores were used to reconstruct historical changes in organic matter (OM) accumulation in three Swedish lakes receiving nutrient-rich mine waters. Ammonium-nitrate-based explosives and sodium cyanide (NaCN) used in gold extraction were the major N sources, while lesser amounts of P originated from apatite and flotation chemicals. The software IsoSource was used to model the relative contribution of soil, terrestrial and littoral vegetation, and phytoplankton detritus in the lake sediments. In one lake the IsoSource modelling failed, suggesting the presence of additional, unknown OM sources. In two of the lakes sedimentary detritus of littoral vegetation and phytoplankton had increased by 15–20% and 20–35%, respectively, since ∼ 1950, when N- and P-rich mine waters began to reach the lakes. Today, phytoplankton is the dominating OM component in these lake sediments, which appears to be a eutrophication effect related to mining operations. Changes in the N isotopic composition of biota, lake water, and sediments related to the use of ammonium-nitrate-based explosives and NaCN were evident in the two studied systems. However, N isotope signals in the receiving waters (δ{sup 15}N ∼ + 9‰ to + 19‰) were clearly shifted from the primary signal in explosives (δ{sup 15}N–NO{sub 3} = + 3.4 ± 0.3‰; δ{sup 15}N–NH{sub 4} = − 8.0 ± 0.3‰) and NaCN (δ{sup 15}N = + 1.1 ± 0.5‰), and direct tracing of the primary N isotope signals in mining chemicals was not possible in the receiving waters. Systems where mine waters with a well known discharge history are a major point source of N with well-defined isotopic composition should, however, be suitable for further studies of processes controlling N isotope signatures and their transformation in aquatic systems receiving mine waters. - Highlights: • Historical mining-related changes in organic

  17. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  18. Simulating dynamics of (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in the planetary boundary layer a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Huang, Lin [Environment Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada). Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate

    2006-11-15

    Stable isotopes of CO{sub 2} contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO{sub 2} between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of (delta){sup 13}C and thus the global (delta){sup 13}C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49 deg 52 min 29.9 sec N, 81 deg 34 min 12.3 sec W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to (delta){sup 13}C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of (delta){sup 13}C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.025% in 1999. The (delta){sup 13}C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO{sub 2}. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% {+-}) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%{+-}) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} dynamics in PBL

  19. Simulating dynamics of {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in the planetary boundary layer a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Huang, Lin [Environment Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada). Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate

    2006-11-15

    Stable isotopes of CO{sub 2} contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO{sub 2} between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C and thus the global {delta}{sup 13}C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49 deg 52 min 29.9 sec N, 81 deg 34 min 12.3 sec W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to {delta}{sup 13}C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.025% in 1999. The {delta}{sup 13}C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO{sub 2}. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% {+-}) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%{+-}) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} dynamics in PBL

  20. Ozone air pollution effects on tree-ring growth,{delta}{sup 13}C, visible foliar injury and leaf gas exchange in three ozone-sensitive woody plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, K. [Swiss Federal Inst. for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Zurich (Switzerland); Saurer, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. Villigen (Switzerland); Fuhrer, J. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Zurich (Switzerland); Skelly, J.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology; Krauchi, N.; Schaub, M. [Swiss Federal Inst. for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Birmensdorf (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Species specific plant responses to tropospheric ozone pollution depend on a range of morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics as well as environmental factors. The effects of ambient tropospheric ozone on annual tree-ring growth, {delta}{sup 13} C in the rings, leaf gas exchange and ozone-induced visible foliar injury in three ozone-sensitive woody plant species in southern Switzerland were assessed during the 2001 and 2002 growing seasons. Seedlings of Populus nigra L., Viburnum lantana L. and Fraxinus excelsior L. were exposed to charcoal-filtered air and non-filtered air in open-top chambers, and to ambient air (AA) in open plots. The objective was to determine if a relationship exists between measurable ozone-induced effects at the leaf level and subsequent changes in annual tree-ring growth and {delta} {sup 13} C signatures. The visible foliar injury, early leaf senescence and premature leaf loss in all species was attributed to the ambient ozone exposures in the region. Ozone had pronounced negative effects on net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in all species in 2002 and in V. lantana and F. excelsior in 2001. Water-use efficiency decreased and intercellular carbon dioxide concentrations increased in all species in response to ozone in 2002 only. The width and {delta}{sup 13} C of the 2001 and 2002 growth rings were measured for all species at the end of the 2002 growing season. Significant ozone-induced effects at the leaf level did not correspond to reduced tree-ring growth or increased {delta}{sup 13} C in all species, suggesting that the timing of ozone exposure and extent of leaf-level responses may be relevant in determining the sensitivity of tree productivity to ozone exposure. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  1. Distinguishing tautomerism in the crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) -4-methylbenzenesulfonamide using DFT-D calculations and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Bond, Andrew D.; Johansson, Kristoffer E.; Van de Streek, Jacco, E-mail: jacco.vandestreek@sund.ku.dk [Department of Pharmacy, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark)

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) -4-methylbenzenesulfonamide contains an imine tautomer, rather than the previously reported amine tautomer. The tautomers can be distinguished using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations and by comparison of calculated and measured {sup 13}C solid-state NMR spectra. The crystal structure of the title compound, C{sub 11}H{sub 13}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}, has been determined previously on the basis of refinement against laboratory powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data, supported by comparison of measured and calculated {sup 13}C solid-state NMR spectra [Hangan et al. (2010 ▶). Acta Cryst. B66, 615–621]. The mol@@ecule is tautomeric, and was reported as an amine tautomer [systematic name: N-(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thia@@diazol-2-yl)-p-toluene@@sulfonamide], rather than the correct imine tautomer. The protonation site on the mol@@ecule’s 1,3,4-thia@@diazole ring is indicated by the inter@@molecular contacts in the crystal structure: N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are established at the correct site, while the alternative protonation site does not establish any notable inter molecular inter@@actions. The two tautomers provide essentially identical Rietveld fits to laboratory PXRD data, and therefore they cannot be directly distinguished in this way. However, the correct tautomer can be distinguished from the incorrect one by previously reported qu@@anti@@tative criteria based on the extent of structural distortion on optimization of the crystal structure using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. Calculation of the {sup 13}C SS-NMR spectrum based on the correct imine tautomer also provides considerably better agreement with the measured {sup 13}C SS-NMR spectrum.

  2. Stability and breakdown of Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt associated with formation of {sup 13}C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, A.V., E-mail: spivak@iem.ac.ru [Institute of Experimental Mineralogy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Litvin, Yu.A. [Institute of Experimental Mineralogy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovsyannikov, S.V. [Bayerishes Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Dubrovinskaia, N.A. [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Dubrovinsky, L.S. [Bayerishes Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3}, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of {sup 13}C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and {sup 13}C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO{sub 3} up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO{sub 3} melt. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase states of CaCO{sub 3} were studied at P=11-43 GPa and T=1600-3900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 13}C-diamond easily crystallizes in carbonate-carbon (Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3-}{sup 13}C-graphite) melt-solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca-carbonate melts congruently that was observed in experiments in DAC with laser heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} melt, indicated by formation of graphite and/or diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} was observed at temperatures above 3400 K in the pressure interval studied.

  3. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  4. Applications of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance to chemistry: multiple-pulse NMR, cross polarization, magic-angle spinning annd instrumental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, P.D.

    1979-07-01

    Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been applied to: (1) Measurements of the prinicpal components of the proton shielding tensors of the hydrides of zirconium chloride and zirconium bromide. Multiple-Pulse techniques have been used to remove static homonuclear dipolar coupling. The anisotropies and isotropic shifts of these tensors have been used to infer the possible locations of the hydrogen within the sandwich-like layers of these unusual compounds. (2) Studies of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization between /sup 1/H and /sup 29/Si in substituted silanes. The technique of J Cross Polarization has been used to enhance sensitivity. The /sup 29/Si NMR shifts of -Si-O- model compounds have been investigated as a possible probe for future studies of the environment of bound oxygen in coal-derived liquids. (3) Measurements of the aromatic fraction of /sup 13/C in whole coals. The techniques of /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C Cross Polarization and Magic-Angle Spinning have been used to enhance sensitivity and remove shift anisotropy. Additional topics described are: (4) Calculation and properties of the broadened lineshape of the shileding Powder Pattern. (5) Calculation of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization for an I-S system. (6) Numerical convolution and its uses. (7) The technique of digital filtering applied in the frequency domain. (8) The designs and properties of four NMR probe-circuits. (9) The design of a single-coil double-resonance probe for combined Magic-Angle Spinning and Cross Polarization. (10) The designs of low Q and high Q rf power amplifiers with emphasis on the rf matching circuitry.

  5. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C e {sup 17}O with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays; Medidas das secoes de choque de fotoneutrons do {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C e {sup 17}O com radiacao gama de captura de neutrons termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Renato

    2006-07-01

    Photoneutron cross sections measurements of {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O have been obtained in the energy interval between 1,6 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 a 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (5 MW) research reactor. The samples have been irradiated inside a 4{pi} geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm{sup 3}, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A inversion matrix methodology to solve inversion problems for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, was used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma line energies of the capture targets). The cross sections obtained at the energy values of the principal gamma lines were compared with experimental data reported by other authors, with have employed different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed among the experimental data in this work with reported in the literature. (author)

  6. Reconstruction of past evolution of atmospheric methane {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotopic ratio, from polar firn air analysis; Reconstruction de l'evolution passee du rapport isotopique {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C du methane atmospherique, a partir de l'analyse de l'air extrait du neve polaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aballain, O

    2002-07-01

    Interstitial air extracted from the firn at 4 polar sites has given access to air samples aging back to a hundred years in sufficient amount for isotopic analysis of CH{sub 4}, a gas considered to be the second most important responsible for man-induced greenhouse effect. Thus, after optimization of a particularly sensible experimental device (CF-IRMS), {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratio of air samples pumped in the firn at different depths were measured, whose results lie in remarkable agreement with ratios measured using another experimental method (TDLAS) at the MPI in Mayence (Germany). The recursive use of a physical model of diffusive gas transport in the firn then allowed us to infer, from firn profiles, the likely evolution of atmospheric {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratio over the last century. This new constraint on CH{sub 4} atmospheric budget thus enabled us to confirm the existing assumption of a dominating anthropogenic activities responsibility in the 150 % growth of atmospheric methane concentration since pre-industrial times. This constraint has also been applied into a global atmospheric model to test the relevance of a scenario assuming a 20 % decrease of the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere since 1885. Besides, a collaboration with the PSSRI from Open University (United-Kingdom) allowed us to resume development of a method for measurement of CH{sub 3}D/CH{sub 4} ratio in air, and to try to apply it to samples extracted at 2 polar sites and already analyzed in {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C. A sensible method for extraction and analysis of CH{sub 4} in air trapped in polar ice has also been developed and successfully tested, which has now to be applied for analysis of pre-industrial air. (author)

  7. Multivariate analysis of calcareous nanno fossils and stable isotopic ({delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C) in the upper Campanian - lower Maastrichtian of the Campos Basin, Brazil; Analise multivariada em nanofosseis calcarios e isotopos estaveis ({delta}{sup 18}O e {delta}{sup 13}C) do Campaniano superior - Maastrichtiano inferior na Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Veiga de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Gerencia de Bioestratigrafia e Paleoecologia]. E-mail: lcveiga@petrobras.com.br; Rodrigues, Rene; Lemos, Valesca Brasil

    2005-05-01

    Qualitative analysis in calcareous nanno fossils is a powerful tool for bio stratigraphic uses, principally in identification of bio zones and determination of relative age. But quantitative studies must be applied for pale oceanographic applications and high resolution bio stratigraphy. In order to better understand the relationships between the different species of nanno fossils, new methodologies and non-traditional correlation tools were tested on a 18 m upper Campanian - lower Maastrichtian core from Campos Basin. Multiple regression helped to determine the best counting method. Watznaueria barnesae and Micula decussata dominate the fossil assemblage and have inverse abundances to each other. Both were opportunist species in competition for nutrients. Q mode factorial analysis (57 samples, 19 variables) was applied to the same core and shows that two factors explain 99.2% of the total variance of the micro fossil assemblage. The first factor represents 83.6% and the second factor only 15.6% of the total variance. The former is associated with Watznaueria barnesae, Cribrosphaerella ehrenbergii and Stradneria crenulata, which represent the original population of nano plankton. The latter factor is associated with Micula decussata, which is believed to represent the effect of solution at the sediment water interface. Both factors were used to develop a dissolution-sea level curve for nanno fossils. When combined with oxygen and carbon isotopes, this curve clearly shows that higher dissolution occurred during the late Campanian - early Maastrichtian time when {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13} C and TOC all had lower values. These correlations indicate a strong link between high sea levels, high temperatures and lower amount of continental organic debris. (author)

  8. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  9. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. (Monsanto Agricultural Company, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  10. Application of capillary gas chromatography-reaction interface/mass spectrometry to the selective detection of sup 13 C-, sup 15 N-, sup 2 H-, and sup 14 C-labeled drugs and their metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chace, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A novel reaction interface/mass spectrometer (RIMS) technique has been applied to the selective detection of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-, {sup 2}H-, and {sup 14}C-labeled phenytoin and its metabolites in urine following separation by capillary gas chromatography. The microwave-powered reaction interface converts materials from their original forms into small molecules whose mass spectra serve to identify and quantify the nuclides. The presence of each element is followed by monitoring the isotopic variants of CO{sub 2}, NO, H{sub 2}, or CH{sub 4} that are produced by the reaction interface. Chromatograms showing only enriched {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N were produced using the net {sup 13}CO{sub 2} or {sup 15}NO signal derived by subtracting the abundance of naturally occurring isotopes from the observed M + 1 signal. When hydrogen was used as a reactant gas, a selective chromatogram of {sup 2}H (D) was obtained by measuring HD at m/Z 3.0219, and a chromatogram showing {sup 14}C was obtained by measuring {sup 14}CH{sub 4} at m/Z 18.034 with a high resolution. For a stable isotope detection, metabolites representing less than 1.5% of the total labeled compounds could be detected in the chromatogram. Detection limits of 170 pCi/mL (34 pCi on column that is equivalent to 187 pg) of a {sup 14}C- labeled metabolite was detected. To identify many of these labeled peaks (metabolites), the chromatographic analysis was repeated with the reaction interface turned off and mass spectra obtained at the retention times found in the RIMS experiment. In addition to the ability of GC-RIMS to detect the presence of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-, and {sup 2}H- (D), it can also quantify the level of enrichment. Enrichment of {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N is quantified by measuring the ratio of excess {sup 13}CO{sub 2} to total {sup 12}CO{sub 2} or excess {sup 15}NO to total {sup 14}NO.

  11. Residue-specific membrane location of peptides and proteins using specifically and extensively deuterated lipids and {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Residue-specific location of peptides in the hydrophobic core of membranes was examined using {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H REDOR and samples in which the lipids were selectively deuterated. The transmembrane topology of the KALP peptide was validated with this approach with substantial dephasing observed for deuteration in the bilayer center and reduced or no dephasing for deuteration closer to the headgroups. Insertion of {beta} sheet HIV and helical and {beta} sheet influenza virus fusion peptides into the hydrophobic core of the membrane was validated in samples with extensively deuterated lipids.

  12. Nuclear magnetic ordering in silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefmann, K.

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed by neutron diffraction in a single crystal of {sup 109}Ag. The critical temperature is found to 700 pK, and the critical field is 100 {mu}T. From the paramagnetic phase a second order phase transition leads into a type-I 1-k structure with long range order. The experiments have taken place at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin in collaboration with the low Temperature Laboratory in Helsinki, the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde. The present report is a Ph.D. thesis which has been successfully defended at the Niels Bohr Institute. Besides the results of the nuclear ordering experiments the thesis contains a description of the theoretical background for nuclear magnetism and a review of earlier nuclear ordering experiments as well as theoretical work. The principles for studying polarized nuclei with use of polarized and unpolarized neutrons are presented, as well as the results of such experiments. (au) 11 tabs., 59 ills., 143 refs.

  13. Measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania and Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  14. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations.

  15. Condensed aromatic rings and E{sub 4}/E{sub 6} ratio: humic acids in gleysoils studied by NMR CP/MAS{sup 13}C, and dipolar dephasing; Aneis aromaticos condensados e relacao E{sub 4}/E{sub 6}: estudo de acidos humicos de gleissolos por RMN de {sup 13}C no estado solido utilizando a tecnica CP/MAS desacoplamento defasado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saab, Sergio da Costa [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: scsaab@uepg.br; Martin-Neto, Ladislau [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-03-15

    In this work, seven samples of humic acids extracted from gleysoils were investigated. These studies, using NMR CP/MAS {sup 13}C techniques, did not show significant correlation between the E{sub 4}/E{sub 6} ratio and the degree of aromaticity. However, dipolar dephasing (DD) measurements of condensed aromatic or substituted carbons showed a negative correlation of 0.94. Also, there was a good correlation between the amount of semiquinone free radicals measured by the EPR technique and condensed aromatic rings measured by NMR CP/MAS {sup 13}C with the DD technique. The content of semiquinone free radicals was quantified by EPR spectroscopy and was correlated with the humification (degree of aromaticity) of the humic substances. The results indicated that the E{sub 4}/E{sub 6} ratio identifies the degree of aromatic rings condensation. It was also found that the degree of aromaticity, measured by NMR, as frequently presented in the literature (by conventional CP/MAS), underestimates aromatic rings in condensed structures. (author)

  16. Brominated and phosphorus flame retardants in White-tailed Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla nestlings: Bioaccumulation and associations with dietary proxies (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 34}S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eulaers, Igor, E-mail: igor.eulaers@uantwerpen.be [Ethology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Jaspers, Veerle L.B., E-mail: veerle.jaspers@ntnu.no [Ethology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Halley, Duncan J., E-mail: duncan.halley@nina.no [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Postboks 5685 Sluppen, 7485 Trondheim (Norway); Lepoint, Gilles, E-mail: G.Lepoint@ulg.ac.be [MARE Centre, Oceanology, University of Liège, Allée de la Chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Nygård, Torgeir, E-mail: Torgeir.Nygard@nina.no [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Postboks 5685 Sluppen, 7485 Trondheim (Norway); Pinxten, Rianne, E-mail: annie.pinxten@uantwerpen.be [Ethology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.covaci@uantwerpen.be [Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Eens, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.eens@uantwerpen.be [Ethology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    Very little is known on the exposure of high trophic level species to current-use brominated (BFRs) and phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs), although observations on their persistence, bioaccumulation potential, and toxicity have been made. We investigated the accumulation of BFRs and PFRs, and their associations with dietary proxies (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 34}S), in plasma and feathers of White-tailed Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla nestlings from Trøndelag, Norway. In addition to accumulation of a wide range of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners in both plasma and feathers, all non-PBDE BFRs and PFRs could be measured in feathers, while in plasma only two of six PFRs, i.e. tris-(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris-(2,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCPP) were detected. PFR concentrations in feathers (0.95–3000 ng g{sup −1}) were much higher than selected organochlorines (OCs), such as polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (CB 153; 2.3–15 ng g{sup −1}) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′-DDE; 2.3–21 ng g{sup −1}), PBDEs (0.03–2.3 ng g{sup −1}) and non-PBDE BFRs (0.03–1.5 ng g{sup −1}). Non-significant associations of PFR concentrations in feathers with those in plasma (P ≥ 0.74), and their similarity to reported atmospheric PFR concentrations, may suggest atmospheric PFR deposition on feathers. Most OCs and PBDEs, as well as tris(chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(phenyl) phosphate (TPHP) and tri-(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) were associated to δ{sup 15}N and/or δ{sup 13}C (all P ≤ 0.02). Besides δ{sup 15}N enrichment, δ{sup 34}S was depleted in nestlings from fjords, inherently close to an urbanised centre. As such, both may have been a spatial proxy for anthropogenic disturbance, possible confounding their use as dietary proxy. - Highlights: • Non-PBDE BFRs and PFRs were highly detected in feathers, but poorly in plasma. • PFR levels in feathers were up to 100-fold those of BFRs and selected OCs.

  17. Seasonal mercury concentrations and {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C values of benthic macroinvertebrates and sediments from a historically polluted estuary in south central Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Jaramillo, Mauricio, E-mail: mdiazjaramillo@conicet.gov.ar [Aquatic Systems Research Unit, EULA Chile Environmental Sciences Centre, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Munoz, Claudia; Rudolph, Ignacio [Aquatic Systems Research Unit, EULA Chile Environmental Sciences Centre, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Servos, Mark [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, ON (Canada); Barra, Ricardo [Aquatic Systems Research Unit, EULA Chile Environmental Sciences Centre, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile)

    2013-01-01

    The Lenga Estuary is one of the most industrialized sites in south central Chile where the historic operation of chlor-alkali plants resulted in large quantities of mercury (Hg) being deposited into the estuary. This historical contamination may still represent a risk to the biota in the estuary. To investigate this four macroinvertebrates, Neotrypaea uncinata (ghostshrimp), Elminius kingii (barnacle), Hemigrapsus crenulatus (shore crab) and Perinereis gualpensis (ragworm) were collected seasonally from three different sites in the Lenga Estuary and one in a reference estuary (Tubul Estuary), and analyzed for Hg and stable isotopes ({delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C). Mercury concentrations in Lenga sediments ranged from 0.4 {+-} 0.1 to 13 {+-} 3 mg/kg, while those in Tubul sediments ranged from 0.02 {+-} 0.01 to 0.07 {+-} 0.09 mg/kg. Total Hg concentrations of invertebrates were significantly different between estuaries (p < 0.05), but not by species or season for each estuary (p > 0.05). In contrast, organic Hg concentrations were different by species and season with shore crab muscle tissues exhibiting the greatest percent difference. Site-specific relationships demonstrated that total Hg concentrations in ragworm best reflected the total Hg sediment mercury concentrations. Signatures of {delta}{sup 13}C were correlated to the organic Hg % rather than total Hg. This suggests that organic Hg concentrations in these species were related to the carbon sources. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hg in sediments and biota from Lenga Estuary were elevated compared to nearby estuary. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Invertebrates showed interspecific and seasonal differences in terms of organic Hg %. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total Hg levels in the ragworm best reflect Hg sediment gradient in Lenga Estuary. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interspecific variation in {delta}{sup 13}C signatures indicated different feeding modes. Black

  18. Self-diffusion measurements of methanol and 1-decanol in supercritical CO{sub 2} by {sup 13}C pulsed field gradient NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, S.; Mayne, C.L.; Grant, D.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Taylor, C.M.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Organic Analytical Chemistry Group

    1997-10-01

    A small amount of a highly polar compound, such as methanol, is frequently added to supercritical fluid (SCF) carbon dioxide to enhance its ability to dissolve polar molecules in SCF separation technology. Few diffusion coefficients in SCF mixtures have been reported in the literature. The pulsed field gradient spin-echo technique (PGSE) has been used extensively to measure self-diffusion in neat monohydric alcohols under pressure. Hurle et al. and Luedemann et al. showed that the experimental diffusion coefficients of methanol may be explained by a rough hard-sphere model (RHS) with a roughness parameter, A. In this paper, diffusion measurements are reported for CO{sub 2}-methanol and CO{sub 2}-decanol mixtures in supercritical fluids. Since methanol in CO{sub 2} is primarily monomeric at low concentration, the RHS model, that is accurate for most simple, non-associated liquids, should apply. Previous nuclear spin-lattice relaxation studies in SCF CO{sub 2} suggest a large local solvent density enhancement, or solvent clustering, near a alcohol solute molecule under SCF conditions. If solvent clustering occurs in the vicinity of alcohol solute molecules, it should affect the diffusion coefficients. The authors have made the requisite measurements and found that they corroborate their previous spin-relaxation data.

  19. Structural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, Remi [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Viel, Stephane [Aix-Marseille Universite - CNRS, UMR 6263: Institut des Sciences Moleculaires de Marseille, Chimiometrie et Spectrometries, F-13397 Marseille (France); Hidalgo, Manuel; Allard-Breton, Beatrice [ARKEMA, Centre de Recherche Rhone Alpes, Rue Henri Moissan, F-69493 Pierre-Benite (France); Thevand, Andre [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Charles, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.charles@univ-provence.fr [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France)

    2009-11-03

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been combined to achieve the complete microstructural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA-PMMA) copolymer synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Various PMAA-PMMA species could be identified which mainly differ in terms of terminaisons. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR experiments revealed the structure of the end-groups as well as the proportion of each co-monomer in the copolymers. These end-group masses were further confirmed from m/z values of doubly charged copolymer anions detected in the single stage mass spectrum. In contrast, copolymer composition derived from MS data was not consistent with NMR results, obviously due to strong mass bias well known to occur during electrospray ionization of these polymeric species. Tandem mass spectrometry could reveal the random nature of the copolymer based on typical dissociation reactions, i.e., water elimination occurred from any two contiguous MAA units while MAA-MMA pairs gave rise to the loss of a methanol molecule. Polymer backbone cleavages were also observed to occur and gave low abundance fragment ions which allowed the structure of the initiating end-group to be confirmed.

  20. {sup 13}C NMR hyperfine couplings, {ital T}{sub 1} anisotropy, and Korringa relations in Rb{sub 2}CsC{sub 60}: Search for effects of strong correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, C.H.; Stenger, V.A.; Recchia, C.H.; Hahm, C.; Gorny, K.; Nandor, V. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Buffinger, D.R.; Lee, S.M.; Ziebarth, R.P. [Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Initial considerations lead one to suspect that effects of strong correlation might be present in the alkali fulleride superconductors. We report {ital direct} measurements of {sup 13}C {ital T}{sub 1} anisotropy at 80 K in Rb{sub 2}CsC{sub 60} and compare, in the context of the Korringa relation, the inferred spin-dipolar contribution to 1/{ital T}{sub 1} with the widths of the measured powder pattern line shape. The results demonstrate that the Korringa relation, valid in the limit of noninteracting electrons, holds in this case. Taken together with other normal-state NMR behavior this result makes important effects of strong correlation appear unlikely. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. A new system for the simultaneous measurement of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N by IRMS and radiocarbon by AMS on gaseous samples: Design features and performances of the gas handling interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braione, Eugenia; Maruccio, Lucio; Quarta, Gianluca; D’Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.calcagnile@unisalento.it

    2015-10-15

    We present the general design features and preliminary performances of a new system for the simultaneous AMS-{sup 14}C and IRMS δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N measurements on samples with masses in the μg range. The system consists of an elemental analyzer (EA), a gas splitting unit (GSU), a IRMS system, a gas handling interface (GHI) and a sputtering ion source capable of accepting gaseous samples. A detailed description of the system and of the control software supporting unattended operation are presented together with the first performance tests carried out by analyzing samples with masses ranging from 8 μgC to 2.4 mgC. The performances of the system were tested in term of stability of the ion beam extracted from the ion source, precision and accuracy of the results by comparing the measured isotopic ratios with those expected for reference materials.

  2. Chemical constituents of Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. from Amazon forest: {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments; Constituintes quimicos de Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. da floresta Amazonica - atribuicao dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facundo, Valdir A. [Rondonia Univ., Porto Velho, RO (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Morais, Selene M. [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Braz Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas. Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais]. E-mail: braz@uenf.br

    2004-02-01

    In an ethanolic extract of leaves of Ottonia corcovadensis (Piperaceae) were identified sixteen terpenoids of essential oil and the three flavonoids 3',4',5,5',7-penta methoxyflavone (1), 3',4',5,7-tetra methoxyflavone (2) and 5-hydroxy-3',4',5',7-tetra methoxyflavone (3) and cafeic acid (4). Two amides (5 and 6) were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the roots. The structures were established by spectral analysis, meanly NMR (1D and 2D) and mass spectra. Extensive NMR analysis was also used to complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments of the flavonoids and amides. The components of the essential oil were identified by computer library search, retention indices and visual interpretation of mass spectra. (author)

  3. Iboga alkaloids from Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae) - unequivocal {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments: antioxidant activity; Alcaloides iboga de Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae) - atribuicao inequivoca dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono: atividade antioxidante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allana Kellen L.; Magalhaes, Ticiane S.; Monte, Francisco Jose Q.; Mattos, Marcos Carlos de; Oliveira, Maria Conceicao F. de; Almeida, Maria Mozarina B.; Lemos, Telma L.G.; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica], e-mail: tlemos@dqoi.ufc.br

    2009-07-01

    Six known alkaloids iboga type and the triterpene {alpha}- and {beta}-amyrin acetate were isolated from the roots and stems of Peschiera affinis. Their structures were characterized on the basis of spectral data mainly NMR and mass spectra. 1D and 2D NMR spectra were also used to unequivocal {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments of alkaloids. The ethanolic extract of roots, alkaloidic and no-alkaloidic fractions and iso-voacristine hydroxyindolenine and voacangine were evaluated for their antioxidative properties using an autographic assay based on {beta}-carotene bleaching on TLC plates, and also spectrophotometric detection by reduction of the stable DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical. (author)

  4. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N sequential correlations in ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Research Group Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy (Germany); Herbst, Christian [Ubon Ratchathani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai, E-mail: raman@fli-leibniz.de [Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Research Group Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue ‘i’ with that of residues ‘i−1’ and ‘i+1’ in ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of {sup 1}J{sub CαN} and {sup 2}J{sub CαN} couplings to transfer the {sup 15}N{sub x} magnetisation from amino acid residue ‘i’ to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C{sup α} heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ∼100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described.

  5. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  6. Defining fish community structure in Lake Winnipeg using stable isotopes (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 34}S): Implications for monitoring ecological responses and trophodynamics of mercury and other trace elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofukany, Amy F.A. [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B3 (Canada); Wassenaar, Leonard I. [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada); Bond, Alexander L., E-mail: alex.bond@rspb.org.uk [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada); Hobson, Keith A. [Environment Canada, 11 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 3H5 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    The ecological integrity of freshwater lakes is influenced by atmospheric and riverine deposition of contaminants, shoreline development, eutrophication, and the introduction of non-native species. Changes to the trophic structure of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, and consequently, the concentrations of contaminants and trace elements measured in tissues of native fishes, are likely attributed to agricultural runoff from the 977,800 km{sup 2} watershed and the arrival of non-native zooplankters and fishes. We measured δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N, and δ{sup 34}S along with concentrations of 15 trace elements in 17 native fishes from the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg in 2009 and 2010. After adjusting for differences in isotopic baseline values between the two basins, fishes in the south basin had consistently higher δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 34}S, and lower δ{sup 15}N. We found little evidence of biomagnification of trace elements at the community level, but walleye (Sander vitreus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) had higher mercury and selenium concentrations with increased trophic position, coincident with increased piscivory. There was evidence of growth dilution of cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, thallium, and vanadium, and bioaccumulation of mercury, which could be explained by increases in algal (and consequently, lake and fish) productivity. We conclude that the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg represent very different communities with different trophic structures and trace element concentrations. - Highlights: • Anthropogenic eutrophication and non-native species affect Lake Winnipeg’s ecosystem. • We measured stable isotopes and trace elements in 15 native fish species. • There was more evidence for growth dilution than biomagnification for most elements. • The trophic structures of the north and south basins were different. • These results will help determine the effects of recent arrival of zebra mussels.

  7. CARBON-RICH PRESOLAR GRAINS FROM MASSIVE STARS: SUBSOLAR {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C AND {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N RATIOS AND THE MYSTERY OF {sup 15}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatari, M. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 15-17, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Zinner, E. [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K. [E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics, Dept of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Trappitsch, R. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences and Chicago Center for Cosmochemistry, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Herwig, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P5C2 (Canada); Fryer, C. [Computational Physics and Methods (CCS-2), LANL, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Hirschi, R. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Timmes, F. X. [The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N. The short-lived radionuclides {sup 22}Na and {sup 26}Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic {sup 22}Ne from the decay of {sup 22}Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of {sup 14}N and {sup 15}N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in the solar system.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Tomography of tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1983-10-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography.

  9. Determination of the percentage of quitine desacetilation reaction by solid state carbon-13 NMR; Determinacao do porcentual de reacao de desacetilacao de quitina por RMN {sup 13} C no estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin, Ricardo J. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento; Cass, Quezia B.; Bassi, Ana L. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Lab. de Sintese Organica

    1997-12-31

    Quitine is a bi-polymer largely found in invertebrates. As most compounds of this class are insoluble in common organic solvents, the des-acetylation percentile was obtained by carbon-13 solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The methodology is presented. Results are presented 3 refs., 1 figs.

  10. Analyzing sites of OH radical attack (ring vs. side chain) in oxidation of substituted benzenes via dual stable isotope analysis (δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 2}H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Geronimo, Inacrist; Paneth, Piotr [Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Lodz University of Technology, Żeromskiego 116, 90-924 Łódź (Poland); Schindelka, Janine; Schaefer, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut [Department of Chemistry, Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Vogt, Carsten [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Richnow, Hans H., E-mail: hans.richnow@ufz.de [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    OH radicals generated by the photolysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can degrade aromatic contaminants by either attacking the aromatic ring to form phenolic products or oxidizing the substituent. We characterized these competing pathways by analyzing the carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation (ε{sub C} and ε{sub H}) of various substituted benzenes. For benzene and halobenzenes that only undergo ring addition, low values of ε{sub C} (− 0.7‰ to − 1.0‰) were observed compared with theoretical values (− 7.2‰ to − 8‰), possibly owing to masking effect caused by pre-equilibrium between the substrate and OH radical preceding the rate-limiting step. In contrast, the addition of OH radicals to nitrobenzene ring showed a higher ε{sub C} (− 3.9‰), probably due to the lower reactivity. Xylene isomers, anisole, aniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, and benzonitrile yielded normal ε{sub H} values (− 2.8‰ to − 29‰) indicating the occurrence of side-chain reactions, in contrast to the inverse ε{sub H} (11.7‰ to 30‰) observed for ring addition due to an sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} hybridization change at the reacting carbon. Inverse ε{sub H} values for toluene (14‰) and ethylbenzene (30‰) were observed despite the formation of side-chain oxidation products, suggesting that ring addition has a larger contribution to isotope fractionation. Dual element isotope slopes (∆ δ{sup 2}H/∆δ{sup 13}C) therefore allow identification of significant degradation pathways of aromatic compounds by photochemically induced OH radicals. Issues that should be addressed in future studies include quantitative determination of the contribution of each competing pathway to the observed isotope fractionation and characterization of physical processes preceding the reaction that could affect isotope fractionation. - Highlights: • Isotope fractionation to investigate photoreaction pathways of substituted benzenes • Normal {sup 13}C AKIE and inverse {sup 2}H AKIE for

  11. Synergistic effect of the simultaneous chemometric analysis of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic and stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C) data: Application to wine analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monakhova, Yulia B., E-mail: yul-monakhova@mail.ru [Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, Karlsruhe 76187 (Germany); Bruker Biospin GmbH, Silberstreifen, Rheinstetten 76287 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya Street 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Godelmann, Rolf [Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, Karlsruhe 76187 (Germany); Hermann, Armin [Landesuntersuchungsamt -Institut für Lebensmittelchemie und Arzneimittelprüfung, Emy-Roeder-Straße 1, Mainz 55129 (Germany); Kuballa, Thomas [Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, Karlsruhe 76187 (Germany); Cannet, Claire; Schäfer, Hartmut; Spraul, Manfred [Bruker Biospin GmbH, Silberstreifen, Rheinstetten 76287 (Germany); Rutledge, Douglas N. [AgroParisTech, UMR 1145, Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, Paris F-75005 (France)

    2014-06-23

    Highlights: • {sup 1}H NMR profilings of 718 wines were fused with stable isotope analysis data (SNIF-NMR, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C). • The best improvement was obtained for prediction of the geographical origin of wine. • Certain enhancement was also obtained for the year of vintage (from 88 to 97% for {sup 1}H NMR to 99% for the fused data). • Independent component analysis was used as an alternative chemometric tool for classification. - Abstract: It is known that {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy represents a good tool for predicting the grape variety, the geographical origin, and the year of vintage of wine. In the present study we have shown that classification models can be improved when {sup 1}H NMR profiles are fused with stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C) data. Variable selection based on clustering of latent variables was performed on {sup 1}H NMR data. Afterwards, the combined data of 718 wine samples from Germany were analyzed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), factorial discriminant analysis (FDA) and independent components analysis (ICA). Moreover, several specialized multiblock methods (common components and specific weights analysis (ComDim), consensus PCA and consensus PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The best improvement in comparison with {sup 1}H NMR data was obtained for prediction of the geographical origin (up to 100% for the fused data, whereas stable isotope data resulted only in 60–70% correct prediction and {sup 1}H NMR data alone in 82–89% respectively). Certain enhancement was obtained also for the year of vintage (from 88 to 97% for {sup 1}H NMR to 99% for the fused data), whereas in case of grape varieties improved models were not obtained. The combination of {sup 1}H NMR data with stable isotope data improves efficiency of classification models for geographical origin and vintage of wine and can be potentially used for other food products as well.

  12. In Folio Respiratory Fluxomics Revealed by {sup 13}C Isotopic Labeling and H/D Isotope Effects Highlight the Non-cyclic Nature of the Tricarboxylic Acid 'Cycle' in Illuminated Leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcherkez, G.; Mahe, A.; Gauthier, P.; Hodges, M. [Institut de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Plateforme Metabolisme-Metabolome IFR87, Batiment 630, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Tcherkez, G.; Mauve, C.; Cornic, G. [Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale, Ecologie Systematique Evolution (G.C.), Batiment 630, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Gout, E.; Bligny, R. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2009-07-01

    While the possible importance of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle reactions for leaf photosynthesis operation has been recognized, many uncertainties remain on whether TCA cycle biochemistry is similar in the light compared with the dark. It is widely accepted that leaf day respiration and the metabolic commitment to TCA decarboxylation are down-regulated in illuminated leaves. However, the metabolic basis (i.e. the limiting steps involved in such a down-regulation) is not well known. Here, we investigated the in vivo metabolic fluxes of individual reactions of the TCA cycle by developing two isotopic methods, {sup 13}C tracing and fluxomics and the use of H/D isotope effects, with Xanthium strumarium leaves. We provide evidence that the TCA 'cycle' does not work in the forward direction like a proper cycle but, rather, operates in both the reverse and forward directions to produce fumarate and glutamate, respectively. Such a functional division of the cycle plausibly reflects the compromise between two contrasted forces: (1) the feedback inhibition by NADH and ATP on TCA enzymes in the light, and (2) the need to provide pH-buffering organic acids and carbon skeletons for nitrate absorption and assimilation. (authors)

  13. Refined structure of a flexible heptasaccharide using {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H NMR residual dipolar couplings in concert with NOE and long range scalar coupling constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Bush, C. Allen [University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2001-02-15

    The heptasaccharide isolated from the cell wall polysaccharide of Streptococcus mitis J22 serves as an important model for the dynamics and conformation of complex polysaccharides, illustrating the nature of flexibility with rigid epitopes joined by flexible hinges. One-bond C-H residual dipolar couplings ({sup 1}D{sub CH}) and long-range H-H residual dipolar couplings ({sup n}D{sub HH}) were measured for the heptasaccharide in a cetylpyridinium chloride/hexanol/brine lamellar liquid crystal medium. A method is proposed to determine the {sup n}D{sub HH} in natural abundance based on a {sup 13}C resolved {sup 1}H TOCSY pulse sequence previously published to determine the homonuclear scalar couplings. Different methods for interpretation of the {sup 1}D{sub CH} and the {sup n}D{sub HH} residual dipolar coupling data obtained were compared and combined with the NOE and long-range H,C and C,C scalar couplings available for this heptasaccharide. A flexible model of the heptasaccharide was determined in which two structurally well-defined regions involving four and two sugar residues, respectively are joined by a flexible hinge which involves two 1{sup {yields}}6 glycosidic linkages.

  14. Solid-state structures of (R sub 3 P) sub 2 PtX sub 2 complexes as determined by a combination of sup 13 C( sup 1 H) and sup 31 P( sup 1 H) NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, J.A.; Nelson, J.H. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno (USA)); Baltusis, L. (Varian Instrument Div., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1990-02-21

    Cross-polarization, combined with magic-angle spinning, has been employed to obtain high-resolution solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 31}P NMR spectra of a series of 31 (R{sub 3}P){sub 2}PtX{sub 2} complexes. These data together with spectra obtained in solution were used to compare the solid-state structures with those in solution. It was found that most of these complexes, which have regular square-planar structures in solution, are distorted in the solid state. The extent of the solid-state distortion is a function of the bulk of the coordinated ligands and increases as the ligand size increases. The solid-state distortions appear to result from intramolecular steric effects for cis-(R{sub 3}P){sub 2}PtX{sub 2} and probably from intermolecular crystal packing forces for trans-(R{sub 3}P){sub 2}PtX{sub 2}. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Uniform {sup 15}N- and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeling of proteins in mammalian cells and solution structure of the amino terminal fragment of u-PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, A.P.; Petros, A.M.; Meadows, R.P.; Mazar, A.P.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Pederson, T.M.; Fesik, S.W. [Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) is a 54-kDa glycoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, a broad-specificity protease responsible for the degradation of fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. The u-PA protein consists of three individual modules: a growth factor domain (GFD), a kringle, and a serine protease domain. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) includes the GFD-responsible for u-PA binding to its receptor-and the kringle domains. This protein was expressed and uniformly {sup 15}N-and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled in mammalian cells by methods that will be described. In addition, we present the three-dimensional structure of ATF that was derived from 1299 NOE-derived distance restraints along with the {phi} angle and hydrogen bonding restraints. Although the individual domains in the structures were highly converged, the two domains are structurally independent. The overall structures of the individual domains are very similar to the structures of homologous proteins. However, important structural differences between the growth factor domain of u-PA and other homologous proteins were observed in the region that has been implicated in binding the urokinase receptor. These results may explain, in part, why other growth factors show no appreciable affinity for the urokinase receptor.

  16. Measurement of the signs of methyl {sup 13}C chemical shift differences between interconverting ground and excited protein states by R{sub 1{rho}}: an application to {alpha}B-crystallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Andrew J.; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion (CPMG RD) NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for quantifying the kinetics and thermodynamics of millisecond time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between a visible ground state and one or more minor, sparsely populated invisible 'excited' conformational states. Recently it has also become possible to determine atomic resolution structural models of excited states using a wide array of CPMG RD approaches. Analysis of CPMG RD datasets provides the magnitudes of the chemical shift differences between the ground and excited states, {Delta}{omega}, but not the sign. In order to obtain detailed structural insights from, for example, excited state chemical shifts and residual dipolar coupling measurements, these signs are required. Here we present an NMR experiment for obtaining signs of {sup 13}C chemical shift differences of {sup 13}CH{sub 3} methyl groups using weak field off-resonance R{sub 1{rho}} relaxation measurements. The accuracy of the method is established by using an exchanging system where the invisible, excited state can be converted to the visible, ground state by altering sample conditions so that the signs of {Delta}{omega} values obtained from the spin-lock approach can be validated against those measured directly. Further, the spin-lock experiments are compared with the established H(S/M)QC approach for measuring signs of chemical shift differences and the relative strengths of each method are discussed. In the case of the 650 kDa human {alpha}B-crystallin complex where there are large transverse relaxation differences between ground and excited state spins the R{sub 1{rho}} method is shown to be superior to more 'traditional' experiments for sign determination.

  17. Sediment features, macrozoobenthic assemblages and trophic relationships ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N analysis) following a dystrophic event with anoxia and sulphide development in the Santa Giusta lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magni, P. [CNR-IAMC National Research Council - Institute for Coastal Marine Environment c/o IMC - International Marine Centre, Loc. Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); IMC - International Marine Centre, Loc. Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.magni@iamc.cnr.it; Rajagopal, S. [Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Velde, G. van der [Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); National Museum of Natural History Naturalis, P.O. Box 9517, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Fenzi, G. [IMC - International Marine Centre, Loc. Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); Kassenberg, J. [Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vizzini, S.; Mazzola, A. [Dipartimento di Biologia Animale, Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 18, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Giordani, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Universita di Parma, Via Usberti 33/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    Macrozoobenthic assemblages and stable carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) isotope values of various primary producers (macroalgae and angiosperms) and consumers (macroinvertebrate filter/suspension feeders, deposit feeders, detritivores/omnivores and carnivores and fishes) were studied in the Santa Giusta lagoon (Sardinia, Italy) before (spring) and after (autumn) a dystrophic event which occurred in the summer of 2004. A few days after the dystrophy, the physico-chemical characteristics of sediments and macrozoobenthic assemblages were also investigated. In the latter occasion, high total organic carbon (3.9%) and organic matter (15.9%) contents of surface sediments went together with peaks in acid-volatile sulphide concentrations. Certain immediate effects were quite extreme, such as the drastic reduction in macrozoobenthos and the massive fish kill in August 2004. Among the macrozoobenthos, there were few individuals of chironomid larvae and Capitella cf. capitata left. However, by October, chironomid larvae were numerous, indicating a lack of predators (e.g. fish) and competitors. In addition, some bivalve species and polychaetes which were absent, or present in small numbers before the event, became relatively numerous. The results are discussed based on a knowledge of the sulphide tolerance of these species. Stable isotope analysis clearly showed that the basal level of the food web for most consumers consisted mainly of macroalgae and sedimentary organic matter, and that the values before and after the dystrophic event were not significantly different from one another. This indicates that the relations among different trophic levels were quickly restored following the dystrophic event.

  18. Whole body glucose kinetics in type I diabetes studied with (6,6-/sup 2/H) and (U-/sup 13/C)-glucose and the artificial B-cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmaun, D.; Cirillo, D.; Koziet, J.; Chauvet, D.; Young, V.R.; Robert, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Dynamic aspects of whole body glucose metabolism were assessed in ten young adult insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic men. Using a primed, continuous intravenous infusion of (6,6-/sup 2/H)glucose and (U-/sup 13/C)glucose, endogenous production, tissue uptake, carbon recycling, and oxidation of glucose were measured in the postabsorptive state. These studies were undertaken after blood glucose had been maintained overnight at 5.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/L (n = 10), and on another night at 10.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/L (n = 4) or 15.2 +/- 0.6 mmol/L (n = 6). In the normoglycemic state, endogenous glucose production averaged 2.15 +/- 0.13 mg x kg-1 x min-1. This value, as well as the rate of glucose carbon recycling (0.16 +/- 0.04 mg x kg-1 x min-1) and glucose oxidation (1.52 +/- 0.16 mg x kg-1 x min-1) are comparable to those found in nondiabetic controls. In the hyperglycemic states at 10 or 15 mmol/L, endogenous glucose production was increased by 11% (P less than .01) and 60% (P less than .01) compared to the normoglycemic states, respectively. Glucose carbon recycling contributed only a small percentage to this variation in glucose production (15% at the 15 mmol/L glucose level). This suggests that if gluconeogenesis participates in the increased glucose output, it is not dependent on a greater systemic supply of three-carbon precursors. The increased rate of glucose production in the hyperglycemic state was quantitatively offset by a rise in urinary glucose excretion. Glucose tissue uptake, as well as glucose oxidation, did not vary between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic states.

  19. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  20. The low temperature oxidation of Athabasca oil sand asphaltene observed from {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, and pulsed field gradient spin-echo proton n.m.r. spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desando, M.A.; Lahanjar, G.; Ripmeester, J.A.; Zupancic, I. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Division of Chemistry

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-13 and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of chemically derivatized, by phase transfer methylation and trifluoroacetylation, Athabasca oil sand asphaltene, reveal a broad site distribution of different types of hydroxyl-containing functional groups, viz., carboxylic acids, phenols, and alcohols. The low temperature air oxidation of asphaltene, at ca. 130{degree}C for 3 days, generates a few additional carboxyl and phenolic groups. These results are consistent with a mechanism in which diaryl methylene and ether moieties react with oxygen. Self-diffusion coefficients, from the pulsed field gradient spin-echo proton magnetic resonance technique, suggest that low temperature oxidation does not appreciably alter the average particle size and diffusion properties of asphaltene in deuterochloroform. 55 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Oxygen as a paramagnetic probe for nuclear magnetic resonance: structure and paramagnetic profile of a lipid bilayer/membrane model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abdul Wahid, M.S

    2005-07-01

    Paramagnetic contact shifts and relaxation rate enhancements from molecular oxygen dissolved in a model membrane, were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model membrane system was an isotropic bicelle formed using 1-myristelaidoyl-2-myristoyl-d27-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (MLMPC), a custom phospholipid, and 1-2-dihexanoyl-d22-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H spectra of MLMPC were assigned. Molecular oxygen was delivered at external pressures of 20 and 50 atm. Paramagnetic contact shifts were found to scale with the oxygen solubility gradient in the lipid bilayer, were found to be invariant to temperature changes in the region studied (288K to 331K), and scaled linearly with changes in oxygen pressure. Relaxation rate enhancements from oxygen were low in the headgroup region and increased to a roughly constant rate in the acyl chain region. Rates were comparable to values predicted by simple thermodynamic theories which take into account the observed gradients in diffusion rates and solubility of oxygen in bilayers. (author)

  2. magnetic order studied by nuclear methods

    CERN Document Server

    Reichl, C

    2001-01-01

    investigated within the frame of this work. The studies on the highly concentrated deuterides revealed a gradual loss in local field due to a distribution of 'local Curie temperatures' depending on the number of Fe neighbours and their distances from the Moessbauer nucleus. On rising the temperature, during a magnetic transition, an increasing number of Fe sites with different local environment loose their hyperfine fields, whereas bulk measurements showed a relatively sharp, however, incomplete transition. By using a combination of neutron diffraction- and muon spin relaxation studies the complex magnetic phase diagram of the system Ce(Rh,Ru) sub 3 B sub 2 , where weak magnetic moments exist, could be studied. There, transitions from para- to ferromagnetism, and more complicated magnetic structures could be observed. Due to the existence of several isotopes of B and Ru, each carrying different nuclear spins and magnetic moment, particularly complicated second moment simulations for interpreting the muon data...

  3. Combination of {sup 13}C/{sup 113}Cd NMR, potentiometry, and voltammetry in characterizing the interactions between Cd and two models of the main components of soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoble, V. [IFRE PMSE 112, CEREGE (UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne), Aix-en-Provence (France); Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire PROTEE, La Garde Cedex (France); Garnier, C. [Universite du Sud Toulon Var, Laboratoire PROTEE, La Garde Cedex (France); Universite Bordeaux I, ISM-LPTC (UMR CNRS 5255), Talence (France); Masion, A.; Garnier, J.M. [IFRE PMSE 112, CEREGE (UMR 6635 CNRS/Universite Paul Cezanne), Aix-en-Provence (France); Ziarelli, F. [CNRS, Federation des Sciences Chimiques de Marseille, Spectropole, Marseille cedex 20 (France)

    2008-01-15

    This work allowed the characterization of the Cd-binding sites of two compounds taken as models for exudates, the main components of soil organic matter (SOM). The studied compounds were exopolysaccharides (EPS), specifically exudates of roots (polygalacturonic acid) and of soil bacteria (Phytagel). Potentiometric acid-base titrations were performed and fitting of the obtained results indicated the presence of two main classes of acidic sites, defined by their pK{sub a} values, for both EPS but of a different nature when comparing the two compounds. The two studied exopolysaccharides presented different acidic/basic site ratios: 0.15 for Phytagel and 0.76 for polygalacturonic acid. Spectroscopic techniques ({sup 13}C/{sup 113}Cd NMR, FTIR) distinguished different Cd surroundings for each of the studied EPS, which is in agreement with the titration results. Furthermore, these analyses indicated the presence of -COOH and -OH groups in various proportions for each exopolysaccharide, which should be linked to their reactivity towards cadmium. Cadmium titrations (voltammetric measurements) also differentiated different binding sites for each compound and allowed the determination of the strength of the Cd-binding site of the EPS. Fitting of the results of such voltammetric measurements was performed using PROSECE (Programme d'Optimisation et de Speciation Chimique dans l'Environnement), a software coupling chemical speciation calculation and binding parameter optimization. The fitting, taking into account the Cd{sup 2+}/H{sup +} competition towards exopolysaccharides, confirmed the acid-base titrations and spectroscopic analyses by revealing two classes of binding sites: (i) one defined as a strong complexant regarding its Cd{sup 2+}-EPS association (logK = 9-10.4) and with basic functionality regarding H{sup +}-EPS association (pK{sub a} = 11.3-11.7), and (ii) one defined as a weak complexant (logK = 7.1-8.2) and with acidic functionality (pK{sub a} = 3

  4. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ{sup 13}C, Δ{sup 14}C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-15

    Circumpolar permafrost soils store about half of the global soil organic carbon pool. These huge amounts of organic matter (OM) could accumulate due to low temperatures and water saturated soil conditions over the course of millennia. Currently most of this OM remains frozen and therefore does not take part in the active carbon cycle, making permafrost soils a globally important carbon sink. Over the last decades mean annual air temperatures in the Arctic increased stronger than the global mean and this trend is projected to continue. As a result the permafrost carbon pool is under climate pressure possibly creating a positive climate feedback due to the thaw-induced release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Arctic warming will lead to increased annual permafrost thaw depths and Arctic river runoff likely resulting in enhanced mobilization and export of old, previously frozen soil-derived OM. Consequently, the great arctic rivers play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles by connecting the large permafrost carbon pool of their hinterlands with the arctic shelf seas and the Arctic Ocean. The first part of this thesis deals with particulate organic matter (POM) from the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay. The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial OM from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea. The permafrost soils from the Lena catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C and Δ{sup 14}C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex) were analyzed. The lignin compositions of these samples are

  5. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beirsdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J Crespo R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Utter, S. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-26

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron' s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to

  6. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  7. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  8. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  9. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, J. R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  10. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  11. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  12. Nuclear Spin Statistics of extended aromatic C48N12 Azafullerene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, K

    2004-05-06

    We have presented the nuclear spin statistics of the novel extended aromatic C{sub 48}N{sub 12} azafullerene. The nuclear spin multiplets and statistical weights of {sup 14}N spin-1 bosons are provided. In addition we have also provided the {sup 13}C nuclear spin species and spin statistical weights of {sup 13}C{sub 48}N{sub 12}. The spin statistical weights and spin species show that the presence of {sup 14}N nuclei in the aromatic fullerene can provide unique experimental opportunity to investigate the nuclear spin species.

  13. Quantum information processing through nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulnes, J.D.; Sarthour, R.S.; Oliveira, I.S. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonk, F.A.; Azevedo, E.R. de; Bonagamba, T.J. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Freitas, J.C.C. [Espirito Santo Univ., Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2005-09-15

    We discuss the applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to quantum information processing, focusing on the use of quadrupole nuclei for quantum computing. Various examples of experimental implementation of logic gates are given and compared to calculated NMR spectra and their respective density matrices. The technique of Quantum State Tomography for quadrupole nuclei is briefly described, and examples of measured density matrices in a two-qubit I = 3/2 spin system are shown. Experimental results of density matrices representing pseudo-Bell states are given, and an analysis of the entropy of theses states is made. Considering an NMR experiment as a depolarization quantum channel we calculate the entanglement fidelity and discuss the criteria for entanglement in liquid state NMR quantum information. A brief discussion on the perspectives for NMR quantum computing is presented at the end. (author)

  14. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  16. Sensitive Magnetic Control of Ensemble Nuclear Spin Hyperpolarisation in Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hai-Jing; Avalos, Claudia E; Seltzer, Scott J; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Bajaj, Vikram S

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation, which transfers the spin polarisation of electrons to nuclei, is routinely applied to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance; it is also critical in spintronics, particularly when spin hyperpolarisation can be produced and controlled optically or electrically. Here we show the complete polarisation of nuclei located near the optically-polarised nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond. When approaching the ground-state level anti-crossing condition of the NV electron spins, 13C nuclei in the first-shell are polarised in a pattern that depends sensitively and sharply upon the magnetic field. Based on the anisotropy of the hyperfine coupling and of the optical polarisation mechanism, we predict and observe a complete reversal of the nuclear spin polarisation with a few-mT change in the magnetic field. The demonstrated sensitive magnetic control of nuclear polarisation at room temperature will be useful for sensitivity-enhanced NMR, nuclear-based spintronics, and quant...

  17. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Nuclear Magnetic Ordering in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jyrkkiö, T.A.; Huiku, M.T.; Siemensmeyer, K.;

    1989-01-01

    to depend strongly on the external magnetic field between zero and the critical fieldB c=0.25 mT, indicating the existence of at least two antiferromagnetic phases. The results are compared to previous measurements of the magnetic susceptibility. Theoretical calculations do not provide a full explanation......We have constructed a two-stage nuclear demagnetization cryostat for neutron diffraction studies of nuclear magnetism in copper. The cryostat is combined with a two-axis neutron spectrometer which can use both polarized and unpolarized neutrons. By demagnetizing highly polarized copper nuclear...

  18. Nuclear Composition of Magnetized GRB Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, Sanshiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the fraction of metal nuclei in the relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts associated with core-collapse supernovae. We simulate the fallback in jet-induced explosions with two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics calculations and the jet acceleration with steady, radial, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics calculations, and derive detail nuclear composition of the jet by postprocessing calculation. We found that if the temperature at the jet launch site is above $4.7\\times 10^9$K, quasi-statistical equilibrium (QSE) is established and heavy nuclei are dissociated to light particles such as $^4$He during the acceleration of the jets. The criterion for the survival of metal nuclei is written in terms of the isotropic jet luminosity as $L_{\\rm j}^{\\rm iso} \\lesssim 3.9\\times 10^{50}(R_{\\rm i}/10^7{\\rm cm})^2 (1+\\sigma_{\\rm i})~{\\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, where $R_{\\rm i}$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm i}$ are the initial radius of the jets and the initial magnetization parameter, respectively. If the jet is initially d...

  19. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES OF URANOCENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Wayne D.; Streitwieser, Jr., Andrew

    1979-12-01

    In the past several years a substantial amount of work has been devoted toward evaluation of the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed isotropic shifts in H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of uranium(IV) organometallic compounds. One reason for interest in this area arises from using the presence of contact shifts as a prcbe for covalent character in the uranium carbon bonds in these compounds. Several extensive {sup 1}H NNR studies on Cp{sub 3} U-X compounds and less extensive studies on uranocenes have been reported. Interpretation of these results suggests that contact shifts-contribute significantly to the observed isotropic shifts. Their presence has been taken as indicative of covalent character of metal carbon bonds in these systems, but agreement is not complete. In this paper we shall review critically the work reported on uranocenes in the light of recent results and report recent work on attempted separation of the observed isotropic shifts in alkyluranocenes into contact and pseudocontact components.

  20. Nuclear states with anomalously large radius (size isomers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogloblin, A. A.; Demyanova, A. S., E-mail: a.s.demyanova@bk.ru; Danilov, A. N. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Belyaeva, T. L. [Ciudad Universitaria, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Meéxico (Mexico); Goncharov, S. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. [University of Jyvaäskylaä (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Methods of determination of the nuclear excited state radii are discussed together with the recently obtained data on the states of some light nuclei having abnormally large radii (size isomers). It is shown that such states include excited neutron-halo states in {sup 9}Be, {sup 11}Be, and {sup 13}C and some alpha-cluster states in {sup 12}C, {sup 11}B, and {sup 13}C. Among the latter ones, there is the well-known Hoyle state in {sup 12}C—the structure of this state exhibit rudimentary features of alpha-particle states.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C9H11ITe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C10H13ITe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meksuriyen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of anode exhaust of direct methanol fuel cells without isotope enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Young Seok; Hwang, Reo Yun; Han, Ochee [Western Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert the chemical energy of fuels such as natural gas, gasoline, and methanol, into electricity. Fuel cells more efficiently use energy than internal combustion engines and do not produce undesirable pollutants, such as NO{sub x} ,SO{sub x} and particulates. Fuel cells can be distinguished from one another by their electrolytes. Among the various direct alcohol fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have been developed most. However, DMFCs have several practical problems such as methanol crossove r from an anode to a cathode and slow methanol oxidation reaction rates. Therefore, understanding the electrochemical reaction mechanisms of DMFCs may provide clues to solve these problems, and various analytical methods have been employed to examine these mechanisms. We demonstrated that {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for analyzing anode exhausts of DMFCs operated with methanol without any isotope enrichment. However, the low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy hindered our efforts to detect minor reaction intermediates. Therefore, sensitivity enhancement techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR methods and/or presaturation methods to increase the dynamic range of the proton spectra by pre-saturating large water signals, are expected to be useful to detect low-concentration species.

  5. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  6. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tomimatsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance involving quantum Hall states (QHSs was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear magnetic resonance in the simplest pseudospin quantum Hall ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. W.; Yang, K. F.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B.; Hirayama, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in the simplest pseudospin quantum Hall ferromagnet (QHF) of an InSb two-dimensional electron gas with a large g factor using tilted magnetic fields. The DNP-induced amplitude change in a resistance spike of the QHF at large current enables observation of the resistively detected nuclear magnetic resonance of the high nuclear spin isotope I115n with nine quadrupole splittings. Our results demonstrate the importance of domain structures in the DNP process. The nuclear spin relaxation time T1 in this QHF was relatively short (˜120s) and almost temperature independent.

  8. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallen, G; Kunz, S; Amand, T; Bouet, L; Kuroda, T; Mano, T; Paget, D; Krebs, O; Marie, X; Sakoda, K; Urbaszek, B

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain--that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  9. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallen, G.; Kunz, S.; Amand, T.; Bouet, L.; Kuroda, T.; Mano, T.; Paget, D.; Krebs, O.; Marie, X.; Sakoda, K.; Urbaszek, B.

    2014-02-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain—that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  10. Pulse Design in Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palani, Ravi Shankar

    2017-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation is centred on the theory of experimental methods in solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which deals with interaction of electromagnetic radiation with nuclei in a magnetic field and possessing a fundamental quantum mechanical property...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measure

  12. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, D G

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  13. Low frequency spin dynamics in the quantum magnet copper pyrazine dinitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehne, H.; Klauss, H.H. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Dresden Dresden (Germany); Institut fuer Physik der Kondensierten Materie, TU Braunschweig (Germany); Guenther, M. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Dresden Dresden (Germany); Grossjohann, S.; Brenig, W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Braunschweig (Germany); Litterst, F.J. [Institut fuer Physik der Kondensierten Materie, TU Braunschweig (Germany); Reyes, A.P.; Kuhns, P.L. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Turnbull, M.M.; Landee, C.P. [Carlson School of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Clark University, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The S = 1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain exhibits a magnetic field driven quantum critical point. We study the low frequency spin dynamics in copper pyrazine dinitrate (CuPzN), a realization of this model system of quantum magnetism, by means of {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy. Measurements of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate T{sub 1}{sup -} {sup 1} in the vicinity of the saturation field are compared with quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the dynamic structure factor. Both show a strong divergence of low energy excitations at temperatures in the quantum regime. The analysis of the anisotropic T{sub 1}{sup -} {sup 1}-rates and frequency shifts allows one to disentangle the contributions from transverse and longitudinal spin fluctuations for a selective study and to determine the transfer of delocalized spin moments from copper to the neighboring nitrogen atoms. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas; Ganssle, Paul; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnet...

  15. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  16. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor.

  17. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kessel, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Fusion Technology Institute; Titus, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems.

  19. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  20. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Stephen [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramesh [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  1. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TonThat, Dinh M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  2. Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.; Zilm, K.; Pines, A.

    1983-01-01

    In polycrystalline samples, NMR "powder spectra" are broad and much structural information is lost as a result of the orientational disorder. In this Letter Fourier-transform NMR in zero magnetic field is described. With no preferred direction in space, all crystallites contribute equivalently and resolved dipolar splittings can be interpreted directly in terms of internuclear distances. This opens the possiblity of molecular structure determination without the need for single crystals or ori...

  3. Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.; Zilm, K.; Pines, A.

    1983-05-30

    In polycrystalline samples, NMR ''powder spectra'' are broad and much structural information is lost as a result of the orientational disorder. In this Letter Fourier transform NMR in zero magnetic field is described. With no preferred direction in space, all crystallites contribute equivalently and resolved dipolar splittings can be interpreted directly in terms of internuclear distances. This opens the possibility of molecular structure determination without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  4. Realization of a Quantum Scheduling Algorithm Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Fu; DENG Zhi-Wei; PAN Yan-Na; LU Zhi-Heng

    2004-01-01

    The quantum scheduling algorithm proposed by Grover is generalized to extend its scope of applications. The generalized algorithm proposed here is realized on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer. The experimental results show that the generalized algorithm can work efficiently in the case that Grover's scheduling algorithm is completely invalid, and represent the quantum advantages when qubits replace classical bits.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water motion in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Thesis treats one of the new techniques in plant science i.e. nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRi) applied to water motion in plants. It is a challenge, however, to measure this motion in intact plants quantitatively, because plants impose specific problems when studied using

  6. NMR of TMV. Nuclear magnetic resonance of tobacco mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de J.L.

    1978-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of conventional 13 C and 1 H high resolution Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic resonance (HR FT NMR) to Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and its protein oligo- and polymers and some other largebiological systems. The rod-like (TMV) consists of 2

  7. Neutron studies of nuclear magnetism at ultralow temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemensmeyer, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Lefmann, K.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic order in copper and silver has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in these simple, diamagnetic metals at temperatures below 50 nK and 560 pK, respectively. Both crystallize in the FCC-symmetry which is fully frustrated for nearest...

  8. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  9. Nuclear magnetic response imaging of sap flow in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging of long distance transport in plants. Long distance transport in plants is an enigmatic process. The theoretical framework that describes its basic properties has been in place for almost a century, yet at the same time only little is

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water motion in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Thesis treats one of the new techniques in plant science i.e. nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRi) applied to water motion in plants. It is a challenge, however, to measure this motion in intact plants quantitatively, because plants impose specific problems when studied using NMRi. At high

  11. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  12. Hydrochemistry and isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N) in six dunes lagoons in the National Park of Lencois Maranhenses, Maranhao, Brazil; Hidroquimica e composicao isotopica (δ13C, δ15N) em seis lagoas de dunas no Parque Nacional dos Lencois Maranhenses, Maranhao, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Junior, Jayme Teixeira; Suzuki, Marina Satika; Meirelles, Brunele de Araujo; Rangel, Thiago Pessanha; Oliveira, Braulio Cherene Vaz de, E-mail: jaymetr@gmail.com, E-mail: marina@uenf.com, E-mail: brunelemeirelles@hotmail.com, E-mail: thiprangel@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: brauliocherene@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia. Lab. de Ciencias Ambientais

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the physicochemical parameters, nutrients and isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N) of dissolved organic matter and MPS in six lakes located in the Maranhenses National Park, Maranhao State, under varying degrees of anthropic impact and distance from the sea. The physical and chemical parameters were measured in the field with portable devices; for total alkalinity, nutrients and photosynthetic pigments, samples were collected and analysed in the laboratory; the isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen was determined from the particulate material retained on the filter and in the extract generated in the PPL filtration resin column. The limnological variables were assessed in both the dry and rainy seasons. The high rainfall caused a dilution effect for most of the elements studied in the rainy season. The elemental composition of the particulate fraction was 58% lower than the fraction dissolved. The carbon isotopic composition was lighter in the rainy season as a result of dilution and loading of allochthonous impoverished organic matter. (author)

  13. Development of a miniature permanent magnetic circuit for nuclear magnetic resonance chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rongsheng; Yi, Hong; Wu, Weiping; Ni, Zhonghua

    2013-07-01

    The existing researches of miniature magnetic circuits focus on the single-sided permanent magnetic circuits and the Halbach permanent magnetic circuits. In the single-sided permanent magnetic circuits, the magnetic flux density is always very low in the work region. In the Halbach permanent magnetic circuits, there are always great difficulties in the manufacturing and assembly process. The static magnetic flux density required for nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) chip is analyzed based on the signal noise ratio(SNR) calculation model, and then a miniature C-shaped permanent magnetic circuit is designed as the required magnetic flux density. Based on Kirchhoff's law and magnetic flux refraction principle, the concept of a single shimming ring is proposed to improve the performance of the designed magnetic circuit. Using the finite element method, a comparative calculation is conducted. The calculation results demonstrate that the magnetic circuit improved with a single shimming has higher magnetic flux density and better magnetic field homogeneity than the one improved with no shimming ring or double shimming rings. The proposed magnetic circuit is manufactured and its experimental test platform is also built. The magnetic flux density measured in the work region is 0.7 T, which is well coincided with the theoretical design. The spatial variation of the magnetic field is within the range of the instrument error. At last, the temperature dependence of the magnetic flux density produced by the proposed magnetic circuit is investigated through both theoretical analysis and experimental study, and a linear functional model is obtained. The proposed research is crucial for solving the problem in the application of NMR-chip under different environmental temperatures.

  14. Unconventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using nanostructured diamond surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Victor; Jarmola, Andrey; Budker, Dmitry; Santori, Charles; Huang, Zhihong; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies rely on obtaining high nuclear magnetization, motivating low operating temperatures and high magnetic fields. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques traditionally require another superconducting magnet and THz optics. We seek to use chip-scale devices to polarize nuclei in liquids at room temperature. The technique relies on optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers and subsequent transfer of polarization to nuclei via hyperfine interaction, spin diffusion, and heteronuclear polarization transfer. We expect efficient polarization transfer will be realized by maximizing the diamond surface area. We have fabricated densely-packed (50 % packing fraction), high-aspect-ratio (10+) nanopillars over mm2 regions of the diamond surface. Pillars designed to have a few-hundred-nanometer diameter act as optical antennas, reducing saturation intensity. We also report progress in using nanopillar arrays as sensitive optical detectors of nano-scale NMR by measuring NV center Zeeman shifts produced by nearby external nuclei. The enhanced surface area increases the effective density of NV centers which couple to external nuclei. Combining these techniques may enable, e.g., identification of trace analytes and molecular imaging.

  15. Hydrogen-bonding studies of pyridine and 0-phenylphenol with coal asphaltenes by multi-nuclei magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweighardt, F.K.; Friedel, R.A.; Retcofsky, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    Proton, carbon, and nitrogen-14 nuclear magnetic resonance studies are reported of hydrogen bonding between the OH proton of o-phenylphenol (OPP) and the nitrogen electron donor of pyridine (Py). Data are also reported on the hydrogen bonding of the acid and base components of coal-derived asphaltenes with the model system. Determination was made of the equilibrium constant of the 1:1 complex between OPP and Py from the proton NMR studies. Qualitative results are reported from the /sup 13/C and /sup 14/N studies of the model system (OPP-Py) with the individual asphaltene fractions. Because of the recent renewed interest in coal liquefaction this investigation may provide a starting point for future research. 7 figures.

  16. Isotope effects on nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated by including zero-point vibration corrections: the VMF approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dransfeld, Alk

    2004-03-08

    As a minimal dynamic correction the 'zero-point vibration', ZPV, was included in the ab initio calculation of the isotropic magnetic shielding of {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P, and {sup 35}Cl in some molecules including the references of NMR spectroscopy (f.i. CFCl{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}-NO{sub 2}, and TMS). In contrast to most previous works the ZPV correction is not based on gradients of internal coordinates, but uses derivatives obtained by 'vibration mode following' (VMF, the coordinates of the gradients describing the magnetic shielding hypersurface are the normal coordinates of the ground state vibration motion). The vibrational corrections obtained at the applied DFT level of theory are slightly smaller than those reported for MP2 calculations. Isotope effects computed with the ZPV/VMF correction are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. Contributions from individual vibration modes to the zero-point correction show that rotational motions have a large effect.

  17. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance studies of the stripes materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, H.-J., E-mail: h.grafe@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic and Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) is a powerful tool to probe electronic inhomogeneities in correlated electron systems. Its local character allows for probing different environments due to spin density modulations or inhomogeneous doping distributions emerging from the correlations in these systems. In fact, NMR/NQR is not only sensitive to magnetic properties through interaction of the nuclear spin, but also allows to probe the symmetry of the charge distribution and its homogeneity, as well as structural modulations, through sensitivity to the electric field gradient (EFG). We review the results of NMR and NQR in the cuprates from intrinsic spatial variations of the hole concentration in the normal state to stripe order at low temperatures, thereby keeping in mind the influence of doping induced disorder and inhomogeneities. Finally, we briefly discuss NQR evidence for local electronic inhomogeneities in the recently discovered iron pnictides, suggesting that electronic inhomogeneities are a common feature of correlated electron systems.

  18. Observation of nuclear magnetic order in solid 3He

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of T dp/dT have been made along the He3 melting curve near an anomaly at Ts=1.17 mK. It is found that the solid-He3 entropy decreases by 80% in an interval of 100 μK at Ts. This is attributed to onset of nuclear magnetic order.......Measurements of T dp/dT have been made along the He3 melting curve near an anomaly at Ts=1.17 mK. It is found that the solid-He3 entropy decreases by 80% in an interval of 100 μK at Ts. This is attributed to onset of nuclear magnetic order....

  19. Advances in Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In the course of the last century, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has become a powerful and ubiquitous analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. Traditionally, the great analytical power of NMR comes at the cost of mobility and large expenses for cryogenic cooling. This thesis presents how zero-field NMR detected with an atomic magnetometer is emerging as a new, potentially portable and cost-effective modality of NMR with the ability of providing ...

  20. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Pourmodheji; Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh; Sebastian Magierowski

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelera...

  1. Demonstration of Quantum Entanglement Control Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jing-Yi; ZHANG Jing-Fu; DENG Zhi-Wei; LU Zhi-Heng

    2004-01-01

    @@ With the two forms of the quantum entanglement control, the quantum entanglement swapping and preservation are demonstrated in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer. The pseudopure state is prepared to represent the quantum entangled states through macroscopic signals. Entanglement swapping is directly realized by a swap operation. By controlling the interactions between the system and its environment,we can preserve an initial entangled state for a longer time. The experimental results are in agreement with the experiment.

  2. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  3. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rasly

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Li-ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ohno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging has high sensitivity to proton (1H and lithium (7Li. It is a useful measurement for electrolyte in Li-ion battery. 1H NMR images of lithium ion battery which is composed of LiMn2O4 / LiClO4 + propylene carbonate (PC / Li-metal have been studied. 1H NMR images of electrolyte near cathode material (LiMn2O4 showed anomalous intensity distribution, which was quite inhomogeneous. From NMR images as a function of repetition time (TR, it was concluded that the anomalous intensity distribution was not due to change of relaxation time but an indirect (spatial para-magnetization effect from cathode material. The paramagnetization induced by high magnetic field distorts linearity of magnetic gradient field, leading to apparent intensity variance. This functional image is an easy diagnostic measurement for magnetization of cathode material, which allows the possibility to check uniformity of cathode material and change of magnetization under electrochemical process.

  5. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  6. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, Thomas; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared to conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated via parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP), enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H J-couplings in compounds with 13C in natural abundance in a single transient. The resulting spectra display distinct features that have straightforward interpretation and can be...

  7. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  8. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  9. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  10. Decoherence and fluctuation dynamics of the quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhovich, Evgeny A.

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of nuclear spin decoherence and nuclear spin flip-flops in self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots are studied experimentally using optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Nuclear spin-echo decay times are found to be in the range 1-4 ms. This is a factor of ~3 longer than in strain-free GaAs/AlGaAs structures and is shown to result from strain-induced quadrupolar effects that suppress nuclear spin flip-flops. The correlation times of the flip-flops are examined using a novel frequency-comb NMR technique and are found to exceed 1 s, a factor of ~1000 longer than in strain-free structures. These findings complement recent studies of electron spin coherence and reveal the paradoxical dual role of the quadrupolar effects in self-assembled quantum dots: large increase of the nuclear spin bath coherence and at the same time significant reduction of the electron spin-qubit coherence. Approaches to increasing electron spin coherence are discussed. In particular the nanohole filled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots are an attractive option: while their optical quality matches the self-assembled dots the quadrupolar effects measured in NMR spectra are a factor of 1000 smaller.

  11. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability.

  12. Light nuclear charge measurement with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basara, Laurent [Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Povo 38123 (Italy); Choutko, Vitaly [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Li, Qiang, E-mail: q.li@cern.ch [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2016-06-11

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle detector installed and operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011. So far more than 70 billion cosmic ray events have been recorded by AMS. In the present paper the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) detector of AMS is used to measure cosmic ray nuclear charge magnitudes up to Z=10. The obtained charge magnitude resolution is about 0.1 and 0.3 charge unit for Helium and Carbon, respectively. These measurements are important for an accurate determination of the interaction probabilities of various nuclei with the AMS materials. The ECAL charge calibration and measurement procedures are presented.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based quantification of organic diphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-01-15

    Phosphorylated compounds are ubiquitous in life. Given their central role, many such substrates and analogs have been prepared for subsequent evaluation. Prior to biological experiments, it is typically necessary to determine the concentration of the target molecule in solution. Here we describe a method where concentrations of stock solutions of organic diphosphates and bisphosphonates are quantified using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with standard instrumentation using a capillary tube with a secondary standard. The method is specific and is applicable down to a concentration of 200 μM. The capillary tube provides the reference peak for quantification and deuterated solvent for locking.

  14. Thermo-magnetic systems for space nuclear reactors an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Maidana, Carlos O

    2014-01-01

    Introduces the reader to engineering magnetohydrodynamics applications and presents a comprehensive guide of how to approach different problems found in this multidisciplinary field. An introduction to engineering magnetohydrodynamics, this brief focuses heavily on the design of thermo-magnetic systems for liquid metals, with emphasis on the design of electromagnetic annular linear induction pumps for space nuclear reactors. Alloy systems that are liquid at room temperature have a high degree of thermal conductivity far superior to ordinary non-metallic liquids. This results in their use for

  15. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  16. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  17. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chuan; HAO Liang; ZHAO Lian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database.Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation,the query process can be realized in a two-mode database.In the query process,the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information,and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query.We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system.The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed.

  18. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Proietti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  19. Random matrix theory in biological nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacelle, S

    1984-01-01

    The statistical theory of energy levels or random matrix theory is presented in the context of the analysis of chemical shifts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of large biological systems. Distribution functions for the spacing between nearest-neighbor energy levels are discussed for uncorrelated, correlated, and random superposition of correlated energy levels. Application of this approach to the NMR spectra of a vitamin, an antibiotic, and a protein demonstrates the state of correlation of an ensemble of energy levels that characterizes each system. The detection of coherent and dissipative structures in proteins becomes feasible with this statistical spectroscopic technique. PMID:6478032

  20. 11B nuclear magnetic resonance in boron-doped diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Murakami, Tadashi Shimizu, Masataka Tansho and Yoshihiko Takano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent results obtained by 11B solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR on boron-doped diamond, grown by the high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT or chemical vapor deposition techniques. Simple single-pulse experiments as well as advanced two-dimensional NMR experiments were applied to the boron sites in diamond. It is shown that magic-angle spinning at magnetic fields above 10 T is suitable for observation of high-resolution 11B spectra of boron-doped diamond. For boron-doped HPHT diamonds, the existence of the excess boron that does not contribute to electrical conductivity was confirmed and its 11B NMR signal was characterized. The point-defect structures (B+H complexes and -B-B-/-B-C-B- clusters, postulated previously for the excess boron, were discarded and graphite-like structures were assigned instead.

  1. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Cameron Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  2. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  3. Measuring the Muon g-2 Magnetic Storage Field Via Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthias; Muon g-2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Muon g - 2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment, aμ, to a precision of 140 ppb, using a technique that determines the muon spin precession frequency in the highly uniform magnetic field of a storage ring. Both precession frequency and field determination contribute equally to the final systematic uncertainty. The magnetic field is determined from the measurement of free induction decay (FID) signals provided by a matrix of custom proton nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) probes. FID simulations show that we can achieve the required precision for extraction of field values compared to systematic contributions. The recently powered muon storage ring is providing data to evaluate the pNMR measurement results. We will describe the performance to date of this system.

  4. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUNFLOWER AND RAPESEED LECITHIN

    OpenAIRE

    Lisovaya E. V.; Victorova E. P.; Agafonov O. S.; Kornen N. N.; Shahray T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a comparative assessment and peculiarities of nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics of rapeseed and sunflower lecithin. It was established, that lecithin’s nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics, namely, protons’ spin-spin relaxation time and amplitudes of nuclear magnetic relaxation signals of lecithin components, depend on content of oil’s fat acids and phospholipids, contained in the lecithin. Comparative assessment of protons’ spin-spin relaxation time of r...

  5. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Optically enhanced nuclear cross polarization in acridine-doped fluorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshiro, C.M.

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this work has been to create large polarizations of the dilute /sup 13/C nuclei in the solid state. The idea was to create /sup 1/H polarizations larger than Boltzmann and to use the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy cross polarization technique to then transfer this large polarization to the /sup 13/C spin system. Optical Nuclear Polarization (ONP) of acridine-doped fluorene single crystals was studied. In addition, ONP of powdered samples of the acridine-doped fluorene was studied. In general, many compounds do not crystallize easily or do not form large crystals suitable for NMR experiments. Powdered, amorphous and randomly dispersed samples are generally far more readily available than single crystals. One objective of this work has been to (first) create large /sup 1/H polarizations. Although large optical proton polarizations in single crystals have been reported previously, optically generated polarizations in powdered samples have not been reported. For these reasons, ONP studies of powdered samples of the acridine-doped fluorene were also undertaken. Using ONP in combination with the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy experiment, large /sup 13/C polarizations have been created in fluorene single crystals. These large /sup 13/C polarizations have permitted the determination of the seven incongruent chemical shielding tensors of the fluorene molecule. Part 2 of this thesis describes the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy experiment. Part 3 describes the ONP experiment. Part 4 is a description of the experimental set-up. Part 5 describes the data analysis for the determination of the chemical shielding tensors. Part 6 presents the results of the ONP experiments performed in this work and the chemical shielding tensors determined.

  7. Coherent manipulation of an NV center and one carbon nuclear spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Nemoto, Kae [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan); Munro, William J. [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    We study a three-qubit system formed by the NV center’s electronic and nuclear spin plus an adjacent spin 1/2 carbon {sup 13}C. Specifically, we propose a manipulation scheme utilizing the hyperfine coupling of the effective S=1 degree of freedom of the vacancy electrons to the two adjacent nuclear spins to achieve accurate coherent control of all three qubits.

  8. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N., E-mail: neelampg@iastate.edu; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  10. Multinuclear solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of inorganic materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacKenzie, Kenneth J D

    2002-01-01

    Techniques of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are constantly being extended to a more diverse range of materials, pressing into service an ever-expanding range of nuclides including some previously considered too intractable to provide usable results. At the same time, new developments in both hardware and software are being introduced and refined. This book covers the most important of these new developments. With sections addressed to non-specialist researchers (providing accessible answers to the most common questions about the theory and practice of NMR asked by novices) as well as a more specialised and up-to-date treatment of the most important areas of inorganic materials research to which NMR has application, this book should be useful to NMR users whatever their level of expertise and whatever inorganic materials they wish to study.

  11. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  13. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite profiling in plant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terskikh, Victor; Kermode, Allison R

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been successfully applied to profile a variety of primary and secondary metabolites in whole intact plant seeds in vivo. The nondestructive nature of NMR spectroscopy allows direct metabolic studies to be performed on the same seed throughout a given physio-logical process or key lifecycle transition, such as dormancy breakage, germination, and early postgerminative growth. Multinuclear NMR is capable of evaluating seed quality by assessing nondestructively nutrient reserves and seed protectants at seed maturity and to further monitor reserve mobilization following germination, which is critical for seedling emergence. In this chapter, we illustrate the use of several in vivo NMR techniques for metabolite profiling in seeds. Importantly, some of these methods have potential for the screening of single seeds or seed populations to identify seedlots with compromised viability either due to developmental problems or as a result of deterioration during prolonged storage.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-12-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single subnanoliter ova

    CERN Document Server

    Grisi, Marco; Guidetti, Roberto; Harris, Nicola; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is, in principle, a promising candidate to study the intracellular chemistry of single microscopic living entities. However, due to sensitivity limitations, NMR experiments were reported only on very few and relatively large single cells down to a minimum volume of 10 nl. Here we show NMR spectroscopy of single ova at volume scales (0.1 and 0.5 nl) where life development begins for a broad variety of animals, humans included. We demonstrate that the sensitivity achieved by miniaturized inductive NMR probes (few pmol of 1H nuclei in some hours at 7 T) is sufficient to observe chemical heterogeneities among subnanoliter ova of tardigrades. Such sensitivities should allow to non-invasively monitor variations of concentrated intracellular compounds, such as glutathione, in single mammalian zygotes.

  16. Diffusion Pore Imaging by Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Windschuh, Johannes; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements are widely used to derive parameters indirectly related to the microstructure of biological tissues and porous media. However, a direct imaging of cell or pore shapes and sizes would be of high interest. For a long time, determining pore shapes by NMR diffusion acquisitions seemed impossible, because the necessary phase information could not be preserved. Here we demonstrate experimentally using the measurement technique which we have recently proposed theoretically that the shape of arbitrary closed pores can be imaged by diffusion acquisitions, which yield the phase information. For this purpose, we use hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined geometries. The signal can be collected from the whole sample which mainly eliminates the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution of conventional NMR imaging. This could be used to non-invasively gain structural information inaccessible so far such as pore or cell shapes, cell density or axon integri...

  17. Effect of a strong magnetic field on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekerzhitskii, V.S. [Pushkin Pedagogical Institute, Brest (Belarus)

    1995-01-01

    According to modern concepts, the electron-neutron-nuclear (Aen) phase of dense highly degenerate matter can be realized in the shells of neutron stars. This phase has relatively stable and absolutely stable states of thermodynamic equilibrium. Strong magnetic fields can exist in neutron stars. For this reason, analysis of their effect on the characteristics of the Aen phase is of great interest. It is specially important to study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter because the transition to the absolute equilibrium state proceeds through these reactions.

  18. Single crystal nuclear magnetic resonance in spinning powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Andrew J.; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-10-01

    We present a method for selectively exciting nuclear magnetic resonances (NMRs) from well-defined subsets of crystallites from a powdered sample under magic angle spinning. Magic angle spinning induces a time dependence in the anisotropic interactions, which results in a time variation of the resonance frequencies which is different for different crystallite orientations. The proposed method exploits this by applying selective pulses, which we refer to as XS (for crystallite-selective) pulses, that follow the resonance frequencies of nuclear species within particular crystallites, resulting in the induced flip angle being orientation dependent. By selecting the radiofrequency field to deliver a 180 ○ pulse for the target orientation and employing a train of such pulses combined with cogwheel phase cycling, we obtain a high degree of orientational selectivity with the resulting spectrum containing only contributions from orientations close to the target. Typically, this leads to the selection of between 0.1% and 10% of the crystallites, and in extreme cases to the excitation of a single orientation resulting in single crystal spectra of spinning powders. Two formulations of this method are described and demonstrated with experimental examples on [1 - 13C]-alanine and the paramagnetic compound Sm2Sn2O7.

  19. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  20. Application of the SIMNRA code to calibrate the analyzing magnet associated with a Van de Graaff accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: andrade@fisica.unam.mx; Solis, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rocha, M.F. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieri' a Mecanica y Electrica, IPN, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 07738 (Mexico)

    2007-08-15

    This work reports on a fast method of calibrating the analyzer magnet associated with a Van de Graaff accelerator based on the SIMNRA simulation of the backscattered elastic proton spectra produced by the proton bombardment of thick silicon. Several proton spectra were measured with proton beam energies in the 1.6 -2.3 MeV energy region where two resonances in {sup 28}Si(p, p){sup 28}Si elastic scattering occur at 1.645 and 2.087 MeV. Also the {sup 12}C(d, p){sup 13}C nuclear reaction was applied to calibrate the analyzing magnet. A thick carbon target was bombarded with several deuteron beam energies in the 1.4 MeV range. The nuclear reaction proton spectra were also simulated using the SIMNRA code. However, in this case, it was not necessary to choose the deuterium beam energies near a nuclear reaction energy resonance. The comparison of the analyzer magnet calibration with this procedure is in good agreement with the calibration using the {sup 27}Al(p, {gamma}){sup 28}Si method.

  1. Nuclear magnetic shieldings of stacked aromatic and antiaromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raul; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-03-13

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonable well for the (1)H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the (13)C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  2. Saturation properties of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Z. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, G.H. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM)-Maragha, P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Different saturation properties of cold symmetric nuclear matter in strong magnetic field have been considered. We have seen that for magnetic fields about B>3 x 10{sup 17} G, for both cases with and without nucleon anomalous magnetic moments, the saturation density and saturation energy grow by increasing the magnetic field. It is indicated that the magnetic susceptibility of symmetric nuclear matter becomes negative showing the diamagnetic response especially at B<3 x 10{sup 17} G. We have found that for the nuclear matter, the magnitude of orbital magnetization reaches higher values comparing to the spin magnetization. Our results for the incompressibility show that at high enough magnetic fields, i.e. B>3 x 10{sup 17} G, the softening of the equation of state caused by Landau quantization is overwhelmed by stiffening due to the magnetization of nuclear matter. We have shown that the effects of strong magnetic field on nuclear matter may affect the constraints on the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter obtained by applying the experimental observables. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  4. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze and INSTM, Firenze (Italy); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Corti, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.corti@unipv.it; Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  5. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Vogel

    Full Text Available We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability.The finite element method (COMSOL® was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field.A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres.A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  6. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation in pulsed high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, C; Van der Linden, P; Rüffer, R

    2010-02-26

    We report the demonstration of nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 57Fe in ferromagnetic alpha iron in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The observed magnetic hyperfine field follows the calculated high field bulk magnetization within 1%, establishing the technique as a precise tool for the study of magnetic solids in very high magnetic fields. To perform these experiments in pulsed fields, we have developed a detection scheme for fully time resolved nuclear forward scattering applicable to other pump probe experiments.

  7. Magnetic Moments of Octet Baryons in Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harpreet; Dahiya, Harleen

    2016-01-01

    We have calculated the in-medium magnetic moments of octet baryons in the presence of hot and dense symmetric nuclear matter. Effective magnetic moments of baryons have been derived from medium modified quark masses within chiral SU(3) quark mean field model.Further, for better insight of medium modification of baryonic magnetic moments, we have considered the explicit contributions from the valence as well as sea quark effects. These effects have been successful in giving the description of baryonic magnetic moments in vacuum. The magnetic moments of baryons are found to vary significantly as a function of density of nuclear medium.

  8. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  9. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaney, M.B. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  11. Frequency and Spatial Selectivity in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jan O.

    1988-12-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The techniques presented in this thesis are concerned with the high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of liquids. A selective pulse, shaped according to the first half of a Gaussian curve, is developed; it gives a very narrow absorption-mode excitation profile. This characteristics is used in developing selective coherence transfer experiments in which an individual transition is irradiated by the selective pulse followed by irradiation with an intense non-selective pulse. By stepping the irradiation frequency of the selective pulse along in small increments, this experiment produces results similar to conventional two-dimensional homonuclear correlation spectroscopy. Such a method allows selected spectral regions of a conventional two-dimensional spectrum to be examined under higher resolution while avoiding the restrictions imposed by the sampling theorem. The technique is also extended to a third frequency dimension by irradiating two transitions simultaneously before applying a non-selective pulse which yields correlations between three coupled nuclei. The remainder of this thesis introduces a spatial localisation method based on a "straddle coil": two parallel coaxial surface coils, one on each side of the sample and supplied with radiofrequency pulses of opposite phase. This configuration can be used for spatial localisation experiments by applying a sequence of equal and opposite prepulses before acquiring the signal. The prepulses saturate the nuclear spins in all sample regions except the sensitive volume close to the median plane where the radiofrequency fields from the two coils cancel. Pulse sequences are proposed that are insensitive to radiofrequency offset over an appreciable range. The location of the sensitive volume can be tracked across the sample in the axial dimension by changing the ratio of the radiofrequency currents in the two coils.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with DC SQUID amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, M. B.

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al2O3/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 10(exp 17) in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  13. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  14. Multi-exponential inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Weimin(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Kenyon, W. E. , Petrophysical principles of applications of NMR logging, The Log Analyst, 1997, March-April: 21-43.[2]Timur, A., Producible porosity and permeability of sandstone investigated through nuclear magnetic resonance principles,Journal of Petroleum Technology, 1969, 21: 775-786.[3]Chakrabarty, T. , Longo, J. , A new method for mineral quantification to aid in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation,Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology, 1997, 36(11 ): 15-21.[4]Kleinberg, R. L. , Vinegar, H. J. , NMR properties of reservoir fluids, The Log Analyst, 1996, November-December: 20-32.[5]Wahba, G. , Practical approximate solutions to linear operator equations when the data are noisy, SIAM. J. Numer. Anal. ,1977, 14(4): 651-667.[6]Butler, J. P. , Reeds, J. A. , Dawson, S. V. , Estimating solutions of first kind integral equations with nonnegative constraints and optimal smoothing, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. , 1981, 18(3): 381-397.[7]Munn, K. , Smith, D. M., A NMR technique for the analysis of pore structure: Numerical inversion of relaxation measurements, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 1987,19(1): 117-126.[8]Provencher, S. W., A constrained regularization method for inverting data represented by linear algebraic or integral equations, Computer Physics Communications, 1982, 27: 213-227.[9]Bergman, D. J., Dunn, K. J., Magnetic susceptibility contrasted fixed field gradient effects on the spin-echo amplitude in a periodic porous media with diffusion, Phys. Soc., 1995, 40: 695-702.[10]Wang Weimin, The basic experiment studies of NMR logging, Well Logging Technology, 1997, 21 (6): 385-392.

  15. Novel homo- and hetero-nuclear copper(II) complexes of tetradentate Schiff bases: Synthesis, characterization, solvent-extraction and catalase-like activity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dede, Buelent [Sueleyman Demirel University, Department of Chemistry, Isparta, 32260 (Turkey)], E-mail: dbulent@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Karipcin, Fatma; Cengiz, Mustafa [Sueleyman Demirel University, Department of Chemistry, Isparta, 32260 (Turkey)

    2009-04-30

    Twelve homo- and hetero-nuclear copper(II) complexes of tetradentate Schiff base ligands containing N{sub 4} donor sets have been prepared by employing several steps. The characterization and nature of bonding of the complexes have been deduced from elemental analysis, FT-IR, molar conductivity, magnetic moment measurements and thermal analysis. The three Schiff base ligands were further identified using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. All copper(II) complexes are 1:2 electrolytes as shown by their molar conductivities ({lambda}{sub M}) in DMF and paramagnetic. The subnormal magnetic moment values of the di- and tri-nuclear complexes explained by a very strong anti-ferromagnetic interaction. The extraction ability of the ligands has been examined by the liquid-liquid extraction of selected transition metal (Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}) cations. The ligands show strong binding ability toward copper(II) ion. Furthermore the homo- and hetero-nuclear copper(II) complexes were each tested for their ability to catalyse the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of the added base imidazole.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of bovine γB-crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George; Mills, Jeffrey; Michel, Lea; Mathews, Kaylee; Zanet, John; Payan, Angel; van Nostrand, Keith; Kotlarchyk, Michael; Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Hamilton, John

    Anisotropy of shape and/or interactions play an important role in determining the properties of concentrated solutions of the eye lens protein, γB-crystallin, including its liquid-liquid phase transition. We are studying γB anisotropic interactions with use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) concentration- and temperature-dependent chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We analyze two-dimensional heteronuclear spin quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on backbone nitrogen and attached hydrogen nuclei for CSPs, up to 3 percent volume fraction. Cumulative distribution functions of the CSPs show a concentration and temperature-dependent spread. Many peaks that are highly shifted with either concentration or temperature are close (i) crystal intermolecular contacts (ii) locations of cataractogenic point mutations of a homologous human protein, human γD-crystallin, and (iii) charged amino-acid residues. We also discuss the concentration- and temperature-dependence of NMR and quasielastic light scattering measurements of rotational and translational diffusion of γB crystallin in solution, affected by interprotein attractions. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  18. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  19. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information.

  20. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  1. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-12-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10-12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  2. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  4. Quantification of lipoprotein profiles by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aru, Violetta; Lam, Chloie; Khakimov, Bekzod

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins and their subfraction profiles have been associated to diverse diseases including Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD). There is thus a great demand for measuring and quantifying the lipoprotein profile in an efficient and accurate manner. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy...

  5. QED calculation of the nuclear magnetic shielding for hydrogen-like ions

    CERN Document Server

    Yerokhin, V A; Harman, Z; Keitel, C H

    2012-01-01

    We report an ab initio calculation of the shielding of the nuclear magnetic moment by the bound electron in hydrogen-like ions. This investigation takes into account several effects that have not been calculated before (electron self-energy, vacuum polarization, nuclear magnetization distribution), thus bringing the theory to the point where further progress is impeded by the uncertainty due to nuclear-structure effects. The QED corrections are calculated to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter and, independently, to the leading order in the expansion in this parameter. The results obtained lay the ground for the high-precision determination of nuclear magnetic dipole moments from measurements of the g-factor of hydrogen-like ions.

  6. Developing hyperpolarized krypton-83 for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.

    This dissertation discusses the production of highly nonequilibrium nuclear spin polarization, referred to as hyperpolarization or hp, in the nuclear spin I = 9/2 noble gas isotope krypton-83 using spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). This nonequilibrium polarization yields nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that are enhanced three or more orders of magnitude above those of thermally polarized krypton and enables experiments that would otherwise be impossible. Krypton-83 possesses a nuclear electric quadrupole moment that dominates the longitudinal (T1) relaxation due to coupling of the quadrupole moment to fluctuating electric field gradients generated by distortions to the spherical symmetry of the electronic environment. Relaxation slows polarization buildup and limits the maximum signal intensity but makes krypton-83 a sensitive probe of its environment. The gas-phase krypton-83 longitudinal relaxation rate increases linearly with total gas density due to binary collisions. Density independent relaxation, caused by the formation of krypton-krypton van der Waals molecules and surface adsorption, also contributes to the observed rate. Buffer gases suppress van der Waals molecule mediated relaxation by breaking apart the weakly bound krypton dimers. Surface relaxation is gas composition independent and therefore more difficult to suppress. However, this relaxation mechanism makes hp krypton-83 sensitive to important surface properties including surface-to-volume ratio, surface chemistry, and surface temperature. The presence of surfaces with high krypton adsorption affinities (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces) accelerates the relaxation times and can produce T1 contrast in hp krypton-83 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tobacco smoke deposited on surfaces generates strong T1 contrast allowing the observation of smoke deposition with spatial resolution. Conversely, water adsorption on surfaces significantly lengths the T1 times due competitive surface adsorption

  7. Time-odd mean fields in the rotating frame microscopic nature of nuclear magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, A V

    2000-01-01

    The microscopic role of nuclear magnetism in rotating frame is investigated for the first time in the framework of the cranked relativistic mean field theory. It is shown that nuclear magnetism modifies the expectation values of single-particle spin, orbital and total angular momenta along the rotational axis effectively creating additional angular momentum. This effect leads to the increase of kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia at given rotational frequency and has an impact on effective alignments.

  8. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourmodheji

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS. In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  9. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrall, Geoffrey Alden [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  11. Calculation of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field using LOCV technique

    CERN Document Server

    Bordbar, G H

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we are interested in the properties of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the presence of strong magnetic fields using the lowest order constraint variational (LOCV) method employing $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. Our results indicate that in the absence of a magnetic field, the energy per particle is a symmetric function of the spin polarization parameter. This shows that for the nuclear matter, the spontaneous phase transition to a ferromagnetic state does not occur. However, we have found that for the magnetic fields $ B\\gtrsim 10 ^ {18}\\ G$, the symmetry of energy is broken and the energy has a minimum at a positive value of the spin polarization parameter. We have also found that the effect of magnetic field on the value of energy is more significant at the low densities. Our calculations show that at lower densities, the spin polarization parameter is more sensitive to the magnetic field.

  12. UTOPIA NMR: activating unexploited magnetization using interleaved low-gamma detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegas, Aldino; Viennet, Thibault [Heinrich-Heine-University, Institute of Physical Biology (Germany); Yu, Tsyr-Yan [Academia Sinica, Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences (China); Schumann, Frank [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Switzerland); Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Germany); Wagner, Gerhard [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Etzkorn, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.etzkorn@hhu.de [Heinrich-Heine-University, Institute of Physical Biology (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    A growing number of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies are impaired by the limited information content provided by the standard set of experiments conventionally recorded. This is particularly true for studies of challenging biological systems including large, unstructured, membrane-embedded and/or paramagnetic proteins. Here we introduce the concept of unified time-optimized interleaved acquisition NMR (UTOPIA-NMR) for the unified acquisition of standard high-γ (e.g. {sup 1}H) and low-γ (e.g. {sup 13}C) detected experiments using a single receiver. Our aim is to activate the high level of polarization and information content distributed on low-γ nuclei without disturbing conventional magnetization transfer pathways. We show that using UTOPIA-NMR we are able to recover nearly all of the normally non-used magnetization without disturbing the standard experiments. In other words, additional spectra, that can significantly increase the NMR insights, are obtained for free. While we anticipate a broad range of possible applications we demonstrate for the soluble protein Bcl-x{sub L} (ca. 21 kDa) and for OmpX in nanodiscs (ca. 160 kDa) that UTOPIA-NMR is particularly useful for challenging protein systems including perdeuterated (membrane) proteins.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  14. Development and applications of NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in low fields and zero field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Nuclear ground-state spin and magnetic moment of 21Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, J; De Rydt, M; Flanagan, K T; Geppert, Ch; Kowalska, M; Lievens, P; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Stroke, H H; Vingerhoets, P; Yordanov, D T

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of combined laser spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 21Mg. The nuclear ground-state spin was measured to be I=5/2 with a magnetic moment of μ=−0.983(7)μN. The isoscalar magnetic moment of the mirror pair is evaluated and compared to the extreme single-particle prediction and to nuclear shell-model calculations. We determine an isoscalar spin expectation value of σ=1.15(2), which is significantly greater than the empirical limit of unity given by the Schmidt values of the magnetic moments. Shell-model calculations taking into account isospin non-conserving effects, are in agreement with our experimental results.

  16. Coexistence of phases in asymmetric nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, R

    2014-01-01

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is strongly affected by the presence of a magnetic field. Here we study the equilibrium configuration of asymmetric nuclear matter for a wide range of densities, isospin composition, temperatures and magnetic fields. Special attention is paid to the low density and low temperature domain, where a thermodynamical instability exists. Neglecting fluctuations of the Coulomb force, a coexistence of phases is found under such conditions, even for extreme magnetic intensities. We describe the nuclear interaction by using the non--relativistic Skyrme potential model within a Hartree--Fock approach. We found that the coexistence of phases modifies the equilibrium configuration, masking most of the manifestations of the spin polarized matter. However, the compressibility and the magnetic susceptibility show clear signals of this fact. Thermal effects are significative for both quantities, mainly out of the coexistence region.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance applied to the study of polymeric nano composites; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear aplicada do estudo de nanocompositos polimericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno [Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ - RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Polymers and nanoparticles based nano composites were prepared by intercalation by solution. The obtained nano composites were characterized mainly by the nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (NMR), applying the analysis of carbon-13 (polymeric matrix), silicon-29 (nanoparticle), and by determination of spin-lattice relaxation of the hydrogen nucleus (T{sub 1}H) (polymeric matrix). The NMR have presented a promising technique in the characterization of the nano charge dispersion in the studied polymeric matrixes.

  18. Chromium-53 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of pentacarbonylchromium-carbene complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafner, A.; Hegedus, L.S.; DeWeck, G.; Hawkins, B. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (USA)); Doetz, K.H. (Universitaet Hans-Meerweinstrasse, Marburg (Germany, F.R.))

    1988-12-07

    The {sup 53}Cr NMR spectra of 46 chromium-carbene complexes were recorded, and chemical shift and line width data are reported, along with associated infrared, uv-visible, and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic data. The {sup 53}Cr chemical shifts correlated very well with the donor-acceptor properties of the carbene ligand and were quite sensitive to steric influences on efficiency of {pi}-overlap of the heteroatom with the carbene carbon. There was no correlation of {delta}({sup 53}Cr) with reactivity toward imines to form {beta}-lactams, but line width appeared to be related to reactivity. Preliminary attempts to utilize {sup 53}Cr NMR data to direct synthetic utilization of chromium-carbene complexes are reported. 5 refs., 49 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A set of triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds in mixture samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, Harri, E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi [VERIFIN, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR pulse experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of organophosphorus (OP) compounds in complex matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selective extraction of {sup 1}H, {sup 31}P, and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and connectivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More precise NMR identification of OP nerve agents and their degradation products. - Abstract: The {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy utilizes J{sub CH} couplings in molecules, and provides important structural information from small organic molecules in the form of carbon chemical shifts and carbon-proton connectivities. The full potential of the {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy has not been realized in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) related verification analyses due to the sample matrix, which usually contains a high amount of non-related compounds obscuring the correlations of the relevant compounds. Here, the results of the application of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy in characterization of OP compounds related to the CWC are presented. With a set of two-dimensional triple-resonance experiments the J{sub HP}, J{sub CH} and J{sub PC} couplings are utilized to map the connectivities of the atoms in OP compounds and to extract the carbon chemical shift information. With the use of the proposed pulse sequences the correlations from the OP compounds can be recorded without significant artifacts from the non-OP compound impurities in the sample. Further selectivity of the observed correlations is achieved with the application of phosphorus band-selective pulse in the pulse sequences to assist the analysis of multiple OP compounds in mixture samples. The use of the triple-resonance experiments in the analysis of a complex sample is shown with a test mixture containing typical scheduled OP compounds, including the characteristic degradation

  20. (129) Xe and (131) Xe nuclear magnetic dipole moments from gas phase NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2015-04-01

    (3) He, (129) Xe and (131) Xe NMR measurements of resonance frequencies in the magnetic field B0=11.7586 T in different gas phase mixtures have been reported. Precise radiofrequency values were extrapolated to the zero gas pressure limit. These results combined with new quantum chemical values of helium and xenon nuclear magnetic shielding constants were used to determine new accurate nuclear magnetic moments of (129) Xe and (131) Xe in terms of that of the (3) He nucleus. They are as follows: μ((129) Xe) = -0.7779607(158)μN and μ((131) Xe) = +0.6918451(70)μN . By this means, the new 'helium method' for estimations of nuclear dipole moments was successfully tested. Gas phase NMR spectra demonstrate the weak intermolecular interactions observed on the (3) He and (129) Xe and (131) Xe shielding in the gaseous mixtures with Xe, CO2 and SF6 .

  1. Nuclear structure in strong magnetic fields: nuclei in the crust of a magnetar

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel Pena; Khan, Elias; Ring, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Covariant density functional theory is used to study the effect of strong magnetic fields, up to the limit predicted for neutron stars (for magnetars $B \\approx10^{18}$G), on nuclear structure. All new terms in the equation of motion resulting from time reversal symmetry breaking by the magnetic field and the induced currents, as well as axial deformation, are taken into account in a self-consistent fashion. For nuclei in the iron region of the nuclear chart it is found that fields in the order of magnitude of $10^{17}$G significantly affect bulk properties like masses and radii.

  2. Anomalous hyperfine coupling and nuclear magnetic relaxation in Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okvátovity, Zoltán; Simon, Ferenc; Dóra, Balázs

    2016-12-01

    The electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction shows up in a variety of phenomena including, e.g., NMR studies of correlated states and spin decoherence effects in quantum dots. Here we focus on the hyperfine coupling and the NMR spin relaxation time T1 in Weyl semimetals. Since the density of states in Weyl semimetals varies with the square of the energy around the Weyl point, a naive power counting predicts a 1 /T1T ˜E4 scaling, with E the maximum of temperature (T ) and chemical potential. By carefully investigating the hyperfine interaction between nuclear spins and Weyl fermions, we find that while its spin part behaves conventionally, its orbital part diverges unusually, with the inverse of the energy around the Weyl point. Consequently, the nuclear spin relaxation rate scales in a graphenelike manner as 1 /T1T ˜E2ln(E /ω0) , with ω0 the nuclear Larmor frequency. This allows us to identify an effective hyperfine coupling constant, which is tunable by gating or doping. This is relevant for the decoherence effect in spintronics devices and double quantum dots, where hyperfine coupling is the dominant source of spin-blockade lifting.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of pure and Ni/Co doped LiFeAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Baek, Seung-Ho; Hammerath, Franziska; Graefe, Uwe; Utz, Yannic; Harnagea, L.; Nacke, Claudia; Aswartham, Saicharan; Wurmehl, Sabine; Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present Nuclear Magnetic and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) measurements on pure, Ni and Co doped LiFeAs single crystals. The parent compound LiFeAs exhibits unconventional superconductivity with a transition temperature of about 17 K. Unlike other Fe based superconductors, where superconductivity is induced or stabilized by Co or Ni doping, replacement of Fe by these elements leads to a suppression of the superconducting transition temperature in LiFeAs. In case of Ni doping, a bulk magnetic order is induced below about 160 K. In contrast, for Co doping, the superconducting transition temperature is only reduced, but no magnetic order is observed. We discuss the nature and the origin of this magnetic order and its relation to unconventional superconductivity in pure LiFeAs.

  4. Zero and Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Via Optical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, John Woodland

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is among the most powerful analytical tools available to the chemical and biological sciences for chemical detection, characterization, and structure elucidation. NMR experiments are usually performed in large magnetic fields in order to maximize sensitivity and increase chemical shift resolution. However, the high magnetic fields required for conventional NMR necessitate large, immobile, and expensive superconducting magnets, limiting the use of the technique. New hyperpolarization and non-inductive detection methods have recently allowed for NMR measurements in the inverse regime of extremely low magnetic fields. Whereas a substantial body of research has been conducted in the high-field regime, taking advantage of the efficient coherent control afforded by a spectroscopy dominated by coupling to the spectrometer, the zero- and ultra-low-field (ZULF) regime has remained mostly unexplored. In this dissertation, we investigate the applicability of ZULF-NMR as a novel spectroscopic technique complimentary to high-field NMR. In particular, we consider various aspects of the ZULF-NMR experiment and the dynamics of nuclear spins under various local spin coupling Hamiltonians. We first survey zero-field NMR experiments on systems dominated by the electron-mediated indirect spin-spin coupling (J-coupling). The resulting J-spectra permit precision measurement of chemically relevant information due to the exquisite sensitivity of J-couplings to subtle changes in molecular geometry and electronic structure. We also consider the effects of weak magnetic fields and residual dipolar couplings in anisotropic media, which encode information about nuclear magnetic moments and geometry, and further resolve topological ambiguities by lifting degeneracies. By extending the understanding of the interactions that contribute to ZULF-NMR spectra, this work represents a significant advancement towards a complete description of zero- and ultra

  5. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-11-C-0047 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...ECBC-TR-1326 HIGH RESOLUTION MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE (HRMAS NMR) FOR STUDIES OF REACTIVE FABRICS David J. McGarvey...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT An analytical chemistry method is described for measuring the reactivity and permeation of

  6. Functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for U removal from low and high pH groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dien, E-mail: dien.li@srs.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Egodawatte, Shani [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Larsen, Sarah C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Serkiz, Steven M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Seaman, John C. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles were functionalized with organic molecules. • The functionalized nanoparticles had high surface areas and consistent pore sizes. • The functionalized nanoparticles were easily separated due to their magnetism. • They exhibited high capacity for uranium removal from low- or high-pH groundwater. - Abstract: U(VI) species display limited adsorption onto sediment minerals and synthetic sorbents in pH <4 or pH >8 groundwater. In this work, magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs) with magnetite nanoparticle cores were functionalized with various organic molecules using post-synthetic methods. The functionalized MMSNs were characterized using N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), {sup 13}C cross polarization and magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that mesoporous silica (MCM-41) particles of 100–200 nm formed around a core of magnetic iron oxide, and the functional groups were primarily grafted into the mesopores of ∼3.0 nm in size. The functionalized MMSNs were effective for U removal from pH 3.5 and 9.6 artificial groundwater (AGW). Functionalized MMSNs removed U from the pH 3.5 AGW by as much as 6 orders of magnitude more than unfunctionalized nanoparticles or silica and had adsorption capacities as high as 38 mg/g. They removed U from the pH 9.6 AGW as much as 4 orders of magnitude greater than silica and 2 orders of magnitude greater than the unfunctionalized nanoparticles with adsorption capacities as high as 133 mg/g. These results provide an applied solution for treating U contamination that occurs at extreme pH environments and a scientific foundation for solving critical industrial issues related to environmental stewardship and nuclear power production.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a linker for primary amines used in the solid phase organic synthesis of spermidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Emerson T. da; San Gil, Rosane A.S.; Lima, Edson L.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Caldarelli, Stefano [Aix-Marseille Univ., Marseille (France). Campus de Saint Jerome; Ziarelli, Fabio [Aix-Marseille Universite Spectropole - Federation de Sciences Chimiques de Marseille, Campus de Saint Jerome (France)

    2011-07-01

    A linker resin for the synthesis of functionalized spermidine in good yield is described, along with its characterization by infrared (IR), {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with cross polarization and magic angle spinning ({sup 13}C CPMAS NMR) and {sup 1}H high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H HRMAS NMR). This linker has been regenerated after cleavage of spermidine and re-used without loss of efficiency. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo Simulation of Adiabatic Cooling and Nuclear Magnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Viertiö, H. E.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1988-01-01

    constant-temperature or constant-magnetic-field quenches into the antiferromagnetic phase is found at late times to obey the classical Allen-Cahn growth law. The qualitative features of isentropic quenches and the nonequilibrium ordering phenomena during controlled heating treatments at constant rate...

  9. High-pass bird-cage coil for nuclear-magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Joel C.; Fukushima, Eiichi

    1988-06-01

    Cylindrical bird-cage coils generate uniform magnetic fields transverse to the cylinder axis for use in the large sample nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. We describe the design and construction of an eight-rung high-pass bird-cage coil to operate at 80 MHz in a cylindrical bore of a superconducting magnet. The coil is 12.7 cm in diameter by 30.5 cm long and has a 7-cm-diam region in the center where the field intensity is within 10% of the average.

  10. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Rodolfo H. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)]. E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar; Gomez, Sergio S. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)

    2006-04-24

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown.

  11. In vivo imaging of the rat anatomy with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, G; Crooks, L E; Davis, P; De Groot, J; Herfkens, R; Margulis, A R; Gooding, C; Kaufman, L; Hoenninger, J; Arakawa, M; McRee, R; Watts, J

    1980-09-01

    Live rats were imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These images demonstrated fine detail and high object contrast. Motion artifacts are not apparent in 4-minute images, and major blood vessels are demonstrated as regions of low signal intensity because of blood flow. Selective contrast enhancement is possible by varying NMR imager accumulation parameters.

  12. A New Density Operator Formalism for Describing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林东海; 吴钦义

    1994-01-01

    A density operator formalism has been proposed to describe the evolution of two-spin-1/2 systems in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments:The formalism is particularly convenient and has distinct physical meaning for describing the evolution of spin systems under the Hamiltonian containing non-commutable terms. Some examples are presented to demonstrate the new formalism.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  14. 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: 19F-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-NMR) was used to study host-guest ... least-squares curve fitting program, KINFIT, to obtain the formation constant of CD-drug complex. ..... It is interesting to note that, methylated.

  15. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  16. Study of coals by high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨保联; 冯继文; 周建威; 李丽云; 叶朝辉

    1999-01-01

    By using high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance method, six coal samples coming from four countries were investigated. Twelve structural parameters of these samples were measured and compared with those of Chinese coals. Spectral editing experiment was carried out and 15N NMR spectrum was obtained.

  17. Towards nuclear magnetic resonance micro-spectroscopy and micro-imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, P.J.M. van; Janssen, J.W.G.; Kentgens, A.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The first successful experiments demonstrating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were a spin-off from the development of electromagnetic technology and its introduction into civilian life in the late forties. It was soon discovered that NMR spectra held chemically relevant information making it usefu

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Elastic Wave Velocity of Chalk Saturated with Brines Containing Divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven a good technique for measuring pore size distribution in reservoir rocks. The use of low field NMR together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, can contribute to illustrate the effect of adsorbing ions on chalk elasticity. NMR is useful...

  19. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  1. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  2. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  3. Origin of the magnetic-field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in iron

    CERN Document Server

    Seewald, G; Körner, H J; Borgmann, D; Dietrich, M

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation at Ir impurities in Fe was measured for fields between 0 and 2 T parallel to the [100] direction. The reliability of the applied technique of nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei was demonstrated by measurements at different radio-frequency (rf) field strengths. The interpretation of the relaxation curves, which used transition rates to describe the excitation of the nuclear spins by a frequency-modulated rf field, was confirmed by model calculations. The magnetic-field dependence of the so-called enhancement factor for rf fields, which is closely related to the magnetic-field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation, was also measured. For several magnetic-field-dependent relaxation mechanisms, the form and the magnitude of the field dependence were derived. Only the relaxation via eddy-current damping and Gilbert damping could explain the observed field dependence. Using reasonable values of the damping parameters, the field depe...

  4. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc, E-mail: m.baldus@uu.nl [NMR Spectroscopy, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina [Department of Physics, Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, PO Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ivanov, Konstantin L., E-mail: ivanov@tomo.nsc.ru [International Tomography Center, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Institutskaya 3a, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 63009 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing Using Liquid Crystal Solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Yannoni, C S; Vandersypen, L M K; Miller, D C; Kubinec, M G; Chuang, I L; Yannoni, Costantino S.; Sherwood, Mark H.; Vandersypen, Lieven M.K.; Miller, Dolores C.; Kubinec, Mark G.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid crystals offer several advantages as solvents for molecules used for NMR quantum computing (NMRQC). The dipolar coupling between nuclear spins manifest in the NMR spectra of molecules oriented by a liquid crystal permits a significant increase in clock frequency, while short spin-lattice relaxation times permit fast recycling of algorithms, and save time in calibration and signal-enhancement experiments. Furthermore, the use of liquid crystal solvents offers scalability in the form of an expanded library of spin-bearing molecules suitable for NMRQC. These ideas are demonstrated with the successful execution of a 2-qubit Grover search using a molecule ($^{13}$C$^{1}$HCl$_3$) oriented in a liquid crystal and a clock speed eight times greater than in an isotropic solvent. Perhaps more importantly, five times as many logic operations can be executed within the coherence time using the liquid crystal solvent.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance on selected lithium based compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisch, Christian

    2013-11-26

    This thesis presents the NMR measurements on the single crystals LiMnPO{sub 4} and Li{sub 0.9}FeAs. Therefore, the thesis is divided into two separated sections. The first part reports on the competitive next generation cathode material LiMnPO{sub 4} with a stable reversible capacity up to 145 mAh/g and a rather flat discharge voltage curve at 4.1 V. For the basic understanding of the material the magnetic properties have been investigated by a Li and P NMR study in the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase. LiMnPO{sub 4} shows a strong anisotropy of the dipolar hyperfine coupling due to the strong local magnetic moments at the Mn site. The corresponding dipole tensor of the Li- and P-nuclei is fully determined by orientation and temperature dependent NMR experiments and compared to the calculated values from crystal structure data. Deviations of the experimentally determined values from the theoretical ones are discussed in terms of Mn disorder which could have an impact on the mobility of the Li ions. The disorder is corroborated by diffuse X-ray diffraction experiments which indicate a shift of the heavy elements in the lattice, namely the Mn atoms. Furthermore, the spin arrangement in the relative strong field of 7.0494 T in the antiferromagnetic state is understood by the NMR measurements. In order to obtain parameters of the Li ion diffusion in LiMnPO{sub 4} measurements of the spin lattice relaxation rate were performed. Due to the strong dipolar coupling between the Li-nuclei and the magnetic moments at the Mn site it is difficult to extract parameters which can characterize the diffusive behavior of the Li ions. The second section reports on the AC/DC susceptibility and NMR/NQR studies on Li deficit samples labeled as Li{sub 0.9}FeAs. LiFeAs belongs to the family of the superconducting Pnictides which are discovered in 2008 by H. Hosono et al. In recent studies the stoichiometric compound reveals triplet superconductivity below T{sub c}-18 K which

  8. Energy Moment Method Applied to Nuclear Quadrupole Splitting of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, V

    1962-01-01

    Expressions giving the sum of the energy values, raised to the second and third power, for a nucleus interacting with a static magnetic field and a static electric field gradient are derived. Several applications of this method for obtaining the values of the components of the electric field...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of lipid in living plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy; Neuberger, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This review highlights technological developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which are creating opportunities for the three dimensional visualization and quantification of lipids in plant materials. A major feature of MRI is that it is a non-invasive platform, and thus can be used for the analysis of living organisms. An overview of the theoretical aspects of MRI is provided, followed by a description of the various analytical modes available, and an explanation of how MRI can be applied to plant samples and what it can achieve. Various lipid maps and three dimensional models of seeds and fruits are included to demonstrate the potential of MRI and to exemplify recent cutting-edge advances in the field. The importance and prospects of the imaging of lipids in living plants, as well as the integration of lipid imaging with other emerging techniques, are outlined to provide impetus for future plant lipid research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On the Floquet–Magnus expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane, E-mail: emananga@gradcenter.cuny.edu [Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Charpentier, Thibault, E-mail: thibault.charpentier@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, IRAMIS, Service interdisciplinaire sur les systèmes moléculaires et matériaux, CEA/CNRS UMR 3299, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-01-22

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Floquet–Magnus expansion that is helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics, based on promising and useful theory of Floquet–Magnus expansion. This theory provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Major applications of the Floquet–Magnus expansion are illustrated by simple solid-state NMR and physical applications such as in nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, NMR, quantum field theory and high energy physics, electromagnetism, optics, general relativity, search of periodic orbits, and geometric control of mechanical systems. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics. This review article also discusses future potential theoretical directions in solid-state NMR.

  11. Direct Characterization of Kerogen by X-ray and Solid-State [superscript 13]C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelemen, S. R.; Afeworki, M.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Sansone, M.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Walters, C.C.; Freund, H.; Siskin, M.; Bence, A.E.; Curry, D.J.; Solum, M.; Pugmire, R.J.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Leblond, M.; Behar, F. (ExxonMobil); (ExxonMobil); (IFP); (Utah)

    2008-06-12

    A combination of solid-state {sup 13}C NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and sulfur X-ray absorption near edge structure (S-XANES) techniques are used to characterize organic oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur species and carbon chemical/structural features in kerogens. The kerogens studied represent a wide range of organic matter types and maturities. A van Krevelen plot based on elemental H/C data and XPS derived O/C data shows the well established pattern for type I, type II, and type III kerogens. The anticipated relationship between the Rock-Eval hydrogen index and H/C is independent of organic matter type. Carbon structural and lattice parameters are derived from solid-state {sup 13}C NMR analysis. As expected, the amount of aromatic carbon, measured by both {sup 13}C NMR and XPS, increases with decreasing H/C. The correlation between aromatic carbon and Rock-Eval T{sub max}, an indicator of maturity, is linear for types II and IIIC kerogens, but each organic matter type follows a different relationship. The average aliphatic carbon chain length (Cn) decreases with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon in a similar manner across all organic matter types. The fraction of aromatic carbons with attachments (FAA) decreases, while the average number of aromatic carbons per cluster (C) increases with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon. FAA values range from 0.2 to 0.4, and C values range from 12 to 20 indicating that kerogens possess on average 2- to 5-ring aromatic carbon units that are highly substituted. There is basic agreement between XPS and {sup 13}C NMR results for the amount and speciation of organic oxygen. XPS results show that the amount of carbon oxygen single bonded species increases and carbonyl-carboxyl species decrease with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon. Patterns for the relative abundances of nitrogen and sulfur species exist regardless of the large differences in the total amount of organic nitrogen and sulfur seen in the

  12. Magnetic field effect on nuclear shell structure and implications to physics of neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratyev, V.N.; Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    The effect of the magnetic field on the shell structure of nuclei is considered by employing the shell-correction method. The shift of a phase in shell-oscillations is shown to represent the main feature of the field effect. Such a phase-change is originating from the Pauli-magnetic response associated with the relative shift of spin-up and spin-down energy levels. The neutron shell-correction energy behaves almost periodically as a function of the field strength with a slightly enhanced amplitude of the shell-oscillations at a large field. The period of the sign change is determined by the energy difference between neighbour levels. The proton shell-correction energy displays an anomalous dependence on the field. The proton orbital magnetism enhances the nuclear shell effect especially when the field influence is comparable to the spin-orbit coupling. The nuclear magic numbers are demonstrated to depend considerably on the magnetic field on the strength scale B {approx} 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 17} G relevant for neutron stars and supernovas. Such a field is found to shift significantly nuclear magics of the iron region towards smaller mass numbers. (author)

  13. Experimental quantum simulation of Avian Compass in a nuclear magnetic resonance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jason; Feng, GuanRu; Zheng, Chao; Long, GuiLu

    2016-12-01

    Avian magnetoreception is the capacity for avians to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Discovered more than forty years ago, it has attracted intensive studies over the years. One promising model for describing this capacity in avians is the widely used reference-and-probe model where radical pairs within the eyes of bird combines to form singlet and triplet quantum states. The yield depends on the angle between the Earth's magnetic field and the molecules' axis, hence the relative value of yield of the singlet state or triplet state enables avians to sense the direction. Here we report the experimental demonstration of avian magnetoreception in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor. It is shown clearly from the experiment that the yield of the singlet state attains maximum when it is normal to the Earth's magnetic field, and the experimental results agree with theory very well.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance system with continuous flow of polarized water to obtain the traceability to static magnetic fields; Sistema de ressonancia magnetica nuclear com fluxo continuo de agua polarizada para obtencao da rastreabilidade para campos magneticos estaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ramon Valls; Nazarre, Diego Joriro, E-mail: ramon@ipt.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a system to obtain the traceability of field or magnetic induction intensity in the range of 2 μT up to 2 T, even in the presence of magnetic field gradients or noisy environments. The system is based on a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer, built in streaming water. The calibration procedure of a coil for magnetic field generation is described, as well as the results obtained and the estimated uncertainty (author)

  15. Development of nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance spectroscopy under 10 GPa class pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, R; Uchida, Y; Hirayama, K; Yamazaki, T; Fukazawa, H; Kohori, Y [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Takeshita, N, E-mail: hideto@nmr.s.chiba-u.ac.j [JST, TRIP, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    The high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) are conventionally performed up to 3 GPa using piston cylinder cell. However, the NMR/NQR measurements beyond this pressure range are scarcely performed owing to the technical difficulty. Recently, we developed new high pressure NMR/NQR technique using cubic anvil apparatus in which highly hydrostatic pressure was obtained. Using the new method, the {sup 63}Cu-NQR signal of Cu{sub 2}O was observed up to 7.2GPa with high sensitivity. The use of MgO gasket in mini-cubic anvil apparatus was examined for enlarging pressure range.

  16. Four-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic shielding: magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2009-12-28

    It is recognized only recently that the incorporation of the magnetic balance condition is absolutely essential for four-component relativistic theories of magnetic properties. Another important issue to be handled is the so-called gauge problem in calculations of, e.g., molecular magnetic shielding tensors with finite bases. It is shown here that the magnetic balance can be adapted to distributed gauge origins, leading to, e.g., magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbitals (MB-GIAOs) in which each magnetically balanced atomic orbital has its own local gauge origin placed on its center. Such a MB-GIAO scheme can be combined with any level of theory for electron correlation. The first implementation is done here at the coupled-perturbed Dirac-Kohn-Sham level. The calculated molecular magnetic shielding tensors are not only independent of the choice of gauge origin but also converge rapidly to the basis set limit. Close inspections reveal that (zeroth order) negative energy states are only important for the expansion of first order electronic core orbitals. Their contributions to the paramagnetism are therefore transferable from atoms to molecule and are essentially canceled out for chemical shifts. This allows for simplifications of the coupled-perturbed equations.

  17. Residual Dipolar Couplings in Zero-to-Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchard, John W; King, Jonathan P; Ledbetter, Micah P; Levine, Emma H; Bajaj, Vikram S; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Zero-to-ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF-NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the interaction averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial orientational ordering, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero-to-ultra-low-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-$^{13}$C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This represents the first investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin $J$-coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole c...

  18. Generation of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields during large- scale chemical and nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adushkin, V.V. [Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Dynamics of the Geospheres; Dubinya, V.A.; Karaseva, V.A.; Soloviev, S.P.; Surkov, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the main parameters of the electric field in the surface layer of the atmosphere and the results of the investigations of the natural electric field variations. Experimental investigations of the electromagnetic field for explosions in air are presented. Electromagnetic signals generated by underground nuclear and chemical explosions are discussed and explosions for 1976--1991 are listed. Long term anomalies of the earth`s electromagnetic field in the vicinity of underground explosions were also investigated. Study of the phenomenon of the irreversible shock magnetization showed that in the zone nearest to the explosion the quasistatic magnetic field decreases in inverse proportion to the distance.

  19. A method for mechanical generation of radio frequency fields in nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wagenaar, J J T; Donkersloot, R J; Marsman, F; de Wit, M; Bossoni, L; Oosterkamp, T H

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative method for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with ultra-low dissipation, by using the higher modes of the mechanical detector as radio frequency (rf) source. This method allows MRFM on samples without the need to be close to an rf source. Furthermore, since rf sources require currents that give dissipation, our method enables nuclear magnetic resonance experiments at ultra-low temperatures. Removing the need for an on-chip rf source is an important step towards a MRFM which can be widely used in condensed matter physics.

  20. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  1. Magnetic Lenz lenses increase the limit-of-detection in nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Spengler, Nils; Meissner, Markus V; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    A high NMR detection sensitivity is indispensable when dealing with mass and volume-limited samples, or whenever a high spatial resolution is required. The use of miniaturised RF coils is a proven way to increase sensitivity, but may be impractical and is not applicable to every experimental situation. We present the use of magnetic lenses, denoted as Lenz lenses due to their working principle, to focus the magnetic flux of a macroscopic RF coil into a smaller volume and thereby locally enhance the sensitivity of the NMR experiment - at the expense of the total sensitive volume. Besides focusing, such lenses facilitate re-guiding or re-shaping of magnetic fields much like optical lenses do with light beams. For the first time we experimentally demonstrate the use of Lenz lenses in magnetic resonance and provide a compact mathematical description of the working principle. Through simulations we show that optimal arrangements can be found.

  2. Development and initial characterization of a nuclear magnetic resonance dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel high dose radiation dosimeter was developed employing NMR spectroscopic quantitation of the radiolytic products of methanol. Chemical shifts of product resonances relative to the solvent allow quantification using NMR techniques. Due to expected dynamic range limitations of NMR instrumentation, deuterated methanol is used with a presaturation suppression sequence to reduce the solvent proton signals. Methanol's {sup 13}C-coupled proton resonances is used as an internal reference to normalize product signals otherwise subject to spectrometer variability. Data on reproducibility, dose response, and temporal stability were acquired. System reproducibility for a sample at 1 kGy is {approx}10%. The dose response is linear in the range between 200 Gy and 50 kGy. No significant signal degradation was observed during a six month period. Advantages of this type dosimeter system include ease of use, large dynamic range, and temporal stability. An additional characteristic of a methanol based system is the LET dependent response in the chemical yields of formaldehyde and ethylene glycol. 70 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  4. Negotiated identities of chemical instrumentation: the case of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1956-1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jody A

    2003-05-01

    What is an NMR spectrometer? Beginning with this seemingly simple question, I will explore the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy between the years 1956 and 1969 from two vantage points: the organic chemists who used the new instrument, and Varian Associates-the makers of the first NMR spectrometers-. Through an examination of the articles and advertisements published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, I will draw two conclusions. First, organic chemists and Varian Associates (along with other actors) are co-responsible for the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (i.e., NMR spectroscopy was not created by a single actor). Second, by changing the way NMR spectrometers are used, organic chemists attempted to change to the identity of the instrument. Similarly, when Varian Associates advertised their NMR spectrometers in a different way, they, too, attempted to change the identity of the instrument.

  5. Simulation of general three-body interactions in a nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Three-body interaction plays an important role in many-body physics,and quantum computer is efficient in simulating many-body interactions. We have experimentally demonstrated the general three-body interactions in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance computer we implemented general forms of three-body interactions including σ 1x σ z2 σ x3 and σ 1x σ z2 σ y3 . The results show good agreement between theory and experiment. We have also given a concise and practical formula for a general n-body interaction in terms of one-and two-body interactions.

  6. Use of Nuclear Spin Noise Spectroscopy to Monitor Slow Magnetization Buildup at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Peat, David; Owers‐Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At ultralow temperatures, longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation times become exceedingly long and spectral lines are very broad. These facts pose particular challenges for the measurement of NMR spectra and spin relaxation phenomena. Nuclear spin noise spectroscopy is used to monitor proton spin polarization buildup to thermal equilibrium of a mixture of glycerol, water, and copper oxide nanoparticles at 17.5 mK in a static magnetic field of 2.5 T. Relaxation times determined in such a way are essentially free from perturbations caused by excitation radiofrequency pulses, radiation damping, and insufficient excitation bandwidth. The experimental spin‐lattice relaxation times determined on resonance by saturation recovery with spin noise detection are consistently longer than those determined by using pulse excitation. These longer values are in better accordance with the expected field dependence trend than those obtained by on‐resonance experiments with pulsed excitation. PMID:27305629

  7. Transition-Selective Pulses in Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjolander, Tobias F; Tayler, Michael C D; King, Jonathan P; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    We use low-amplitude, ultralow frequency pulses to drive nuclear spin transitions in zero and ultralow magnetic fields. In analogy to high-field NMR, a range of sophisticated experiments becomes available as these allow narrow-band excitation. As a first demonstration, pulses with excitation bandwidths 0.5-5 Hz are used for population redistribution, selective excitation, and coherence filtration. These methods are helpful when interpreting zero- and ultralow-field NMR spectra that contain a large number of transitions.

  8. Thermal Transition of Ribonuclease A Observed Using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫永彬; 罗雪春; 周海梦; 张日清

    2001-01-01

    The thermal transition of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) was investigated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Significant resonance overlap in the large native protein limits accurate assignments in the 1H NMR spectrum. This study proposes extending the investigation of large proteins by dynamic analysis. Comparison of the traditional method and the correlation coefficient method suggests successful application of spectrum image analysis in dynamic protein studies by NMR.

  9. Simulation of the four-body interaction in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WenZhang; ZHANG JingFu; LONG GuiLu

    2009-01-01

    The four-body interaction plays an important role in many-body systems,and it can exhibit interesting phase transition behaviors.In this letter,we report the experimental demonstration of a four-body interaction in a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor.The strongly modulating pulse is used to implement spin selective excitation.The results show a good agreement between theory and experiment.

  10. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of prion peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Jonathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    High-resolution structural studies using x-ray diffraction and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are not feasible for proteins of low volubility and high tendency to aggregate. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) is in principle capable of providing structural information in such systems, however to do this efficiently and accurately, further SSNMR tools must be developed This dissertation describes the development of three new methods and their application to a biological system of interest, the priori protein (PrP).

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of changes induced by the energy of ultrasonic field in the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaită, A; Andru-Vangheli, D; Nagy, I; Coman, M; Covlescu, H

    156 laboratory mice were exposed to ultrasonic (US) waves under 12 different conditions. After exposure to ultrasounds, the left lung of each animal was studied morphopathologically and then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The study emphasized the possibility of hemorrhagical lesions in the lung through US and the fact that both measurement techniques (for T1 and T2) are alike in sensitivity. The effect on the lung is depending on the intensity and time of exposure to US.

  12. Self-energy Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Parameters within Quantum Electrodynamics Perturbation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Aucar

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A theory for the calculation of self-energy corrections to the nuclear magnetic parameters is given in this paper. It is based on the S-matrix formulation of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED. Explicit expressions for the various terms of the S-matrix are given. The interpretation of the self-energy, one- and two-vertex terms and some perspective for possible future developments are discussed.

  13. Glass transition temperatures of epoxy resins by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutenberg, A.C.; Dorsey, G.F.; Peck, C.G.

    1976-04-21

    Pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to measure the glass transition temperatures of cured epoxy resins. These measurements make it possible to monitor the cure and determine the glass transition temperature as a function of the curing conditions and the concentration of the components. Knowledge of the glass transition temperature of the cured epoxies allows screening of them for a number of uses, including adhesives and coatings operations.

  14. Simulating decoherence behavior of a system in entangled state using nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Shan, L; Deng, Z; Zhang, Jingfu; Lu, Zhiheng; Shan, Lu; Deng, Zhiwei

    2002-01-01

    By choosing H nucleus in Carbon-13 labelled trichloroethylene as one qubit environment, and two C nuclei as a two-qubit system, we have simulated quantum decoherence when the system lies in an entangled state using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Decoupling technique is used to trace over the environment degrees of freedom. Experimental results show agreements with the theoretical predictions. Our experiment scheme can be generalized to the case that environment is composed of multiple qubits.

  15. Compound-specific {sup 13}C analysis for tracking organic pollutants through the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangerberg, J.E. [Lausanne Univ., Lausanne (Switzerland). Institut de Mineralogie et Petrographie

    2000-07-01

    The application of compound specific carbon isotope analyses has led to major advances in the elucidation of the origin and alteration of complex organic chemicals and priority pollutants (e.g., aliphatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, PCBs) in environmental materials. This method will provide unique information on the source and impact of pollutants of most environmental concern (e.g., organochlorines, organometals, organophosphates, polychlorinated dibenzofuranes), allowing conclusive forensic studies. Further developments of GC-C-IRMS attempt the multiple isotopic analyses of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen at molecular level. This approach will give unique information on the extremely complicate processes linking the biogeochemical reservoirs of the elements essential for life.

  16. Tracing {sup 13}C reveals the below ground connection between trees and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegwolf, R.T.W.; Steinmann, K.; Saurer, M.; Koerner, Ch.

    2003-03-01

    Freshly assimilated atmospheric CO{sub 2} is transferred as sugars from the leaves into the whole organism. Since mycorrhiza fungi and tree roots are in an intensive symbiosis, the fungi provide important information about the tree internal carbon distribution. (author)

  17. NMR absolute shielding scale and nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjan, Bożena; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Jackowski, Karol; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth; Antušek, Andrej; Jaszuński, Michał

    2016-06-28

    An absolute shielding scale is proposed for (207)Pb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is based on ab initio calculations performed on an isolated tetramethyllead Pb(CH3)4 molecule and the assignment of the experimental resonance frequency from the gas-phase NMR spectra of Pb(CH3)4, extrapolated to zero density of the buffer gas to obtain the result for an isolated molecule. The computed (207)Pb shielding constant is 10 790 ppm for the isolated molecule, leading to a shielding of 10799.7 ppm for liquid Pb(CH3)4 which is the accepted reference standard for (207)Pb NMR spectra. The new experimental and theoretical data are used to determine μ((207)Pb), the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb, by applying the standard relationship between NMR frequencies, shielding constants and nuclear moments of two nuclei in the same external magnetic field. Using the gas-phase (207)Pb and (reference) proton results and the theoretical value of the Pb shielding in Pb(CH3)4, we find μ((207)Pb) = 0.59064 μN. The analysis of new experimental and theoretical data obtained for the Pb(2+) ion in water solutions provides similar values of μ((207)Pb), in the range of 0.59000-0.59131 μN.

  18. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: Insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the O17 and H1 isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4ppm for the O17 shielding and 1ppm for the H1 shielding.

  19. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-21

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the (17)O and (1)H isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4 ppm for the (17)O shielding and 1 ppm for the (1)H shielding.

  20. (83)Kr nuclear magnetic moment in terms of that of (3)He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2014-08-01

    High resolution NMR spectroscopy was applied to precisely determine the (83)Kr nuclear magnetic dipole moment on the basis of new results available for nuclear magnetic shielding in krypton and helium-3 atoms. Small amounts of (3)He as the solutes and (83)Kr as the buffer gas were observed in (3)He and (83)Kr NMR spectra at the constant external field, B0 = 11.7578 T. In each case, the resonance frequencies (ν(He) and ν(Kr)) were linearly dependent on the density of gaseous solvent. The extrapolation of experimental points to the zero density of gaseous krypton allowed for the evaluation of both resonance frequencies free from intermolecular interactions. By combining these measurements with the recommended (83)Kr chemical shielding value, the nuclear magnetic moment could be determined with much better precision than ever before, μ((83)Kr) = -0.9707297(32)μN, with the improvement due to the greater accuracy of the spectral data.

  1. Bohr-Weisskopf effect influence of the distributed nuclear magnetization on hfs

    CERN Document Server

    Stroke, Hinko Henry; Pinard, J

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic moments provide a sensitive test of nuclear wave functions, in particular those of neutrons, which are not readily obtainable from other nuclear data. These are taking added importance by recent proposals to study parity non-conservation (PNC) effects in alkali atoms in isotopic series. By taking ratios of the PNC effects in pairs of isotopes, uncertainties in the atomic wave functions are largely cancelled out at the cost of knowledge of the change in the neutron wave function, the Bohr-Weisskopf effect (1950) in the hyperfine structure interaction of atoms measures the influence of the spatial distribution of the nuclear magnetization, and thereby provides an additional constraint on the determination of the neutron wave function. The added great importance of B-W in the determination of QED effects from the hfs in hydrogen-like ions of heavy elements, as measured recently at GSI, is noted, the B-W experiments require precision measurements of the hfs interactions and, independently, of the...

  2. Nuclear magnetic biosignatures in the carbonaceous matter of ancient cherts: comparison with carbonaceous meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourier, Didier; Delpoux, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé

    2013-10-01

    The search for organic biosignatures is motivated by the hope of understanding the conditions of emergence of life on Earth and the perspective of finding traces of extinct life in martian sediments. Paramagnetic radicals, which exist naturally in amorphous carbonaceous matter fossilized in Precambrian cherts, were used as local structural probes and studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The nuclear magnetic resonance transitions of elements inside and around these radicals were detected by monitoring the nuclear modulations of electron spin echo in pulsed EPR. We found that the carbonaceous matter of fossilized microorganisms with age up to 3.5 billion years gives specific nuclear magnetic signatures of hydrogen (¹H), carbon (¹³C), and phosphorus (³¹P) nuclei. We observed that these potential biosignatures of extinct life are found neither in the carbonaceous matter of carbonaceous meteorites (4.56 billion years), the most ancient objects of the Solar System, nor in any carbonaceous matter resulting from carbonization of organic and bioorganic precursors. These results indicate that these nuclear signatures are sensitive to thermal episodes and can be used for Archean cherts with metamorphism not higher than the greenschist facies.

  3. Fabrication and Magnetic Properties of Co-Doped TiO2 Powders Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Shi-Hui; WANG Xin-Wei; KOU Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Xue-Yun; XI Li; ZUO Ya-Lu; YANG Xiao-Lin; ZHAO Yu-Xuan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Co0.04 Ti0.96 O2 powders are fabricated by sol-gel method. The structure and magnetic properties are investigated under different annealing conditions systematically with emphasis on the influence of oxygen pressure. Pure anatase structure was acquired for all the samples annealed at 450 ℃ for one hour. The samples annealed in air exhibit evident room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) with a small magnetic moment of 0.029μB per Co atom and coercivity Hc of 26 Oe, while the samples annealed in vacuum have strong RTFM with a larger magnetic moment of 1.18 μB per Co atom and Hc of 430 Oe. The zero-field spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 59 Co is obtained to prove the existence of Co clusters in the latter samples, implying that the Co clusters are responsible for the strong RTFM in the samples annealed in vacuum. No Co cluster could be observed using both XPS and NMR techniques in the samples annealed in air, implying that the RTFM found in these samples is intrinsic.

  4. Advances in high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance methods in inhomogeneous magnetic fields using intermolecular multiple quantum coherences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Strong and extremely homogeneous static magnetic field is usually required for high-resolution nu-clear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, in the cases of in vivo and so on, the magnetic field inho-mogeneity owing to magnetic susceptibility variation in samples is unavoidable and hard to eliminate by conventional methods such as shimming. Recently, intermolecular multiple quantum coherences (iMQCs) have been employed to eliminate inhomogeneous broadening and obtain high-resolution NMR spectra, especially for in vivo samples. Compared to other high-resolution NMR methods, iMQC method exhibits its unique feature and advantage. It simultaneously holds information of chemical shifts, multiplet structures, coupling constants, and relative peak areas. All the information is often used to analyze and characterize molecular structures in conventional one-dimensional NMR spec-troscopy. In this work, recent technical developments including our results in this field are summarized; the high-resolution mechanism is analyzed and comparison with other methods based on interactions between spins is made; comments on the current situation and outlook on the research directions are also made.

  5. Correction of environmental magnetic fields for the acquisition of Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles below Earth's field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetoulas, Vasileios; Lurie, David J.; Broche, Lionel M.

    2017-09-01

    T1 relaxation times can be measured at a range of magnetic field strengths by Fast Field-Cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry to provide T1-dispersion curves. These are valuable tools for the investigation of material properties as they provide information about molecular dynamics non-invasively. However, accessing information at fields below 230 μT (10 kHz proton Larmor frequency) requires careful correction of unwanted environmental magnetic fields. In this work a novel method is proposed that compensates for the environmental fields on a FFC-NMR relaxometer and extends the acquisition of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion profiles to 2.3 μT (extremely low field region), with direct application in the study of slow molecular motions. Our method is an improvement of an existing technique, reported by Anoardo and Ferrante in 2003, which exploits the non-adiabatic behaviour of the magnetisation in rapidly-varying magnetic fields and makes use of the oscillation of the signal amplitude to estimate the field strength. This increases the accuracy in measuring the environmental fields and allows predicting the optimal correction values by applying simple equations to fit the data acquired. Validation of the method is performed by comparisons with well-known dispersion curves obtained from polymers and benzene.

  6. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  7. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance in osteoporosis evaluation; Aplicacoes de ressonancia magnetica nuclear na avaliacao de osteoporose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A., E-mail: giannoni@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Montrazi, Elton T.; Bonagamba, Tito J., E-mail: elton.montrazi@gmail.com, E-mail: tito@ifsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cesar, Reinaldo, E-mail: reinaldofisica@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    In this work, initially ceramic samples of known porosity were used. These ceramic samples were saturated with water. The nuclear magnetic resonance signal due to relaxation processes that the hydrogen nucleus water contained in the pores of this ceramic material was measured. Then these samples were subjected to a process of drying and measures successively. As the water contained in pores greater evaporates the intensity of signal decreases and shows the sign because of the smaller pores. The analysis of this drying process gives a qualitative assessment of the pore size of the material. In a second step, bones of animals of unknown porosity underwent the same methodology for evaluating osteoporosis. Also a sample of human vertebra in a unique manner, with the same purpose was measured. Combined with other techniques is a quantitative evaluation of the possible porosity.

  8. Enhanced affinity of ketotifen toward tamarind seed polysaccharide in comparison with hydroxyethylcellulose and hyaluronic acid: a nuclear magnetic resonance investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Nazzi, Samuele; Balzano, Federica; Di Colo, Giacomo; Zambito, Ylenia; Zaino, Chiara; Sansò, Marco; Salvadori, Eleonora; Benvenuti, Marco

    2008-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that, in aqueous solution, ketotifen fumarate bound more strongly to tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) than to hydroxyethylcellulose or hyaluronic acid. Results were confirmed by dynamic dialysis technique.

  9. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance for the in vivo study of water content in trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, Jacob, E-mail: jlyoder@lanl.gov [Inorganic, Isotope and Actinide Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, Michael W.; Espy, Michelle A. [Applied Modern Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sevanto, Sanna [Earth Systems Observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging have long been used to study water content in plants. Approaches have been primarily based on systems using large magnetic fields (∼1 T) to obtain NMR signals with good signal-to-noise. This is because the NMR signal scales approximately with the magnetic field strength squared. However, there are also limits to this approach in terms of realistic physiological configuration or those imposed by the size and cost of the magnet. Here we have taken a different approach – keeping the magnetic field low to produce a very light and inexpensive system, suitable for bulk water measurements on trees less than 5 cm in diameter, which could easily be duplicated to measure on many trees or from multiple parts of the same tree. Using this system we have shown sensitivity to water content in trees and their cuttings and observed a diurnal signal variation in tree water content in a greenhouse. We also demonstrate that, with calibration and modeling of the thermal polarization, the system is reliable under significant temperature variation.

  10. Using microcontact printing to fabricate microcoils on capillaries for high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance on nanoliter volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.A.; Jackman, R.J.; Whitesides, G.M. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Olson, D.L.; Sweedler, J.V. [Beckman Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This letter describes a method for producing conducting microcoils for high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopy on nanoliter volumes. This technique uses microcontact printing and electroplating to form coils on microcapillaries. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra collected using these microcoils, have linewidths less than 1 Hz for model compounds and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) for ethylbenzene of 2.6 nmol in 13 min. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  12. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  13. NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC MINI-RELAXOMETER FOR LIQUID AND VISCOUS MEDIA CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Davydov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new method for registration of nuclear magnetic resonance signal of small volume liquid and viscous media being studied (0.5 ml in a weak magnetic field (0.06 –0.08 T, and measuring of longitudinal T1 and transverse T2 relaxation constants. A new construction of NMR mini-relaxometer magnetic system is developed for registration of NMR signal. The nonuniformity of a magnetic field in a pole where registration coil is located is 0,410–3 sm–1 (the induction is В0 = 0.079 T. An electrical circuit of autodyne receiver (weak fluctuations generator has been developed with usage of low noise differential amplifier and NMR signal operating and control scheme (based on microcontroller STM32 for measuring of relaxation constants of liquid and viscous media in automatic operating mode. New technical decisions made it possible to improve relaxometer response time and dynamic range of measurements for relaxation constants T1 and T2 in comparison with small sized nuclear-magnetic spectrometer developed by the authors earlier (with accuracy characteristics conservation. The developed schemes for self-tuning of registration frequency, generating amplitude of magnetic field H1 in registration coil, and amplitude and frequency of modulating field provide measuring of T1 and T2 with error less than 0.5 % and signal to noise ratio about 1.2 in temperature range from 3 to 400 C. A new construction of mini-relaxometer reduced the weight of the device to 4 kg (with independent supply unit and increased transportability and operating convenience.

  14. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  15. A Neutron Diffraction Study of the Nuclear and Magnetic Structure of MnNb2O6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Oliver Vindex; Lebech, Bente; Krebs Larsen, F.;

    1976-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was made of the nuclear and the magnetic structure of MnNb2O6 single crystals. The thirteen nuclear parameters (space group Pbcn) were determined from 304 reflections at room temperature. The antiferromagnetic structure (Neel temperature=4.4K), determined at 1.2K, is a...

  16. Homometallic and Heterometallic Antiferromagnetic Rings: Magnetic Properties Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadei, Cecilia [Univ. of Pavia (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to investigate the local magnetic properties of homometallic Cr8 antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring and the changes occurring by replacing one Cr3+ ion with diamagnetic Cd2+ (Cr7Cd) and with Ni2+ (Cr7Ni). In the heterometallic ring a redistribution of the local magnetic moment is expected in the low temperature ground state. We have investigated those changes by both 53Cr-NMR and 19F-NMR. We have determined the order of magnitude of the transferred hyperfine coupling constant 19F - M+ where M+ = Cr3+, Ni2+ in the different rings. This latter result gives useful information about the overlapping of the electronic wavefunctions involved in the coordinative bond.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes in