WorldWideScience

Sample records for sunyaev-zeldovich effect sze

  1. Cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Scaling Relations

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Holder, G P; Balogh, M L; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; Babul, Arif; Holder, Gilbert P.; Balogh, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray observations of an "entropy floor" in nearby groups and clusters of galaxies offer evidence that important non-gravitational processes, such as radiative cooling and/or "preheating", have strongly influenced the evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM). We examine how the presence of an entropy floor modifies the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. A detailed analysis of scaling relations between X-ray and SZ effect observables and also between the two primary SZ effect observables is presented. We find that relationships between the central Compton parameter and the temperature or mass of a cluster are extremely sensitive to the presence of an entropy floor. The same is true for correlations between the integrated Compton parameter and the X-ray luminosity or the central Compton parameter. In fact, if the entropy floor is as high as inferred in recent analyses of X-ray data, a comparison of these correlations with both current and future SZ effect observations should show a clear signature of this...

  2. Cosmography with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, R.F.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58429-500, Campina Grande - PB (Brazil); Alcaniz, J.S.; Carvalho, J.C., E-mail: holanda@uepb.edu.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br, E-mail: carvalho@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatório Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2013-06-01

    Cosmography provides a direct method to map the expansion history of the Universe in a model-independent way. Recently, different kinds of observations have been used in cosmographic analyses, such as SNe Ia and gamma ray bursts measurements, weak and strong lensing, cosmic microwave background anisotropies, etc. In this work we examine the prospects for constraining cosmographic parameters from current and future measurements of galaxy clusters distances based on their Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) and X-ray observations. By assuming the current observational error distribution, we perform Monte Carlo simulations based on a well-behaved parameterization for the deceleration parameter to generate samples with different characteristics and study the improvement on the determination of the cosmographic parameters from upcoming data. The influence of galaxy clusters (GC) morphologies on the H{sub 0}−q{sub 0} plane is also investigated.

  3. Cosmography with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Carvalho, J C

    2013-01-01

    Cosmography provides a direct method to map the expansion history of the Universe in a model-independent way. Recently, different kinds of observations have been used in cosmographic analyses, such as SNe Ia and gamma ray bursts measurements, weak and strong lensing, cosmic microwave background anisotropies, etc. In this work we examine the prospects for constraining cosmographic parameters from current and future measurements of galaxy clusters distances based on their Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) and X-ray observations. By assuming the current observational error distribution, we perform Monte Carlo simulations based on a well-behaved parameterization for the deceleration parameter to generate samples with different characteristics and study the improvement on the determination of the cosmographic parameters from upcoming data. The influence of galaxy clusters (GC) morphologies on the $H_0- q_0$ plane is also investigated.

  4. Planck 2015 results: XXII. A map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.;

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed all-sky Compton parameters maps, y-maps, of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 30 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck satellite. These reconstructed y-maps are delivered as part of t...

  5. Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Studies of Galaxy Clusters with Bolocam (and Future Instrumentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golwala, Sunil; Ameglio, Silvia; Pierpaoli, Elena; Sayers, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are excellent laboratories for studying the astrophysics of gravitational collapse and the non-self-similar processes that can affect it. A number of different techniques allow us to study the distribution of the consituents of galaxy clusters. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect measures the line-of-sight integral of the the pressure in the ICM plasma. Comparison to and combination with other probes enables a variety of studies of the ICM and of clusters: scaling relations, radial profiles, tests of hydrostatic equilibrium, etc. We report on the status of our program to image clusters in the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect at 150GHz using Bolocam and perform such tests. We also describe the upcoming MKIDCam long-wavelength multi-color facility camera for the CSO, which will provide new capabilities in thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect imaging. We comment on the role Tom Phillips and the CSO have played in facilitating the development of mm-wave SZ observations.

  6. Cross-correlation between thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    CERN Document Server

    Creque-Sarbinowski, Cyril; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large-angle fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect and Compton-y distortions from the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect are both due to line-of-sight density perturbations. Here we calculate the cross-correlation between these two signals. Measurement of this cross-correlation can be used to test the redshift distribution of the tSZ distortion. We also evaluate the detectability of a yT cross-correlation from exotic early-Universe sources in the presence of this late-time effect.

  7. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and the MITO experiment, a project for cosmological parameters determination

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alba, L; De Petris, M; Orlando, A E; Lamagna, L; Rephaeli, Y; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Signore, M; Kreysa, E; Alba, Livia D'; Melchiorri, Francesco; Petris, Marco De; Orlando, Angiola; Lamagna, Luca; Rephaeli, Yoel; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Signore, Monique; Kreysa, Ernst

    2000-01-01

    Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background radiation by electrons in the hot gas in clusters of galaxies - the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect - has long been recognized as a uniquely important feature, rich in cosmological and astrophysical information. Here, we briefly report a theoretical description of this effect. Moreover we discuss the importance to have high-quality clusters X-maps in order to yield an accurate value of the Hubble constant and of other cosmological parameters, strongly preferring nearby clusters observations. Finally we present the MITO experiment, devoted to the observation of the richest nearby cluster, the Coma cluster (A1656).

  8. Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect from Quasar-driven Blast-waves

    CERN Document Server

    Platania, P; De Zotti, G; Lazzaro, E; Bersanelli, M

    2002-01-01

    Quasar-driven winds are currently the best candidates for accounting for the pre-heating of the intergalactic medium in clusters. Such winds, occurring during early phases of the evolution of spheroidal galaxies, shock-heat the interstellar gas, thus inducing a detectable Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We estimate the amplitude and the angular scale of such effect as well as its counts as a function of the comptonization parameter $y$. The contamination due to radio emission by the quasar itself is also discussed. The corresponding mean Compton distortion of the cosmic microwave background spectrum is found to be well below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit.

  9. Triple Experiment Spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in the Coma Cluster: H_0

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; Lamagna, L; Luzzi, G; Maoli, R; Melchiorri, A; Melchiorri, F; Orlando, A E; Palladino, E; Savini, G; Rephaeli, Y; Shimon, M; Colafrancesco, S; Kreysa, E; Signore, M

    2003-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect was previously measured in the Coma cluster by the OVRO and MITO experiments, and recently also with the WMAP satellite. We assess the consistency of these results and their implications on the feasibility of high frequency SZ work with ground-based telescopes. The unique dataset from the combined measurements at six frequency bands is jointly analyzed to determine the Hubble constant, H_0, towards Coma: H_0 \\simeq (77 \\pm 20) km/(s Mpc), whose error include both y and X-ray data uncertainties.

  10. Extraction of cluster parameters from Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations with simulated annealing optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, S H

    2004-01-01

    We present a user-friendly tool for the analysis of data from Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations. The tool is based on the stochastic method of simulated annealing, and allows the extraction of the central values and error-bars of the 3 SZ parameters, Comptonization parameter, y, peculiar velocity, v_p, and electron temperature, T_e. The f77-code SASZ will allow any number of observing frequencies and spectral band shapes. As an example we consider the SZ parameters for the COMA cluster.

  11. Cross-correlation between thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creque-Sarbinowski, Cyril; Bird, Simeon; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Large-angle fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background temperature induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and Compton-y distortions from the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect are both due to line-of-sight density perturbations. Here we calculate the cross-correlation between these two signals. Measurement of this cross-correlation can be used to test the redshift distribution of the tSZ distortion, which has implications for the redshift at which astrophysical processes in clusters begin to operate. We also evaluate the detectability of a y T cross-correlation from exotic early-Universe sources in the presence of this late-time effect.

  12. The Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect of Primordial Recombination Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kholupenko, E E; Ivanchik, A V; Varshalovich, D A

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that recombination radiation of primordial hydrogen-helium plasma leads to the distortions of the planckian spectrum shape of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). We discuss the thermal Sunayev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect with taking into account primordial recombination radiation (PRR). Since in the thermal SZ effect the redistribution of the photons depends on the derivatives of the spectrum, the value of relative correction to SZ effect due to PRR significantly higher than relative corrections due to PRR in the initial spectrum. Calculations of corrections to the thermal SZ effect due to PRR show that depending on the cluster parameters: 1) in the range of frequencies $\

  13. Planck 2015 results: XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect-cosmic infrared background correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrared...... data; (ii) using an all-sky tSZ map built from Planck frequency maps; and (iii) using cross-spectra between Planck frequency maps. With the three different methods, we detect the tSZ-CIB cross-power spectrum at significance levels of (i) 6σ; (ii) 3σ; and (iii) 4σ. We model the tSZ-CIB cross...

  14. Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in WMAP and its effect on cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Huffenberger, Kevin M; Makarov, A; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Seljak, Uros; Makarov, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    We use multi-frequency information in first year WMAP data to search for the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. WMAP has sufficiently broad frequency coverage to constrain SZ without the addition of higher frequency data: the SZ power spectrum amplitude is expected to increase 50% from W to Q frequency band. This, in combination with the low noise in WMAP, allows us to strongly constrain the SZ contribution. We derive an optimal frequency combination of WMAP cross-spectra to extract SZ in the presence of noise, CMB, and radio point sources, which are marginalized over. We find that the SZ contribution is less than 2% (95% c.l.) at the first acoustic peak in W band. Under the assumption that the removed radio point sources are not correlated with SZ this limit implies sigma_8<1.07 at 95% c.l. We investigate the effect on the cosmological parameters of allowing an SZ component. We run Monte Carlo Markov Chains with and without an SZ component and find that the addition of SZ does not affect any of the cosmologic...

  15. Planck 2015 results. XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect--cosmic infrared background correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrared emission produced by dusty galaxies inside these clusters and demonstrate that the infrared emission is about 50% more extended than the tSZ effect. Modelling the emission with a Navarro--Frenk--White profile, we find that the radial profile concentration parameter is $c_{500} = 1.00^{+0.18}_{-0.15}$. This indicates that infrared galaxies in the outskirts of clusters have higher infrared flux than cluster-core galaxies. We also study the cross-correlation between tSZ and CIB anisotropies, following three alternative approaches based on power spectrum analyses: (i) using a catalogue of confirmed clusters detected in Planck data; (ii) using an all-sky tSZ map built from Planck frequency maps; and (iii) using cross-spe...

  16. MITO measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in the Coma cluster of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Petris, M; Lamagna, L; Melchiorri, F; Orlando, A E; Palladino, E; Rephaeli, Y; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Kreysa, E; Signore, M

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect towards the Coma cluster (A1656) with the MITO experiment, a 2.6-m telescope equipped with a 4-channel 17 arcminute (FWHM) photometer. Measurements at frequency bands 143+/-15, 214+/-15, 272+/-16 and 353+/-13 GHz, were made during 120 drift scans of Coma. We describe the observations and data analysis that involved extraction of the S-Z signal by employing a spatial and spectral de-correlation scheme to remove a dominant atmospheric component. The deduced values of the thermal S-Z effect in the first three bands are DT_{0} = -179+/-38,-33+/-81,170+/-35 microKelvin in the cluster center. The corresponding optical depth, tau=(4.1+/-0.9) 10^{-3}, is consistent (within errors) with both the value from a previous low frequency S-Z measurement, and the value predicted from the X-ray deduced gas parameters.

  17. Planck intermediate results. CV. Evidence of unbound gas from the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kitaura, F; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Ma, Y -Z; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Puget, J -L; Puisieux, S; Rachen, J P; Racine, B; Reach, W T; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wang, W; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    By looking at the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ) in Planck nominal mission data, we present a significant detection of baryons participating in large-scale bulk flows around central galaxies (CGs) at redshift $z\\approx 0.1$. We estimate the pairwise momentum of the kSZ temperature fluctuations at the positions of the CGC (Central Galaxy Catalogue) samples extracted from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7) data. For the foreground-cleaned maps, we find $1.8$-$2.5\\sigma$ detections of the kSZ signal, which are consistent with the kSZ evidence found in individual Planck raw frequency maps, although lower than found in the WMAP-9yr W band ($3.3\\sigma$). We further reconstruct the peculiar velocity field from the CG density field, and compute for the first time the cross-correlation function between kSZ temperature fluctuations and estimates of CG radial peculiar velocities. This correlation function yields a $3.0$-$3.7$$\\sigma$ detection of the peculiar motion of extended gas on Mpc scales, in flows correlated...

  18. Planck 2015 results. XXII. A map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lacasa, F; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tramonte, D; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed all-sky y-maps of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 30 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck satellite survey. These reconstructed y-maps are delivered as part of the Planck 2015 release. The y-maps are characterised in terms of noise properties and residual foreground contamination, mainly thermal dust emission at large angular scales and CIB and extragalactic point sources at small angular scales. Specific masks are defined to minimize foreground residuals and systematics. Using these masks we compute the y-map angular power spectrum and higher order statistics. From these we conclude that the y-map is dominated by tSZ signal in the multipole range, 20-600. We compare the measured tSZ power spectrum and higher order statistics to various physically motivated models and discuss the implications of our results in terms of cluster physics and cosmology.

  19. Testing Dark Matter Halo Models of Quasars With Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    A statistical analysis of stacked Compton$-y$ maps of quasar hosts with a median redshift of $1.5$ using Millennium Simulation is performed to address two issues, one on the feedback energy from quasars and the other on testing dark matter halo models for quasar hosts. On the first, we find that, at the resolution of FWHM=$10$ arcmin obtained by Planck data, the observed thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect can be entirely accounted for and explained by the thermal energy of halos sourced by gravitational collapse of halos, without a need to invoke additional, large energy sources, such as quasar or stellar feedback. Allowing for uncertainties of dust temperature in the calibration of observed Comton$-y$ maps, the maximum additional feedback energy is $\\sim 25\\%$ of that previously suggested. Second, we show that, with FWHM=$1$ arcmin beam, tSZ measurements will provide a potentially powerful test of quasar-hosting dark matter halo models, limited only by possible observational systematic uncertainties, not...

  20. Planck Intermediate Results. V. Pressure profiles of galaxy clusters from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borgani, S; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Ensslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hempel, A; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jagemann, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; LÛpez-Caniego, M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; White, S D M; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    Taking advantage of the all-sky coverage and broad frequency range of the Planck satellite, we study the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) and pressure profiles of 62 nearby massive clusters detected at high significance in the 14-month nominal survey. Careful reconstruction of the SZ signal indicates that most clusters are individually detected at least out to R500. By stacking the radial profiles, we have statistically detected the radial SZ signal out to 3R500, i.e., at a density contrast of about 50-100, though the dispersion about the mean profile dominates the statistical errors across the whole radial range. Our measurement is fully consistent with previous Planck results on integrated SZ fluxes, further strengthening the agreement between SZ and X-ray measurements inside R500. Correcting for the effects of the Planck beam, we have calculated the corresponding pressure profiles. This new constraint from SZ measurements is consistent with the X-ray constraints from xmm in the region in which the profiles overlap (...

  1. Constraints on the missing baryons from the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in Planck data

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Wang, Wenting; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Macías-Pérez, Juan; Herranz, Diego

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the amount of the missing baryons detected by the Planck measurements of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ) around members of the Central Galaxy Catalogue (CGC) from the seventh release of the Sloan Survey. We use two statistics yielding evidence for kSZ signal, namely the pairwise peculiar momentum and the correlation function of the kSZ temperature estimates and predicted line-of-sight peculiar velocities. We find that both statistics yield consistent measurements of the Thomson optical depth $\\tau_{\\rm T}$ in the range of $0.5$-$1.4\\times 10^{-4}$ for angular apertures that, on average, correspond to a range of distances of $>1$ to almost $3$ virial radii from the centres of the CG host halos. We find that, for the larger apertures for which we still have significant ($2$-$2.5\\,\\sigma$) kSZ detection, the regions probed around CGs contain roughly half the total amount of baryons present in the cosmological volume sampled by the Sloan footprint at $z\\simeq 0.12$. Furthermore, under the a...

  2. Planck intermediate results: V. Pressure profiles of galaxy clusters from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castex, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2013-01-01

    Taking advantage of the all-sky coverage and broadfrequency range of the Planck satellite, we study the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) and pressure profiles of 62 nearby massive clusters detected at high significance in the 14-month nominal survey. Careful reconstruction of the SZ signal indicates that m...

  3. Planck 2015 results. XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect-cosmic infrared background correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-08-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrared emission produced by dusty galaxies inside these clusters and demonstrate that the infrared emission is about 50% more extended than the tSZ effect. Modelling the emission with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find that the radial profile concentration parameter is c500 = 1.00+0.18-0.15 . This indicates that infrared galaxies in the outskirts of clusters have higher infrared flux than cluster-core galaxies. We also study the cross-correlation between tSZ and CIB anisotropies, following three alternative approaches based on power spectrum analyses: (i) using a catalogue of confirmed clusters detected in Planck data; (ii) using an all-sky tSZ map built from Planck frequency maps; and (iii) using cross-spectra between Planck frequency maps. With the three different methods, we detect the tSZ-CIB cross-power spectrum at significance levels of (i) 6σ; (ii) 3σ; and (iii) 4σ. We model the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation signature and compare predictions with the measurements. The amplitude of the cross-correlation relative to the fiducial model is AtSZ-CIB = 1.2 ± 0.3. This result is consistent with predictions for the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation assuming the best-fit cosmological model from Planck 2015 results along with the tSZ and CIB scaling relations.

  4. Planck intermediate results. V. Pressure profiles of galaxy clusters from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Bobin, J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borgani, S.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2013-02-01

    Taking advantage of the all-sky coverage and broadfrequency range of the Planck satellite, we study the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) and pressure profiles of 62 nearby massive clusters detected at high significance in the 14-month nominal survey. Careful reconstruction of the SZ signal indicates that most clusters are individually detected at least out to R500. By stacking the radial profiles, we have statistically detected the radial SZ signal out to 3 × R500, i.e., at a density contrast of about 50-100, though the dispersion about the mean profile dominates the statistical errors across the whole radial range. Our measurement is fully consistent with previous Planck results on integrated SZ fluxes, further strengthening the agreement between SZ and X-ray measurements inside R500. Correcting for the effects of the Planck beam, we have calculated the corresponding pressure profiles. This new constraint from SZ measurements is consistent with the X-ray constraints from XMM-Newton in the region in which the profiles overlap (i.e., [0.1-1] R500), and is in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions within the expected dispersion. At larger radii the average pressure profile is slightly flatter than most predictions from numerical simulations. Combining the SZ and X-ray observed profiles into a joint fit to a generalised pressure profile gives best-fit parameters [P0,c500,γ,α,β ] = [6.41,1.81,0.31,1.33,4.13 ] . Using a reasonable hypothesis for the gas temperature in the cluster outskirts we reconstruct from our stacked pressure profile the gas mass fraction profile out to 3 R500. Within the temperature driven uncertainties, our Planck constraints are compatible with the cosmic baryon fraction and expected gas fraction in halos. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. THE SUNYAEV-ZELDOVICH EFFECT IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Falcón

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The large scale expansion rate of the Universe is given by the value of the Hubble constant. Several methods have been used to determine the Hubble constant: CMB anisotropies, supernovae observations, and AGN at high redshift. In this work we use the Grainge method to estimate the Hubble constant by using the Sunyaev- Zeldovich e ect with data from the VSA interferometer (Observatorio El Teide and the X-Ray data from ROSAT. The derived h = 0:78 is consistent with the reported value obtained with a di erent set of clusters of galaxies, and it is slightly higher than the h = 0:71 derived with other methods. We discuss the possible discrepancies in terms of the isothermal and spherical cluster hypothesis, and the the Sunyaev-Zeldovich kinetic e ect.

  6. Probing Cosmic Distance Duality Relation with Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect, X-rays Observations and Supernovae Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Ribeiro, M B

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray combined with the validity of the distance-duality relation can determine the angular diameter distances from galaxy clusters. This sort of combination enable us to probe the galaxy cluster physics or even to test the validity of the distance-duality relation based on two different approaches. Firstly, the possible galaxy cluster morphologies are constrained by assuming the strict validity of the distance-duality relation in the LCDM framework. Secondly, by adopting a cosmological-model-independent test, we confront directly the angular diameters from galaxy clusters with two Supernovae Ia (SNe Ia) sub-samples (carefully chosen to coincide with cluster positions). In our analysis we consider three galaxy clusters samples whose difference lies in the underlying assumptions used to describe the clusters: (i) isothermal elliptical beta model, (ii) isothermal spherical beta model, and (iii) non-isothermal spherical double beta model. The elliptical beta model pro...

  7. The contribution of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium to the CMB anisotropies via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Suarez-Velásquez, I F; Atrio-Barandela, F

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations predict that a large fraction of all baryons reside within mildly non-linear structures with temperatures in the range $10^{5}-10^{7}$K. As the gas is highly ionized, it could be detected by the temperature anisotropies generated on the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. We refine our previous estimates of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect by introducing a non-polytropic equation of state to model the temperature distribution of the shock heated gas derived from temperature-density phase diagrams of different hydrodynamical simulations. Depending on the specific model, the Comptonization parameter varies in the range $10^{-7}\\le y_c \\le 2\\times 10^{-6}$, compatible with the FIRAS upper limit. This amplitude is in agreement with a simple toy model constructed to estimate the average effect induced by filaments of ionized gas. Using the log-normal probability density function we calculate the correlation function and the power spectrum of the temperature anisotropi...

  8. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B.; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; hide

    2016-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalogue, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver data. We constrain the form of the far-infrared emission and find 3 sigma-4 sigma evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy (6.2 plus or minus 1.7) × 10 (exp 60) erg. This amount of thermal energy is greater than expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of (1-5) × 10(exp 12) h(exp -1) solar mass that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. Our measurements are consistent with quasars depositing up to (14.5 +/- 3.3)tau (sub 8)(exp -1) per cent of their radiative energy into their circumgalactic environment if their typical period of quasar activity is tau(sub 8) x 108 yr. For high quasar host masses, approximately 10(exp 13) h(exp -1) solar mass, this percentage will be reduced. Furthermore, the uncertainty on this percentage is only statistical and additional systematic uncertainties enter at the 40 per cent level. The SEDs are dust dominated in all bands and we consider various models for dust emission. While sufficiently complex dust models can obviate the SZ effect, the SZ interpretation remains favoured at the 3 sigma-4 sigma level for most models.

  9. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B.; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Sifon, Cristobal; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Viero, Marco P.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalogue, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver data. We constrain the form of the far-infrared emission and find 3 sigma-4 sigma evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy (6.2 plus or minus 1.7) × 10 (exp 60) erg. This amount of thermal energy is greater than expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of (1-5) × 10(exp 12) h(exp -1) solar mass that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. Our measurements are consistent with quasars depositing up to (14.5 +/- 3.3)tau (sub 8)(exp -1) per cent of their radiative energy into their circumgalactic environment if their typical period of quasar activity is tau(sub 8) x 108 yr. For high quasar host masses, approximately 10(exp 13) h(exp -1) solar mass, this percentage will be reduced. Furthermore, the uncertainty on this percentage is only statistical and additional systematic uncertainties enter at the 40 per cent level. The SEDs are dust dominated in all bands and we consider various models for dust emission. While sufficiently complex dust models can obviate the SZ effect, the SZ interpretation remains favoured at the 3 sigma-4 sigma level for most models.

  10. Cosmic Microwave Background Fluctuations from the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect as a Cosmological Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, P.; Komatsu, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect on of the Comic Microwave Background fluctuation. We focus on the scale at the multipole moment of l = 3000 10000 that is currently being probed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. For the post-reionization contribution of the total signal, we use the 3rd order perturbation theory (3PT) to model non-linearity of post-reionization epoch. We evaluate a non-linear expression for momentum powerspectrum in Ma and Fry (2002) with the 3PT density and velocity powerspectrum. And, we use the 3PT momentum powerspectrum to calculate the kSZ signal. We show that the 3PT is a reasonable approximation by comparing our result with previous work by Zhang, Pen and Trac (2004). For reionization contribution, we use our N-body radiative transfer simulations to take patchiness of ionization of intergalactic medium in reionization epoch into account. Using ionized fraction field in the simulation, we calculate the momentum field of the ionized gas. And, we correct for the missing power in finite size boxes of simulations. Finally, we show the kSZ calculation for different simulations with reionization scenarios. With contributions from each epoch, we predict total kSZ signal for different reionization history and put constraint on reionization scenario using an upper bound of the signal from recent SPT measurement.

  11. The contribution of the warm-hot intergalactic medium to the cosmic microwave background anisotropies via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Velásquez, I. F.; Mücket, J. P.; Atrio-Barandela, F.

    2013-05-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations predict that a large fraction of all baryons reside within mildly non-linear structures with temperatures in the range 105-107 K. As the gas is highly ionized, it could be detected by the temperature anisotropies generated on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We refine our previous estimates of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect by introducing a non-polytropic equation of state to model the temperature distribution of the shock-heated gas derived from temperature-density phase diagrams of different hydrodynamical simulations. Depending on the specific model, the Comptonization parameter varies in the range 10-7 ≤ yc ≤ 2 × 10-6, compatible with the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer upper limit. This amplitude is in agreement with a simple toy model constructed to estimate the average effect induced by filaments of the ionized gas. Using the log-normal probability density function, we calculate the correlation function and the power spectrum of the temperature anisotropies generated by the warm-hot intergalactic medium filaments. For a wide range of the parameter space, the maximum amplitude of the radiation power spectrum is (ℓ + 1)ℓCℓ/2π = 0.7-70 (μK)2 at ℓ ≈ 200-500. This amplitude scales with baryon density, Hubble constant and the amplitude of the matter power spectrum σ8 as [(ℓ + 1)ℓCℓ]max/2π∝σ2.68(Ωb h)2. Since the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has a specific frequency dependence, we analyse the possibility of detecting this component with the forthcoming Planck data.

  12. Sunyaev-Zeldovich and Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Burigana, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Since its original formulation the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect has been recognized as a ``powerful laboratory'' for our comprehension of physical processes in cosmic structures and to derive crucial information on some general properties of the universe. After a discussion of the fundamental concepts and of some well established applications of the SZ effect towards galaxy clusters, I will focus on dedicated themes related to the SZ effect and other features in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) of particular interest in the view of the extremely high angular resolution observations achievable in the future with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). SKA will allow the mapping of the thermal and density structure of clusters of galaxies at radio and centimetre bands with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity and with an extremely accurate control of extragalactic radio source contamination. The signatures from SZ effects and free-free emission at galactic scales and in the intergalactic medium probe the st...

  13. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in CMB-calibrated theories applied to the Cosmic Background Imager anisotropy power at l > 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Pen, U L; Pogosyan, D; Prunet, S; Ruetalo, M I; Wadsley, J W; Zhang, P; Mason, B S; Myers, S T; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the nature of the possible high-l excess in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI). We probe the angular structure of the excess in the CBI deep fields and investigate whether the excess could be due to the scattering of CMB photons by hot electrons within clusters, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. We estimate the density fluctuation parameters for amplitude, sigma_8, and shape, Gamma, from CMB primary anisotropy data and other cosmological data. We use the results of two separate hydrodynamical codes for Lambda-CDM cosmologies, consistent with the allowed sigma_8 and Gamma values, to quantify the expected contribution from the SZ effect to the bandpowers of the CBI experiment and pass simulated SZ effect maps through our CBI analysis pipeline. The result is very sensitive to the value of sigma_8, and is roughly consistent with the observed power if sigma_8 ~ 1. We conclude that the CBI anomaly could be a result of the SZ eff...

  14. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in superclusters of galaxies using gasdynamical simulations: the case of Corona Borealis

    CERN Document Server

    Flores-Cacho, I; Luzzi, G; Rebolo, R; De Petris, M; Yepes, G; Lamagna, L; De Gregori, S; Battistelli, E S; Coratella, R; Gottlöber, S

    2009-01-01

    [Abridged] We study the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with superclusters of galaxies using the MareNostrum Universe SPH simulation. We consider superclusters similar to the Corona Borealis Supercluster (CrB-SC). This paper is motivated by the detection at 33GHz of a strong temperature decrement in the CMB towards the core of this supercluster. Multifrequency observations with VSA and MITO suggest the existence of a thermal SZ effect component in the spectrum of this cold spot, which would account for roughly 25% of the total observed decrement. We identify nine regions containing superclusters similar to CrB-SC, obtain the associated SZ maps and calculate the probability of finding such SZ signals arising from hot gas within the supercluster. Our results show that WHIM produces a thermal SZ effect much smaller than the observed value. Neither can summing the contribution of small clusters and galaxy groups in the region explain the amplitude of the SZ signal. When we take into ...

  15. Determination of a pressure discontinuity at the position of the Coma relic from Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect data

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens; Trasatti, Monica; Klein, Ulrich; Bertoldi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse synchrotron sources found in galaxy cluster outskirts. They are believed to be associated with large-scale shocks propagating through the intra-cluster medium, although the connection between radio relics and the cluster merger shocks is not yet proven conclusively. We present a first tentative detection of a pressure jump in the well-known relic of the Coma cluster through Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging. The SZ data is extracted from the first public all-sky data release of Planck and we use high-frequency radio data at 2.3 GHz to constrain the shock-front geometry. The SZ data provides evidence for a pressure discontinuity, consistent with the relic position, without requiring any additional prior on the shock-front location. The derived Mach number M = 2.9 (+0.8/-0.6) is consistent with X-ray and radio results. A high-pressure "filament" without any pressure discontinuity is disfavoured by X-ray measurements and a "sub-cluster" model based on the infalling group N...

  16. Planck 2013 results. XXXII. The updated Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.;

    2015-01-01

    We update the all-sky Planck catalogue of 1227 clusters and cluster candidates (PSZ1) published in March 2013, derived from detections of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. As an addendum, we deliver an updated version of the PSZ1...

  17. Planck early results. XI. Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z <0.5) detected at high signal-to-noise in the first Planck all-sky data set. The sample spans approximately a decade in total mass, 2 × 1014 M

  18. Planck early results. VIII. The all-sky early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This early SZ (ESZ) sample is comprised of 189 candidates, which have a high signal-to-noise ratio ranging from 6 to 29. Its ...

  19. Probing cosmological isotropy with Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    We probe the statistical isotropy hypothesis of the large-scale structure with the second Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (PSZ2) galaxy clusters data set. Our analysis adopts a statistical-geometrical method that compares the two-point angular-correlation function of objects in antipodal patches of the sky. Given possible observational biases, such as the presence of anisotropic sky cuts and the non-uniform exposure of Planck's instrumentation, ensembles of Monte Carlo realizations are produced in order to assess the significance of our results. When these observational effects are properly taken into account, we find neither evidence for preferred directions in the sky nor signs of large-angle features in the galaxy clusters celestial distribution. The PSZ2 data set is, therefore, in good concordance with the fundamental hypothesis of large-angle isotropy of cosmic objects.

  20. Cosmological constraints from thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich power spectrum revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) power spectrum is one of the most sensitive methods to constrain cosmological parameters, scaling as the amplitude $\\sigma_8^8$. It is determined by the integral over the halo mass function multiplied by the total pressure content of clusters, and further convolved by the cluster gas pressure profile. It has been shown that various feedback effects can change significantly the pressure profile, strongly affecting the tSZ power spectrum at high $l$. Energetics arguments and SZ-halo mass scaling relations suggest feedback is unlikely to significantly change the total pressure content, making low $l$ tSZ power spectrum more robust against feedback effects. Furthermore, the separation between the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and tSZ is more reliable at low $l$. Low $l$ modes are however probing very small volumes, giving rise to very large non-gaussian sampling variance errors. By computing the trispectrum contribution we identify $90

  1. Planck 2013 results. XX. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal...... spectrum amplitude σ8 and matter density parameter Ωm in a flat ΛCDM model. We test the robustness of our estimates and find that possible biases in the Y–M relation and the halo mass function are larger than the statistical uncertainties from the cluster sample. Assuming the X-ray determined mass...

  2. Planck early results. XI. Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    corresponding to a total density contrast of 500. Combining these high quality Planck measurements with deep XMM-Newton X-ray data, we investigate the relations between DA2 Y500, the integrated Compton parameter due to the SZ effect, and the X-ray-derived gas mass M g,500, temperature TX, luminosity LX,500, SZ...... signal analogue YX,500 = Mg,500 × TX, and total mass M500. After correction for the effect of selection bias on the scaling relations, we find results that are in excellent agreement with both X-ray predictions and recently-published ground-based data derived from smaller samples. The present data yield......We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z mass, 2 × 1014 M mass...

  3. Probing cosmological isotropy with Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bengaly,, C A P; Alcaniz, J S; Ferreira, I S

    2015-01-01

    We probe the hypothesis of cosmological isotropy using the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (PSZ) galaxy clusters data set. Our analyses consist on a hemispherical comparison of the clusters angular distribution, searching for a preferred direction in the large-scale structure of the Universe. We obtain a maximal dipolar signal at the direction $(l,b) = (53.44^{\\circ},41.81^{\\circ})$ whose antipode points toward $(l,b) = (233.44^{\\circ},-41.81^{\\circ})$. Interestingly, this antipode is marginally consistent with the anomalous Cold Spot found in the Cosmic Microwave Background, located at $(l,b) \\simeq (209^ {\\circ},-57^ {\\circ})$, which might be possibly aligned with a supervoid at $z \\sim 0.2$ with $\\sim 200 \\; \\mathrm{Mpc/h}$ of radius. The statistical significance of this result is assessed with ensembles of Monte Carlo realisations, finding that only a small number of runs are able to reproduce a close direction to this one, hence rejecting the null hypothesis of such direction being a random fluctuation of the d...

  4. Planck early results: Cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich optical scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    We present the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal-to-richness scaling relation (Y500-N200) for the MaxBCG cluster catalogue. Employing a multi-frequency matched filter on the Planck sky maps, we measure the SZ signal for each cluster by adapting the filter according to weak-lensing calibrated mass-richness relations (N200-M500). We bin our individual measurements and detect the SZ signal down to the lowest richness systems (N200=10) with high significance, achieving a detection of the SZ signal in systems with mass as low as M500~5e13 Msolar. The observed Y500-N200 relation is well modeled by a power law over the full richness range. It has a lower normalisation at given N200 than predicted based on X-ray models and published mass-richness relations. An X-ray subsample, however, does conform to the predicted scaling, and model predictions do reproduce the relation between our measured bin-average SZ signal and measured bin-average X-ray luminosities. At fixed richness, we find an intrinsic dispersion in the Y500-N...

  5. Planck intermediate results. III. The relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borgani, S; Borrill, J; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jagemann, T; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Khamitov, I; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Savini, G; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Weller, J; White, S D M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal D_A^2 Y for a sample of nineteen objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses (HE) are derived from XMM-Newton archive data and the SZ effect signal is measured from Planck all-sky survey data. We find an M_WL-D_A^2 Y relation that is consistent in slope and normalisation with previous determinations using weak lensing masses; however, there is a normalisation offset with respect to previous measures based on hydrostatic X-ray mass-proxy relations. We verify that our SZ effect measurements are in excellent agreement with previous determinations from Planck data. At odds with expectations, for the present sample, the hydrostatic X-ray masses at R_500 are on average 22 +/- 8 per cent larger than the corresponding weak lensing masses. We show that the mass discrepancy is driven by a difference in mass concentratio...

  6. Planck Early Results: Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lanoux, J; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z <0.5) detected at high signal-to-noise in the first Planck all-sky dataset. The sample spans approximately a decade in total mass, 10^14 < M_500 < 10^15, where M_500 is the mass corresponding to a total density contrast of 500. Combining these high quality Planck measurements with deep XMM-Newton X-ray data, we investigate the relations between D_A^2 Y_500, the integrated Compton parameter due to the SZ effect, and the X-ray-derived gas mass M_g,500, temperature T_X, luminosity L_X, SZ signal analogue Y_X,500 = M_g,500 * T_X, and total mass M_500. After correction for the effect of selection bias on the scaling relations, we find results that are in excellent agreement with both X-ray predictions and recently-published ground-based data derived from smaller samples. The present data yield an exceptionally robust, high-quality local reference, and illustrate Planck's unique capabilities for a...

  7. Planck 2013 results. XXIX. The Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources: Addendum

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Aussel, H; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Démoclès, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Feroz, F; Ferragamo, A; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Gilfanov, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; N,; Groeneboom, E; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Hempel, A; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Hurley-Walker, N; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Li, C; Liddle, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mikkelsen, K; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nastasi, A; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nesvadba, N P H; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Olamaie, M; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrott, Y C; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rumsey, C; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Saunders, R D E; Savini, G; Schammel, M P; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Shimwell, T W; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Streblyanska, A; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tramonte, D; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; White, M; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We update the all-sky Planck catalogue of 1227 clusters and cluster candidates (PSZ1) published in March 2013, derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. Addendum. We deliver an updated version of the PSZ1 catalogue, reporting the further confirmation of 86 Planck-discovered clusters. In total, the PSZ1 now contains 947 confirmed clusters, of which 214 were confirmed as newly discovered clusters through follow-up observations undertaken by the Planck Collaboration. The updated PSZ1 contains redshifts for 913 systems, of which 736 (~80.6%) are spectroscopic, and associated mass estimates derived from the Y_z mass proxy. We also provide a new SZ quality flag, derived from a novel artificial neural network classification of the SZ signal, for the remaining 280 candidates. Based on this assessment, the purity of the updated PSZ1 catalogue is estimated to be 94%. In this release, we provide the full updated catalogue and an additional readme ...

  8. Planck intermediate results. XL. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from the Virgo cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Marcos-Caballero, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Weller, J; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    The Virgo cluster is the largest Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) source in the sky, both in terms of angular size and total integrated flux. Planck's wide angular scale and frequency coverage, together with its high sensitivity, allow a detailed study of this large object through the SZ effect. Virgo is well resolved by Planck, showing an elongated structure, which correlates well with the morphology observed from X-rays, but extends beyond the observed X-ray signal. We find a good agreement between the SZ signal (or Compton paranmeter, y_c) observed by Planck and the expected signal inferred from X-ray observations and simple analytical models. Due to its proximity to us, the gas beyond the virial radius can be studied with unprecedented sensitivity by integrating the SZ signal over tens of square degrees. We study the signal in the outskirts of Virgo and compare it with analytical models and a constrained simulation of the environment of Virgo. Planck data suggest that significant amounts of low-density plasma surro...

  9. Planck Early Results: The all-sky Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cantalupo, C M; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Eisenhardt, P; En\\sslin, T A; Feroz, F; Finelli, F; Flores, I; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; González-Riestra, R; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Heinämäki, P; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Hurley-Walker, N; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Li, C; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Olamie, M; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Saar, E; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Saunders, R D E; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Stanford, A; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Sygnet, J -F; Taburet, N; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Weller, J; White, S D M; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This Early SZ (ESZ) sample of 189 candidates comprises high signal-to-noise clusters, from 6 to 29. Its high reliability (purity above 95%) is further insured by an extensive validation process based on Planck-internal quality assessments and external cross-identification and follow-up observations. Planck provides the first measured SZ signal for about 80% of the 169 ESZ known clusters. Planck further releases 30 new cluster candidates among which 20 are within the ESZ signal-to-noise selection criterion. Eleven of these 20 ESZ candidates are confirmed using XMM-Newton snapshot observations as new clusters, most of them with disturbed morphologies and low luminosities. The ESZ clusters are mostly at moderate redshifts (86% with z below 0.3) and span over a decade in mass, up to the rarest and most massive clusters with masses above 10^15 M...

  10. Planck 2013 results. XX. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bohringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bourdin, H.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M.L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Democles, J.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal-to-noise threshold of seven, with each object confirmed as a cluster and all but one with a redshift estimate. We discuss the completeness of the sample and our construction of a likelihood analysis. Using a relation between mass $M$ and SZ signal $Y$ calibrated to X-ray measurements, we derive constraints on the power spectrum amplitude $\\sigma_8$ and matter density parameter $\\Omega_{\\mathrm{m}}$ in a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. We test the robustness of our estimates and find that possible biases in the $Y$--$M$ relation and the halo mass function are larger than the statistical uncertainties from the cluster sample. Assuming the X-ray determined mass to be biased low relative to the true mass by between zero and 30%, m...

  11. Planck 2013 results. XXIX. Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bohringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P.R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Democles, J.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Grainge, K.J.B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; N, E.Groeneboom; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; MacTavish, C.J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nesvadba, N.P.H.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I.J.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y.C.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R.D.E.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Shimwell, T.W.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the all-sky Planck catalogue of clusters and cluster candidates derived from Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. The catalogue contains 1227 entries, making it over six times the size of the Planck Early SZ (ESZ) sample and the largest SZ-selected catalogue to date. It contains 861 confirmed clusters, of which 178 have been confirmed as clusters, mostly through follow-up observations, and a further 683 are previously-known clusters. The remaining 366 have the status of cluster candidates, and we divide them into three classes according to the quality of evidence that they are likely to be true clusters. The Planck SZ catalogue is the deepest all-sky cluster catalogue, with redshifts up to about one, and spans the broadest cluster mass range from (0.1 to 1.6) 10^{15}Msun. Confirmation of cluster candidates through comparison with existing surveys or cluster catalogues is extensively described, as is the statistical characterization...

  12. Planck early results. XII. Cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich optical scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal-to-richness scaling relation (Y500 - N200) for the MaxBCG cluster catalogue. Employing a multi-frequency matched filter on the Planck sky maps, we measure the SZ signal for each cluster by adapting the filter according to weak-lensing calibrated mass-r...

  13. Planck 2015 results: XXVII. The second Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.;

    2016-01-01

    We present the all-sky Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources detected from the 29 month full-mission data. The catalogue (PSZ2) is the largest SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters yet produced and the deepest systematic all-sky surveyof galaxy clusters. It contains 1653 detections, ...

  14. Planck early results. X. Statistical analysis of Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations for X-ray galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    All-sky data from the Planck survey and the Meta-Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC) are combined to investigate the relationship between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and X-ray luminosity. The sample comprises ~1600 X-ray clusters with redshifts up to ~1 and spans...

  15. Planck Intermediate Results. XI: The gas content of dark matter halos: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich-stellar mass relation for locally brightest galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2013-01-01

    gas, and that this gas must be less concentrated than the dark matter in such halos in order to remain consistent with X-ray observations. At the high-mass end, the measured SZ signal is 20% lower than found from observations of X-ray clusters, a difference consistent with Malmquist bias effects......We present the scaling relation between Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and stellar mass for almost 260,000 locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These are predominantly the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. We calibrate the stellar-to-halo...... indication of signal at even lower stellar mass. We derive the scaling relation between SZ signal and halo mass by assigning halo properties from our mock catalogues to the real LBGs and simulating the Planck observation process. This relation shows no evidence for deviation from a power law over a halo mass...

  16. Planck 2015 results. XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Weller, J; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We present cluster counts and corresponding cosmological constraints from the Planck full mission data set. Our catalogue consists of 439 clusters detected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal down to a signal-to-noise of six, and is more than a factor of two larger than the 2013 Planck cluster cosmology sample. The counts are consistent with those from 2013 and yield compatible constraints under the same modelling assumptions. Taking advantage of the larger catalogue, we extend our analysis to the two-dimensional distribution in redshift and signal-to-noise. We use mass estimates from two recent studies of gravitational lensing of background galaxies by Planck clusters to provide priors on the hydrostatic bias parameter, $1-b$. In addition, we use lensing of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations by Planck clusters as a third independent constraint on this parameter. These various calibrations imply constraints on the present-day amplitude of matter fluctuations in varying degrees of t...

  17. Planck 2015 results. XXVII. The Second Planck Catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Eisenhardt, P R M; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fergusson, J; Feroz, F; Ferragamo, A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hempel, A; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jin, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nastasi, A; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Olamaie, M; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrott, Y C; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rozo, E; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rumsey, C; Rusholme, B; Rykoff, E S; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Saunders, R D E; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schammel, M P; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Shimwell, T W; Spencer, L D; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Streblyanska, A; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tramonte, D; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; White, S D M; Wright, E L; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the all-sky Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources detected from the 29 month full-mission data. The catalogue (PSZ2) is the largest SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters yet produced and the deepest all-sky catalogue of galaxy clusters. It contains 1653 detections, of which 1203 are confirmed clusters with identified counterparts in external data-sets, and is the first SZ-selected cluster survey containing > 103 confirmed clusters. We present a detailed analysis of the survey selection function in terms of its completeness and statistical reliability, placing a lower limit of 83% on the purity. Using simulations, we find that the Y5R500 estimates are robust to pressure-profile variation and beam systematics, but accurate conversion to Y500 requires. the use of prior information on the cluster extent. We describe the multi-wavelength search for counterparts in ancillary data, which makes use of radio, microwave, infra-red, optical and X-ray data-sets, and which places emphasis on the ro...

  18. Dissecting the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich-gravitational lensing cross-correlation with hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hojjati, Alireza; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Hinshaw, Gary; Brun, Amandine M C Le

    2014-01-01

    We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the cross-correlation signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) $y$-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ cross-correlation, $\\xi_{y\\kappa}(\\theta)$, well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only ($\\theta \\lesssim 10$ arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as $\\sigma_8$, $\\Omega_m$ and $\\Omega_b$). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass ($M_{\\rm{halo}} \\lesssim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}$) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial ra...

  19. X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich properties of the WHIM

    CERN Document Server

    Ursino, Eugenio; Huffenberger, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to predict the soft X-ray ([0.4-0.6] keV) and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal (at 150 GHz) from the large scale structure in the Universe and then compute 2-point statistics to study the spatial distribution and time evolution of the signals. The average X-ray signal predicted for the WHIM is in good agreement with observational constraints that set it at about 10% of the total Diffuse X-ray Background. The characteristic angle computed with the Autocorrelation Function is of the order of some arcminutes and becomes smaller at higher redshift. The power spectrum peak of the SZ due to the WHIM is at l~10000 and has amplitude of ~0.2 muK^2, about one order of magnitude below the signal measured with telescopes like Planck, ACT, and SPT. Even if the high-redshift WHIM signal is too weak to be detected using X-rays only, the small-scale correlation between X-ray and SZ maps is dominated by the high-redshift WHIM. This makes the analysis of the SZ signal in support of X-rays a promising tool ...

  20. Joint deprojection of Sunyaev-Zeldovich and X-ray images of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ameglio, S; Pierpaoli, E; Dolag, K

    2007-01-01

    We present two non-parametric deprojection methods aimed at recovering the three-dimensional density and temperature profiles of galaxy clusters from spatially resolved thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) and X-ray surface brightness maps, thus avoiding the use of X-ray spectroscopic data. In both methods, clusters are assumed to be spherically symmetric and modeled with an onion-skin structure. The first method follows a direct geometrical approach. The second method is based on the maximization of a single joint (tSZ and X-ray) likelihood function, which allows one to fit simultaneously the two signals by following a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. These techniques are tested against a set of cosmological simulations of clusters, with and without instrumental noise. We project each cluster along the three orthogonal directions defined by the principal axes of the momentum of inertia tensor. This enables us to check any bias in the deprojection associated to the cluster elongation along the line of sight. Aft...

  1. Planck 2015 results. XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present cluster counts and corresponding cosmological constraints from the Planck full mission data set. Our catalogue consists of 439 clusters detected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal down to a signal-to-noise ratio of 6, and is more than a factor of 2 larger than the 2013 Planck cluster cosmology sample. The counts are consistent with those from 2013 and yield compatible constraints under the same modelling assumptions. Taking advantage of the larger catalogue, we extend our analysis to the two-dimensional distribution in redshift and signal-to-noise. We use mass estimates from two recent studies of gravitational lensing of background galaxies by Planck clusters to provide priors on the hydrostatic bias parameter, (1-b). In addition, we use lensing of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations by Planck clusters as an independent constraint on this parameter. These various calibrations imply constraints on the present-day amplitude of matter fluctuations in varying degrees of tension with those from the Planck analysis of primary fluctuations in the CMB; for the lowest estimated values of (1-b) the tension is mild, only a little over one standard deviation, while it remains substantial (3.7σ) for the largest estimated value. We also examine constraints on extensions to the base flat ΛCDM model by combining the cluster and CMB constraints. The combination appears to favour non-minimal neutrino masses, but this possibility does little to relieve the overall tension because it simultaneously lowers the implied value of the Hubble parameter, thereby exacerbating the discrepancy with most current astrophysical estimates. Improving the precision of cluster mass calibrations from the current 10%-level to 1% would significantly strengthen these combined analyses and provide a stringent test of the base ΛCDM model.

  2. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Miyatake, H; Hasselfield, M; Gralla, M B; Allison, R; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Crichton, D; Devlin, M J; Dunkley, J; Dünner, R; Erben, T; Ferrara, S; Halpern, M; Hilton, M; Hill, J C; Hincks, A D; Hložek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, J P; Kneib, J P; Kosowsky, A; Makler, M; Marriage, T A; Menanteau, F; Miller, L; Moodley, K; Moraes, B; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Shan, H; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Sifón, C; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Taylor, J; Thornton, R; van Waerbeke, L; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The average weak lensing mass is $\\left(4.8\\pm0.8\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of $\\left(4.70\\pm1.0\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously neglected.

  3. A $f(R)$-gravity model of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich profile of the Coma cluster compatible with {\\it Planck} data

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, I

    2016-01-01

    In the weak field limit, analytic $f(R)$ models of gravity introduce a Yukawa-like correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential. These models have been widely tested at galactic scales and provide an alternative explanation to the dynamics of galaxies without Dark Matter. We study if the temperature anisotropies due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect are compatible with these Extended Theories of Gravity. We assume that the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the modified Newtonian potential and it is well described by a polytropic equation of state. We particularize the model for the Coma cluster and the predicted anisotropies are compared with those measured in the foreground cleaned maps obtained using the Planck Nominal maps released in 2013. We show that the computed $f(R)$ pressure profile fits the data giving rise to competitive constraints of the Yukawa scale length $L=(2.19\\pm1.02) \\rm{\\, Mpc}$, and of the deviation parameter $ \\delta=-0.48\\pm0.22$. Those are currently the tightest c...

  4. Weak-lensing mass calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope stripe 82 survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, N.; Leauthaud, A.; Miyatake, H.; Hasselfield, M.; Gralla, M. B.; Allison, R.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Crichton, D.; Devlin, M. J.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; Erben, T.; Ferrara, S.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, M.; Hill, J. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hložek, R.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hughes, J. P.; Kneib, J. P.; Kosowsky, A.; Makler, M.; Marriage, T. A.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, L.; Moodley, K.; Moraes, B.; Niemack, M. D.; Page, L.; Shan, H.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Sifón, C.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Taylor, J. E.; Thornton, R.; van Waerbeke, L.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). For a sample of 9 ACT clusters with a tSZ signal-to-noise greater than five the average weak lensing mass is (4.8±0.8) ×1014 Msolar, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of (4.70±1.0) ×1014 Msolar which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously excluded.

  5. Planck intermediate results: II. Comparison of sunyaev-zeldovich measurements from planck and from the arcminute microkelvin imager for 11 galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2013-01-01

    , there is a tendency for AMI to find the Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal to be smaller in angular size and fainter than Planck. Significant discrepancies exist for the three remaining clusters in the sample, namely A1413, A1914, and the newly-discovered Planck cluster PLCKESZ G139.59+24.18. The robustness of the analysis...

  6. Southern Cosmology Survey II: Massive Optically-Selected Clusters from 70 square degrees of the SZE Common Survey Area

    CERN Document Server

    Menanteau, Felipe; Barrientos, L Felipe; Deshpande, Amruta J; Hilton, Matt; Infante, Leopoldo; Jimenez, Raul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Spergel, David; Verde, Licia

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of 105 rich and massive ($M>3\\times10^{14}M_{\\sun}$) optically-selected clusters of galaxies extracted from 70 square-degrees of public archival griz imaging from the Blanco 4-m telescope acquired over 45 nights between 2005 and 2007. We use the clusters' optically-derived properties to estimate photometric redshifts, optical luminosities, richness, and masses. We complement the optical measurements with archival XMM-Newton and ROSAT X-ray data which provide additional luminosity and mass constraints on a modest fraction of the cluster sample. Two of our clusters show clear evidence for central lensing arcs; one of these has a spectacular large-diameter, nearly-complete Einstein Ring surrounding the brightest cluster galaxy. A strong motivation for this study is to identify the massive clusters that are expected to display prominent signals from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect (SZE) and therefore be detected in the wide-area mm-band surveys being conducted by both the Atacama Cosmology Teles...

  7. Planck early results: Statistical analysis of Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations for X-ray galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sunyaev, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; White, M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    All-sky data from the Planck survey and the Meta-Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC) are combined to investigate the relationship between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and X-ray luminosity. The sample comprises ~ 1600 X-ray clusters with redshifts up to ~ 1 and spanning a wide range in X-ray luminosity. The SZ signal is extracted for each object individually and the statistical significance of the measurement is maximised by averaging the SZ signal in bins of X-ray luminosity, total mass or redshift. The SZ signal is detected at very high significance over more than 2 decades in X-ray luminosity (10^43 erg/s < L_500 E(z)^-7/3 < 2 X 10^45 erg/s). The relation between intrinsic SZ signal and X-ray luminosity is investigated and the measured SZ signal is compared to values predicted from X-ray data. Planck measurements and X-ray based predictions are found to be in excellent agreement over the whole explored luminosity range. No significant deviation from standard evolution ...

  8. Constraining H{sub 0} in general dark energy models from Sunyaev-Zeldovich/X-ray technique and complementary probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, R.F.L.; Lima, J.A.S. [Departamento de Astronomia (IAGUSP), Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cunha, J.V. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia 166, 09210-170, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Marassi, L., E-mail: holanda@astro.iag.usp.br, E-mail: jvcunha@ufpa.br, E-mail: luciomarassi@ect.ufrn.br, E-mail: limajas@astro.iag.usp.br [Escola de Ciência e Tecnologia, UFRN, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-02-01

    In accelerating dark energy models, the estimates of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0}, from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters may depend on the matter content (Ω{sub M}), the curvature (Ω{sub K}) and the equation of state parameter (ω). In this article, by using a sample of 25 angular diameter distances of galaxy clusters described by the elliptical β model obtained through the SZE/X-ray technique, we constrain H{sub 0} in the framework of a general ΛCDM model (arbitrary curvature) and a flat XCDM model with a constant equation of state parameter ω = p{sub x}/ρ{sub x}. In order to avoid the use of priors in the cosmological parameters, we apply a joint analysis involving the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the CMB Shift Parameter signature. By taking into account the statistical and systematic errors of the SZE/X-ray technique we obtain for nonflat ΛCDM model H{sub 0} = 74{sup +5.0}{sub −4.0} km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}(1σ) whereas for a flat universe with constant equation of state parameter we find H{sub 0} = 72{sup +5.5}{sub −4.0} km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}(1σ). By assuming that galaxy clusters are described by a spherical β model these results change to H{sub 0} = 62{sup +8.0}{sub −7.0} and H{sub 0} = 59{sup +9.0}{sub −6.0} km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}(1σ), respectively. The results from elliptical description are in good agreement with independent studies from the Hubble Space Telescope key project and recent estimates based on the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, thereby suggesting that the combination of these three independent phenomena provides an interesting method to constrain the Hubble constant. As an extra bonus, the adoption of the elliptical description is revealed to be a quite realistic assumption. Finally, by comparing these results with a recent determination for a flat ΛCDM model using only the SZE/X-ray technique and BAO, we see that the geometry has a very

  9. Constraining H0 in General Dark Energy Models from Sunyaev-Zeldovich/X-ray Technique and Complementary Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Marassi, L; Lima, J A S

    2010-01-01

    In accelerating dark energy models, the estimates of H0 from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters may depend on the matter content (Omega_M), the curvature (Omega_K) and the equation of state parameter (w). In this article, by using a sample of 25 angular diameter distances from galaxy clusters obtained through SZE/X-ray technique, we constrain H_0 in the framework of a general LCDM models (free curvature) and a flat XCDM model with equation of state parameter, w=p_x/\\rho_x (w=constant). In order to broke the degeneracy on the cosmological parameters, we apply a joint analysis involving the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the CMB Shift Parameter signature. By neglecting systematic uncertainties, for nonflat LCDM cosmologies we obtain $H_0=73.2^{+4.3}_{-3.7}$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$ (1sigma) whereas for a flat universe with constant equation of state parameter we find $H_0=71.4^{+4.4}_{-3.4}$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$ (1$\\sigma$). Such results are also in good agre...

  10. The Effects of Relativistic Corrections on Cosmological Parameter Estimations from SZE Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Z H

    2003-01-01

    Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) cluster surveys are anticipated to yield tight constraints on cosmological parameters such as the equation of state of dark energy. In this paper, we study the impact of relativistic corrections of the thermal SZE on the cluster number counts expected from a cosmological model and thus, assuming that other cosmological parameters are known to high accuracies, on the determination of the $w$ parameter and $\\sigma_8$ from a SZE cluster survey, where $w=p/\\rho$ with $p$ the pressure and $\\rho$ the density of dark energy, and $\\sigma_8$ is the rms of the extrapolated linear density fluctuation smoothed over $8\\hbox{Mpc}h^{-1}$. For the purpose of illustrating the effects of relativistic corrections, our analyses mainly focus on $\

  11. Planck Intermediate Results II: Comparison of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements from Planck and from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager for 11 galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Planck,; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Bucher, M; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Feroz, F; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Hurley-Walker, N; Jagemann, T; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Khamitov, I; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Liddle, A; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Olamaie, M; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perrott, Y C; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Pierpaoli, E; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, C; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Saunders, R D E; Savini, G; Schammel, M P; Scott, D; Shimwell, T W; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    A comparison is presented of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements for 11 galaxy clusters as obtained by Planck and by the ground-based interferometer, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager. Assuming a universal spherically-symmetric Generalised Navarro, Frenk & White (GNFW) model for the cluster gas pressure profile, we jointly constrain the integrated Compton-Y parameter (Y_500) and the scale radius (theta_500) of each cluster. Our resulting constraints in the Y_500-theta_500 2D parameter space derived from the two instruments overlap significantly for eight of the clusters, although, overall, there is a tendency for AMI to find the Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal to be smaller in angular size and fainter than Planck. Significant discrepancies exist for the three remaining clusters in the sample, namely A1413, A1914, and the newly-discovered Planck cluster PLCKESZ G139.59+24.18. The robustness of the analysis of both the Planck and AMI data is demonstrated through the use of detailed simulations, which also discount confu...

  12. Precision cosmology with a combination of wide and deep Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Khedekar, Satej; Das, Sudeep

    2010-01-01

    We show the advantages of a wedding cake design for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster surveys. We show that by dividing up a cluster survey into a wide and a deep survey, one can essentially recover the cosmological information that would be diluted in a single survey of the same duration due to the uncertainties in our understanding of cluster physics. The parameter degeneracy directions of the deep and wide surveys are slightly different, and combining them breaks these degeneracies effectively. A variable depth survey with a few thousand clusters is as effective at constraining cosmological parameters as a single depth survey with a much larger cluster sample.

  13. Planck intermediate results: III. the relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.;

    2013-01-01

    -Newton archive data, and the SZ effect signal is measured from Planck all-sky survey data. We find an MWL-D A2 Y500 relation that is consistent in slope and normalisation with previous determinations using weak lensing masses; however, there is a normalisation offset with respect to previous measures based...

  14. Cosmological constraints from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts: An approach to account for missing redshifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaldi, A.; Battye, R. A.; Brown, M. L., E-mail: anna.bonaldi@manchester.ac.uk [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-10

    The accumulation of redshifts provides a significant observational bottleneck when using galaxy cluster surveys to constrain cosmological parameters. We propose a simple method to allow the use of samples where there is a fraction of the redshifts that are not known. The simplest assumption is that the missing redshifts are randomly extracted from the catalog, but the method also allows one to take into account known selection effects in the accumulation of redshifts. We quantify the reduction in statistical precision of cosmological parameter constraints as a function of the fraction of missing redshifts for simulated surveys, and also investigate the impact of making an incorrect assumption for the distribution of missing redshifts.

  15. Resolved SZE Cluster Count

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Yu Tang; Zu-Hui Fan

    2003-01-01

    We study the counts of resolved SZE (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) clus-ters expected from an interferometric survey in different cosmological models underdifferent conditions. The self-similar universal gas model and Press-Schechter massfunction are used. We take the observing frequency to be 90 GHz, and consider twodish diameters, 1.2 m and 2.5 m. We calculate the number density of the galaxyclusters dN/(dΩdz) at a high flux limit Slimv = 100mJy and at a relative lowSlimv = 10 mJy. The total numbers of SZE clusters N in two low-Ω0 models arecompared. The results show that the influence of the resolved effect depends notonly on D, but also on Slimv: at a given D, the effect is more significant for a highthan for a low Slim Also, the resolved effect for a flat universe is more impressivethan that for an open universe. For D = 1.2m and Slimv= 10mJy, the resolvedeffect is very weak. Considering the designed interferometers which will be used tosurvey SZE clusters, we find that the resolved effect is insignificant when estimatingthe expected yield of the SZE cluster surveys.

  16. AMiBA: Cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Observations with the Expanded 13-Element Array

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Kai-Yang; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Liao, Yu-Wei; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Koch, Patrick M; Umetsu, Keiichi; Chen, Ming-Tang; Chan, Shun-Hsiang; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Wen-Hsuan Lucky; Cheng, Tai-An; Duy, Hoang Ngoc; Fu, Szu-Yuan; Han, Chih-Chiang; Ho, Solomon; Ho, Ming-Feng; Ho, Paul T P; Huang, Yau-De; Jiang, Homin; Kubo, Derek Y; Li, Chao-Te; Lin, Yu-Chiung; Liu, Guo-Chin; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Molnar, Sandor M; Nunez, Emmanuel; Oshiro, Peter; Pai, Shang-Ping; Raffin, Philippe; Ridenour, Anthony; Shih, Chia-You; Stoebner, Sara; Teo, Giap-Siong; Yeh, Jia-Long Johnny; Williams, Joshua; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is a co-planar interferometer array operating at a wavelength of 3mm to measure the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) of galaxy clusters. In the first phase of operation -- with a compact 7-element array with 0.6m antennas (AMiBA-7) -- we observed six clusters at angular scales from 5\\arcmin to 23\\arcmin. Here, we describe the expansion of AMiBA to a 13-element array with 1.2m antennas (AMiBA-13), its subsequent commissioning, and our cluster SZE observing program. The most important changes compared to AMiBA-7 are (1) array re-configuration with baselines ranging from 1.4m to 4.8m covering angular scales from 2\\arcmin to 11.5\\arcmin, (2) thirteen new lightweight carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) 1.2m reflectors, and (3) additional correlators and six new receivers. From the AMiBA-13 SZE observing program, we present here maps of a subset of twelve clusters. In highlights, we combine AMiBA-7 and AMiBA-13 observations of Abell 1689 and perfo...

  17. Planck Intermediate Results. XI: The gas content of dark matter halos: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich-stellar mass relation for locally brightest galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wang, W; Welikala, N; Weller, J; White, S D M; White, M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    We present the scaling relation between Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and stellar mass for almost 260,000 locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These are predominantly the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. We calibrate the stellar-to-halo mass conversion using realistic mock catalogues based on the Millennium Simulation. Applying a multi-frequency matched filter to the Planck data for each LBG, and averaging the results in bins of stellar mass, we measure the mean SZ signal down to $M_\\ast\\sim 2\\times 10^{11} \\Msolar$, with a clear indication of signal at even lower stellar mass. We derive the scaling relation between SZ signal and halo mass by assigning halo properties from our mock catalogues to the real LBGs and simulating the Planck observation process. This relation shows no evidence for deviation from a power law over a halo mass range extending from rich clusters down to $M_{500}\\sim 2\\times 10^{13} \\Msolar$, and there is a clear indication of s...

  18. Planck intermediate results XXXVII. Evidence of unbound gas from the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    SZ signatures out to apertures of 8 arcmin and beyond, corresponding to a physical radius of >1 Mpc, more than twice the mean virial radius of halos. This is consistent with the predictions from hydrodynamical simulations that most of the baryons are outside the virialized halos. We fit a simple model, in which...

  19. Fundamental Plane of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2007-01-01

    Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster surveys are considered among the most promising methods for probing dark energy up to large redshifts. However, their premise is hinged upon an accurate mass-observable relationship, which could be affected by the (rather poorly understood) physics of the intracluster gas. In this letter, using a semi-analytic model of the intracluster gas that accommodates various theoretical uncertainties, I develop a Fundamental Plane relationship between the observed size, thermal energy, and mass of galaxy clusters. In particular, I find that M ~ (Y_{SZ}/R_{SZ,2})^{3/4}, where M is the mass, Y_{SZ} is the total SZ flux or thermal energy, and R_{SZ,2} is the SZ half-light radius of the cluster. I show that, within this model, using the Fundamental Plane relationship reduces the (systematic+random) errors in mass estimates to 14%, from 22% for a simple mass-flux relationship. Since measurement of the cluster sizes is an inevitable part of observing the SZ clusters, the Fundamental Plane rela...

  20. Optical-SZE scaling relations for DES optically selected clusters within the SPT-SZ Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saro, A.; Bocquet, S.; Mohr, J.; Rozo, E.; Benson, B. A.; Dodelson, S.; Rykoff, E. S.; Bleem, L.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allen, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capasso, R.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Grandis, S.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; McDonald, M.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Soergel, B.; Strazzullo, V.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zenteno, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signature in South Pole Telescope (SPT) data for an ensemble of 719 optically identified galaxy clusters selected from 124.6 deg2 of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data, detecting a clear stacked SZE signal down to richness λ ˜ 20. The SZE signature is measured using matched-filtered maps of the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey at the positions of the DES clusters, and the degeneracy between SZE observable and matched-filter size is broken by adopting as priors SZE and optical mass-observable relations that are either calibrated using SPT-selected clusters or through the Arnaud et al. (A10) X-ray analysis. We measure the SPT signal-to-noise ζ-λ relation and two integrated Compton-y Y500-λ relations for the DES-selected clusters and compare these to model expectations that account for the SZE-optical centre offset distribution. For clusters with λ > 80, the two SPT-calibrated scaling relations are consistent with the measurements, while for the A10-calibrated relation the measured SZE signal is smaller by a factor of 0.61 ± 0.12 compared to the prediction. For clusters at 20 compared to the prediction, with the SPT-calibrated scaling relations and larger λ clusters showing generally better agreement. We quantify the required corrections to achieve consistency, showing that there is a richness-dependent bias that can be explained by some combination of (1) contamination of the observables and (2) biases in the estimated halo masses. We also discuss particular physical effects associated with these biases, such as contamination of λ from line-of-sight projections or of the SZE observables from point sources, larger offsets in the SZE-optical centring or larger intrinsic scatter in the λ-mass relation at lower richnesses.

  1. Optical-SZE Scaling Relations for DES Optically Selected Clusters within the SPT-SZ Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saro, A.; et al.

    2016-05-27

    We study the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signature in South Pole Telescope (SPT) data for an ensemble of 719 optically identified galaxy clusters selected from 124.6 deg$^2$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data, detecting a stacked SZE signal down to richness $\\lambda\\sim20$. The SZE signature is measured using matched-filtered maps of the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey at the positions of the DES clusters, and the degeneracy between SZE observable and matched-filter size is broken by adopting as priors SZE and optical mass-observable relations that are either calibrated using SPT selected clusters or through the Arnaud et al. (2010, A10) X-ray analysis. We measure the SPT signal to noise $\\zeta$-$\\lambda$, relation and two integrated Compton-$y$ $Y_\\textrm{500}$-$\\lambda$ relations for the DES-selected clusters and compare these to model expectations accounting for the SZE-optical center offset distribution. For clusters with $\\lambda > 80$, the two SPT calibrated scaling relations are consistent with the measurements, while for the A10-calibrated relation the measured SZE signal is smaller by a factor of $0.61 \\pm 0.12$ compared to the prediction. For clusters at $20 < \\lambda < 80$, the measured SZE signal is smaller by a factor of $\\sim$0.20-0.80 (between 2.3 and 10~$\\sigma$ significance) compared to the prediction, with the SPT calibrated scaling relations and larger $\\lambda$ clusters showing generally better agreement. We quantify the required corrections to achieve consistency, showing that there is a richness dependent bias that can be explained by some combination of contamination of the observables and biases in the estimated masses. We discuss possible physical effects, as contamination from line-of-sight projections or from point sources, larger offsets in the SZE-optical centering or larger scatter in the $\\lambda$-mass relation at lower richnesses.

  2. Optical-SZE Scaling Relations for DES Optically Selected Clusters within the SPT-SZ Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Saro, A; Mohr, J; Rozo, E; Benson, B A; Dodelson, S; Rykoff, E S; Bleem, L; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allen, S; Annis, J; Benoit-Levy, A; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Capasso, R; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Chiu, I; Crawford, T M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gangkofner, C; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Giannantonio, T; Grandis, S; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, G; Holzapfel, W L; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Marshall, J L; McDonald, M; Melchior, P; Menanteau, F; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Rapetti, D; Reichardt, C L; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Soergel, B; Strazzullo, V; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Zenteno, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signature in South Pole Telescope (SPT) data for an ensemble of 719 optically identified galaxy clusters selected from 124.6 deg$^2$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data, detecting a stacked SZE signal down to richness $\\lambda\\sim20$. The SZE signature is measured using matched-filtered maps of the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey at the positions of the DES clusters, and the degeneracy between SZE observable and matched-filter size is broken by adopting as priors SZE and optical mass-observable relations that are either calibrated using SPT selected clusters or through the Arnaud et al. (2010, A10) X-ray analysis. We measure the SPT signal to noise $\\zeta$-$\\lambda$, relation and two integrated Compton-$y$ $Y_\\textrm{500}$-$\\lambda$ relations for the DES-selected clusters and compare these to model expectations accounting for the SZE-optical center offset distribution. For clusters with $\\lambda > 80$, the two SPT calibrated scaling relations are c...

  3. The enhancement and decrement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect towards the ROSAT Cluster RXJ0658-5557The enhancement and decrement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect towards the ROSAT Cluster RXJ0658-5557

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreani, P.; Böhringer, H.; Dall'Oglio, G.; Martinis, L.; Shaver, P. A.; Lemke, R.; Nyman, L. A. A.; Booth, R.; Pizzo, L.; Whyborn, N.

    1999-01-01

    Published in: Astrophys. J. 513 (1999) 23 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We report simultaneous observations at 1.2 and 2 mm, with a double channel photometer on the SEST Telescope, of the X-ray cluster RXJ0658-5557 in search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z). The S-Z data w

  4. The enhancement and decrement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect towards the ROSAT Cluster RXJ0658-5557The enhancement and decrement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect towards the ROSAT Cluster RXJ0658-5557

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreani, P.; Böhringer, H.; Dall'Oglio, G.; Martinis, L.; Shaver, P. A.; Lemke, R.; Nyman, L. A. A.; Booth, R.; Pizzo, L.; Whyborn, N.

    1999-01-01

    Published in: Astrophys. J. 513 (1999) 23 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We report simultaneous observations at 1.2 and 2 mm, with a double channel photometer on the SEST Telescope, of the X-ray cluster RXJ0658-5557 in search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z). The S-Z data w

  5. Simulations of the Pairwise Kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Flender, Samuel; Finkel, Hal; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin; Holder, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    The pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal from galaxy clusters is a probe of their line-of-sight momenta, and thus a potentially valuable source of cosmological information. In addition to the momenta, the amplitude of the measured signal depends on the properties of the intra-cluster gas and observational limitations such as errors in determining cluster centers and redshifts. In this work we simulate the pairwise kSZ signal of clusters at z<1, using the output from a cosmological N-body simulation and including the properties of the intra-cluster gas via a model that can be varied in post-processing. We find that modifications to the gas profile due to star formation and feedback reduce the pairwise kSZ amplitude of clusters by ~50%, relative to the naive `gas traces mass' assumption. We further demonstrate that offsets between the true and observer-selected centers of clusters can reduce the overall amplitude of the pairwise kSZ signal by up to 10%, while errors in the redshifts can lead to...

  6. The statistical nature of the second order corrections to the thermal SZE

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that the accepted expressions for the second order corrections in the parameter $z$ to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect can be accurately reproduced by a simple convolution integral approach. This representation allows to separate the second order SZE corrections into two type of components. One associated to a single line broadening, directly related to the even derivative terms present in the distortion intensity curve, while the other is related to a frequency shift, ...

  7. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 percent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  8. Constraints on the Richness-Mass Relation and the Optical-SZE Positional Offset Distribution for SZE-Selected Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Saro, A; Rozo, E; Benson, B A; Mohr, J; Rykoff, E S; Soares-Santos, M; Bleem, L; Dodelson, S; Melchior, P; Sobreira, F; Upadhyay, V; Weller, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Bayliss, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brodwin, M; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Chiu, I; Covarrubias, R; Crawford, T M; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; de Haan, T; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gangkofner, C; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gupta, N; Hennig, C; Holzapfel, W L; Honscheid, K; Jain, B; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lin, H; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; McDonald, M; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reichardt, C L; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Strazzullo, V; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; von der Linden, A; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Zenteno, A; Ziegler, K E

    2015-01-01

    We cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg$^2$ of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between $0.1\\lesssim z\\lesssim 0.8$ in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness $\\lambda$-mass relation with the following function $\\langle\\ln\\lambda|M_{500}\\rangle\\propto B_\\lambda\\ln M_{500}+C_\\lambda\\ln E(z)$ and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses $\\lambda$ to constrain the parameters. We find $B_\\lambda= 1.14^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ and $C_\\lambda=0.73^{+0.77}_{-0.75}$. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is $\\sigma_{\\ln M|\\lambda} = 0.18^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ at a characteristic richness $\\lambda=70$. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the ma...

  9. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array: Constraining a new pressure profile for fitting SZE observations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mroczkowski, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA), an eight element interferometer designed to probe the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) from galaxy clusters, which I helped construct and operate, is described here (Part I). I then use SZA observations to investigate the utility of a new, self-similar pressure profile for fitting SZE observations of galaxy clusters (Part II). The SZA 30-GHz receiver system probes angular scales ~1-5'. A model that can accurately describe a cluster's pressure profile over a correspondingly broad range of radii is therefore required. In the analysis presented here, I fit a 2-parameter, radial pressure profile, derived from simulations and detailed X- ray analysis of relaxed clusters, to SZA observations of three clusters with exceptionally high quality X-ray data. From the joint analysis of the SZE and X-ray data, I derive physical properties of the cluster, such as gas and total mass, gas fraction and the integrated Compton y -parameter. The parameters derived from the joint fit to SZE+X-ray...

  10. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF ACT SZE-SELECTED CLUSTERS FROM THE EQUATORIAL STRIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Erik D.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Menanteau, Felipe; Baker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sievers, Jonathan; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Aguirre, Paula; Duenner, Rolando [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Appel, John William; Das, Sudeep; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Fowler, Joseph W.; Hill, J. Colin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2012-05-20

    We present follow-up observations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA) of optically confirmed galaxy clusters found in the equatorial survey region of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT): ACT-CL J0022-0036, ACT-CL J2051+0057, and ACT-CL J2337+0016. ACT-CL J0022-0036 is a newly discovered, massive ({approx_equal} 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }), high-redshift (z = 0.81) cluster revealed by ACT through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Deep, targeted observations with the SZA allow us to probe a broader range of cluster spatial scales, better disentangle cluster decrements from radio point-source emission, and derive more robust integrated SZE flux and mass estimates than we can with ACT data alone. For the two clusters we detect with the SZA we compute integrated SZE signal and derive masses from the SZA data only. ACT-CL J2337+0016, also known as A2631, has archival Chandra data that allow an additional X-ray-based mass estimate. Optical richness is also used to estimate cluster masses and shows good agreement with the SZE and X-ray-based estimates. Based on the point sources detected by the SZA in these three cluster fields and an extrapolation to ACT's frequency, we estimate that point sources could be contaminating the SZE decrement at the {approx}< 20% level for some fraction of clusters.

  11. Cosmology with the S-Z Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Rephaeli, Y

    2002-01-01

    Extensive recent work on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect reflects major progress in observational capabilities of interferometric arrays, the improved quality of multi-frequency measurements with upcoming ground-based and stratospheric bolometer arrays, and the intense theoretical and experimental work on the small scale structure of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. I briefly describe the effect and discuss its significance as a major cosmological probe. Recent results for the gas mass fraction in clusters and the Hubble constant (largely from measurements with the BIMA and OVRO interferometric arrays) are discussed. Also reviewed are results from the first determination of the CMB temperature at the redshifts of two clusters (from measurements with the MITO and SuZIE experiments), and recent work on the CMB anisotropy due to the S-Z effect.

  12. The statistical nature of the second order corrections to the thermal SZE

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that the accepted expressions for the second order corrections in the parameter $z$ to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect can be accurately reproduced by a simple convolution integral approach. This representation allows to separate the second order SZE corrections into two type of components. One associated to a single line broadening, directly related to the even derivative terms present in the distortion intensity curve, while the other is related to a frequency shift, which is in turn related to the first derivative term.

  13. Searching for cosmological signatures of the Einstein equivalence principle breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of gravity generated by a multiplicative coupling of a scalar field to the electromagnetic Lagrangian lead to a breaking of Einstein equivalence principle (EEPB) as well as to variations of fundamental constants. In these theoretical frameworks, deviations of standard values of the fine structure constant, $\\Delta \\alpha/\\alpha=\\phi$, and of the cosmic distance duality relation, $D_L(1+z)^{-2}/D_A=\\eta=1$, where $D_L$ and $D_A$ are the luminosity and angular diameter distances, respectively, are unequivocally linked. In this paper, we search for cosmological signatures of the EEPB by using angular diameter distance from galaxy clusters, obtained via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) and X-ray observations, and distance modulus of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The crucial point here is that we take into account the dependence of the SZE/X-ray technique with $\\phi$ and $\\eta$. Our new results show no indication of the EEPB.

  14. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, N; Mohr, J J; Benson, B A; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Chiu, I; Crawford, T M; de Haan, T; Dietrich, J P; Gangkofner, C; Holzapfel, W L; McDonald, M; Rapetti, D; Reichardt, C L

    2016-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; $\\langle z \\rangle = 0.14$) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. ...

  15. Research for the Classroom: Playing with Difficult Poetry--High School Seniors and Arthur Sze's "Quipu"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The author had been assigned two sections of Contemporary Literature, a semester-long senior elective, and he wanted to do something new with poetry. He planned to teach Arthur Sze's "Quipu." Sze's poetry is nonlinear, adopting principles from science, anthropology, and history into a multilayered poetic texture--text unlike anything students…

  16. Planck 2013 results. XXIX. Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2013-01-01

    comparison with existing surveys or cluster catalogues is extensively described, as is the statistical characterization of the catalogue in terms of completeness and statistical reliability. The outputs of the validation process are provided as additional information. This gives, in particular, an ensemble...

  17. Planck early results. XII. Cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich optical scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    -richness relations (N200 - M500). We bin our individual measurements and detect the SZ signal down to the lowest richness systems (N200 = 10) with high significance, achieving a detection of the SZ signal in systems with mass as low as M500 ≈ 5 × 1013 M. The observed Y500 - N200 relation is well modeled by a power...

  18. Planck intermediate results XL. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from the Virgo cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    -ray observations and simple analytical models. Owing to its proximity to us, the gas beyond the virial radius in Virgo can be studied with unprecedented sensitivity by integrating the SZ signal over tens of square degrees. We study the signal in the outskirts of Virgo and compare it with analytical models...... and a constrained simulation of the environment of Virgo. Planck data suggest that significant amounts of low-density plasma surround Virgo, out to twice the virial radius. We find the SZ signal in the outskirts of Virgo to be consistent with a simple model that extrapolates the inferred pressure at lower radii......, while assuming that the temperature stays in the keV range beyond the virial radius. The observed signal is also consistent with simulations and points to a shallow pressure profile in the outskirts of the cluster. This reservoir of gas at large radii can be linked with the hottest phase of the elusive...

  19. Planck 2015 results: XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.;

    2016-01-01

    because it simultaneously lowers the implied value of the Hubble parameter, thereby exacerbating the discrepancy with most current astrophysical estimates. Improving the precision of cluster mass calibrations from the current 10%-level to 1% would significantly strengthen these combined analyses...

  20. APEX Sunyaev-Zeldovich observations of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2744.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horellou, C.; Johansson, D.; Koloczek, A.; Singh, R.; APEX-SZ Collaboration

    This work is part of a Large Programme with APEX to map the SZ decrement at a wavelength of 2 mm in about 50 galaxy clusters. Both isolated and merging clusters were observed, and part of the XMM-LSS field. The sample will be used to constrain mass-SZ-observable scaling relations, and some individual clusters are studied in detail. Here we present SZ maps at 2 mm and at 870 mu m of Abell 2744, a massive galaxy cluster at redshift 0.31 that shows evidence of merging activity. We used two bolometer cameras on APEX: ASZCA (also called APEX-SZ), and LABOCA. With careful treatment of the data it is possible to quantify the size of the hot plasma distribution, to measure the Compton parameter (y ∝ n_eT_e dl), and to detect deviations from the X-ray brightness distribution.

  1. Planck early results. X. Statistical analysis of Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations for X-ray galaxy clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    in the luminosity - mass relation from X-ray studies. There is no evidence of any deficit in SZ signal strength in Planck data relative to expectations from the X-ray properties of clusters, underlining the robustness and consistency of our overall view of intra-cluster medium properties. © ESO, 2011....... a wide range in X-ray luminosity. The SZ signal is extracted for each object individually, and the statistical significance of the measurement is maximised by averaging the SZ signal in bins of X-ray luminosity, total mass, or redshift. The SZ signal is detected at very high significance over more than...... two decades in X-ray luminosity (1043ergs-1 L 500E(z)-7/3 2 × 1045ergs-1). The relation between intrinsic SZ signal and X-ray luminosity is investigated and the measured SZ signal is compared to values predicted from X-ray data. Planck measurements and X-ray based predictions are found...

  2. Extracting the late-time kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Munshi, D; Dixon, K L; Coles, P

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel technique to separate the late-time, post-reionization component of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect from the contribution to it from a (poorly understood and probably patchy) reionization history. The kSZ effect is one of the most promising probe of the {\\em missing baryons} in the Universe. We study the possibility of reconstructing it in three dimensions (3D), using future spectroscopic surveys such as the Euclid survey. By reconstructing a 3D template from galaxy density and peculiar velocity fields from spectroscopic surveys we cross-correlate the estimator against CMB maps. The resulting cross-correlation can help us to map out the kSZ contribution to CMB in 3D as a function of redshift thereby extending previous results which use tomographic reconstruction. This allows the separation of the late time effect from the contribution owing to reionization. By construction, it avoids contamination from foregrounds, primary CMB, tSZ effect as well as from star forming galaxies. Du...

  3. Magnetic fields and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gopal, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the contribution of magnetic fields to the Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect in the intracluster medium. In particular we calculate the SZ angular power spectrum and the central temperature decrement. The effect of magnetic fields is included in the hydrostatic equilibrium equation by splitting the Lorentz force into two terms one being the force due to magnetic pressure which acts outwards and the other being magnetic tension which acts inwards. A perturbative approach is adopted to solve for the gas density profile for weak magnetic fields ( 2000 with sigma_8 ~ 0.8 (WMAP 5 year data) for typical cluster magnetic fields. In addition we also see that the magnetic field effect on the SZ t emperature decrement is more pronounced for low mass clusters ( ~ 2 keV). Future SZ detections of low mass clusters at few arc second resolution will be able to probe this effect more precisely. Thus, it will be instructive to explore the implications of this model in greater detail in future works.

  4. The SZ Effect Signature of Excess Entropy in Distant, Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Babul, A; Balogh, M L; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; Holder, Gilbert P.; Babul, Arif; Balogh, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of cluster X-ray scaling relations have led to suggestions that non-gravitational processes, e.g., radiative cooling and/or "preheating", have significantly modified the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM). For the first time, we test this hypothesis through a comparison of predicted thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect scaling relations with available data from the literature. One of the relations that we explore, in principle, depends solely on SZ effect observations, thus offering an X-ray independent probe of the ICM. A detailed comparison of the theoretical relations with the largest compilation of high redshift SZ effect data to date indicates that the presence of an entropy floor is favored by the data. Furthermore, the inferred level of that floor, 300 keV cm^2 or higher, is comparable to that found in studies of X-ray scaling relations of nearby massive clusters. Thus, we find no evidence for significant evolution of the entropy floor out to z = 0.7. We further demonstrate that the high...

  5. The effect of hot gas in early-type galaxies on the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trester, Jeffrey J.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1989-01-01

    The effects on the cosmic microwave background which are due to Compton scattering by the hot gas contained in early-type galaxies (the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) are computed. Using the known properties of the gas deduced from X-ray observations, it is found that the fractional attenuation DeltaT/T at the center of a gas-rich galaxy is likely to be less than 10 to the -5th, which is just below current limits of detectability. A distribution function is derived for the attenuation which is due to a population of early-type galaxies out to some redshift and the expected rms fluctuations in the background on subarcmin scales are computed. These fluctuations are comparable to those intrinsic to the microwave background in the 'cold dark matter' scenario on these angular scales, but they fall orders of magnitude below the detection limits and below the level of fluctuations expected from nonlinear density perturbations at the epoch of galaxy formation.

  6. SZ effects in the Magneticum Pathfinder Simulation: Comparison with the Planck, SPT, and ACT results

    CERN Document Server

    Dolag, Klaus; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the one-point probability density distribution functions (PDF) and the power spectra of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ and kSZ) effects and the mean Compton Y parameter using the Magneticum Pathfinder simulations, state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a large cosmological volume of (896 Mpc/h)^3. These simulations follow in detail the thermal and chemical evolution of the intracluster medium as well as the evolution of super-massive black holes and their associated feedback processes. We construct full-sky maps of tSZ and kSZ from the light-cones out to z=0.17, and one realization of 8.8x8.8 degree wide, deep light-cone out to z=5.2. The local universe at z=1.18x10^{-6} for \\Omega_m=0.272 and \\sigma_8=0.809. Nearly half (~ 5x10^{-7}) of the signal comes from halos below a virial mass of 10^{13}M_\\odot/h. Scaling this to the Planck 2015 parameters, we find =1.57x10^{-6}. The PDF and the power spectrum of kSZ from our simulation agree broadly with the previous ...

  7. SZ effects in the Magneticum Pathfinder simulation: comparison with the Planck, SPT, and ACT results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolag, K.; Komatsu, E.; Sunyaev, R.

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the one-point probability density distribution functions (PDF) and the power spectra of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ and kSZ) effects and the mean Compton Y parameter using the Magneticum Pathfinder simulations, state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a large cosmological volume of (896 Mpc h-1)3. These simulations follow in detail the thermal and chemical evolution of the intracluster medium as well as the evolution of supermassive black holes and their associated feedback processes. We construct full-sky maps of tSZ and kSZ from the light-cones out to z = 0.17, and one realization of 8.8° × 8.8° deep light-cone out to z = 5.2. The local universe at z half (≈5 × 10-7) of the signal comes from haloes below a virial mass of 1013 M⊙ h-1. Scaling this to the Planck 2015 parameters, we find bar{Y}=1.57× {}10^{-6}.

  8. Angular diameter distance from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters: calibration from hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ameglio, S; Diaferio, A; Dolag, K

    2005-01-01

    The angular-diameter distance D_A of a galaxy cluster can be measuread by combining its X-ray emission with the cosmic microwave background fluctution due to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The application of this distance indicator usually assumes that the cluster is spherically symmetric, the gas is distributed according to the isothermal beta-model, and the X-ray temperature is an unbiased measure of the electron temperature. We test these assumptions with galaxy clusters extracted from an extended set of cosmological N-body/hydrodynamical simulations of a LCDM concordance cosmology, which include the effect of radiative cooling, star formation and energy feedback from supernovae. We find that, due to the steep temperature gradients which are present in the central regions of simulated clusters, the assumption of isothermal gas leads to a significant underestimate of D_A. This bias is efficiently corrected by using the polytropic version of the beta-model to account for the presence of temperature gradients....

  9. Detection of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with BOSS DR11 and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    De Bernardis, F; Vavagiakis, E M; Niemack, M D; Battaglia, N; Beall, J; Becker, D T; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Cho, H; Coughlin, K; Datta, R; Devlin, M; Dunkley, J; Dunner, R; Ferraro, S; Fox, A; Gallardo, P A; Halpern, M; Hand, N; Hasselfield, M; Henderson, S W; Hill, J C; Hilton, G C; Hilton, M; Hincks, A D; Hlozek, R; Hubmayr, J; Huffenberger, K; Hughes, J P; Irwin, K D; Koopman, B J; Kosowsky, A; Li, D; Louis, T; Lungu, M; Madhavacheril, M S; Maurin, L; McMahon, J; Moodley, K; Naess, S; Nati, F; Newburgh, L; Nibarger, J P; Page, L A; Partridge, B; Schaan, E; Schmitt, B L; Sehgal, N; Sievers, J; Simon, S M; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Stevens, J R; Thornton, R J; van Engelen, A; Van Lanen, J; Wollack, E J

    2016-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect using data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Using 600 square degrees of overlapping sky area, we evaluate the mean pairwise baryon momentum associated with the positions of 50,000 bright galaxies in the BOSS DR11 Large Scale Structure catalog. A non-zero signal arises from the large-scale motions of halos containing the sample galaxies. The data fits an analytical signal model well, with the optical depth to microwave photon scattering as a free parameter determining the overall signal amplitude. We estimate the covariance matrix of the mean pairwise momentum as a function of galaxy separation, using microwave sky simulations, jackknife evaluation, and bootstrap estimates. The most conservative simulation-based errors give signal-to-noise estimates between 3.6 and 4.1 for varying galaxy luminosity cuts. We discuss how the other error determinations can lead to higher signal-...

  10. Measuring cosmological bulk flows via the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the upcoming cosmic microwave background maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kashlinsky, A

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new method to measure the possible large-scale bulk flows in the Universe from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps from the upcoming missions, MAP and Planck. This can be done by studying the statistical properties of the CMB temperature field at many X-ray cluster positions. At each cluster position, the CMB temperature fluctuation will be a combination of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) kinematic and thermal components, the cosmological fluctuations and the instrument noise term. When averaged over many such clusters the last three will integrate down, whereas the first one will be dominated by a possible bulk flow component. In particular, we propose to use all-sky X-ray cluster catalogs that should (or could) be available soon from X-ray satellites, and then to evaluate the dipole component of the CMB field at the cluster positions. We show that for the MAP and Planck mission parameters the dominant contributions to the dipole will be from the terms due to the SZ kinematic effect produced b...

  11. A convolution integral representation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2003-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the non-relativistic and relativistic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) are derived by means of suitable convolution integrals. The establishment of these expressions is based on the fact that the SZE disturbed spectrum, at high frequencies, possesses the form of a Laplace transform of the single line distortion profile (structure factor). Implications of this description of the SZE related to light scattering in optically thin plasmas are discussed.

  12. A convolution integral representation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Lomas de Santa Fe 01210 Mexico DF (Mexico); Garcia-Colin, L S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico DF, 09340 (Mexico)

    2003-04-25

    Analytical expressions for the non-relativistic and relativistic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) are derived by means of suitable convolution integrals. The establishment of these expressions is based on the fact that the SZE disturbed spectrum, at high frequencies, possesses the form of a Laplace transform of the single line distortion profile (structure factor). Implications of this description of the SZE related to light scattering in optically thin plasmas are discussed.

  13. Planck intermediate results. X. Physics of the hot gas in the Coma cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planck Collaboration, [No Value; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Brown, S. D.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rudnick, L.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Stivoli, F.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of Planck satellite data on the Coma cluster observed via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Thanks to its great sensitivity, Planck is able, for the first time, to detect SZ emission up to r ≈ 3 × R500. We test previously proposed spherically symmetric models for the pressure dist

  14. Planck intermediate results : X. Physics of the hot gas in the Coma cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bikmaev, I.; Boehringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Brown, S. D.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayon, L.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Democles, J.; Desert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Doerl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rudnick, L.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Stivoli, F.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Tuerler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of Planck satellite data on the Coma cluster observed via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Thanks to its great sensitivity, Planck is able, for the first time, to detect SZ emission up to r approximate to 3 x R-500. We test previously proposed spherically symmetric models for the

  15. Planck intermediate results : VI. The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Boehringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayon, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Democles, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Doerl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinamaki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihaenen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-01-01

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to its full sky coverage. One of the SZ candidates detected in the early months of the mission near to the signal-to-noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was la

  16. Planck intermediate results. VI. The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planck Collaboration, [Unknown; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-01-01

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to its full sky coverage. One of the SZ candidates detected inthe early months of the mission near to the signal-to-noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was lat

  17. Planck intermediate results : VI. The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Boehringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayon, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Democles, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Doerl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinamaki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihaenen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J. -B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J. -L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-01-01

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to its full sky coverage. One of the SZ candidates detected in the early months of the mission near to the signal-to-noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was la

  18. Planck intermediate results. VI. The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planck Collaboration, [Unknown; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-01-01

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to its full sky coverage. One of the SZ candidates detected inthe early months of the mission near to the signal-to-noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was lat

  19. Planck intermediate results: XIII. Constraints on peculiar velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.; Le Jeune, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Using Planck data combined with the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we address the study of peculiar motions by searching for evidence of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ). By implementing various filters designed to extract the kSZ generated at the position...

  20. Testing the Distance-Duality Relation with Galaxy Clusters and Supernovae Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Ribeiro, M B

    2010-01-01

    In this letter we propose a new and model-independent cosmological test for the distance-duality (DD) relation, $\\eta=D_{L}(z)(1+z)^{-2}/D_{A}(z)=1$, where $D_{L}$ and $D_{A}$ are, respectively, the luminosity and angular diameter distances. For $D_L$ we consider two sub-samples of SNe type Ia taken from Constitution data (2009) whereas $D_A$ distances are provided by two samples of galaxy clusters compiled by De Fillipis {\\it et al.} (2005) and Bonamente {\\it et al.} (2006) by combining Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness. The SNe Ia redshifts of each sub-sample were carefully chosen to coincide with the ones of the associated galaxy cluster sample ($\\Delta z<0.005$) thereby allowing a direct test of DD relation. Since for very low redshifts, $D_{A}(z) \\approxeq D_{L}(z)$, we have tested the DD relation by assuming that $\\eta$ is a function of the redshift parametrized by two different expressions: $\\eta(z) = 1 + \\eta_{0}z$ and $\\eta(z) = 1 + \\eta_{0}z/(1+z)$, where $\\eta_0$ is a c...

  1. Galaxy Populations in Massive Galaxy Clusters to z=1.1: Color Distribution, Concentration, Halo Occupation Number and Red Sequence Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Hennig, C; Zenteno, A; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Bocquet, S; Strazzullo, V; Saro, A; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Bayliss, M; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Capasso, R; Capozzi, D; Carnero, A; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Chiu, I; D'Andrea, C B; daCosta, L N; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti-Neto, A; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gangkofner, C; Gonzalez, A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; McDonald, M; Melchior, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reichardt, C; Romer, A K; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    We study the galaxy populations in 74 Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect (SZE) selected clusters from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey that have been imaged in the science verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The sample extends up to $z\\sim 1.1$ with $4 \\times 10^{14} M_{\\odot}\\le M_{200}\\le 3\\times 10^{15} M_{\\odot}$. Using the band containing the 4000~\\AA\\ break and its redward neighbor, we study the color-magnitude distributions of cluster galaxies to $\\sim m_*+2$, finding: (1) the intrinsic rest frame $g-r$ color width of the red sequence (RS) population is $\\sim$0.03 out to $z\\sim0.85$ with a preference for an increase to $\\sim0.07$ at $z=1$ and (2) the prominence of the RS declines beyond $z\\sim0.6$. The spatial distribution of cluster galaxies is well described by the NFW profile out to $4R_{200}$ with a concentration of $c_{\\mathrm{g}} = 3.59^{+0.20}_{-0.18}$, $5.37^{+0.27}_{-0.24}$ and $1.38^{+0.21}_{-0.19}$ for the full, the RS and the blue non-RS populations, respectively, but with $\\sim4...

  2. Extracting the late-time kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, D.; Iliev, I. T.; Dixon, K. L.; Coles, P.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a novel technique to separate the late-time, post-reionization component of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect from the contribution to it from a (poorly understood and probably patchy) reionization history. The kSZ effect is one of the most promising probe of the missing baryons in the Universe. We study the possibility of reconstructing it in three dimensions (3D), using future spectroscopic surveys such as the Euclid survey. By reconstructing a 3D template from galaxy density and peculiar velocity fields from spectroscopic surveys we cross-correlate the estimator against CMB maps. The resulting cross-correlation can help us to map out the kSZ contribution to CMB in 3D as a function of redshift thereby extending previous results which use tomographic reconstruction. This allows the separation of the late-time effect from the contribution owing to reionization. By construction, it avoids contamination from foregrounds, primary CMB, tSZ effect as well as from star-forming galaxies. Due to a high number density of galaxies the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for such cross-correlational studies is higher, compared to the studies involving CMB power-spectrum analysis. Using a spherical Bessel-Fourier (sFB) transform we introduce a pair of 3D power spectra: C^{allel }_ℓ (k) and C^{perp }_ℓ (k) that can be used for this purpose. We find that in a future spectroscopic survey with near all-sky coverage and a survey depth of z ≈ 1, reconstruction of C^{perp }_ℓ (k) can be achieved in a few radial wave bands k ≈ (0.01-0.5 h- 1 Mpc) with a S/N ratio of up to O(10) for angular harmonics in the range ℓ = (200-2000).

  3. CMB Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Crittenden, Robert G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the subject of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) analysis - its past, present and future. The theory of Gaussian primary anisotropies, those arising from linear physics operating in the early Universe, is in reasonably good shape so the focus has shifted to the statistical pipeline which confronts the data with the theory: mapping, filtering, comparing, cleaning, compressing, forecasting, estimating. There have been many algorithmic advances in the analysis pipeline in recent years, but still more are needed for the forecasts of high precision cosmic parameter estimation to be realized. For secondary anisotropies, those arising once nonlinearity develops, the computational state of the art currently needs effort in all the areas: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, inhomogeneous reionization, gravitational lensing, the Rees-Sciama effect, dusty galaxies. We use the Sunyaev-Zeldovich example to illustrate the issues. The direct interface with observations for these non-Gaussian signals is much more compl...

  4. Primary and Secondary Anisotropies of Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros

    2002-01-01

    The three main topics we proposed to do are linear calculations (continuing development of CMBFAST), nonlinear calculations of gas physics relevant to Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) (Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, etc.) and nonlinear effects on CMB due to dark matter (gravitational lensing, etc.). We describe each of these topics, as well as additional topics PI and his group worked on that are related to the topics in the proposal.

  5. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P.R.M.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Grainge, K.J.B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Ilic, S.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Ma, Y.Z.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Mak, D.S.Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J.D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H.V.; Pelkonen, V.M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y.C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B.Rouille; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H.S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R.D.E.; Sauve, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B.M.; Schammel, M.P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Shimwell, T.W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L.D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S.A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J.P.; Zonca, A.

    2015-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14~May 2009 and scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12~August 2009 and 23~October 2013. In February~2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic col...

  6. Galaxy Populations in the 26 most massive Galaxy Clusters in the South Pole Telescope SZE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zenteno, A; Desai, S; Stalder, B; Saro, A; Dietrich, J P; Bayliss, M; Bocquet, S; Chiu, I; Gonzalez, A H; Gangkofner, C; Gupta, N; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; McDonald, M; Reichardt, C; Rest, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the optical properties of the 26 most massive galaxy clusters selected within the SPT-SZ 2500 deg$^2$ survey. This Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect selected sample spans a redshift range of 0.10 < z < 1.13. We measure the galaxy radial profile, the luminosity function (LF), and the halo occupation number (HON) using optical data with a typical depth of $m^*$ + 2. The stacked radial profiles are consistent with a NFW profile with a concentration of $2.84^{+0.40}_{-0.37}$ for the red sequence (RS) and $2.36^{+0.38}_{-0.35}$ for the total population. Stacking the data in multiple redshift bins shows a hint of redshift evolution in the concentration when both the total population is used, and when only RS galaxies are used (at 2.1$\\sigma$ and 2.8$\\sigma$, respectively). The stacked LF shows a faint end slope $\\alpha = -1.06^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ for the total and $\\alpha = -0.80^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ for the RS population. The redshift evolution of $m^*$ is found to be consistent with a passively evolv...

  7. 近代广东四邑地区的文教建筑研究%Study on Culture and Education Architecture in the Sze' Yap District in Modern Canton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜省; 江泓; 蔡凌

    2012-01-01

    在教育兴国的观念影响下和华侨积极捐资的支持下,近代四邑地区文教建筑发达.以中小学、图书馆为主体的文教建筑在数量、规模和建筑技术、艺术水平方面都有很大突破.西洋风格的中小学校、图书馆,中西合璧的复合式学校是那个时代常见的文教建筑,反映了近代四邑社会积极学习西方先进知识和教育理念,力图实现民族自强的共识.%Effected by the new idea of revitalization through education, many new schools and libraries were built up with the money contributed by the immigrations in the Sze'Yap district in modern Canton. The quantities, scale, construction technology and artistic level of these buildings were very different from the traditional educational buildings. As a reflection of the universal concept that studying the advanced western knowledge and technology was the only way to revitalize Chinese nation, most of the middle and primary schools and libraries were designed by a western style or a combining style between Chinese and western architecture.

  8. New Constraints on Spatial Variations of the Fine Structure Constant from Clusters of Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan De Martino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have constrained the spatial variation of the fine structure constant using multi-frequency measurements of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect of 618 X-ray selected clusters. Although our results are not competitive with the ones from quasar absorption lines, we improved by a factor 10 and ∼2.5 previous results from Cosmic Microwave Background power spectrum and from galaxy clusters, respectively.

  9. Galaxy Populations in Massive Galaxy Clusters to z = 1.1: Color Distribution, Concentration, Halo Occupation Number and Red Sequence Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, C.; Mohr, J. J.; Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Bocquet, S.; Strazzullo, V.; Saro, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bayliss, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capasso, R.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero, A.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Chiu, I.; D'Andrea, C. B.; daCosta, L. N.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti-Neto, A.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McDonald, M.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We study the galaxy populations in 74 Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect (SZE) selected clusters from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey that have been imaged in the science verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The sample extends up to z ˜ 1.1 with 4 × 1014M⊙ ≤ M200 ≤ 3 × 1015M⊙. Using the band containing the 4000 Å break and its redward neighbor, we study the color-magnitude distributions of cluster galaxies to ˜m★ + 2, finding: (1) the intrinsic rest frame g - r color width of the red sequence (RS) population is ˜0.03 out to z ˜ 0.85 with a preference for an increase to ˜0.07 at z = 1 and (2) the prominence of the RS declines beyond z ˜ 0.6. The spatial distribution of cluster galaxies is well described by the NFW profile out to 4R200 with a concentration of cg = 3.59^{+0.20}_{-0.18}, 5.37^{+0.27}_{-0.24} and 1.38^{+0.21}_{-0.19} for the full, the RS and the blue non-RS populations, respectively, but with ˜40% to 55% cluster to cluster variation and no statistically significant redshift or mass trends. The number of galaxies within the virial region N200 exhibits a mass trend indicating that the number of galaxies per unit total mass is lower in the most massive clusters, and shows no significant redshift trend. The red sequence (RS) fraction within R200 is (68 ± 3)% at z = 0.46, varies from ˜55% at z = 1 to ˜80% at z = 0.1, and exhibits intrinsic variation among clusters of ˜14%. We discuss a model that suggests the observed redshift trend in RS fraction favors a transformation timescale for infalling field galaxies to become RS galaxies of 2 to 3 Gyr.

  10. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect at Five Arc-seconds: RXJ1347.5-1145 Imaged by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Kitayama, T; Takakuwa, S; Tsutsumi, T; Komatsu, E; Akahori, T; Iono, D; Izumi, T; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Matsuo, H; Ota, N; Suto, Y; Takizawa, M; Yoshikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    We present the first image of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) obtained by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Combining 7-m and 12-m arrays in Band 3, we create an SZE map toward a galaxy cluster RXJ1347.5-1145 with 5 arc-second resolution (corresponding to the physical size of 20 kpc/h), the highest angular and physical spatial resolutions achieved to date for imaging the SZE, while retaining extended signals out to 40 arc-seconds. The 1-sigma statistical sensitivity of the image is 0.017 mJy/beam or 0.12 mK_CMB at the 5 arc-second full width at half maximum. The SZE image shows a good agreement with an electron pressure map reconstructed independently from the X-ray data and offers a new probe of the small-scale structure of the intracluster medium. Our results demonstrate that ALMA is a powerful instrument for imaging the SZE in compact galaxy clusters with unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity. As the first report on the detection of the SZE by ALMA, we present ...

  11. Probing photon decay with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Colafrancesco, S

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental properties of the photon have deep impact on the astrophysical processes that involve it, like the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photon by energetic electrons residing within galaxy cluster atmospheres, usually referred to as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). We calculate the combined constraints on the photon decay time and mass by studying the impact of the modified CMB spectrum, as recently calculated (Heeck 2013), on the SZE of galaxy clusters. We analyze the modifications of the SZE as produced by photon decay effects. We study in details the frequency regimes where these modifications are large and where the constraints derived from the SZE can be stronger with respect to those already obtained from the CMB spectrum. We show that the SZE can set limits on the photon decay time and mass, or on $E^* = \\frac{t_0}{\\tau_\\gamma}m_\\gamma c^2$, that are stronger than those obtained from the CMB: the main constraints come from the low frequency range $\

  12. A test for cosmic distance duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, R.F.L.; Gonçalves, R.S.; Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: holanda@on.br, E-mail: rsousa@on.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatório Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    Testing the cosmic distance duality relation (CDDR) constitutes an important task for cosmology and fundamental physics since any violation of it would be a clear evidence of new physics. In this paper, we propose a new test for the CDDR using only current measurements of the gas mass fraction of galaxy clusters from Sunyaev-Zeldovich (f{sub SZE}) and X-ray surface brightness (f{sub X−ray}) observations. We show that the relation between f{sub X−ray} and f{sub SZE} observations is given by f{sub SZE} = ηf{sub X−ray}, where η quantifies deviations from the CDDR. Since this latter expression is valid for the same object in a given galaxy cluster sample, the method proposed removes possible contaminations from different systematics error sources and redshift differences involved in luminosity and angular diameter distance measurements. We apply this cosmological model-independent methodology to the most recent f{sub X−ray} and f{sub SZE} data and show that no significant violation of the CDDR is found.

  13. A test for cosmic distance duality

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Alcaniz, J S

    2012-01-01

    Testing the cosmic distance duality relation (CDDR) constitutes an important task for cosmology and fundamental physics since any violation of it would be a clear evidence of new physics. In this {\\it Letter}, we propose a new test for the CDDR using only measurements of the gas mass fraction of galaxy clusters from Sunyaev-Zeldovich ($f_{SZE}$) and X-ray surface brightness ($f_{X-ray}$) observations. We show that the relation between current $f_{X-ray}$ and $f_{SZE}$ observations is given by $f_{SZE}=\\eta f_{X-ray}$, where $\\eta$ quantifies deviations from the CDDR. Since this latter expression is valid for the same object in a given galaxy cluster sample, the method proposed removes possible contaminations from different systematics error sources and redshift differences involved in luminosity and angular diameter distance measurements. We apply this cosmological model-independent methodology to the most recent $f_{X-ray}$ and $f_{SZE}$ data and show that no significant violation of the CDDR is found.

  14. Probing the physics and history of cosmic reionization with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Colafrancesco, S; Emritte, M S

    2016-01-01

    We study here an alternative technique to probe the Dark Ages (DA) and the Epoch of Reonization (EoR) that makes use of the Comptonization of the CMB spectrum modified by physical effects occurring during this epoch related to the emergence of the 21-cm radiation background. Inverse Compton scattering of 21-cm photon background by thermal and non-thermal electrons residing in the atmospheres of cosmic structures like galaxy clusters, radiogalaxy lobes and galaxy halos, produces a specific form of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) that we refer to as SZE-21cm. We derive the SZE-21cm in a general relativistic approach which is required to describe the correct spectral features of this astrophysical effect. We calculate the spectral features of the thermal and non-thermal SZE-21cm in galaxy clusters and in radiogalaxy lobes, and their dependence on the history of physical mechanisms occurring during the DA and EoR. We study how the spectral shape of the SZE-21cm can be used to establish the global features in the ...

  15. The Observable Thermal and Kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in Merging Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, John J; Babul, Arif

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-resolution imaging of galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) provides a unique probe of the astrophysics of the intracluster medium (ICM) out to high redshifts. To investigate the effects of cluster mergers on resolved SZE images, we present a high-resolution cosmological simulation of a 1.5E15 M_sun adiabatic cluster using the TreeSPH code ChaNGa. This massive cluster undergoes a 10:3:1 ratio triple merger accompanied by a dramatic rise in its integrated Compton-Y, peaking at z = 0.05. By modeling the thermal SZE (tSZ) and kinetic SZE (kSZ) spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at this redshift with relativistic corrections, we produce various mock images of the cluster at frequencies and resolutions achievable with current high-resolution SZE instruments. The two gravitationally-bound merging subclusters account for 10% and 1% of the main cluster's integrated Compton-Y, and have extended merger shock features in the background ICM visible in our ...

  16. Probing photon decay with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Marchegiani, P.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The fundamental properties of the photon have a deep impact on the astrophysical processes that involve it, such as the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photon by energetic electrons residing within galaxy cluster atmospheres. This is usually referred to as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Aims: We calculate the combined constraints on the photon decay time and mass by studying the impact of the modified CMB spectrum on the SZE of galaxy clusters. Methods: We analyze the modifications of the SZE as produced by photon decay effects. We study the frequency ranges where these modifications are large and where the constraints derived from the SZE are stronger than those already obtained from the CMB spectrum. Results: We show that the SZE can set limits on the photon decay time and mass, or on E∗ = (t0/τγ)mγc2 , which are stronger than those obtained from the CMB. The main constraints come from the low-frequency range ν ≈ 10-50 GHz where the modified SZE ΔImod is greater than the standard one ΔI, with the difference |(ΔImod - ΔI)| increasing with the frequency for increasing values of E∗. Additional constraints can be set in the range 120-180 GHz where there is an increase in the frequency position of the minimum of ΔImod with respect to the standard one with increasing values of E∗. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the effect of photon decay can be measured or constrained by the Square Kilometer Array in the optimal range ≈ 10-30 GHz setting limits of E∗ ≲ 1.4 × 10-9 eV and 5 × 10-10 eV for 30- and 260-h integration for A2163, respectively. These limits are tighter than those obtained with the COBE-FIRAS spectral measurements of the CMB.

  17. Multi-frequency imaging of the galaxy cluster Abell 2163 using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Nord, M; Pacaud, F; Ade, P A R; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bertoldi, F; Cho, H -M; Chon, G; Clarke, J; Dobbs, M; Ferrusca, D; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Horellou, C; Johansson, D; Kennedy, J; Kermish, Z; Kneissl, R; Lanting, T; Lee, A T; Lueker, M; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Plagge, T; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Schaaf, R; Schwan, D; Spieler, H; Tucker, C; Weiss, A; Zahn, O

    2009-01-01

    We have used the APEX-SZ and LABOCA bolometer cameras on the APEX telescope to map both the decrement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 150 GHz and the increment at 345 GHz toward the rich and X-ray luminous galaxy cluster Abell 2163 at redshift 0.203. The decrement SZE image is used, in conjunction with archival XMM-Newton X-ray data, under the simplifying assumption of spherical symmetry, to model the radial density and temperature distributions of the intra-cluster medium and to derive the gas mass fraction in the cluster. We combine the peak SZE signals derived in this paper with published SZE measurements of this cluster to derive the cluster line-of-sight bulk velocity and the central Comptonization, using priors on the temperature of the intra-cluster medium. We find that the best-fit isothermal model to the SZE data is consistent with the gas properties implied by the X-ray data, particularly inside the central 1 Mpc radius. Inside a radius of 1500 kpc from the cluster center, the mean gas tem...

  18. AMiBA: Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect derived properties and scaling relations of massive galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Paul T P; Liu, Guo-Chin; Molnar, Sandor M; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Altamirano, Pablo; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Ming-Tang; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Jiang, Homin; Kesteven, Michael; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Raffin, Philippe; Wei, Tashun; Wilson, Warwick

    2010-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) has been observed toward six massive galaxy clusters, at redshifts 0.091 \\leq z \\leq 0.322 in the 86-102 GHz band with the Y. T. Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA). We modify an iterative method, based on the isothermal \\beta-models, to derive the electron temperature T_e, total mass M_t, gas mass M_g, and integrated Compton Y within r_2500, from the AMiBA SZE data. Non-isothermal universal temperature profile (UTP) \\beta models are also considered in this paper. These results are in good agreement with those deduced from other observations. We also investigate the embedded scaling relations, due to the assumptions that have been made in the method we adopted, between these purely SZE-deduced T_e, M_t, M_g and Y. Our results suggest that cluster properties may be measurable with SZE observations alone. However, the assumptions built into the pure-SZE method bias the results of scaling relation estimations and need further study.

  19. Redshift of Galaxy Clusters from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Diego-Rodriguez, J M; Silk, J; Bryan, G

    2002-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the redshift of galaxy clusters through resolved images of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Our method is based on morphological observables which can be measured by actual and future SZE experiments. The method is tested using a set of high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters at different redshifts. The method combines the observables in a principal component analysis. We show how this can give an estimate of the redshift of the galaxy clusters. Although the uncertainty in the redshift estimation is large, the method should be useful for future SZE surveys where hundreds of clusters are expected to be detected. A first preselection of the high redshift candidates could be done using our proposed morphological redshift estimator.

  20. New constraints on H_0 and Omega_M from SZE/X-RAY data and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Lima, J A S

    2008-01-01

    The Hubble constant, $H_0$, sets the scale of the size and age of the Universe and its determination from independent methods is still worthwhile to be investigated. In this article, by using the Sunyaev-Zel`dovich effect and X-ray surface brightness data from 38 galaxy clusters observed by Bonamente {\\it{et al.}} (2006), we obtain a new estimate of $H_0$ in the context of a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. There is a degeneracy on the mass density parameter ($\\Omega_{m}$) which is broken by applying a joint analysis involving the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) as given by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This happens because the BAO signature does not depend on $H_0$. Our basic finding is that a joint analysis involving these tests yield $H_0= 0.765^{+0.035}_{-0.033}$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$ and $\\Omega_{m}=0.27^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$. Since the hypothesis of spherical geometry assumed by Bonamente {\\it {et al.}} is questionable, we have also compared the above results to a recent work where a sample of triaxial galaxy...

  1. The observable thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in merging galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, John J.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Babul, Arif

    2013-07-01

    The advent of high-resolution imaging of galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) provides a unique probe of the astrophysics of the intracluster medium (ICM) out to high redshifts. To investigate the effects of cluster mergers on resolved SZE images, we present a high-resolution cosmological simulation of a 1.5 × 1015 M⊙ adiabatic cluster using the TreeSPH code CHANGA. This massive cluster undergoes a 10:3:1 ratio triple merger accompanied by a dramatic rise in its integrated Compton-Y, peaking at z = 0.05. By modelling the thermal SZE (tSZ) and kinetic SZE (kSZ) spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at this redshift with relativistic corrections, we produce various mock images of the cluster at frequencies and resolutions achievable with current high-resolution SZE instruments. The two gravitationally bound merging subclusters account for 10 per cent and 1 per cent of the main cluster's integrated Compton-Y, and have extended merger shock features in the background ICM visible in our mock images. We show that along certain projections and at specific frequencies, the kSZ CMB intensity distortion can dominate over the tSZ due to the large line-of-sight velocities of the subcluster gas and the unique frequency dependence of these effects. We estimate that a one-velocity assumption in estimation of line-of-sight velocities of the merging subclusters from the kSZ induces a bias of ˜10 per cent. This velocity bias is small relative to other sources of uncertainty in observations, partially due to helpful bulk motions in the background ICM induced by the merger. Our results show that high-resolution SZE observations, which have recently detected strong kSZ signals in subclusters of merging systems, can robustly probe the dynamical as well as the thermal state of the ICM.

  2. THE SZ EFFECT IN THE PLANCK ERA: ASTROPHYSICAL AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Colafrancesco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect (SZE is a relevant probe for cosmology and particle astrophysics. The Planck Era marks a definite step forward in the use of this probe for astrophysics and cosmology. Astrophysical applications to galaxy clusters, galaxies, radiogalaxies and large-scale structures are discussed. Cosmological relevance for the Dark Energy equation of state, modified Gravity scenarios, Dark Matter search, cosmic magnetism and other cosmological applications is also reviewed. Future directions for the study of the SZE and its polarization are finally outlined.

  3. Astrophysical components from Planck maps

    CERN Document Server

    Burigana, Carlo; Paoletti, Daniela; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Natoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Planck Collaboration has recently released maps of the microwave sky in both temperature and polarization. Diffuse astrophysical components (including Galactic emissions, cosmic far infrared (IR) background, y-maps of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect) and catalogs of many thousands of Galactic and extragalactic radio and far-IR sources, and galaxy clusters detected through the SZ effect are the main astrophysical products of the mission. A concise overview of these results and of astrophysical studies based on Planck data is presented.

  4. Imaging the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Carlstrom, J E; Grego, L E; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Mohr, J J; Patel, S; Reese, E D

    1999-01-01

    We report on results of interferometric imaging of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) with the OVRO and BIMA mm-arrays. Using low-noise cm-wave receivers on the arrays, we have obtained high quality images for 27 distant galaxy clusters. We review the use of the SZE as a cosmological tool. Gas mass fractions derived from the SZE data are given for 18 of the clusters, as well as the implied constraint on the matter density of the universe, $\\Omega_M$. We find $\\Omega_M h_{100} \\le 0.22 ^{+0.05}_{-0.03}$. A best guess for the matter density obtained by assuming a reasonable value for the Hubble constant and also by attempting to account for the baryons contained in the galaxies as well as those lost during the cluster formation process gives $\\Omega_M \\sim 0.25$. We also give preliminary results for the Hubble constant. Lastly, the power for investigating the high redshift universe with a non-targeted high sensitivity SZE survey is discussed and an interferometric survey is proposed.

  5. New Tests of the Cluster Entropy Floor Hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Balogh, M L; Holder, G P; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; Babul, Arif; Balogh, Michael L.; Holder, Gilbert P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent efforts to account for the observed X-ray luminosity - temperature relation of galaxy clusters has led to suggestions that the ICM has an apparent ``entropy floor'' at or above the level of 300 keV cm^2. Here, we propose new tests based on the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and on the cluster gas mass - temperature trend (from X-ray data) to probe the level of excess entropy in the ICM. We show that these new tests lend further support to the case for a high entropy floor in massive clusters.

  6. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT IN THE TRIPLE-MERGER CLUSTER MACS J0717.5+3745 WITH MUSTANG AND BOLOCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroczkowski, Tony; Korngut, Phillip; Bock, James; Zemcov, Michael [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dicker, Simon; Reese, Erik D.; Young, Alexander; Devlin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole; Golwala, Sunil [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mason, Brian; Romero, Charles [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Sarazin, Craig [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Koch, Patrick M.; Lin, Kai-Yang; Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Molnar, Sandor M. [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pierpaoli, Elena, E-mail: tonym@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    We present 90, 140, and 268 GHz subarcminute resolution imaging of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) in the disturbed, intermediate-redshift (z 0.5458) galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5+3745, a triple-merger system comprising four distinct, optically detected subclusters. Our 90 GHz SZE data result in a sensitive, 34 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} map of the SZE at 13'' effective resolution using the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Our 140 and 268 GHz SZE imaging, with resolutions of 58'' and 31'' and sensitivities of 1.8 and 3.3 mJy beam{sup -1}, respectively, was obtained through observations from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory using Bolocam. We compare these maps to a two-dimensional pressure map derived from Chandra X-ray observations. Our MUSTANG SZE data confirm previous indications from Chandra of a pressure enhancement due to shock-heated, {approx}> 20 keV gas immediately adjacent to extended radio emission seen in low-frequency radio maps of this cluster. MUSTANG also detects pressure substructure that is not well constrained by the Chandra X-ray data in the remnant core of a merging subcluster. We find that the small-scale pressure enhancements in the MUSTANG data amount to {approx}2% of the total pressure measured in the 140 GHz Bolocam observations. The X-ray inferred pseudo-pressure template also fails on larger scales to accurately describe the Bolocam data, particularly at the location of the subcluster with a remnant core known to have a high line-of-sight optical velocity of {approx}3200 km s{sup -1}. Our Bolocam data are adequately described when we add an additional component-not described by a thermal SZE spectrum-to the X-ray template coincident with this subcluster. Using flux densities extracted from our model fits, and marginalizing over the X-ray spectroscopic temperature constraints for the region, we fit a thermal + kinetic SZE spectrum to our Bolocam data and find that the subcluster

  7. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Observations of the Bullet Cluster (1E 0657-56) with APEX-SZ

    CERN Document Server

    Halverson, N W; Ade, P A R; Basu, K; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bertoldi, F; Cho, H -M; Chon, G; Clarke, J; Dobbs, M; Ferrusca, D; Guesten, R; Holzapfel, W L; Kovács, A; Kennedy, J; Kermish, Z; Kneissl, R; Lee, A T; Lueker, M; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Muders, D; Nord, M; Pacaud, F; Plagge, T; Reichardt, C; Richards, P L; Schaaf, R; Schilke, P; Schuller, F; Schwan, D; Spieler, H; Tucker, C; Weiss, A; Zahn, O

    2008-01-01

    We present observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) in the Bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) using the APEX-SZ instrument at 150 GHz with a resolution of 1 arcmin. The main results are maps of the SZE in this massive, merging galaxy cluster. The cluster is detected with 23 sigma significance within the central 1 arcmin radius of the source position. The SZE map has a broadly similar morphology to that in existing X-ray maps of this system, and we find no evidence for significant contamination of the SZE emission by radio or IR sources. In order to make simple quantitative comparisons with cluster gas models derived from X-ray observations, we fit our data to an isothermal elliptical beta model, despite the inadequacy of such a model for this complex merging system. With an X-ray derived prior on the power-law index, beta = 1.04 +0.16/-0.10, we find a core radius r_c =144 +/- 19 arcsec, an axial ratio of 0.881 +/- 0.086, and a central temperature decrement of -880 +/- 80 micro-K_CMB, including a +/- 6% fl...

  8. Comptonisation of Cosmic Microwave Background Photons in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Culverhouse, T L; Colafrancesco, S; Culverhouse, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco (2004) and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1'', the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as ALMA. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable soon. Nonetheless, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect is a promising way of constraining ...

  9. On the universality of MOG weak field approximation at galaxy cluster scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Ivan; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2017-07-01

    In its weak field limit, Scalar-tensor-vector gravity theory introduces a Yukawa-correction to the gravitational potential. Such a correction depends on the two parameters, α which accounts for the modification of the gravitational constant, and μ * - 1 which represents the scale length on which the scalar field propagates. These parameters were found to be universal when the modified gravitational potential was used to fit the galaxy rotation curves and the mass profiles of galaxy clusters, both without Dark Matter. We test the universality of these parameters using the temperature anisotropies due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. In our model the intra-cluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the modified gravitational potential well and it is described by a polytropic equation of state. We predict the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich temperature anisotropies produced by Coma cluster, and we compare them with those obtained using the Planck 2013 Nominal maps. In our analysis, we find α and the scale length, respectively, to be consistent and to depart from their universal values. Our analysis points out that the assumption of the universality of the Yukawa-correction to the gravitational potential is ruled out at more than 3.5σ at galaxy clusters scale, while demonstrating that such a theory of gravity is capable to fit the cluster profile if the scale dependence of the gravitational potential is restored.

  10. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vassallo, T.; Vibert, L.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which is dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013. In February 2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based ondata from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The data products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity, and new results on low-frequency Galactic foregrounds.

  11. Measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in MACS J0647.7+7015 and MACS J1206.2-0847 at High Angular Resolution with MUSTANG

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Alexander H; Romero, Charles; Sayers, Jack; Balestra, Italo; Clarke, Tracy E; Czakon, Nicole; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon R; Ferrari, Chiara; Girardi, Marisa; Golwala, Sunil; Intema, Huib; Korngut, Phillip M; Mason, Brian S; Mercurio, Amata; Nonino, Mario; Reese, Erik D; Rosati, Piero; Sarazin, Craig; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    We present high resolution (9$^{\\prime \\prime}$) imaging of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) toward two massive galaxy clusters, MACS J0647.7+7015 ($z=0.591$) and MACS J1206.2-0847 ($z=0.439$). We compare these 90 GHz measurements, taken with the MUSTANG receiver on the Green Bank Telescope, with generalized Navarro-Frenk-White (gNFW) models derived from Bolocam 140 GHz SZE data as well as maps of the thermal gas derived from {\\it Chandra} X-ray observations. For MACS J0647.7+7015, we find a gNFW profile with core slope parameter $\\gamma= 0.9$ fits the MUSTANG image with $\\chi^{2}_{red}=1.005$ and probability to exceed (PTE) = 0.34. For MACS J1206.2-0847, we find $\\gamma=0.7$, $\\chi^{2}_{red}=0.993$, and PTE = 0.70. In addition, we find a significant ($>$3-$\\sigma$) residual SZE feature in MACS J1206.2-0847 coincident with a group of galaxies identified in VLT data and filamentary structure found in a weak-lensing mass reconstruction. We suggest the detected sub-structure may be the SZE decrement from a lo...

  12. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dynamical Masses and Scaling Relations for a Sample of Massive Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Selected Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sifon, Cristobal; Hasselfield, Matthew; Marriage, Tobias A; Hughes, John P; Barrientos, L Felipe; Gonzalez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Addison, Graeme E; Baker, Andrew J; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan B; Hajian, Amir; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Kosowsky, Arthur B; Marsden, Danica; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Reese, Erik D; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert J; Trac, Hy; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass estimates and scaling relations for a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) selected galaxy clusters. The sample consists of 16 massive clusters detected with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) over a 455 sq deg. area of the southern sky. Deep multi-object spectroscopic observations were taken to secure intermediate-resolution (R~700-800) spectra and redshifts for ~60 member galaxies on average per cluster. The dynamical masses M_200c of the clusters have been calculated using simulation-based scaling relations between velocity dispersion and mass. The sample has a median redshift z=0.50 and a median mass M_200c=11x10^14 Msun/h_70 with a lower limit M_200c ~ 5x10^14 Msun/h_70, consistent with the expectations for the ACT southern sky survey. These masses are compared to the ACT SZE properties of the sample, specifically, the central SZE amplitude y0, the Compton signal within a 0.5' pixel y_0.5', and the integrated Compton signal Y_200c, which we use to derive SZE-Ma...

  13. Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Diego-Rodriguez, J M

    2002-01-01

    Future Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) surveys will detect thousands of clusters, many of them at high redshift. We show how the SZE number counts as a function of flux can be used as a useful way of constraining the cosmological model. The constraints can be dramatically improved if redshift information is provided for a small subsample of the observed clusters. In this work we present the constraints in Omega_m and Sigma_8 expected for a combined mm-optical survey. The mm survey (Planck) providing the cluster number counts as a function of flux and the optical survey (GTC) the redshift estimation of a small subsample of the cluster catalogue. We also show how it is possible to get an accurate estimate of the cluster flux using a non-parametric component separation algorithm and how using morphological redshifts it is possible to make a high-z preselection of the small subsample to be observed in the optical.

  14. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.;  uhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-02-25

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter

  15. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J. J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.

    2015-04-11

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from similar to 6 deg(2) of the XMM-Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (>= 10(42) erg s(-1)) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y-500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8 sigma with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8 sigma significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y-500 signal that is (17 +/- 9) per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter constraints on these SZE mass

  16. Galaxy Cluster Scaling Relations between Bolocam Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and Chandra X-ray Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Czakon, N G; Mantz, A; Golwala, S R; Downes, T P; Koch, P M; Lin, K -Y; Molnar, S M; Moustakas, L A; Mroczkowski, T; Pierpaoli, E; Shitanishi, J A; Siegel, S; Umetsu, K

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling relations between the integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, $Y_{\\rm SZ}$, its X-ray analogue, $Y_{\\rm X}$$\\equiv$$M_{\\rm gas}$$T_{\\rm X}$, and total mass, $M_{\\rm tot}$, for the 45 galaxy clusters in the Bolocam X-ray-SZ (BOXSZ) sample. All parameters are integrated within $r_{2500}$. $Y_{2500}$ values are measured using SZE data collected with Bolocam, operating at 140 GHz at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The temperature, $T_{\\rm X}$, and mass, $M_{\\rm gas,2500}$, of the intracluster medium are determined using X-ray data collected with \\emph{Chandra}, and $M_{\\rm tot}$ is derived from $M_{\\rm gas}$ using a constant gas mass fraction. Our analysis accounts for several potential sources of bias, including: selection effects, contamination from radio point sources, and the loss of SZE signal due to noise filtering and beam-smoothing effects. We measure the $Y_{2500}$-$Y_{\\rm X}$ scaling to have a logarithmic slope of $0.84\\pm0.07$, and a fractional intrinsic scatt...

  17. Prospects for ACT: simulations, power spectrum, and non-Gaussian analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Huffenberger, Kevin M; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Seljak, Uros

    2004-01-01

    A new generation of instruments will reveal the microwave sky at high resolution. We focus on one of these, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, which probes scales 1000Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effects, and extragalactic point sources, we simulate the telescope's observations of the CMB in three channels, then extract the power spectra of these components in a multifrequency analysis. We present results for various cases, differing in assumed knowledge of the contaminating point sources. We find that both radio and infrared point sources are important, but can be effectively eliminated from the power spectrum given three (or more) channels and a good understanding of their frequency dependence. However, improper treatment of the scatter in the point source frequency dependence relation may introduce a large systematic bias. Even if all thermal SZ and point source effects are eliminated, the kinetic SZ...

  18. Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich effect observations of the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) with APEX-SZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, N.W.; Lanting, T.; Ade, P.A.R.; Basu, K.; Bender, A.N.; Benson, B.A.; Bertoldi, F.; Cho, H.-M.; Chon, G.; Clarke, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ferrusca, D.; Gusten, R.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Kovacs, A.; Kennedy, J.; Kermish, Z.; Kneissl, R.; Lee, A.T.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Menten, K.M.; Muders, D.; Nord, M.; Pacaud, F.; Plagge, T.; Reichardt, C.; Richards, P.L.; Schaaf, R.; Schilke, P.; Schuller, F.; Schwan, D.; Spieler, H.; Tucker, C.; Weiss, A.; Zahn, O.

    2008-07-25

    We present observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) in the Bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) using the APEX-SZ instrument at 150 GHz with a resolution of 1'. The main results are maps of the SZE in this massive, merging galaxy cluster. The cluster is detected with 23 sigma significance within the central 1' radius of the source position. The SZE map has a broadly similar morphology to that in existing X-ray maps of this system, and we find no evidence for significant contamination of the SZE emission by radio or IR sources. In order to make simple quantitative comparisons with cluster gas models derived from X-ray observations, we fit our data to an isothermal elliptical beta model, despite the inadequacy of such a model for this complex merging system. With an X-ray derived prior on the power-law index, beta = 1.04+0.16-0.10, we find a core radius rc = 142" +- 18", an axial ratio of 0.889 +- 0.072, and a central temperature decrement of -771 +- 71 muKCMB, including a +-5.5percent flux calibration uncertainty. Combining the APEX-SZ map with a map of projected electron surface density from Chandra X-ray observations, we determine the mass-weighted temperature of the cluster gas to be Tmg = 10.8 +- 0.9 keV, significantly lower than some previously reported X-ray spectroscopic temperatures. Under the assumption of an isothermal cluster gas distribution in hydrostatic equilibrium, we compute the gas mass fraction for prolate and oblate spheroidal geometries and find it to be consistent with previous results from X-ray and weak-lensing observations. This work is the first result from the APEX-SZ experiment and represents the first reported scientific result from observations with a large array of multiplexed superconducting transition-edge sensor bolometers.

  19. Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich effect observations of the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) with APEX-SZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, N.W.; Lanting, T.; Ade, P.A.R.; Basu, K.; Bender, A.N.; Benson, B.A.; Bertoldi, F.; Cho, H.-M.; Chon, G.; Clarke, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ferrusca, D.; Gusten, R.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Kovacs, A.; Kennedy, J.; Kermish, Z.; Kneissl, R.; Lee, A.T.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Menten, K.M.; Muders, D.; Nord, M.; Pacaud, F.; Plagge, T.; Reichardt, C.; Richards, P.L.; Schaaf, R.; Schilke, P.; Schuller, F.; Schwan, D.; Spieler, H.; Tucker, C.; Weiss, A.; Zahn, O.

    2008-07-25

    We present observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) in the Bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) using the APEX-SZ instrument at 150 GHz with a resolution of 1'. The main results are maps of the SZE in this massive, merging galaxy cluster. The cluster is detected with 23 sigma significance within the central 1' radius of the source position. The SZE map has a broadly similar morphology to that in existing X-ray maps of this system, and we find no evidence for significant contamination of the SZE emission by radio or IR sources. In order to make simple quantitative comparisons with cluster gas models derived from X-ray observations, we fit our data to an isothermal elliptical beta model, despite the inadequacy of such a model for this complex merging system. With an X-ray derived prior on the power-law index, beta = 1.04+0.16-0.10, we find a core radius rc = 142" +- 18", an axial ratio of 0.889 +- 0.072, and a central temperature decrement of -771 +- 71 muKCMB, including a +-5.5percent flux calibration uncertainty. Combining the APEX-SZ map with a map of projected electron surface density from Chandra X-ray observations, we determine the mass-weighted temperature of the cluster gas to be Tmg = 10.8 +- 0.9 keV, significantly lower than some previously reported X-ray spectroscopic temperatures. Under the assumption of an isothermal cluster gas distribution in hydrostatic equilibrium, we compute the gas mass fraction for prolate and oblate spheroidal geometries and find it to be consistent with previous results from X-ray and weak-lensing observations. This work is the first result from the APEX-SZ experiment and represents the first reported scientific result from observations with a large array of multiplexed superconducting transition-edge sensor bolometers.

  20. Planck intermediate results. XLIII. The spectral energy distribution of dust in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    Although infrared (IR) overall dust emission from clusters of galaxies has been statistically detected using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), it has not been possible to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission over its peak, and thus to break the degeneracy between dust temperature and mass. By complementing the IRAS spectral coverage with Planck satellite data from 100 to 857 GHz, we provide new constraints on the IR spectrum of thermal dust emission in clusters of galaxies. We achieve this by using a stacking approach for a sample of several hundred objects from the Planck cluster sample; this procedure averages out fluctuations from the IR sky, allowing us to reach a significant detection of the faint cluster contribution. We also use the large frequency range probed by Planck, together with component-separation techniques, to remove the contamination from both cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) signal, which d...

  1. The 10 Meter South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Carlstrom, J E; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Busetti, S; Chang, C L; Chauvin, E; Cho, H -M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Schwan, D; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vieira, K Vanderlinde J D

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, multi-color, millimeter-wave, bolometer camera. It is located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Antarctica. The design of the SPT emphasizes careful control of spillover and scattering, to minimize noise and false signals due to ground pickup. The key initial project is a large-area survey at wavelengths of 3, 2 and 1.3 mm, to detect clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect and to measure the high-l angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The data will be used to characterize the primordial matter power spectrum and to place constraints on the equation of state of dark energy.

  2. SAGACE: the Spectroscopic Active Galaxies And Clusters Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    De Bernardis, P; Bardi, A; Battistelli, E; Birkinshaw, M; Calvo, M; Colafrancesco, S; Conte, A; De Gregori, S; De Petris, M; De Zotti, G; Donati, A; Ferrari, L; Franceschini, A; Gatti, F; Gervasi, M; Giommi, P; Giordano, C; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Lamagna, L; Lapi, A; Luzzi, G; Maiolino, R; Marchegiani, P; Mariani, A; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Mauskopf, P; Nati, F; Nati, L; Natoli, P; Negrello, M; Piacentini, F; Polenta, G; Salatino, M; Savini, G; Schillaci, A; Spinelli, S; Tartari, A; Tavanti, M; Tortora, A; Vaccari, M; Vaccarone, R; Zannoni, M; Zolesi, V

    2010-01-01

    The SAGACE experiment consists of a mm/sub-mm telescope with a 3-m diameter primary mirror, coupled to a cryogenic multi-beam differential spectrometer. SAGACE explores the sky in the 100-760 GHz frequency range, using four diffraction-limited bolometer arrays. The instrument is designed to perform spectroscopic surveys of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effects of thousands of galaxy clusters, of the spectral energy distribution of active galactic nuclei, and of the [CII] line of a thousand galaxies in the redshift desert. In 2008 a full phase-A study for a national small mission was completed and delivered to the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We have shown that taking advantage of the differential operation of the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, this ambitious instrument can operate from a Molniya orbit, and can be built and operated within the tight budget of a small mission.

  3. Revisiting the Distance Duality Relation using LOESS and SIMEX

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Akshay; Mahajan, Shobhit; Mukherjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Interdependence of luminosity distance and angular diameter distance, shown by the distance duality relation (DDR) is very significant in observational Cosmology. Any deviation from this relation highlights the emergence of new physics. Our aim in this work is to check the consistency of this relation using a very efficient non-parametric method, LOESS with SIMEX. This technique avoids dependency on the cosmological model and works with a minimal set of assumptions. We use the Union 2.1 SNe Ia data for luminosity distance while the angular diameter distances are obtained from X-ray surface brightness and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (S-Z) effect measurement of galaxy clusters by assuming elliptical and spherical profiles. We find no evidence of deviation from {\\eta} = 1 and both geometries of galaxy clusters are fairly compatible within 1{\\sigma}.

  4. Planck 2016 intermediate results. XLVII. Planck constraints on reionization history

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Carron, J; Chiang, H C; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fantaye, Y; Finelli, F; Forastieri, F; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Gerbino, M; Ghosh, T; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Huang, Z; Ili_, S; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knox, L; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Ma, Y -Z; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Matarrese, S; Mauri, N; McEwen, J D; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Molinari, D; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Moss, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Patanchon, G; Patrizii, L; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Plaszczynski, S; Polastri, L; Polenta, G; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Racine, B; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Sirri, G; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Tenti, M; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; White, M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate constraints on cosmic reionization extracted from the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We combine the Planck CMB anisotropy data in temperature with the low-multipole polarization data to fit {\\Lambda}CDM models with various parameterizations of the reionization history. We obtain a Thomson optical depth {\\tau}=0.058 +/- 0.012 for the commonly adopted instantaneous reionization model. This confirms, with only data from CMB anisotropies, the low value suggested by combining Planck 2015 results with other data sets and also reduces the uncertainties. We reconstruct the history of the ionization fraction using either a symmetric or an asymmetric model for the transition between the neutral and ionized phases. To determine better constraints on the duration of the reionization process, we also make use of measurements of the amplitude of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect using additional information from the high resolution Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope...

  5. New Cosmic Center Universe Model Matches Eight of Big Bang's Major Predictions Without The F-L Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, R V

    2003-01-01

    Accompanying disproof of the F-L expansion paradigm eliminates the basis for expansion redshifts, which in turn eliminates the basis for the Cosmological Principle. The universe is not the same everywhere. Instead the spherical symmetry of the cosmos demanded by the Hubble redshift relation proves the universe is isotropic about a nearby universal Center. This is the foundation of the relatively new Cosmic Center Universe (CCU) model, which accounts for, explains, or predicts: (i) The Hubble redshift relation, (ii) a CBR redshift relation that fits all current CBR measurements, (iii) the recently discovered velocity dipole distribution of radiogalaxies, (iv) the well-known time dilation of SNeIa light curves, (v) the Sunyaev-Zeldovich thermal effect, (vi) Olber's paradox, (vii) SN dimming for z 1 an enhanced brightness that fits SN 1997ff measurements, (ix) the existence of extreme redshift (z > 10) objects which, when observed, will further distinguish it from the big bang. The CCU model also plausibly expl...

  6. Introduction and Overview CMB Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, G F

    1998-01-01

    This is a very exciting time for the CMB field. It is widely recognized that precision measurements of the CMB can provide a definitive test of cosmological models and determine their parameters accurately. At present observations give us the first rough results but ongoing experiments promise new and improved results soon and eventually satellite missions (MAP and COBRAS/SAMBA now named Planck) are expected to provide the requisite precision measurements. Other areas such as observations of the spectrum and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect are also making significant progress. There has long been anticipation that cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation would provide significant information about the early Universe due to its early central role and its general lack of interaction in the later epochs. Though there have been many observations of the CMB since its discovery by Penzias and Wilson in 1964, the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite, COBE, provided two watershed observations: (1) the CMB is extremely we...

  7. Spectral imaging of galaxy clusters with Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, H; Rasia, E

    2016-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is a promising tool for detecting the presence of hot gas out to the galaxy cluster peripheries. We developed a spectral imaging algorithm dedicated to the SZ observations of nearby galaxy clusters with Planck, with the aim of revealing gas density anisotropies related to the filamentary accretion of materials, or pressure discontinuities induced by the propagation of shock fronts. To optimize an unavoidable trade-off between angular resolution and precision of the SZ flux measurements, the algorithm performs a multiscale analysis of the SZ maps as well as of other extended components, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the Galactic thermal dust. The demixing of the SZ signal is tackled through kernel weighted likelihood maximizations. The CMB anisotropies are further analyzed through a wavelet analysis, while the Galactic foregrounds and SZ maps are analyzed via a curvelet analysis that best preserves their anisotropic details. The algorithm perfo...

  8. Influence of ~7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter on the process of reionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudakovskyi, Anton; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

    2016-01-01

    significantly sharper reionization compared to widely used cold dark matter models, impossible to `imitate' within the cold dark matter scenario under any reasonable choice of our model parameters, and would have a clear tendency of lowering both the redshift of reionization and the electron scattering optical...... neutrino dark matter able to produce the observed line at ~3.5 keV, to the process of reionization. By incorporating dark matter power spectra for ~7 keV sterile neutrinos into extended semi-analytical `bubble' model of reionization we obtain that such sterile neutrino dark matter would produce...... depth (although the difference is still below the existing model uncertainties). Further dedicated studies of reionization (such as 21 cm measurements or studies of kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) will thus be essential for reconstruction of particle candidate responsible the ~3.5 keV line....

  9. Probing SZ Source Detection with Gasdynamical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Wadsley, J W; Gladders, M D; Ruetalo, Marcelo I.; Wadsley, James W.; Gladders, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The huge worldwide investment in CMB experiments should make the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect a key probe of the cosmic web in the near future. For the promise to be realized, substantial development of simulation and analysis tools to relate observation to theory is needed. The high nonlinearity and dissipative/feedback gas physics lead to highly non-Gaussian patterns that are much more difficult to analyze than Gaussian primary anisotropies for which the procedures are reasonably well developed. Historical forecasts for what CMB experiments might see used semi-analytic tools, including large scale map constructions, with localized and simplified pressure structures distributed on a point process of (clustered) sources. Hydro studies beyond individual cluster/supercluster systems were inadequate, but now large-volume simulations with high resolution are beginning to shift the balance. We illustrate this by applying ``Gasoline'' (parallelized Tree+SPH) computations to construct SZ maps and derive statistical...

  10. The Spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy from the Combined COBE FIRAS and WMAP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.

    2003-09-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data from the COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) is reanalyzed in light of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. The frequency spectrum of the FIRAS signal that has the spatial distribution seen by WMAP is shown to be consistent with CMB temperature fluctuations well into the Wien region of the spectrum. The consistency of these data, from very different instruments with very different observing strategies, provides compelling support for the interpretation that the signal seen by WMAP is temperature anisotropy of cosmological origin. The data also limit rms fluctuations in the Compton y parameter, observable via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, to Δy<3×10-6 (95% confidence level) on ~5° angular scales. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) was responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE).

  11. Radio observations of Planck clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a number of new galaxy clusters have been detected by the ESA-Planck satellite, the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Several of the newly detected clusters are massive, merging systems with disturbed morphology in the X-ray surface brightness. Diffuse radio sources in clusters, called giant radio halos and relics, are direct probes of cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the intra-cluster medium. These radio sources are found to occur mainly in massive merging clusters. Thus, the new SZ-discovered clusters are good candidates to search for new radio halos and relics. We have initiated radio observations of the clusters detected by Planck with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. These observations have already led to the detection of a radio halo in PLCKG171.9-40.7, the first giant halo discovered in one of the new Planck clusters.

  12. Constraining neutrino mass and extra relativistic degrees of freedom in dynamical dark energy models using Planck 2015 data in combination with low-redshift cosmological probes: basic extensions to $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the properties of dark energy affect the cosmological measurements of neutrino mass and extra relativistic degrees of freedom. We limit ourselves to the most basic extensions of $\\Lambda$CDM model, i.e., the $w$CDM model with one additional parameter $w$, and the $w_{0}w_{a}$CDM model with two additional parameters, $w_{0}$ and $w_{a}$. In the cosmological fits, we employ the 2015 CMB temperature and polarization data from the Planck mission, in combination with low-redshift measurements such as the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), type Ia supernovae (SN) and the Hubble constant ($H_{0}$). Given effects of massive neutrinos on large-scale structure, we further include weak lensing (WL), redshift space distortion (RSD), Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts (SZ), and Planck lensing data. We find that $w$ is anti-correlated with $\\sum m_{\

  13. Planck 2013 results. XXI. Power spectrum and high-order statistics of the Planck all-sky Compton parameter map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. This map shows an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched...... with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales (l thermal dust emission. At small angular scales (l > 500) the clustered cosmic......-Gaussianity of the Compton parameter map is further characterized by computing its 1D probability distribution function and its bispectrum. The measured tSZ power spectrum and high order statistics are used to place constraints on sigma(8)....

  14. MUSTANG High Angular Resolution Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Imaging of Sub-Structure in Four Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Korngut, P M; Reese, E D; Mason, B S; Devlin, M J; Mroczkowski, T; Sarazin, C L; Sun, M; Sievers, J

    2010-01-01

    We present 10" to 18" images of four massive clusters of galaxies through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE). These measurements, made at 90~GHz with the MUSTANG receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), reveal pressure sub-structure to the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in three of the four systems. We identify the likely presence of a previously unknown weak shock-front in MACS0744+3927. By fitting the Rankine-Hugoniot density jump conditions in a complementary SZE/X-ray analysis, we infer a Mach number of M = 1.2^{+0.2}_{-0.2} and a shock-velocity of 1827^{+267}_{-195}~km/s. In RXJ1347-1145, we present a new reduction of previously reported data and confirm the presence of a south-east SZE enhancement with a significance of 13.9 sigma when smoothed to 18" resolution. This too is likely caused by shock-heated gas produced in a recent merger. In our highest redshift system, CL1226+3332, we detect sub-structure at a peak significance of 4.6 sigma in the form of a ridge oriented orthogonally to the vector conne...

  15. Using X-rays to determine which compact groups are illusory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Lubin, Lori M.; Hernquist, Lars

    1995-01-01

    If the large-scale galaxy distribution is filamentary, as suggested by some observations and recent hydrodynamical simulations, then lengthwise views of filaments will apparently produce compact groups (CGs) that are in reality stretched out along the line of sight. This possibility has been advocated recently by Hernquist, Katz, & Weinberg (1995). Here we propose a test for this hypothesis using X-ray emission from CGs. The observable quantity Q identical with L(sub x)a(sup 3)(sup p)/(L(sup 2)(sup g))T(sup 1/2)(sub x) should be proportional to the axis ratio of the group, a/c, where a and c are the short and long axes of a prolate distribution, a(sub p) is the radius of the group projected onto the sky, L(sub x) is the bolometric X-ray luminosity, L(sub g) is the group blue luminosity, and T(sub x) is the gas temperature. We find that the distribution of Q is consistent with the notion that many CGs with unusually small values of a/c are frauds, i.e., that the values of Q are anomalously small. Absent other information, it is equally possible that CGs are very gas-poor relative to rich clusters; however, this can be tested using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. If the groups have a close to normal ratio of gas to total mass, but are simply stretched out along the line of sight, a Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal should be detectable.

  16. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: DYNAMICAL MASSES AND SCALING RELATIONS FOR A SAMPLE OF MASSIVE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTERS {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sifon, Cristobal; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Gonzalez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Duenner, Rolando [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Menanteau, Felipe; Hughes, John P.; Baker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Marriage, Tobias A.; Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Addison, Graeme E.; Dunkley, Joanna [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Devlin, Mark J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-07-20

    We present the first dynamical mass estimates and scaling relations for a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) selected galaxy clusters. The sample consists of 16 massive clusters detected with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) over a 455 deg{sup 2} area of the southern sky. Deep multi-object spectroscopic observations were taken to secure intermediate-resolution (R {approx} 700-800) spectra and redshifts for Almost-Equal-To 60 member galaxies on average per cluster. The dynamical masses M{sub 200c} of the clusters have been calculated using simulation-based scaling relations between velocity dispersion and mass. The sample has a median redshift z = 0.50 and a median mass M{sub 200c}{approx_equal}12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub sun} with a lower limit M{sub 200c}{approx_equal}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub sun}, consistent with the expectations for the ACT southern sky survey. These masses are compared to the ACT SZE properties of the sample, specifically, the match-filtered central SZE amplitude y{sub 0}-tilde, the central Compton parameter y{sub 0}, and the integrated Compton signal Y{sub 200c}, which we use to derive SZE-mass scaling relations. All SZE estimators correlate with dynamical mass with low intrinsic scatter ({approx}< 20%), in agreement with numerical simulations. We explore the effects of various systematic effects on these scaling relations, including the correlation between observables and the influence of dynamically disturbed clusters. Using the three-dimensional information available, we divide the sample into relaxed and disturbed clusters and find that {approx}50% of the clusters are disturbed. There are hints that disturbed systems might bias the scaling relations, but given the current sample sizes, these differences are not significant; further studies including more clusters are required to assess the impact of these clusters on the scaling relations.

  17. AMiBA: Cluster Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Effect Observations with the Expanded 13-element Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai-Yang; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Locutus Huang, Chih-Wei; Liao, Yu-Wei; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei; Koch, Patrick M.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Chen, Ming-Tang; Chan, Shun-Hsiang; Chang, Shu-Hao; Lucky Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Cheng, Tai-An; Duy, Hoang Ngoc; Fu, Szu-Yuan; Han, Chih-Chiang; Ho, Solomon; Ho, Ming-Feng; Ho, Paul T. P.; Huang, Yau-De; Jiang, Homin; Kubo, Derek Y.; Li, Chao-Te; Lin, Yu-Chiung; Liu, Guo-Chin; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Molnar, Sandor M.; Nunez, Emmanuel; Oshiro, Peter; Pai, Shang-Ping; Raffin, Philippe; Ridenour, Anthony; Shih, Chia-You; Stoebner, Sara; Teo, Giap-Siong; Yeh, Jia-Long Johnny; Williams, Joshua; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is a co-planar interferometer array operating at a wavelength of 3 mm to measure the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect (SZE) of galaxy clusters at arcminute scales. The first phase of operation—with a compact 7-element array with 0.6 m antennas (AMiBA-7)—observed six clusters at angular scales from 5\\prime to 23\\prime . Here, we describe the expansion of AMiBA to a 13-element array with 1.2 m antennas (AMiBA-13), its subsequent commissioning, and cluster SZE observing program. The most noticeable changes compared to AMiBA-7 are (1) array re-configuration with baselines ranging from 1.4 m to 4.8 m, allowing us to sample structures between 2\\prime and 10\\prime , (2) 13 new lightweight carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) 1.2 m reflectors, and (3) additional correlators and six new receivers. Since the reflectors are co-mounted on and distributed over the entire six-meter CFRP platform, a refined hexapod pointing error model and phase error correction scheme have been developed for AMiBA-13. These effects—entirely negligible for the earlier central close-packed AMiBA-7 configuration—can lead to additional geometrical delays during observations. Our correction scheme recovers at least 80 ± 5% of the point-source fluxes. We, therefore, apply an upward correcting factor of 1.25 to our visibilities to correct for phase decoherence, and a ±5% systematic uncertainty is added in quadrature with our statistical errors. We demonstrate the absence of further systematics with a noise level consistent with zero in stacked uv-visibilities. From the AMiBA-13 SZE observing program, we present here maps of a subset of 12 clusters with signal-to-noise ratios above five. We demonstrate combining AMiBA-7 with AMiBA-13 observations on Abell 1689, by jointly fitting their data to a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White model. Our cylindrically integrated Compton-y values for five radii are consistent with results from

  18. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: cosmological parameters from three seasons of data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Jonathan L.; Appel, John William [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hlozek, Renée A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Nolta, Michael R.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Acquaviva, Viviana [New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Brown, Ben [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Calabrese, Erminia [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Chervenak, Jay [Code 553/665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Crichton, Devin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Das, Sudeep [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Lemont IL 60439 (United States); Devlin, Mark J., E-mail: renee.hlozek@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); and others

    2013-10-01

    We present constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters from high-resolution microwave background maps at 148 GHz and 218 GHz made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in three seasons of observations from 2008 to 2010. A model of primary cosmological and secondary foreground parameters is fit to the map power spectra and lensing deflection power spectrum, including contributions from both the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect, Poisson and correlated anisotropy from unresolved infrared sources, radio sources, and the correlation between the tSZ effect and infrared sources. The power ℓ{sup 2}C{sub ℓ}/2π of the thermal SZ power spectrum at 148 GHz is measured to be 3.4±1.4  μK{sup 2} at ℓ = 3000, while the corresponding amplitude of the kinematic SZ power spectrum has a 95% confidence level upper limit of 8.6  μK{sup 2}. Combining ACT power spectra with the WMAP 7-year temperature and polarization power spectra, we find excellent consistency with the LCDM model. We constrain the number of effective relativistic degrees of freedom in the early universe to be N{sub eff} = 2.79±0.56, in agreement with the canonical value of N{sub eff} = 3.046 for three massless neutrinos. We constrain the sum of the neutrino masses to be Σm{sub ν} < 0.39 eV at 95% confidence when combining ACT and WMAP 7-year data with BAO and Hubble constant measurements. We constrain the amount of primordial helium to be Y{sub p} = 0.225±0.034, and measure no variation in the fine structure constant α since recombination, with α/α{sub 0} = 1.004±0.005. We also find no evidence for any running of the scalar spectral index, dn{sub s}/dln k = −0.004±0.012.

  19. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J.-Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from

  20. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmological parameters from three seasons of data

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, Jonathan L; Nolta, Michael R; Acquaviva, Viviana; Addison, Graeme E; Ade, Peter A R; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John William; Barrientos, L Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Calabrese, Erminia; Chervenak, Jay; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; Doriese, W Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Faber, David; Fisher, Ryan P; Fowler, Joseph W; Gallardo, Patricio; Gordon, Michael S; Gralla, Megan B; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hill, J Colin; Hilton, Gene C; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Holtz, Dave; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, David H; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Irwin, Kent D; Jacobson, David R; Johnstone, Brittany; Juin, Jean Baptiste; Kaul, Madhuri; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lau, Judy M; Limon, Michele; Lin, Yen-Ting; Louis, Thibaut; Lupton, Robert H; Marriage, Tobias A; Marsden, Danica; Martocci, Krista; Mauskopf, Phil; McLaren, Michael; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Moseley, Harvey; Netterfield, Calvin B; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Page, William A; Parker, Lucas; Partridge, Bruce; Plimpton, Reed; Quintana, Hernan; Reese, Erik D; Reid, Beth; Rojas, Felipe; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Stryzak, Omelan; Swetz, Daniel S; Switzer, Eric R; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tucker, Carole; Uehara, Masao; Visnjic, Katerina; Warne, Ryan; Wilson, Grant; Wollack, Ed; Zhao, Yue; Zuncke, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters from high-resolution microwave background maps at 148 GHz and 218 GHz made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in three seasons of observations from 2008 to 2010. A model of primary cosmological and secondary foreground parameters is fit to the map power spectra and lensing deflection power spectrum, including contributions from both the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, Poisson and correlated anisotropy from unresolved infrared sources, radio sources, and the correlation between the thermal SZ effect and infrared sources. The power ell^2 C_ell/2pi of the thermal SZ power spectrum at 148 GHz is measured to be 3.4 +/-1.4 muK^2 at ell=3000, while the corresponding amplitude of the kinematic SZ power spectrum has a 95 percent confidence level upper limit of 8.6 muK^2. Combining ACT power spectra with the WMAP 7-year temperature and polarization power spectra, we find excellent consistency with the LCDM model. We constrain...

  1. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Colafrancesco, S.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1 arcsec, the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable now. None the less, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced SZ effect is a promising way of constraining the dark distribution in dSphs, especially if the particles are light.

  2. Impact of thermal diffusion and other abundance anomalies on cosmological uses of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Medvedev, P; Sazonov, S; Shtykovskiy, P

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the topology of the magnetic field and characteristics of turbulent motions, diffusion can significantly affect the distribution of elements, in particular helium, in the intracluster medium (ICM). As has been noted previously, an incorrect assumption about the helium abundance will lead to an error in the iron abundance determined from X-ray spectroscopy. The corresponding effect on the temperature measurement is negligibly small. An incorrectly assumed helium abundance will also lead to a systematic error in angular distance measurements based on X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) observations of clusters of galaxies. Its magnitude is further amplified by the associated error in the metal abundance determination, the impact being larger at lower ICM temperatures. Overall, a factor of 2-5 error in the helium abundance will lead to an ~ 10-25 % error in the angular distance. We solve the full set of Burgers equations for a multi-component intracluster plasma to determine the maximal effect of diffu...

  3. A highly elongated prominent lens at z=0.87: first strong lensing analysis of El Gordo

    CERN Document Server

    Zitrin, Adi; Hughes, John P; Coe, Dan; Barrientos, L Felipe; Infante, Leopoldo; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    We present the first strong-lensing (SL) analysis of the galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 (El Gordo), in recent HST/ACS images, revealing a prominent strong lens at a redshift of $z=0.87$. This finding adds to the already-established unique properties of El Gordo: it is the most massive, hot, X-ray luminous, and bright Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect cluster at $z\\gtrsim0.6$, and the only `bullet'-like merging cluster known at these redshifts. The lens consists of two merging massive clumps, where for a source redshift of $z_{s}\\sim2$ each clump exhibits only a small, separate critical area, with a total area of $0.69\\pm0.11\\sq\\arcmin$ over the two clumps. For a higher source redshift, $z_{s}\\sim4$, the critical curves of the two clumps merge together into one bigger and very elongated lens (axis ratio $\\simeq5.5$), enclosing an effective area of $1.44\\pm0.22\\sq\\arcmin$. The critical curves continue expanding with increasing redshift so that for high-redshift sources ($z_{s}\\gtrsim9$) they enclose an area of $\\sim1....

  4. Constraining ALP-photon coupling using galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlederer, Martin; Sigl, Günter [II. Institut für theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    We study photon-ALP conversion by resonance effects in the magnetized plasma of galaxy clusters and compare the predicted distortion of the cosmic microwave background spectrum in the direction of such objects to measurements of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Using galaxy cluster models based on current knowledge, we obtain upper limits on the photon-ALP coupling constant g of ≲O(10{sup −11} GeV{sup −1}). The constraints apply to the mass range of 2⋅10{sup −14} eV ≲m{sub ALP}≲3⋅10{sup −12} eV in which resonant photon-ALP conversions can occur. These limits are slightly stronger than current limits, and furthermore provide an independent constraint. We find that a next generation PRISM-like experiment would allow limits down to g≈O(10{sup −14} GeV{sup −1}), two orders of magnitude stronger than the currently strongest limits in this mass range.

  5. Tests of the CMB temperature-redshift relation, CMB spectral distortions and why adiabatic photon production is hard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, J.

    2014-09-01

    In the expanding Universe, the average temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is expected to depend like TCMB ∝ (1 + z) on redshift z. Adiabatic photon production (or destruction) or deviations from isotropy and homogeneity could modify this scaling and several observational tests have been carried out in response. Here, we explain why `adiabatic' conditions are extremely difficult to establish in the redshift range targeted by these tests. Thus, instead of leading to a simple rescaling of the CMB temperature, a spectral distortion should be produced, which can be constrained using COBE/FIRAS. For scenarios with late photon production, tests of the temperature-redshift relation (TRR) should therefore be reinterpreted as weak spectral distortion limits, directly probing the energy dependence of the photon production process. For inhomogeneous cosmologies, an average y-type distortion is produced, but this type of distortion can be created in several other ways. Here, we briefly discuss possible effects that may help disentangling different contributions to the distortion signal, finding this to be very challenging. We furthermore argue that tests of the TRR using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect have limited applicability and that for non-gravitational changes to the TRR, the CMB anisotropy spectrum should exhibit an additional y-type dependence.

  6. WSPEC: A Waveguide Filter-Bank Focal Plane Array Spectrometer for Millimeter Wave Astronomy and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Sean; Aguirre, James; Che, George; Doyle, Simon; Flanigan, Daniel; Groppi, Christopher; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Glenn; Mauskopf, Philip; McCarrick, Heather; Monfardini, Alessandro; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths are key frontiers in astronomy and cosmology. Large area spectral surveys with moderate spectral resolution (R=50-200) will be used to characterize large-scale structure and star formation through intensity mapping surveys in emission lines such as the CO rotational transitions. Such surveys will also be used to study the the Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and will detect the emission lines and continuum spectrum of individual objects. WSPEC is an instrument proposed to target these science goals. It is a channelizing spectrometer realized in rectangular waveguide, fabricated using conventional high-precision metal machining. Each spectrometer is coupled to free space with a machined feed horn, and the devices are tiled into a 2D array to fill the focal plane of the telescope. The detectors will be aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). To target the CO lines and SZ effect, we will have bands at 135-175 and 190-250 GHz, each Nyquist-sampled at R≈ 200 resolution. Here, we discuss the instrument concept and design, and successful initial testing of a WR10 (i.e., 90 GHz) prototype spectrometer. We recently tested a WR5 (180 GHz) prototype to verify that the concept works at higher frequencies, and also designed a resonant backshort structure that may further increase the optical efficiency. We are making progress towards integrating a spectrometer with a LEKID array and deploying a prototype device to a telescope for first light.

  7. Estimating the Sunyaev - Zel'dovich signal from quasar hosts using a Halo Occupation Distribution based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, Dhruba Dutta

    2015-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is a spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), caused due to up-scattering of CMB photons by high energy electron distributions. The largest SZ distortion in the CMB is caused by the hot electrons present in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). However, several other small scale astrophysical processes can also contribute to the SZ distortion in the CMB. Analytic studies have shown that the interstellar (ISM) electron gas of the host galaxy heated by quasar feedback can also cause substantial SZ effect. For successful detection of the quasar feedback signal, the SZ signal from the virialized gas in the host halos of quasars needs to be properly quantified. In this dissertation work, I have estimated the SZ signal from quasar hosts using analytic models of the virialized gas in the ICM/ISM. As a new extension to existing work I have used the measured Halo Occupation Distribution properties of quasar hosts. The results show that the average SZ signal from quasar ...

  8. High-resolution tSZ cartography of clusters of galaxies with NIKA at the IRAM 30-m telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Adane, A; Ade, P; André, P; Arnaud, M; Bartalucci, I; Beelen, A; Benoît, A; Bideaud, A; Billot, N; Blanquer, G; Boudou, N; Bourrion, O; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Coiffard, G; Comis, B; Cruciani, A; Désert, F -X; Doyle, S; Goupy, J; Hasnoun, B; Hermelo, I; Kramer, C; Lagache, G; Leclercq, S; Macías-Pérez, J F; Mauskopf, P; Monfardini, A; Pajot, F; Perotto, L; Pointecouteau, E; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Revéret, V; Ritacco, A; Rodriguez, L; Ruppin, F; Schuster, K; Sievers, A; Triqueneaux, S; Tucker, C; Zylka, R

    2016-01-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) is a powerful probe to study clusters of galaxies and is complementary with respect to X-ray, lensing or optical observations. Previous arcmin resolution tSZ observations ({\\it e.g.} SPT, ACT and Planck) only enabled detailed studies of the intra-cluster medium morphology for low redshift clusters ($z < 0.2$). Thus, the development of precision cosmology with clusters requires high angular resolution observations to extend the understanding of galaxy cluster towards high redshift. NIKA2 is a wide-field (6.5 arcmin field of view) dual-band camera, operated at $100 \\ {\\rm mK}$ and containing $\\sim 3300$ KID (Kinetic Inductance Detectors), designed to observe the millimeter sky at 150 and 260 GHz, with an angular resolution of 18 and 12 arcsec respectively. The NIKA2 camera has been installed on the IRAM 30-m telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain) in September 2015. The NIKA2 tSZ observation program will allow us to observe a large sample of clusters (50) at redshift ranging...

  9. High angular resolution SZ observations with NIKA and NIKA2

    CERN Document Server

    Comis, B; Ade, P; André, P; Arnaud, M; Bartalucci, I; Beelen, A; Benoît, A; Bideaud, A; Billot, N; Bourrion, O; Calvo, M; Catalano, A; Coiffard, G; Désert, F -X; Doyle, S; Goupy, J; Kramer, C; Lagache, G; Leclercq, S; Macías-Pérez, J F; Mauskopf, P; Mayet, F; Monfardini, A; Pajot, F; Pascale, E; Perotto, L; Pointecouteau, E; Pisano, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Revéret, V; Ritacco, A; Rodriguez, L; Romero, C; Ruppin, F; Savini, G; Schuster, K; Sievers, A; Triqueneaux, S; Tucker, C; Zilch, R

    2016-01-01

    NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays) is a dual band (150 and 260 GHz) imaging camera based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) and designed to work at the IRAM 30 m telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain). Built on the experience of the NIKA prototype, NIKA2 has been installed at the 30 m focal plane in October 2015 and the commissioning phase is now ongoing. Through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect, NIKA2 will image the ionized gas residing in clusters of galaxies with a resolution of 12 and 18 arcsec FWHM (at 150 and 260 GHz, respectively). We report on the recent tSZ measurements with the NIKA camera and discuss the future objectives for the NIKA2 SZ large Program, 300h of observation dedicated to SZ science. With this program we intend to perform a high angular resolution follow-up of a cosmologically-representative sample of clusters belonging to SZ catalogues, with redshift greater than 0.5. The main output of the program will be the study of the redshift evolution of the cluster pressure profile as well as ...

  10. Cool Core Bias in Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Henry W; Benson, Bradford; Miller, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) surveys find massive clusters of galaxies by measuring the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background off of intra-cluster gas. The cluster selection function from such surveys is expected to be nearly independent of redshift and cluster astrophysics. In this work, we estimate the effect on the observed SZ signal of centrally-peaked gas density profiles (cool cores) and radio emission from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) by creating mock observations of a sample of clusters that span the observed range of classical cooling rates and radio luminosities. For each cluster, we make simulated SZ observations by the South Pole Telescope and characterize the cluster selection function, but note that our results are broadly applicable to other SZ surveys. We find that the inclusion of a cool core can cause a change in the measured SPT significance of a cluster between 0.01% - 10% at z > 0.3, increasing with cuspiness of the cool core and angular size on the sky of the cluster ...

  11. Calibrating the Planck cluster mass scale with CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna-Lima, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Rozo, E.; Melin, J.-B.; Merten, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Postman, M.; Rykoff, E.

    2017-08-01

    We determine the mass scale of Planck galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing mass measurements from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). We have compared the lensing masses to the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) mass proxy for 21 clusters in common, employing a Bayesian analysis to simultaneously fit an idealized CLASH selection function and the distribution between the measured observables and true cluster mass. We used a tiered analysis strategy to explicitly demonstrate the importance of priors on weak lensing mass accuracy. In the case of an assumed constant bias, bSZ, between true cluster mass, M500, and the Planck mass proxy, MPL, our analysis constrains 1-bSZ = 0.73 ± 0.10 when moderate priors on weak lensing accuracy are used, including a zero-mean Gaussian with standard deviation of 8% to account for possible bias in lensing mass estimations. Our analysis explicitly accounts for possible selection bias effects in this calibration sourced by the CLASH selection function. Our constraint on the cluster mass scale is consistent with recent results from the Weighing the Giants program and the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project. It is also consistent, at 1.34σ, with the value needed to reconcile the Planck SZ cluster counts with Planck's base ΛCDM model fit to the primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies.

  12. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrio-Barandela, F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kashlinsky, A., E-mail: atrio@usal.es, E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ∼5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ∼ 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (Δτ ≅ 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ∼10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  13. The South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  14. Improving Photometric Redshifts using GALEX Observations for the SDSS Stripe 82 and the Next Generation of SZ Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Niemack, Michael D; Verde, Licia; Menanteau, Felipe; Panter, Ben; Spergel, David

    2008-01-01

    Four large-area Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) experiments -- APEX-SZ, SPT, ACT, and Planck -- promise to detect clusters of galaxies through the distortion of Cosmic Microwave Background photons by hot (> 10^6 K) cluster gas (the SZ effect) over thousands of square degrees. A large observational follow-up effort to obtain redshifts for these SZ-detected clusters is under way. Given the large area covered by these surveys, most of the redshifts will be obtained via the photometric redshift (photo-z) technique. Here we demonstrate, in an application using ~3000 SDSS stripe 82 galaxies with r<20, how the addition of GALEX photometry (FUV, NUV) greatly improves the photometric redshifts of galaxies obtained with optical griz or ugriz photometry. In the case where large spectroscopic training sets are available, empirical neural-network-based techniques (e.g., ANNz) can yield a photo-z scatter of $\\sigma_z = 0.018 (1+z)$. If large spectroscopic training sets are not available, the addition of GALEX data makes possible...

  15. Stacking weak lensing signals of SZ clusters to constrain cluster physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sealfon, C; Verde, L; Jimenez, Raul; Sealfon, Carolyn; Verde, Licia

    2006-01-01

    We show how to place constraints on cluster physics by stacking the weak lensing signals from multiple clusters found through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For a survey that covers about 200 sq. deg. both in SZ and weak lensing observations, the slope and amplitude of the mass vs. SZ luminosity relation can be measured with few percent error for clusters at z~0.5. This can be used to constrain cluster physics, such as the nature of feedback. For example, we can distinguish a pre-heated model from a model with a decreased accretion rate at more than 5sigma. The power to discriminate among different non-gravitational processes in the ICM becomes even stronger if we use the central Compton parameter y_0, which could allow one to distinguish between models with pre-heating, SN feedback and AGN feedback, for example, at more than 5sigma. Measurement of these scaling relations as a function of redshift makes it possible to directly observe e.g., the evolution of the hot gas in clusters. With this approach the ...

  16. Possible signature of distant foreground in the Planck data

    CERN Document Server

    Yershov, V N; Raikov, A A

    2014-01-01

    By using the Planck map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation we have checked and confirmed the existence of a correlation between supernova (SN) redshifts, $z_{\\rm SN}$, and CMB temperature fluctuations at the SNe locations, $T_{\\rm SN}$, which we previously reported for the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the Planck data is $r=+0.38\\pm 0.08$ which indicates that the correlation is statistically significant (the signal is about $5\\sigma$ above the noise level). The correlation becomes even stronger for the type Ia subsample of SNe, $r_{\\rm Ia}=+0.45\\pm 0.09$, whereas for the rest of the SNe it is vanishing. By checking the slopes of the regression lines $T_{\\rm SN} / z_{\\rm SN}$ for Planck's different frequency bands we have also excluded the possibility of this anomaly being caused by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The remaining possibility is some, unaccounted for, contribution to the CMB from distant ($z>0.3$) foreground through either the int...

  17. A weak gravitational lensing recalibration of the scaling relations linking the gas properties of dark halos to their mass

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wenting; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Henriques, Bruno; Anderson, Michael E; Han, Jiaxin

    2015-01-01

    We use weak gravitational lensing to measure mean mass profiles around Locally Brightest Galaxies (LBGs). These are selected from the SDSS/DR7 spectroscopic and photometric catalogues to be brighter than any neighbour projected within 1.0 Mpc and differing in redshift by $ 83\\%$) are expected to be the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. Previous stacking analyses have used this LBG sample to measure mean Sunyaev-Zeldovich flux and mean X-ray luminosity as a function of LBG stellar mass. In both cases, a simulation of the formation of the galaxy population was used to estimate effective halo mass for LBGs of given stellar mass, allowing the derivation of scaling relations between the gas properties of halos and their mass. By comparing results from a variety of simulations to our lensing data, we show that this procedure has significant model dependence reflecting: (i) the failure of any given simulation to reproduce observed galaxy abundances exactly; (ii) a dependence on the cosmology underlying th...

  18. Resolving galaxy cluster gas properties at z~1 with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalucci, I; Pratt, G W; Démoclès, J; van der Burg, R F J; Mazzotta, P

    2016-01-01

    We present a pilot X-ray study of the five most massive ($M_{500}>5 \\times 10^{14} M_{\\odot}$), distant (z~1), galaxy clusters detected via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We optimally combine XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations by leveraging the throughput of XMM to obtain spatially-resolved spectroscopy, and the spatial resolution of Chandra to probe the bright inner parts and to detect embedded point sources. Capitalising on the excellent agreement in flux-related measurements, we present a new method to derive the density profiles, constrained in the centre by Chandra and in the outskirts by XMM. We show that the Chandra-XMM combination is fundamental for morphological analysis at these redshifts, the Chandra resolution being required to remove point source contamination, and the XMM sensitivity allowing higher significance detection of faint substructures. The sample is dominated by dynamically disturbed objects. We use the combined Chandra-XMM density profiles and spatially-resolved temperature prof...

  19. Constraining the redshift evolution of the Cosmic Microwave Background black-body temperature with PLANCK data

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, I; Atrio-Barandela, F; Ebeling, H; Kashlinsky, A; Kocevski, D; Martins, C J A P

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the deviation of adiabatic evolution of the Universe using the data on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies measured by the {\\it Planck} satellite and a sample of 481 X-ray selected clusters with spectroscopically measured redshifts. To avoid antenna beam effects, we bring all the maps to the same resolution. We use a CMB template to subtract the cosmological signal while preserving the Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) anisotropies; next, we remove galactic foreground emissions around each cluster and we mask out all known point sources. If the CMB black-body temperature scales with redshift as $T(z)=T_0(1+z)^{1-\\alpha}$, we constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution to be $\\alpha=-0.007\\pm 0.013$, consistent with the temperature-redshift relation of the standard cosmological model. This result could suffer from a potential bias associated with the CMB template, that we quantify it to be less than $-0.02$, but is free from those biases associated with using TSZ selected ...

  20. Probing the dynamical and X-ray mass proxies of the cluster of galaxies Abell S1101

    CERN Document Server

    Rabitz, Andreas; Schwope, Axel; Verdugo, Miguel; Reiprich, Thomas H; Klein, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Context: The galaxy cluster Abell S1101 (S1101 hereafter) deviates significantly from the X-ray luminosity versus velocity dispersion relation (L-sigma) of galaxy clusters in our previous study. Given reliable X-ray luminosity measurement combining XMM-Newton and ROSAT, this could most likely be caused by the bias in the velocity dispersion due to interlopers and low member statistic in the previous sample of member galaxies, which was solely based on 20 galaxy redshifts drawn from the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the galaxy member statistic to perform a precision measurement of the velocity dispersion and dynamical mass of S1101. We aim for a detailed substructure and dynamical state characterization of this cluster, and a comparison of mass estimates derived from (i) the velocity dispersion (M_vir), (ii) the caustic mass computation (M_caustic), and (iii) mass proxies from X-ray observations and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. Methods: We carried out new optical spectroscopic observations of t...

  1. Planck intermediate results. XIII. Constraints on peculiar velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Democles, J; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Doerl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Ensslin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Genova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jasche, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lahteenmaki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vornle, M; Lopez-Caniego, M; Macias-Perez, J F; Maino, D; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Puisieux, S; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Roman, M; Rubino-Martin, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zibin, J P; Zonca, A

    2013-01-01

    Using \\Planck\\ data combined with the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we address the study of peculiar motions by searching for evidence of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ). By implementing various filters designed to extract the kSZ generated at the positions of the clusters, we obtain consistent constraints on the radial peculiar velocity average, root mean square (rms), and local bulk flow amplitude at different depths. For the whole cluster sample of average redshift 0.18, the measured average radial peculiar velocity with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at that redshift, i.e., the kSZ monopole, amounts to $72 \\pm 60$\\,km\\,s$^{-1}$. This constitutes less than 1\\,% of the relative Hubble velocity of the cluster sample with respect to our local CMB frame. From a subset of this cluster sample \\Planck\\ finds the radial peculiar velocity rms to be below 800\\,km\\,s$^{-1}$ at the 95\\,% confidence level, which is around three times the $\\Lambda$CD...

  2. Tracing the Baryon Cycle within Nearby Galaxies with a next-generation VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Leroy, Adam; Murphy, Eric J.; ngVLA Baryon Cycle Science Working Group

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies over cosmic time is shaped by the cycling of baryons through these systems, namely the inflow of atomic gas, the formation of molecular structures, the birth of stars, and the expulsion of gas due to associated feedback processes. The best way to study this cycle in detail are observations of nearby galaxies. These systems provide a complete picture of baryon cycling over a wide range of astrophysical conditions. In the next decade, higher resolution/sensitivity observations of such galaxies will fundamentally improve our knowledge of galaxy formation and evolution, allowing us to better interpret higher redshift observations of sources that were rapidly evolving at epochs soon after the Big Bang. In particular, the centimeter-to-millimeter part of the spectrum provides critical diagnostics for each of the key baryon cycling processes and access to almost all phases of gas in galaxies: cool and cold gas (via emission and absorption lines), ionized gas (via free-free continuum and recombination lines), cosmic rays and hot gas (via synchrotron emission and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect). This poster highlights a number of key science problems in this area whose solutions require a next-generation radio-mm interferometer such as the next-generation VLA.

  3. Constraining ALP-photon coupling using galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Schlederer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new approach to constrain the coupling of axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. One intriguing property of these ALPs is their mixing with photons within magnetic fields. This mixing allows photons propagating in magnetic fields to convert into ALPs and \\textit{vice versa}. Plasma effects can lead to resonant conversion, further enhancing the conversion probability. For suitable ALP masses, this resonant conversion can occur for cosmic microwave background photons transversing galaxy clusters which would distort the CMB spectrum in the direction of galaxy clusters. We compare the predicted distortion with recent measurements of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich Compton parameter to obtain upper limits on the coupling between photons and ALPs. The constraints apply to the mass range of approximately $2\\cdot 10^{-14}$ eV $ \\lesssim m_\\phi \\lesssim 3\\cdot 10^{-12}$ eV in which resonant photon-ALP conversions can occur. Using simple galaxy cluster models, we obtain new limits for this ma...

  4. Calibrating the Planck Cluster Mass Scale with CLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Penna-Lima, M; Rozo, E; Melin, J -B; Merten, J; Evrard, A E; Postman, M; Rykoff, E

    2016-01-01

    We determine the mass scale of Planck galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing mass measurements from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). We compare the lensing masses to the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) mass proxy for 21 clusters in common, employing a Bayesian analysis to simultaneously fit an idealized CLASH selection function and the distribution between the measured observables and true cluster mass. We use a tiered analysis strategy to explicitly demonstrate the importance of priors on weak lensing mass accuracy. In the case of an assumed constant bias, $b_{SZ}$, between true cluster mass, $M_{500}$, and the Planck mass proxy, $M_{PL}$, our analysis constrains $1- b_{SZ} = 0.73 \\pm 0.10$ when moderate priors on weak lensing accuracy are used. Our analyses explicitly accounts for possible selection bias effects in this calibration sourced by the CLASH selection function. Our constraint on the cluster mass scale is consistent with recent results from the Weighing the Giants p...

  5. The CCAT Observatory: Science and Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, G. J.; Bertoldi, F.; Magnelli, B.; Stutzki, J.; Schilke, P.; Glenn, J.; Bally, J.; Giovanelli, R.; Riechers, D.; Karim, A.; Plume, R.

    2016-05-01

    CCAT is a 25 meter submm telescope proposed to be built at 5600 meters elevation on Cerro Chajnantor overlooking the ALMA site in northern Chile. The CCAT site is the best submm site that is accessible by truck, so that with its large aperture, exceptionally good surface accuracy (˜17 μm rms total wavefront error, WFE), state-of-the-art instrumentation and large (≥20 arcmin) field-of-view (FoV) CCAT will deliver unsurpassed point source sensitivity and mapping speeds across the submm telluric windows. Our primary science goals are: (1) to trace the obscurred star formation (SF) history of the Universe through multicolor submm surveys of 100's deg2 on the sky followed up by spectroscopy to characterize the energy sources in dusty SF galaxies; (2) to measure and characterize the SF process in the Milky Way galaxy and nearby resolved galaxies through submm spectroscopic and dust continuum surveys; and (3) to probe galaxy cluster astrophysics through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect.

  6. Planck 2013 results. XXI. All-sky Compton parameter power spectrum and high-order statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. These maps show an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales ($\\ell 500$) the clustered Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and residual point sources are the major contaminants. These foregrounds are carefully modelled and subtracted. We measure the tSZ power spectrum in angular scales, $0.17^{\\circ} \\lesssim \\theta \\lesssim 3.0^{\\circ}$, that were previously unexplored. The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with additional clear evidence of signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. We use the tSZ power spectrum to ...

  7. Constraining spatial variations of the fine structure constant using clusters of galaxies and Planck data

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, I; Ebeling, H; Kocevski, D

    2016-01-01

    We propose an improved methodology to constrain spatial variations of the fine structure constant using clusters of galaxies. We use the {\\it Planck} 2013 data to measure the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect at the location of 618 X-ray selected clusters. We then use a Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm to obtain the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background at the location of each galaxy cluster. When fitting three different phenomenological parameterizations allowing for monopole and dipole amplitudes in the value of the fine structure constant we improve the results of earlier analysis involving clusters and CMB power spectrum, and we also found that the best-fit direction of a hypothetical dipole is compatible with the direction of other known anomalies. Although the constraining power of our current datasets do not allow us to test the indications of a dipole obtained though high-resolution optical/UV spectroscopy, our results do highlight that clusters of galaxies will be a very powerful tool to pr...

  8. The intergalactic medium temperature and Compton y parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Trac, H; Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue-Li; Trac, Hy

    2004-01-01

    (Abridged) The precision modeling of the thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect and future high accuracy measurements will provide a powerful way to constrain the thermal history of the universe. In this paper, we combine high resolution adiabatic hydro simulations and analytical models to provide a precision modeling of the gas density weighted temperature $\\bar{T}_g$ and the mean SZ Compton $y$ parameter. Simulation artifacts are quantified and corrected and our analytical model passes tests of various simulations and is able to predict $\\bar{T}_g$ and $\\bar{y}$ to several percent accuracy. For low matter density $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, the present $\\bar{T}_g$ is $0.32 (\\sigma_8/0.84)^{3.05-0.15\\Omega_m}(\\Omega_m/0.268)^{1.28-0.2\\sigma_8} {\\rm keV}$. The mean $y$ parameter is $2.6\\times 10^{-6} (\\sigma_8/0.84)^{4.1-2\\Omega_m}(\\Omega_m/0.268)^{1.28-0.2\\sigma_8}$. The current upper limit of $y<1.5\\times 10^{-5}$ measured by FIRAS has already ruled out combinations of high $\\sigma_8\\ga 1.1$ and high $\\Omega_...

  9. An SZ Temperature Decrement X-ray Luminosity Relation for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R

    1999-01-01

    We present the observed relation between the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature decrement due to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect and the X-ray luminosity of galaxy clusters. We discuss this relation in terms of the cluster properties, and show that the slope of the observed relation is in agreement with both the L-T relation based on numerical simulations and X-ray emission observations, and the M_gas-L relation based on observations. The slope of the Delta T_SZ-L relation is also consistent with the M_tot-L relation, where M_tot is the cluster total mass based on gravitational lensing observations. This agreement may be taken to imply a constant gas mass fraction within galaxy clusters, however, there are large uncertainties, dominated by observational errors, associated with these relations. Using the Delta T_SZ-L relation and the cluster X-ray luminosity function, we evaluate the local cluster contribution to arcminute scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies. The Compton distortion y-pa...

  10. Planck intermediate results. VI: The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gilfanov, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Heinämäki, P; Hempel, A; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jagemann, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zaroubi, S; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to the whole coverage of the sky. One of the SZ candidates detected in the early months of the mission near to the signal to noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was later revealed by XMM-Newton to be a triple system of galaxy clusters. We have further investigated this puzzling system with a multi-wavelength approach and we present here the results from a deep XMM-Newton re-observation. The characterisation of the physical properties of the three components has allowed us to build a template model to extract the total SZ signal of this system with Planck data. We partly reconciled the discrepancy between the expected SZ signal from X-rays and the observed one, which are now consistent at less than 1.2 sigma. We measured the redshift of the three components with the iron lines in the X-ray spectrum, and confirmed that the three clumps are likely part of the same superclus...

  11. Planck intermediate results. VI. The dynamical structure of PLCKG214.6+37.0, a Planck discovered triple system of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Démoclès, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zaroubi, S.; Zonca, A.

    2013-02-01

    The survey of galaxy clusters performed by Planck through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect has already discovered many interesting objects, thanks to its full sky coverage. One of the SZ candidates detected inthe early months of the mission near to the signal-to-noise threshold, PLCKG214.6+37.0, was later revealed by XMM-Newton to be a triple system of galaxy clusters. We present the results from a deep XMM-Newton re-observation of PLCKG214.6+37.0, part of a multi-wavelength programme to investigate Planck discovered superclusters. The characterisation of the physical properties of the three components has allowed us to build a template model to extract the total SZ signal of this system with Planck data. We have partly reconciled the discrepancy between the expected SZ signal derived from X-rays and the observed one, which are now consistent within 1.2σ. We measured the redshift of the three components with the iron lines in the X-ray spectrum, and confirm that the three clumps are likely part of the same supercluster structure. The analysis of the dynamical state of the three components, as well as the absence of detectable excess X-ray emission, suggests that we are witnessing the formation of a massive cluster at an early phase of interaction.

  12. Planck Intermediate Results. X. Physics of the hot gas in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Brown, M L; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombo, L P L; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gilfanov, M; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jagemann, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Smoot, G F; Stivoli, F; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zaroubi, S; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of Planck satellite data on the Coma Cluster observed via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Planck is able, for the first time, to detect SZ emission up to r ~ 3 X R_500. We test previously proposed models for the pressure distribution in clusters against the azimuthally averaged data. We find that the Arnaud et al. universal pressure profile does not fit Coma, and that their pressure profile for merging systems provides a good fit of the data only at rR_500 than the mean pressure profile predicted by the simulations. The Planck image shows significant local steepening of the y profile in two regions about half a degree to the west and to the south-east of the cluster centre. These features are consistent with the presence of shock fronts at these radii, and indeed the western feature was previously noticed in the ROSAT PSPC mosaic by Markevitch (2000) as well as in the radio. Using Planck y profiles extracted from corresponding sectors we find pressure jumps of 4.5+2.5-0.1 and 4.9+0.7-0.2 ...

  13. Galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae and the fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Colaço, L R; Alcaniz, J S; Landau, S J

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be combined with observations of the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters to estimate the angular diameter distance to these structures. In this paper, we show that this technique depends on the fine structure constant, $\\alpha$. Therefore, if $\\alpha$ is a time-dependent quantity, e.g., $\\alpha=\\alpha_0 \\phi(z)$, where $\\phi$ is a function of redshift, we argue that current data do not provide the real angular diameter distance, $D_{\\rm{A}}(z)$, to the cluster but instead $D_A^{data}(z) = \\phi(z)^2 D_{\\rm{A}}(z)$. We use this result to derive constraints on a possible variation of $\\alpha$ for a class of dilaton runaway models considering a sample of 25 measurements of $D_A^{data}(z)$ in redshift range $0.023 < z < 0.784$ and estimates of $D_{\\rm{A}}(z)$ from current type Ia supernovae observations. We find no significant indication of variation of $\\alpha$ with the present data.

  14. Tilted Lema\\^itre model and the dark flow

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, J

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, the peculiar velocities of many X-ray galaxies clusters with respect to the distance have been measured directly in the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR), using the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect. These measures prove that exists a highly coherent motion, extending out to at least to ~1 Gpc, of the matter rest frame with respect to the CBR rest frame. This global motion was named "dark flow". By using an inhomogeneous spherically symmetric "tilted" Lema\\^itre model, we could explain the dark flow if we assume a linear increase with distance of the peculiar velocities, which is in principle allowed by these observations. This linear increase of the dark flow with the distance has the same behavior that the intrinsic dipole, due to the kinematic acceleration, which appears in the Hubble law of the Lema\\^itre model. In the "tilted" Lema\\^itre model considered, we consider that the radiation orthogonal congruence is a perfect fluid and the matter "tilted" c...

  15. Status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Golwala, Sunil R; Brugger, Spencer; Czakon, Nicole G; Day, Peter K; Downes, Thomas P; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Gill, Amandeep K; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I; LeDuc, Henry G; Maloney, Philip R; Mazin, Benjamin A; McHugh, Sean G; Miller, David; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James A; Siegel, Seth; Vayonakis, Anastasios K; Wilson, Philip R; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    We present the status of MUSIC, the MUltiwavelength Sub/millimeter Inductance Camera, a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. MUSIC is designed to have a 14', diffraction-limited field-of-view instrumented with 2304 detectors in 576 spatial pixels and four spectral bands at 0.87, 1.04, 1.33, and 1.98 mm. MUSIC will be used to study dusty star-forming galaxies, galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and star formation in our own and nearby galaxies. MUSIC uses broadband superconducting phased-array slot-dipole antennas to form beams, lumped-element on-chip bandpass filters to define spectral bands, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors to senseincoming light. The focal plane is fabricated in 8 tiles consisting of 72 spatial pixels each. It is coupled to the telescope via an ambient temperature ellipsoidal mirror and a cold reimaging lens. A cold Lyot stop sits at the image of the primary mirror formed by the ellipsoidal mirror. Dielectric and metal mesh filters are used to b...

  16. Probing the epoch of pre-reionization by cross-correlating cosmic microwave and infrared background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from {\\it Euclid}, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky {\\it Euclid} CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales $\\sim 5'-60'$ w...

  17. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A.R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L.Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J.Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Doriese, W.Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.

    2011-08-18

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zeldovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.851 {+-} 0.115 and w = -1.14 {+-} 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.821 {+-} 0.044 and w = -1.05 {+-} 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP 7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus type Ia supernoava which give {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.802 {+-} 0.038 and w = -0.98 {+-} 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  18. Planck intermediate results XXXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck SZ sources with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.;

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories as part of the general optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck Collaboration. In total, 78 SZ sources are discussed. Deep-i...

  19. Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.;

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark...

  20. A Lossless Differential Fourier-Transform Spectrometer for precision Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schillaci, Alessandro; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia; Novaes, Camila Paiva; Gervasi, Massimo; Zannoni, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) in clusters of galaxies require excellent rejection of common-mode signals and wide frequency coverage. We describe an imaging, lossless, differential Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), optimized for measurements of faint brightness gradients at millimeter wavelengths. Our instrument is based on a Martin-Puplett Interferometer (MPI) configuration. We combine two MPIs working synchronously, in order to use the whole input power. In our implementation the observed sky field is divided in two halves along the meridian, and each half field corresponds to one of the two input ports of the MPI. In this way each detector in the FTS focal planes measures the difference in brightness between two sky pixels, symmetrically located with respect to the meridian. Exploiting the high common-mode rejection of the MPI we can measure small sky brightness gradients over a large isotropic background. The instrument works in the range $\\sim$ 1$\\div$20 cm$^{-1}$ (30$...

  1. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Derived Distances to the High Redshift Clusters MS 0451.6-0305 and CL 0016+16

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, E D; Carlstrom, J E; Joy, M; Grego, L E; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hughes, J P; Patel, S K; Donahue, M

    2000-01-01

    We determine the distances to the z~0.55 galaxy clusters MS 0451.6-0305 and CL 0016+16 from a maximum likelihood joint fit to interferometric Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray observations. We model the intracluster medium (ICM) using a spherical isothermal beta-model. We quantify the statistical and systematic uncertainties inherent to these direct distance measurements, and we determine constraints on the Hubble parameter for three different cosmologies. For an OmegaM = 0.3, OmegaL = 0.7 cosmology, these distances imply a Hubble constant of 63 ^{+12}_{- 9} ^{+21}_{-21} km/s/Mpc, where the uncertainties correspond to statistical followed by systematic at 68% confidence. The best fit Ho is 57 km/sec/Mpc for an open OmegaM = 0.3 universe and 52 km/s/Mpc for a flat Omega = 1 universe.

  2. Wandering in the Lyman-alpha forest: a study of dark matter-dark radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Rebecca; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Dvorkin, Cora

    2017-09-01

    The amplitude of large-scale matter fluctuations inferred from the observed Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster mass function and from weak gravitational lensing studies, when taken at face value, is in tension with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). In this work, we revisit whether this possible discrepancy can be attributed to new interactions in the dark matter sector. Focusing on a cosmological model where dark matter interacts with a dark radiation species until the epoch of matter-radiation equality, we find that measurements of the Lyman-alpha flux power spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey provide no support to the hypothesis that new dark matter interactions can resolve the possible tension between CMB and large-scale structure (LSS). Indeed, while the addition of dark matter-dark radiation interactions leads to an improvement of 2Δ&ln;Script L=12 with respect to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model when only CMB, BAO, and LSS data are considered, the inclusion of Lyman-alpha data reduces the improvement of the fit to 2Δ&ln;Script L=6 relative to ΛCDM . We thus conclude that the statistical evidence for new dark matter interactions (largely driven by the Planck SZ dataset) is marginal at best, and likely caused by systematics in the data. We also perform a Fisher forecast analysis for the reach of a future dataset composed of a CMB-S4 experiment combined with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope galaxy survey. We find that the constraint on the effective number of fluid-like dark radiation species, Δ Nfluid, will be improved by an order of magnitude compared to current bounds.

  3. HICOSMO - cosmology with a complete sample of galaxy clusters - I. Data analysis, sample selection and luminosity-mass scaling relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, G.; Reiprich, T. H.

    2017-08-01

    The X-ray regime, where the most massive visible component of galaxy clusters, the intracluster medium, is visible, offers directly measured quantities, like the luminosity, and derived quantities, like the total mass, to characterize these objects. The aim of this project is to analyse a complete sample of galaxy clusters in detail and constrain cosmological parameters, like the matter density, Ωm, or the amplitude of initial density fluctuations, σ8. The purely X-ray flux-limited sample (HIFLUGCS) consists of the 64 X-ray brightest galaxy clusters, which are excellent targets to study the systematic effects, that can bias results. We analysed in total 196 Chandra observations of the 64 HIFLUGCS clusters, with a total exposure time of 7.7 Ms. Here, we present our data analysis procedure (including an automated substructure detection and an energy band optimization for surface brightness profile analysis) that gives individually determined, robust total mass estimates. These masses are tested against dynamical and Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) derived masses of the same clusters, where good overall agreement is found with the dynamical masses. The Planck SZ masses seem to show a mass-dependent bias to our hydrostatic masses; possible biases in this mass-mass comparison are discussed including the Planck selection function. Furthermore, we show the results for the (0.1-2.4) keV luminosity versus mass scaling relation. The overall slope of the sample (1.34) is in agreement with expectations and values from literature. Splitting the sample into galaxy groups and clusters reveals, even after a selection bias correction, that galaxy groups exhibit a significantly steeper slope (1.88) compared to clusters (1.06).

  4. Thermal SZ fluctuations in the ICM: probing turbulence and thermodynamics in Coma cluster with Planck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Rishi; Gaspari, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    We report the detection of thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect fluctuations in the intracluster medium (ICM) of Coma cluster observed with Planck. The SZ data links the maximum observable X-ray scale to the large Mpc scale, extending our knowledge of the power spectrum of ICM fluctuations. Deprojecting the 2D SZ perturbations into 3D pressure fluctuations, we find an amplitude spectrum which peaks at δP/P = 33 ± 12 and 74 ± 19 per cent in the 15 and 40 arcmin radius region, respectively. We perform tests to ensure fluctuations are intrinsic to the cluster and not due to noise contamination. By using high-resolution hydrodynamical models, we improve the ICM turbulence constraints in Coma, finding 3D Mach number Ma3d = 0.8 ± 0.3 (15 arcmin region), increasing to supersonic values at larger radii (40 arcmin) and an injection scale Linj ≈ 500 kpc. Such properties are consistent with driving due to mergers, in particular tied to internal galaxy groups. The large pressure fluctuations show that Coma is in adiabatic mode (mediated by sound waves), rather than isobaric mode (mediated by buoyancy waves). As predicted by turbulence models, the distribution of SZ fluctuations is lognormal with mild non-Gaussianities (heavy tails). The substantial non-thermal pressure support implies hydrostatic mass bias bM = -15 to -45 per cent from the core to the outskirt region, respectively. While total SZ power probes the thermal energy content, the SZ fluctuations constrain the non-thermal deviations important for precision cosmology. The proposed, novel approach can be exploited by multifrequency observations using ground-based interferometers and future space cosmic microwave background missions.

  5. Origin of matter and space-time in the big bang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, G. J. [University of Notre Dame, Center for Astrophysics/JINA, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA and Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kajino, T. [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamazaki, D. [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791, Korea and Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    We review the case for and against a bulk cosmic motion resulting from the quantum entanglement of our universe with the multiverse beyond our horizon. Within the current theory for the selection of the initial state of the universe from the landscape multiverse there is a generic prediction that pre-inflation quantum entanglement with other universes should give rise to a cosmic bulk flow with a correlation length of order horizon size and a velocity field relative to the expansion frame of the universe. Indeed, the parameters of this motion are are tightly constrained. A robust prediction can be deduced indicating that there should be an overall motion of of about 800 km/s relative to the background space time as defined by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This talk will summarize the underlying theoretical motivation for this hypothesis. Of course our motion relative to the background space time (CMB dipole) has been known for decades and is generally attributed to the gravitational pull of the local super cluster. However, this cosmic peculiar velocity field has been recently deduced out to very large distances well beyond that of the local super cluster by using X-ray galaxy clusters as tracers of matter motion. This is achieved via the kinematic component of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (KSZ) effect produced by Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons from the local hot intracluster gas. As such, this method measures peculiar velocity directly in the frame of the cluster. Similar attempts by our group and others have attempted to independently assess this bulk flow via Type la supernova redshifts. In this talk we will review the observation case for and against the existence of this bulk flow based upon the observations and predictions of the theory. If this interpretation is correct it has profound implications in that we may be observing for the first time both the physics that occurred before the big bang and the existence of the multiverse

  6. Origin of matter and space-time in the big bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, G. J.; Kajino, T.; Yamazaki, D.; Kusakabe, M.; Cheoun, M.-K.

    2014-05-01

    We review the case for and against a bulk cosmic motion resulting from the quantum entanglement of our universe with the multiverse beyond our horizon. Within the current theory for the selection of the initial state of the universe from the landscape multiverse there is a generic prediction that pre-inflation quantum entanglement with other universes should give rise to a cosmic bulk flow with a correlation length of order horizon size and a velocity field relative to the expansion frame of the universe. Indeed, the parameters of this motion are are tightly constrained. A robust prediction can be deduced indicating that there should be an overall motion of of about 800 km/s relative to the background space time as defined by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This talk will summarize the underlying theoretical motivation for this hypothesis. Of course our motion relative to the background space time (CMB dipole) has been known for decades and is generally attributed to the gravitational pull of the local super cluster. However, this cosmic peculiar velocity field has been recently deduced out to very large distances well beyond that of the local super cluster by using X-ray galaxy clusters as tracers of matter motion. This is achieved via the kinematic component of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (KSZ) effect produced by Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons from the local hot intracluster gas. As such, this method measures peculiar velocity directly in the frame of the cluster. Similar attempts by our group and others have attempted to independently assess this bulk flow via Type la supernova redshifts. In this talk we will review the observation case for and against the existence of this bulk flow based upon the observations and predictions of the theory. If this interpretation is correct it has profound implications in that we may be observing for the first time both the physics that occurred before the big bang and the existence of the multiverse

  7. A new method of measuring the peculiar velocity power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Juszkiewicz, R; Feldman, H A; Zhang, Pengjie; Stebbins, Albert; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Feldman, Hume

    2004-01-01

    We show that by directly correlating the cluster kinetic Sunyaev Zeldovich (KSZ) flux, the cluster peculiar velocity power spectrum can be measured to $\\sim 10%$ accuracy by future large sky coverage KSZ surveys. This method is almost free of systemics entangled in the usual velocity inversion method. The direct correlation brings extra information of density and velocity clustering. We utilize these information to construct two indicators of the Hubble constant and comoving angular distance and propose a novel method to constrain cosmology.

  8. Expectations For an Interferometric Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Survey for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Holder, G P; Carlstrom, J E; Evrard, A E; Leitch, E M; Holder, Gilbert P.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Carlstrom, John E.; Evrard, August E.; Leitch, Erik M.

    2000-01-01

    Non-targeted surveys for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) will yield valuable information on both cosmology and evolution of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The redshift distribution of detected clusters will constrain cosmology, while the properties of the discovered clusters will be important for studies of the ICM and galaxy formation. Estimating survey yields requires a detailed model for both cluster properties and the survey strategy. We address this by making mock observations of galaxy clusters in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The mock observatory consists of an interferometric array of ten 2.5 m diameter telescopes, operating at a central frequency of 30 GHz with a bandwidth of 8 GHz. We find that clusters with a mass above $2.5 exact limit showing a very modest redshift dependence. Using a Press-Schechter prescription for evolving the number densities of clusters with redshift, we determine that such a survey should find hundreds of galaxy clusters per year, many ...

  9. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Mass-Observable Relations using South Pole Telescope Observations of an X-ray Selected Sample of Low Mass Galaxy Clusters and Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, J; Saro, A; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiu, I; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Dobbs, M A; Foley, R J; Gangkofner, D; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Hennig, C; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Keisler, R; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Suhada, R; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) We use 95, 150, and 220GHz observations from the SPT to examine the SZE signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg^2 of the XMM-BCS. These systems extend to redshift z=1.02, have characteristic masses ~3x lower than clusters detected directly in the SPT data and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (>10^42 erg s^-1) yet. We develop an analysis tool that combines the SZE information for the full ensemble of X-ray-selected clusters. Using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, we extract selection-bias corrected constraints on the SZE significance- and Y_500-mass relations. The SZE significance- mass relation is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high mass clusters. However, the fit to the Y_500-mass relation at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from high mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8 sigma with the constraints from the Planck sample. We examine the tension with the Planck relation...

  10. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Physical Properties and Purity of a Galaxy Cluster Sample Selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Menanteau, Felipe; Juin, Jean-Baptiste; Marriage, Tobias A; Reese, Erik; Acquaviva, Viviana; Aguirre, Paula; Appel, John William; Baker, Andrew J; Barrientos, L Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S; Bond, J Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon; Deshpande, Amruta J; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renee; Hughes, John P; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Infante, Leopoldo; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Marsden, Danica; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Parker, Lucas; Partridge, Bruce; Sievers, Jon; Sehgal, Neelima; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel; Switzer, Eric; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Warne, Ryan; Wollack, Ed

    2010-01-01

    We present optical and X-ray properties for the first confirmed galaxy cluster sample selected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect from 148 GHz maps over 455 square degrees of sky made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. These maps, coupled with multi-band imaging on 4-meter-class optical telescopes, have yielded a sample of 23 galaxy clusters with redshifts between 0.118 and 1.066. Of these 23 clusters, 10 are newly discovered. The selection of this sample is approximately mass limited and essentially independent of redshift. We provide optical positions, images, redshifts and X-ray fluxes and luminosities for the full sample, and X-ray temperatures of an important subset. The mass limit of the full sample is around 8e14 Msun, with a number distribution that peaks around a redshift of 0.4. For the 10 highest significance SZE-selected cluster candidates, all of which are optically confirmed, the mass threshold is 1e15 Msun and the redshift range is 0.167 to 1.066. Archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton...

  11. A HIGHLY ELONGATED PROMINENT LENS AT z = 0.87: FIRST STRONG-LENSING ANALYSIS OF EL GORDO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitrin, Adi [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Menanteau, Felipe; Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Coe, Dan [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Barrientos, L. Felipe; Infante, Leopoldo [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Mandelbaum, Rachel, E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We present the first strong-lensing (SL) analysis of the galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 (El Gordo), in recent HST/ACS images, revealing a prominent strong lens at a redshift of z = 0.87. This finding adds to the already-established unique properties of El Gordo: it is the most massive, hot, X-ray luminous, and bright Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect cluster at z {approx}> 0.6, and the only {sup b}ullet{sup -}like merging cluster known at these redshifts. The lens consists of two merging massive clumps, where, for a source redshift of z{sub s} {approx} 2, each clump exhibits only a small, separate critical area, with a total area of 0.69 {+-} 0.11{open_square}' over the two clumps. For a higher source redshift, z{sub s} {approx} 4, the critical curves of the two clumps merge together into one bigger and very elongated lens (axis ratio {approx_equal} 5.5), enclosing an effective area of 1.44 {+-} 0.22{open_square}'. The critical curves continue expanding with increasing redshift so that for high-redshift sources (z{sub s} {approx}> 9) they enclose an area of {approx}1.91 {+-} 0.30{open_square}' (effective {theta}{sub e} {approx_equal} 46.''8 {+-} 3.''7) and a mass of 6.09 {+-} 1.04 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. According to our model, the area of high magnification ({mu} > 10) for such high-redshift sources is {approx_equal}1.2{open_square}', and the area with {mu} > 5 is {approx_equal}2.3{open_square}', making El Gordo a compelling target for studying the high-redshift universe. We obtain a strong lower limit on the total mass of El Gordo, {approx}> 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} from the SL regime alone, suggesting a total mass of roughly M{sub 200} {approx} 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. Our results should be revisited when additional spectroscopic and HST imaging data are available.

  12. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-02-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 106 clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during inflation and

  13. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: ACT-CL J0102-4215 "El Gordo," a Massive Merging Cluster at Redshift 0.87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menanteau, Felipe; Hughes, John Pl; Baker, Andrew J.; Sifon, Cristobal; Gonzalez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Hilton, Matt; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.; Hincks, Adam D.; Page, Lyman A.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Mardsen, Danica; Reese, Erik D.; Dunkley, Joanna; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis from new multi-wavelength observations of the exceptional galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915, likely the most massive, hottest, most X-ray luminous and brightest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect cluster known at redshifts greater than 0.6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) collaboration discovered ACT-CL J0102-4915 as the most significant Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) decrement in a sky survey area of 755 square degrees. Our VLT/FORS2 spectra of 89 member galaxies yield a cluster redshift, z = 0.870, and velocity dispersion, sigma(gal) +/- 1321 106 km s-1. Our Chandra observations reveal a hot and X-ray luminous system with an integrated temperature of T(X) = 14:5 +/- 0:1 keV and 0.5 2.0 keV band luminosity of L(X) = (2:19 0:11) 1045 h(exp -2)70erg s-1. We obtain several statistically consistent cluster mass estimates; using empirical mass scaling relations with velocity dispersion, X-ray Y(X) , and integrated SZ distortion, we estimate a cluster mass of M(200) = (2:16 +/- 0:32) 10(exp 15) h(exp-1) 70M compared to the Sun. We constrain the stellar content of the cluster to be less than 1% of the total mass, using Spitzer IRAC and optical imaging. The Chandra and VLT/FORS2 optical data also reveal that ACT-CL J0102-4915 is undergoing a major merger between components with a mass ratio of approximately 2 to 1. The X-ray data show significant temperature variations from a low of 6:6 +/- 0:7 keV at the merging low-entropy, high-metallicity, cool core to a high of 22 +/- 6 keV. We also see a wake in the X-ray surface brightness and deprojected gas density caused by the passage of one cluster through the other from which we estimate a merger speed of around 1300 km s(exp -1) for an assumed merger timescale of 1 Gyr. ACTCL J0102-4915 is possibly a high-redshift analog of the famous Bullet Cluster. Such a massive cluster at this redshift is rare, although consistent with the standard CDM cosmology in the lower part of its allowed mass range. Massive

  14. Galaxy populations in massive galaxy clusters to z = 1.1: colour distribution, concentration, halo occupation number and red sequence fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, C.; Mohr, J. J.; Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Bocquet, S.; Strazzullo, V.; Saro, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bayliss, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capasso, R.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Chiu, I.; D'Andrea, C. B.; daCosta, L. N.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti-Neto, A.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McDonald, M.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-06-01

    We study the galaxy populations in 74 Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect selected clusters from the South Pole Telescope survey, which have been imaged in the science verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. The sample extends up to z ˜ 1.1 with 4 × 1014 M⊙ ≤ M200 ≤ 3 × 1015M⊙. Using the band containing the 4000 Å break and its redward neighbour, we study the colour-magnitude distributions of cluster galaxies to ˜m* + 2, finding that: (1)The intrinsic rest frame g - r colour width of the red sequence (RS) population is ˜0.03 out to z ˜ 0.85 with a preference for an increase to ˜0.07 at z = 1, and (2) the prominence of the RS declines beyond z ˜ 0.6. The spatial distribution of cluster galaxies is well described by the NFW profile out to 4R200 with a concentration of cg = 3.59^{+0.20}_{-0.18}, 5.37^{+0.27}_{-0.24} and 1.38^{+0.21}_{-0.19} for the full, the RS and the blue non-RS populations, respectively, but with ˜40 per cent to 55 per cent cluster to cluster variation and no statistically significant redshift or mass trends. The number of galaxies within the virial region N200 exhibits a mass trend indicating that the number of galaxies per unit total mass is lower in the most massive clusters, and shows no significant redshift trend. The RS fraction within R200 is (68 ± 3) per cent at z = 0.46, varies from ˜55 per cent at z = 1 to ˜80 per cent at z = 0.1 and exhibits intrinsic variation among clusters of ˜14 per cent. We discuss a model that suggests that the observed redshift trend in RS fraction favours a transformation time-scale for infalling field galaxies to become RS galaxies of 2-3 Gyr.

  15. A new method of measuring the cluster peculiar velocity power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Pengjie; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Stebbins, Albert

    2008-01-01

    We propose to use spatial correlations of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (KSZ) flux as an estimator of the peculiar velocity power spectrum. In contrast with conventional techniques, our new method does not require measurements of the thermal SZ signal or the X-ray temperature. Moreover, this method has the special advantage that the expected systematic errors are always sub-dominant to statistical errors on all scales and redshifts of interest. We show that future large sky coverage KSZ surveys may allow a peculiar velocity power spectrum estimates of an accuracy reaching ~10%.

  16. Are Galaxy Clusters Suggesting an Accelerating Universe Independent of SNe Ia and Gravity Metric Theory?

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Cunha, J V

    2009-01-01

    A kinematic method to access cosmic acceleration based exclusively on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness data from galaxy clusters is proposed. By using the SZE/X-ray data from 38 galaxy clusters [Bonament et al., Astrop. J. 647, 25 (2006)], we find that the present Universe is accelerating and that the transition from an earlier decelerating to a late time accelerating regime occurred relatively recent. Such results are fully independent on the validity of any metric gravity theory, the possible matter-energy contents filling the Universe, as well as on the SNe type Ia Hubble diagram from which the present acceleration was inferred. The ability of the ongoing Planck satellite mission to obtain tighter constraints on the expansion history through SZE/X-ray angular diameters is also discussed. Two simple simulations of future Planck data suggest that such technique will be competitive with supernova data besides being complementary to it.

  17. Are Galaxy Clusters Suggesting an Accelerating Universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Cunha, J V; 10.1063/1.3462638

    2010-01-01

    The present cosmic accelerating stage is discussed through a new kinematic method based on the Sunyaev- Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness data from galaxy clusters. By using the SZE/X-ray data from 38 galaxy clusters in the redshift range $0.14 \\leq z \\leq 0.89 $ [Bonamente et al., Astrop. J. {\\bf 647}, 25 (2006)] it is found that the present Universe is accelerating and that the transition from an earlier decelerating to a late time accelerating regime is relatively recent. The ability of the ongoing Planck satellite mission to obtain tighter constraints on the expansion history through SZE/X-ray angular diameters is also discussed. Our results are fully independent on the validity of any metric gravity theory, the possible matter- energy contents filling the Universe, as well as on the SNe Ia Hubble diagram from which the presenting accelerating stage was inferred.

  18. 18 GHz SZ Measurements of the Bullet Cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth S. Malu; Ravi Subrahmanyan

    2011-12-01

    We present 18 GHz observations of the Bullet cluster using the Austalia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), which show structure in the Sunyaev–Zeldovich effect; in particular, a deep, compact feature which does not correspond to any bright feature in X-ray, optical or lensing maps. In general, the relatively deeper SZE features appear to avoid the regions with the most intense X-ray emission. SZE displaced from X-ray centres implies that modeling cluster dynamics is non-trivial. The SZE distribution in the western parts of the cluster are co-spatial with the radio halo indicative of a common origin for the hot and relativistic electrons in the turbulent wake of the Bullet.

  19. Win Honors for the Motherland and the Birthplace Indonesia with Gratitude and Forethought——An Interview with Jackson Leung Sze Mau, Chairman of Golden Island Cable Company

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lili; Zhang Li

    2011-01-01

    @@ There was a young boy who presented the bouquet on behalf of the nation to Premier Zhou Enlai during the Bandung Conference (also called Asian-African Conference) which was held in 1955, a young lad who spentendless efforts in saving huge amount of foreign capitals for his motherland - China during the economic reform, a young businessman with philanthropy concern that commands proficient dialectics and contradiction theories, a society leader that care about thedevelopment, as well as disastrous events of the two countries, China and Indonesia, a civil diplomat that promote and bridge multilateral economic developments between China, Indonesia and many other countries.

  20. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: The LABOCA/ACT Survey of Clusters at All Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Baker, Andrew J; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Lima, Marcos; Marriage, Tobias A; Menanteau, Felipe; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, J L; Sifón, Cristóbal; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel; Weiß, Axel; Wollack, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of eleven Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect (SZE)-selected galaxy clusters (ten with new data) from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. We have obtained new imaging from the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (345GHz; LABOCA) on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array (2.1GHz; ATCA), and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (250, 350, and $500\\,\\rm\\mu m$; SPIRE) on the Herschel Space Observatory. Spatially-resolved 345GHz SZE increments with integrated S/N > 5 are found in six clusters. We compute 2.1GHz number counts as a function of cluster-centric radius and find significant enhancements in the counts of bright sources at projected radii $\\theta < \\theta_{2500}$. By extrapolating in frequency, we predict that the combined signals from 2.1GHz-selected radio sources and 345GHz-selected SMGs contaminate the 148GHz SZE decrement signal by ~5% and the 345GHz SZE increment by ~18%. After removing radio source...

  1. Cordycepin enhances cisplatin apoptotic effect through caspase/MAPK pathways in human head and neck tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying-Hui Chen,1,2,* Jo-Yu Wang,3,* Bo-Syong Pan,3,4 Yi-Fen Mu,3 Meng-Shao Lai,3,4 Edmund Cheung So,5 Thian-Sze Wong,6 Bu-Miin Huang3,4 1Department of Anesthesia, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Liouying, 2Department of Nursing, Min-Hwei College of Health Care Management, 3Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 4The Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 5Department of Anesthesia, An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong *Authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The present study aims to investigate whether the combination treatment of cordycepin (an extracted pure compound from Cordyceps sinensis and cisplatin (a platinum-based chemotherapy drug has better apoptotic effect in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods: The apoptotic influences of cordycepin and/or cisplatin treatments to human OC3, OEC-M1, and FaDu HNSCC cells were investigated by morphological observations, viability assay, flow cytometry assay, and Western blotting methods. Results: Data showed that the cell death phenomenon increased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and it appeared more in cordycepin plus cisplatin cotreatment among three cell lines. Cell survival rates significantly decreased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and the better apoptotic effects were observed in cotreatment. Cell cycle analysis further demonstrated that percentages of subG1 cells in cordycepin or cisplatin treatments significantly increased, suggesting that cells underwent apoptosis, and cordycepin plus cisplatin induced many more subG1 cells. Furthermore, cordycepin or cisplatin induced caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase protein cleavages, and stimulated c

  2. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Observations Using Large-Format Millimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakon, Nicole G.

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the observable universe, and they are formed from the largest perturbations of the primordial matter power spectrum. During initial cluster collapse, matter is accelerated to supersonic velocities, and the baryonic component is heated as it passes through accretion shocks. This process stabilizes when the pressure of the bound matter prevents further gravitational collapse. Galaxy clusters are useful cosmological probes, because their formation progressively freezes out at the epoch when dark energy begins to dominate the expansion and energy density of the universe. A diverse set of observables, from radio through X-ray wavelengths, are sourced from galaxy clusters, and this is useful for self-calibration. The distributions of these observables trace a cluster's dark matter halo, which represents more than 80% of the cluster's gravitational potential. One such observable is the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE), which results when the ionized intercluster medium blueshifts the cosmic microwave background via Compton scattering. Great technical advances in the last several decades have made regular observation of the SZE possible. Resolved SZE science, such as is explored in this analysis, has benefitted from the construction of large-format camera arrays consisting of highly sensitive millimeter-wave detectors, such as Bolocam. Bolocam is a submillimeter camera, sensitive to 140 GHz and 268 GHz radiation, located at one of the best observing sites in the world: the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Bolocam fielded 144 of the original spider web NTD bolometers used in an entire generation of ground-based, balloon-borne, and satellite-borne millimeter wave instrumention. Over approximately six years, our group at Caltech has developed a mature galaxy cluster observational program with Bolocam. This thesis describes the construction of the instrument's full cluster catalog: BOXSZ

  3. The plasma physics of thermal conduction in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher

    Most of the baryons in a galaxy cluster reside in a hot (10-100 million K) and tenuous gaseous atmosphere confined by the gravitational potential of the cluster's dark matter halo. Understanding the microphysics of this intracluster medium (ICM), particularly the transport processes such as thermal conduction and viscosity, is important to any understanding of the thermodynamic state of ICM atmospheres. For example, the current paradigm is that radiative losses in the ICM core are offset by energy from a central jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN), preventing a cooling catastrophe in the cluster core. However, the mechanism by which the jet-injected energy is thermalized in the ICM is highly uncertain - the dissipation of waves or turbulence by thermal conduction or plasma viscosity is a leading contender. A knowledge of thermal conduction in the ICM is also important for any attempts to understand the global temperature profiles of clusters, with consequences for e.g. cosmological studies based on observations of the SunyaevZeldovich (SZ) effect. The basic physics of thermal conduction in the ICM is very poorly understood, however, leading to a huge uncertainty in the relevant coefficients. The ICM resides in a poorly studied regime of plasma physics - it is a highly magnetized (gyroradii path), high-beta (thermal pressure >> magnetic pressure), and weakly collisional (mean-free path only moderately less than global scale lengths) plasma. Thermal conduction will be strongly suppressed perpendicular to magnetic fields lines. But even along field lines, the growth of small scale and fast kinetic instabilities may strongly suppress thermal conduction. Hence the usual assumption, that conduction along the field has its classical Spitzer value, has a shaky theoretical basis and may well be wildly inaccurate. In this proposal, we use analytical theory and computer models to explore thermal conduction in ICM-like plasmas. Recently, we have found that a strong heat

  4. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: ACT-CL J0102-4915 'EL GORDO', A Massive Merging Cluster at Redshift 0.87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menanteau, Felipe; Hughes, John P.; Sifon, Cristobal; Hilton, Matt; Gonzalez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Baker, Andrew J.; Bond, John R.; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marsden, Danica; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Reese, Erik D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Seivers, Jon; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis from new multi-wavelength observations of the exceptional galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915, likely the most massive, hottest, most X-ray luminous and brightest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect cluster known at redshifts greater than 0.6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) collaboration discovered ACT-CL J0102-4915 as the most significant Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) decrement in a sky survey area of 755 square degrees. Our VLT/FORS2 spectra of 89 member galaxies yield a cluster redshift, z = 0.870, and velocity dispersion, sigma(sub gal) = 1321+/-106 km s-1. Our Chandra observations reveal a hot and X-ray luminous system with an integrated temperature of T(sub X) = 14.5+/-1.0 keV and 0.5-2.0 keV band luminosity of L(sub X) = (2.19+/-0.11)×10(sup 45) h(sup -2)(sub 70) erg s-1. We obtain several statistically consistent cluster mass estimates; using empirical mass scaling relations with velocity dispersion, X-ray Y(sub X), and integrated SZ distortion, we estimate a cluster mass of M(sub 200a) = (2.16+/-0.32)×1015 h(sup -1)(sub 70) solar mass. We constrain the stellar content of the cluster to be less than 1% of the total mass, using Spitzer IRAC and optical imaging. The Chandra and VLT/FORS2 optical data also reveal that ACT-CL J0102-4915 is undergoing a major merger between components with a mass ratio of approximately 2 to 1. The X-ray data show significant temperature variations from a low of 6.6+/-0.7 keV at the merging low-entropy, high-metallicity, cool core to a high of 22+/-6 keV. We also see a wake in the X-ray surface brightness and deprojected gas density caused by the passage of one cluster through the other. Archival radio data at 843 MHz reveal diffuse radio emission that, if associated with the cluster, indicates the presence of an intense double radio relic, hosted by the highest redshift cluster yet. ACT-CL J0102-4915 is possibly a high-redshift analog of the famous Bullet Cluster. Such a massive cluster at this redshift

  5. Win Honors for the Motherland and the Birthplace Indonesia with Gratitude and Forethought ——An Interview with Jackson Leung Sze Mau, Chairman of Golden Island Cable Company%Win Honors for the Motherland and the Birthplace Indonesia with Gratitude and Forethought ——An Interview with Jackson Leung Sze Mau, Chairman of Golden Island Cable Company

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lili; Zhang Li

    2011-01-01

    There was a young boy who presented the bouquet on behalf of the nation to Premier Zhou Enlai during the Bandung Conference (also called Asian-African Conference) which was held in 1955, a young lad who spentendless efforts in saving huge amount of foreign capitals for his motherland - China during the economic reform,

  6. Planck 2015 results: I. Overview of products and scientific results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based ondata from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data...... Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models...... against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy...

  7. Planck Intermediate Results. XXXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck SZ sources with telescopes in the Canary Islands Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Ferragamo, A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hempel, A; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Lietzen, H; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Stolyarov, V; Streblyanska, A; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tramonte, D; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories, as part of the general optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. In total, 78 SZ sources are discussed. Deep imaging observations were obtained for most of those sources; spectroscopic observations in either in long-slit or multi-object modes were obtained for many. We found optical counterparts for 73 of the 78 candidates. This sample includes 53 spectroscopic redshifts determinations, 20 of them obtained with a multi-object spectroscopic mode. The sample contains new redshifts for 27 Planck clusters that were not included in the first Planck SZ source catalogue (PSZ1).

  8. Cosmological constraints on galaxy cluster structure

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L

    2014-01-01

    Observations of galaxy clusters (GC's) are a powerful tool to probe the evolution of the Universe at $z<2$. However, the determination of their real shape and structure is not completely understood and the assumption of asphericity is often used in several cosmological tests. In this work, we propose methods to infer the elongation of the gas distribution of GC's based on measurements of the cosmic expansion rate, luminosity distance to type Ia supernovae, X-Ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich properties of GC's and on the validity of the so-called distance duality relation. For the sample considered, we find that the clusters look elongated preferentially aligned along the line of sight with the results of the different methods showing a good agreement with each other and with those predicted by the current cosmic concordance model.

  9. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (including out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors. This was determined by measuring the output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer coupled with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. Ver...

  10. Mass modeling of galaxy clusters: quantifying hydrostatic bias and contribution from non-thermal pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Martizzi, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy cluster mass determinations achieved using X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich data combined with the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium are generally biased. The bias exists for two main reasons: non-thermal pressure forces are expected to contribute to the overall pressure balance and deviations from spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium can be present. In this paper, we use a sample of zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters to measure the magnitude of hydrostatic bias and the contribution from turbulence to the total pressure. We propose a new empirical model for turbulent pressure based on our simulations that can be applied to observations. We show that our model can be successfully applied to remove most of the bias related to neglection of turbulent pressure, which is usually not included in hydrostatic cluster mass profile reconstructions. The use of this model may significantly improve the calibration of cluster scaling relations that are a key tool for cluster cosmology.

  11. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Statistical quality assessment of SZ detections

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Diego, J -M; Douspis, M; Macias-Perez, J; Pointecouteau, E; Comis, B; Arnaud, M; Montier, L

    2014-01-01

    We examine three approaches to the problem of source classification in catalogues. Our goal is to determine the confidence with which the elements in these catalogues can be distinguished in populations on the basis of their spectral energy distribution (SED). Our analysis is based on the projection of the measurements onto a comprehensive SED model of the main signals in the considered range of frequencies. We first first consider likelihood analysis, which half way between supervised and unsupervised methods. Next, we investigate an unsupervised clustering technique. Finally, we consider a supervised classifier based on Artificial Neural Networks. We illustrate the approach and results using catalogues from various surveys. i.e., X-Rays (MCXC), optical (SDSS) and millimetric (Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ)). We show that the results from the statistical classifications of the three methods are in very good agreement with each others, although the supervised neural network-based classification shows better pe...

  12. The pre-launch Planck Sky Model: a model of sky emission at submillimetre to centimetre wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Delabrouille, J; Melin, J -B; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Jeune, M Le; Castex, G; de Zotti, G; Basak, S; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A; Bernard, J -P; Bouchet, F R; Clements, D L; da Silva, A; Dickinson, C; Dodu, F; Dolag, K; Elsner, F; Fauvet, L; Faÿ, G; Giardino, G; Leach, S; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Macias-Perez, J F; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Montier, L; Mottet, S; Paladini, R; Partridge, B; Piffaretti, R; Prezeau, G; Prunet, S; Ricciardi, S; Roman, M; Schaefer, B; Toffolatti, L

    2012-01-01

    We present the Planck Sky Model (PSM), a parametric model for the generation of all-sky, few arcminute resolution maps of sky emission at submillimetre to centimetre wavelengths, in both intensity and polarisation. Several options are implemented to model the cosmic microwave background, Galactic diffuse emission (synchrotron, free-free, thermal and spinning dust, CO lines), Galactic H-II regions, extragalactic radio sources, dusty galaxies, and thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signals from clusters of galaxies. Each component is simulated by means of educated interpolations/extrapolations of data sets available at the time of the launch of the Planck mission, complemented by state-of-the-art models of the emission. Distinctive features of the simulations are: spatially varying spectral properties of synchrotron and dust; different spectral parameters for each point source; modeling of the clustering properties of extragalactic sources and of the power spectrum of fluctuations in the cosmic infrared back...

  13. Constraints on a possible variation of the fine structure constant from galaxy cluster data

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Alcaniz, J S; G., I E Sanchez; Busti, V C

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method to probe a possible time evolution of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements of the gas mass fraction ($f_{gas}$) in galaxy clusters. Taking into account a direct relation between variations of $\\alpha$ and violations of the distance-duality relation, we discuss constraints on $\\alpha$ for a class of dilaton runaway models. Although not yet competitive with bounds from high-$z$ quasar absorption systems, our constraints, considering a sample of 29 measurements of $f_{gas}$, in the redshift interval $0.14 < z < 0.89$, provide an independent estimate of $\\alpha$ variation at low and intermediate redshifts. Furthermore, current and planned surveys will provide a larger amount of data and thus allow to improve the limits on $\\alpha$ variation obtained in the present analysis.

  14. Effect

    OpenAIRE

    M.F. Sabry; M.R. Hamed; El Sayed, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Stress alters psychological diseases such as anxiety and depression. Protein malnutrition (PM) contributes to psychological disorders. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of biphenyl dimethyl dicarboxylate (DDB) on anxiety of psychologically stressed protein malnourished mice as compared to its effect in normally-fed mice. Fluoxetine (FLX) was used as reference standard. Animals were randomly divided into two major groups, normally-fed group provided with 20% casein diet and a p...

  15. Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Abdou Seleem; Fakhr El-Din M. Lashein

    2016-01-01

    Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker that belongs to the phenylalkylamine group. It has been clinically used for various diseases such as combating hypertension, ischemic heart diseases, supraventricular antiarrhythmic and tycolysis. The study was conducted to investigate the effect of verapamil on selected pro- and apoptotic factors during prenatal retinal differentiation of mice at E14 and E17 of gestation. The pregnant females were classified into two groups, the first is the control and...

  16. Low-Resistance Spin Injection into Silicon Using Graphene Tunnel Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    generate high local magnetoresistance. Reducing the resistance–area product also has a positive effect on the electrical properties of the spin device, as...injection through an Fe/ AlGaAs Schottky barrier. Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 4092–4094 (2003). 14. Motsnyi, V. F. et al. Electrical spin injection in a ferromagnet...37. Sze, S. M. Physics of Semiconductor Devices 29 (Wiley, 1981). 38. Dery, H., Cywinski, L. & Sham, L. J. Lateral diffusive spin transport in

  17. Constraints on the High-l Power Spectrum of Millimeter-wave Anisotropies from APEX-SZ

    CERN Document Server

    Reichardt, C L; Ade, P A R; Basu, K; Bender, A N; Bertoldi, F; Cho, H -M; Chon, G; Dobbs, M; Ferrusca, D; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Horellou, C; Johansson, D; Johnson, B R; Kennedy, J; Kneissl, R; Lanting, T; Lee, A T; Lueker, M; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Nord, M; Pacaud, F; Richards, P L; Schaaf, R; Schwan, D; Spieler, H; Weiss, A; Westbrook, B

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular power spectrum of millimeter wave anisotropies with the APEX-SZ instrument. APEX-SZ has mapped 0.8 square degrees of sky at a frequency of 150 GHz with an angular resolution of 1'. These new measurements significantly improve the power constraints at 150 GHz over the range of angular multipoles 3000 < l < 10,000, limiting the total astronomical anisotropy in a flat band power to be less than 105 microK^2 at 95% CL. We expect both submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies and secondary CMB anisotropies from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) to significantly contribute to the observed power. Subtracting the SZE power spectrum expected for sigma_8=0.8 and masking bright sources, the best fit value for the remaining power is C_l = 1.1^{+0.9}_{-0.8} x 10^{-5} micro K^2 (1.7^{+1.4}_{-1.3} Jy^2 sr^{-1}). This agrees well with model predictions for power due to submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies. Simultaneously fitting for the amplitude of the SZE power spectrum and a Poiss...

  18. New High-Resolution Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Observations with GBT+MUSTANG

    CERN Document Server

    Mroczkowski, Tony; Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phillip; Mason, Brian; Reese, Erik; Sarazin, Craig; Sievers, Jonathon; Sun, Ming; Young, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We present recent high angular resolution (9") Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) observations with MUSTANG, a 90-GHz bolometric receiver on the Green Bank Telescope. MUSTANG has now imaged several massive clusters of galaxies in some of the highest-resolution SZE imaging to date, revealing complex pressure substructure within the hot intra-cluster gas in merging clusters. We focus on three merging, intermediate redshift clusters here: MACS J0744.8+3927, MACS J0717.5+3745, RX J1347.5-1145. In one of these merging clusters, MACS J0744.8+3927, the MUSTANG observation has revealed shocked gas that was previously undetected in X-ray observations. Our preliminary results for MACS J0717.5+3745 demonstrate the complementarity these observations provide when combined with X-ray observations of the thermal emission and radio observations of the non-thermal emission. And finally, by revisiting RX J1347.5-1145, we note an inter- esting correlation between its radio emission and the SZE data. While observations of the therm...

  19. Detection of Enhancement in Number Densities of Background Galaxies due to Magnification by Massive Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J. J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.

    2016-04-11

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE-) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z similar or equal to 0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. These clusters are observed by the Megacam on the Magellan Clay Telescope though gri filters. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian similar or equal to 0.9 (low-z background) and z(median) similar or equal to 1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3 sigma and 1.3 sigma for the low-and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit Navarro, Frenk and White models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor. that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in. resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting. for the combined background populations with 1 sigma uncertainties is 0.83 +/- 0.24(stat) +/- 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We use our best-fitting eta to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. This work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  20. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; Desai, S.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; von der Linden, A.; Liu, J.; McDonald, M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Strazzullo, V.; Stubbs, C. W.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE-) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z ≃ 0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. These clusters are observed by the Megacam on the Magellan Clay Telescope though gri filters. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian ≃ 0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian ≃ 1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit Navarro, Frenk and White models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We use our best-fitting η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. This work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  1. A search for sterile neutrinos with the latest cosmological observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Lu; Zhang, Jing-Fei [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Zhang, Xin [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-06-15

    We report the result of a search for sterile neutrinos with the latest cosmological observations. Both cases of massless and massive sterile neutrinos are considered in the ΛCDM cosmology. The cosmological observations used in this work include the Planck 2015 temperature and polarization data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the Hubble constant direct measurement data, the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts data, the Planck lensing data, and the cosmic shear data. We find that the current observational data give a hint of the existence of massless sterile neutrino (as dark radiation) at the 1.44σ level, and the consideration of an extra massless sterile neutrino can indeed relieve the tension between observations and improve the cosmological fit. For the case of massive sterile neutrino, the observations give a rather tight upper limit on the mass, which implies that actually a massless sterile neutrino is more favored. Our result is consistent with the recent result of neutrino oscillation experiment done by the Daya Bay and MINOS collaborations, as well as the recent result of cosmic ray experiment done by the IceCube collaboration. (orig.)

  2. Bias from gas inhomogeneities in the pressure profiles as measured from X-ray and SZ observations

    CERN Document Server

    Khedekar, S; Kravtsov, A; Zhuravleva, I; Lau, E T; Nagai, D; Sunyaev, R

    2012-01-01

    X-ray observations of galaxy clusters provide emission measure weighted spectra, arising from a range of density and temperature fluctuations in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). This is fitted to a single temperature plasma emission model to provide an estimate of the gas density and temperature, which are sensitive to the gas inhomogeneities. Therefore, X-ray observations yield a potentially biased estimate of the thermal gas pressure, P_X. At the same time Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) observations directly measure the integrated gas pressure, P_SZ. If the X-ray pressure profiles are strongly biased with respect to to the SZ, then one has the possibility to probe the gas inhomogeneities, even at scales unresolved by the current generation of telescopes. At the same time, a weak bias has implications for the use of mass proxies like Y_SZ and Y_X as cosmological probes. In this paper we investigate the dependence of the bias, P_X(r)/P_SZ(r)-1, on the characteristics of fluctuations in the ICM taking into account the ...

  3. The XMM Cluster Outskirts Project (X-COP)

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, D; Pointecouteau, E; Molendi, S; Paltani, S; Tchernin, C

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are thought to grow hierarchically through the continuous merging and accretion of smaller structures across cosmic time. In the local Universe, these phenomena are still active in the outer regions of massive clusters ($R>R_{500}$), where the matter distribution is expected to become clumpy and asymmetric because of the presence of accreting structures. We present the XMM-Newton Cluster Outskirts Project (X-COP), which targets the outer regions of a sample of 13 massive clusters ($M_{500}>3\\times10^{14}M_\\odot$) in the redshift range 0.04-0.1 at uniform depth. The sample was selected based on the signal-to-noise ratio in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey with the aim of combining high-quality X-ray and SZ constraints throughout the entire cluster volume. Our observing strategy allows us to reach a sensitivity of $3\\times10^{-16}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-2}$ in the [0.5-2.0] keV range thanks to a good control of systematic uncertainties. The combination of depth and field of v...

  4. The hot gas content of fossil galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, G W; Arnaud, M; van der Burg, R F J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the hot gas in four fossil galaxy systems detected at high significance in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations reveal overall temperatures of kT ~ 5-6 keV and yield hydrostatic masses M500,HE > 3.5 x 10e14 Msun, confirming their nature as bona fide massive clusters. We measure the thermodynamic properties of the hot gas in X-rays (out to beyond R500 in three cases) and derive their individual pressure profiles out to R ~ 2.5 R500 with the SZ data. We combine the X-ray and SZ data to measure hydrostatic mass profiles and to examine the hot gas content and its radial distribution. The average Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) concentration parameter, c500 = 3.2 +/- 0.4, is the same as that of relaxed `normal' clusters. The gas mass fraction profiles exhibit striking variation in the inner regions, but converge to approximately the cosmic baryon fraction (corrected for depletion) at R500. Beyond R500 the gas mass fraction profiles again diverge, which we int...

  5. An Australia telescope survey for CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, R; Ekers, R D; Sinclair, M; Silk, J

    2000-01-01

    We have surveyed six distinct `empty fields' using the Australia TelescopeCompact Array in an ultra-compact configuration with the aim of imaging, with ahigh brightness sensitivity, any arcmin-scale brightness-temperatureanisotropies in the background radio sky. The six well-separated regions wereobserved at a frequency of 8.7 GHz and the survey regions were limited by theATCA primary beams which have a full width at half maximum of 6 arcmin at thisfrequency; all fields were observed with a resolution of 2 arcmin and an rmsthermal noise of 24 microJy/beam. After subtracting foreground confusiondetected in higher resolution images of the fields, residual fluctuations inStokes I images are consistent with the expectations from thermal noise andweaker (unidentified) foreground sources; the Stokes Q and U images areconsistent with expectations from thermal noise. Within the sensitivity of our observations, we have no reason to believe thatthere are any Sunyaev-Zeldovich holes in the microwave sky surveyed. Assumi...

  6. Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Carvalho, P; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gilfanov, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hempel, A; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Mac\\'\\ias-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Mart\\'\\inez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Mart\\'\\in, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark and grey clear time available at the telescope was devoted to observations of Planck objects. Some observations of distant clusters were also done at the 6-m Bolshoy Telescope Azimutal'ny (BTA) of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In total, deep, direct images of more than one hundred fields were obtained in multiple filters. We identified 47 previously unknown galaxy clusters, 41 of which are included in the Planck catalogue of SZ sources. The redshifts of 65 Planck clusters were measured spectroscopically and 14 more were measured photometrically. We discuss the details of cluster optical identifications and redshift measurements. We also present new spectroscopic redhifts f...

  7. Dynamical analysis of galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    CERN Document Server

    White, J A; King, L J; Lee, B E; Russell, H R; Baum, S A; Clowe, D I; Coleman, J E; Donahue, M; Edge, A C; Fabian, A C; Johnstone, R M; McNamara, B R; ODea, C P; Sanders, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the merging galaxy cluster system Abell 2146 using spectroscopy obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope. As revealed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the system is undergoing a major merger and has a gas structure indicative of a recent first core passage. The system presents two large shock fronts, making it unique amongst these rare systems. The hot gas structure indicates that the merger axis must be close to the plane of the sky and that the two merging clusters are relatively close in mass, from the observation of two shock fronts. Using 63 spectroscopically determined cluster members, we apply various statistical tests to establish the presence of two distinct massive structures. With the caveat that the system has recently undergone a major merger, the virial mass estimate is M_vir = 8.5 +4.3 -4.7 x 10 ^14 M_sol for the whole system, consistent with the mass determination in a previous study using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal....

  8. The pre-launch Planck Sky Model: a model of sky emission at submillimetre to centimetre wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabrouille, J.; Betoule, M.; Melin, J.-B.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Le Jeune, M.; Castex, G.; de Zotti, G.; Basak, S.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bouchet, F. R.; Clements, D. L.; da Silva, A.; Dickinson, C.; Dodu, F.; Dolag, K.; Elsner, F.; Fauvet, L.; Faÿ, G.; Giardino, G.; Leach, S.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Montier, L.; Mottet, S.; Paladini, R.; Partridge, B.; Piffaretti, R.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Ricciardi, S.; Roman, M.; Schaefer, B.; Toffolatti, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present the Planck Sky Model (PSM), a parametric model for generating all-sky, few arcminute resolution maps of sky emission at submillimetre to centimetre wavelengths, in both intensity and polarisation. Several options are implemented to model the cosmic microwave background, Galactic diffuse emission (synchrotron, free-free, thermal and spinning dust, CO lines), Galactic H ii regions, extragalactic radio sources, dusty galaxies, and thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signals from clusters of galaxies. Each component is simulated by means of educated interpolations/extrapolations of data sets available at the time of the launch of the Planck mission, complemented by state-of-the-art models of the emission. Distinctive features of the simulations are spatially varying spectral properties of synchrotron and dust; different spectral parameters for each point source; modelling of the clustering properties of extragalactic sources and of the power spectrum of fluctuations in the cosmic infrared background. The PSM enables the production of random realisations of the sky emission, constrained to match observational data within their uncertainties. It is implemented in a software package that is regularly updated with incoming information from observations. The model is expected to serve as a useful tool for optimising planned microwave and sub-millimetre surveys and testing data processing and analysis pipelines. It is, in particular, used to develop and validate data analysis pipelines within the Planck collaboration. A version of the software that can be used for simulating the observations for a variety of experiments is made available on a dedicated website.

  9. Planck Early Results: The Early Release Compact Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Cantalupo, C M; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Haissinski, J; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Huynh, M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Leroy, C; Lilje, P B; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Sajina, A; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    A brief description of the methodology of construction, contents and usage of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC), including the Early Cold Cores (ECC) and the Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich (ESZ) cluster catalogue is provided. The catalogue is based on data that consists of mapping the entire sky once and 60% of the sky a second time by Planck. A Monte-Carlo algorithm based on the injection and extraction of artificial sources into the Planck maps was implemented to select reliable sources among all extracted candidates such that the cumulative reliability of the catalogue is >=90%. As a result of the Monte-Carlo assessment of the reliability of sources from different techniques, the PowellSnakes source extraction technique was used at the 5 frequencies between 30 and 143 GHz while the SExtractor technique was used between 217 and 857 GHz. The 10 sigma photometric flux density limit of the catalogue at |b|>30 deg is 0.49, 1.0, 0.67, 0.5, 0.33, 0.28, 0.25, 0.47 and 0.82 Jy at each of the nine f...

  10. Thermal SZ fluctuations in the ICM: probing turbulence and thermodynamics in Coma cluster with ${\\it Planck}$

    CERN Document Server

    Khatri, R

    2016-01-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) ${\\it fluctuations}$ can open up a new powerful window into the astrophysics of the hot diffuse medium in cosmological structures. We report the detection of SZ fluctuations in the intracluster medium (ICM) of Coma cluster observed with ${\\it Planck}$. The SZ data links the maximum observable X-ray scale to the large Mpc scale, extending our knowledge of the power spectrum of ICM fluctuations. Deprojecting the 2-d SZ perturbations into 3-d pressure fluctuations, we find an amplitude spectrum which peaks at $\\delta P/P = 33\\pm 12\\%$ and $74\\pm19\\%$ in the $15'$ and $40'$ radius region, respectively. By using high-resolution hydrodynamical models, we improve the ICM turbulence constraints in Coma, finding 3-d Mach number ${\\rm Ma_{3d}}= 0.8\\pm0.3$ (15' region) and injection scale $L_{\\rm inj}\\approx 500$ kpc. Such properties are consistent with driving due to mergers tied to internal galaxy groups. For larger radii (40'), the injection scale is unaltered and the Mach number do...

  11. Cross-correlating Planck tSZ with RCSLenS weak lensing: Implications for cosmology and AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Hojjati, Alireza; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; McCarthy, Ian G; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hinshaw, Gary; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Miller, Lance; Viola, Massimo; Tanimura, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the spatial mapping between (hot) baryons and the total matter in the Universe, via the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) map from Planck and the weak gravitational lensing maps from the Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCSLenS). The cross-correlations are performed on the map level where all the sources (including diffuse intergalactic gas) contribute to the signal. We consider two configuration-space correlation function estimators, $\\xi^{ y-\\kappa}$ and $\\xi^ {y-\\gamma_{t}}$, and a Fourier space estimator, $C_{\\ell}^{y-\\kappa}$, in our analysis. We detect a significant correlation out to three degrees of angular separation on the sky. Based on statistical noise only, we can report 13$\\sigma$ and 17$\\sigma$ detections of the cross-correlation using the configuration-space $y-\\kappa$ and $y-\\gamma_{t}$ estimators, respectively. Including a heuristic estimate of the sampling variance yields a detection significance of 6$\\sigma$ and 8$\\sigma$, respectively. A ...

  12. The CCAT-prime Extreme Field-of-View Submillimeter Telescope on Cerro Chajnantor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Brian; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Fich, Michel; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Herter, Terry L.; Murray, Norman W.; Niemack, Michael D.; Riechers, Dominik; Schilke, Peter; Stacey, Gordon J.; Stutzki, Juergen; CCAT-prime Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    CCAT-prime is a six meter aperture off-axis submillimeter telescope that we plan to build at 5600m elevation on Cerro Chajnantor in Chile. The CCAT-prime optics are based on a cross-Dragone design with high throughput and a wide field-of-view optimized to increase the mapping speed of next generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. These characteristics make CCAT-prime an excellent platform for a wide range of next generation millimeter and submillimeter science goals, and a potential platform for CMB stage-IV measurements. Here we present the telescope design for CCAT-prime and review the science goals.Taking advantage of the high elevation site, the first generation instrument for CCAT-prime will measure seven different frequency bands from 350um to 3mm. These seven bands will enable precise measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effects (SZE) by separating contributions from CMB, thermal SZE, kinetic SZE, bright submm galaxies, and radio sources with a goal of extracting the peculiar velocities from a large number of galaxy clusters. Additional science priorities for CCAT-prime include: Galactic Ecology studies of the dynamic intersteller medium by mapping the fine structure lines [CI], [CII] and [NII] as well as high-excitation CO lines at the shortest wavelength bands; high redshift intensity mapping of [CII] emission from star-forming galaxies that likely dominates cosmic reionization at z~5-9 to probe the Epoch of Reionization; and next generation CMB polarization measurements to constrain inflation and cosmological models. The CCAT-prime facility will further our understanding of astrophysical processes from moments after the Big Bang to the present-day evolution of the Milky Way.

  13. Galaxy cluster scaling relations measured with APEX-SZ

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, A N; Ade, P A R; Basu, K; Bertoldi, F; Burkutean, S; Clarke, J; Dahlin, D; Dobbs, M; Ferrusca, D; Flanigan, D; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Horellou, C; Johnson, B R; Kermish, Z D; Klein, M; Kneissl, R; Lanting, T; Lee, A T; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Muders, D; Nagarajan, A; Pacaud, F; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Schaaf, R; Schwan, D; Sommer, M W; Spieler, H; Tucker, C; Westbrook, B

    2014-01-01

    We present thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) measurements for 42 galaxy clusters observed at 150 GHz with the APEX-SZ experiment. For each cluster, we model the pressure profile and calculate the integrated Comptonization $Y$ to estimate the total thermal energy of the intracluster medium (ICM). We compare the measured $Y$ values to X-ray observables of the ICM from the literature (cluster gas mass $M_{gas}$, temperature $T_X$, and $Y_X =M_{gas}T_X$) that relate to total cluster mass. We measure power law scaling relations, including an intrinsic scatter, between the SZE and X-ray observables for both the X-ray selected and uniform REFLEX-DXL cluster sample and the full ad hoc APEX-SZ sample. We observe that the lack of uniform X-ray analysis for the full cluster sample introduces significant variability into the measured scaling relations and dominates the level of intrinsic scatter. For the REFLEX-DXL sample, we find results consistent with a self-similar model of cluster evolution dominated by gravit...

  14. Constraints on the Hubble Parameter from galaxy clusters and the Validity of the Cosmic Distance Duality Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L

    2012-01-01

    Constraints on the Hubble parameter, $H_0$, via X-ray surface brightness and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) observations of the galaxy clusters depend on the validity of the cosmic distance duality relation (DD relation), $\\eta= D_{L}(z)(1+z)^{-2}/D_{A}(z) = 1$, where $D_L$ and $D_A$ are the luminosity distance and angular diameter distance (ADD), respectively. In this work, we argue that if the DD relation does not hold the X-ray plus SZE technique furnishes a $H^{*}_{0}=H_{0}/\\eta^{2}$. We use 25 ADD of galaxy clusters to obtain simultaneous constraints on $H_{0}$ and possible violation of the DD relation in a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. Such a violation is parametrized by two functions: $\\eta(z) = 1 + \\eta_{0}z$ and $\\eta(z) = 1 + \\eta_{0}z/(1+z)$, where $\\eta_0$ is a constant parameter quantifying possible departures from the strict validity. Finally, by marginalizing on the $\\eta_{0}$ in both parameterizations, we obtain constraints on $H_0$ regardless of the validity of the DD relation. For the linear and...

  15. A Measurement of Arcminute Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, Matthew K; Carlstrom, John E; Culverhouse, Thomas; Greer, Christopher; Hawkins, David; Hennessy, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Lamb, James W; Leitch, Erik M; Loh, Michael; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; Muchovej, Stephen; Pryke, Clem; Woody, David

    2009-01-01

    We present 30 GHz measurements of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA). The measurements are sensitive to arcminute angular scales, where secondary anisotropy from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) is expected to dominate. For a broad bin centered at multipole 4066 we find 60+65-55 uK^2, of which 26+/-5uK^2 is the expected contribution from primary CMB anisotropy and 20+/-28uK^2 is the expected contribution from undetected radio sources. These results imply an upper limit of 149uK^2 (95% C.L.) on the secondary contribution to the anisotropy, lower than that reported previously by other 30 GHz instruments. The SZA interferometric observations employed a hybrid configuration of antennas including short and long antenna separations to provide high sensitivity to arcminute anisotropy while simultaneously detecting 30 GHz radio sources at much higher resolution. The hybrid configuration was also used to check whether SZE anisotropy p...

  16. Three-dimensional Multi-probe Analysis of A1689

    CERN Document Server

    Umetsu, Keiichi; Medezinski, Elinor; Nonino, Mario; Mroczkowski, Tony; Diego, Jose M; Ettori, Stefano; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Broadhurst, Tom; Lemze, Doron

    2015-01-01

    We perform a 3D multi-probe analysis of the rich galaxy cluster A1689 by combining improved weak-lensing data from new BVRi'z' Subaru/Suprime-Cam observations with strong-lensing, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) data sets. We reconstruct the projected matter distribution from a joint weak-lensing analysis of 2D shear and azimuthally integrated magnification constraints, the combination of which allows us to break the mass-sheet degeneracy. The resulting mass distribution reveals elongation with axis ratio ~0.7 in projection. When assuming a spherical halo, our full weak-lensing analysis yields a projected concentration of $c_{200c}^{2D}=8.9\\pm 1.1$ ($c_{vir}^{2D}\\sim 11$), consistent with and improved from earlier weak-lensing work. We find excellent consistency between weak and strong lensing in the region of overlap. In a parametric triaxial framework, we constrain the intrinsic structure and geometry of the matter and gas distributions, by combining weak/strong lensing and X-ray/SZE data with mi...

  17. The redMaPPer Galaxy Cluster Catalog From DES Science Verification Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E. S. [et al.

    2016-04-29

    We describe updates to the redMaPPer algorithm, a photometric red-sequence cluster finder specifically designed for large photometric surveys. The updated algorithm is applied to $150\\,\\mathrm{deg}^2$ of Science Verification (SV) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 photometric data set. The DES SV catalog is locally volume limited, and contains 786 clusters with richness $\\lambda>20$ (roughly equivalent to $M_{\\mathrm{500c}}\\gtrsim10^{14}\\,h_{70}^{-1}\\,M_{\\odot}$) and 0.2 < $z$ <0.9. The DR8 catalog consists of 26311 clusters with 0.08 < $z$ < 0.6, with a sharply increasing richness threshold as a function of redshift for $z\\gtrsim 0.35$. The photometric redshift performance of both catalogs is shown to be excellent, with photometric redshift uncertainties controlled at the $\\sigma_z/(1+z)\\sim 0.01$ level for $z\\lesssim0.7$, rising to $\\sim0.02$ at $z\\sim0.9$ in DES SV. We make use of $Chandra$ and $XMM$ X-ray and South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zeldovich data to show that the centering performance and mass--richness scatter are consistent with expectations based on prior runs of redMaPPer on SDSS data. We also show how the redMaPPer photo-$z$ and richness estimates are relatively insensitive to imperfect star/galaxy separation and small-scale star masks.

  18. rhapsody-g simulations - I. The cool cores, hot gas and stellar content of massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Oliver; Martizzi, Davide; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E.; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-09-01

    We present the rhapsody-g suite of cosmological hydrodynamic zoom simulations of 10 massive galaxy clusters at the Mvir ∼ 1015 M⊙ scale. These simulations include cooling and subresolution models for star formation and stellar and supermassive black hole feedback. The sample is selected to capture the whole gamut of assembly histories that produce clusters of similar final mass. We present an overview of the successes and shortcomings of such simulations in reproducing both the stellar properties of galaxies as well as properties of the hot plasma in clusters. In our simulations, a long-lived cool-core/non-cool-core dichotomy arises naturally, and the emergence of non-cool cores is related to low angular momentum major mergers. Nevertheless, the cool-core clusters exhibit a low central entropy compared to observations, which cannot be alleviated by thermal active galactic nuclei feedback. For cluster scaling relations, we find that the simulations match well the M500-Y500 scaling of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters but deviate somewhat from the observed X-ray luminosity and temperature scaling relations in the sense of being slightly too bright and too cool at fixed mass, respectively. Stars are produced at an efficiency consistent with abundance-matching constraints and central galaxies have star formation rates consistent with recent observations. While our simulations thus match various key properties remarkably well, we conclude that the shortcomings strongly suggest an important role for non-thermal processes (through feedback or otherwise) or thermal conduction in shaping the intracluster medium.

  19. Measuring the Redshift Dependence of The Cosmic Microwave Background Monopole Temperature With Planck Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, I.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Da Silva, A.; Ebling, H.; Kashlinsky, A.; Kocevski, D.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the capability of Planck data to constrain deviations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) blackbody temperature from adiabatic evolution using the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy induced by clusters of galaxies. We consider two types of data sets depending on how the cosmological signal is removed: using a CMB template or using the 217 GHz map. We apply two different statistical estimators, based on the ratio of temperature anisotropies at two different frequencies and on a fit to the spectral variation of the cluster signal with frequency. The ratio method is biased if CMB residuals with amplitude approximately 1 microK or larger are present in the data, while residuals are not so critical for the fit method. To test for systematics, we construct a template from clusters drawn from a hydro-simulation included in the pre-launch Planck Sky Model. We demonstrate that, using a proprietary catalog of X-ray-selected clusters with measured redshifts, electron densities, and X-ray temperatures, we can constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution, measured by the parameter a in the redshift scaling T (z) = T0(1 + z)(sup 1-alpha), with an accuracy of sigma(sub alpha) = 0.011 in the most optimal case and with sigma alpha = 0.018 for a less optimal case. These results represent a factor of 2-3 improvement over similar measurements carried out using quasar spectral lines and a factor 6-20 with respect to earlier results using smaller cluster samples.

  20. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given ΛCDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the ARGO code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate N-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual lightcone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10% of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, e.g. BAO reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ), integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) measurements, or environmental studies.

  1. The RedMaPPer Galaxy Cluster Catalog From DES Science Verification Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Hollowood, D.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Mayers, J.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Saro, A.; Vergara Cervantes, C.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wilcox, H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Childress, M.; Collins, C. A.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, T. M.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Hilton, M.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Kay, S. T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G. F.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Mann, R. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Sahlén, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stott, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Uddin, S.; Viana, P. T. P.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We describe updates to the redMaPPer algorithm, a photometric red-sequence cluster finder specifically designed for large photometric surveys. The updated algorithm is applied to 150 {{deg}}2 of Science Verification (SV) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 photometric data set. The DES SV catalog is locally volume limited and contains 786 clusters with richness λ \\gt 20 (roughly equivalent to {M}{{500c}}≳ {10}14 {h}70-1 {M}⊙ ) and 0.2\\lt z\\lt 0.9. The DR8 catalog consists of 26,311 clusters with 0.08\\lt z\\lt 0.6, with a sharply increasing richness threshold as a function of redshift for z≳ 0.35. The photometric redshift performance of both catalogs is shown to be excellent, with photometric redshift uncertainties controlled at the {σ }z/(1+z)˜ 0.01 level for z≲ 0.7, rising to ˜0.02 at z˜ 0.9 in DES SV. We make use of Chandra and XMM X-ray and South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zeldovich data to show that the centering performance and mass-richness scatter are consistent with expectations based on prior runs of redMaPPer on SDSS data. We also show how the redMaPPer photo-z and richness estimates are relatively insensitive to imperfect star/galaxy separation and small-scale star masks.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  3. Multi-frequency survey of background radiations of the Universe. The "Cosmological Gene" project. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhel'Skii, N. A.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Grechkin, A. A.; Zharov, V. I.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Majorova, E. K.; Semenova, T. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskii, R. Yu.; Khaikin, V. B.

    2011-10-01

    The results of the first stage of the "Cosmological Gene" project of the Russian Academy of Sciences are reported. These results consist in the accumulation of multi-frequency data in 31 frequency channels in the wavelength interval 1-55 cm with maximum achievable statistical sensitivity limited by the noise of background radio sources at all wavelengths exceeding 1.38 cm. The survey region is determined by constraints 00 h microwave background are reported as well as the contribution of these noise components in millimeter-wave experiments to be performed in the nearest years. The role of dipole radio emission of fullerene-type dust nanostructures is shown to be small. The most precise estimates of the role of background radio sources with inverted spectra are given and these sources are shown to create no serious interference in experiments. The average spectral indices of the weakest sources of the NVSS and FIRST catalogs are estimated. The "saturation" data for all wavelengths allowed a constraint to be imposed on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich noise (the SZ noise) at all wavelengths, and made it possible to obtain independent estimates of the average sky temperature from sources, substantially weaker than those listed in the NVSS catalog. These estimates are inconsistent with the existence of powerful extragalactic synchrotron background associated with radio sources. Appreciable "quadrupole" anisotropy in is detected in the distribution of the spectral index of the synchrotron radiation of the Galaxy, and this anisotropy should be taken into account when estimating the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on small l. All the results are compared to the results obtained by foreign researchers in recent years.

  4. The hot gas content of fossil galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, G. W.; Pointecouteau, E.; Arnaud, M.; van der Burg, R. F. J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the properties of the hot gas in four fossil galaxy systems detected at high significance in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations reveal overall temperatures of kT ~ 5-6 keV and yield hydrostatic masses M500,HE ≳ 3.5 × 1014M⊙, confirming their nature as bona fide massive clusters. We measure the thermodynamic properties of the hot gas in X-rays (out to beyond R500 in three cases) and derive their individual pressure profiles out to R ~ 2.5 R500 with the SZ data. We combine the X-ray and SZ data to measure hydrostatic mass profiles and to examine the hot gas content and its radial distribution. The average Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) concentration parameter, ⟨ c500 ⟩ = 3.2 ± 0.4, is the same as that of relaxed "normal" clusters. The gas mass fraction profiles exhibit striking variation in the inner regions, but converge to approximately the cosmic baryon fraction (corrected for depletion) at R500. Beyond R500 the gas mass fraction profiles again diverge, which we interpret as being due to a difference in gas clumping and/or a breakdown of hydrostatic equilibrium in the external regions. Our observations point to considerable radial variation in the hot gas content and in the gas clumping and/or hydrostatic equilibrium properties in these fossil clusters, at odds with the interpretation of their being old, evolved, and undisturbed. At least some fossil objects appear to be dynamically young.

  5. Cross-correlating Planck tSZ with RCSLenS weak lensing: implications for cosmology and AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Alireza; Tröster, Tilman; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; McCarthy, Ian G.; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hinshaw, Gary; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Miller, Lance; Viola, Massimo; Tanimura, Hideki

    2017-10-01

    We present measurements of the spatial mapping between (hot) baryons and the total matter in the Universe, via the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) map from Planck and the weak gravitational lensing maps from the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS). The cross-correlations are performed on the map level where all the sources (including diffuse intergalactic gas) contribute to the signal. We consider two configuration-space correlation function estimators, ξy-κ and ξ ^ {y-γ t}, and a Fourier-space estimator, C_{ℓ}^{y-κ}, in our analysis. We detect a significant correlation out to 3° of angular separation on the sky. Based on statistical noise only, we can report 13σ and 17σ detections of the cross-correlation using the configuration-space y-κ and y-γt estimators, respectively. Including a heuristic estimate of the sampling variance yields a detection significance of 7σ and 8σ, respectively. A similar level of detection is obtained from the Fourier-space estimator, C_{ℓ}^{y-κ}. As each estimator probes different dynamical ranges, their combination improves the significance of the detection. We compare our measurements with predictions from the cosmo-OverWhelmingly Large Simulations suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, where different galactic feedback models are implemented. We find that a model with considerable active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback that removes large quantities of hot gas from galaxy groups and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-yr best-fitting cosmological parameters provides the best match to the measurements. All baryonic models in the context of a Planck cosmology overpredict the observed signal. Similar cosmological conclusions are drawn when we employ a halo model with the observed 'universal' pressure profile.

  6. Towards a more sustainable agriculture: wheat mycorrhization to protect against powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, G; Tisserant, B; Randoux, B; Fontaine, J; Reignault, Ph; Sahraoui, A Lounes-Hadj

    2013-01-01

    One of the means to reduce the use of pesticides, which are harmful for humans and the environment, is the development of alternative methods to control crop diseases. In this context, arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation possesses a great potential for crop production by a more sustainable agriculture. Our work aims to (i) determine the optimal conditions for wheat mycorrhization (ii) study the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation on a foliar disease of wheat, powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici, Bgt), (iii) evaluate the stimulation of natural defences of wheat (Triticuma estivum). Therefore, this work consisted firstly of defining the parameters, affecting the establishment of wheat mycorrhization, such as: phosphorus concentration (62, 12.5, 6.2 mg/L), culture time (4, 5, 6, 7 weeks), arbuscular mycorrhizal species used as an inoculum (Rhizophagus irregularis (Ri), Glomus masseae (Gm) and the mixture of (Ri+Gm)) and wheat cultivars (Orvantis and Lord, sensitive and moderately resistant to Bgt, respectively). Secondly, the protective effect of mycorrhizal inoculation against Bgt was estimated by comparing infection rates of wheat seedlings subjected and non-subjected to AMF. Finally, to better understand the biochemical mechanisms involved in the protection, two enzymatic activities described as defense markers [lipoxygenase (LOX) and peroxidase (POX)] were also assessed. Extensive mycorrhization (about 31%) was obtained at P/5 concentration (12.5 mg/L) when wheat plants were 6 weeks old. The highest colonization rate was obtained when wheat was inoculated with Gm compared to SZE and Ri. The higher resistance level of Lord wheat cultivar against Bgt did not affect the mycorrhizal rate compared to the more susceptible cultivar Orvantis. Our work showed a significant protection level in mycorrhizal (M) wheat plants against Bgt, estimated to about 25 and 43% with Ri and SZE respectively compared to non-mycorrhizal (NM) Orvantis plants. The

  7. The Effect of Liquid Aluminium on the Corrosion of Carbonaceous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzyk S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Podczas wielu procesów wytapiania aluminium występują bezpośrednie kontakty ciekłego metalu i materiałów węglowych stanowiących wyłożenia wanien, pieców, tygli i kadzi itp. W rezultacie zachodzą procesy tworzenia węglika glinu na powierzchni między fazowej a następnie jego roztwarzania, które są uznawane jest za jeden z najważniejszych mechanizmów powodujących zużycie powierzchni i obniżenia żywotności urządzeń, zwłaszcza w procesie elektrolizy aluminium. Niniejsza praca miała na celu bliższe poznanie początkowych etapów tworzenia AI4C3 na powierzchni granicznej aluminium/węgiel. Zbadano trzy rodzaje materiałów węglowych: amorficzne, semigrafitowe i grafitowe, w obecności oraz przy braku stopionego kriolitu. Ponieważ jest bardzo trudno zbadać warstwę AI4C3 bezpośrednio (in situ, zastosowano dwie pośrednie techniki eksperymentalne: pomiar potencjału i rezystancji elektryczjnej. Stwierdzono, iż proces powstawania węglika glinu będzie zależeć od wielu zjawisk związanych z obecnością elektrolitu (interkalacja, penetracja i rozpuszczanie, jak również od struktury materiału węglowego a zwłaszcza od obecności fazy nieuporządkowanej.

  8. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The placebo effect Joseph H. Friedman, MD Richard Dubinsky, MD WHAT ... placebo: a “dummy” medication that should have no effect on the condition. Placebos are not only drugs. ...

  9. Phosphorus supply, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, and plant genotype impact on the protective efficacy of mycorrhizal inoculation against wheat powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, G; Randoux, B; Tisserant, B; Fontaine, J; Magnin-Robert, M; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, A; Reignault, Ph

    2016-10-01

    A potential alternative strategy to chemical control of plant diseases could be the stimulation of plant defense by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). In the present study, the influence of three parameters (phosphorus supply, mycorrhizal inoculation, and wheat cultivar) on AMF protective efficiency against Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, responsible for powdery mildew, was investigated under controlled conditions. A 5-fold reduction (P/5) in the level of phosphorus supply commonly recommended for wheat in France improved Funneliformis mosseae colonization and promoted protection against B. graminis f. sp. tritici in a more susceptible wheat cultivar. However, a further decrease in P affected plant growth, even under mycorrhizal conditions. Two commercially available AMF inocula (F. mosseae, Solrize®) and one laboratory inoculum (Rhizophagus irregularis) were tested for mycorrhizal development and protection against B. graminis f. sp. tritici of two moderately susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars at P/5. Mycorrhizal levels were the highest with F. mosseae (38 %), followed by R. irregularis (19 %) and Solrize® (SZE, 8 %). On the other hand, the highest protection level against B. graminis f. sp. tritici was obtained with F. mosseae (74 %), followed by SZE (58 %) and R. irregularis (34 %), suggesting that inoculum type rather than mycorrhizal levels determines the protection level of wheat against B. graminis f. sp. tritici. The mycorrhizal protective effect was associated with a reduction in the number of conidia with haustorium and with an accumulation of polyphenolic compounds at B. graminis f. sp. tritici infection sites. Both the moderately susceptible and the most resistant wheat cultivar were protected against B. graminis f. sp. tritici infection by F. mosseae inoculation at P/5, although the underlying mechanisms appear rather different between the two cultivars. This study emphasizes the importance of taking into account the considered

  10. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  11. "Further Effects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  12. Fantasy islands: Chinese dreams and ecological fears in an age of climate crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sze, Julie

    2015-01-01

    .... Examining sites in China, including the plan for a new eco-city called Dongtan on the island of Chongming, suburbanization projects, and the Shanghai World Expo, Julie Sze interrogates Chinese...

  13. Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Policy Partners Climate Effects on Health Air Pollution Allergens Wildfires Temperature Extremes Precipitation Extremes Diseases Carried by Vectors Food and Waterborne Diarrheal Disease Food Security Mental Health and Stress-Related Disorders Climate-Ready States and ...

  14. Effects of

    OpenAIRE

    Gowthaman, S.; A. P. Sathiyagnanam

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of both inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure on performance and emission behaviour of homogeneous charge compression ignition engine (HCCI) fuelled with diesel fuel. In this investigation, HCCI engine operates with different inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure, and analysis the effect of these variables on HCCI engine performance and emissions. The inlet air temperatures are varied between 40 °C and 70 °C and the injection pressure ...

  15. Facebook Effect

    OpenAIRE

    STOICA, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    This research paper is intended to understand the effects that Facebook, the social networking site has upon us, whether it influences our lives in a good or in a bad way. In order to understand the Facebook Effect we are trying to see how it impacts our lives at economic level,social level, political level, terminology level , psychological level and cultural level . Starting from the question : What does Facebook want? we found several answers consisting in pros and cons of this phenomenon ...

  16. Effective Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Jacob

    To investigate the use of VTLoE as a basis for formal derivation of functional programs with effects. As a part of the process, a number of issues central to effective formal programming are considered. In particular it is considered how to develop a proof system suitable for pratical reasoning......, how to implement this system in the generic proof assistant Isabelle and finally how to apply the logic and the implementation to programming....

  17. Treatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... to observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  18. Monday effect

    OpenAIRE

    Vicent Almela, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Treball final de Grau en Economia. Codi: EC1049. Curs acadèmic 2013-2014 Monday effect consists of fuel price falling between Monday and Sunday, followed by price increases during the following days. It is coincidentally on Monday when the European Commission collects fuel prices data to be able to elaborate statistics. In this essay we have firstly studied which has been the recent evolution of the Monday effect in our country. After that we have analysed the magnitude and the...

  19. Treatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... to observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  20. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.;

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy...

  1. and Effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes and Effects. Viljoen 1/W, PhD, Panzer/l, MBChB, PhD. Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Faculty .... transducer, while a type II IL-1 receptor ... and indirectly cause all symptoms of .... e.g. the fear motivational state may take.

  2. Tectonomagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the actual stress within the Earth and its changes with time are very difficult. It is much easier to monitor the direct effects of this stress, such as ground strain, or the indirect effects, such as changes in resistivity, strain, changes in seismic velocity or changes in magnetic field, and so forth. The latter technique is one of the more promising methods for monitoring substantial volumes of the Earth's crust near active faults with only a few instruments. It derives from the piezomagnetic properties of rocks (that is, the change in rock magnetization and, therefore, local magnetic field due to a change in applied stress). AS stress and strain fields along active faults vary, these variations should be reflected in changing local magnetic fields. In particular, rapidly changing fields might be expected to occur just before a large earthquake.

  3. Health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahieu, L

    1998-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of health effects at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study; (4) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (5) to assess the genetic risks of material exposure to ionizing radiation; (6) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (7) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas for 1997 are reported.

  4. Ventilation effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathisen, Hans Martin; Nielsen, Peter V; Moser, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-understand descriptions of the indices used to mesure the performance of a ventilation system and which indices to use in different cases.

  5. AFTER EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    创建物体动画最快速的方法是使用运动捕捉,这是一种以真实世界物体为动画而提供的运动。现在打开光盘After Effects Shortcut文件夹中的文件,依照我们循序渐进的技巧教程来学习如何使用这种方法。

  6. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    or quasars which are strongly magnified and sheared. In the last decade, double and quadruply imaged systems due to galactic lenses have been studied with optical and radio observations. An interesting result obtained from the flux ratio 'anomalies' of quadruply imaged systems is the statistical detection of dark sub-clumps in galaxy halos. More broadly, while we have learned a lot about the mass distribution in lens galaxies and improved time delay constraints on the Hubble constant, the limitations of cosmological studies with strong lensing due to uncertainties in lens mass models have also come to be appreciated. That said, progress will no doubt continue with qualitative advances in observations such as astrometric counterparts to the flux anomalies, clever ideas such as the use of spectroscopic signatures to assemble the SLACS lens sample, and combining optical imaging, spectroscopy and radio data to continue the quest for a set of golden lenses to measure the Hubble constant. Galaxy clusters are a fascinating arena for studying the distribution of dark and baryonic matter. Weak and strong lensing information can be combined with dynamical information from the spectroscopic measurements of member galaxies and x-ray/Sunyaev Zeldovich measurements of the hot ionized gas. Hubble Space Telescope observations have yielded spectacular images of clusters, such as Abell 1689, which has over a hundred multiply imaged arcs. Mass measurements have progressed to the level of 10 percent accuracy for several clusters. Unfortunately, it is unclear if one can do much better for individual clusters given inherent limitations such as unknown projection effects. The statistical study of clusters is likely to remain a promising way to study dark matter, gravity theories, and cosmology. Techniques to combine weak and strong lensing information to obtain the mass distribution of clusters have also advanced, and work continues on parameter-free techniques that are agnostic to the

  7. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    images from the The ISS / SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System Completed Operations (ISERV, which Irwin claimed as the instrument acronym that contains the most acronyms). ISERV is a monitoring camera aboard the ISS with 4m resolution of the ground and a 14.5 km by 10 km field of view. This camera is able identify indications of natural disasters to give early-warnings to areas that are potentially threatened, and help analyze disaster aftermath to aid in recoveries. Particularly striking was an image of the retreating glaciers in Chile due to rising global temperatures. 47,000 such images are available to the public at http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/! The contributions by NASA to the well-being of our planet and civilization are certainly staggering. 110: Galaxy Clusters (by Ben Cook)A short session on clusters of galaxies began with X-ray observations by David Buote studying the distribution of mass in a cluster. By measuring the X-ray temperature (using the spectral information) and the intensity of X-rays, Buote derived the amount of gas in each part of the cluster. By assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, this lets you derive the total mass (not just the gas, but also the stars and dark matter!) of the cluster. But its unclear so far whether that assumption is valid here. Jack Burns followed this up by discussing the ways we can observe the wreckage when galaxy clusters merge together. These mergers, as Burns puts it, are the most energetic events since the Big Bang. When two clusters crash together, their gas is heated to very high temperatures, producing radio emission that is visible as radio relics.Reinout Van Weeren used similar observations in the radio to attempt to measure the magnetic fields in a few clusters. Christine Jones looked at the two primary ways of locating clusters through X-rays and through the SunyaevZeldovich (SZ) effect in the radio and concluded that the two methods are different: one method will easily find clusters the other

  8. Effects of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gowthaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of both inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure on performance and emission behaviour of homogeneous charge compression ignition engine (HCCI fuelled with diesel fuel. In this investigation, HCCI engine operates with different inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure, and analysis the effect of these variables on HCCI engine performance and emissions. The inlet air temperatures are varied between 40 °C and 70 °C and the injection pressure in the port fuel injector is varied from 3 bar to 5 bar respectively. From the results, the optimum inlet air temperature and fuel injection pressure for efficient HCCI engine operation are identified. The result shows that, brake thermal efficiency of HCCI is nearer to the value of conventional diesel engine, and can be obtained if HCCI engine operates with 5 bar injection pressure and 60 °C air temperature and a simultaneous reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx and smoke emissions compared to conventional diesel engine. However, when inlet air is heated for improvement of vaporisation of diesel fuel, the higher inlet air temperature limits the operation range of HCCI engine, due to high knocking intensity, high NOx emissions and misfire of charge. The fuel injection pressure is also limited due to high level of HC and NOx emissions.

  9. Effective Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Keinan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article defines a new term, Effective Area, K, of a given territory as a function of four independent parameters: its nominal acreage, A, the intellectual competence of its inhabitants, B, their social competence, C, and their global influence, D, using a simple formalism: K = A x B x C x D. This analysis demonstrates that in our current world any consideration of the physical area of a given territory is meaningless if the quality of its population is ignored. K is a much more useful parameter than A, certainly for political and economical considerations, explaining why claims for territorial expansion are placed low on the national ladder of priorities in the developed countries. In many respects, large geographical areas may become a burden rather than an advantage. Thus, the importance of armed conflicts over geographical territories, which have taken a dominant part of the entire human history, is fading away. Furthermore, although the global acreage is constant, the total effective area of planet Earth keeps growing, providing sufficient room for the growing human population.

  10. Effective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. King Miller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the educational strategies that can be used to support female students of African descent in their persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM education and careers. STEM careers have historically been White male and White female dominated, which has yielded an underrepresentation of those of African descent. Drawing from a grounded qualitative case study, the data used for this article share the responses of Afro-Caribbean females in STEM who have immigrated to the United States from the country of Panama. As Latinas, they are representative of the changing face in the American educational system—bilingual, multicultural, and of African descent. The strategies offered reflect their own teaching practices, their former teachers, or experiences with their children’s teachers. What emerged were descriptions of four strategies and behaviors of effective teachers that align with Ladson-Billings’s culturally relevant pedagogy and Gay’s culturally responsive teaching. Included in the findings are the high standards and expectations embodied by effective teachers that serve to positively inspire their students. Culturally responsive teachers create an atmosphere of learning that supports academic success, conveying their belief in their students’ ability based upon their own reflectivity. As the U.S. educational system continues to become multilingual and multicultural, there is need for strategies for the successful inclusion and progression of students in STEM educational pathways and careers. This will occur as teachers challenge themselves to be the agents of change in the lives of their students.

  11. THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE CLUSTER SURVEY. III. CLUSTER CATALOG FROM 2005-2012 ARCHIVAL DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Teng; Wang, Jun-Xian [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Tozzi, Paolo; Tundo, Elena [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Moretti, Alberto [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Brera 28, I-20121 Milano (Italy); Rosati, Piero [Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Via Saragat 1, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Campana, Sergio [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Giavalisco, Mauro, E-mail: liuteng@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present the Swift X-ray Cluster Survey (SWXCS) catalog obtained using archival data from the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite acquired from 2005 February to 2012 November, extending the first release of the SWXCS. The catalog provides positions, soft fluxes, and, when possible, optical counterparts for a flux-limited sample of X-ray group and cluster candidates. We consider the fields with Galactic latitude |b| > 20° to avoid high H I column densities. We discard all of the observations targeted at groups or clusters of galaxies, as well as particular extragalactic fields not suitable to search for faint extended sources. We finally select ∼3000 useful fields covering a total solid angle of ∼400 deg{sup 2}. We identify extended source candidates in the soft-band (0.5-2 keV) images of these fields using the software EXSdetect, which is specifically calibrated for the XRT data. Extensive simulations are used to evaluate contamination and completeness as a function of the source signal, allowing us to minimize the number of spurious detections and to robustly assess the selection function. Our catalog includes 263 candidate galaxy clusters and groups down to a flux limit of 7 × 10{sup –15} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} in the soft band, and the logN-logS is in very good agreement with previous deep X-ray surveys. The final list of sources is cross-correlated with published optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zeldovich catalogs of clusters. We find that 137 sources have been previously identified as clusters in the literature in independent surveys, while 126 are new detections. Currently, we have collected redshift information for 158 sources (60% of the entire sample). Once the optical follow-up and the X-ray spectral analysis of the sources are complete, the SWXCS will provide a large and well-defined catalog of groups and clusters of galaxies to perform statistical studies of cluster properties and tests of cosmological models.

  12. Planck 2013 results. XXX. Cosmic infrared background measurements and implications for star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Blagrave, K.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Winkel, B.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies using Planck. Combining HFI data with IRAS, the angular auto- and cross-frequency power spectrum is measured from 143 to 3000 GHz, and the auto-bispectrum from 217 to 545 GHz. The total areas used to compute the CIB power spectrum and bispectrum are about 2240 and 4400 deg2, respectively. After careful removal of the contaminants (cosmic microwave background anisotropies, Galactic dust, and Sunyaev-Zeldovich emission), and a complete study of systematics, the CIB power spectrum is measured with unprecedented signal to noise ratio from angular multipoles ℓ ~ 150 to 2500. The bispectrum due to the clustering of dusty, star-forming galaxies is measured from ℓ ~ 130 to 1100, with a total signal to noise ratio of around 6, 19, and 29 at 217, 353, and 545 GHz, respectively. Two approaches are developed for modelling CIB power spectrum anisotropies. The first approach takes advantage of the unique measurements by Planck at large angular scales, and models only the linear part of the power spectrum, with a mean bias of dark matter haloes hosting dusty galaxies at a given redshift weighted by their contribution to the emissivities. The second approach is based on a model that associates star-forming galaxies with dark matter haloes and their subhaloes, using a parametrized relation between the dust-processed infrared luminosity and (sub-)halo mass. The two approaches simultaneously fit all auto- and cross-power spectra very well. We find that the star formation history is well constrained up to redshifts around 2, and agrees with recent estimates of the obscured star-formation density using Spitzer and Herschel. However, at higher redshift, the accuracy of the star formation history measurement is strongly degraded by the uncertainty in the spectral energy distribution of CIB galaxies. We also find that the mean halo mass which is most efficient at hosting star formation is log (Meff/M⊙) = 12

  13. Planck intermediate results. XXXIX. The Planck list of high-redshift source candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Planck mission, thanks to its large frequency range and all-sky coverage, has a unique potential for systematically detecting the brightest, and rarest, submillimetre sources on the sky, including distant objects in the high-redshift Universe traced by their dust emission. A novel method, based on a component-separation procedure using a combination of Planck and IRAS data, has been validated and characterized on numerous simulations, and applied to select the most luminous cold submillimetre sources with spectral energy distributions peaking between 353 and 857 GHz at 5' resolution. A total of 2151 Planck high-z source candidates (the PHZ) have been detected in the cleanest 26% of the sky, with flux density at 545 GHz above 500 mJy. Embedded in the cosmic infrared background close to the confusion limit, these high-z candidates exhibit colder colours than their surroundings, consistent with redshifts z > 2, assuming a dust temperature of Txgal = 35 K and a spectral index of βxgal = 1.5. Exhibiting extremely high luminosities, larger than 1014L⊙, the PHZ objects may be made of multiple galaxies or clumps at high redshift, as suggested by a first statistical analysis based on a comparison with number count models. Furthermore, first follow-up observations obtained from optical to submillimetre wavelengths, which can be found in companion papers, have confirmed that this list consists of two distinct populations. A small fraction (around 3%) of the sources have been identified as strongly gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at redshift 2 to 4, while the vast majority of the PHZ sources appear as overdensities of dusty star-forming galaxies, having colours consistent with being at z > 2, and may be considered as proto-cluster candidates. The PHZ provides an original sample, which is complementary to the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich Catalogue (PSZ2); by extending the population of virialized massive galaxy clusters detected below z population of sources at

  14. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  15. The XMM-BCS galaxy cluster survey: I. The X-ray selected cluster catalog from the initial 6 deg$^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhada, R.; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U.; Song, J.; /Michigan U.; Bohringer, H.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Mohr, J.J.; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. /Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Chon, G.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Finoguenov, A.; /Munich, Tech. U. /CSST, Baltimore; Fassbender, R.; /Munich, Tech. U. /CSST, Baltimore; Desai, S.; /Munich U. /Illinois U., Urbana; Armstrong, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Zenteno, A.; /Munich U. /Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Barkhouse, W.A.; /North Dakota U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2011-11-01

    The XMM-Newton - Blanco Cosmology Survey project (XMM-BCS) is a coordinated X-ray, optical and mid-infrared cluster survey in a field also covered by Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect (SZE) surveys by the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The aim of the project is to study the cluster population in a 14 deg{sup 2} field (center: {alpha} {approx} 23:29:18.4, {delta} {approx} -54:40:33.6). The uniform multi-wavelength coverage will also allow us for the first time to comprehensively compare the selection function of the different cluster detection approaches in a single test field and perform a cross-calibration of cluster scaling relations. In this work, we present a catalog of 46 X-ray selected clusters from the initial 6 deg{sup 2} survey core.We describe the XMM-BCS source detection pipeline and derive physical properties of the clusters. We provide photometric redshift estimates derived from the BCS imaging data and spectroscopic redshift measurements for a low redshift subset of the clusters. The photometric redshift estimates are found to be unbiased and in good agreement with the spectroscopic values. Our multi-wavelength approach gives us a comprehensive look at the cluster and group population up to redshifts z {approx} 1. The median redshift of the sample is 0.47 and the median mass M{sub 500} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 2 keV). From the sample, we derive the cluster log N - log S using an approximation to the survey selection function and find it in good agreement with previous studies. We compare optical mass estimates from the Southern Cosmology Survey available for part of our cluster sample with our estimates derived from the X-ray luminosity. Weak lensing masses available for a subset of the cluster sample are in agreement with our estimates. Optical masses based on cluster richness and total optical luminosity are found to be significantly higher than the X-ray values. The present results illustrate the

  16. Fałszywy znak równości

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraim Zuroff

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The equivalency canard Efraim Zuroff's text, originally published in Haaretz magazine, is a review of Timothy Snyder's Bloodlands. Snyder distinguishes six main mass murders commited by Nazi Germany and Soviet Union during the period of the Third Reich's existence. In Zuroff's opinion there are some significant differences between these tragedies. Dubious comparisons proposed by Snyder made the Holocaust most affected. Describing the Shoah as one of the six equally horryfying mass murders, the author ignores its ideological roots. Roots that sentenced to death all Jews  - regardless of their political views, religious practicies or the level of identification with Jewish community. Moreover Snyder takes no notice of the georaphical scope of the Holocaust. He also does not notice the fact, that the Nazis effectively managed to make so many Europeans their accomplices, who actively supported the Shoah.   Fałszywy znak równości Tekst Efraima Zuroffa, który pierwotnie ukazał się w piśmie Haaretz, to recenzja książki Skrwawione ziemie Timothy Snydera. Snyder wyróżnia sześć głównych masowych mordów popełnionych przez Niemcy i Związek Radziecki w okresie, który odpowiada istnieniu Trzeciej Rzeszy. Istnieją jednak, zdaniem Zuroffa, znaczące różnice między tymi tragediami. Na wątpliwych porównaniach, które proponuje Snyder, najbardziej „ucierpiał” Holokaust. Opisując Shoah jako jeden z sześciu równie straszliwych, masowych mordów, autor pomija jego ideologiczne korzenie, które sprawiały, że na śmierć skazany był każdy bez wyjątku Żyd, niezależnie od jego poglądów politycznych, praktyk religijnych czy stopnia identyfikacji z żydowską wspólnotą. Ponadto Snyder ignoruje ogromny zasięg geograficzny Holokaustu. Nie zauważa także skuteczności, z jaką naziści potrafili uczynić swoimi wspólnikami tak wielu Europejczyków, którzy w konsekwencji aktywnie wspomagali Shoah.

  17. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  18. On Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  19. On Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  20. Decomposable Effectivity Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, G.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Decomposable effectivity functions are introduced as an extension of additive effectivity functions. Whereas additive effectivity functions are determined by pairs of additive TU-games, decomposable effectivity functions are generated by pairs of TU-games that need not be additive. It turns out that

  1. Maxwell's demon in the quantum world

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Wook; De Liberato, Simone; Ueda, Masahito

    2010-01-01

    Maxwell's demon (MD) is a hypothetical being of intelligence that was conceived to illuminate possible limitations of the second law of thermodynamics. Leo Szilard made a classical analysis of the MD, considering an idealized heat engine with one molecule gas, and directly associated the information acquired by measurement with physical entropy to save the second law. Although Szilard's engine (SZE) deals with a truly quantum-mechanical object, namely an engine with a single molecule, surprisingly its fully quantum-mechanical analysis has been elusive except for the measurement process. Here, we present the first complete quantum analysis of the SZE, and report two important findings. First, we derive an analytic expression of the quantum-mechanical work performed by a quantum SZE containing an arbitrary number of molecules, where it is crucial to regard the process of insertion or removal of a wall as a legitimate thermodynamic process. Secondly, we find that the indistinguishability of quantum identical par...

  2. Hall effect accompanying a static skin effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkenshtein, N.V.; Marchenkov, V.V.; Startsev, V.E.; Cherepanov, A.N.; Glin' skii, M.

    1985-05-10

    The Hall effect and the magnetoresistance of tungsten single crystals with rho/sub 293K//rho/sub 4.2K/ = 80 000 have been measured at 4.2 K in magnetic fields up to 150 kOe. The results reveal that a static skin effect gives rise to an anomalously pronounced increase in the Hall coefficient.

  3. Experiences with effects specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    We describe the effects-specification process from a project that was conducted during the fall 2010 and spring of 2011 in this chapter. The project configured and implemented an electronic patient record system at a maternity ward at a hospital located in a European region. The process comprised...... for measuring effects were designed. The project is analyzed and lessons learned are discussed....... workshops with effects specification with management and end-users and an agile development process including prototypes configured from the effects specifications. We describe the project and the effects-specification process through which effects were related to the system design and instruments...

  4. DAFX Digital Audio Effects

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development in various fields of Digital Audio Effects, or DAFX, has led to new algorithms and this second edition of the popular book, DAFX: Digital Audio Effects has been updated throughout to reflect progress in the field. It maintains a unique approach to DAFX with a lecture-style introduction into the basics of effect processing. Each effect description begins with the presentation of the physical and acoustical phenomena, an explanation of the signal processing techniques to achieve the effect, followed by a discussion of musical applications and the control of effect parameter

  5. TREATMENT EFFECTS 101

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma J. Mielenz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical therapy researchers are interested in how beneficial an intervention is or the “treatment effect.” There are many measures of treatment effect that are applicable for understanding the efficacy and effectiveness of health interventions. Given that each treatment effect has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, understanding these characteristics can help guide which measure is most appropriate for a specific study. This article presents the more common treatment effects for both dichotomous and continues outcomes. The overall aim is to serve as a guide to newer physical therapy researchers on using and interpreting treatment effects.

  6. [Placebo and placebo effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulas, J-J

    2005-11-01

    The word placebo appeared for the first time in an English medical dictionary in 1785. In French, it appeared much latter in 1958. This word defines an experimental tool used for rigourous evaluation of a specific effect of pharmacological treatment and the non specific effect of any therapy. The placebo effect is the strictly psychological or psychophysiological effect of a placebo. The two principal components of placebo effect as a pain killer, which has been extensively studied in this field, are positive expectancies of both the patient and the physician. Although the mechanisms of action of placebo effect are not well understood, results of several recent works are particularly interesting.

  7. Effective Business Communication requires effective practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨福明

    2011-01-01

    @@ The topic of this essay is that effective businees communication requires effective practices.This essay will focus on communication practices that can assist an organi- zation in reaching its strategic goals and objectives.This article will present this topic by analyzing the communication theory, writing process and business writing style, team building and interpersonal communication, negotiation and persuasion tech- niques and intercultural communication.

  8. Memory effects in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  9. Characteristics of Effective Argumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frana, Adrian W.

    1989-01-01

    Examines how the 1988 Presidential Debates provide a resource for effective instruction in public argument. Provides several examples of effective (and ineffective) argumentative speaking taken from the debates. (MM)

  10. Side Effects (Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer care is relieving side effects, called symptom management, palliative care, or supportive care. It is important ... treat them. To learn about the symptoms and management of the long-term side effects of cancer ...

  11. Gravitomagnetic Effect in Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2016-01-01

    Rotating bodies in General Relativity produce frame dragging (or Lense-Thirring effect), also known as the {\\it Gravitomagnetic effect} in analogy with Classical Electromagnetism. In this work, we study the effect of strong magnetic fields in neutron stars on the Gravitomagnetic effect, which is produced as a result of its rotation. We show that the magnetic field has a non-negligible impact on frame dragging. The maximum effect of the magnetic field appears along the polar direction, where the Lense-Thirring frequency decreases with increase in magnetic field, and along the equatorial direction, where its magnitude increases. For intermediate angles, the effect of the magnetic field decreases, and goes through a minimum for a particular angular value at which magnetic field has no effect on Gravitomagnetism. Beyond that particular angle Gravitomagnetic effect increases with increasing magnetic field. We try to identify this "Null Region" for the case of magnetars, both inside and outside, as a function of th...

  12. Multipollutant health effect simulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Resulting betas (health effects) from a variety of copollutant epidemiologic models used to analyze the impact of exposure measurement error on health effect...

  13. Prooxidant effects of nitrofurantoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, O O; Pokrovskii, M V; Konovalenko, A B

    2002-08-01

    We studied the possibility of using prooxidant effects of nitrofurantoin (furadonin) for stimulation of the natural antioxidant systems for preventing myocardial damage after coronary occlusion. A pronounced cardioprotective effect of the drug was observed.

  14. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  15. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  16. Effective graph resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Spieksma, F.M.; Mieghem, P. van; Jamakovic, A.; Kooij, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies an interesting graph measure that we call the effective graph resistance. The notion of effective graph resistance is derived from the field of electric circuit analysis where it is defined as the accumulated effective resistance between all pairs of vertices. The objective of the

  17. Photon thermal Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A near-field thermal Hall effect (i.e.Righi-Leduc effect) in lattices of magneto-optical particles placed in a constant magnetic field is predicted. This effect is related to a symetry breaking in the system induced by the magnetic field which gives rise to preferential channels for the heat-transport by photon tunneling thanks to the particles anisotropy tuning.

  18. Magnetic effects in electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEBOJSA D. NIKOLIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of imposed magnetic fields onto the electrodeposition of magnetic (nickel and non – magnetic (copper metals was analysed. Also, magnetic properties of electrochemically obtained nanocontacts were examined. An effort to establish a possible correlation between the morphologies of the nanocontacts and the effect of the very large ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR effect was made.

  19. Binary effectivity rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Peleg, Bezalel

    2006-01-01

    is binary if it is rationalized by an acyclic binary relation. The foregoing result motivates our definition of a binary effectivity rule as the effectivity rule of some binary SCR. A binary SCR is regular if it satisfies unanimity, monotonicity, and independence of infeasible alternatives. A binary...... effectivity rule is regular if it is the effectivity rule of some regular binary SCR. We characterize completely the family of regular binary effectivity rules. Quite surprisingly, intrinsically defined von Neumann-Morgenstern solutions play an important role in this characterization...

  20. Mass, shape and thermal properties of A1689 by a multi-wavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, Mauro; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial to understand their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require the understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multi-wavelength data set spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZe). The method relies on two quite non informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the SZ amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected thanks to Bay...

  1. Quantifying Substructure Measures In X-ray Images of Galaxy Cluster Mergers With SLAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikos, Marios; Sarazin, C. L.; O'Shea, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    I use the Simulation Library of Astrophysical galaxy cluster Mergers (SLAM) database to quantify the effects of mergers on X-ray observables. SLAM consists of a set of 156 adiabatic simulations of binary galaxy cluster mergers, that covers 2 orders of magnitude in the mass of the primary cluster, four values for the mass contrast, and four values for the angular momentum of the collision. In this talk I describe results on substructure measures obtained for various viewing angles. I have quantified the substructure in X-ray images using both center shifts and power ratios. Mergers of intermediate mass contrasts produce substructure signals that can persist in X-ray images for at least 1-2 sound crossing times. The amplitude of both measures depends strongly on the initial mass contrast. The measures for major mergers (mass contrast less than 3) appear to depend on the system mass, while for minor mergers (mass contrast between 3 and 10) they are generally independent of the system mass. Neither measure reflects the true dynamical state of the system closely, although the center shifts appear to be a better proxy. Comparisons with the virial and hydrostatic disequilibrium parameters reveal that there is no value of either substructure measure that unambiguously distinguishes merging from relaxing systems. Implications for SZE observations will also be discussed.

  2. AMiBA: scaling relations between the integrated Compton-y and X-ray derived temperature, mass, and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Paul T P; Liu, Guo-Chin; Molnar, Sandor M; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Altamirano, Pablo; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Ming-Tang; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Jiang, Homin; Kesteven, Michael; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Raffin, Philippe; Wei, Tashun; Wilson, Warwick

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scaling relations between the X-ray and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) properties of clusters of galaxies, using data taken during 2007 by the Y.T. Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) at 94 GHz for the six clusters A1689, A1995, A2142, A2163, A2261, and A2390. The scaling relations relate the integrated Compton-y parameter Y_{2500} to the X-ray derived gas temperature T_{e}, total mass M_{2500}, and bolometric luminosity L_X within r_{2500}. Our results for the power-law index and normalization are both consistent with the self-similar model and other studies in the literature except for the Y_{2500}-L_X relation, for which a physical explanation is given though further investigation may be still needed. Our results not only provide confidence for the AMiBA project but also support our understanding of galaxy clusters.

  3. Pengaruh Pasta Gigi Mengandung Xylitol terhadap Pertumbuhan Streptococcus mutans Serotip C In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulia Agustina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans serotype C is a major causative agent to caries and is found predominantly in dental plaque and saliva. Dentrifice containing xylitol has been shown to inhibit the growth of mutans streptococci. The aim of the study was to determine in vitro the influence of dentrifice containing xylitol on S. mutans serotype C. The solution of dentrifice containing xylitol was first diluted with sterile aquadest at 1:1, and then to concentration of 100%, 10%, 1%, 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001%, also with positive and negative controls. These solutions were exposed to S. mutans serotype C by diffusion and dilution method. The results of the study show that the inhibition zone formed at concentrations of 10% and 100%. There was a significant positive correlation betwee the concentration of the dentrifice and the growth of mutans streptococci (p<0.05, with MBC point at 10%. In conclusion, dentrifice containing xylitol has an antibacterial effect and can inhibit the growth of S. mutans serotype C. Increasing concentration of dentrifice containing xylitol increases the sze of the inhibition zone.

  4. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  5. EFFECTIVE DISCHARGE CALCULATION GUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.S.BIEDENHARN; C.R.THORNE; P.J.SOAR; R.D.HEY; C.C.WATSON

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for calculating the effective discharge for rivers with alluvial channels.An alluvial river adjusts the bankfull shape and dimensions of its channel to the wide range of flows that mobilize the boundary sediments. It has been shown that time-averaged river morphology is adjusted to the flow that, over a prolonged period, transports most sediment. This is termed the effective discharge.The effective discharge may be calculated provided that the necessary data are available or can be synthesized. The procedure for effective discharge calculation presented here is designed to have general applicability, have the capability to be applied consistently, and represent the effects of physical processes responsible for determining the channel, dimensions. An example of the calculations necessary and applications of the effective discharge concept are presented.

  6. The Hubble effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, T.M.; Miao, S.P.; Prokopec, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Woodard, R.P., E-mail: T.M.Janssen@uu.nl, E-mail: S.Miao@uu.nl, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: woodard@phys.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We generalize the effective potential to scalar field configurations which are proportional to the Hubble parameter of a homogeneous and isotropic background geometry. This may be useful in situations for which curvature effects are significant. We evaluate the one loop contribution to the Hubble Effective Potential for a massless scalar with arbitrary conformal and quartic couplings, on a background for which the deceleration parameter is constant. Among other things, we find that inflationary particle production leads to symmetry restoration at late times.

  7. Effective School Counseling Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Lilley, Stacey Custer

    2007-01-01

    Despite much attention given to effective teams in the workplace, school counseling teams have been neglected in the research. The primary purpose of this mixed methods study was to learn what characteristics secondary counselors perceive contribute to an effective school counseling team. The first research phase conducted six team interviews; themes emerging from the interviews yielded the development of the Effective School Counseling Team Questionnaire (ESCTQ). The following research quest...

  8. Educational effectiveness: Key findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent and advanced studies on educational effectiveness. Section on integrated school effectiveness research is followed by a section on conceptually integrated models. The subsequent two sections focus on more methodological limitations of past research: the failure to accommodate the hierarchical nature of schooling and the inability to capture teacher effects. Finally, the last section sums up all relevant facts and research strands.

  9. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  10. The Atomic Lighthouse Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Máximo, C E; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  11. On the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shnirelman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The term "butterfly effect" means an extreme sensitivity of a dynamical system to small perturbations: "The beating of a butterfly wing in South America can result in the considerable change of positions and force of a tropical cyclon in Atlantic 2 weeks later". Numerical simulations of R.Robert show the absence of the butterfly effect in some simple flows of 2-d ideal incompressible fluid which is a model of the atmosphere. In this work a more complicated flow is considered. Numerical simulation demonstrates the butterfly effect in the strongest form. The effect is robust, and the experiment is 100% reproducible.

  12. Multicaloric effect: An outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopson, Melvin M.

    2017-05-01

    In 2017 the scientific community celebrates 100 years since Weiss and Piccard made the first observation of a caloric effect in magnetic materials, when studying temperature changes in Nickel subjected to applied magnetic fields near the Curie transition temperature [1]. The effect was called the magneto-caloric effect. A thermodynamic formulation of the adiabatic magneto-caloric refrigeration was given independently by Debye [2] and Giauque [3] in 1920s, followed by the first experimental confirmation of adiabatic refrigeration in 1933 [4]. Since then, the research field has expanded considerably and other interesting caloric effects have been discovered in materials displaying different forms of ferroic order.

  13. Impedance and Collective Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, E; Rumolo, R; Herr, W

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '4 Impedance and Collective Effects' with the content: 4 Impedance and Collective Effects Introduction 4.1 Space Charge 4.2 Wake Fields and Impedances 4.3 Coherent Instabilities 4.4 Landau Damping 4.5 Two-Stream Effects (Electron Cloud and Ions) 4.6 Beam-Beam Effects 4.7 Numerical Modelling

  14. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  15. CCTV Effectiveness Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorthuijsen, G.P. van; Hoof, H.A.J.M. van; Klima, M.; Roubik, K.; Bernas, M.; Pata, P.

    2006-01-01

    The field of CCTV surveillance is topical and widely used in many different applications. The fundamental part of the CCTV system is a reliable image evaluation by a human observer, whose effectiveness is influenced by many variables. Optimization of the effectiveness is a multidimensional problem r

  16. Relative Effects at Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeken, Johan; Mulder, Joris; Wood, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of predictors has been of historical importance in a variety of disciplines including management, medicine, economics, and psychology. When approaching hypotheses on the relative ordering of the magnitude of predicted effects (e.g., the effects of discrimination

  17. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  18. Defining Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  19. PLEYOTROPIC EFFECTS OF METFORMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ju. Morgunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, traditionally used for the therapy of diabetes mellitus, possesses a number of diverse pleyotropic effects. The drug, in addition to the glucose-lowering actions, has a beneficial effect on components of the metabolic syndrome, significantly reduces body weight.

  20. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  1. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  2. Network effects in railways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Railway operation is often affected by network effects as a change in one part of the network can influence other parts of the network. Network effects occur because the train runs may be quite long and since the railway system has a high degree of interdependencies as trains cannot cross...

  3. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  4. School effectiveness research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, J.; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    School effectiveness research is described as the scientific approach to determine the causal influence of malleable conditions of schooling. The article describes how different strands of school effectiveness have developed and are now increasingly combined into more integrative approaches. The kno

  5. Occlusion effects, Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    The present report studies the mechanism of the occlusion effect by means of literature studies, experiments and model estimates. A mathematical model of the occlusion effect is developed. The model includes the mechanical properties of the earmould and the airborne sound as well as the body...

  6. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  7. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  8. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  10. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  11. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  12. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  13. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  14. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    in a questionnaire based on their daily experience with their personal hearing aid. It turned out that 73% of these persons experienced a change in own voice, but both occlusion effects of acoustic, mechanical and biological origin were experienced. The same persons came into Oticon's clinic, where their hearing aid...... fitting and occlusion effect were evaluated. Occlusion effect was measured as the difference in real ear sound pressure level with and without hearing aid while the person was speaking. It was done both with the hearing aid turned off and with the hearing aid turned on. Relations between their experienced...

  15. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  16. Seebeck effect in electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikina, I; Shikin, V; Varlamov, A A

    2012-07-01

    We study Seebeck effect in liquid electrolytes, starting from its simple neutral analog--thermodiffusion (so-called Ludwig-Soret or Soret effect). It is observed that when two or more subsystems of mobile particles are subjected to the temperature gradient, various types of them respond to it differently. In the case when these fractions, with different mobility parameters (Soret coefficients), are oppositely charged (a case typical for electrolytes), the nonhomogeneous internal electric field is generated. The latter field prevents these fractions from space separation and determines the intensity of the appearing Seebeck effect.

  17. Cohomology of Effect Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Roumen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We will define two ways to assign cohomology groups to effect algebras, which occur in the algebraic study of quantum logic. The first way is based on Connes' cyclic cohomology. The resulting cohomology groups are related to the state space of the effect algebra, and can be computed using variations on the Kunneth and Mayer-Vietoris sequences. The second way involves a chain complex of ordered abelian groups, and gives rise to a cohomological characterization of state extensions on effect algebras. This has applications to no-go theorems in quantum foundations, such as Bell's theorem.

  18. Complex Effective Action and Schwinger Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous pair production from background fields or spacetimes is one of the most prominent phenomena predicted by quantum field theory. The Schwinger mechanism of production of charged pairs by a strong electric field and the Hawking radiation of all species of particles from a black hole are the consequence of nonperturbative quantum effects. In this review article, the vacuum structure and pair production is reviewed in the in-out formalism, which provides a consistent framework for quantum field theory in the sense that the complex action explains not only the vacuum persistence but also pair production. The current technology of intense lasers is still lower by a few order than the Schwinger limit for electron-positron pair production, while magnetic fields of magnetars on the surface are higher than the Schwinger limit and even higher at the core. On the other hand, the zero effective mass of electron and hole in graphene and Dirac or Weyl semimetals will open a window for experimental test of quantum...

  19. Vaccine herd effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  20. Conditions for Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeannette T.

    1988-01-01

    The most effective college presidents are those whose leadership styles are dominant, decisive, and when appropriate, autocratic. The president has to believe profoundly in the intrinsic value of the college. (Author/MSE)

  1. Developing Effective Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-14

    University When Performance Measurement Goes Bad Laziness Vanity Narcissism Too Many Pettiness Inanity 52 Developing Effective...Kasunic, October 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Narcissism Measuring performance from the organization’s point of view, rather than from

  2. The Effective Volunteer Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides information for volunteer teachers of adults and older youth on how to conduct an effective presentation. Topics include focus of presentation, characteristics of the learners, teaching methods, visual aides and evaluations.

  3. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  4. Developing Effective Working Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two workshops are described in detail. One explores ways to increase the effectiveness of work groups and includes the workshop leader's personal observations. The second involves training transformational leaders, whose characteristics include idealized influence, individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, and inspirational…

  5. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it safely and effectively. By Mayo Clinic Staff Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine. The main concern is exercising, not stretching, right? Not so fast. Stretching may help you: ...

  6. Vascular Effects of Histamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype ... Keywords: Histamine, Vascular smooth muscle, Endothelium .... responses to histamine, but not those to acetylcholine, were.

  7. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Side Effects of Chemotherapy Each of the chemotherapy drugs available today works in a slightly different ... few rules of thumb when it comes to chemotherapy that should always be kept in mind. Ignore ...

  8. Effects of New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  9. Dynamic Treatment Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, James J; Humphries, John Eric; Veramendi, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    This paper develops robust models for estimating and interpreting treatment effects arising from both ordered and unordered multistage decision problems. Identification is secured through instrumental variables and/or conditional independence (matching) assumptions. We decompose treatment effects into direct effects and continuation values associated with moving to the next stage of a decision problem. Using our framework, we decompose the IV estimator, showing that IV generally does not estimate economically interpretable or policy relevant parameters in prototypical dynamic discrete choice models, unless policy variables are instruments. Continuation values are an empirically important component of estimated total treatment effects of education. We use our analysis to estimate the components of what LATE estimates in a dynamic discrete choice model.

  10. the effects of Garlic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appetite and food selection. ... It is therefore recommended that garlic intake should be regulated to avoid some possible adverse effects ..... particularly reproductive hormones, on the peripheral ... the taste modulatory mechanism of raw garlic.

  11. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  12. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditions The Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for...

  13. Strategies for Effective Outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneta, Larry; Dillon, William L.

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizes strategies that can be employed for effective outsourcing in higher education settings. Several models of outsourcing are identified and described, and examples of institutions using each model are provided. (GCP)

  14. The Effects: Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient pollution has diverse and far-reaching effects on the U.S. economy, impacting tourism, property values, commercial fishing, recreational businesses and many other sectors that depend on clean water.

  15. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to m...

  16. Performance effect of Lean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Israelsen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    relevant to Denmark, but the approach is empirically more generalizable. We show that the effect of Lean standardized flow production practices on performance is mediated by analytical continuous improvement empowerment practices and by delegation of decision rights practices. Thus, standardized flow...... practices do not have direct effects on performance. Instead, standardized flow provided that foundation for companies to implement continuous improvement, which, in turn, directly affect performance positively. Another cause, in addition to flow practices, of continuous improvement was the delegation...

  17. Pharmacological Effects of Mangiferin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zhi-quan; DENG Jia-gang; YAN Li

    2011-01-01

    Mango leaves have been widely used in the clinical practice for thousands of years in traditional Chinese medicine.Mangiferin,an effective constituent in the mango leaves,has multiple pharmacological actions involved in some basic pathological processes,such as inflammation,oxidative injury,tumor growth,micro-organism infections,metabolic regulations,and immunological regulations.The pharmacological effects of mangiferin from some published data are reviewed in this article.

  18. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  19. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People's Bank of China,the country's central bank,published an article concerning China's managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank's website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China's macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.

  20. Advertising Effectiveness In Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sushilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Confronted with decreasing effectiveness of the classic marketing communications, events have become an increasingly popular alternative for marketers. Events constitute one of the most exciting and fastest growing forms of leisure and business. With time, the decreasing effectiveness of classical marketing communications boosted the use of events for marketing and making brand awareness. Event marketing is seen as the unique opportunity to integrate the firm’s communication activities like p...

  1. Extracardiac Effects of Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are one of the most commonly used drugs in the world. Although it plays a valuable role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, it has some extracardiac effects which are frequently ignored by physicians during routine practice. In this review we would like to summarise the potential beneficial or harmful extracardiac effects of statins which comprise a wide spectrum of systems and organs.

  2. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  3. I LOVE CHINA,I LOVE INDONESIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ In July 1940,JACKSON Sze Mau Leung(here-in-after called Jackson Leung)was born in an oversea Chinese family in WestJava,Indonesia.During 18 to 24 April 1955,the world famous Asian-African Conference was held in Bandung,Indonesia.

  4. Long-Distance, High Data-Rate Quantum Communication With Ultralow Loss Photonic Band Gap Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Theory of Bragg Fiber. Journal of the Optical Society of America 68, 1196-1201 (1978). 8.C. M. Smith , N. Venkataraman, M. T. Gallagher, D. Muller...reflected light power measured. REFERENCES [1] Sze, S. M. Semiconductor Devices: Physics and Technology (John Wiley, 2nd Ed., 2001). [2] Sedra , A. S

  5. Passive Multistatic Detection of Maritime Targets using Opportunistic Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    optimal configuration using MATLAB simulation. The simulation results are obtained using actual system parameters extracted from civil marine radar ...Bistatic Radar . Norwood, MA: Artech House, Technology Service Corporation, p. 1, 1995. [2] D. C. Jenn, Radar and Laser Cross Section Engineering...MULTISTATIC DETECTION OF MARITIME TARGETS USING OPPORTUNISTIC RADARS by Chong Sze Sing March 2014 Thesis Advisor: Herschel H. Loomis Co-Advisor

  6. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasaraju Kavalipati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe.

  7. The Vampire Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erfgen, Carsten; Zenker, Sebastian; Sattler, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Although many brand managers favor the use of celebrities in advertisements, others worry that celebrities overshadow the brand and thus impair brand recall. Practitioners refer to this overshadowing as the vampire effect, defined as a decrease in brand recall for an advertising stimulus that fea......Although many brand managers favor the use of celebrities in advertisements, others worry that celebrities overshadow the brand and thus impair brand recall. Practitioners refer to this overshadowing as the vampire effect, defined as a decrease in brand recall for an advertising stimulus...... that features a celebrity endorser versus the same stimulus with an unknown but equally attractive endorser. Because there is no agreement about whether this overshadowing really exists, this research analyzes the existence of the vampire effect and its moderators in a series of experiments with a total of 4......,970 respondents. The results provide important insights into how to avoid the vampire effect by creating appropriate conditions, such as high endorser–brand congruence or a strong cognitive link between the celebrity and the brand. Surprisingly, brand familiarity does not significantly moderate the effect....

  8. Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David L; Secura, Gina M; Madden, Tessa E; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine women's knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a contraceptive knowledge questionnaire that had been completed by 4144 women who were enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project before they received comprehensive contraceptive counseling and chose their method. For each contraceptive method, women were asked "what percentage would get pregnant in a year: 10%, don't know." Overall, 86% of subjects knew that the annual risk of pregnancy is >10% if no contraception is used. More than 45% of women overestimate the effectiveness of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, pills, the patch, the ring, and condoms. After adjustment for age, education, and contraceptive history, the data showed that women who chose the intrauterine device (adjusted relative risk, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-8.5) or implant (adjusted relative risk, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-7.3) were significantly more likely to identify the effectiveness of their method accurately compared with women who chose either the pill, patch, or ring. This cohort demonstrated significant knowledge gaps regarding contraceptive effectiveness and over-estimated the effectiveness of pills, the patch, the ring, depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, and condoms. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Paramagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-05-01

    We report the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, we generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. Using this technique at low temperatures (<20 K ), we resolve the paramagnetic spin Seebeck effect in the insulating paramagnets Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and DyScO3 (DSO), using either W or Pt as the spin detector layer. By taking advantage of the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy of DSO, we eliminate contributions from the Nernst effect in W or Pt, which produces a phenomenologically similar signal.

  10. The Mozart Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R.

    2001-10-01

    This review deals with the Mozart Effect, an improvement of performance while listening to Mozart music. Previous studies have shown improved spatial temporal reasoning and improved IQ test results and neurophysiological changes, mainly increased coherence among different groups of subjects. This review emphasizes the effect on epileptiform patterns, both generalized and focal; provides an example of a chronic effect over a period of 1-2 days; addresses the distinctive aspects of the music to account for this phenomenon and shows that long-term periodicity in the power of the music is a special quality; and deals with the melodic line and shows that Mozart repeats the melodic line much more frequently than other well-known composers. It is likely that the superorganization of the cerebral cortex resonates with great organization found in Mozart music.

  11. The quantum sweeper effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  12. Cosmological memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  13. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tolish, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of $(1 + z)$.

  14. Quantum Hamlet Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Panković, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, by use of a formalism similar to formalism of the quantum Zeno effect (decrease of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements) and quantum anti-Zeno effect (increase of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements), we introduce so-called quantum Hamlet effect. It represents a complete destruction of the quantum predictions on the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurement. Precisely, by means of some especial, correctly defined, frequent measurements, decay probability of an unstable quantum system can behave as a divergent series without any definite value. In this way there is quantum mechanically completely unsolvable ``Hamlet dilemma'', to decay or not to decay.

  15. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  16. Security effectiveness review (SER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouprianova, I. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Ek, D.; Showalter, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    As part of the on-going DOE/Russian MPC and A activities at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and in order to provide a basis for planning MPC and A enhancements, an expedient method to review the effectiveness of the MPC and A system has been adopted. These reviews involve the identification of appropriate and cost-effective enhancements of facilities at IPPE. This effort requires a process that is thorough but far less intensive than a traditional vulnerability assessment. The SER results in a quick assessment of current and needed enhancements. The process requires preparation and coordination between US and Russian analysts before, during, and after information gathering at the facilities in order that the analysis is accurate, effective, and mutually agreeable. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SER process, including the objectives, time scale, and lessons learned at IPPE.

  17. Conditional Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) studies the effect of development aid using econometrics on macro data. It contains about 100 papers of which a third analyzes conditional models where aid effectiveness depends upon z, so that aid only works for a certain range of the variable. The key term...... in this family of AEL models is thus an interaction term of z times aid. The leading candidates for z are a good policy index and aid itself. In this paper, meta-analysis techniques are used (i) to determine whether the AEL has established the said interaction terms, and (ii) to identify some of the determinants...... of the differences in results between studies. Taking all available studies in consideration, we find no support for conditionality with respect to policy, while conditionality regarding aid itself is dubious. However, the results differ depending on the authors’ institutional affiliation....

  18. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  19. Picosecond Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2017-02-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 bilayers driven by an interfacial temperature difference between electrons and magnons. The measured time evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across normal metal /Y3Fe5 O12 interfaces on a picosecond time scale, too short for contributions from a bulk temperature gradient in an yttrium iron garnet. The product of spin-mixing conductance and the interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is of the order of 108 A m-2 K-1 .

  20. Picosecond spin Seebeck effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kimling, Johannes; Choi, Gyung-Min; Brangham, Jack T.; Matalla-Wagner, Tristan; Huebner, Torsten; Kuschel, Timo; Yang, Fengyuan; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    We report time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect driven by an interfacial temperature difference between itinerant electrons and magnons. The measured time-evolution of spin accumulation induced by laser-excitation indicates transfer of angular momentum across Au/Y$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$ and Cu/Y$_3$Fe$_5$O$_{12}$ interfaces on a picosecond time-scale. The product of spin-mixing conductance and interfacial spin Seebeck coefficient determined is...

  1. Casimir edge effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, H; Gies, Holger; Klingmuller, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    We compute Casimir forces in open geometries with edges, involving parallel as well as perpendicular semi-infinite plates. We focus on Casimir configurations which are governed by a unique dimensional scaling law with a universal coefficient. With the aid of worldline numerics, we determine this coefficient for various geometries for the case of scalar-field fluctuations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our results facilitate an estimate of the systematic error induced by the edges of finite plates, for instance, in a standard parallel-plate experiment. The Casimir edge effects for this case can be reformulated as an increase of the effective area of the configuration.

  2. Nuclear medium effects in $\

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

  3. Magnetic Nernst effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes in continuous media predicts the existence of a magnetic Nernst effect that results from a magnetic analog to the Seebeck effect in a ferromagnet and magnetophoresis occurring in a paramagnetic electrode in contact with the ferromagnet. Thus, a voltage that has DC and AC components is expected across a Pt electrode as a response to the inhomogeneous magnetic induction field generated by magnetostatic waves of an adjacent YIG slab subject to a temperature gradient. The voltage frequency and dependence on the orientation of the applied magnetic induction field are quite distinct from that of spin pumping.

  4. Erythropoietin and Nonhematopoietic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoui, Alireza; Blaise, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is the main regulator of red blood cell production. Since the 1990s, EPO has been used for the treatment of anemia associated with end-stage renal failure and chemotherapy. The erythropoietin receptors were found on other organs such as the brain, spinal cord, heart and skin. In addition, it has been shown that many tissues produce and locally release EPO in response to hypoxic, biochemical and physical stress. In cellular, animal and clinical studies, EPO protects tissues from ischemia and reperfusion injury, has antiapoptotic effects and improves regeneration after injury. In this article, we mainly review the nonhematopoietic effects and new possible clinical indications for EPO.

  5. The effect of Ad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小艳

    2010-01-01

    There is the trend that now people appreciate those who are slim and regard slim even thin people beautiful. The thinner a person is, the more beautiful. Women, born to pursuit beauty, try various means to follow the trend. We all watch TV, and find a lot of advertisements on diet. The effect of them is tremendous. We all know the fact that it is not at all the better mouse trap will catch mouse. The sales methods are more important. If an advertisement is very interesting and seemingly effective, people will be lured by the ad and then try some of the products.

  6. The Lazarus effect

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    Members of the RD39 collaboration stage a demonstration of the Lazarus effect in the CERN cryolab. At the LHC experiments, the front-line inner detectors - trackers - will be traversed by a mammoth thousand million million passing particles per square centimetre over the lifetimes of the experiments. After long exposure to passing particles, defects appear in the silicon and the signal is destroyed. A group of physicists at Bern University have found that at temperatures below 100 K, dead detectors apparently come back to life. They're calling their discovery the Lazarus effect after the Biblical character raised from the dead by Jesus after he had been entombed for four days.

  7. Level Width Broaden Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Shang

    2004-01-01

    In fitting the double-differential measurements thelevelwidth broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg uncertainty.Besides level width broadening effect the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in this procedure.In general,the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed.However,the research indicates that to do so in this way the energy balance could not hold.For this reason,the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced,with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could hold exactly in the analytical form.

  8. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People’s Bank of China,the country’s central bank, published an article concerning China’s managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank’s website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China’s macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.Edited excerpts follow

  9. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  10. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton.

  11. Imagineering the butterfly effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Diane Elza Lea Winie

    2014-01-01

    Het is een ‘inconvenient truth’ zowel in de wetenschap als in de praktijk dat conventioneel verandermanagement dat gericht is op gedragsverandering slechts beperkt effectief is. Slechts 1 op de 3 verander-inspanningen zou enig positief effect hebben. Mensen laten zich namelijk niet veranderen. Als m

  12. What Effective Schools Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Martin R.; Gabrieli, Christopher F. O.; Finn, Amy S.; Kraft, Matthew A.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Research has been showing that the most important development in K-12 education over the past decade has been the emergence of a growing number of urban schools that have been convincingly shown to have dramatic positive effects on the achievement of disadvantaged students. Those with the strongest evidence of success are oversubscribed charter…

  13. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    system and change its dynamic behavior and its dynamic characteristics. When predicting structural vibrations it is not common to account for the passive crowd, but the paper will illustrate effects of the presence of a passive croud on structural behavior. Numerical and experimental results...

  14. Matthew Effects for Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Farkas, George; Hibel, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Which children are most at risk of experiencing a Matthew effect in reading? We investigated this question using population-based methodology. First, we identified children entering kindergarten on socio-demographic factors (i.e., gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status) known to index the relative risks and resources available to them as…

  15. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  16. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products.

  17. The Last Line Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beller, M.; Zaidman, A.E.; Karpov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-clones are tiny duplicated pieces of code; they typically comprise only a few statements or lines. In this paper, we expose the “last line effect,” the phenomenon that the last line or statement in a micro-clone is much more likely to contain an error than the previous lines or statements. We

  18. EFFECTIVE TEACHING PRACTICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    Before the cognitive shift in educational psychology research on teaching practices that bring about the desired learning outcomes on the part of the students was dominated by the process-product research program. The findings of this confirmative research approach show that an effective lesson may

  19. Cost-Effective Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Gottlieb, S

    2001-01-01

    Small Beowulf clusters can effectively serve as personal or group supercomputers. In such an environment, a cluster can be optimally designed for a specific problem (or a small set of codes). We discuss how theoretical analysis of the code and benchmarking on similar hardware lead to optimal systems.

  20. Heavy quarkonium effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mannel, T

    1995-01-01

    We formulate a QCD-based effective theory approach to heavy quarkonia-like systems as \\bar{c} c and \\bar{b} b resonances and B_c states. We apply the method to inclusive decays, working out a few examples in detail.

  1. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia. The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the "glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones" of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-1 7-37 and GLP1 7-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP. GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine, central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health.

  2. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  3. Challenges to effective protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Kimotho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With sexual violence now recognised as a weapon of war and a punishable violation of human rights, it is incumbent upon the international community, national governments and humanitarian organisations to provide more effective protection of women and girls.

  4. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  5. Drug effects on melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koomen, Elsje Rosalie

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and its incidence among Caucasian populations has increased whereas mortality rates are stabilizing or decreasing. The total burden of melanoma is expected to be increasing. As effective treatment options for advanced melanoma are lackin

  6. [Pharmacological effects of hordenine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, H J; Strathmann, W

    1995-06-01

    Hordenine is an ingredient of some plants which are used as feed for animals, i.e. in sprouting barley. After ingestion of such feed hordenine may be detected in blood or urine of horses which in case of racing horses may be the facts of using prohibited compounds. Results of some experiments in pharmacological models show that hordenine is an indirectly acting adrenergic drug. It liberates norepinephrine from stores. In isolated organs and those structures with reduced epinephrine contents the hordenine-effect is only very poor. Experiments in intact animals (rats, dogs) show that hordenine has a positive inotropic effect upon the heart, increases systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral blood flow volume, inhibits gut movements but has no effect upon the psychomotorical behaviour of mice. All effects are short and only possible after high doses which are not to be expected after ingestion of hordenine containing feed for horses. A measurable increase of the performance of racing horses is quite improbable.

  7. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    annoyances and the objective measurements were analysed. Persons suffering from tinnitus behaved differently than person without tinnitus. The latter group showed significant relations between the measured occlusion effect, hearing loss and the personal of occlusion. The actual sensation level is also...

  8. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  9. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  10. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    system and change its dynamic behavior and its dynamic characteristics. When predicting structural vibrations it is not common to account for the passive crowd, but the paper will illustrate effects of the presence of a passive croud on structural behavior. Numerical and experimental results...

  11. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  12. Globalisation, Effectiveness and Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimore, Peter

    This paper reports principally on two studies, prompted by research on school effectiveness in the United States and England, which indicate globalization is beginning to affect school improvement. The first study cites case studies of two schools--from working-class, multi-ethnic, poorly educated areas of Singapore and London--to determine if…

  13. The Negative Repetition Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  14. Analgesic effects of calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyritis, G P; Trovas, G

    2002-05-01

    The analgesic activity of salmon calcitonin (subcutaneous or intranasal) has been demonstrated in several prospective clinical trials, in patients suffering different painful skeletal conditions, including recent nontraumatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The mechanism of the analgesic effect of calcitonin is not clear. It is possible that specific binding sites for salmon calcitonin exist in the brain. Another explanation is that changes in descending serotonergic modification on the sensory transmission mediated by C afferents contribute to the analgesic effects of calcitonin on pain in osteoporotic patients. From the clinical point of use, the analgesic effect of calcitonin is beneficial throughout the whole period of medical treatment of osteoporotic patients. Salmon calcitonin in a daily dose of 100 IU subcutaneously or 200 IU intranasally reduces dramatically the back pain (p salmon calcitonin effectively controls severe pain in osteoporotic patients with a recent vertebral fracture, allowing them earlier mobility in combination with a reduction of the urinary hydroxyproline excretion, and a limitation of the considerable bone loss that may occur during prolonged bed rest, make this therapeutic scheme attractive.

  15. Side effects of ergotamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyler, WJ

    1996-01-01

    Ergotamine has been used for many years in the treatment of migraine, although there is Little formal clinical evidence that it is significantly more efficacious than placebo. A number of side effects associated with ergotamine have been reported in the literature, including myocardial infarction, i

  16. The Binggeli effect

    CERN Document Server

    Biernacka, Monika; Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Bajan, Katarzyna; Flin, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We found the alignement of elongated clusters of BM type I and III (the excess of small values of the \\Delta\\theta angles is observed), having range till about 60Mpc/h. The first one is probably connected with the origin of supergiant galaxy, while the second one with environmental effects in clusters, originated on the long filament or plane.

  17. Drug effects on melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koomen, Elsje Rosalie

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and its incidence among Caucasian populations has increased whereas mortality rates are stabilizing or decreasing. The total burden of melanoma is expected to be increasing. As effective treatment options for advanced melanoma are

  18. Cannabis its clinical effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be enhanced and short-term memory and judgement may be impaired. These effects ... realisation, a sense of loss of control, fear of dying, panic reactions and ... A mild withdrawal state from long-term use has been described. It consists ...

  19. Access to effective healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Access to effective healthcare is in particular challenging for vulnerable and socially disadvantaged patients. Patients with chronic conditions are over-represented in these lower socioeconomic (LSES) groups. No generic review integrating the evidence on Self-Management support interventions in ...

  20. The Kaye effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, J M; Landig, A J [Student Research Center Suedwuerttemberg, Gutenbergstrasse 18, 88348 Bad Saulgau (Germany)], E-mail: jan.binder@sfz-bw.de, E-mail: andreas.landig@sfz-bw.de

    2009-11-15

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur.

  1. Haemodynamic effects of eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høost, U; Kelbaek, H; Rasmusen, H

    1996-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fractional meal stimulation on postprandial haemodynamic changes, the possible correlation between these changes and the potential mediating role of circulating catecholamines and insulin. 2. Healthy young subjects were studied before...

  2. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  3. Systemic effects in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, E.F.M.; Creutzberg, E.C.; Schols, A.M.W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic effects in COPD. Wouters EF, Creutzberg EC, Schols AM. Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Maastricht, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands. ewo@ms-azm-3.azm.nl The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of COPD are not restricted to pulmonary inflammation an

  4. QCD Interconnection Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    1999-01-01

    Heavy objects like the W, Z and t are short-lived compared with typical hadronization times. When pairs of such particles are produced, the subsequent hadronic decay systems may therefore become interconnected. We study such potential effects at Linear Collider energies.

  5. Systemic effects in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, E.F.M.; Creutzberg, E.C.; Schols, A.M.W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic effects in COPD. Wouters EF, Creutzberg EC, Schols AM. Department of Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Maastricht, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, the Netherlands. ewo@ms-azm-3.azm.nl The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of COPD are not restricted to pulmonary inflammation an

  6. Effective Free Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapalparvi, Ramesh; Protas, Bartosz

    2010-11-01

    In this investigation we introduce the concept of an "effective free surface" arising as a solution of time--averaged equations in the presence of free boundaries. This work is motivated by applications of optimization theory to problems involving free surfaces, such as droplets impinging on the weld pool surface in welding processes. In such problems the time--dependent governing equations lead to technical difficulties, many of which are alleviated when methods of optimization are applied to a steady problem with effective free surfaces. The corresponding equations are obtained by performing the Reynolds decomposition and averaging of the time--dependent free--boundary equations based on the volume--of--fluid (VoF) formalism. We identify the terms representing the average effect of fluctuating free boundaries which, in analogy with the Reynolds stresses in classical turbulence models, need to be modelled and propose some simple algebraic closures for these terms. We argue that effective free boundaries can be computed using methods of shape optimization and present some results.

  7. Cardiovascular effects of gliptins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Preclinical data and mechanistic studies have indicated a possible beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-dependent and GLP-1-independent effects. DPP-4 inhibition increases the concentration of many peptides with potential vasoactive and cardioprotective effects. Clinically, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several risk factors in patients with T2DM. They improve blood glucose control (mainly by reducing postprandial glycaemia), are weight neutral (or even induce modest weight loss), lower blood pressure, improve postprandial lipaemia, reduce inflammatory markers, diminish oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function. Some positive effects on the heart have also been described in patients with ischaemic heart disease or congestive heart failure, although their clinical relevance requires further investigation. Post-hoc analyses of phase II-III, controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend for a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with gliptins than with placebo or active agents. However, the actual relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials with predefined cardiovascular outcomes and involving various DPP-4 inhibitors are now underway in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile.

  8. Unconscious advertising effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, M.; Belch, M.A.; Belch, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional advertising effect models are based on the premise that advertising is attended to and processed consciously. However, recent neuroscientific research shows that most information is unconsciously attended to, processed, and stored in memory. The concept of unconscious processing is

  9. Open Access policy effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, Alma

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses the policy elements that are necessary for an effective open access policy, according to the findings of the analysis of the revamped ROARMAP tool for open access policies by PASTEUR4OA. It contains graphs, charts and numbers for evidence-based arguments

  10. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...

  11. Unconscious advertising effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, M.; Belch, M.A.; Belch, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional advertising effect models are based on the premise that advertising is attended to and processed consciously. However, recent neuroscientific research shows that most information is unconsciously attended to, processed, and stored in memory. The concept of unconscious processing is

  12. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  13. Aristotle and Double Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    There are some interesting similarities between Aristotle’s ‘mixed actions’ in Book III of the Nicomachean Ethics and the actions often thought to be justifiable with the Doctrine of Double Effect. Here I analyse these similarities by comparing Aristotle’s examples of mixed actions with standard ...

  14. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  15. Immunological effects of vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo, J R

    1982-06-01

    It is only recently that the adverse effects of vasectomy have become the subject of numerous scientific and at times speculative articles in medical and in lay periodicals. In this review of the literature on the immunological effects of vasectomy, attention is directed to the following: immunological response; cellular immunity; effects on testes and epididymis, and systemic effects of sperm autoantibodies. In 1970, 50% of vasectomized men were found to have circulating spermatozoal antibodies. A more recent survey provides confirmation for this finding and presents an incidence of only 2% of agglutinating antibodies and 0% of immobilizing antibodies in a fertile control population. Some recent and convincing studies have shown sperm agglutinating and immobilizing antibodies to remain either at the same titer level or actually to increase 5-12 years postoperatively. Titers range from 2 to 2048 among different patients. The highest incidence of titers is 1 year after vasectomy, but titers can be found as early as 6 months or as late as 20 years postoperatively. The wide range in titers can be explained in terms of technical problems in immune assays, since only immunoglobulins and not those antibodies part of immune complex systems can be measured. Since sperm antigens are in abundant supply in vasectomized men because of the continuous resorption of spermatozoa after vasectomy, possibly undetectable antibody titers actually reflect high levels of antisperm antibodies circulating in the form of immune complexes. Also it may be possible that the variety in measured titers of autoantibodies, as well as the nonuniversal (70%) antibody response in a vasectomized population, is a variable dependent on genetic content and, therefore, an individual characteristic. The fact that hormonal reponse takes place rather readily after vasectomy makes at least some degree of cellular response a necessary occurrence. Studies by Alexander and Anderson, which show delayed

  16. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  17. Separating Gender Composition Effects from Peer Effects in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Babak

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate the importance of controlling for endogenous peer effects in estimating the influence of gender peer effects on educational outcomes. Using Manski's linear-in-means model, this paper illustrates that the estimation of gender peer effects is potentially biased in the presence of endogenous peer effect in education.…

  18. Effects and Side Effects of Flemish School Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninckx, Maarten; Vanhoof, Jan; De Maeyer, Sven; Van Petegem, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increased importance of school inspection in recent years, the current knowledge base does not provide a clear view on the effects and side effects of being inspected. More evidence is needed in more diverse educational contexts. This article responds to this need with a quantitative study on the effects and side effects of school…

  19. Integrating teacher education effectiveness research into educational effectiveness models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and to connect research about teacher education effectiveness and school effectiveness to arrive at an integrative conceptualization that has the potential of improving empirical research in both fields. Teacher education effectiveness addresses effects of te

  20. Integrating teacher education effectiveness research into educational effectiveness models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and to connect research about teacher education effectiveness and school effectiveness to arrive at an integrative conceptualization that has the potential of improving empirical research in both fields. Teacher education effectiveness addresses effects of

  1. 75 FR 10411 - Borrower Rights; Effective Interest Rates; Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... 12 CFR Part 617 RIN 3052-AC45 Borrower Rights; Effective Interest Rates; Effective Date AGENCY: Farm Credit Administration. ACTION: Notice of effective date. SUMMARY: The Farm Credit Administration (FCA or... efficient manner. In accordance with 12 U.S.C. 2252, the effective date of the final rule is 30 days...

  2. Effective Vaccination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, L; Spears, W; Billings, L; Maxim, P

    2010-10-01

    We present a framework for modeling the spread of pathogens throughout a population and generating policies that minimize the impact of those pathogens on the population. This framework is used to study the spread of human viruses between cities via airplane travel. It combines agent-based simulation, mathematical analysis, and an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) optimizer. The goal of this study is to develop tools that determine the optimal distribution of a vaccine supply in the model. Using plausible benchmark vaccine allocation policies of uniform and proportional distribution, we compared their effectiveness to policies found by the EA. We then designed and tested a new, more effective policy which increased the importance of vaccinating smaller cities that are flown to more often. This "importance factor" was validated using U.S. influenza data from the last four years.

  3. Viscoelectric Effects in Nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Davidson, Malcolm R; Dunstan, David E; Hwang, Junho; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic transport behavior in nanochannels is different to that in larger sized channels. Specifically, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in nanochannels have demonstrated two barely understood phenomena which are not observed in microchannels, being: (i) the decrease of average electroosmotic mobility at high surface charge density, and (ii) the decrease of channel conductance at high salt concentrations, as the surface charge is increased. However, current electric double layer models do not capture these results. In this study we provide evidence that this inconsistency primarily arises from the neglect of the viscoelectric effect (being the increase of local viscosity near charged surfaces due to water molecule orientation) in conventional continuum models. It is shown that predictions of electroosmotic mobility in a slit nanochannel, derived from a viscoelectric-modified continuum model, are in quantitative agreement with previous MD simulation results. Furthermore, viscoelectric effects are fou...

  4. [Herbs and cardiotoxic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffè, Stefano; Paffoni, Paola; Laura Colombo, Maria; Davanzo, Franca; Dellavesa, Pierfranco; Cucchi, Lorenzo; Zenone, Franco; Paino, Anna Maria; Franchetti Pardo, Nicolò; Bergamasco, Luca; Signorotti, Fabiana; Parravicini, Umberto

    2013-06-01

    Accidental or deliberate ingestion of poisonous herbs has become an increasingly common phenomenon over the last years. From existing literature data and case reports from emergency room visits or poison control centers, an overview is presented of the potential cardiotoxic manifestations following intoxication by wild herbal plants of the territory. The effects of the consumption of cardiac glycoside-containing plants (e.g., digitalis) are discussed along with tachyarrhythmias induced by Aconitum napellus L., Atropa belladonna L., Mandragora officinarum L. or Ephedra distachya L. herbs, and hypertensive crises associated with licorice abuse. For each plant, a brief historical and botanical background is provided, focusing on pathophysiology of intoxication and cardiotoxic effects on the basis of the most recent literature. Finally, medical management of intoxication, from both a general and cardiological viewpoint, is reviewed.

  5. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, SM; W. Zhang; Kc, A; Borisov, P.; Pearson, JE; Jiang, JS; Lederman, D.; Hoffmann, A.; Bhattacharya, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop t...

  6. Context effects in games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Vlaev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment exploring sequential context effects on strategy choices in one-shot Prisoner's Dilemma (PD game. Rapoport and Chammah (1965 have shown that some PDs are cooperative and lead to high cooperation rate, whereas others are uncooperative. Participants played very cooperative and very uncooperative games, against anonymous partners. The order in which these games were played affected their cooperation rate by producing perceptual contrast, which appeared only between the trials, but not between two separate sequences of games. These findings suggest that people may not have stable perceptions of absolute cooperativeness. Instead, they judge the cooperativeness of each fresh game only in relation to the previous game. The observed effects suggest that the principles underlying judgments about highly abstract magnitudes such as cooperativeness may be similar to principles governing the perception of sensory magnitudes.

  7. Being an effective speaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Cosgray, R

    1991-08-01

    Communication in a group is an essential quality for success in nursing. Despite this, many nurses who must have communication skills to advance have little training in public speaking. Some nurses seek to correct such deficiencies in their education by taking courses in the evenings or on weekends to improve their understanding of the elements of effective speaking. Other nurses learn by self-reflection, study, and ongoing practice. This article has presented guidelines for speaking in a group that can offer assistance in mastering this important nursing skill. Elements of nonverbal communication are crucial for effective communication. However, despite the importance of non-verbal communication to the message, language is what makes communication possible. It is language that allows people to communicate new ideas and thoughts and to solve problems.

  8. The Uniform Rugosity Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnivard, Matthieu; Bucur, Dorin

    2012-06-01

    Relying on the effect of microscopic asperities, one can mathematically justify that viscous fluids adhere completely on the boundary of an impermeable domain. The rugosity effect accounts asymptotically for the transformation of complete slip boundary conditions on a rough surface in total adherence boundary conditions, as the amplitude of the rugosities vanishes. The decreasing rate (average velocity divided by the amplitude of the rugosities) computed on close flat layers is definitely influenced by the geometry. Recent results prove that this ratio has a uniform upper bound for certain geometries, like periodical and "almost Lipschitz" boundaries. The purpose of this paper is to prove that such a result holds for arbitrary (non-periodical) crystalline boundaries and general (non-smooth) periodical boundaries.

  9. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Lee, Jong Seok; Baskerville, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to suggest that translating a design theory (DT) into practice (e.g. creating an instance design artifact (IDA)) is hardly straight-forward and requires substantial creativity. Specifically the authors suggest that adopting a DT embodies a creativity passdown...... effect in which the creative thinking of a team of design theorist(s) inherent in DT invokes a creative mind of a team of artifact instance designer(s) in creating an IDA. In this study, the authors empirically investigate the creativity passdown effect through an action case in which a DT (DT nexus...... designer team introducing a previously published DT as a basis for creating an IDA. Findings – The experience in the action case suggests that using a DT in creating an IDA may encourage design thinking, and in certain way increase its power and practical relevance by fostering the creative mind...

  10. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  11. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency

  12. Safety Intervention Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZIMMERMAN, R.O.

    2001-10-16

    Judging safety intervention effectiveness is often left up to the eye of the beholder. Safety and Health Professionals must increase skills and increase their body of knowledge, based on scientific evidence, that can be applied confidently in the workplace. Evidence must be collected and analyzed to separate the interventions of the month with those that stand the test of time. The book Guide to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Work injuries DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-119, April 2001, serves as a primary reference. An example study related to biorhythms, popular in the late 1970s, is used to illustrate the separating of scientific evidence and pseudo-science hype. The cited biorhythm study focuses on the relationship of the accident dates and the three biorhythmic cycles (physical, emotional, and intelligence).

  13. Electricity Distribution Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Szpyra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the basic concepts of cost accounting in the power industry and selected ways of assessing the effectiveness of electricity distribution. The results of effectiveness analysis of MV/LV distribution transformer replacement are presented, and unit costs of energy transmission through various medium-voltage line types are compared. The calculation results confirm the viability of replacing transformers manufactured before 1975. Replacing transformers manufactured after 1975 – only to reduce energy losses – is not economically justified. Increasing use of a PAS type line for energy transmission in local distribution networks is reasonable. Cabling these networks under the current calculation rules of discounts for excessive power outages is not viable, even in areas particularly exposed to catastrophic wire icing.

  14. Renormalization and effective lagrangians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    There is a strong intuitive understanding of renormalization, due to Wilson, in terms of the scaling of effective lagrangians. We show that this can be made the basis for a proof of perturbative renormalization. We first study renormalizability in the language of renormalization group flows for a toy renormalization group equation. We then derive an exact renormalization group equation for a four-dimensional λø 4 theory with a momentum cutoff. We organize the cutoff dependence of the effective lagrangian into relevant and irrelevant parts, and derive a linear equation for the irrelevant part. A lengthy but straightforward argument establishes that the piece identified as irrelevant actually is so in perturbation theory. This implies renormalizability. The method extends immediately to any system in which a momentum-space cutoff can be used, but the principle is more general and should apply for any physical cutoff. Neither Weinberg's theorem nor arguments based on the topology of graphs are needed.

  15. Quantum Cosmology: Effective Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cosmology has traditionally been studied at the level of symmetry-reduced minisuperspace models, analyzing the behavior of wave functions. However, in the absence of a complete full setting of quantum gravity and detailed knowledge of specific properties of quantum states, it remained difficult to make testable predictions. For quantum cosmology to be part of empirical science, it must allow for a systematic framework in which corrections to well-tested classical equations can be derived, with any ambiguities and ignorance sufficiently parameterized. As in particle and condensed-matter physics, a successful viewpoint is one of effective theories, adapted to specific issues one encounters in quantum cosmology. This review presents such an effective framework of quantum cosmology, taking into account, among other things, space-time structures, covariance, the problem of time and the anomaly issue.

  16. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  17. Magnetoviscous effects in ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles or ferrofluids can be effectively controlled by magnetic fields, which opens up a fascinating field for basic research into fluid dynamics as well as a host of applications in engineering and medicine. The introductory chapter provides the reader with basic information on the structure, and magnetic and viscous properties of ferrofluids. The bulk of this monograph is based on the author's own research activity and deals with ferrohydrodynamics, especially with the magnetoviscous effects. In particular, the author studies in detail the interparticle interactions so far often neglected but of great importance in concentrated ferrofluids. The basic theory and the most recent experimental findings are presented, making the book interesting reading for physicists or engineers interested in smart materials.

  18. Establishing effective working relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-02-24

    This article, the second in a series of 11, provides support and offers advice to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence. In particular, the article discusses how to establish effective working relationships and emphasises the importance of the student-mentor or student-practice teacher relationship. It examines the essential qualities, attributes and characteristics of an effective mentor or practice teacher. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements for these roles as stipulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

  19. Developing Effective Clinical Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Khamarko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education and training provides a means to improve performance among health care professionals (HCP. Research shows, however, that continuing professional education activities have inconsistent effects on HCP competence, performance, and patient health outcomes. Furthermore, the trainer’s role as a facilitator of knowledge translation (KT has been understudied. To understand how clinical trainers support their trainees in translating what they learned into practice, we conducted 16 in-depth interviews with expert trainers. These interviews yielded a variety of KT-enhancing strategies, including tailoring training activities to their trainees’ needs. In addition, participants recommended trainers familiarize themselves with their trainees’ work environments, be able to identify their knowledge deficits, and devote time to provide trainees with post-training support. Creating an effective training, one that leads to transfer, requires active planning, communication, and command of the training topic by skilled trainers.

  20. The Blazhko Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacs, Geza

    2009-01-01

    Current status of (the lack of) understanding Blazhko effect is reviewed. We focus mostly on the various components of the failure of the models and touch upon the observational issues only at a degree needed for the theoretical background. Attention is to be paid to models based on radial mode resonances, since they seem to be not fully explored yet, especially if we consider possible non-standard effects (e.g., heavy element enhancement). To aid further modeling efforts, we stress the need for accurate time-series spectral line analysis to reveal any possible non-radial component(s) and thereby let to include (or exclude) non-radial modes in explaining the Blazhko phenomenon.