WorldWideScience

Sample records for suny stony brook

  1. Stony Brook's Graduate Courses in Clear, Vivid, Conversational Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, E.

    2011-12-01

    Graduate students in the sciences at Stony Brook University are taking for-credit courses to learn to communicate more effectively about science with people outside their disciplines, including public officials, the press, students, potential funders and employers, colleagues in other fields, and the general public. Five Communicating Science courses are offered; two more will be added in January, 2012. The courses are offered by the School of Journalism and developed by the Center for Communicating Science (CCS). This interdisciplinary center was founded in 2009, with the participation of Alan Alda, the actor, writer, director and longtime advocate for science, who is a Visiting Professor at Stony Brook. At the core of the program are three 1-credit (14-hour) modules that rely on experiential learning, repeated practice and immediate, interactive feedback. In Distilling Your Message, students practice speaking clearly, vividly and conversationally about their work at different levels of complexity and formality to different audiences, using storytelling techniques where appropriate. In Writing for the Public, they extend these skills into writing. In Improvisation for Scientists, the most unconventional of the courses, students play improvisational theater games to help themselves connect more directly, personally and responsively with their audiences. In their first two semesters, the courses are expected to serve about 90 students, taking a total of about 180 credits. Most of the courses have filled quickly, mixing master's and doctoral students from more than a dozen fields, including marine and atmospheric sciences. Three to six credits of Communicating Science courses are required for students in two programs, an MA in Marine Conservation and Policy and an Advanced Certificate in Health Communications. The content and methods of the courses are based largely on lessons learned from evaluations of all-day workshops that CCS has conducted for more than 250

  2. Analysis of reinjection problems at the Stony Brook ATES field test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supkow, D. J.; Shultz, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) is one of several energy storage technologies being investigated by the DOE to determine the feasibility of reducing energy consumption by means of energy management systems. The State University of New York, (SUNY) Stony Brook, Long Island, New York site was selected by Battelle PNL for a Phase 1 investigation to determine the feasibility of an ATES demonstration to seasonally store chill energy by injecting chilled water in the winter and recovering it at a maximum rate of 100 MBTU/hr (30 MW) in the summer. The Phase 1 study was performed during 1981 by Dames & Moore under subcontract to Batelle PLN. The pumping and injection tests were performed using two wells in a doublet configuration. Well PI-1 is a previously existing well and PI-2 was installed specifically for this investigation. Both wells are screened in the Upper Magothy aquifer from approximately 300 to 350 feet below ground surface. Nine observation wells were also installed as a portion of the investigation to monitor water level and aquifer temperature changes during the test.

  3. Beam emittance of the Stony Brook Tandem-LINAC booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholldorf, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation is primarily a study of the longitudinal and transverse beam emittance of the Stony Brook Heavy Ion Tandem LINAC Accelerator Facility, with a secondary emphasis on the beam dynamical design of two key elements of the system: a low energy double-drift buncher, and an achromatic double-90 0 LINAC injection system. A transverse emittance measuring system consisting of two translation stages controlled by stepper motors is described. Each stage carried a pair of beam defining slits mounted so that both horizontal and vertical emittances could be measured with only linear motion of the stage assembly. Beam currents were measured directly by a low-noise, high-sensitivity electrometer circuit integrated with the second slit-stage assembly. A mini-computer controlled the motors and acquired and displayed the data. Transverse emittance areas of beams of 12 C, 16 O, 32 S, and 58 Ni were measured at ion source extraction potential, after ion source acceleration, after tandem acceleration, and after LINAC acceleration. The results were analyzed in terms of source sputter-cone geometry, angle straggling in gas and foil strippers, and a variety of other factors

  4. Lead/tin resonator development at the Stony Brook heavy-ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikora, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brennan, J.M.; Cole, M.; Noe, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Stony Brook Nuclear Structure Laboratory (NSL) has operated a superconducting heavy-ion booster linac since April 1983. The 40 copper split-loop resonators were developed and fabricated at Cal-Tech and plated with lead at Stony Brook. These original lead surfaces have given stable performance for the last 4 years, at an average accelerating gradient of about 2.5 MV/m in the high-β section. The low-β resonators however have never run reliably on-line much better than 2.0 MV/m, due to excessive vibration of their rather soft loop arms in the working accelerator environment. For the last 2-3 years the efforts of the Stony Brook accelerator development group have been focused on (1) a retrofit of the low-beta section of the linac with new QWRs and (2) the further development of plated superconducting surfaces. In particular a Sn/Pb alloy has been shown to give resonator performance at least comparable to that obtained with pure Pb but with a greatly simplified plating technique, as discussed below. Recently a possible heavy-ion injector based on superconducting RF quadrupole (RFQ) structures has also been studied. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  5. What Do Facts Have to Do with It? Exploring Instructional Emphasis in Stony Brook News Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    An analytic matrix comprised of multiple media literacy teaching and learning principles is conceptualized to examine a model of news literacy developed by journalism educators at Stony Brook University. The multidimensional analysis indicates that news literacy instructors focus on teaching students how to question and assess the veracity of news…

  6. GPU-Accelerated Stony-Brook University 5-class Microphysics Scheme in WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielikainen, J.; Huang, B.; Huang, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system. Microphysics plays an important role in weather and climate prediction. Several bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the WRF, with different numbers of simulated hydrometeor classes and methods for estimating their size fall speeds, distributions and densities. Stony-Brook University scheme (SBU-YLIN) is a 5-class scheme with riming intensity predicted to account for mixed-phase processes. In the past few years, co-processing on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) has been a disruptive technology in High Performance Computing (HPC). GPUs use the ever increasing transistor count for adding more processor cores. Therefore, GPUs are well suited for massively data parallel processing with high floating point arithmetic intensity. Thus, it is imperative to update legacy scientific applications to take advantage of this unprecedented increase in computing power. CUDA is an extension to the C programming language offering programming GPU's directly. It is designed so that its constructs allow for natural expression of data-level parallelism. A CUDA program is organized into two parts: a serial program running on the CPU and a CUDA kernel running on the GPU. The CUDA code consists of three computational phases: transmission of data into the global memory of the GPU, execution of the CUDA kernel, and transmission of results from the GPU into the memory of CPU. CUDA takes a bottom-up point of view of parallelism is which thread is an atomic unit of parallelism. Individual threads are part of groups called warps, within which every thread executes exactly the same sequence of instructions. To test SBU-YLIN, we used a CONtinental United States (CONUS) benchmark data set for 12 km resolution domain for October 24, 2001. A WRF domain is a geographic region of interest discretized into a 2-dimensional grid parallel to the ground. Each grid point has

  7. Level II scour analysis for brigde 5 (STOCTH00360005) on Town Highway 36, crossing Stony Brook, Stockridge, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STOCTH00360005 on Town Highway 36 crossing Stony Brook, Stockbridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  8. State University of New York, University of Stoney Brook, University and Clinical Practice Management Plan Space Leasing Practices. Report 96-S-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report assesses the propriety and economy of space leasing practices of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNY-SB) for the period July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1996, specifically those related to a health center that includes five professional schools, a 536-bed teaching hospital, and a 350-bed veterans' home. Some of…

  9. Energy at Stony Brook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visich, Marian, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses strategies used in a course for nonengineering students which consists of case studies of such sociotechnological problems as automobile safety, water pollution, and energy. Solutions to the problems are classified according to three approaches: education, government regulation, and technological fix. (BC)

  10. A Grassroots Community Dialogue on the Ethics of the Care of People with Autism and Their Families: The Stony Brook Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Stephen G; Pomeroy, John; Keirns, Carla; Cover, Virginia Isaacs; Dorn, Michael Leverett

    2017-06-01

    The increased recognition and reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) combined with the associated societal and clinical impact call for a broad grassroots community-based dialogue on treatment related ethical and social issues. In these Stony Brook Guidelines, which were developed during a full year of community dialogue (2010-2011) with affected individuals, families, and professionals in the field, we identify and discuss topics of paramount concern to the ASD constituency: treatment goals and happiness, distributive justice, managing the desperate hopes for a cure, sibling responsibilities, intimacy and sex, diagnostic ethics, and research ethics. The members of the dialogue core committee included doctors, ethicists, administrators, social workers, ministers, disability experts, and many family members of individuals with autism who were especially engaged in community activities on behalf of their constituency, including siblings, parents, and grandparents. Our guidelines are not based on "top-down" imposition of professional expertise, but rather on a "bottom-up" grass roots attention to the voices of affected individuals and families speaking from experience. These guidelines can inform clinical practice, but they also are meaningful for the wider social conversation emerging over the treatment of individuals with ASD.

  11. Nuclear theory group progress report and renewal proposal, December 1, 1980-November 30, 1981. [Dept. of Physics, SUNY at Stony Brook, proposal for 12/1/80-11/30/81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G. E.; Jackson, A. D.; Kuo, T. T.S.

    1980-01-01

    This report covers a broad range of topics in theoretical nuclear physics, intermediate energy physics, and nuclear astrophysics. Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the nature of the nucleon-nucleon and meson-nucleon interactions and on related questions regarding the structure of baryons. A number of these questions are addressed with the aid of the chiral bag model. Starting from the free interaction, many-body techniques are used to construct the effective interaction between nucleons in nuclei and nuclear media and optical potentials for the description of the scattering of nucleons by nuclei. A wide range of nuclear phenomena are amenable to analysis using such effective interactions. Among the most interesting are nuclear giant resonances, for which are offered both new semiclassical insight and a new dynamical theory of nuclear vibrations that emphasizes the importance of the energy dependence of the effective interaction. The extension of Jastrow/hypernetted chain techniques and a better understanding of their content has led to a better description of the ground-state correlations in nuclear matter and a variety of other condensed systems. The equation of state of nuclear matter at densities of astrophysical interest is discussed. It is possible to understand the properties of pulsars given the interactions between their constituents. A description of pulsar formation and of the effects of the shock wave generated in the collapse of large stars is given. Heavy-ion reactions, quasimolecular states, and energy dissipation are studied through the excitation of collective excitations within a semiclassical framework. Items in this report are of the nature of extended abstracts. References to complete papers are given.

  12. General paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detect syphilis in the body include: CSF-VDRL FTA-ABS Tests of the nervous system may include: ... DO, FACP, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony ...

  13. Plating laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamster, A.G.; Weitkamp, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lead plating of the prototype resonator has been conducted entirely in the plating laboratory at SUNY Stony Brook. Because of the considerable cost and inconvenience in transporting personnel and materials to and from Stony Brook, it is clearly impractical to plate all the resonators there. Furthermore, the high-beta resonator cannot be accommodated at Stony Brook without modifying the set up there. Consequently the authors are constructing a plating lab in-house

  14. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from UNKNOWN From Long Island Sound from 19710809 to 19710814 (NODC Accession 8900019)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data contains two versions of a Long Island Sound Data Set collected between August 9-14, 1971. Data was originally collected by SUNY at Stony Brook and automated by...

  15. Ultrasonic Derivative Measurements of Bone Strain During Exercise, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations, Inc., in collaboration with the SUNY Stony Brook, proposes to extend ultrasonic pulsed phase locked loop (PPLL) derivative measurements to the...

  16. Sleep walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleepwalking. In: Chokroverty S, Thomas RJ, eds. Atlas of Sleep Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:380- ... of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more ...

  17. Nonresident Tuition and Fees at SUNY. Rates, Policies, and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Craig W.; Armour-Garb, Allison

    2010-01-01

    To inform the discussion of out-of-state tuition, SUNY officials asked the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government to conduct a study that addresses three questions. First, how do SUNY's undergraduate nonresident tuition and fees compare to those charged by comparable higher education institutions? Second, what is known about the effects of…

  18. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  19. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  20. PRELIMINARY NOTES ON mE SUNI, NESOTRAGUS MOSCHATUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRELIMINARY NOTES ON mE SUNI, NESOTRAGUS MOSCHATUS ~'lD. RED DUIKER, CEPHALOPHUS ... it as being "not uncommon at Mkuzi river, but very shy, taking refuge in the tangled scrub of the flats and only coming into the .... The one chased the other, while making a "tchie-tchie" sound, but louder and more ...

  1. Massachusetts Stony Brook galactic plane CO survey - disk and spiral arm molecular cloud populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, P.M.; Sanders, D.B.; Rivolo, A.R.; Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory, Pasadena, CA; Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD)

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of a new high-resolution CO survey of the galactic disk is presented, which can detect and measure essentially all molecular clouds and cloud components in the inner Galaxy with size greater than 10 pc. In the region of l between 20 and 50 deg approximately 2000 emission centers are identified. Two populations which separate according to temperature are found. The disk population of cold molecular cores contains about three-quarters of the total number of cores, is not confined to any large-scale pattern in longitude-velocity space, and must be widespread in the Galaxy both in and out of spiral arms. The spiral arm population of warm molecular cores contains about one-quarter of the population with one-half of the emission and is very closely associated with radio H II regions. Between longitudes 20 and 50 deg their radial distribution shows two peaks at R = 5 and 7.5 kpc. The warm molecular cloud cores have a nonaxisymmetric galactic distribution, occur in clusters, and are confined to restricted regions and patterns in longitude-velocity space and in the galactic disk. 20 references

  2. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layegh Pouran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brooke-Spiegler syndrome (BSS is an uncommon autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a high affinity to form multiple adnexal neoplasia (skin appendage tumors, especially trichoepitheliomas and cylindromas, and occasionally spiradenomas, which usually appear in the second or third decade of life. To date, only a few cases with this syndrome have been reported. This case report describes a 26-year-old woman who presented to the dermatology department of Qaem Hospital with tumoral lesions on her scalp, face, and forearm. Her father and younger brother were also affected. On examination, several round-to-oval skin-colored papules with a smooth pearly surface measuring 2 to 6 mm in diameter were seen on the mid-face, particularly in the nasolabial folds, the upper lip. Tumors and nodules seen on the scalp were pinkish red, dome-shaped, and to some extent, pedunculated with surface telangiectasia and induration. Histopathology of the facial papules showed trichoepithelioma while that of a scalp nodule showed cylindroma.

  3. Spiders (Araneae of stony debris in North Bohemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžička, Vlastimil

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The arachnofauna was studied at five stony debris sites in northern Bohemia. In Central Europe, the northern and montane species inhabiting cold places live not only on mountain tops and peat bogs but also on the lower edges of boulder debris, where air streaming through the system of inner compartments gives rise to an exceedingly cold microclimate. At such cold sites, spiders can live either on bare stones (Bathyphantes simillimus, Wubanoides uralensis, or in the rich layers of moss and lichen (Diplocentria bidentata. Kratochviliella bicapitata exhibits a diplostenoecious occurence in stony debris and on the tree bark. Latithorax faustus and Theonoe minutissima display diplostenoecious occurence in stony debris and on peat bogs. The occurence of the species Scotina celans in the Czech Republic was documented for the first time.

  4. Evaluation of Stony Coral Indicators for Coral Reef Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonies of reef-building stony corals at 57 stations around St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands were characterized by species, size and percentage of living tissue. Taxonomic, biological and physical indicators of coral condition were derived from these measurements and assessed for ...

  5. Problem solving environment for modelling stony coral morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merks, R.M.H.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Kaandorp, J.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from experimental and theoretical approaches, computer simulation is an important tool in testing hypotheses about stony coral growth. However, the construction and use of such simulation tools needs extensive computational skills and knowledge that is not available to most research

  6. Rao, Prof. Sumathi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Prof. Sumathi Ph.D. (SUNY, Stony Brook), FNASc. Date of birth: 5 December 1956. Specialization: Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Quantum field Theory Address: Harish Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211 019, U.P.. Contact: Office: (0532) 227 4303. Residence: (0532) 227 4002

  7. The influence of stony soil properties on water dynamics modeled by the HYDRUS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlaváčiková Hana

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Stony soils are composed of two fractions (rock fragments and fine soil with different hydrophysical characteristics. Although stony soils are abundant in many catchments, their properties are still not well understood. This manuscript presents an application of the simple methodology for deriving water retention properties of stony soils, taking into account a correction for the soil stoniness. Variations in the water retention of the fine soil fraction and its impact on both the soil water storage and the bottom boundary fluxes are studied as well. The deterministic water flow model HYDRUS-1D is used in the study. The results indicate that the presence of rock fragments in a moderate-to-high stony soil can decrease the soil water storage by 23% or more and affect the soil water dynamics. Simulated bottom fluxes increased or decreased faster, and their maxima during the wet period were larger in the stony soil compared to the non-stony one.

  8. DESIGN OF SLIT DAMS FOR CONTROLLING STONY DEBRIS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Pang LIEN

    2003-01-01

    A new method to a slit dam for controlling the stony debris flow has been derived based on the mass conservation law of the stony debris flow passing through a slit dam and the laboratory experiment results.This new method is then combined with three primary efficiency expressions: the dimensionless sediment outflow ratio,the sediment concentration ratio,and the sediment storage rate to develop a simple module,with which the height and the spacing of the posts,as well as the total spacing of slit dam are determined.Furthermore,these expressions can also be applied to check those slit dams that have already been constructed with their effectiveness against various magnitudes of the debris flow. The comparison between these expressions and laboratory data is in reasonable agreement.

  9. International Conference on Hyperbolic Problems Theory, Numerics, Applications Held in Stony Brook, New York on 13-17 June 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-25

    Astrophysik are investigated numerically. These collisions do not seem to Karl - Schwarzschild -str., 1, D-85470 Garching, Germany be elastic. On the other hand...Astrophysak, Departamento de Matemdtsca Aplscada y Astronomia Karl -Schwaarzschild-Str. i Universadad de Valencia 85740 Garching bes Munchen. Germany "E...the R-W metric to the empty space Schwarzschild metric, and since in this cae mass and momentum cannot cross the interface, (which in this case models

  10. 77 FR 60676 - Stony Brook University, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty-Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... Importation Act of 1966 (Pub. L. 89-651, as amended by Pub. L. 106-36; 80 Stat. 897; 15 CFR part 301). Related...: September 27, 2012. Gregory W. Campbell, Director, Subsidies Enforcement Office, Import Administration. [FR...

  11. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-01-01

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field

  12. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  13. ADAPTIVE ENERGY-SAVING CULTIVATOR FOR STONY SOILS CULTIVATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kudzaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Practice of cultivators operation on stony soils in RNO-Alania with high hardness and humidity indicates that traction resistance during the work varies widely, with deviation from the mean value by more than 2 times. Optimally adjust the machine to the soil background when using most modern mechanisms of regulation is not always possible. Customizing the data machine boils down to the choice of priority between the vibration of the working bodies in the soil, the maintenance of the given depth and power reserve stands required to crawl the working body of the big stones. It is very difficult to get in practice the best combination of these three factors, especially on stony soils. Therefore, the machine must be designed with the ability to quickly adjust to changing operating conditions and modes to ensure energy-saving effects and not violations of the specified soil depth of various hardness with the possibility of equipping the machine racks with different working bodies. The interrow cultivator with the possibility of the quick adjustment (including automated to varying conditions was developed. In the process of studied basic parameters of elastic composite racks and parameters of pneumatic mechanism drive to adjust the proposed section of the machine were established. The system hardiness in layouts by elastic bars with air pressure up to 0.6 MPa varies from 17.7 to 45.3 N/mm. It was received effective values of pressures 0.4-0.5 MPa in the pneumatic drive partitions of the machine when operating with universal blade and ridger body OK-3 on stony soil. As a result, traction resistance decreases by 30-35 percent.

  14. Evaluation of Stony Coral Indicators for Coral Reef ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonies of reef-building stony corals at 57 stations around St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands were characterized by species, size and percentage of living tissue. Taxonomic, biological and physical indicators of coral condition were derived from these measurements and assessed for their response to gradients of human disturbance. The purpose of the study was to identify indicators that could be used for regulatory assessments under authority of the Clean Water Act--this requires that indicators distinguish anthropogenic disturbances from natural variation. Stony coral indicators were tested for correlation with human disturbance across gradients located on three different sides of the island. At the most intensely disturbed location, five of eight primary indicators were highly correlated with distance from the source of disturbance: Coral taxa richness, average colony size, the coefficient of variation of colony size (an indicator of colony size heterogeneity), total topographic coral surface area, and live coral surface area. An additional set of exploratory indicators related to rarity, reproductive and spawning mode, and taxonomic identity were also screened for association with disturbance at the same location. For the other two locations, there were no significant changes in indicator values and therefore no discernible effects of human activity. Coral indicators demonstrated sufficient precision to detect levels of change that would be applicable in a regio

  15. SUNY College of Agriculture and Technology at Morrisville: Selected Financial Management Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report of the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Agriculture and Technology at Morrisville addresses the question of whether the college management has established an effective system of internal control over its revenue, equipment, and student work-study payroll. The audit makes a number of observations and conclusions.…

  16. DOE Closeout Report from SUNY Albany High Energy Physics to Department of Energy Office of Science.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Jesse [SUNY Albany; Jain, Vivek

    2014-08-15

    A report from the SUNY Albany Particle Physics Group summarizing our activities on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We summarize our work: on data analysis projects, on efforts to improve detector performance, and on service work to the experiment.

  17. Evaluation of the Pilot Mentoring Program at the Research Foundation for SUNY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Harr, Amy; Caggiano-Siino, Kathleen; Prewitt, Ashlee

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a description of an 18-month pilot program focused on the leadership development of the next generation of research administrators (RAs) in the State University of New York system (SUNY). The key questions for the evaluators were: 1) can we create a developmental program that effectively prepares the next generation of RAs;…

  18. Harriet Brooks-Pioneer nuclear scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner-Canham, M. F.; Rayner-Canham, G. W.

    1989-10-01

    This article, using revealing statements from contemporary correspondence, traces the eventful life of Harriet Brooks, one of Ernest Rutherford's most valued research students and collaborators at McGill University. Brooks performed some of the crucial experiments in the early work on radioactivity; her work led her to the Cavendish where she did work with J. J. Thomson. Still later, she worked with Marie Curie, to whom Rutherford favorably compared her. Despite Brooks' achievements and promise, she finally relinquished her research career when faced with insurmountable objections to women who wished to have both a professional and a married life.

  19. Katherine Brooke'ist / Tiina Lepiste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lepiste, Tiina

    2007-01-01

    Ameerika teleseriaali "Vaprad ja ilusad" ("The Bold and the Beautiful") osatäitja Katherine Kelly Lang (Brooke). Artikli aluseks on Soap Opera Weekly ajakirjaniku Linda Susmani vestlus näitlejannaga

  20. 2012 USGS Lidar: Brooks Camp (AK)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) had a requirement for high resolution Lidar needed for mapping the Brooks Camp region of Katmai National Park in Alaska....

  1. Elemental composition analysis of stony meteorites discovered in Phitsanulok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loylip, T.; Wannawichian, S.

    2017-09-01

    A meteorite is a fragment of pure stone, iron or the mixture of stony-iron. The falling of meteorites into Earth’s surface is part of Earth’s accretion process from dust and rocks in our solar system. When these fragments come close enough to the Earth to be attracted by its gravity, they may fall into the Earth. Following the detection of objects that fall from the sky onto a home in Phitsanulok in June 27, the meteorites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) instruments. The results from SEM/EDS analysis show that the meteorites are mainly composed of Fe-Ni and Fe-s. The meteorite is Achondrite, a class of meteorite which does not contain Chondrule. The meteorites in this work are thought to be part of a large asteroid.

  2. ABOUT EXPERIENCE OF THE DR.SUNI1800 INTRAORAL RADIOVISIOGRAPH AND OPENDENTAL EMR-SYSTEM INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Semenets

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiovisiography is widely used X-ray technology in the dentistry practice for the diagnostics currently. The brief overview of the market of the digital radiovisiographs and related radiology information systems is given. High hardware and software prices are often combined with insufficient and low-quality support services. The Dr.Suni 1800 intraoral radiovisiograph installation problems due to the outdated software are described. The abilities of the open-source free software usage in the radiology diagnoses tasks are shown. The existing methodology of the Dr.Suni 1800 intraoral radiovisiograph and the OpenDental medical information system integration is improved. An updated step-by-step integration procedure is presented. The Windows 7 (32-bit edition compatibility is confirmed.

  3. SYMBIODINIUM ISOLATES FROM STONY CORAL: ISOLATION, GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS AND EFFECTS OF UV IRRADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symbiodinium spp. Isolates from Stony Coral: Isolation, Growth Characteristics and Effects of UV Irradiation (Abstract). J. Phycol. 37(3):42-43.Symbiodinium species were isolated from Montipora capitata, Acropora palmata and two field samples of Porites porites. Cultures ...

  4. Stony meteoroid space erosion and drag: Effect on cosmic ray exposure ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2017-09-01

    Collisions with dust particles in retrograde orbits cause space erosion on stony meteoroids in addition to the particle drag which causes drift toward resonances. The spacing between resonances determines the maximum drift time and sets upper limits on the neon-21 cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages for meteoroids less than ∼1 m in radius, while space erosion controls the limit for radii greater than ∼1 m; the limits accord well with the measured CRE ages of stony meteorites.

  5. Reframing Romaine Brooks' heroic queer modernism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Cassandra L

    2010-01-01

    Modernism was not a wholesale embracing of Greenberg's definition as abstracting, non-objective, and autonomous. The expatriate U.S. artist and lesbian Romaine Brooks politicized her portraits of females based on a queer combination of the Byronic erotic and Baudelaire's modern dandy. Her execution of her queer modernist aesthetics re-presents female heroes as part of a self-reflective dynamic of lesbian modernity that emphasizes the ambiguity of normative gender binaries and plays with style, personality, and impersonation as disrupting to bourgeoisie mores. My focus is on how Brooks shatters normative conventions of portraiture in her revolutionary critique of heteronormativity.

  6. Detecting Terrain Stoniness From Airborne Laser Scanning Data †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paavo Nevalainen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three methods to estimate the presence of ground surface stones from publicly available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS point clouds are presented. The first method approximates the local curvature by local linear multi-scale fitting, and the second method uses Discrete-Differential Gaussian curvature based on the ground surface triangulation. The third baseline method applies Laplace filtering to Digital Elevation Model (DEM in a 2 m regular grid data. All methods produce an approximate Gaussian curvature distribution which is then vectorized and classified by logistic regression. Two training data sets consisted of 88 and 674 polygons of mass-flow deposits, respectively. The locality of the polygon samples is a sparse canopy boreal forest, where the density of ALS ground returns is sufficiently high to reveal information about terrain micro-topography. The surface stoniness of each polygon sample was categorized for supervised learning by expert observation on the site. The leave-pair-out (L2O cross-validation of the local linear fit method results in the area under curve A U C = 0 . 74 and A U C = 0 . 85 on two data sets, respectively. This performance can be expected to suit real world applications such as detecting coarse-grained sediments for infrastructure construction. A wall-to-wall predictor based on the study was demonstrated.

  7. The Brooks Act, Is it Relevant Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Publishing Company, 1990. 7. Fla=., Kenneth. Creatina The ComDuter. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 1988. 8. Gilchrist, Bruce, & Wessel...Milton R. Reaulation of the Computer Industry. Montvale: AFIPS Press, 1972. 9. Gore, Al. Creatina A Government That Works Better & Cost Less: Renort

  8. Evapotranspiration simulated by CRITERIA and AquaCrop models in stony soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Campi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a water balance model is also based on the ability to correctly perform simulations in heterogeneous soils. The objective of this paper is to test CRITERIA and AquaCrop models in order to evaluate their suitability in estimating evapotranspiration at the field scale in two types of soil in the Mediterranean region: non-stony and stony soil. The first step of the work was to calibrate both models under the non-stony conditions. The models were calibrated by using observations on wheat crop (leaf area index or canopy cover, and phenological stages as a function of degree days and pedo-climatic measurements. The second step consisted in the analysing the impact of the soil type on the models performances by comparing simulated and measured values. The outputs retained in the analysis were soil water content (at the daily scale and crop evapotranspiration (at two time scales: daily and crop season. The model performances were evaluated through four statistical tests: normalised difference (D% at the seasonal time scale; and relative root mean square error (RRMSE, efficiency index (EF, coefficient of determination (r2 at the daily scale. At the seasonal scale, values of D% were less than 15% in stony and on-stony soils, indicating a good performance attained by both models. At the daily scale, the RRMSE values (<30% indicate that the evapotranspiration simulated by CRITERIA is acceptable in both soil types. In the stony soil conditions, 3 out 4 statistical tests (RRMSE, EF, r2 indicate the inadequacy of AquaCrop to simulate correctly daily evapotranspiration. The higher performance of CRITERIA model to simulate daily evapotranspiration in stony soils, is due to the soil submodel, which requires the percentage skeleton as an input, while AquaCrop model takes into account the presence of skeleton by reducing the soil volume.

  9. Comparative embryology of eleven species of stony corals (Scleractinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nami Okubo

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of coral reproduction and development is needed because corals are threatened in many ways by human activity. Major threats include the loss of their photosynthetic symbionts (Symbiodinium caused by rising temperatures (bleaching, reduced ability to calcify caused by ocean acidification, increased storm severity associated with global climate change and an increase in predators caused by runoff from human agricultural activity. In spite of these threats, detailed descriptions of embryonic development are not available for many coral species. The current consensus is that there are two major groups of stony corals, the "complex" and the "robust". In this paper we describe the embryonic development of four "complex" species, Pseudosiderastrea tayamai, Galaxea fascicularis, Montipora hispida, and Pavona Decussata, and seven "robust" species, Oulastrea crispata, Platygyra contorta, Favites abdita, Echinophyllia aspera, Goniastrea favulus, Dipsastraea speciosa (previously Favia speciosa, and Phymastrea valenciennesi (previously Montastrea valenciennesi. Data from both histologically sectioned embryos and whole mounts are presented. One apparent difference between these two major groups is that before gastrulation the cells of the complex corals thus far described (mainly Acropora species spread and flatten to produce the so-called prawn chip, which lacks a blastocoel. Our present broad survey of robust and complex corals reveals that prawn chip formation is not a synapomorphy of complex corals, as Pavona Decussata does not form a prawn chip and has a well-developed blastocoel. Although prawn chip formation cannot be used to separate the two clades, none of the robust corals which we surveyed has such a stage. Many robust coral embryos pass through two periods of invagination, separated by a return to a spherical shape. However, only the second of these periods is associated with endoderm formation. We have therefore

  10. High {Tc} superconductivity: Symmetries and reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    This is a talk given at the Symposium Symmetries and Reflections, dedicated to Prof. C.N. Yang's retirement. In this talk, the author reflects on his personal interaction with Prof. Yang since his graduate career at SUNY Stony Brook, and his profound impact on his understanding of theoretical physics. He also reviews the SO(5) theory of high T c superconductivity and shows how his collaboration with Prof. Yang in 1990 lead to the foundation of this idea

  11. An International Symposium and Exhibition on Active Materials and Adaptive Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    Materials 12 V. Varadan and V. Varadan, Pennsylvania State University The New BLM System: Self-Assembling Bilayer Lipid Membranes (s-BLMs) 14 H...in Shape Memory Effect NiTi 186 for use in Vibration Isolation adn Cavitation -Erosion Applications A. Jardine, SUNY at Stony Brook Materials...hydrophone and biomedical imaging ( ultrasound ). The advantages of relic processing are that it allows the production of large area composites with a

  12. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  13. Production and evaluation of YY-male Brook Trout to eradicate nonnative wild brook trout populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Patrick; Schill, Daniel J.; Meyer, Kevin A.; Campbell, Matthew R.; Vu, Ninh V.; Hansen, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Nonnative Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis were introduced throughout western North America in the early 1900s, resulting in widespread self-sustaining populations that are difficult to eradicate and often threaten native salmonid populations. A novel approach for their eradication involves use of YY male (MYY) Brook Trout (created in the hatchery by feminizing XY males and crossing them with normal XY males). If MYY Brook Trout survive after stocking, and reproduce successfully with wild females, in theory this could eventually drive the sex ratio of the wild population to 100% males, at which point the population would not be able to reproduce and would be eradicated. This study represents the first successful development of a FYY and MYY salmonid broodstock, which was produced in four years at relatively low cost. Field trials demonstrated that stocked hatchery MYY Brook Trout survived and produced viable MYY offspring in streams, although reproductive fitness appeared to have been lower than their wild conspecifics. Even if reduced fitness is the norm in both streams and alpine lakes, our population simulations suggest that eradication can be achieved in reasonable time periods under some MYY stocking scenarios, especially when wild Brook Trout are simultaneously suppressed in the population.

  14. Harriet Brooks: Canada's First Woman Physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey

    2004-03-01

    During those early halcyon days of the study of radioactivity, one young Canadian woman, Harriet Brooks, joined Ernest Rutherford's group as his first research student. Later, she joined J.J. Thomson's group in Cambridge and, finally, Marie Curie's group in Paris. During her short research career, she made several important contributions to science. She investigated the nature of 'emanation' from radium; discovered that radioactive substances could undergo successive decay; and first reported the recoil of the radioactive atom. Much of this research was published under her name alone though Rutherford made extensive reference to her discoveries in his Bakerian lecture of 1904. Brooks life is of interest not only in what she accomplished, but also in the challenges she faced as a pioneering woman scientist in the early part of the twentieth century. In the presentation we will blend the account of her life and work with the societal context. This work was accomplished jointly with Marelene F. Rayner-Canham.

  15. Magnetic particles extracted from manganese nodules: Suggested origin from stony and iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe data, spherical and ellipsoidal particles extracted from manganese nodules were divided into three groups. Group I particles are believed to be derived from iron meteorites, and Group II particles from stony meteorites. Group III particles are believed to be volcanic in origin.

  16. Brook trout passage performance through culverts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Bergeron, Normand

    2016-01-01

    Culverts can restrict access to habitat for stream-dwelling fishes. We used passive integrated transponder telemetry to quantify passage performance of >1000 wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) attempting to pass 13 culverts in Quebec under a range of hydraulic and environmental conditions. Several variables influenced passage success, including complex interactions between physiology and behavior, hydraulics, and structural characteristics. The probability of successful passage was greater through corrugated metal culverts than through smooth ones, particularly among smaller fish. Trout were also more likely to pass at warmer temperatures, but this effect diminished above 15 °C. Passage was impeded at higher flows, through culverts with steep slopes, and those with deep downstream pools. This study provides insight on factors influencing brook trout capacity to pass culverts as well as a model to estimate passage success under various conditions, with an improved resolution and accuracy over existing approaches. It also presents methods that could be used to investigate passage success of other species, with implications for connectivity of the riverscape.

  17. THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED MANIPULATION PROJECT: WATERSHED SCIENCE IN A POLICY PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bear Brook Watershed Manipulation in Maine is a paired watershed experiment. Monitoring of the paired catchments (East Bear Brook - reference; West Bear Brook - experimental) began in early 1987. Chemical manipulation of West Bear Brook catchment began in November 1989. Proce...

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Brooks City Base Project, Brooks Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Maitland Road and the east base boundary (Goliad Road). The CoSA Fire Department Training Academy may be included within this area. The Fire Department...replacement of the gas lines in the 1100s area (the area containing Facilities 1162 through 1193 bounded by Welch, Chennault, Hawks, and Maitland roads...3 Ian Smith, P.E., REM, Brooks City Base Program Office, 311 HSW/CDB M.S., 1990, Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska B.C.E., 1978, Civil

  19. Chemical compositions of magnetic, stony spherules from deep-sea sediments determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compositions of magnetic, stony spherules from deep sea sediments were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. High Ir, Au, Ni and Co contents indicate their extraterrestrial origin. The obtained compositions are considerably different from those of chondrites. It can be qualitatively interpreted, however, that cosmic matters having the compositions of chondrites are changed into magnetic, stony spherules by thermal degenerations during their atmospheric entry. (author)

  20. Erosion on very stony forest soil during phenomenal rain in Webster County, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. H. Patric; W. E., Jr. Kidd

    1982-01-01

    On July 15 and 16, 1979, at least 6 inches of rain fell in central West Virginia during 3 hours, a storm of return period longer than 1,000 years. More than 6 miles of logging roads were examined for evidences of soil erosion and sediment delivery to streams. Erosion was negligible on very stony soils where (a) logging roads were litter covered, (b) road grades were...

  1. Brook Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for BROOK TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  2. VT Foote Brook Natural Channel Design Restoration 2001-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Foote Brook, located in Johnson, Vermont, is known to biologists and anglers as a high quality stream with significant natural reproduction of...

  3. VT Foote Brook Natural Channel Design Restoration 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Foote Brook, located in Johnson, Vermont, is known to biologists and anglers as a high quality stream with significant natural reproduction of...

  4. Comparison of myocardial Perfusion imaging by thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography with SUNY4001 (adenosine) and exercise. Crossover clinical trial at multi-center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamazaki, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    We compared the ischemic diagnosis ability and adverse events of 201 Tl myocardial perfusion imaging with SUNY4001 (adenosine) stress to that with exercise (ergometer) stress both on random crossover trial. Thirty one known or suspected chronic stable angina patients who are able to exercise and 10 healthy volunteers were enrolled for the trial. The early and delayed images were obtained by SPECT imaging. The concordance of diagnoses [ischemia vs. no ischemia] between the two types of stresses was 97.3% (36/37) [Kappa: 0.9068]. The sensitivity and specificity based on the exercise test were 100% (6/6) and 96.8% (30/31) respectively. The incidence of adverse events caused by SUNY4001 and the exercise were 44.7% (17/38) and 52.6% (20/38), respectively. Major adverse events caused by SUNY4001 were blood pressure (BP) decrease, flushing and headache. And those by exercise were ST decrease, dyspnea and chest pain. None of the adverse events required the intervention or caused life-threatening complication in the trial. The trial showed that the ischemic diagnosis ability and safety of 201 Tl scintigraphy with SUNY4001 stress are almost equal to those of the exercise stress that is considered as the standard stress method. We concluded that 201 Tl imaging with SUNY4001 is safe and useful for detecting ischemic heart disease, especially for patients unable to exercise adequately. (author)

  5. Spatial Distribution of Stony Desertification and Key Influencing Factors on Different Sampling Scales in Small Karst Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenming; Zhou, Yunchao; Wang, Shijie

    2018-01-01

    Karst areas are typical ecologically fragile areas, and stony desertification has become the most serious ecological and economic problems in these areas worldwide as well as a source of disasters and poverty. A reasonable sampling scale is of great importance for research on soil science in karst areas. In this paper, the spatial distribution of stony desertification characteristics and its influencing factors in karst areas are studied at different sampling scales using a grid sampling method based on geographic information system (GIS) technology and geo-statistics. The rock exposure obtained through sampling over a 150 m × 150 m grid in the Houzhai River Basin was utilized as the original data, and five grid scales (300 m × 300 m, 450 m × 450 m, 600 m × 600 m, 750 m × 750 m, and 900 m × 900 m) were used as the subsample sets. The results show that the rock exposure does not vary substantially from one sampling scale to another, while the average values of the five subsamples all fluctuate around the average value of the entire set. As the sampling scale increases, the maximum value and the average value of the rock exposure gradually decrease, and there is a gradual increase in the coefficient of variability. At the scale of 150 m × 150 m, the areas of minor stony desertification, medium stony desertification, and major stony desertification in the Houzhai River Basin are 7.81 km2, 4.50 km2, and 1.87 km2, respectively. The spatial variability of stony desertification at small scales is influenced by many factors, and the variability at medium scales is jointly influenced by gradient, rock content, and rock exposure. At large scales, the spatial variability of stony desertification is mainly influenced by soil thickness and rock content. PMID:29652811

  6. Spatial Distribution of Stony Desertification and Key Influencing Factors on Different Sampling Scales in Small Karst Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Karst areas are typical ecologically fragile areas, and stony desertification has become the most serious ecological and economic problems in these areas worldwide as well as a source of disasters and poverty. A reasonable sampling scale is of great importance for research on soil science in karst areas. In this paper, the spatial distribution of stony desertification characteristics and its influencing factors in karst areas are studied at different sampling scales using a grid sampling method based on geographic information system (GIS technology and geo-statistics. The rock exposure obtained through sampling over a 150 m × 150 m grid in the Houzhai River Basin was utilized as the original data, and five grid scales (300 m × 300 m, 450 m × 450 m, 600 m × 600 m, 750 m × 750 m, and 900 m × 900 m were used as the subsample sets. The results show that the rock exposure does not vary substantially from one sampling scale to another, while the average values of the five subsamples all fluctuate around the average value of the entire set. As the sampling scale increases, the maximum value and the average value of the rock exposure gradually decrease, and there is a gradual increase in the coefficient of variability. At the scale of 150 m × 150 m, the areas of minor stony desertification, medium stony desertification, and major stony desertification in the Houzhai River Basin are 7.81 km2, 4.50 km2, and 1.87 km2, respectively. The spatial variability of stony desertification at small scales is influenced by many factors, and the variability at medium scales is jointly influenced by gradient, rock content, and rock exposure. At large scales, the spatial variability of stony desertification is mainly influenced by soil thickness and rock content.

  7. Spatial Distribution of Stony Desertification and Key Influencing Factors on Different Sampling Scales in Small Karst Watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenming; Zhou, Yunchao; Wang, Shijie; Huang, Xianfei

    2018-04-13

    Karst areas are typical ecologically fragile areas, and stony desertification has become the most serious ecological and economic problems in these areas worldwide as well as a source of disasters and poverty. A reasonable sampling scale is of great importance for research on soil science in karst areas. In this paper, the spatial distribution of stony desertification characteristics and its influencing factors in karst areas are studied at different sampling scales using a grid sampling method based on geographic information system (GIS) technology and geo-statistics. The rock exposure obtained through sampling over a 150 m × 150 m grid in the Houzhai River Basin was utilized as the original data, and five grid scales (300 m × 300 m, 450 m × 450 m, 600 m × 600 m, 750 m × 750 m, and 900 m × 900 m) were used as the subsample sets. The results show that the rock exposure does not vary substantially from one sampling scale to another, while the average values of the five subsamples all fluctuate around the average value of the entire set. As the sampling scale increases, the maximum value and the average value of the rock exposure gradually decrease, and there is a gradual increase in the coefficient of variability. At the scale of 150 m × 150 m, the areas of minor stony desertification, medium stony desertification, and major stony desertification in the Houzhai River Basin are 7.81 km², 4.50 km², and 1.87 km², respectively. The spatial variability of stony desertification at small scales is influenced by many factors, and the variability at medium scales is jointly influenced by gradient, rock content, and rock exposure. At large scales, the spatial variability of stony desertification is mainly influenced by soil thickness and rock content.

  8. Engaging Climate Change Mitigation Strategies as Citizen-Scientists at SUNY College at Oneonta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, T. D.; McEnroe, N. A.

    2009-12-01

    At SUNY College at Oneonta, we have developed a new course on Global Climate Change that seeks to educate students on the science and policy considerations related to the ongoing discussion of the causes and effects of climatic change. In this course, taught by the Department of Earth Sciences, we engage not only the science behind how and why the climate is changing, but there is a curricular emphasis on improving how we communicate about climate change science. Class activities include developing personal action plans that include evaluation of how effective their plans will be and the challenges they will face; a mock town-hall meeting that will help student-scientists put themselves into different roles in the community and attempt to see things from different perspectives, and a term-project where students will go in-depth on a proposed mitigation plan (local, regional, national, or international), weigh the pros and cons, and recommend a course of action in terms that a lay person can understand. Our goal is to produce citizen-scientists who can communicate more effectively in public about the science and the stakes of mitigating climate change.

  9. Characterizing Neutron Diagnostics on the nTOF Line at SUNY Geneseo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Hannah; Seppala, Hannah; Visca, Hannah; Wakwella, Praveen; Fletcher, Kurt; Padalino, Stephen; Forrest, Chad; Regan, Sean; Sangster, Craig

    2016-10-01

    Charged particle beams from SUNY Geneseo's 1.7 MV Tandem Pelletron Accelerator induce nuclear reactions that emit neutrons ranging from 0.5 to 17.9 MeV via 2H(d,n)3He and 11B(d,n)12C. This adjustable neutron source can be used to calibrate ICF and HEDP neutron scintillators for ICF diagnostics. However, gamma rays and muons, which are often present during an accelerator-based calibration, are difficult to differentiate from neutron signals in scintillators. To mitigate this problem, a new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) line has been constructed. The nTOF timing is measured using the associated particle technique. A charged particle produced by the nuclear reaction serves as a start signal, while its associated neutron is the stop signal. Each reaction is analyzed event-by-event to determine whether the scintillator signal was generated by a neutron, gamma or muon. Using this nTOF technique, the neutron response for different scintillation detectors can be determined. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  10. Enhancements to the Low-Energy Ion Facility at SUNY Geneseo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Zachariah; Kostick, Steven; Nagasing, Ethan; Fletcher, Kurt; Padalino, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    The Low Energy Ion Facility at SUNY Geneseo is used for detector development and characterization for inertial confinement fusion diagnostics. The system has been upgraded to improve the ion beam quality by reducing contaminant ions. In the new configuration, ions produced by the Peabody Scientific duoplasmatron ion source are accelerated through a potential, focused into a new NEC analyzing magnet and directed to an angle of 30°. A new einzel lens on the output of the magnet chamber focuses the beam into a scattering chamber with a water-cooled target mount and rotatable detector mount plates. The analyzing magnet has been calibrated for deuteron, 4He+, and 4He2+ ion beams at a range of energies, and no significant hysteresis has been observed. The system can accelerate deuterons to energies up to 25 keV to initiate d-d fusion using a deuterated polymer target. Charged particle spectra with protons, tritons, and 3He ions from d-d fusion have been measured at scattering angles ranging from 55° to 135°. A time-of-flight beamline has been designed to measure the energies of ions elastically scattered at 135°. CEM detectors initiate start and stop signals from secondary electrons produced when low energy ions pass through very thin carbon foils. Funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  11. Hydraulic modeling of stream channels and structures in Harbor and Crow Hollow Brooks, Meriden, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Lawrence A.; Sears, Michael P.; Cervione, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of urbanization have increased the frequency and size of floods along certain reaches of Harbor Brook and Crow Hollow Brook in Meriden, Conn. A floodprofile-modeling study was conducted to model the effects of selected channel and structural modifications on flood elevations and inundated areas. The study covered the reach of Harbor Brook downstream from Interstate 691 and the reach of Crow Hollow Brook downstream from Johnson Avenue. Proposed modifications, which include changes to bank heights, channel geometry, structural geometry, and streambed armoring on Harbor Brook and changes to bank heights on Crow Hollow Brook, significantly lower flood elevations. Results of the modeling indicate a significant reduction of flood elevations for the 10-year, 25-year, 35-year, 50-year, and 100-year flood frequencies using proposed modifications to (1 ) bank heights between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook, and between Centennial Avenue and Johnson Avenue on Crow Hollow Brook; (2) channel geometry between Coe Avenue and Interstate 69 1 on Harbor Brook; (3) bridge and culvert opening geometry between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook; and (4) channel streambed armoring between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook. The proposed modifications were developed without consideration of cost-benefit ratios.

  12. Systemic response of the stony coral Pocillopora damicornis against acute cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Yu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Jia; Wu, Yibo; Wang, Lingui; Huang, Bo

    2018-01-01

    Heavy metals have become one of the main pollutants in the marine environment and a major threat to the growth and reproduction of stony corals. In the present study, the density of symbiotic zooxanthellae, levels of crucial physiological activities and the transcriptome were investigated in the stony coral Pocillopora damicornis after the acute exposure to elevated cadmium concentration. The density of symbiotic zooxanthellae decreased significantly during 12-24h period, and reached lowest at 24h after acute cadmium stress. No significant changes were observed in the activity of glutathione S-transferase during the entire stress exposure. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of glutathione decreased significantly, but the activation level of caspase3 increased significantly after cadmium exposure. Furthermore, transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis revealed 3538 significantly upregulated genes and 8048 significantly downregulated genes at 12h after the treatment. There were 12 overrepresented GO terms for significantly upregulated genes, mostly related to unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. In addition, a total of 32 GO terms were overrepresented for significantly downregulated genes, and mainly correlated with macromolecular metabolic processes. These results collectively suggest that acute cadmium stress could induce apoptosis by repressing the production of the antioxidants, elevating oxidative stress and activating the unfolded protein response. This cascade of reactions would result to the collapse of the coral-zooxanthella symbiosis and the expulsion of symbiotic zooxanthellae in the stony coral P. damicornis, ultimately leading to coral bleaching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. RNA-Seq Reveals Extensive Transcriptional Response to Heat Stress in the Stony Coral Galaxea fascicularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Xu, Tao; Su, Dingjia; Wu, Ying; Cheng, Li; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Galaxea fascicularis, a stony coral belonging to family Oculinidae, is widely distributed in Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and large areas of the Indo-Pacific oceans. So far there is a lack of gene expression knowledge concerning this massive coral. In the present study, G. fascicularis was subjected to heat stress at 32.0 ± 0.5°C in the lab, we found that the density of symbiotic zooxanthellae decreased significantly; meanwhile apparent bleaching and tissue lysing were observed at 10 h and 18 h after heat stress. The transcriptome responses were investigated in the stony coral G. fascicularis during heat bleaching using RNA-seq. A total of 42,028 coral genes were assembled from over 439 million reads. Gene expressions were compared at 10 and 18 h after heat stress. The significantly upregulated genes found in the Control_10h vs. Heat_10h comparison, presented mainly in GO terms related with DNA integration and unfolded protein response; and for the Control_18h vs. Heat_18h comparison, the GO terms include DNA integration. In addition, comparison between groups of Control_10h vs. Heat_10h and Control_18h vs. Heat_18h revealed that 125 genes were significantly upregulated in common between the two groups, whereas 21 genes were significantly downregulated in common, all these differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in stress response, DNA integration and unfolded protein response. Taken together, our results suggest that high temperature could activate the stress response at the early stage, and subsequently induce the bleaching and lysing through DNA integration and unfolded protein response, which are able to disrupt the balance of coral-zooxanthella symbiosis in the stony coral G. fascicularis. PMID:29487614

  14. RNA-Seq Reveals Extensive Transcriptional Response to Heat Stress in the Stony Coral Galaxea fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Galaxea fascicularis, a stony coral belonging to family Oculinidae, is widely distributed in Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and large areas of the Indo-Pacific oceans. So far there is a lack of gene expression knowledge concerning this massive coral. In the present study, G. fascicularis was subjected to heat stress at 32.0 ± 0.5°C in the lab, we found that the density of symbiotic zooxanthellae decreased significantly; meanwhile apparent bleaching and tissue lysing were observed at 10 h and 18 h after heat stress. The transcriptome responses were investigated in the stony coral G. fascicularis during heat bleaching using RNA-seq. A total of 42,028 coral genes were assembled from over 439 million reads. Gene expressions were compared at 10 and 18 h after heat stress. The significantly upregulated genes found in the Control_10h vs. Heat_10h comparison, presented mainly in GO terms related with DNA integration and unfolded protein response; and for the Control_18h vs. Heat_18h comparison, the GO terms include DNA integration. In addition, comparison between groups of Control_10h vs. Heat_10h and Control_18h vs. Heat_18h revealed that 125 genes were significantly upregulated in common between the two groups, whereas 21 genes were significantly downregulated in common, all these differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in stress response, DNA integration and unfolded protein response. Taken together, our results suggest that high temperature could activate the stress response at the early stage, and subsequently induce the bleaching and lysing through DNA integration and unfolded protein response, which are able to disrupt the balance of coral-zooxanthella symbiosis in the stony coral G. fascicularis.

  15. Water distribution in an orchard irrigated by perforated distributors in stony ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decroix, M.; Marcesse, J.; Normand, M.

    1975-01-01

    In the context of new irrigation techniques the Compagnie Nationale d'Amenagement du Bas-Rhone et du Languedoc (B.Rh.L.) has developed a process of localized irrigation by perforated distributors. Conditions were defined for the optimum use of this process, especially the distribution of water in the ground. The study was carried out in a peach orchard in stony ground. The neutronic method was used to measure the soil moisture content. Because of the heterogeneous stone size distribution it was necessary for the specific humidity determination to take into account the dry apparent density. This parameter was measured by gammametry [fr

  16. New nanomaterials for applications in conservation and restoration of stony materials: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra-Fernandez, A.; Gomez-Villalba, L.S.; Rabanal, M.E.; Fort, R.

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, nanomaterials have been applied in the construction and maintenance of the world's cultural heritage with the aim of improving the consolidation and protection treatments of damaged stone. These nanomaterials include important advantages that could solve many problems found in the traditional interventions. The present paper aims to carry out a review of the state of art on the application of nanotechnology to the conservation and restoration of the stony cultural heritage. We highlight the different types of nanoparticles currently used to produce conservation treatments with enhanced material properties and novel functionalities.

  17. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm -2 . Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures

  18. The effect of soil stoniness on the estimation of water retention properties of soils: A case study from central France

    OpenAIRE

    Tetegan, Marion; Richer de Forges, Anne; Verbeque, Bernard; Nicoullaud, Bernard; Desbourdes, Caroline; Bouthier, Alain; Arrouays, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the water retention capacity of a heterogeneous soil requires knowledge of the hydric properties of each soil phase. Nevertheless, for stony soils, the rock fragments have often been neglected. The objective of this work was then to propose a methodology to improve the calculation of the available water content (AWC) of stony soils at a regional scale. On a 36,200 ha surface area in Beauce located in the Region Centre of France, the AWC was calculated by coupling pedotransfer cl...

  19. Aerospace medicine at Brooks AFB, TX: hail and farewell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunneley, Sarah A; Webb, James T

    2011-05-01

    With the impending termination of USAF operations at Brooks Air Force Base (AFB) in San Antonio, TX, it is time to consider its historic role in Aerospace Medicine. The base was established in 1917 as a flight training center for the U.S. Army Air Service and in 1926 became home to its School of Aviation Medicine. The school moved to San Antonio's Randolph Field in 1931, but in 1959 it returned to Brooks where it occupied new facilities to support its role as a national center for U.S. Air Force aerospace medicine, including teaching, clinical medicine, and research. The mission was then expanded to encompass support of U.S. military and civilian space programs. With the abrupt termination of the military space program in 1969, research at Brooks focused on clinical aviation medicine and support of advanced military aircraft while continuing close cooperation with NASA in support of orbital spaceflight and the journey to the Moon. Reorganization in the 1990s assigned all research functions at Brooks to the Human Systems Division and its successors, leaving to USAFSAM the missions related to clinical work and teaching. In 2002 the USAF and the city of San Antonio implemented shared operation of Brooks as a "City-Base" in the hope of deflecting threatened closure. Nevertheless, under continuing pressure to consolidate military facilities in the United States, the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment Commission ordered Brooks closed by 2011, with its aerospace medicine functions relocated to new facilities at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, OH.

  20. Grandy Brook Station to Hope Brook Station transmission line, environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro proposes to construct a 138kW transmission line to provide power and energy requirements of the Hope Brook Gold Mine. The proposed route runs approximately 33 km adjacent to Route 480, requiring a cleared right-of-way approximately 30 m wide, with access provided by an all terrain vehicle trail. Concerns were expressed about possible adverse effects on terrestrial and aquatic habitat, water resources, resource utilization, wildlife, and historic resources. This document provides a description of the project and the rationale; the baseline environmental conditions; the environmental protection plan agreed to by Hydro, including mitigation measures and predicted impacts; rehabilitation measures; monitoring; and public involvement. Hydro's studies concluded there would be no significant impact on the environment, including the La Poile caribou herd or the raptors affected. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggest that stony corals are monophyletic but most families of stony corals are not (Order Scleractinia, Class Anthozoa, Phylum Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Fukami

    Full Text Available Modern hard corals (Class Hexacorallia; Order Scleractinia are widely studied because of their fundamental role in reef building and their superb fossil record extending back to the Triassic. Nevertheless, interpretations of their evolutionary relationships have been in flux for over a decade. Recent analyses undermine the legitimacy of traditional suborders, families and genera, and suggest that a non-skeletal sister clade (Order Corallimorpharia might be imbedded within the stony corals. However, these studies either sampled a relatively limited array of taxa or assembled trees from heterogeneous data sets. Here we provide a more comprehensive analysis of Scleractinia (127 species, 75 genera, 17 families and various outgroups, based on two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome oxidase I, cytochrome b, with analyses of nuclear genes (ss-tubulin, ribosomal DNA of a subset of taxa to test unexpected relationships. Eleven of 16 families were found to be polyphyletic. Strikingly, over one third of all families as conventionally defined contain representatives from the highly divergent "robust" and "complex" clades. However, the recent suggestion that corallimorpharians are true corals that have lost their skeletons was not upheld. Relationships were supported not only by mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but also often by morphological characters which had been ignored or never noted previously. The concordance of molecular characters and more carefully examined morphological characters suggests a future of greater taxonomic stability, as well as the potential to trace the evolutionary history of this ecologically important group using fossils.

  2. Construction and maintenance of SUNY facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Progress report, 1 July 1983-1 July 1984. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.

    1984-01-01

    Research reported includes beamline facilities, X-21 beamline update, SUNY-PRT participation in the design and commissioning of the CHESS crystallography facility, surface physics, material and structure studies using EXAFS, x-ray standing wave studies of surfaces and interfaces, and surface diffraction of adsorbed polyatomic molecules

  3. Construction and maintenance of SUNY facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Progress report, 1 October 1981-1 July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of the SUNY beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source is described. The line now includes monochromator/mirror optics with tandem arrangement of experiments. The beamline computer system is now working with CAMAC data acquisition, and a four-circle diffractometer, a small-angle-scattering bench, and a fluorescence EXAFS apparatus should be ready soon

  4. Restoration of brook valley meadows in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Bakker, J.P.; Jansen, A.J.M.; Kemmers, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, restoration measures in Dutch brook valley meadows consisted of re-introducing traditional management techniques, such as mowing without fertilisation and low-intensity grazing. In the Netherlands, additional measures, such as rewetting and sod cutting, are now carried out on a large

  5. Feasibility of target communities in a Dutch brook valley system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, AH; Bekker, RM

    As a reaction to the ongoing deterioration of nature conservation interest in The Netherlands, an offensive nature strategy was formulated in the 1990 Nature Policy Plan. In this Plan, target communities and target plant species are mentioned. For the 'Drentse A brook valley system', target

  6. Marginal Experiments: Peter Brook and Stepping out Theatre Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpin, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article juxtaposes the recent work of Peter Brook with a Bristol-based mental health service-user collective--Stepping Out Theatre Company. Informed by field-work with the company, this chapter explores the aesthetic and political relationship between professional, experimental theatre work and community-based performance practice. Drawing…

  7. Fine Sediment Effects on Brook Trout Eggs in Laboratory Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    David G. Argent; Patricia A. Flebbe

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine effects of different fine sediments (0.43-0.85 mm in diameter) on survival of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) eggs during early developmental stages under laboratory conditions. Intragravel permeability and dissolved oxygen declined with increasing fine sediment amounts. Survival at each developmental stage...

  8. Evaluation of an Unsuccessful Brook Trout Electrofishing Removal Project in a Small Rocky Mountain Stream.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2006-01-26

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout from streams by means of electrofishing. Although the success of such projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. A multiagency watershed advisory group (WAG) conducted a 3-year removal project to reduce brook trout and enhance native salmonids in 7.8 km of a southwestern Idaho stream. We evaluated the costs and success of their project in suppressing brook trout and looked for brook trout compensatory responses, such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, and earlier maturation. The total number of brook trout removed was 1,401 in 1998, 1,241 in 1999, and 890 in 2000; removal constituted an estimated 88% of the total number of brook trout in the stream in 1999 and 79% in 2000. Although abundance of age-1 and older brook trout declined slightly during and after the removals, abundance of age-0 brook trout increased 789% in the entire stream 2 years after the removals ceased. Total annual survival rate for age-2 and older brook trout did not decrease during the removals, and the removals failed to produce an increase in the abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri. Lack of a meaningful decline and unchanged total mortality for older brook trout during the removals suggest that a compensatory response occurred in the brook trout population via reduced natural mortality, which offset the removal of large numbers of brook trout. Although we applaud WAG personnel for their goal of enhancing native salmonids by suppressing brook trout via electrofishing removal, we conclude that their efforts were unsuccessful and suggest that similar future projects elsewhere over such large stream lengths would be costly, quixotic enterprises.

  9. The SSC superconducting air core toroid design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, T.; Carroll, A.; Chiang, I.H.; Frank, J.S.; Haggerty, J.; Littenberg, L.; Morse, W.; Strand, R.C.; Lau, K.; Weinstein, R.; McNeil, R.; Friedman, J.; Hafen, E.; Haridas, P.; Kendall, H.W.; Osborne, L.; Pless, I.; Rosenson, L.; Pope, B.; Jones, L.W.; Luton, J.N.; Bonanos, P.; Marx, M.; Pusateri, J.A.; Favale, A.; Gottesman, S.; Schneid, E.; Verdier, R.

    1990-01-01

    Superconducting air core toroids show great promise for use in a muon spectrometer for the SSC. Early studies by SUNY at Stony Brook funded by SSC Laboratory, have established the feasibility of building magnets of the required size. The toroid spectrometer consists of a central toroid with two end cap toroids. The configuration under development provides for muon trajectory measurement outside the magnetic volume. System level studies on support structure, assembly, cryogenic material selection, and power are performed. Resulting selected optimal design and assembly is described. 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Peter Carravetta, Del postmoderno.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Carrera

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Peter Carravetta, professor of “Italian and Italian American Studies” at SUNY Stony Brook, with an Italian and American education, has put together in his massive Del postmoderno possibly the most complete critical review so far of American academic production from the 1970s to the present. “Postmodern” is the key word of the cultural turn that took place between the 1950s and the 1970s only to meet its death, in Carravetta’s opinion, on September 11, 2001, when the shortlived illusion that h...

  11. Do you Mini-Med School? Leveraging library resources to improve Internet consumer health information literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moorsel, G

    2001-01-01

    Popular for engaging public interest in medical science while promoting health awareness, Mini-Med School (MMS) programs also afford important if largely unrealized opportunities to improve the health information literacy of attendees. With a growing population using the Internet to make health decisions, needed venues for improving Internet Consumer Health Information (CHI) literacy may be found in the MMS platform. Surveyed directors of MMS programs understand the need to include CHI, and successful programs at SUNY Stony Brook and elsewhere demonstrate the potential for collaboration with affiliated health sciences libraries to integrate CHI instruction into MMS curricula.

  12. Relational Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    be illustrated by example. If ’z’ is the name of an individual and ’C’ is the name of a class (set), then ’ zEC ’ means that the individual denoted by ’z...will abbreviate this un z. Conversely, if C is a single element class, then un-1 C selects the unique member of that class: un-1C = Lz( zEC ). It is...Professor Peter Henderson1 Department of Computer Science SUNY at Stony Brook Long Island, NY 11794 Dr. Olle Olsson Department of Computer Science

  13. A raptor study for the proposed Grandy Brook Station to Hope Brook Mine transmission line environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The proposed Grandy Brook Station to Hope Brook mine transmission line study area occupies a remote area of south-central Newfoundland. Raptors have been identified as a valued ecosystem component which may be adversely affected. Since little information on population numbers and activities in the study area is available, a survey was conducted to determine raptor use of the proposed route to minimize adverse impacts of the development. Field data was the primary information source, although government officials were consulted for additional information and data files were accessed. Raptors were recorded by species and age class, and apparent activity. One field trip, composed of a ground survey and a helicopter survey, was conducted on July 12, 1986. Suggestions are made for mitigation measures related to such negative aspects as electrocution during construction and maintenance activities, harassment and persecution, collisions with the lines, and electric fields and corona.

  14. Phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria associated with soft coral Alcyonium gracllimum and stony coral Tubastraea coccinea in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shan; Sun, Wei; Tang, Cen; Jin, Liling; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-07-01

    Actinobacteria are widely distributed in the marine environment. To date, few studies have been performed to explore the coral-associated Actinobacteria, and little is known about the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria. In this study, the actinobacterial diversity associated with one soft coral Alcyonium gracllimum and one stony coral Tubastraea coccinea collected from the East China Sea was investigated using both culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. A total of 19 actinobacterial genera were detected in these two corals, among which nine genera (Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Gordonia, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Streptomyces, and Candidatus Microthrix) were common, three genera (Cellulomonas, Dermatophilus, and Janibacter) were unique to the soft coral, and seven genera (Brevibacterium, Dermacoccus, Leucobacter, Micromonospora, Nocardioides, Rhodococcus, and Serinicoccus) were unique to the stony coral. This finding suggested that highly diverse Actinobacteria were associated with different types of corals. In particular, five actinobacterial genera (Cellulomonas, Dermacoccus, Gordonia, Serinicoccus, and Candidatus Microthrix) were recovered from corals for the first time, extending the known diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria. This study shows that soft and stony corals host diverse Actinobacteria and can serve as a new source of marine actinomycetes.

  15. The Mediterranean stony coral Cladocora caespitosa (Linnaeus, 1767) as habitat provider for molluscs: colony size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitacco, Valentina; Crocetta, Fabio; Orlando-Bonaca, Martina; Mavrič, Borut; Lipej, Lovrenc

    2017-11-01

    The stony coral Cladocora caespitosa (Linnaeus, 1767) is an important Mediterranean habitat builder, whose survival is now being threatened by human activities and possibly natural events such as mass mortality and bleaching. We characterized the mollusc assemblage associated with colonies in the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea) and then tested whether the number of mollusc species increases in relation with colony size, following a Species-Area Relationship (SAR) model. At least 62 taxa were found in association with coral colonies, with bivalves constituting the dominant group. More than half of the 3034 specimens encountered were juveniles. Mollusc taxa richness increased with increasing C. caespitosa colony size according to the power-function model, whilst the analyses of trophic and functional groups supports the hypothesis of at least two factors underlying SAR (area per se and habitat diversity). Our results confirmed the importance of C. caespitosa for benthic communities, indicating that larger colonies support higher biodiversity, and suggesting that C. caespitosa is the most important habit builder among Mediterranean cnidarians, having also an influential function as a natural nursery ground. These results underline the necessity of new investigations aimed at filling gaps in our knowledge and planning new measures to protect the species.

  16. Subsurface cadmium loss from a stony soil-effect of cow urine application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Colin William; Chrystal, Jane Marie; Monaghan, Ross Martin; Cavanagh, Jo-Anne

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) losses in subsurface flow from stony soils that have received cow urine are potentially important, but poorly understood. This study investigated Cd loss from a soil under a winter dairy-grazed forage crop that was grazed either conventionally (24 h) or with restricted grazing (6 h). This provided an opportunity to test the hypothesis that urine inputs could increase Cd concentrations in drainage. It was thought this would be a result of cow urine either (i) enhancing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations via an increase in soil pH, resulting in the formation of soluble Cd-organic carbon complexes and, or (ii) greater inputs of chloride (Cl) via cow urine, promoting the formation of soluble Cd-Cl complexes. Cadmium concentrations in subsurface flow were generally low, with a spike above the water quality guidelines for a month after the 24-h grazing. Cadmium fluxes were on average 0.30 g Cd ha -1  year -1 (0.27-0.32 g Cd ha -1  year -1 ), in line with previous estimates for agricultural soils. The mean Cd concentration in drainage from the 24-h grazed plots was significantly higher (P soil. Further study is warranted to confirm the mechanisms involved and quantities of Cd lost from other systems.

  17. Broad-scale patterns of Brook Trout responses to introduced Brown Trout in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James E.; Slattery, Michael T.; Kean M. Clifford,

    2013-01-01

    Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis and Brown Trout Salmo trutta are valuable sport fish that coexist in many parts of the world due to stocking introductions. Causes for the decline of Brook Trout within their native range are not clear but include competition with Brown Trout, habitat alteration, and repetitive stocking practices. New York State contains a large portion of the Brook Trout's native range, where both species are maintained by stocking and other management actions. We used artificial neural network models, regression, principal components analysis, and simulation to evaluate the effects of Brown Trout, environmental conditions, and stocking on the distribution of Brook Trout in the center of their native range. We found evidence for the decline of Brook Trout in the presence of Brown Trout across many watersheds; 22% of sampled reaches where both species were expected to occur contained only Brown Trout. However, a model of the direct relationship between Brook Trout and Brown Trout abundance explained less than 1% of data variation. Ordination showed extensive overlap of Brook Trout and Brown Trout habitat conditions, with only small components of the hypervolume (multidimensional space) being distinctive. Subsequent analysis indicated higher abundances of Brook Trout in highly forested areas, while Brown Trout were more abundant in areas with relatively high proportions of agriculture. Simulation results indicated that direct interactions and habitat conditions were relatively minor factors compared with the effects of repeated stocking of Brown Trout into Brook Trout habitat. Intensive annual stocking of Brown Trout could eliminate resident Brook Trout in less than a decade. Ecological differences, harvest behavior, and other habitat changes can exacerbate Brook Trout losses. Custom stocking scenarios with Brown Trout introductions at relatively low proportions of resident Brook Trout populations may be able to sustain healthy populations of both

  18. Spatial and temporal movement dynamics of brook Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L.A.; Wagner, Tyler; Barton, Meredith L.

    2015-01-01

    Native eastern brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized brown trout Salmo trutta occur sympatrically in many streams across the brook trout’s native range in the eastern United States. Understanding within- among-species variability in movement, including correlates of movement, has implications for management and conservation. We radio tracked 55 brook trout and 45 brown trout in five streams in a north-central Pennsylvania, USA watershed to quantify the movement of brook trout and brown trout during the fall and early winter to (1) evaluate the late-summer, early winter movement patterns of brook trout and brown trout, (2) determine correlates of movement and if movement patterns varied between brook trout and brown trout, and (3) evaluate genetic diversity of brook trout within and among study streams, and relate findings to telemetry-based observations of movement. Average total movement was greater for brown trout (mean ± SD = 2,924 ± 4,187 m) than for brook trout (mean ± SD = 1,769 ± 2,194 m). Although there was a large amount of among-fish variability in the movement of both species, the majority of movement coincided with the onset of the spawning season, and a threshold effect was detected between stream flow and movement: where movement increased abruptly for both species during positive flow events. Microsatellite analysis of brook trout revealed consistent findings to those found using radio-tracking, indicating a moderate to high degree of gene flow among brook trout populations. Seasonal movement patterns and the potential for relatively large movements of brook and brown trout highlight the importance of considering stream connectivity when restoring and protecting fish populations and their habitats.

  19. Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS): Stony Asteroids Abundant in the Background and Family Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2016-10-01

    The Hungaria region represents a "purgatory" for the closest, preserved samples of the material from which the terrestrial planets accreted. The Hungaria region harbors a collisional family of Xe-type asteroids, which are situated among a background of predominantly S-complex asteroids. Deciphering their surface composition may provide constraints on the nature of the primordial building blocks of the terrestrial planets. We hypothesize that planetesimals in the inner part of the primordial asteroid belt experienced partial- to full-melting and differentiation, the Hungaria region should retain any petrologically-evolved material that formed there.We have undertaken an observational campaign entitled the Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) to record near-infrared (NIR) spectra to characterize taxonomy, surface mineralogy, and potential meteorite analogs. We used NIR instruments at two ground-based facilities (NASA IRTF; TNG). Our data set includes spectra of 82 Hungaria asteroids (61 background; 21 family), 65 were observed during HARTSS. We compare S-complex background asteroids to calibrations developed via laboratory analyses of ordinary chondrites, and to our analyses (EPMA, XRD, VIS+NIR spectra) of 11 primitive achondrite (acapulcoite-lodranite clan) meteorites.We find that stony S-complex asteroids dominate the Hungaria background population (~80%). Background objects exhibit considerable spectral diversity, when quantified by spectral band parameter measurements, translates to a variety of surface compositions. Two main meteorite groups are represented within the Hungaria background: unmelted, nebular L chondrites (and/or L chondrites), and partially-melted primitive achondrites. H-chondrite mineralogies appear to be absent from the Hungaria background. Xe-type Hungaria family members exhibit spectral homogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that the family was derived from the disruption of a parent body analogous to an enstatite

  20. Akumal ’s reefs: Stony coral communities along the developing Mexican Caribbean coastline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan E Roy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Fringing coral reefs along coastlines experiencing rapid development and human population growth have declined worldwide because of human activity and of natural causes.The "Mayan Riviera "in Quintana Roo,México,attracts large numbers of tourists in part because it still retains some of the natural diversity and it is important to obtain baseline information to monitor changes over time in the area.In this paper,the condition of the stony corals in the developing coastline of the Akumal-area fore reefs is characterized at the start of the new millennium at two depths,and along an inferred sedimentation gradient.Transect surveys were conducted in five fringing reefs starting at haphazardly chosen points.with respect to species composition,live cover,colony density,relative exposure to TAS mats and,for one species (Diploria strigosa ,Dana,1848,tissue regression rates in the presence of TAS mats.Fish population density and herbivory rates are also assessed.Data from line intercept transects (n=74show that live stony coral cover,density and relative peripheral exposure of colonies to turf algal/sediment (TASmats were inversely related to an inferred sediment stress gradient at 13m.In 2000, live stony coral cover had decreased by 40-50%at two sites studied in 1990 by Muñoz-Chagín and de la Cruz- Agüero (1993.About half of this loss apparently occurred between 1998 and 2000 during an outbreak of white plague disease that mostly affected Montastraea faveolata ,and M.annularis .At a 13 m site,where inferred sedimentation rates are relatively high,time series photography of tagged Diploria strigosa ,(n=38showed an average loss of 70 cm 2 of live tissue/coral/year to encroachment by TAS mats during the same period.Whereas densities of carnivorous fishes and herbivores (echinoids,scarids,acanthurids and Microspathodon chrysurus in 2000 were low in belt transects at 10-19 m (n=106,turf-algal gardening pomacentrids were relatively common on these reefs

  1. Brook trout movement during and after recolonization of a naturally defaunated stream reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig N. Roghair; C. Andrew Dolloff

    2005-01-01

    In june 1995 a debris flow associated with a massive streamwide flood completely eliminated brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis from the lower 1.9 km of the Staunton River in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Biannual diver counts revealed that brook trout moved several hundred meters into the debris-flow-affected area each year, resulting in...

  2. Global climate change and fragmentation of native brook trout distribution in the southern Appalachian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Flebbe

    1997-01-01

    Current distributions of native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Southern Appalachians are restricted to upper elevations by multiple factors, including habitat requirements, introduced rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown (Salmo trutta) trout, and other human activities. Present-day distribution of brook trout habitat is already fragmented. Increased...

  3. Competition and predation as mechanisms for displacement of greenback cutthroat trout by brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. C. McGrath; W. M. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii frequently are displaced by nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, but the ecological mechanisms of displacement are not understood. Competition for food and predation between greenback cutthroat trout O. c. stomias and brook trout were investigated in montane streams of...

  4. The Why, What, and Impact of GPA at Oxford Brookes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the introduction at Oxford Brookes University of a Grade Point Average (GPA) scheme alongside the traditional honours degree classification. It considers the reasons for the introduction of GPA, the way in which the scheme was implemented, and offers an insight into the impact of GPA at Brookes. Finally, the paper considers…

  5. Is motivation important to brook trout passage through culverts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2017-01-01

    Culverts can restrict movement of stream-dwelling fish. Motivation to enter and ascend these structures is an essential precursor for successful passage. However, motivation is challenging to quantify. Here, we use attempt rate to assess motivation of 447 brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) entering three culverts under a range of hydraulic, environmental, and biological conditions. A passive integrated transponder system allowed for the identification of passage attempts and success of individual fish. Attempt rate was quantified using time-to-event analysis allowing for time-varying covariates and recurrent events. Attempt rate was greatest during the spawning period, at elevated discharge, at dusk, and for longer fish. It decreased during the day and with increasing number of conspecifics downstream of the culvert. Results also show a positive correlation between elevated motivation and successful passage. This study enhances understanding of factors influencing brook trout motivation to ascend culverts and shows that attempt rate is a dynamic phenomenon, variable over time and among individuals. It also presents methods that could be used to investigate other species’ motivation to pass natural or anthropogenic barriers.

  6. Non-local rheology of stony debris flow propagating over a cohesionless sediment bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Stefano; Gregoretti, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Velocity profiles of gravel-water mixtures observed in flume experiments often exhibit a double-slope behavior, with a lower narrower region where the velocity increases slowly, and an upper wider region often exhibiting a nearly linear behavior. Even though the flow can be classified within the grain-inertia regime, the overall profile seems to not conform to the power law (with exponent 1.5) distribution obtained by integrating along the normal to the flow the dispersive stresses envisaged by Bagnold (1954) in his pioneer work. Note that this formulation neglects the contribution to the velocity profile of the quasi-static (frictional) stresses that tend to dominate close to an erodible sediment bottom. The present work investigates the possibility to find out a uniformly valid distribution of shear stress from the bottom to the flow surface. To this aim we follow a heuristic coherence length approach (GDR-MIDI, 2004) similar to the mixing length procedure commonly used to study the atmospheric boundary layer over canopy (see, e.g., Harmann and Finnegan, 2007). A database built on 64 systematic debris flow experiments is used to disclose the general features of velocity profiles that establish within the body of almost steady water-sediment flows and the dependence of transport sediment volumetric concentration on the relevant parameters. The almost steady water-sediment flows considered in the study were generated by releasing a prescribed water discharge on a saturated layer of sediment (specifically, 3 mm gravel, 6 mm gravel, and 3 mm glass spheres) initially placed in a 10 m long and 0.2 m wide laboratory flume. The analysis clearly indicates that stony debris flow conditions characterized the experiments. The mixing length does not result constant, as required by a Bagnold-like profile, but varies gradually, from zero at the flow surface, to a finite value near the erodible bottom. We discuss this structure in terms of shear stress distribution along the

  7. Genome sequence of Prevotella intermedia SUNY aB G8-9K-3, a biofilm forming strain with drug-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Kim, Minjung; Lee, Jae-Hyung

    Prevotella intermedia has long been known to be as the principal etiologic agent of periodontal diseases and associated with various systemic diseases. Previous studies showed that the intra-species difference exists in capacity of biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, and serological reaction among P. intermedia strains. Here we report the genome sequence of P. intermedia SUNY aB G8-9K-3 (designated ATCC49046) that displays a relatively high antimicrobial resistant and biofilm-forming capacity. Genome sequencing information provides important clues in understanding the genetic bases of phenotypic differences among P. intermedia strains. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Histoire de lÈstonie et de la nation estonienne : Eesti ja eesti rahvuse ajalugu : intervjuu Jean-Pierre Minaudier̀ga / Jean-Pierre Minaudier ; küsitlenud Marek Tamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Minaudier, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Intervjuu raamatu "Histoire de lÈstonie et de la nation estonienne" autori, prantsuse ajaloolase Jean-Pierre Minaudier̀ga. Raamatututvustus : Minaudier, Jean-Pierre. Histoire de lÈstonie et de la nation estonienne. Paris : L̀Harmattan, 2007 (Bibliothèque finno-ougrienne; 17)

  9. Hungaria asteroid region telescopic spectral survey (HARTSS) I: Stony asteroids abundant in the Hungaria background population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2017-07-01

    The Hungaria asteroids remain as survivors of late giant planet migration that destabilized a now extinct inner portion of the primordial asteroid belt and left in its wake the current resonance structure of the Main Belt. In this scenario, the Hungaria region represents a ;purgatory; for the closest, preserved samples of the asteroidal material from which the terrestrial planets accreted. Deciphering the surface composition of these unique samples may provide constraints on the nature of the primordial building blocks of the terrestrial planets. We have undertaken an observational campaign entitled the Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) to record near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra in order to characterize their taxonomy, surface mineralogy, and potential meteorite analogs. The overall objective of HARTSS is to evaluate the compositional diversity of asteroids located throughout the Hungaria region. This region harbors a collisional family of Xe-type asteroids, which are situated among a background (i.e., non-family) of predominantly S-complex asteroids. In order to assess the compositional diversity of the Hungaria region, we have targeted background objects during Phase I of HARTSS. Collisional family members likely reflect the composition of one original homogeneous parent body, so we have largely avoided them in this phase. We have employed NIR instruments at two ground-based telescope facilities: the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), and the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). Our data set includes the NIR spectra of 42 Hungaria asteroids (36 background; 6 family). We find that stony S-complex asteroids dominate the Hungaria background population (29/36 objects; ∼80%). C-complex asteroids are uncommon (2/42; ∼5%) within the Hungaria region. Background S-complex objects exhibit considerable spectral diversity as band parameter measurements of diagnostic absorption features near 1- and 2-μm indicate that several

  10. Contact resistance problems applying ERT on low bulk density forested stony soils. Is there a solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraedt, Deborah; Touzé, Camille; Robert, Tanguy; Colinet, Gilles; Degré, Aurore; Garré, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    contact resistance reduced to 5222 Ω. This improved the contact resistance substantially, but complicates the execution of a pulse tracer experiment. To date we did not find any better solution to this problem and we keep searching a way to improve the contact resistance in stony forested soils with very low bulk density. We would like to exchange on these questions with EGU attendees in order to improve the experimental design or point out a new research path for these specific conditions. This could lead to enhance the use of ERT in soils with low density and high stone content.

  11. Olemuse teater. Kantor ja Brook / Jan Kott ; tõlk. Eva-Liisa Linder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kott, Jan

    2004-01-01

    T. Kantori lavastustest "Surnud klass" ja "Wielopole Wielopole" ning P. Brooki "Carmeni" lavastusest. Tõlgitud raamatust : Jan Kott. The Theatre of Essence: Kantor and Brook.- The Theatre of Essence and other Essays. Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1984, lk. 159-165

  12. The role of groundwater in the effect of climatic warming on stream habitat of brook trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Freshwater fisheries are linked to climate through the variables of water temperature, water quality and water quantity. These three ecosystem linkages provide a basis for assessments of potential impacts of climate change on fisheries resources. A characteristic of fisheries resources, whether it be the size or distribution of fish populations, or a measure of yield, which can be related to climate through one or more of these linkages, is a useful tool with which to forecast the effects of climate change. A stream population of brook trout is a coldwater fisheries resource that is linked to climate by groundwater. Stream dwelling brook trout at low altitudes rely heavily on groundwater discharge in summer to maintain low stream temperature. Groundwater temperature tracks mean annual air temperature due to the insulative effect of the lower troposphere on the surface of the earth. The effect of elevated groundwater temperature on the stream habitat of brook trout was investigated in two brook trout streams north of Toronto, Ontario, with an energy balance stream temperature model, calibrated to both streams to simulate maximum water temperature observed in the brook trout zones. Simulated maximum summer temperatures from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies scenario reduced the brook trout zones by up to 42%. 17 refs., 2 figs

  13. Effects of environmental factors on C-type lectin recognition to zooxanthellae in the stony coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Zhao, Shuimiao; Ni, Junyi; Su, Yilu; Wang, Lingui; Xu, Yanlai

    2018-05-15

    C-type lectin is a superfamily of Ca 2+ -dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that play significant roles in nonself-recognition and pathogen clearance. In the present study, a C-type lectin (PdC-Lectin) was chosen from stony coral Pocillopora damicornis to understand its recognition characteristics to zooxanthellae. PdC-Lectin protein contained a signal peptide and a carbohydrate-recognition domain with EPN motif in Ca 2+ -binding site 2. The PdC-Lectin recombinant protein was expressed and purified in vitro. The binding of PdC-Lectin protein to zooxanthellae was determined with western blotting method, and the bound protein to 10-10 5  cell mL -1 zooxanthellae was detectable in a concentration-dependent manner. Less PdC-Lectin protein binding to zooxanthellae was observed for the incubation at 36 °C than that at 26 °C. Furthermore, the PAMP recognition spectrum of PdC-Lectin protein was tested through surface plasmon resonance method, and it bound to LPS and Lipid A, but not to LTA, β-glucan, mannose or Poly (I:C). When PdC-Lectin protein was preincubated with LPS, there was less protein binding to zooxanthellae compared with that in non-preincubation group. These results collectively suggest that PdC-Lectin could recognize zooxanthellae, and the recognition could be repressed by high temperature and pathogenic bacteria, which would help to further understand the molecular mechanism of coral bleaching and the establishment of coral-zooxanthella symbiosis in the stony coral P. damicornis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Geohydrology of Brooks, Lowndes, and western Echols counties, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The principal artesian aquifer, a limestone of Eocene to Miocene age, is the main source of water supply for Brooks, Lowndes, and western Echols Counties in south Georgia. Pumpage of about 22 million gallons perday from this prolific aquifer has not posed any problems regarding declining water levels or depletion of the reservoir. However, water-quality problems do occur in the Valdosta area. Seepage-run measurements indicate that the Withlacoochee River north of Valdosta contributes an average of 112 cubic feet per second of water to caverns and sinkholes that recharge the aquifer. Wells near the recharge area withdraw relatively unfiltered water with iron concentration and color intensity exceeding standards for drinking water. South of Valdosta, water from the aquifer contains as much as 3.0 milligrams per liter of hydrogen sulfide, rendering the water unfit for drinking. Water high in sulfate concentration occurs below 550 feet in the lower part of the aquifer in Valdosta, and is assumed to be present at that depth throughout the study area. Generally, sufficient quantities of freshwater can be obtained without drilling to this depth.

  15. THEOLOGY AS CREATIVE LANGUAGE. THE CASE OF THOMAS BROOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian SIMUȚ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of theological language has been a hindrance in coming closer to God, ever since complex patterns of thought have combined with the theological inquiry. The conclusion that helped Protestantism gain ground was bringing the theological message of the Bible to the understanding of every-day believer. An effort was made to explain how God works in history, and how to become more like Christ in one’s every-day life. However, mere copying was not the foundation of Christianity. Inner conviction born out of understanding the explanation from the Biblical message was crucial. Thomas Brooks was one of the protestant theologians who aimed to explain how the Devil and evil work against the believer, in order to create chaos, disorder, sorrow, hatred, deception, and ignorance. He did this by transforming the theological message into creative language, using every-day images in order to create a relation between theology and praxis. This paper will analyze some of the aspects found in Brooks’ theological presentation, in order to show how theology could be used for the benefit of the individual believer, as well as for the benefit of society.

  16. Evaluation of catch-and-release regulations on Brook Trout in Pennsylvania streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason Detar,; Kristine, David; Wagner, Tyler; Greene, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission implemented catch-and-release (CR) regulations on headwater stream systems to determine if eliminating angler harvest would result in an increase in the number of adult (≥100 mm) or large (≥175 mm) Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis. Under the CR regulations, angling was permitted on a year-round basis, no Brook Trout could be harvested at any time, and there were no tackle restrictions. A before-after–control-impact design was used to evaluate the experimental regulations. Brook Trout populations were monitored in 16 treatment (CR regulations) and 7 control streams (statewide regulations) using backpack electrofishing gear periodically for up to 15 years (from 1990 to 2003 or 2004) before the implementation of the CR regulations and over a 7–8-year period (from 2004 or 2005 to 2011) after implementation. We used Poisson mixed models to evaluate whether electrofishing catch per effort (CPE; catch/100 m2) of adult (≥100 mm) or large (≥175 mm) Brook Trout increased in treatment streams as a result of implementing CR regulations. Brook Trout CPE varied among sites and among years, and there was no significant effect (increase or decrease) of CR regulations on the CPE of adult or large Brook Trout. Results of our evaluation suggest that CR regulations were not effective at improving the CPE of adult or large Brook Trout in Pennsylvania streams. Low angler use, high voluntary catch and release, and slow growth rates in infertile headwater streams are likely the primary reasons for the lack of response.

  17. Brook trout use of thermal refugia and foraging habitat influenced by brown trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Snook, Erin; Massie, Danielle L.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in eastern North America is often limited by temperature and introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta), the relative importance of which is poorly understood but critical for conservation and restoration planning. We evaluated effects of brown trout on brook trout behavior and habitat use in experimental streams across increasing temperatures (14–23 °C) with simulated groundwater upwelling zones providing thermal refugia (6–9 °C below ambient temperatures). Allopatric and sympatric trout populations increased their use of upwelling zones as ambient temperatures increased, demonstrating the importance of groundwater as thermal refugia in warming streams. Allopatric brook trout showed greater movement rates and more even spatial distributions within streams than sympatric brook trout, suggesting interference competition by brown trout for access to forage habitats located outside thermal refugia. Our results indicate that removal of introduced brown trout may facilitate native brook trout expansion and population viability in downstream reaches depending in part on the spatial configuration of groundwater upwelling zones.

  18. Does the introduced brook trout ( Salvelinus fontinalis) affect growth of the native brown trout ( Salmo trutta)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsu, Kai; Huusko, Ari; Muotka, Timo

    2009-03-01

    Non-native brook trout have become widely established in North European streams. We combined evidence from an artificial-stream experiment and drainage-scale field surveys to examine whether brook trout suppressed the growth of the native brown trout (age 0 to age 2). Our experimental results demonstrated that brown trout were unaffected by the presence of brook trout but that brook trout showed reduced growth in the presence of brown trout. However, the growth reduction only appeared in the experimental setting, indicating that the reduced spatial constraint of the experimental system may have forced the fish to unnaturally intense interactions. Indeed, in the field, no effect of either species on the growth of the putative competitor was detected. These results caution against uncritical acceptance of findings from small-scale experiments because they rarely scale up to more complex field situations. This and earlier work suggest that the establishment of brook trout in North European streams has taken place mainly because of the availability of unoccupied (or underutilized) niche space, rather than as a result of species trait combinations or interspecific competition per se.

  19. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endolithic algae in living stony corals: algal concentrations under influence of depth-dependent light conditions and coral tissue fluorescence in Agaricia agaricites (L.) and Meandrina meandrites (L.) (Scleractinia, Anthozoa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delvoye, Laurent

    1992-01-01

    DELVOYE, L., 1992. Endolithic algae in living stony corals: Algal concentrations under influence of depth-dependent light conditions and coral tissue fluorescence in Agaricia agaricites (L) and Meandrina meandrites (L.) (Sclereactinia, Anthozoa). Studies Nat. Hist. Caribbean Region 71, Amsterdam

  1. LopheliaII2012: Coral Research on Oil Rigs in the Gulf of Mexico on TDI-Brooks Vessel Brooks McCall between 2012-07-12 and 2012-07-24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The final year of a multi-year effort to study Lophelia coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico is occurring on the TDI-Brooks research vessel, Brooks McCall,...

  2. Transcriptome, expression, and activity analyses reveal a vital heat shock protein 70 in the stress response of stony coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yidan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingui; Huang, Bo

    2018-02-12

    Coral bleaching occurs worldwide with increasing frequencies and intensities, which is caused by the stress response of stony coral to environmental change, especially increased sea surface temperature. In the present study, transcriptome, expression, and activity analyses were employed to illustrate the underlying molecular mechanisms of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the stress response of coral to environmental changes. The domain analyses of assembled transcripts revealed 30 HSP70 gene contigs in stony coral Pocillopora damicornis. One crucial HSP70 (PdHSP70) was observed, whose expressions were induced by both elevated temperature and ammonium after expression difference analysis. The complete complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of PdHSP70 was identified, which encoded a polypeptide of 650 amino acids with a molecular weight of 71.93 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of PdHSP70 contained a HSP70 domain (from Pro8 to Gly616), and it shared the highest similarity (95%) with HSP70 from Stylophora pistillata. The expression level of PdHSP70 gene increased significantly at 12 h, and returned to the initial level at 24 h after the stress of high temperature (32 °C). The cDNA fragment encoding the mature peptide of PdHSP70 was recombined and expressed in the prokaryotic expression system. The ATPase activity of recombinant PdHSP70 protein was determined, and it did not change significantly in a wide range of temperature from 25 to 40 °C. These results collectively suggested that PdHSP70 was a vital heat shock protein 70 in the stony coral P. damicornis, whose mRNA expression could be induced by diverse environmental stress and whose activity could remain stable under heat stress. PdHSP70 might be involved in the regulation of the bleaching owing to heat stress in the stony coral P. damicornis.

  3. Genome evolution in the fish family salmonidae: generation of a brook charr genetic map and comparisons among charrs (Arctic charr and brook charr with rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghadam Hooman K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonids are regarded as 4R derivative species, having experienced 4 whole genome duplication events in their ancestry. Many duplicated chromosome regions still share extensive homology with one another which is maintained primarily through male-based homeologous chromosome pairings during meiosis. The formation of quadrivalents during meiosis leads to pseudolinkage. This phenomenon is more prevalent within 5 of the 12 ancestral teleost linkage groups in salmonids. Results We constructed a genetic linkage map for brook charr and used this in combination with the genetic map from Arctic charr, to make comparisons with the genetic map of rainbow trout. Although not all chromosome arms are currently mapped, some homologous chromosome rearrangements were evident between Arctic charr and brook charr. Notably, 10 chromosome arms in brook charr representing 5 metacentric chromosomes in Arctic charr have undergone rearrangements. Three metacentrics have one arm translocated and fused with another chromosome arm in brook charr to a make a new metacentrics while two metacentrics are represented by 4 acrocentric pairs in brook charr. In two cases (i.e., BC-4 and BC-16, an apparent polymorphism was observed with the identification of both a putative metacentric structure (similar to metacentric AC-4 = BC-4 and a joining of acrocentric AC-16 + one arm of AC-28 = BC-16, as well as two separate acrocentric linkage groups evident in the mapping parents. Forty-six of the expected 50 karyotypic arms could be inter-generically assigned. SEX in brook charr (BC-4 was localized to the same homologous linkage group region as in Arctic charr (AC-4. The homeologous affinities detected in the two charr species facilitated the identification of 20 (expected number = 25 shared syntenic regions with rainbow trout, although it is likely that some of these regions were partial or overlapping arm regions. Conclusions Inter-generic comparisons among 2

  4. Suspended-sediment and turbidity responses to sediment and turbidity reduction projects in the Beaver Kill, Stony Clove Creek, and Warner Creek, Watersheds, New York, 2010–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemion, Jason; McHale, Michael R.; Davis, Wae Danyelle

    2016-12-05

    Suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and turbidity were monitored within the Beaver Kill, Stony Clove Creek, and Warner Creek tributaries to the upper Esopus Creek in New York, the main source of water to the Ashokan Reservoir, from October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2014. The purpose of the monitoring was to determine the effects of suspended-sediment and turbidity reduction projects (STRPs) on SSC and turbidity in two of the three streams; no STRPs were constructed in the Beaver Kill watershed. During the study period, four STRPs were completed in the Stony Clove Creek and Warner Creek watersheds. Daily mean SSCs decreased significantly for a given streamflow after the STRPs were completed. The most substantial decreases in daily mean SSCs were measured at the highest streamflows. Background SSCs, as measured in water samples collected in upstream reference stream reaches, in all three streams in this study were less than 5 milligrams per liter during low and high streamflows. Longitudinal stream sampling identified stream reaches with failing hillslopes in contact with the stream channel as the primary sediment sources in the Beaver Kill and Stony Clove Creek watersheds.

  5. Predicting soil water content at - 33 kPa by pedotransfer functions in stoniness 1 soils in northeast Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, M C; Viloria, J; Martínez-Casasnovas, J A; Valera, A; Lobo, D; Timm, L C; Pires, L F; Gabriels, D

    2018-02-22

    Soil water content is a key property in the study of water available for plants, infiltration, drainage, hydraulic conductivity, irrigation, plant water stress and solute movement. However, its measurement consumes time and, in the case of stony soils, the presence of stones difficult to determinate the water content. An alternative is the use of pedotransfer functions (PTFs), as models to predict these properties from readily available data. The present work shows a comparison of different widely used PTFs to estimate water content at-33 kPa (WR -33kPa ) in high stoniness soils. The work was carried out in the Caramacate River, an area of high interest because the frequent landslides worsen the quality of drinking water. The performance of all evaluated PTFs was compared with a PTF generated for the study area. Results showed that the Urach's PTF presented the best performance in relation to the others and could be used to estimate WR -33kPa in soils of Caramacate River basin. The calculated PTFs had a R 2 of 0.65. This was slightly higher than the R 2 of the Urach's PTF. The inclusion of the rock fragment volume could have the better results. The weak performance of the other PTFs could be related to the fact that the mountain soils of the basin are rich in 2:1 clay and high stoniness, which were not used as independent variables for PTFs to estimate the WR -33kPa .

  6. Fall and winter survival of brook trout and brown trout in a north-central Pennsylvania watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweka, John A.; Davis, Lori A.; Wagner, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Stream-dwelling salmonids that spawn in the fall generally experience their lowest survival during the fall and winter due to behavioral changes associated with spawning and energetic deficiencies during this time of year. We used data from Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis and Brown Trout Salmo trutta implanted with radio transmitters in tributaries of the Hunts Run watershed of north-central Pennsylvania to estimate survival from the fall into the winter seasons (September 2012–February 2013). We examined the effects that individual-level covariates (trout species, size, and movement rates) and stream-level covariates (individual stream and cumulative drainage area of a stream) have on survival. Brook Trout experienced significantly lower survival than Brown Trout, especially in the early fall during their peak spawning period. Besides a significant species effect, none of the other covariates examined influenced survival for either species. A difference in life history between these species, with Brook Trout having a shorter life expectancy than Brown Trout, is likely the primary reason for the lower survival of Brook Trout. However, Brook Trout also spawn earlier in the fall than Brown Trout and low flows during Brook Trout spawning may have resulted in a greater risk of predation for Brook Trout compared with Brown Trout, thereby also contributing to the observed differences in survival between these species. Our estimates of survival can aid parameterization of future population models for Brook Trout and Brown Trout through the spawning season and into winter.

  7. Shale Gas Development and Brook Trout: Scaling Best Management Practices to Anticipate Cumulative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Snyder, Craig D.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Young, John A.; Faulkner, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Shale gas development may involve trade-offs between energy development and benefits provided by natural ecosystems. However, current best management practices (BMPs) focus on mitigating localized ecological degradation. We review evidence for cumulative effects of natural gas development on brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and conclude that BMPs should account for potential watershed-scale effects in addition to localized influences. The challenge is to develop BMPs in the face of uncertainty in the predicted response of brook trout to landscape-scale disturbance caused by gas extraction. We propose a decision-analysis approach to formulating BMPs in the specific case of relatively undisturbed watersheds where there is consensus to maintain brook trout populations during gas development. The decision analysis was informed by existing empirical models that describe brook trout occupancy responses to landscape disturbance and set bounds on the uncertainty in the predicted responses to shale gas development. The decision analysis showed that a high efficiency of gas development (e.g., 1 well pad per square mile and 7 acres per pad) was critical to achieving a win-win solution characterized by maintaining brook trout and maximizing extraction of available gas. This finding was invariant to uncertainty in predicted response of brook trout to watershed-level disturbance. However, as the efficiency of gas development decreased, the optimal BMP depended on the predicted response, and there was considerable potential value in discriminating among predictive models through adaptive management or research. The proposed decision-analysis framework provides an opportunity to anticipate the cumulative effects of shale gas development, account for uncertainty, and inform management decisions at the appropriate spatial scales.

  8. Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Sandusky OH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (later known as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities. After successfully completing the objective of landing humans on the Moon and returning them safely to Earth, NASA was faced with budget reductions from Congress in 1973. These budgetary constraints caused NASA to cease operations at several research facilities across the country, including those at Plum Brook Station. The major test facilities at Plum Brook were maintained in a standby mode, capable of being reactivated for future use. The Plum Brook Reactor Facility (PBRF) was shut down January 5, 1973 and all of the nuclear fuel was eventually removed and shipped off site to a U.S. Department of Energy facility in Idaho for disposal or reuse. Decommissioning activities are currently underway at the PBRF (NASA 1999). The objectives of the confirmatory survey activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee's procedures and final status survey (FSS) results

  9. William Keith Brooks and the naturalist's defense of Darwinism in the late-nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Richard

    2015-06-01

    William Keith Brooks was an American zoologist at Johns Hopkins University from 1876 until his death in 1908. Over the course of his career, Brooks staunchly defended Darwinism, arguing for the centrality of natural selection in evolutionary theory at a time when alternative theories, such as neo-Lamarckism, grew prominent in American biology. In his book The Law of Heredity (1883), Brooks addressed problems raised by Darwin's theory of pangenesis. In modifying and developing Darwin's pangenesis, Brooks proposed a new theory of heredity that sought to avoid the pitfalls of Darwin's hypothesis. In so doing he strengthened Darwin's theory of natural selection by undermining arguments for the inheritance of acquired characteristics. In later attacks on neo-Lamarckism, Brooks consistently defended Darwin's theory of natural selection on logical grounds, continued to challenge the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and argued that natural selection best explained a wide range of adaptations. Finally, he critiqued Galton's statistical view of heredity and argued that Galton had resurrected an outmoded typological concept of species, one which Darwin and other naturalists had shown to be incorrect. Brooks's ideas resemble the "biological species concept" of the twentieth century, as developed by evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr and others. The late-nineteenth century was not a period of total "eclipse" of Darwinism, as biologists and historians have hitherto seen it. Although the "Modern Synthesis" refers to the reconciliation of post-Mendelian genetics with evolution by natural selection, we might adjust our understanding of how the synthesis developed by seeing it as the culmination of a longer discussion that extends back to the late-nineteenth century.

  10. Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis extinction in small boreal lakes revealed by ephippia pigmentation: a preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bérubé Tellier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ephippium pigmentation is a plastic trait which can be related to a trade-off between visual predation pressure and better protection of cladoceran eggs against different types of stress. Experimental studies showed that planktivorous fish exert a greater predation pressure on individuals carrying darker ephippia, but little is known about the variation of ephippium pigmentation along gradients of fish predation pressure in natural conditions. For this study, our experimental design included four small boreal lakes with known fish assemblages. Two of the lakes have viable brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis populations, whereas the other two lakes experienced brook trout extinctions during the 20th century. Cladoceran ephippia were extracted from sediment cores at layers corresponding to the documented post- extinction phase (1990's and from an older layer (1950's for which the brook trout population status is not known precisely. Our first objective was to determine whether brook trout extinction has a direct effect on both ephippium pigmentation and size. Our second objective was to give a preliminary assessment of the status of brook trout populations in the 1950's by comparing the variation in ephippia traits measured from this layer to those measured in the 1990's, for which the extinction patterns are well known. Cost-effective image analysis was used to assess variation in pigmentation levels in ephippia. This approach provided a proxy for the amount of melanin invested in each ephippium analysed. Our study clearly shows that ephippium pigmentation may represent a better indicator of the presence of fish predators than ephippium size, a trait that showed a less clear pattern of variation between lakes with and without fish. For the 1990's period, ephippia from fishless lakes were darker and showed a slight tendency to be larger than ephippia from lakes with brook trout. However, no clear differences in either ephippium size or pigmentation

  11. Lead plating of the low beta resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Corcoran, D.; Coughlin, R.; Goliak, T.; Hodgkins, D.; James, P.; Seamster, A.G.; Secora, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Plating operations were performed at the lead plating facility at SUNY, Stony Brook. Initial procedures were based on the previous experience of prototype development by Ben-Zvi and Brennan. Several attempts were made to produce satisfactory results, however the lead surfaces were consistently stained and lacked the bright metallic finish routinely achieved with the split loop resonator at SUNY. The development of a new set of procedures was initiated, aided by reports of plating success from Ben-Zvi. Controlled tests were conducted which suggested several changes in the plating parameters. Based on these results and suggestions from the staff at SUNY a new process was defined which was successful in producing the smooth reflective metallic surface known to be necessary forla optimum resonator performance. Following a successful repair of the the crack, the prototype was plated and chemically polished with the new techniques. The resultant surface was highly reflective and free of stains and particulates. The subsequent prototype cold test was successful

  12. IMPACTS OF MARINE AEROSOLS ON SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY AT BEAR BROOK WATERSHED, MAINE USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The East Bear catchment at Bear Brook Watershed, Maine receives moderate (for the eastern U.S.) amounts of Cl- in wet and dry deposition. In 1989, Cl- in precipitation ranged from 2 to 55 eq/L. Dry, occult, and wet deposition plus evapotranspiration resulted in stream Cl- averagi...

  13. Chemical and morphological distinctions between vertical and lateral podzolization at Hubbard Brook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca R. Bourgault; Donald S. Ross; Scott W. Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Classical podzolization studies assumed vertical percolation and pedon-scale horizon development. However, hillslope-scale lateral podzolization also occurs where lateral subsurface water flux predominates. In this hydropedologic study, 99 podzols were observed in Watershed 3, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. Soil horizon samples were extracted with...

  14. William Graham Brooke (1835-1907): Advocate of Girls' Superior Schooling in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of William Graham Brooke as advocate of women's higher education and access to university. His work as advocate is considered against the religious, political, social and economic backdrop of late nineteenth century Ireland. A barrister, as Clerk in the Lord Chancellor's office, he was centrally involved in the…

  15. Elevation dependent sensitivity of northern hardwoods to Ca addition at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long; Palaniswamy Thangavel; Subhash C. Minocha; Christopher Eagar; Charles T. Driscoll

    2010-01-01

    Acidic deposition has caused a depletion of calcium (Ca) in the northeastern forest soils. Wollastonite (Ca silicate) was added to watershed 1 (WS1) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in 1999 to evaluate its effects on various functions of the HBEF ecosystem. The effects of Ca addition on foliar soluble (extractable in 5% HClO4) ions...

  16. Brook trout movement within a high-elevation watershed: Consequences for watershed restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff L. Hansbarger; J. Todd Petty; Patricia M. Mazik

    2010-01-01

    We used radio-telemetry to quantify brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) movements in the Shavers Fork of the Cheat River, West Virginia, and an adjacent second-order tributary (Rocky Run). Our objectives were to quantify the overall rate of trout movement, assess spatial and temporal variation in...

  17. The evolution of the science of Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Norton, S. A.; Fernandez, I. J.; Kahl, J. S.; Rustad, L. E.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Almquist, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 171, 1/4 (2010), s. 3-21 ISSN 0167-6369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Bear Brook Watershed in Maine * acidification * stream * soil * nitrogen * sulfur * phosphorus * base cations Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2010

  18. SOIL ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTION IN THE NEAR-STREAM ZONE AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near-stream and upslope soil chemical properties were analyzed to infer linkages between soil and surface water chemistry at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine [BBWM]. Organic and mineral soil samples were collected along six 20 m transects perpendicular to the stream and one 200 ...

  19. A useful single-solution polychrome stain for plant material...Brook Cyte-Chrome I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley L Krugman; Julia F. Littlefield

    1968-01-01

    Fresh and chemically fixed sectioned plant material can be quickly stained by applying a Brook Cyte Chrome I polychrome stain. Staining time averaged only about 10 minutes. And exact timing of staining and de-staining is not as critical as with most of the commonly used stains. The overall quality is comparable to that of the traditional stains.

  20. Hydrogen ion input to the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, during the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene E. Likens; F. Herbert Bormann; John S. Eaton; Robert S. Pierce; Noye M. Johnson

    1976-01-01

    Being downwind of eastern and midwestern industrial centers, the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest offers a prime location to monitor long-term trends in atmospheric chemistry. Continuous measurements of precipitation chemistry during the last 10 years provide a measure of recent changes in precipitation inputs of hydrogen ion. The weighted average pH of precipitation...

  1. EXPERIMENTAL ACIDIFICATION CAUSES SOIL BASE-CATION DEPLETION AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is concern that changes in atmospheric deposition, climate, or land use have altered the biogeochemistry of forests causing soil base-cation depletion, particularly Ca. The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a paired watershed experiment with one watershed subjected to...

  2. Decadal responses in soil N dynamics at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana Jefts; Ivan J. Fernandez; Lindwey E. Rustad; D. Bryan Dail

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to forested ecosystems is a concern because of both geochemical and biological consequences for ecosystem integrity. High levels of prolonged N deposition can lead to "N saturation" of the ecosystem. The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine is a long-term, paired forested watershed experiment with over a decade of experimental N...

  3. Experimental Acidification Causes Soil Base-Cation Depletion at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan J. Fernandez; Lindsey E. Rustad; Stephen A. Norton; Jeffrey S. Kahl; Bernard J. Cosby

    2003-01-01

    There is concern that changes in atmospheric deposition, climate, or land use have altered the biogeochemistry of forests causing soil base-cation depletion, particularly Ca. The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a paired watershed experiment with one watershed subjected to elevated N and S deposition through bimonthly additions of (NH4)2SO4. Quantitative soil...

  4. Long-term trends from ecosystem research at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Charles T. Driscoll; Christopher Eagar; Gene E. Likens; Thomas G. Siccama; Chris E. Johnson; Timothy J. Fahey; Steven P. Hamburg; Richard T. Holmes; Amey S. Bailey; Donald C. Buso

    2007-01-01

    Summarizes 52 years of collaborative, long-term research conducted at the Hubbard Brook (NH) Experimental Forest on ecosystem response to disturbances such as air pollution, climate change, forest disturbance, and forest management practices. Also provides explanations of some of the trends and lists references from scientific literature for further reading.

  5. Physicochemical Analysis of Water Quality of Brook Kuruçay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Mutlu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, through the analyses of water samples taken from 9 stations on the brook between July 2012 and June 2013, we aimed to determine the monthly and seasonal changes in water quality parameters of Brook Kuruçay, to determine the water quality properties, to reveal the pollution problems, to determine the suitability level in terms of aquatic life and to classify the quality of water in accordance with Surface Water Quality Management Regulation’s Inland Surface Water Classes criteria. The study area is located southeast of the Hafik District of Sivas city and the altitude is 2608 m. The water samples were collected from 9 stations established on the brook, and some physicochemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations were analyzed in water samples. The cleaning and maintenance of all of the equipment, land-type measurement tools, and glass sampling containers to be used in sampling were made 1 day before sampling. Sampling tubes were immersed into 15 cm below the water surface for taking water samples. Heavy metal concentrations were determined in the Sivas Provincial Control Laboratory in the same day with sampling (within 5 hours. The total alkalinity, total hardness, ammonium nitrogen, nitrite, nitrate, ammonium azote, phosphate, sulfite, sulfate, chloride, sodium, potassium, suspended solid matter (SSM, chemical oxygen demand (COD, biological oxygen demand (BOD, calcium, magnesium, ferrous, lead, copper, zinc, nickel, mercury and cadmium analyses of water samples were performed. As a result of the analyses, it was determined that, since Brook Kuruçay falls into the water resource class, which is the most sensitive to pollution, the water quality of the brook should be monitored regularly.

  6. Scale-dependent seasonal pool habitat use by sympatric Wild Brook Trout and Brown Trout populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lori A.; Wagner, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Sympatric populations of native Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized Brown Trout Salmo truttaexist throughout the eastern USA. An understanding of habitat use by sympatric populations is of importance for fisheries management agencies because of the close association between habitat and population dynamics. Moreover, habitat use by stream-dwelling salmonids may be further complicated by several factors, including the potential for fish to display scale-dependent habitat use. Discrete-choice models were used to (1) evaluate fall and early winter daytime habitat use by sympatric Brook Trout and Brown Trout populations based on available residual pool habitat within a stream network and (2) assess the sensitivity of inferred habitat use to changes in the spatial scale of the assumed available habitat. Trout exhibited an overall preference for pool habitats over nonpool habitats; however, the use of pools was nonlinear over time. Brook Trout displayed a greater preference for deep residual pool habitats than for shallow pool and nonpool habitats, whereas Brown Trout selected for all pool habitat categories similarly. Habitat use by both species was found to be scale dependent. At the smallest spatial scale (50 m), habitat use was primarily related to the time of year and fish weight. However, at larger spatial scales (250 and 450 m), habitat use varied over time according to the study stream in which a fish was located. Scale-dependent relationships in seasonal habitat use by Brook Trout and Brown Trout highlight the importance of considering scale when attempting to make inferences about habitat use; fisheries managers may want to consider identifying the appropriate spatial scale when devising actions to restore and protect Brook Trout populations and their habitats.

  7. Relationships between the Brook Street Terrane and Median Tectonic Zone (Median Batholith) : evidence from Jurassic conglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulloch, A.J.; Kimbrough, D.L.; Landis, C.A.; Mortimer, N.; Johnston, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    U-Pb zircon ages of 237-180 Ma and c. 280 Ma of seven granitoid clasts from the Rainy River Conglomerate which lies within the eastern Median Tectonic Zone (Median Batholith) in Nelson, and the Barretts Formation of the Brook Street Terrane in Southland, constrain the depositional ages of both units to be no older than c. 180-200 Ma (Early Jurassic). The minimum age of the Rainy River Conglomerate is constrained by the 147 +2 -1 Ma (Latest Jurassic) emplacement age of the One Mile Gabbronorite (new name: previously western Buller Diorite). The ages and chemistry of five of the granitoid clasts are broadly compatible with derivation from rocks that are now represented by Triassic plutons of the Median Tectonic Zone (Median Batholith), although ages as young as 180 Ma are slightly outside the range of the latter as currently exposed in New Zealand. The age (273-290 Ma, 237 +/- 3 Ma) and chemistry of the other two clasts (one each from Rainy River Conglomerate and Barretts Formation) suggest derivation from the Brook Street Terrane. Similarity in stratigraphic age, depositional characteristics, granitoid clast ages and composition between Rainy River Conglomerate and Barretts Formation suggests that they are broadly correlative and collectively overlapped a combined Brook Street Terrane - Median Batholith (MTZ) before the Late Jurassic (147 +2 -1 Ma). Sedimentary overlap may also have continued across to Middle Jurassic conglomeratic strata in the Murihiku Terrane to the east of the Brook Street Terrane. A U-Pb zircon age of 261 +/- 2 Ma is reported for Pourakino Trondhjemite of the Brook Street Terrane. (author). 56 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  8. A comparative and experimental evaluation of performance of stocked diploid and triploid brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budy, Phaedra E.; Thiede, G.P.; Dean, A.; Olsen, D.; Rowley, G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous negative impacts, nonnative trout are still being stocked to provide economically and socially valuable sport fisheries in western mountain lakes. We evaluated relative performance and potential differences in feeding strategy and competitive ability of triploid versus diploid brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in alpine lakes, as well as behavioral and performance differences of diploid and triploid brook trout in two controlled experimental settings: behavioral experiments in the laboratory and performance evaluations in ponds. Across lakes, catch per unit effort (CPUE) and relative weight (Wr ) were not significantly different between ploidy levels. Mean sizes were also similar between ploidy levels except in two of the larger lakes where diploids attained slightly larger sizes (approximately 20 mm longer). We observed no significant differences between diploids and triploids in diet, diet preference, or trophic structure. Similarly, growth and condition did not differ between ploidy levels in smaller-scale pond experiments, and aggressive behavior did not differ between ploidy levels (fed or unfed fish trials) in the laboratory. Independent of ploidy level, the relative performance of brook trout varied widely among lakes, a pattern that appeared to be a function of lake size or a factor that covaries with lake size such as temperature regime or carrying capacity. In summary, we observed no significant differences in the relative performance of brook trout from either ploidy level across a number of indices, systems, and environmental conditions, nor any indication that one group is more aggressive or a superior competitor than the other. Collectively, these results suggest that triploid brook trout will offer a more risk-averse and promising management opportunity when they are stocked to these lakes and elsewhere to simultaneously meet the needs for the sport fishery and conservation objectives.

  9. 2006 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI-06-12 - Brooks Bank, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected between 13-15 October 2006 aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) Brooks Banks in the Northwestern...

  10. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks and St. Rogatien Bank, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20m) of the shelf and slope environments of Brooks Banks and St. Rogatien, Hawaii, USA. The ASCII includes multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad...

  11. Influence of species, size and relative abundance on the outcomes of competitive interactions between brook trout and juvenile coho salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Emily J; Duda, Jeff; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Resource competition between animals is influenced by a number of factors including the species, size and relative abundance of competing individuals. Stream-dwelling animals often experience variably available food resources, and some employ territorial behaviors to increase their access to food. We investigated the factors that affect dominance between resident, non-native brook trout and recolonizing juvenile coho salmon in the Elwha River, WA, USA, to see if brook trout are likely to disrupt coho salmon recolonization via interference competition. During dyadic laboratory feeding trials, we hypothesized that fish size, not species, would determine which individuals consumed the most food items, and that species would have no effect. We found that species, not size, played a significant role in dominance; coho salmon won 95% of trials, even when only 52% the length of their brook trout competitors. As the pairs of competing fish spent more time together during a trial sequence, coho salmon began to consume more food, and brook trout began to lose more, suggesting that the results of early trials influenced fish performance later. In group trials, we hypothesized that group composition and species would not influence fish foraging success. In single species groups, coho salmon consumed more than brook trout, but the ranges overlapped. Brook trout consumption remained constant through all treatments, but coho salmon consumed more food in treatments with fewer coho salmon, suggesting that coho salmon experienced more intra- than inter-specific competition and that brook trout do not pose a substantial challenge. Based on our results, we think it is unlikely that competition from brook trout will disrupt Elwha River recolonization by coho salmon.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Contributing Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    Predictors of patient satisfaction for Brooke Army Medical Center Family Medicine Service primary care clinics was performed. Data was obtained from...Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center Presented to MAJ Eric Schmacker, Ph.D. In...study. All patients ’ medical information was protected at all times and under no circumstances will be discussed or released to any outside agency

  13. Brook trout distributional response to unconventional oil and gas development: Landscape context matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Eric R.; Petty, J. Todd; Maloney, Kelly O.; Young, John A.; Faulkner, Stephen; Slonecker, Terry; Milheim, Lesley E.; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Niles, Jonathan M.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale assessment of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development effects on brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distribution. We compiled 2231 brook trout collection records from the Upper Susquehanna River Watershed, USA. We used boosted regression tree (BRT) analysis to predict occurrence probability at the 1:24,000 stream-segment scale as a function of natural and anthropogenic landscape and climatic attributes. We then evaluated the importance of landscape context (i.e., pre-existing natural habitat quality and anthropogenic degradation) in modulating the effects of UOG on brook trout distribution under UOG development scenarios. BRT made use of 5 anthropogenic (28% relative influence) and 7 natural (72% relative influence) variables to model occurrence with a high degree of accuracy [Area Under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC) = 0.85 and cross-validated AUC = 0.81]. UOG development impacted 11% (n = 2784) of streams and resulted in a loss of predicted occurrence in 126 (4%). Most streams impacted by UOG had unsuitable underlying natural habitat quality (n = 1220; 44%). Brook trout were predicted to be absent from an additional 26% (n = 733) of streams due to pre-existing non-UOG land uses (i.e., agriculture, residential and commercial development, or historic mining). Streams with a predicted and observed (via existing pre- and post-disturbance fish sampling records) loss of occurrence due to UOG tended to have intermediate natural habitat quality and/or intermediate levels of non-UOG stress. Simulated development of permitted but undeveloped UOG wells (n = 943) resulted in a loss of predicted occurrence in 27 additional streams. Loss of occurrence was strongly dependent upon landscape context, suggesting effects of current and future UOG development are likely most relevant in streams near the probability threshold due to pre-existing habitat degradation.

  14. Field performance of timber bridges. 10, Sanborn Brook stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. D. Hilbrich Lee; J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter

    The Sanborn Brook bridge was constructed in August 1991, 10 miles northeast of Concord, New Hampshire, as part of the demonstration timber bridge program of the USDA Forest Service. The bridge is a simple-span, double-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure constructed from Southern Pine lumber and is approximately 25 ft long and 28 ft wide with a skew of 14 degrees...

  15. Growth rate differences between resident native brook trout and non-native brown trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, S.M.; Hendry, A.P.; Letcher, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    Between species and across season variation in growth was examined by tagging and recapturing individual brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta across seasons in a small stream (West Brook, Massachusetts, U.S.A.). Detailed information on body size and growth are presented to (1) test whether the two species differed in growth within seasons and (2) characterize the seasonal growth patterns for two age classes of each species. Growth differed between species in nearly half of the season- and age-specific comparisons. When growth differed, non-native brown trout grew faster than native brook trout in all but one comparison. Moreover, species differences were most pronounced when overall growth was high during the spring and early summer. These growth differences resulted in size asymmetries that were sustained over the duration of the study. A literature survey also indicated that non-native salmonids typically grow faster than native salmonids when the two occur in sympatry. Taken together, these results suggest that differences in growth are not uncommon for coexisting native and non-native salmonids. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  16. Metallothionein in brook trout (salvelinus fontinalis) as a biological indicator of inorganic chemical contaminant stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for quantifying metallothionein was evaluated with fish tissue. Adult brook trout were administered 3 mg 109 cadmium/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection over a 5 day period to induce metallothionein concentrations in liver and kidney tissues. The method was modified so cadmium bound to unsaturated metallothionein could be measured. The method gave precise measurements and was used to evaluate the toxicological significant of metallothionein in two 30-day chronic toxicity studies of cadmium on brook trout. In particular, metallothionein was evaluated as a biological indicator of inorganic chemical stress in brook trout. Pathological effects in animals resulting from exposure to inorganic chemicals is thought to occur when metallothionein's sequestering ability is exceeded; a phenomenon explained by the spillover hypothesis. The presence of free cadmium in tissues of fish from all exposures suggests metallothionein was not saturated with cadmium perhaps because of competition for binding sites on metallothionein between cadmium and other inorganic chemicals such as copper and zinc. Based on results of the two toxicity studies, the spillover hypothesis should be redefined to a continuum of toxic responses to varying balances between the relative abundance of inorganic chemicals present and their respective binding affinities for metallothionein

  17. Low-velocity superconducting accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper reviews the status of RF superconductivity as applied to low-velocity accelerating properties. Heavy-ion accelerators must accelerate efficiently particles which travel at a velocity much smaller than that of light particles, whose velocity changes along accelerator, and also different particles which have different velocity profiles. Heavy-ion superconducting accelerators operate at frequencies which are lower than high-energy superconducting accelerators. The present paper first discusses the basic features of heavy-ion superconducting structures and linacs. Design choices are then addressed focusing on structure geometry, materials, frequency, phase control, and focusing. The report also gives an outline of the status of superconducting booster projects currently under way at the Argonne National Laboratory, SUNY Stony Brook, Weizmann Institute, University of Washington, Florida State, Saclay, Kansas State, Daresbury, Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute, Legnaro, Bombay, Sao Paulo, ANU (Canberra), and Munich. Recent developments and future prospects are also described. (N.K.) 68 refs

  18. Computer-assisted instruction: a library service for the community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, J; Cook, V

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports on five years of experience with computer-assisted instruction (CAI) at Winthrop-University Hospital, a major affiliate of the SUNY at Stony Brook School of Medicine. It compares CAI programs available from Ohio State University and Massachusetts General Hospital (accessed by telephone and modem), and software packages purchased from the Health Sciences Consortium (MED-CAPS) and Scientific American (DISCOTEST). The comparison documents one library's experience of the cost of these programs and the use made of them by medical students, house staff, and attending physicians. It describes the space allocated for necessary equipment, as well as the marketing of CAI. Finally, in view of the decision of the National Board of Medical Examiners to administer the Part III examination on computer (the so-called CBX) starting in 1988, the paper speculates on the future importance of CAI in the community teaching hospital.

  19. Junction and circuit fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackel, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    Great strides have been made in Josephson junction fabrication in the four years since the first IC SQUID meeting. Advances in lithography have allowed the production of devices with planar dimensions as small as a few hundred angstroms. Improved technology has provided ultra-high sensitivity SQUIDS, high-efficiency low-noise mixers, and complex integrated circuits. This review highlights some of the new fabrication procedures. The review consists of three parts. Part 1 is a short summary of the requirements on junctions for various applications. Part 2 reviews intergrated circuit fabrication, including tunnel junction logic circuits made at IBM and Bell Labs, and microbridge radiation sources made at SUNY at Stony Brook. Part 3 describes new junction fabrication techniques, the major emphasis of this review. This part includes a discussion of small oxide-barrier tunnel junctions, semiconductor barrier junctions, and microbridge junctions. Part 3 concludes by considering very fine lithography and limitations to miniaturization. (orig.)

  20. Intruder bands in Z = 51 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFosse, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Recent investigations of h 11/2 proton intruder bands in odd 51 Sb nuclei are reported. In addition to experiments performed at SUNY Stony Brook and Chalk River, data from Early Implementation of GAMMASPHERE (analysis in progress) are presented. In particular, the nuclei 109 Sb and 111 Sb are discussed. Rotational bands based on the πh 11/2 orbital coupled to a 2p2h deformed state of the 50 Sn core have been observed. These bands have been observed to high spin, and in the case of 109 Sb to a rotational frequency of 1.4 MeV, the highest frequency observed in a heavy nucleus. The dynamic moments of inertia in these bands decrease slowly with frequency, suggesting a gradual band termination. The systematics of such bands in 109-119 Sb will be discussed

  1. In the land of the dinosaurs, how to survive experience with building of midrange computing cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevel, A E [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lauret, J [SUNY at Stony Brook (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The authors discuss how to put into operation a midrange computing cluster for the Nuclear Chemistry Group (NCG) of the Stage University of New York at STONY Brook (SUNY-SB). The NCG is part and one of the collaborators within the RHIC/Phenix experiment located at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Phenix detector system produces about half a PB (or 500 TB) of data a year and our goal was to provide to this remote collaborating facility the means to be part of the analysis process. The computing installation was put into operation at the beginning of the year 2000. The cluster consists of 32 peripheral machines running under Linux and central server Alpha 4100 under Digital Unix 4.0f (formally True Unix 64). The realization process is under discussion.

  2. In the land of the dinosaurs, how to survive experience with building of midrange computing cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevel, A.E.; Lauret, J.

    2001-01-01

    The authors discuss how to put into operation a midrange computing cluster for the Nuclear Chemistry Group (NCG) of the Stage University of New York at STONY Brook (SUNY-SB). The NCG is part and one of the collaborators within the RHIC/Phenix experiment located at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Phenix detector system produces about half a PB (or 500 TB) of data a year and our goal was to provide to this remote collaborating facility the means to be part of the analysis process. The computing installation was put into operation at the beginning of the year 2000. The cluster consists of 32 peripheral machines running under Linux and central server Alpha 4100 under Digital Unix 4.0f (formally True Unix 64). The realization process is under discussion

  3. Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine L. Hanks

    2008-12-31

    Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one

  4. Monte Carlo modelling and comparison with experiment of the nuclide production in thick stony targets isotropically irradiated with 600 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aylmer, D.; Herzog, G.F.; Kruse, T.H.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Moniot, R.K.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.; Tuniz, C.

    1987-05-01

    Depth profiles for the production of stable and radioactive nuclides have been measured for a large variety of target elements in three thick spherical stony targets with radii of 5, 15 and 26 cm isotropically irradiated with 600 MeV protons at the CERN synchrocyclotron. These irradiation experiments (CERN SC96) were intended to simulate the irradiation of meteoroids by galactic cosmic ray protons. In order to combine this experimental approach with a theoretical one the intra- and internuclear cascades were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques via the high energy transport code HET/KFA 1. Together with transport calculations for low energy neutrons by the MORSE-CG code the depth dependent spectra of primary and secondary protons and of secondary neutrons were derived. On the basis of these spectra and a set of evaluated experimental excitation functions for p-induced reactions and of theoretical ones for n-induced reactions, calculated by the code ALICE LIVERMORE 82, theoretical depth profiles for the production of stable and radioactive nuclides in the three thick targets were calculated. This report is a comprehensive survey on all those target/product combination for which both experimental and theoretical data are available. It provides the basis for a detailed discussion of the various production modes of residual nuclides and on the depth and size dependence of their production rates in thick stony targets, serving as a simulation of the galactic cosmic ray irradiation of meteoroids in space. On the other hand the comparison of the experimental and theoretical depth profiles validates the high energy transport calculations, making them a promissing tool for further model calculations of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter. (orig.)

  5. Spatial structure of morphological and neutral genetic variation in Brook Trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazyak, David C.; Hilderbrand, Robert H.; Keller, Stephen R.; Colaw, Mark C.; Holloway, Amanda E.; Morgan, Raymond P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis exhibit exceptional levels of life history variation, remarkable genetic variability, and fine-scale population structure. In many cases, neighboring populations may be highly differentiated from one another to an extent that is comparable with species-level distinctions in other taxa. Although genetic samples have been collected from hundreds of populations and tens of thousands of individuals, little is known about whether differentiation at neutral markers reflects phenotypic differences among Brook Trout populations. We compared differentiation in morphology and neutral molecular markers among populations from four geographically proximate locations (all within 24 km) to examine how genetic diversity covaries with morphology. We found significant differences among and/or within streams for all three morphological axes examined and identified the source stream of many individuals based on morphology (52.3% classification efficiency). Although molecular and morphological differentiation among streams ranged considerably (mean pairwise FST: 0.023–0.264; pairwise PST: 0.000–0.339), the two measures were not significantly correlated. While in some cases morphological characters appear to have diverged to a greater extent than expected by neutral genetic drift, many traits were conserved to a greater extent than were neutral genetic markers. Thus, while Brook Trout exhibit fine-scale spatial patterns in both morphology and neutral genetic diversity, these types of biological variabilities are being structured by different ecological and evolutionary processes. The relative influences of genetic drift versus selection and phenotypic plasticity in shaping morphology appear to vary among populations occupying nearby streams.

  6. Haematological and physiological responses of brook charr, to untreated and limestone-neutralized acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, M.B.; Arnold, D.E.; Watten, B.J.; Krise, W.F. [ABR Inc, Forest Grove, OR (USA). Environmental Research and Services

    2001-07-01

    Brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis, exhibited depressed plasma sodium and elevated plasma glucose concentrations in untreated acid mine drainage effluent (AMD), at two dilutions. Plasma sodium and glucose concentrations remained stable in treated AMD, pulsed, fluidized beds of limestone and carbon-dioxide pre-treatment of influent, and in AMD-free water. Results indicate that effluents produced by this treatment system were not toxic to these fish, despite still containing moderate concentrations of manganese (3-4 mg l{sup 1} following dilution in exposure systems), and provide justification for field deployment and further biological testing of this treatment in the field.

  7. A Study to Evaluate the Organization and the Operating Procedures of the Patient Assistance Function at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    15 March 1979. 59Interview with Wendy L. Farace , Head Nurse, Obstetrics/Gynecology Clinic, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, 8...6 February 1979. Farace , Wendy L. Head Nurse, Obstetrica/Gynecology Clinic, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Interview, 8 January

  8. Can nutrient limitations explain low and declining white spruce growth near the Arctic treeline in the eastern Brooks Range, Alaska?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, S.; Sullivan, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    The position of the Arctic treeline is of critical importance for global carbon cycling and surface energy budgets. However, controls on tree growth at treeline remain uncertain. In the Alaskan Brooks Range, 20th century warming has caused varying growth responses among treeline trees, with trees in the west responding positively, while trees in the east have responded negatively. The prevailing explanation of this trend ascribes the negative growth response to warming-induced drought stress in the eastern Brooks Range. However, recent measurements of carbon isotope discrimination in tree rings, xylem sap flow and needle gas exchange suggest that drought stress cannot explain these regional growth declines. Additionally, evidence from the western Brooks Range suggests that nutrient availability, rather than drought stress, may be the proximate control on tree growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that low and declining growth of eastern Brooks Range trees is due to low and declining soil nutrient availability, which may continue to decrease with climate change as soils become drier and microbial activity declines. We compared microclimate, tree performance, and a wide range of proxies for soil nutrient availability in four watersheds along a west-east transect in the Brooks Range during the growing seasons of 2013 and 2014. We hypothesized that soil nutrient availability would track closely with the strong west-east precipitation gradient, with higher rainfall and greater soil nutrient availability in the western Brooks Range. We expected to find that soil water contents in the west are near optimum for nitrogen mineralization, while those in the east are below optimum. Needle nitrogen concentration, net photosynthesis, branch extension growth, and growth in the main stem are expected to decline with the hypothesized decrease in soil nutrient availability. The results of our study will elucidate the current controls on growth of trees near the

  9. Landscape-scale evaluation of asymmetric interactions between Brown Trout and Brook Trout using two-species occupancy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Jefferson T. Deweber,; Jason Detar,; John A. Sweka,

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the distribution of native stream fishes is fundamental to the management and conservation of many species. Modeling species distributions often consists of quantifying relationships between species occurrence and abundance data at known locations with environmental data at those locations. However, it is well documented that native stream fish distributions can be altered as a result of asymmetric interactions between dominant exotic and subordinate native species. For example, the naturalized exotic Brown Trout Salmo trutta has been identified as a threat to native Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis in the eastern United States. To evaluate large-scale patterns of co-occurrence and to quantify the potential effects of Brown Trout presence on Brook Trout occupancy, we used data from 624 stream sites to fit two-species occupancy models. These models assumed that asymmetric interactions occurred between the two species. In addition, we examined natural and anthropogenic landscape characteristics we hypothesized would be important predictors of occurrence of both species. Estimated occupancy for Brook Trout, from a co-occurrence model with no landscape covariates, at sites with Brown Trout present was substantially lower than sites where Brown Trout were absent. We also observed opposing patterns for Brook and Brown Trout occurrence in relation to percentage forest, impervious surface, and agriculture within the network catchment. Our results are consistent with other studies and suggest that alterations to the landscape, and specifically the transition from a forested catchment to one that contains impervious surface or agriculture, reduces the occurrence probability of wild Brook Trout. Our results, however, also suggest that the presence of Brown Trout results in lower occurrence probability of Brook Trout over a range of anthropogenic landscape characteristics, compared with streams where Brown Trout were absent.

  10. NASA's Hydrogen Outpost: The Rocket Systems Area at Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    "There was pretty much a general knowledge about hydrogen and its capabilities," recalled former researcher Robert Graham. "The question was, could you use it in a rocket engine? Do we have the technology to handle it? How will it cool? Will it produce so much heat release that we can't cool the engine? These were the questions that we had to address." The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Glenn Research Center, referred to historically as the Lewis Research Center, made a concerted effort to answer these and related questions in the 1950s and 1960s. The center played a critical role transforming hydrogen's theoretical potential into a flight-ready propellant. Since then NASA has utilized liquid hydrogen to send humans and robots to the Moon, propel dozens of spacecraft across the universe, orbit scores of satellite systems, and power 135 space shuttle flights. Rocket pioneers had recognized hydrogen's potential early on, but its extremely low boiling temperature and low density made it impracticable as a fuel. The Lewis laboratory first demonstrated that liquid hydrogen could be safely utilized in rocket and aircraft propulsion systems, then perfected techniques to store, pump, and cleanly burn the fuel, as well as use it to cool the engine. The Rocket Systems Area at Lewis's remote testing area, Plum Brook Station, played a little known, but important role in the center's hydrogen research efforts. This publication focuses on the activities at the Rocket Systems Area, but it also discusses hydrogen's role in NASA's space program and Lewis's overall hydrogen work. The Rocket Systems Area included nine physically modest test sites and three test stands dedicated to liquid-hydrogen-related research. In 1962 Cleveland Plain Dealer reporter Karl Abram claimed, "The rocket facility looks more like a petroleum refinery. Its test rigs sprout pipes, valves and tanks. During the night test runs, excess hydrogen is burned from special stacks in the best

  11. Kitchenette: Hell or Home? Different"Kitchenette"Images Created by Richard Wright and Gwendolyn Brooks%Kitchenette:Hell or Home?Different"Kitchenette"Images Created by Richard Wright and Gwendolyn Brooks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志宏

    2017-01-01

    How the southern black migrants navigate and survive the northern urban space is a question profoundly explored and realistically documented in many migration narratives in African American literature. This paper concentrates on the image of Chicago"kitchenette"in the works of Richard Wright and Gwendolyn Brooks, in an attempt to demonstrate the different inter-pretations of migrant spaces on the urban landscape.

  12. Maintenance of phenotypic variation: repeatibility, heritability, and size-dependent processes in a wild brook trout population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin H. Letcher; Jason A Coombs; Keith H. Nislow

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in body size can result from within-cohort variation in birth dates, among-individual growth variation and size-selective processes. We explore the relative effects of these processes on the maintenance of wide observed body size variation in stream-dwelling brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Based on the analyses of multiple...

  13. On Conceptual Metaphor and the Flora and Fauna of Mind: Commentary on Brookes and Etkina; and Jeppsson, Haglund, and Amin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, the author presents his thoughts on two papers appearing in this special issue. The first, "The Importance of Language in Students' Reasoning about Heat in Thermodynamic Processes," by David T. Brookes and Eugenia Etkina (See: EJ1060728), and the second, "Varying Use of Conceptual Metaphors Across Levels of…

  14. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in Douglas-fir: report no. 18--Rocky Brook, 1963-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert O. Curtis; David D. Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the history and results of the Rocky Brook installation of the cooperative levels-of-growing-stock (LOGS) study in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), over the 41-year period 1965 to 2006. This 1938 plantation is one of the two site-IV installations among the nine installations in the study. Much public...

  15. Feeding habits of the alien brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and the native brown trout Salmo trutta in Czech mountain streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horká Petra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying patterns of prey resource use is fundamental to identify mechanisms enabling the coexistence of related fish species. Trophic interactions between the native brown trout, Salmo trutta, and the introduced brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, were studied monthly from May to October in three mountain streams in Central Europe (Czech Republic. To evaluate whether the feeding habits differ between separated and coexisting populations of these species, one locality where both species coexist, and two allopatric populations of either species were studied. Across the study period, the mean stomach fullness of fish varied, being highest in spring and declining through autumn. The diet overlap (Schoener's overlap index between the species increased through the studied season (from 54.5% in July to 81.5% in October. In allopatry, both species had nearly the same feeding habits. However, in sympatry, brook trout consumed higher proportion of terrestrial invertebrates, while brown trout showed no changes either in the proportions of aquatic and terrestrial prey utilized or in the selectivity for prey categories in comparison to allopatric conditions. The dietary shift observed for brook trout, but not for brown trout, suggests that brown trout is a stronger competitor in the studied sympatric locality, leading the brook trout to change its feeding habits to reduce interspecific competition.

  16. 77 FR 37707 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Brooks River Visitor Access for Katmai National Park and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... four action alternatives that include bridge and boardwalk systems to replace the existing Brooks River floating bridge and sites to relocate the existing Naknek Lake barge landing area at the mouth of the... maintain seasonal use of the floating bridge, which is 8 feet wide and about 320 feet long. The bridge...

  17. Past and projected future changes in snowpack and soil frost at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Scott V. Ollinger; Gerald N. Flerchinger; Haley Wicklein; Katharine Hayhoe; Amey S. Bailey

    2010-01-01

    Long-term data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire show that air temperature has increased by about 1 °C over the last half century. The warmer climate has caused significant declines in snow depth, snow water equivalent and snow cover duration. Paradoxically, it has been suggested that warmer air temperatures may result in colder soils...

  18. Ranking site vulnerability to increasing temperatures in southern Appalachian brook trout streams in Virginia: An exposure-sensitivity approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradly A. Trumbo; Keith H. Nislow; Jonathan Stallings; Mark Hudy; Eric P. Smith; Dong-Yun Kim; Bruce Wiggins; Charles A. Dolloff

    2014-01-01

    Models based on simple air temperature–water temperature relationships have been useful in highlighting potential threats to coldwater-dependent species such as Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis by predicting major losses of habitat and substantial reductions in geographic distribution. However, spatial variability in the relationship between changes...

  19. Invasion by nonnative brook trout in Panther Creek, Idaho: Roles of habitat quality, connectivity, and biotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph R. Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest the invasion of nonnative freshwater species is facilitated through the interaction of three factors: biotic resistance, habitat quality, and connectivity. We measured variables that represented each component to determine which were associated with small (150 mm) brook trout occurrence in Panther Creek, a tributary...

  20. Eleven-year response of foliar chemistry to chronic nitrogen and sulfur additions at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Alexander Elvir; Lindsey Rustad; G. Bruce Wiersma; Ivan Fernandez; Alan S. White; Gregory J. White

    2005-01-01

    The foliar chemistry of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), and red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) was studied from 1993 to 2003 at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM). The BBWM is a paired-watershed forest ecosystem study, with one watershed treated bimonthly since...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Picorna-Like Virus Associated with Gill Tissue in Clinically Normal Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Adams, Cynthia R.; Galbraith, Heather; Aunins, Aaron; Cornman, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report a draft genome sequence of a picorna-like virus associated with brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, gill tissue. The draft genome comprises 8,681 nucleotides, excluding the poly(A) tract, and contains two open reading frames. It is most similar to picorna-like viruses that infect invertebrates.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Picorna-Like Virus Associated with Gill Tissue in Clinically Normal Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke R; Iwanowicz, Deborah D; Adams, Cynthia R; Galbraith, Heather; Aunins, Aaron; Cornman, Robert S

    2017-10-12

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of a picorna-like virus associated with brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis , gill tissue. The draft genome comprises 8,681 nucleotides, excluding the poly(A) tract, and contains two open reading frames. It is most similar to picorna-like viruses that infect invertebrates.

  3. Phylogeographical analysis reveals multiple conservation units in brook lampreys Lampetra planeri of Portuguese streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A M; Robalo, J I; Freyhof, J; Maia, C; Fonseca, J P; Valente, A; Almada, V C

    2010-08-01

    The populations of brook lamprey Lampetra planeri of Portuguese Rivers were analysed phylogeographically using a fragment of 644 bp of the mitochondrial control region of 158 individuals from six populations. Samples representing L. planeri and migratory lampreys Lampetra fluviatilis of rivers draining to the North Sea and the Baltic Sea were also included to assess the relationships of Portuguese samples. The data support a clear differentiation of all the populations studied. Several populations, which are isolated among themselves and also from the migratory lampreys, proved to be entirely composed of private haplotypes, a finding that supports some time of independent evolutionary history for these populations. This, combined with the geographic confinement to small water bodies, justifies the recognition of at least four conservation units in the Portuguese rivers Sado, São Pedro, Nabão and Inha.

  4. Modeling brook trout presence and absence from landscape variables using four different analytical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Paul J.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.; Wiley, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    As a part of the Great Lakes Regional Aquatic Gap Analysis Project, we evaluated methodologies for modeling associations between fish species and habitat characteristics at a landscape scale. To do this, we created brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis presence and absence models based on four different techniques: multiple linear regression, logistic regression, neural networks, and classification trees. The models were tested in two ways: by application to an independent validation database and cross-validation using the training data, and by visual comparison of statewide distribution maps with historically recorded occurrences from the Michigan Fish Atlas. Although differences in the accuracy of our models were slight, the logistic regression model predicted with the least error, followed by multiple regression, then classification trees, then the neural networks. These models will provide natural resource managers a way to identify habitats requiring protection for the conservation of fish species.

  5. Do native brown trout and non-native brook trout interact reproductively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucherousset, J.; Aymes, J. C.; Poulet, N.; Santoul, F.; Céréghino, R.

    2008-07-01

    Reproductive interactions between native and non-native species of fish have received little attention compared to other types of interactions such as predation or competition for food and habitat. We studied the reproductive interactions between non-native brook trout ( Salvelinus fontinalis) and native brown trout ( Salmo trutta) in a Pyrenees Mountain stream (SW France). We found evidence of significant interspecific interactions owing to consistent spatial and temporal overlap in redd localizations and spawning periods. We observed mixed spawning groups composed of the two species, interspecific subordinate males, and presence of natural hybrids (tiger trout). These reproductive interactions could be detrimental to the reproduction success of both species. Our study shows that non-native species might have detrimental effects on native species via subtle hybridization behavior.

  6. Dry deposition of sulfur: a 23-year record for the Hubbard Brook Forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likens, G E; Eaton, J S [Inst. of Ecosystem Studies, The New York Botanical Garden, NY (US); Bormann, F H [School of Forestry and Environmental Studies Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (US); Hedin, L O [Dept. of Biology, Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (US); Driscoll, C T [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse, NY (US)

    1990-01-01

    Dry deposition of S was estimated for watershed-ecosystems of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest from 1964-65 through 1986-87. Two approaches, a regression analysis of bulk precipitation inputs and stream outputs and a mass-balance method, gave similar average values for Watershed 6 430 and 410 eq SO{sub 4}{sup =}/ha-yr, respectively, for this 23-year period. Dry deposition contributed about 37% of total S deposition, varying from 12% in 1964-65 to 61% in 1983-84. Long-term data from 'replicated' watershed-ecosystems showed that temporal variability in estimates of dry deposition was considerably greater than spatial (between watersheds) variability.

  7. Swimming behaviour and ascent paths of brook trout in a corrugated culvert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerig, Elsa; Bergeron, Normand E.; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2017-01-01

    Culverts may restrict fish movements under some hydraulic conditions such as shallow flow depths or high velocities. Although swimming capacity imposes limits to passage performance, behaviour also plays an important role in the ability of fish to overcome velocity barriers. Corrugated metal culverts are characterized by unsteady flow and existence of low‐velocity zones, which can improve passage success. Here, we describe swimming behaviour and ascent paths of 148 wild brook trout in a 1.5‐m section of a corrugated metal culvert located in Raquette Stream, Québec, Canada. Five passage trials were conducted in mid‐August, corresponding to specific mean cross‐sectional flow velocities ranging from 0.30 to 0.63 m/s. Fish were individually introduced to the culvert and their movements recorded with a camera located above the water. Lateral and longitudinal positions were recorded at a rate of 3 Hz in order to identify ascent paths. These positions were related to the distribution of flow depths and velocities in the culvert. Brook trout selected flow velocities from 0.2 to 0.5 m/s during their ascents, which corresponded to the available flow velocities in the culvert at the low‐flow conditions. This however resulted in the use of low‐velocity zones at higher flows, mainly located along the walls of the culvert. Some fish also used the corrugations for sheltering, although the behaviour was marginal and did not occur at the highest flow condition. This study improves knowledge on fish behaviour during culvert ascents, which is an important aspect for developing reliable and accurate estimates of fish passage ability.

  8. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  9. A Statistical Analysis of the Relationship of Distance and Mode of Transportation on Length of Stay at Brooke Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hagen, John

    1997-01-01

    .... Transportation Command's (TRANSCOM) aeromedical evacuation system, to determine their influence on length of hospital stay at Brooke Army Medical Center in FY 1996 in order to better understand the irnpact these patients have on utilization management...

  10. The effects of varied densities on the growth and emigration of adult cutthroat trout and brook trout in fenced stream enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, D.J.; Hilderbrand, R.H.; Kershner, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of various density treatments on adult fish growth and emigration rates between Bonneville cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki utah and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in stream enclosures in Beaver Creek, Idaho, We used 3 density treatments (low, ambient, and high fish densities) to evaluate density-related effects and to ensure a response. Intraspecific ambient-density tests using cutthroat trout only were also performed. Results indicated an absence of cage effects in the stream enclosures and no differences in fish growth between ambient-density stream-enclosure fish and free-range fish. Brook trout outgrew and moved less than cutthroat trout in the stream enclosures, especially as density increased, In all 3 density treatments, brook trout gained more weight than cutthroat trout, with brook trout gaining weight in each density treatment and cutthroat trout losing weight at the highest density. At high densities, cutthroat trout attempted to emigrate more frequently than brook trout in sympatry and allopatry. We observed a negative correlation between growth and emigration for interspecific cutthroat trout, indicating a possible competitive response due to the presence of brook trout. We observed similar responses for weight and emigration in trials of allopatric cutthroat trout, indicating strong intraspecific effects as density increased. While cutthroat trout showed a response to experimental manipulation with brook trout at different densities, there has been long-term coexistence between these species in Beaver Creek, This system presents a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms that lead cutthroat trout to coexist with rather than be replaced by nonnative brook trout.

  11. Nitrile anion cyclization with epoxysilanes followed by Brook rearrangement/ring-opening of cyclopropane nitriles/alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Seigo; Masu, Hyuma; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Takeda, Kei

    2005-12-09

    [reactions: see text] The reaction of delta-silyl-gamma,delta-epoxypentanenitrile derivatives 9-12 with a base and an alkylating agent affords (Z)-delta-siloxy-gamma,delta-unsaturated pentanenitrile derivatives via a tandem process that involves the formation of a cyclopropane derivative by epoxy nitrile cyclization followed by Brook rearrangement and an anion-induced cleavage of the cyclopropane ring. Exclusive formation of a (Z)-derivative from trans-epoxides is explained by the reaction pathway that involves a backside displacement of the epoxide by the alpha-nitrile carbanion and the O-Si bond formation followed by concerted processes involving Brook rearrangement and the anti-mode of eliminative ring fission of the cyclopropane from the rotamer 19. The fact that (E)-isomers are exclusively obtained from cis-epoxides and alpha-cyclopropyl-alpha-silylcarbinol derivative 26 provides experimental support for the proposed pathway.

  12. Suppression of NF-κB signal pathway by NLRC3-like protein in stony coral Acropora aculeus under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Wu, Yibo; Zhang, Chengkai; Li, Can; Chen, Guangmei; Yu, Xiaopeng; Shi, Xiaowei; Xu, Yanlai; Wang, Lingui; Huang, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Heat stress is the most common factor for coral bleaching, which has increased both in frequency and severity due to global warming. In the present study, the stony coral Acropora aculeus was subjected to acute heat stress and entire transcriptomes were sequenced via the next generation sequencing platform. Four paired-end libraries were constructed and sequenced in two groups, including a control and a heat stress group. A total of 120,319,751 paired-end reads with lengths of 2 × 100 bp were assembled and 55,021 coral-derived genes were obtained. After read mapping and abundance estimation, 9110 differentially expressed genes were obtained in the comparison between the control and heat stress group, including 4465 significantly upregulated and 4645 significantly downregulated genes. Twenty-three GO terms in the Biological Process category were overrepresented for significantly upregulated genes, and divided into six groups according to their relationship. These three groups were related to the NF-κB signal pathway, and the remaining three groups were relevant for pathogen response, immunocyte activation and protein ubiquitination. Forty-three common genes were found in four GO terms, which were directly related to the NF-κB signal pathway. These included 2 NACHT, LRR, PYD domains-containing protein, 5 nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein, 29 NLRC3-like protein, 4 NLRC5-like protein, and 3 uncharacterized protein. For significantly downregulated genes, 27 overrepresented GO terms were found in the Biological Process category, which were relevant to protein ubiquitination and ATP metabolism. Our results indicate that heat stress suppressed the immune response level via the NLRC3-like protein, the fine-tuning of protein turnover activity, and ATP metabolism. This might disrupt the balance of coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis and result in the bleaching of the coral A. aculeus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing the impact of stocking northern-origin hatchery brook trout on the genetics of wild populations in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazyak, David C.; Rash, Jacob; Lubinski, Barbara A.; King, Tim L.

    2018-01-01

    The release of hatchery-origin fish into streams with endemics can degrade the genetics of wild populations if interbreeding occurs. Starting in the 1800s, brook trout descendent from wild populations in the northeastern United States were stocked from hatcheries into streams across broad areas of North America to create and enhance fishery resources. Across the southeastern United States, many millions of hatchery-origin brook trout have been released into hundreds of streams, but the extent of introgression with native populations is not well resolved despite large phylogeographic distances between these groups. We used three assessment approaches based on 12 microsatellite loci to examine the extent of hatchery introgression in 406 wild brook trout populations in North Carolina. We found high levels of differentiation among most collections (mean F′ST = 0.718), and among most wild collections and hatchery strains (mean F′ST = 0.732). Our assessment of hatchery introgression was consistent across the three metrics, and indicated that most wild populations have not been strongly influenced by supplemental stocking. However, a small proportion of wild populations in North Carolina appear to have been strongly influenced by stocked conspecifics, or in some cases, may have been founded entirely by hatchery lineages. In addition, we found significant differences in the apparent extent of hatchery introgression among major watersheds, with the Savannah River being the most strongly impacted. Conversely, populations in the Pee Dee River watershed showed little to no evidence of hatchery introgression. Our study represents the first large-scale effort to quantify the extent of hatchery introgression across brook trout populations in the southern Appalachians using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers.

  14. Role of cortisol in stocking density-induced changes in growth and metabolism of brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    Brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) held at high stocking density (SD) (120 kg/m{sup 3}) had a lower growth rate, food consumption and food conversion efficiency, and plasma thyroxine (T4) than those held at low SD (30 kg/m{sup 3}). SD had no effect on plasma triiodothyronine (T3) levels. Plasma cortisol levels in fish maintained at high SD were variable, being either lower with increased SD or not different from the low SD group. Head kidney tissue (containing the interrenal cells) preparations of brook charr held at high SD showed a higher spontaneous cortisol secretion rate. There was no difference in the clearance rate of ({sup 3}H)-cortisol from plasma, but liver from fish held at high SD showed higher cortisol uptake and catabolism, indicative of altered hepatic metabolic activity. High SD appears to alter the energy metabolism of brook charr. This was evident from significant changes between densities in levels of metabolites (plasma glucose and liver glycogen) and activities of key hepatic enzymes (PFK, HK, FBPase, G6PDH, HOAD, GK and G3PDH). These results suggests that high SD has the effect of mobilizing triglycerides, and promoting gluconeogenesis from glycerol, but has little effect on protein metabolism. When cortisol was administered to brook charr in the form of slow release intraperitoneal implants, the metabolic changes evident were similar to those observed in fish held at high SD. There was no consistent increase in plasma cortisol levels of cortisol implanted fish over a 90 day period. Nevertheless, there were significant effects, apparently cortisol-related, on certain metabolite levels (plasma glycerol, plasma glucose, hepatic glycogen), and activities of key hepatic enzymes.

  15. Sibship reconstruction for inferring mating systems, dispersal and effective population size in headwater brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yoichiro; Vokoun, Jason C.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis populations have declined in much of the native range in eastern North America and populations are typically relegated to small headwater streams in Connecticut, USA. We used sibship reconstruction to infer mating systems, dispersal and effective population size of resident (non-anadromous) brook trout in two headwater stream channel networks in Connecticut. Brook trout were captured via backpack electrofishing using spatially continuous sampling in the two headwaters (channel network lengths of 4.4 and 7.7 km). Eight microsatellite loci were genotyped in a total of 740 individuals (80–140 mm) subsampled in a stratified random design from all 50 m-reaches in which trout were captured. Sibship reconstruction indicated that males and females were both mostly polygamous although single pair matings were also inferred. Breeder sex ratio was inferred to be nearly 1:1. Few large-sized fullsib families (>3 individuals) were inferred and the majority of individuals were inferred to have no fullsibs among those fish genotyped (family size = 1). The median stream channel distance between pairs of individuals belonging to the same large-sized fullsib families (>3 individuals) was 100 m (range: 0–1,850 m) and 250 m (range: 0–2,350 m) in the two study sites, indicating limited dispersal at least for the size class of individuals analyzed. Using a sibship assignment method, the effective population size for the two streams was estimated at 91 (95%CI: 67–123) and 210 (95%CI: 172–259), corresponding to the ratio of effective-to-census population size of 0.06 and 0.12, respectively. Both-sex polygamy, low variation in reproductive success, and a balanced sex ratio may help maintain genetic diversity of brook trout populations with small breeder sizes persisting in headwater channel networks.

  16. Temperature selection of goldfish (Carassius auratus L. ) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis Mitch. ) after heterogeneous temperature acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R.

    1977-01-01

    Goldfish and brook trout were acclimated heterogeneously to temperature by exposing the head and tail simultaneously to different temperatures. The temperature selection of heterogeneously acclimated fish was tested in a vertical temperature gradient and compared to that of homogeneously acclimated fish. All fish selected temperatures essentially corresponding to the state of acclimation of their head. It is concluded that the brain acts as the main control of temperature selection in fish.

  17. Ice processes affect habitat use and movements of adult cutthroat trout and brook trout in a Wyoming foothills stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, J.W.; Hubert, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Habitat use and movements of 25 adult cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii and 25 adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis from fall through winter 2002-2003 were assessed by means of radiotelemetry in a 7-km reach of a Rocky Mountains foothills stream. Temporal dynamics of winter habitat conditions were evaluated by regularly measuring the features of 30 pools and 5 beaver Castor canadensis ponds in the study reach. Groundwater inputs at three locations raised mean daily water temperatures in the stream channel during winter to 0.2-0.6??C and kept at least 250 m of the downstream channel free of ice, but the lack of surface ice further downstream led to the occurrence of frazil ice and anchor ice in pools and unstable habitat conditions for trout. Pools in segments that were not affected by groundwater inputs and beaver ponds tended to be stable and snow accumulated on the surface ice. Pools throughout the study reach tended to become more stable as snow accumulated. Both cutthroat trout and brook trout selected beaver ponds as winter progressed but tended to use lateral scour pools in proportion to their availability. Tagged fish not in beaver ponds selected lateral scour pools that were deeper than average and stable during winter. Movement frequencies by tagged fish decreased from fall through winter, but some individuals of both species moved during winter. Ice processes affected both the habitat use and movement patterns of cutthroat trout and brook trout in this foothills stream.

  18. Invasion by nonnative brook trout in Panther Creek, Idaho: Roles of local habitat quality, biotic resistance, and connectivity to source habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Joseph R.; Dunham, Jason B.; Dare, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical models and empirical evidence suggest that the invasion of nonnative species in freshwaters is facilitated through the interaction of three factors: habitat quality, biotic resistance, and connectivity. We measured variables that represented each factor to determine which were associated with the occurrence of nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in Panther Creek, a tributary to the Salmon River, Idaho. Habitat variables included measures of summer and winter temperature, instream cover, and channel size. The abundance of native rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss within sampled sites was used as a measure of biotic resistance. We also considered the connectivity of sample sites to unconfined valley bottoms, which were considered habitats that may serve as sources for the spread of established populations of brook trout. We analyzed the occurrence of small (<150‐mm [fork length]) and large (≥150‐mm) brook trout separately, assuming that the former represents an established invasion while accounting for the higher potential mobility of the latter. The occurrence of small brook trout was strongly associated with the proximity of sites to large, unconstrained valley bottoms, providing evidence that such habitats may serve as sources for the spread of brook trout invasion. Within sites, winter degree‐days and maximum summer temperature were positively associated with the occurrence of small brook trout. The occurrence of large brook trout was not related to any of the variables considered, perhaps due to the difficulty of linking site‐specific habitat factors to larger and more mobile individuals. The abundance of rainbow trout was not conclusively associated with the occurrence of either small or large brook trout, providing little support for the role of biotic resistance. Overall, our results suggest that source connectivity and local habitat characteristics, but not biotic resistance, influence the establishment and spread of

  19. Can personality predict individual differences in brook trout spatial learning ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S L; Wagner, T; Gowan, C; Braithwaite, V A

    2017-08-01

    While differences in individual personality are common in animal populations, understanding the ecological significance of variation has not yet been resolved. Evidence suggests that personality may influence learning and memory; a finding that could improve our understanding of the evolutionary processes that produce and maintain intraspecific behavioural heterogeneity. Here, we tested whether boldness, the most studied personality trait in fish, could predict learning ability in brook trout. After quantifying boldness, fish were trained to find a hidden food patch in a maze environment. Stable landmark cues were provided to indicate the location of food and, at the conclusion of training, cues were rearranged to test for learning. There was a negative relationship between boldness and learning as shy fish were increasingly more successful at navigating the maze and locating food during training trials compared to bold fish. In the altered testing environment, only shy fish continued using cues to search for food. Overall, the learning rate of bold fish was found to be lower than that of shy fish for several metrics suggesting that personality could have widespread effects on behaviour. Because learning can increase plasticity to environmental change, these results have significant implications for fish conservation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mercury speciation comparison. BrooksApplied Laboratories and Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-16

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences (FGS), Inc. in Bothell, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Program Team. These samples were analyzed for seven species including: total mercury, dissolved mercury, inorganic mercury ((Hg(I) and Hg(II)), elemental mercury, methylmercury, ethylmercury, and dimethylmercury, with an eighth species, particulate mercury, calculated from the difference between total and dissolved mercury after subtracting the elemental mercury. The species fraction of total mercury measured has ranged broadly from a low of 32% to a high of 146%, though the vast majority of samples have been <100%. This can be expected since one is summing multiple values that each have at least a ± 20% measurement uncertainty. Two liquid waste tanks particularly important to understanding the distribution of mercury species in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm were selected for a round robin analysis by Eurofins FGS and BrooksApplied Laboratories (BAL). The analyses conducted by BAL on the Tank 22 and 38 samples and their agreement with those obtained from Eurofins FGS for total mercury, dissolved mercury, methylmercury, ethylmercury, and dimethylmercury provide a strong degree of confidence in these species measurements

  1. Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the lower Sheffield Brook floodplain, Wayne, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    Prior to 1971, the W.R. Grace Company processed and stored radioactive materials at Wayne, New Jersey, under license to the Atomic Energy Commission. Decontamination of structures and storage of waste materials on the property at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) took place in 1974. Surveys by the State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and by Oak Ridge Associated Universities for the NRC in 1982 indicated that properties adjacent to the WISS contained surface contamination by radioactive residuals in amounts exceeding those acceptable under US Department of Energy (DOE) remedial action guidelines. At the request of DOE, remedial actions have been conducted by Bechtel National, Inc., to remove radioactive residuals from properties adjacent to the site. It is the policy of DOE to assign an independent verification contractor to ensure the effectiveness of remedial actions performed within the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This report describes the methods and results of those studies that were conducted by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the lower Sheffield Brook floodplain west of the WISS. Based upon post-remedial action and verification survey data, it was concluded that residual soil concentrations and gamma levels following excavation and backfilling of the area are within the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines. 12 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  3. Can personality predict individual differences in brook trout spatial learning ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S.L.; Wagner, Tyler; Gowan, C.; Braithwaite, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    While differences in individual personality are common in animal populations, understanding the ecological significance of variation has not yet been resolved. Evidence suggests that personality may influence learning and memory; a finding that could improve our understanding of the evolutionary processes that produce and maintain intraspecific behavioural heterogeneity. Here, we tested whether boldness, the most studied personality trait in fish, could predict learning ability in brook trout. After quantifying boldness, fish were trained to find a hidden food patch in a maze environment. Stable landmark cues were provided to indicate the location of food and, at the conclusion of training, cues were rearranged to test for learning. There was a negative relationship between boldness and learning as shy fish were increasingly more successful at navigating the maze and locating food during training trials compared to bold fish. In the altered testing environment, only shy fish continued using cues to search for food. Overall, the learning rate of bold fish was found to be lower than that of shy fish for several metrics suggesting that personality could have widespread effects on behaviour. Because learning can increase plasticity to environmental change, these results have significant implications for fish conservation.

  4. Hiding in Plain Sight: A Case for Cryptic Metapopulations in Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Kazyak

    Full Text Available A fundamental issue in the management and conservation of biodiversity is how to define a population. Spatially contiguous fish occupying a stream network have often been considered to represent a single, homogenous population. However, they may also represent multiple discrete populations, a single population with genetic isolation-by-distance, or a metapopulation. We used microsatellite DNA and a large-scale mark-recapture study to assess population structure in a spatially contiguous sample of Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis, a species of conservation concern. We found evidence for limited genetic exchange across small spatial scales and in the absence of barriers to physical movement. Mark-recapture and stationary passive integrated transponder antenna records demonstrated that fish from two tributaries very seldom moved into the opposite tributary, but movements between the tributaries and mainstem were more common. Using Bayesian genetic clustering, we identified two genetic groups that exhibited significantly different growth rates over three years of study, yet survival rates were very similar. Our study highlights the importance of considering the possibility of multiple genetically distinct populations occurring within spatially contiguous habitats, and suggests the existence of a cryptic metapopulation: a spatially continuous distribution of organisms exhibiting metapopulation-like behaviors.

  5. Mercury speciation comparison. BrooksApplied Laboratories and Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences (FGS), Inc. in Bothell, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Program Team. These samples were analyzed for seven species including: total mercury, dissolved mercury, inorganic mercury ((Hg(I) and Hg(II)), elemental mercury, methylmercury, ethylmercury, and dimethylmercury, with an eighth species, particulate mercury, calculated from the difference between total and dissolved mercury after subtracting the elemental mercury. The species fraction of total mercury measured has ranged broadly from a low of 32% to a high of 146%, though the vast majority of samples have been <100%. This can be expected since one is summing multiple values that each have at least a ± 20% measurement uncertainty. Two liquid waste tanks particularly important to understanding the distribution of mercury species in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm were selected for a round robin analysis by Eurofins FGS and BrooksApplied Laboratories (BAL). The analyses conducted by BAL on the Tank 22 and 38 samples and their agreement with those obtained from Eurofins FGS for total mercury, dissolved mercury, methylmercury, ethylmercury, and dimethylmercury provide a strong degree of confidence in these species measurements

  6. Summer temperature metrics for predicting brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distribution in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Donna; Butryn, Ryan S.; Rizzo, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a methodology to predict brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distribution using summer temperature metrics as predictor variables. Our analysis used long-term fish and hourly water temperature data from the Dog River, Vermont (USA). Commonly used metrics (e.g., mean, maximum, maximum 7-day maximum) tend to smooth the data so information on temperature variation is lost. Therefore, we developed a new set of metrics (called event metrics) to capture temperature variation by describing the frequency, area, duration, and magnitude of events that exceeded a user-defined temperature threshold. We used 16, 18, 20, and 22°C. We built linear discriminant models and tested and compared the event metrics against the commonly used metrics. Correct classification of the observations was 66% with event metrics and 87% with commonly used metrics. However, combined event and commonly used metrics correctly classified 92%. Of the four individual temperature thresholds, it was difficult to assess which threshold had the “best” accuracy. The 16°C threshold had slightly fewer misclassifications; however, the 20°C threshold had the fewest extreme misclassifications. Our method leveraged the volumes of existing long-term data and provided a simple, systematic, and adaptable framework for monitoring changes in fish distribution, specifically in the case of irregular, extreme temperature events.

  7. Observations of Inland Snowpack-driven Bromine Chemistry near the Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, P.; Pöhler, D.; Sihler, H.; Zielcke, J.; S., General; Friess, U.; Platt, U.; Simpson, W. R.; Nghiem, S. V.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Pratt, K.

    2017-12-01

    The snowpack produces high amounts of reactive bromine in the polar regions during spring. The resulting atmospheric bromine chemistry depletes boundary layer ozone to near-zero levels and alters oxidation of atmospheric pollutants, particularly elemental mercury. To improve our understanding of the spatial extent of this bromine chemistry in Arctic coastal regions, the Purdue Airborne Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (ALAR), equipped with the Heidelberg Imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument, measured the spatial distribution of BrO, an indicator of active bromine chemistry, over northern Alaska during the March 2012 BRomine Ozone Mercury Experiment (BROMEX). Here we show that this bromine chemistry, commonly associated with snow-covered sea ice regions in the Arctic Ocean, is active 200 km inland in the foothills of the Brooks Range. Profiles retrieved from limb-viewing measurements show this event was located near the snowpack surface, with measured BrO mole ratios of 20 pmol mol-1 in a 500 m thick layer. This observed bromine chemistry is likely enabled by deposition of transported sea salt aerosol or gas phase bromine species from prior activation events to the snowpack. These observations of halogen activation hundreds of km from the coast suggest the impacts of this springtime bromine chemistry are not restricted to sea ice regions and directly adjacent coastal regions.

  8. Nesting by Golden Eagles on the North Slope of the Brooks Range in Northeastern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Donald D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Bente, Peter J.; McCabe, Thomas R.; Ambrose, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-two Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories and 31 occupied eagle nests were documented on the north slope of the Brooks Range in northeastern Alaska, 1988-1990, in an area previously thought to be marginal breeding habitat for eagles. The mean number of young/successful nest was 1.25 in 1988, 1.27 in 1989, and 1.13 in 1990; means did not differ significantly among years. Eighty percent (20/25) of the nestlings for which age was estimated were assumed to have successfully fledged. Nesting success was 79% (11/14) in 1989, the only year nesting success could be determined. Laying dates ranged from 23 March (1990) to 11 May (1989) with mean estimated laying dates differing significantly among years. Annual variation in nesting phenology coincided with annual differences in snow accumulations during spring. These results indicate that Golden Eagles consistently and successfully breed at the northern extent of their range in Alaska, although, productivity may be lower than that for eagles at more southern latitudes.

  9. New nanomaterials for applications in conservation and restoration of stony materials: A review; Revisión de los nuevos nanomateriales para la conservación y restauración del material pétreo.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Fernandez, A.; Gomez-Villalba, L.S.; Rabanal, M.E.; Fort, R.

    2017-07-01

    In recent times, nanomaterials have been applied in the construction and maintenance of the world's cultural heritage with the aim of improving the consolidation and protection treatments of damaged stone. These nanomaterials include important advantages that could solve many problems found in the traditional interventions. The present paper aims to carry out a review of the state of art on the application of nanotechnology to the conservation and restoration of the stony cultural heritage. We highlight the different types of nanoparticles currently used to produce conservation treatments with enhanced material properties and novel functionalities.

  10. In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 23; Issue 3 ... Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA; Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography Memorial University St. John's NL Canada AIB 3X7; Department of ...

  11. New results for virial coefficients of hard spheres in D dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nathan Clisby1 Barry M McCoy2. ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, 139 Barry Street, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia; C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840, USA ...

  12. Integrative genomics approaches validate PpYUC11-like as candidate gene for the stony hard trait in peach (P. persica L. Batsch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilli, Marco; Giovannini, Daniela; Ciacciulli, Angelo; Chiozzotto, Remo; Gattolin, Stefano; Rossini, Laura; Liverani, Alessandro; Bassi, Daniele

    2018-05-18

    Texture is one of the most important fruit quality attributes. In peach, stony hard (SH) is a recessive monogenic trait (hd/hd) that confers exceptionally prolonged firm flesh to fully ripe fruit. Previous studies have shown that the SH mutation affects the fruit ability to synthesize appropriate amounts of indol-3-acetic acid (IAA), which orchestrates the ripening processes through the activation of system 2 ethylene pathway. Allelic variation in a TC microsatellite located within the first intron of PpYUC11-like (a YUCCA-like auxin-biosynthesis gene) has been recently proposed as the causal mutation of the SH phenotype. The simple genetic determinism of the SH trait has been clarified through genome-wide association and LD analyses in a diverse set of accessions, restricting the hd locus to an interval of about 1.8 Mbp in chromosome 6. The comparison of fruit transcriptome data from non-SH (melting flesh) and SH accessions provided an expression patterns overview of the annotated transcripts within the hd locus, confirming the absence of PpYUC11-like expression in SH fruits. To explore further possible associations between genomic variants at the hd locus and the SH phenotype, re-sequencing data of the SH accession 'D41-62' were compared with several SH and non-SH accessions with different genetic backgrounds. A further step of validation was provided through the evaluation of variant-trait association in two bi-parental F 2 populations issued from the SH accession 'D41-62' and a panel of advanced breeding selections, showing perfect co-segregation of the PpYUC11-like intron TC 20 allele and the SH phenotype. In this study, we provide a multi-level validation of the genetic control of the SH trait through the integration of genome-wide association mapping, transcriptome analysis and whole-genome resequencing data for SH and non-SH accessions, and marker-trait association in a panel of advanced breeding selections and segregating progenies. Collectively, our data

  13. Nucleotide variation in the mitochondrial genome provides evidence for dual routes of postglacial recolonization and genetic recombination in the northeastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, B L; Perry, R C; Barron, J L; Marshall, H D

    2012-09-26

    Levels and patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation were examined to investigate the population structure and possible routes of postglacial recolonization of the world's northernmost native populations of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), which are found in Labrador, Canada. We analyzed the sequence diversity of a 1960-bp portion of the mitochondrial genome (NADH dehydrogenase 1 gene and part of cytochrome oxidase 1) of 126 fish from 32 lakes distributed throughout seven regions of northeastern Canada. These populations were found to have low levels of mtDNA diversity, a characteristic trait of populations at northern extremes, with significant structuring at the level of the watershed. Upon comparison of northeastern brook trout sequences to the publicly available brook trout whole mitochondrial genome (GenBank AF154850), we infer that the GenBank sequence is from a fish whose mtDNA has recombined with that of Arctic charr (S. alpinus). The haplotype distribution provides evidence of two different postglacial founding groups contributing to present-day brook trout populations in the northernmost part of their range; the evolution of the majority of the haplotypes coincides with the timing of glacier retreat from Labrador. Our results exemplify the strong influence that historical processes such as glaciations have had on shaping the current genetic structure of northern species such as the brook trout.

  14. Sex Chromosome Evolution, Heterochiasmy, and Physiological QTL in the Salmonid Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben J.G. Sutherland

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome duplication (WGD can have large impacts on genome evolution, and much remains unknown about these impacts. This includes the mechanisms of coping with a duplicated sex determination system and whether this has an impact on increasing the diversity of sex determination mechanisms. Other impacts include sexual conflict, where alleles having different optimums in each sex can result in sequestration of genes into nonrecombining sex chromosomes. Sex chromosome development itself may involve sex-specific recombination rate (i.e., heterochiasmy, which is also poorly understood. The family Salmonidae is a model system for these phenomena, having undergone autotetraploidization and subsequent rediploidization in most of the genome at the base of the lineage. The salmonid master sex determining gene is known, and many species have nonhomologous sex chromosomes, putatively due to transposition of this gene. In this study, we identify the sex chromosome of Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis and compare sex chromosome identities across the lineage (eight species and four genera. Although nonhomology is frequent, homologous sex chromosomes and other consistencies are present in distantly related species, indicating probable convergence on specific sex and neo-sex chromosomes. We also characterize strong heterochiasmy with 2.7-fold more crossovers in maternal than paternal haplotypes with paternal crossovers biased to chromosome ends. When considering only rediploidized chromosomes, the overall heterochiasmy trend remains, although with only 1.9-fold more recombination in the female than the male. Y chromosome crossovers are restricted to a single end of the chromosome, and this chromosome contains a large interspecific inversion, although its status between males and females remains unknown. Finally, we identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for 21 unique growth, reproductive, and stress-related phenotypes to improve knowledge of the genetic

  15. Metallothionein in brook trout (Salvenlinus fontinalis) as a biological indicator of cadmium stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.J.; Mehrle, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    A cadmium-saturation technique for quantifying metallothionein in mammalian tissues was evaluated for use in fish tissue. Metallothionein characteristically binds 7 gram-atoms of a metal such as cadmium per mole of protein so saturating MT with respect to one metal and then quantifying that metal would thus result in the indirect quantification of MT. The authors administered 3 mg 109 cadmium/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection over a 5-day period to adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis to induce MT in liver and kidney tissues. Homogenates were centrifuged and the supernatant was used to quantitate cadmium in three fractions: 100,000 g supernatant, cadmium-saturated MT, and unsaturated MT. The cadmium-saturated MT method involved the following steps: saturation of MT in an aliquot of 100,000 g supernatant with excess cadmium; removal of excess cadmium by addition of 2% hemoglobin; denaturation of hemoglobin by heating at 100 0 C followed by rapid cooling on ice; centrifugation at 10,000 g; digestion of an aliquot of supernatant in concentrated nitric acid for 16 hours at 70 0 C, and quantification of cadmium by atomic absorption and graphite furnace techniques or radiometric measurement with a scintillation counter. The cadmium saturation technique was modified in two ways so the amount of cadmium bound to unsaturated MT could be measured; first, the binding sites on MT were not saturated with excess cadmium, and second, the concentration of hemoglobin added to remove free cadmium and aid in coagulating low-molecular-weight proteins was 1% instead of 2%. The method gave precise measurements of MT concentrations when aliquots of liver homogenate which were analyzed separately were quantified by atomic absorption or radiometric measurements. Two to four times more cadmium and MT concentrated in the liver of treated fish than in the kidney

  16. Genetically based population divergence in overwintering energy mobilization in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, Amélie; Bernatchez, Louis; Garant, Dany; Audet, Céline

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the nature of physiological traits potentially related to fitness is important towards a better understanding of how species and/or populations may respond to selective pressures imposed by contrasting environments. In northern species in particular, the ability to mobilize energy reserves to compensate for the low external energy intake during winter is crucial. However, the phenotypic and genetic bases of energy reserve accumulation and mobilization have rarely been investigated, especially pertaining to variation in strategy adopted by different populations. In the present study, we documented variation in several energy reserve variables and estimated their quantitative genetic basis to test the null hypothesis of no difference in variation at those traits among three strains of brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) and their reciprocal hybrids. Our results indicate that the strategy of winter energy preparation and mobilization was specific to each strain, whereby (1) domestic fish accumulated a higher amount of energy reserves before winter and kept accumulating liver glycogen during winter despite lower feeding; (2) Laval fish used liver glycogen and lipids during winter and experienced a significant decrease in condition factor; (3) Rupert fish had relatively little energy reserves accumulated at the end of fall and preferentially mobilized visceral fat during winter. Significant heritability for traits related to the accumulation and use of energy reserves was found in the domestic and Laval but not in the Rupert strain. Genetic and phenotypic correlations also varied among strains, which suggested population-specific genetic architecture underlying the expression of these traits. Hybrids showed limited evidence of non-additive effects. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of a genetically based-and likely adaptive-population-specific strategy for energy mobilization related to overwinter survival.

  17. Effect of slope and stoniness on the distribution of rainwater, its quantification and application to the study of vegetation in arid zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Salas Pascual

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For the correct distribution of vegetation in an area, it is essential to manage accurate information on the variables that condition information. Most likely, the parameter that determines further the type of vegetation that can grow in one place is the amount of water available to plants. In this sense, and leaving aside the formations linked to watercourses, lakes, etc., the main source of this resource is the rain. Thus, the study of the distribution of vegetation in any territory is closely related to the analysis of rainfall it receives. To know the amount of rainwater that receives a zone always uses data provided by meteorological stations located in the same. The data collected by these stations are applied to a hypothetical, uniform and flat surface. This information is accurate enough when the scale at which it works is small (1: 100,000, 1: 50,000, but when it requires greater detail, especially in arid areas where the vegetation structure is open and the soil directly receives much of the rainfall, soil conditions exist that determine the distribution of rainwater and therefore access to this resource plants. Two of these variables, perhaps the most important are the inclination and the presence of rocky outcrops or stoniness on the floor. In short, our job is to propose different mathematical models that allow to know the actual amount of water available to plants, we call A. This value is obtained from rainfall data (P, relating to the sloping terrain and the percentage of it occupied by rocks (af. The relationship  between precipitation and tilt gives us a value we call the real precipitation (P', which is lower the greater the inclination, since the amount of rainfall should be distributed over a larger area. The amount of rocky outcrop increases runoff, accumulating water in the earthy areas between the rocks, so a higher percentage of stoniness in soil involves an accumulation of water in the surrounding soil. Thus a model

  18. Organic Compounds in Running Gutter Brook Water Used for Public Supply near Hatfield, Massachusetts, 2003-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Trombley, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The 258 organic compounds studied in this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment generally are man-made, including pesticides, solvents, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal-care and domestic-use products, and pavement and combustion-derived compounds. Of these 258 compounds, 26 (about 10 percent) were detected at least once among the 31 samples collected approximately monthly during 2003-05 at the intake of a flowthrough reservoir on Running Gutter Brook in Massachusetts, one of several community water systems on tributaries of the Connecticut River. About 81 percent of the watershed is forested, 14 percent is agricultural land, and 5 percent is urban land. In most source-water samples collected at Running Gutter Brook, fewer compounds were detected and their concentrations were low (less than 0.1 micrograms per liter) when compared with compounds detected at other stream sites across the country that drain watersheds that have a larger percentage of agricultural and urban areas. The relatively few compounds detected at low concentrations reflect the largely undeveloped land use at Running Gutter Brook. Despite the absence of wastewater discharge points on the stream, however, the compounds that were detected could indicate different sources and uses (point sources, precipitation, domestic, and agricultural) and different pathways to drinking-water supplies (overland runoff, groundwater discharge, leaking of treated water from distribution lines, and formation during treatment). Six of the 10 compounds detected most commonly (in at least 20 percent of the samples) in source water also were detected commonly in finished water (after treatment but prior to distribution). Concentrations in source and finished water generally were below 0.1 micrograms per liter and always less than humanhealth benchmarks, which are available for about one-half of the compounds detected. On the basis of this screening-level assessment, adverse effects to human health are expected to be

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (TOWNTH00290037) on Town Highway 29, crossing Mill Brook, Townshend, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R.L.; Medalie, Laura

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOWNTH00290037 on Town Highway 29 crossing Mill Brook, Townshend, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  20. Use of the E. J. Brooks 'Multi-Lok' for material safeguards at the Y- 12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has begun using the E. J. Brooks 'Multi-Lok' as the replacement of the cup seal. The cup seal in previous years of usage has proved to be difficult to apply and verify, along with easily broken during handling. Replacement of the cup seal with the Multi-Lok has resulted in operations satisfaction in ease of application and verification. Inadvertent breakage of the previous fragile seal has been completely eliminated. Cost savings are abundant. The final result is customer satisfaction with optimum product performance

  1. Geomorphic, flood, and groundwater-flow characteristics of Bayfield Peninsula streams, Wisconsin, and implications for brook-trout habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Peppler, Marie C.; Saad, David A.; Pratt, Dennis M.; Lenz, Bernard N.

    2015-01-01

    In 2002–03, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geomorphic, flood, and groundwater-flow characteristics of five Bayfield Peninsula streams, Wisconsin (Cranberry River, Bark River, Raspberry River, Sioux River, and Whittlesey Creek) to determine the physical limitations for brook-trout habitat. The goals of the study were threefold: (1) to describe geomorphic characteristics and processes, (2) to determine how land-cover characteristics affect flood peaks, and (3) to determine how regional groundwater flow patterns affect base flow.

  2. K-Ar geochronology of the Survey Pass, Ambler River and Eastern Baird Mountains quadrangles, southwestern Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, R.B.; Mayfield, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    We report 76 previously unpublished K-Ar mineral ages from 47 metamorphic and igneous rocks in the southwestern Brooks Range. The pattern of radiometric ages is complex, reflecting the complex geologic history of this area. Local and regional radiometric evidence suggests that the southern Brooks Range schist belt has, at least in part, undergone a late Precambrian metamorphism and that the parent sedimentary and igneous rocks for the metamorphic rocks dated as late Precambrian are at least this old (Precambrian Z). This schist terrane experienced a major thermal event in mid-Cretaceous time, causing widespread resetting of nearly all K-Ar mica ages. A series of apparent ages intermediate between late Precambrian and mid-Cretaceous are interpreted as indicating varying amounts of partial argon loss from older rocks during the Cretaceous event. The schist belt is characterized by dominant metasediments and subordinate metabasites and metafelsites. Blueschists occur within the schist belt from the Chandalar quadrangle westward to the Baird Mountains quadrangle, but geologic evidence does not support the existence of a fossil subduction zone.

  3. Two new species of Dendrobrachia Brook, 1889 (Cnidaria: Octocorallia: Dendrobrachiidae from the north-eastern Atlantic and western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. López-González

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Examination of recent benthic material collected during several cruises in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic and the Strait of Sicily (Mediterranean has allowed the taxonomic reassessment of some previously identified specimens belonging to the monogeneric gorgonian family Dendrobrachiidae Brook, 1889. Dendrobrachia fallax Brook, 1889 is the type species of the single genus in this family, and was originally described from Ascension Island (South Atlantic. Subsequently, other authors reported the presence of this species in Cape Verde Islands (north-eastern Atlantic and some Mediterranean localities (Alboran Sea and the Strait of Sicily. The study of the specimen from the Prince of Monaco collections in Cape Verde Islands, and recently collected material from the Gulf of Cadiz (north-eastern Atlantic and in the south of Malta (Mediterranean, materials previously considered as D. fallax, allow us to recognize two undescribed species in this genus. All previous records of D. fallax from the north-eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean should be considered incorrect. Opresko and Bayer (1991 added two additional species of Dendrobrachia. Two new species are described here and compared with their congeners.

  4. Results of the radiological survey at Interstate 80, North Right of Way at Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ077)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and oil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, on the North Right of Way of Interstate 80 at Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ077), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Breaking the speed limit--comparative sprinting performance of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore; Sanz-Ronda, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Legazpi, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Sprinting behavior of free-ranging fish has long been thought to exceed that of captive fish. Here we present data from wild-caught brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), volitionally entering and sprinting against high-velocity flows in an open-channel flume. Performance of the two species was nearly identical, with the species attaining absolute speeds > 25 body lengths·s−1. These speeds far exceed previously published observations for any salmonid species and contribute to the mounting evidence that commonly accepted estimates of swimming performance are low. Brook trout demonstrated two distinct modes in the relationship between swim speed and fatigue time, similar to the shift from prolonged to sprint mode described by other authors, but in this case occurring at speeds > 19 body lengths·s−1. This is the first demonstration of multiple modes of sprint swimming at such high swim speeds. Neither species optimized for distance maximization, however, indicating that physiological limits alone are poor predictors of swimming performance. By combining distributions of volitional swim speeds with endurance, we were able to account for >80% of the variation in distance traversed by both species.

  6. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease by thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy with intravenous infusion of SUNY4001 (adenosine) in effort angina pectoris. The clinical trial report at multi-center. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Yasushi; Kodama, Kazuhisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kajiya, Teishi; Kato, Kazuzo

    2004-01-01

    Forty-four patients with effort angina pectoris were evaluated with SUNY4001 (adenosine) thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial scintigraphy to detect coronary artery disease. These patients had single-vessel disease (≥American Heart Association (AHA) 90% stenosis) in either right coronary artery (RCA) or left anterior descending (LAD). Adenosine was infused at the rate of 120 or 140 μg/kg/min for six minutes. One hundred eleven MBq of 201 Tl was injected after three minutes of the start of the infusion. The early and delayed images were obtained by SPECT imaging. The sensitivity was 94.7% at 120 μg/kg/min and 84.2% at 140 μg/kg/min. Adenosine 201 Tl myocardial scintigraphy showed high accuracy for detecting significant coronary artery disease. Adverse reactions occurred in 77.3% of the patients. Regarding the rates of the adverse reactions, there was no significant difference between 120 and 140 μg/kg/min. Major adverse reactions were Chest pain/discomfort (52.3%) and Flushing/Feeling of warmth (27.3%). No serious complication was observed at any infusion rate. Most of adverse reactions disappeared shortly. Only two patients required treatment for moderate chest pain, which, however, disappeared in several minutes. One of the treatments was merely the termination of adenosine infusion, and the other was sublingual spray of nitroglycerin. Adenosine infusion caused slight decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate. The hemodynamic changes resolved within several minutes after the adenosine infusion. Decrease in systolic blood pressure of more than 20 mmHg from the base level occurred in 26.1% and 52.4% at 120 and 140 μg/kg/min infusion rate respectively. Therefore, the adenosine infusion at 120 μg/kg/min should be considered safe and useful for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease by pharmacologic stress imaging. (author)

  7. Soil bacterial communities of a calcium-supplemented and a reference watershed at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi Sridevi; Rakesh Minocha; Swathi A. Turlapati; Katherine C. Goldfarb; Eoin L. Brodie; Louis S. Tisa; Subhash C. Minocha

    2012-01-01

    Soil Ca depletion because of acidic deposition-related soil chemistry changes has led to the decline of forest productivity and carbon sequestration in the northeastern USA. In 1999, acidic watershed (WS) 1 at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), NH, USA was amended with Ca silicate to restore soil Ca pools. In 2006, soil samples were collected from the Ca-...

  8. 75 FR 3217 - J&T Hydro Company; H. Dean Brooks and W. Bruce Cox; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 11392-009] J&T Hydro Company; H. Dean Brooks and W. Bruce Cox; Notice of Application for Transfer of License and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene January 12, 2010. On October 30, 2009, J&T Hydro Company (transferor) and...

  9. Alien invasions in aquatic ecosystems: toward an understanding of brook trout invasions and potential impacts on inland cutthroat trout in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason B. Dunham; Susan B. Adams; Robert E. Schroeter; Douglas C. Novinger

    2002-01-01

    Experience from case studies of biological invasions in aquatic ecosystems has motivated a set of proposed empirical “rules” for understanding patterns of invasion and impacts on native species. Further evidence is needed to better understand these patterns, and perhaps contribute to a useful predictive theory of invasions. We reviewed the case of brook trout (

  10. ACIDIFICATION TRENDS AND THE EVOLUTION OF NEUTRALIZATION MECHANISMS THROUGH TIME AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE (BBWM), U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paired catchment study at the forested Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) U.S.A. documents interactions among short- to long-term processes of acidification. In 1987-1989, runoff from the two catchments was nearly identical in quality and quantity. Ammonium sulfate has been...

  11. Factors affecting competitive dominance of rainbow trout over brook trout in southern Appalachian streams: Implications of an individual-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, M.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We used an individual-based model to examine possible explanations for the dominance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss over brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in southern Appalachian streams. Model simulations were used to quantify the effects on interspecific competition of (1) competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout, (2) latitudinal differences in stream temperatures, flows, and daylight, (3) year-class failures, (4) lower fecundity of brook trout, and (5) reductions in spawning habitat. The model tracks the daily spawning, growth, and survival of individuals of both species throughout their lifetime in a series of connected stream habitat units (pools, runs, or riffles). Average densities of each species based on 100-year simulations were compared for several levels of each of the five factors and for sympatric and allopatric conditions. Based on model results and empirical information, we conclude that more frequent year-class failures and the lower fecundity of brook trout are both possible and likely explanations for rainbow trout dominance, that warmer temperatures due to latitude and limited spawning habitat are possible but unlikely explanations, and that competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout is an unlikely explanation. Additional field work should focus on comparative studies of the reproductive success and the early life stage mortalities of brook and rainbow trout among Appalachian streams with varying rainbow trout dominance. 53 refs., 11 figs.

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SPRING BROOK MOBILE HOME PARK IN WALES, ME SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Spring Brook Mobile Home Park in Wales, ME. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiv...

  13. Long-term calcium addition increases growth release, wound closure, and health of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) trees at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett A. Huggett; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Christopher Eager

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed and wounded forest-grown sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) trees in a long-term, replicated Ca manipulation study at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. Plots received applications of Ca (to boost Ca availability above depleted ambient levels) or A1 (to compete with Ca uptake and further reduce Ca availability...

  14. Twenty-year inter-annual trends and seasonal variations in precipitation and stream water chemistry at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Norton, S. A.; Fernandez, I. J.; Nelson, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 171, 1/4 (2010), s. 23-45 ISSN 0167-6369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Bear Brook Watershed in Maine * precipitation chemistry * stream chemistry * seasonality * long-term trends Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2010

  15. The Missing Main Effect of Welfare State Regimes: A Replication of ‘Social Policy Responsiveness in Developed Democracies’ by Brooks and Manza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nate Breznau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the results of a replication of Brooks and Manza's "Social Policy Responsiveness in Developed Democracies" published in 2006 in the American Sociological Review. The article finds that Brooks and Manza utilized an interaction term but excluded the main effect of one of the interacted variables. This model specification has specific implications: statistically, that the omitted main effect variable has no correlation with the residual error term from their regression; theoretically speaking, this means that all unobserved historical, cultural, and other characteristics that distinguish liberal democratic welfare regimes from others can be accounted for with a handful of quantitative measures. Using replicated data, this article finds that the Brooks and Manza models fail these assumptions. A sensitivity analysis using more than 800 regressions with different configurations of variables confirms this. In 99.5 percent of the cases, addition of the main effect removes Brooks and Manza's empirical findings completely. A theoretical discussion illuminates why these findings are not surprising. This article provides a reminder that models and theories are coterminous, each implied by the other.

  16. Invasion by non-native brook trout in Panther Creek, Idaho: Roles of habitat quality, biotic resistance, and connectivity to source habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph R. Benjamin; Jason B. Dunham; Matthew R. Dare

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical models and empirical evidence suggest that the invasion of nonnative species in freshwaters is facilitated through the interaction of three factors: habitat quality, biotic resistance, and connectivity. We measured variables that represented each factor to determine which were associated with the occurrence of nonnative brook trout Salvelinus...

  17. Soilaluminum, iron, and phosphorus dynamics in response to long-term experimental nitrogen and sulfur additions at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica Sherman; Ivan J. Fernandez; Stephen A. Norton; Tsutomu Ohno; Lindsey E. Rustad

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) containing compounds affects soil chemistry in forested ecosystems through (1) acidification and the depletion of base cations, (2) metal mobilization, particularly aluminum (Al), and iron (Fe), (3) phosphorus (P) mobilization, and (4) N accumulation. The Bear BrookWatershed in Maine (BBWM) is a long-term paired...

  18. Assessing Wetland Hydroperiod and Soil Moisture With Remote Sensing: A Demonstration for the NASA Plum Brook Station Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Colin; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura; Endres, Sarah; Battaglia, Michael; Shuchman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Primary Goal: Assist with the evaluation and measuring of wetlands hydroperiod at the PlumBrook Station using multi-source remote sensing data as part of a larger effort on projecting climate change-related impacts on the station's wetland ecosystems. MTRI expanded on the multi-source remote sensing capabilities to help estimate and measure hydroperiod and the relative soil moisture of wetlands at NASA's Plum Brook Station. Multi-source remote sensing capabilities are useful in estimating and measuring hydroperiod and relative soil moisture of wetlands. This is important as a changing regional climate has several potential risks for wetland ecosystem function. The year two analysis built on the first year of the project by acquiring and analyzing remote sensing data for additional dates and types of imagery, combined with focused field work. Five deliverables were planned and completed: 1) Show the relative length of hydroperiod using available remote sensing datasets 2) Date linked table of wetlands extent over time for all feasible non-forested wetlands 3) Utilize LIDAR data to measure topographic height above sea level of all wetlands, wetland to catchment area radio, slope of wetlands, and other useful variables 4) A demonstration of how analyzed results from multiple remote sensing data sources can help with wetlands vulnerability assessment 5) A MTRI style report summarizing year 2 results. This report serves as a descriptive summary of our completion of these our deliverables. Additionally, two formal meetings were held with Larry Liou and Amanda Sprinzl to provide project updates and receive direction on outputs. These were held on 2/26/15 and 9/17/15 at the Plum Brook Station. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a multivariate statistical technique used to identify dominant spatial and temporal backscatter signatures. PCA reduces the information contained in the temporal dataset to the first few new Principal Component (PC) images. Some advantages of PCA

  19. Sex reversal of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) by 17α-methyltestosterone exposure: A serial experimental approach to determine optimal timing and delivery regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Shafaq; Adams, Mark; Wilkinson, Ryan

    2016-12-01

    Commercial culture of Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in Tasmania was partly abandoned due to sexual maturation of male fish early on during the estuarine rearing phase. Maturation adversely affects body mass, flesh quality and immunocompetency effectively. Sex reversal techniques such as the in-feed addition of a synthetic androgen have proven difficult to adapt in brook trout. An appropriate timing, duration and delivery vehicle for administration of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) to produce phenotypic males (neomales) from genotypically female brook trout required further investigation. In this study, groups of brook trout eggs (n=1000) maintained at 9.5±0.15-10±0.14°C, were immersed in MT (400μgL -1 ) for four hours on two alternate days (two immersions/group) staggered over a two week period surrounding the hatch of embryos (control groups excluded). The groups were then split and half received MT-supplemented feed for 60days and the other a standard diet. Following an 11 month on-growing period sex phenotypes were determined by gross & histological gonad morphology. The highest proportion of male phenotypes (75%) was found in fish immersed six and four days pre-hatch and subsequently fed a normal diet. Fish fed a MT supplemented diet and immersed in MT showed significantly higher proportions of sterile fish. These data indicate that a pre-hatch immersion-only regime (4-6days pre-hatch at 9.5°C) should be pursued as a target for optimization studies to further refine the effective concentration and duration of exposure to MT for the successful production of neo-male brook trout. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8, (MANCTH00060008) on Town Highway 6, crossing Bourn Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCTH00060008 on Town Highway 6 crossing Bourn Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30, (HUNTTH00220030), on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220030 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16, (NEWBTH00500016) on Town Highway 50, crossing Halls Brook, Newbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWBTH00500016 on Town Highway 50 crossing Halls Brook, Newbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37, (BRNETH00740037) on Town Highway 74, crossing South Peacham Brook, Barnet, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRNETH00740037 on Town Highway 74 crossing South Peacham Brook, Barnet, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  4. Theoretical Insight Into the Empirical Tortuosity-Connectivity Factor in the Burdine-Brooks-Corey Water Relative Permeability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Ioannidis, Marios A.; Hunt, Allen G.

    2017-12-01

    A model commonly applied to the estimation of water relative permeability krw in porous media is the Burdine-Brooks-Corey model, which relies on a simplified picture of pores as a bundle of noninterconnected capillary tubes. In this model, the empirical tortuosity-connectivity factor is assumed to be a power law function of effective saturation with an exponent (μ) commonly set equal to 2 in the literature. Invoking critical path analysis and using percolation theory, we relate the tortuosity-connectivity exponent μ to the critical scaling exponent t of percolation that characterizes the power law behavior of the saturation-dependent electrical conductivity of porous media. We also discuss the cause of the nonuniversality of μ in terms of the nonuniversality of t and compare model estimations with water relative permeability from experiments. The comparison supports determining μ from the electrical conductivity scaling exponent t, but also highlights limitations of the model.

  5. Chromosomal characteristics and distribution of rDNA sequences in the brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska-Jewsiewicka, A; Kuciński, M; Kirtiklis, L; Dobosz, S; Ocalewicz, K; Jankun, Malgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814) chromosomes have been analyzed using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques enabling characteristics and chromosomal location of heterochromatin, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), ribosomal RNA-encoding genes and telomeric DNA sequences. The C-banding and chromosome digestion with the restriction endonucleases demonstrated distribution and heterogeneity of the heterochromatin in the brook trout genome. DNA sequences of the ribosomal RNA genes, namely the nucleolus-forming 28S (major) and non-nucleolus-forming 5S (minor) rDNAs, were physically mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and primed in situ labelling. The minor rDNA locus was located on the subtelo-acrocentric chromosome pair No. 9, whereas the major rDNA loci were dispersed on 14 chromosome pairs, showing a considerable inter-individual variation in the number and location. The major and minor rDNA loci were located at different chromosomes. Multichromosomal location (3-6 sites) of the NORs was demonstrated by silver nitrate (AgNO3) impregnation. All Ag-positive i.e. active NORs corresponded to the GC-rich blocks of heterochromatin. FISH with telomeric probe showed the presence of the interstitial telomeric site (ITS) adjacent to the NOR/28S rDNA site on the chromosome 11. This ITS was presumably remnant of the chromosome rearrangement(s) leading to the genomic redistribution of the rDNA sequences. Comparative analysis of the cytogenetic data among several related salmonid species confirmed huge variation in the number and the chromosomal location of rRNA gene clusters in the Salvelinus genome.

  6. Fine-scale population structure and riverscape genetics of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distributed continuously along headwater channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yoichiro; Vokoun, Jason C.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    Linear and heterogeneous habitat makes headwater stream networks an ideal ecosystem in which to test the influence of environmental factors on spatial genetic patterns of obligatory aquatic species. We investigated fine-scale population structure and influence of stream habitat on individual-level genetic differentiation in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) by genotyping eight microsatellite loci in 740 individuals in two headwater channel networks (7.7 and 4.4 km) in Connecticut, USA. A weak but statistically significant isolation-by-distance pattern was common in both sites. In the field, many tagged individuals were recaptured in the same 50-m reaches within a single field season (summer to fall). One study site was characterized with a hierarchical population structure, where seasonal barriers (natural falls of 1.5–2.5 m in height during summer base-flow condition) greatly reduced gene flow and perceptible spatial patterns emerged because of the presence of tributaries, each with a group of genetically distinguishable individuals. Genetic differentiation increased when pairs of individuals were separated by high stream gradient (steep channel slope) or warm stream temperature in this site, although the evidence of their influence was equivocal. In a second site, evidence for genetic clusters was weak at best, but genetic differentiation between individuals was positively correlated with number of tributary confluences. We concluded that the population-level movement of brook trout was limited in the study headwater stream networks, resulting in the fine-scale population structure (genetic clusters and clines) even at distances of a few kilometres, and gene flow was mitigated by ‘riverscape’ variables, particularly by physical barriers, waterway distance (i.e. isolation-by-distance) and the presence of tributaries.

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from BROOKE using BT and XBT casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 October 1975 to 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 8900225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the BROOKE in the North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean. Data were...

  8. Cities, Towns and Villages, City limit boundaries for all municipalities in Ben Hill, Brooks, Cook, Echols, Lanier, Irwin, Lowndes, Tift and Turner Counties., Published in 2010, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Cities, Towns and Villages dataset current as of 2010. City limit boundaries for all municipalities in Ben Hill, Brooks, Cook, Echols, Lanier, Irwin, Lowndes, Tift...

  9. Technical Note: Reliability of Suchey-Brooks and Buckberry-Chamberlain methods on 3D visualizations from CT and laser scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Chiara; Buckberry, Jo; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that the ageing method of Suchey-Brooks (pubic bone) and some of the features applied by Lovejoy et al. and Buckberry-Chamberlain (auricular surface) can be confidently performed on 3D visualizations from CT-scans. In this study, seven observers applied the Suchey......-Brooks and the Buckberry-Chamberlain methods on 3D visualizations based on CT-scans and, for the first time, on 3D visualizations from laser scans. We examined how the bone features can be evaluated on 3D visualizations and whether the different modalities (direct observations of bones, 3D visualization from CT......-observer agreement was obtained in the evaluation of the pubic bone in all modalities. In 3D visualizations of the auricular surfaces, transverse organization and apical changes could be evaluated, although with high inter-observer variability; micro-, macroporosity and surface texture were very difficult to score...

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (BARTTH00020008) on Town Highway 2, crossing Roaring Brook, Barton, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BARTTH00020008 on town highway 2 crossing Roaring Brook, Barton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province of North-central Vermont in the town of Barton. The 9.89-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have woody vegetation coverage except for the downstream left bank, which has a few trees and grass and brush coverage. In the study area, Roaring Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.019 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 35 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel/cobble (D50 is 49.1 mm or 0.161 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 18, 1994 indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. A cut-bank on the downstream right bank and overall channel configuration in the valley are indications of the lateral instability at this site. The town highway 2 crossing of Roaring Brook is a 30-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 26-foot span concrete T-beam type superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is

  11. Ecology and impacts of nonnative salmonids with special reference to brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis Mitchill) in North Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Korsu, K. (Kai)

    2008-01-01

    Abstract My main objectives in this thesis were to explore general patterns and mechanisms driving salmonid invasions globally and, more specifically, to examine the invasion dynamics and impacts of the North American brook trout in North European stream systems. Non-native salmonids have often spread extensively and caused many harmful impacts on their native counterparts. Among the three globally introduced salmonids, the European brown trout appeared as the 'worst' alien species (st...

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG), an Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein-like green-emitting fluorescent protein from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Tatsuki; Yamamura, Akihiro; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    A monomeric mutant of Azami-Green from G. fascicularis was expressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belonged to space group P1 and diffracted X-rays to 2.20 Å resolution. Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a derivative of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). mAG and avGFP are 27% identical in amino-acid sequence. Diffraction-quality crystals of recombinant mAG were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The mAG crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.20 Å resolution on beamline AR-NW12A at the Photon Factory (Tsukuba, Japan). The crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.78, b = 51.72, c = 52.89 Å, α = 90.96, β = 103.41, γ = 101.79°. The Matthews coefficient (V M = 2.10 Å 3 Da −1 ) indicated that the crystal contained two mAG molecules per asymmetric unit

  13. Contributions of separate reactions to the acid-base buffering of soils in brook floodplains (Central Forest State Reserve)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, T. A.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Rusakova, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    The acid-base buffering of gleyic gray-humus soils developed in brook floodplains and undisturbed southern-taiga landscapes has been characterized by the continuous potentiometric titration of soil water suspensions. During the interaction with an acid, the major amount of protons (>80%) is consumed for the displacement of exchangeable bases and the dissolution of Ca oxalates. In the O and AY horizons, Mn compounds make the major contribution (2-15%) to the acid buffering. The buffer reactions with the participation of Al compounds make up from 0.5 to 1-2% of the total buffering capacity, and the protonation of the surface OH groups of kaolinite consumes 2-3% of the total buffering capacity. The deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of Fe hydroxides (9-43%), the deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of illite crystals (3-19%), and the dissolution of unidentified aluminosilicates (9-14%) are the most significant buffer reactions whose contributions have been quantified during the interaction with a base. The contribution of the deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of kaolinite particles is lower (1-5%) because of the small specific surface area of this mineral, and that of the dissolution of Fe compounds is insignificant. In the AY horizon, the acid and base buffering of soil in the rhizosphere is higher than beyond the rhizosphere because of the higher contents of organic matter and nonsilicate Fe and Al compounds.

  14. Patterns of δ13C and δ15N in wolverine Gulo gulo tissues from the Brooks Range, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik DALERUM

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of carnivore diets is essential to understand how carnivore populations respond demographically to variations in prey abundance. Analysis of stable isotopes is a useful complement to traditional methods of analyzing carnivore diets. We used data on d13C and d15N in wolverine tissues to investigate patterns of seasonal and annual diet variation in a wolverine Gulo gulo population in the western Brooks Range, Alaska, USA. The stable isotope ratios in wolverine tissues generally reflected that of terrestrial carnivores, corroborating previous diet studies on wolverines. We also found variation in d13C and d15N both between muscle samples collected over several years and between tissues with different assimilation rates, even after correcting for isotopic fractionation. This suggests both annual and seasonal diet variation. Our results indicate that data on d13C and d15N holds promise for qualitative assessments of wolverine diet changes over time. Such temporal variation may be important indicators of ecological responses to environmental perturbations, and we suggest that more refined studies of stable isotopes may be an important tool when studying temporal change in diets of wolverines and similar carnivores [Current Zoology 55(3: 188–192, 2009].

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (MANCUS00070024) on U.S. Route 7, crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCUS00070024 on U.S. Route 7 crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 8.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the primary surface cover consists of brush and trees. In the study area, Lye Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 66 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 6, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. Although, the immediate reach is considered stable, upstream of the bridge the Lye Brook valley is very steep (0.05 ft/ft). Extreme events in a valley this steep may quickly reveal the instability of the channel. In the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Manchester (Federal Emergency Management Agency, January, 1985), Lye Brook’s overbanks were described as “boulder strewn” after the August 1976 flood. The U.S. Route 7 crossing of Lye Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September

  16. Monitoring butterflies using counts of puddling males: A case study of the Rajah Brooke's Birdwing (Trogonoptera brookiana albescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phon, Chooi-Khim; Kirton, Laurence G; Norma-Rashid, Yusoff

    2017-01-01

    The Rajah Brooke's Birdwing, Trogonoptera brookiana, is a large, iconic butterfly that is facing heavy commercial exploitation and habitat loss. Males of some subspecies exhibit puddling behavior. A method of conservation monitoring was developed for subspecies albescens in Ulu Geroh, Peninsular Malaysia, where the males consistently puddle in single-species aggregations at stable geothermal springs, reaching well over 300 individuals when the population is at its highest. Digital photography was used to conduct counts of numbers of males puddling. The numbers of birdwings puddling were significantly correlated with counts of birdwings in flight, but were much higher. The numbers puddling during the peak hour were correlated with numbers puddling throughout the day and could be predicted using the numbers puddling at an alternative hour, enabling flexibility in the time of counts. Average counts for three images taken at each puddle at three peak hours between 1400-1600 hours over 2-3 days were used as a monthly population index. The numbers puddling were positively associated with higher relative humidity and brightness during monitoring hours. Monthly counts of birdwings from monitoring of puddles over a period of two years are presented. The minimum effort required for a monitoring program using counts of puddling males is discussed, as well as the potential of using the method to monitor other species of puddling butterflies.

  17. Physiological and biochemical responses of rainbow trout and brook trout exposed to elevated selenium from coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.; Rasmussen, J.; Hontela, A. [Lethbridge Univ., Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Palace, V.; Carroll, L. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Wang, F. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Since selenium (Se) is an element that bioaccumulates, anthropogenic activities in areas that already have high Se in parent rock can result in an increase in Se in aquatic systems. Se causes reproductive deformities in rainbow trout (RT), at lower concentrations than for brook trout (BT). This presentation reported on a study conducted at coal mines in northeastern Alberta in which juvenile hatchery-reared RT and BT were stocked into 2 reference and 2 Se contaminated end pit lakes. Fish were sampled at 0, 6, and 12 months after stocking, and will be sampled at 18 and 24 months. Water Se levels were found to be high in contaminated lakes. Selenite, the more toxic form of Se, was the highest in Pit C4. Liver glutathione levels were similar in the 2 fish species, and cellular damage in the fish was beginning to increase. At 6 months, liver glycogen levels were higher in the BT than in the RT, but no tangible site specific patterns emerged. At all sites except Pit C4, the RT were in better condition than BT. BT from Pit C4 also had a lower ability to secrete cortisol, suggesting that the elevated selenite levels may negatively affect fish. Se accumulation results from 28 fish sampled at 12 months were also discussed.

  18. Monitoring butterflies using counts of puddling males: A case study of the Rajah Brooke's Birdwing (Trogonoptera brookiana albescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chooi-Khim Phon

    Full Text Available The Rajah Brooke's Birdwing, Trogonoptera brookiana, is a large, iconic butterfly that is facing heavy commercial exploitation and habitat loss. Males of some subspecies exhibit puddling behavior. A method of conservation monitoring was developed for subspecies albescens in Ulu Geroh, Peninsular Malaysia, where the males consistently puddle in single-species aggregations at stable geothermal springs, reaching well over 300 individuals when the population is at its highest. Digital photography was used to conduct counts of numbers of males puddling. The numbers of birdwings puddling were significantly correlated with counts of birdwings in flight, but were much higher. The numbers puddling during the peak hour were correlated with numbers puddling throughout the day and could be predicted using the numbers puddling at an alternative hour, enabling flexibility in the time of counts. Average counts for three images taken at each puddle at three peak hours between 1400-1600 hours over 2-3 days were used as a monthly population index. The numbers puddling were positively associated with higher relative humidity and brightness during monitoring hours. Monthly counts of birdwings from monitoring of puddles over a period of two years are presented. The minimum effort required for a monitoring program using counts of puddling males is discussed, as well as the potential of using the method to monitor other species of puddling butterflies.

  19. Infoühiskond / Raivo Suni

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suni, Raivo, 1976-

    1999-01-01

    Infoühiskond on paradigmana sattunud sotsiaalteadlaste tähelepanu alla seoses informatsiooni plahvatusliku väärtustumisega viimastele aastatel. Ka kultuuriimperialismist, kulturoloogilisest lähenemisest. Meediatehnoloogia areng on aidanud levida väärtustel, mis varem olid kättesaadavad vaid eliidile (Walter Benjamin "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction")

  20. Spectroscopic and Microscopic Characterization of Contaminant Uptake and Retention by Carbonates in the Soil and Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, Richard J.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Hess, Wayne P.; Beck, Kenneth M.

    2003-01-01

    The research focus of this previous EMSP grant was assessment of the role that carbonate minerals play in the uptake and sequestration of metal and radionuclide contaminants in soils and the vadose zone for conditions relevant to the Hanford Site and other sites in the DOE Complex. The project was a collaboration among researchers at SUNY-Stony Brook and EMSL/PNNL. Carbonates, particularly calcite, are present in the Hanford subsurface as grain coatings, disseminated particles, and dense caliche layers. Calcite is also predicted to be forming beneath leaking tanks. A range of metal and radionuclide species that pose risks at Hanford and other DOE sites were considered, including U(VI), Cr(CV), Cs, Pb(II), and selected lanthanides (as models for trivalent actinides). Batch sorption and co-precipitation experiments of these metals with pre-equilibrated calcite and selected uptake experiments on natural caliche formed the basis to determine the mechanisms of metal/radionuclide binding and to assess the effect on the stability of the sorbed species and the potential for remobilization. Our results provide ne information that can benefit DOE clean-up methodology and potentially provide new approaches for uptake of selected heavy metals

  1. Nuclear research with heavy ions. Annual progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.

    1979-10-01

    The experimental research emphasizes the detection and measurement of light charged particles emitted in reactions between heavy ions and complex nuclei. The program involves a collaboration between Carnegie-Mellon University and SUNY at Stony Brook, and utilizes the SuperHILAC and 88'' cyclotron accelerator facilities of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Correlations between light charged particles and heavy fragments provide detailed insights into the dynamics of the reaction mechanism. The light charged particles evaporated from fully accelerated fragments yield information on the excitation energies and spins of the equilibrated reaction products, whereas those particles that are emitted prior to thermal equilibration give a view of the early stages of the reaction. Experimental results of fusion and charged particle emission cross sections are discussed for a variety of heavy ion reactions, particularly those induced by 40 Ar ions. The theoretical development of the statistical model as applied to particle evaporation is reviewed, and semiempirical methods for facilitating comparisons with experimental data are presented. Current results from singles and coincidence experiments are given in detail for reactions of 340-MeV 40 Ar with Au, and analyses of average spins and energy sharing among particles are discussed

  2. Report January 1989 - December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the experimental research of the Manchester Nuclear Physics Group for the period January 1989-December 1990. Most of the experiments have been performed at the Daresbury Nuclear Structure Facility (NSF) usually in collaboration with other groups from the U.K. and elsewhere. There have also been significant collaborations in experimental work carried out at Argonne, CERN the National Physical Laboratory, SUNY Stony Brook, the Niels Bohr Institute and Oxford. The range of contributions reflects the wide range of techniques and equipment available at the NSF and the wide range of phenomena that can be studied in the nuclear many-body system. Deformation is a recurring theme and the use of γ ray array to extend spectroscopic measurements of fission products to the neutron rich limit of known nuclei has identified 104 Zr with a first excited state energy corresponding to the largest known deformation at low spin and excitation energy. The Daresbury experiments described exploit the range of experimental equipment available at the NSF with the γ-ray array being used most frequently. EUROGAM will provide a further substantial improvement in the equipment available for these measurements and two reports describe the test made on the detectors for it

  3. Prospects for exotic beam facilities in North America

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J A

    2002-01-01

    There are several nuclear physics laboratories in North America that have on-going research using energetic and stopped radioactive beams. These include the large ISOL-type programs ISAC at TRIUMF and HRIBF at Oak Ridge and the in-flight fragmentation program at the NSCL of Michigan State University. There are also smaller, more specialized, programs using a variety of techniques at the 88-inch cyclotron of Berkeley, ATLAS at Argonne, the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University, the Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Notre Dame University, and the Nuclear Structure Laboratory at SUNY/Stony Brook. There are also three projects on the horizon in North America for new capabilities in both the near term and more distant future. The intensities of the in-flight fragment beams at the NSCL will be increased dramatically very soon as the Coupled Cyclotron Project will be completed and commissioned for research by mid-2001. A new project, ISAC-II, has been approved in Canada. For the longer term, the United State...

  4. Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.; Kaplan, E.

    1993-11-01

    Funding was provided to Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fourth quarter of FY93 to establish a regional alliance as defined by Dr. Clyde Frank during his visit to BNL on March 7, 1993. In collaboration with the Long Island Research Institute (LIRI), BNL developed a business plan for the Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Concurrently, informal discussions were initiated with representatives of the waste management industry, and meetings were held with local and state regulatory and governmental personnel to obtain their enthusiasm and involvement. A subcontract to LIRI was written to enable it to formalize interactions with companies offering new waste management technologies selected for their dual value to the DOE and local governments in the Northeast. LIRI was founded to develop and coordinate economic growth via introduction of new technologies. As a not-for-profit institution it is in an ideal position to manage the development of NEWMA through ready access to venture capital and strong interactions with the business community, universities, and BNL. Another subcontract was written with a professor at SUNY/Stony Brook to perform an evaluation of new pyrolitic processes, some of which may be appropriate for development by NEWMA. Independent endorsement of the business plan recently by another organization, GETF, with broad knowledge of DOE/EM-50 objectives, provides a further incentive for moving rapidly to implement the NEWMA strategy. This report describes progress made during the last quarter of FY93

  5. SBNCT plan: A 3-dimensional treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinstein, L.E.; Ramsay, E.B.; Gajewski, J.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Meek, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The need for accurate and comprehensive 3-dimensional treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been debated for the past several years. Although many argue against the need for elaborate and expensive treatment planning programs which mimic conventional radiotherapy planning systems, it is clear that in order to realize significant gains over conventional fractionated radiation therapy, patients must be treated to the edge of normal tissue tolerance. Just how close to this edge is dictated by the uncertainties in dosimetry. Hence the focus of BNCT planning is the determination of dose distribution throughout normal tissue volumes. Although precise geometric manipulation of the epithermal neutron beam is not achievable, the following variables play an important role in BNCT optimization: patient orientation, dose fractionation, number of fields, megawatt-minutes per fraction, use of surface bolus, and use of collimation. Other variables which are not as easily adjustable and would not, therefore, be part of treatment planning optimization, include external patient contour, internal patient heterogeneities, boron compound distributions, and RBE's. The boron neutron capture therapy planning system developed at SUNY Stony Brook (SBNCT-Plan) was designed as an interactive graphic tool to assist the radiation oncologist in generating the optimum plan for a neutron capture treatment

  6. Manifestações estomatológicas, contagem de linfócitos T-CD4+ e carga viral de crianças brasileiras e norte-americanas infectadas pelo HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRANDO Liliane Janete

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A prevalência de manifestações estomatológicas associadas à infecção pelo HIV foi avaliada em 184 crianças de ambos os sexos, da faixa etária de zero a 13 anos de idade, atendidas nos Ambulatórios de AIDS Pediátrica do Hospital São Lucas (HSL da PUCRS, e do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA da UFRGS, ambos em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil e no Centro Pediátrico para Doenças Infecciosas do Hospital Universitário e Departamento de Odontopediatria da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Estadual de Nova Iorque (SUNY em Stony Brook, Nova Iorque, EUA, no período de janeiro de 1999 a maio de 2000. A freqüência de crianças brasileiras (72,73% e norte-americanas (53,66% com manifestações estomatológicas associadas à infecção pelo HIV foi estatisticamente significativa, com destaque para linfadenopatia cérvico-facial, aumento de volume das parótidas, candidíase eritematosa, petéquias, gengivite, xerostomia e queilite angular. As crianças com manifestações estomatológicas apresentaram contagens médias de linfócitos T-CD4+ próximas à normalidade e carga viral alta.

  7. Long Island Smart Energy Corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mui, Ming [Long Island Power Authority, Uniondale, NY (United States)

    2015-02-04

    The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) has teamed with Stony Brook University (Stony Brook or SBU) and Farmingdale State College (Farmingdale or FSC), two branches of the State University of New York (SUNY), to create a “Smart Energy Corridor.” The project, located along the Route 110 business corridor on Long Island, New York, demonstrated the integration of a suite of Smart Grid technologies from substations to end-use loads. The Smart Energy Corridor Project included the following key features: -TECHNOLOGY: Demonstrated a full range of smart energy technologies, including substations and distribution feeder automation, fiber and radio communications backbone, advanced metering infrastructure (AM”), meter data management (MDM) system (which LIPA implemented outside of this project), field tools automation, customer-level energy management including automated energy management systems, and integration with distributed generation and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. -MARKETING: A rigorous market test that identified customer response to an alternative time-of-use pricing plan and varying levels of information and analytical support. -CYBER SECURITY: Tested cyber security vulnerabilities in Smart Grid hardware, network, and application layers. Developed recommendations for policies, procedures, and technical controls to prevent or foil cyber-attacks and to harden the Smart Grid infrastructure. -RELIABILITY: Leveraged new Smart Grid-enabled data to increase system efficiency and reliability. Developed enhanced load forecasting, phase balancing, and voltage control techniques designed to work hand-in-hand with the Smart Grid technologies. -OUTREACH: Implemented public outreach and educational initiatives that were linked directly to the demonstration of Smart Grid technologies, tools, techniques, and system configurations. This included creation of full-scale operating models demonstrating application of Smart Grid technologies in business and residential

  8. Light Hydrocarbons Adsorption Mechanisms in Two Calcium-based Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Plonka, Anna M.; Chen, Xianyin; Wang, Hao; Krishna, Rajamani; Dong, Xinglong; Banerjee, Debasis; Woerner, William R.; Han, Yu; Li, Jing; Parise, John B.

    2016-01-01

    measurments and gas adsorption isotherm measurements. Two calcium-based MOFs, designated as SBMOF-1 and SBMOF-2 (SB: Stony Brook), form three-dimensional frameworks with one-dimensional open channels. As determined form single crystal diffraction experiments

  9. 78 FR 35637 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Modulation of Poliovirus Replicative Fitness by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... use of vaccine targets for treatment or prevention of diseases in human health and in animal health...., having a place of business in Stony Brook, New York. The patent rights in these inventions have been...

  10. New York Blue

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — New York Blue is used cooperatively by the Laboratory and Stony Brook University as part of the New York Center for Computation Sciences. Ranked as the 28th fastest...

  11. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Chemical Engineering. Stony Brook ... Vision India: GenY Applied Science Network (VIGYAN)shaala ... teachers organically took over the sessions helping us achieve our ... It's a MATERIALS World – A Hands-on Approach to Intro-.

  12. Effect of Nutrient Management Planning on Crop Yield, Nitrate Leaching and Sediment Loading in Thomas Brook Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon-Armah, Frederick; Yiridoe, Emmanuel K.; Ahmad, Nafees H. M.; Hebb, Dale; Jamieson, Rob; Burton, David; Madani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Government priorities on provincial Nutrient Management Planning (NMP) programs include improving the program effectiveness for environmental quality protection, and promoting more widespread adoption. Understanding the effect of NMP on both crop yield and key water-quality parameters in agricultural watersheds requires a comprehensive evaluation that takes into consideration important NMP attributes and location-specific farming conditions. This study applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to investigate the effects of crop and rotation sequence, tillage type, and nutrient N application rate on crop yield and the associated groundwater leaching and sediment loss. The SWAT model was applied to the Thomas Brook Watershed, located in the most intensively managed agricultural region of Nova Scotia, Canada. Cropping systems evaluated included seven fertilizer application rates and two tillage systems (i.e., conventional tillage and no-till). The analysis reflected cropping systems commonly managed by farmers in the Annapolis Valley region, including grain corn-based and potato-based cropping systems, and a vegetable-horticulture system. ANOVA models were developed and used to assess the effects of crop management choices on crop yield and two water-quality parameters (i.e., leaching and sediment loading). Results suggest that existing recommended N-fertilizer rate can be reduced by 10-25 %, for grain crop production, to significantly lower leaching ( P > 0.05) while optimizing the crop yield. The analysis identified the nutrient N rates in combination with specific crops and rotation systems that can be used to manage leaching while balancing impacts on crop yields within the watershed.

  13. pH preference and avoidance responses of adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fost, B A; Ferreri, C P

    2015-03-01

    The pH preferred and avoided by wild, adult brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta was examined in a series a laboratory tests using gradual and steep-gradient flow-through aquaria. The results were compared with those published for the observed segregation patterns of juvenile S. fontinalis and S. trutta in Pennsylvania streams. The adult S. trutta tested showed a preference for pH 4·0 while adult S. fontinalis did not prefer any pH within the range tested. Salmo trutta are not found in Pennsylvania streams with a base-flow pH < 5·8 which suggests that S. trutta prefer pH well above 4·0. Adult S. trutta displayed a lack of avoidance at pH below 5·0, as also reported earlier for juveniles. The avoidance pH of wild, adult S. fontinalis (between pH 5·5 and 6·0) and S. trutta (between pH 6·5 and 7·0) did not differ appreciably from earlier study results for the avoidance pH of juvenile S. fontinalis and S. trutta. A comparison of c.i. around these avoidance estimates indicates that avoidance pH is similar among adult S. fontinalis and S. trutta in this study. The limited overlap of c.i. for avoidance pH values for the two species, however, suggests that some S. trutta will display avoidance at a higher pH when S. fontinalis will not. The results of this study indicate that segregation patterns of adult S. fontinalis and S. trutta in Pennsylvania streams could be related to pH and that competition with S. trutta could be mediating the occurrence of S. fontinalis at some pH levels. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Simulation of temporal and spatial soot evolution in an automotive diesel engine using the Moss–Brookes soot model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Numerical models were validated against experimental data of two diesel engines. ► Soot model constant values were calibrated to predict in-cylinder soot processes. ► Effects of split-main injection parameters on soot distributions were determined. ► Soot cloud was distributed towards cylinder wall when using large dwell period. ► Greater soot deposition expected with large dwell period and retarded injection. - Abstract: In this reported work, computational study on the formation processes of soot particles from diesel combustion is conducted using an approach where Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is coupled with a chemical kinetic model. A multi-step soot model which accounts for inception, surface growth, coagulation and oxidation was applied. Model constant values in the Moss–Brookes soot formation and Fenimore–Jones soot oxidation models were calibrated, and were validated against in-cylinder soot evolution and exhaust soot density of both heavy- and light-duty diesel engines, respectively. Effects of various injection parameters such as start of injection (SOI) timing, split-main ratio and dwell period of the split-main injection strategy on in-cylinder temporal/spatial soot evolution in a light-duty diesel engine were subsequently investigated. The spatial soot distributions at each crank angle degree after start of injection were found to be insensitive to the change of values in SOI and split-main ratio when close-coupled injection was implemented. Soot cloud was also observed to be distributed towards the cylinder wall when a large separation of 20° was used, even with an advanced SOI timing of −6° after top dead centre (ATDC). The use of large separation is hence not desired for this combustion system as it potentially leads to soot deposition on surface oil film and greater tailpipe soot emissions.

  15. A 12-month descriptive analysis of emergency intubations at Brooke Army Medical Center: a National Emergency Airway Registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Michael D; Schauer, Steven G; Brown Rd, Calvin A; Ng, Patrick C; Fernandez, Jessie; Fantegrossi, Andrea E; Maddry, Joseph K; Summers, Shane; Sessions, Daniel J; Barnwell, Robert M; Antonacci, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Emergency airway management is a critical skill for military healthcare providers. Our goal was to describe the Emergency Department (ED) intubations at Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) over a 12-month period. Physicians performing endotracheal intubations in the BAMC ED complete data collection forms for each intubation event as part of the National Emergency Airway Registry, including patient demographics, intubation techniques, success and failure rates, adverse events, and patient disposition. We cross-referenced these forms against the numbers of intubation events reported in the ED nursing daily reports to ensure capture of all intubations. Providers completed forms for every intubation within 6 weeks of the procedure. We analyzed data from March 28, 2016, to March 27, 2017. During the study period, providers performed 259 intubations in the BAMC ED. Reasons for intubation were related to trauma for 184 patients (71.0%) and medical conditions for 75 patients (29.0%). Overall, first-attempt success was 83.0%. Emergency medicine residents performed a majority of first attempts (95.0%). Most common devices chosen on first attempt were a video laryngoscope for 143 patients (55.2%) and a direct laryngoscope for 115 patients (44.4%). One patient underwent cricothyrotomy. The 2 most common induction agents were ketamine (59.8%; 95% CI, 55.2%-67.4%) and etomidate (19.3%; 95% CI, 14.7%-24.7%). The most common neuromuscular blocking agents were rocuronium (62.9%; 95% CI, 56.7%-68.8%) and succinylcholine (18.9%; 95% CI, 14.3%-24.2%). In the BAMC ED, emergency intubation most commonly occurred for trauma indications using video laryngoscopy with a high first-pass success.

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (DUXBTH00120037) on Town Highway 12, crossing Ridley Brook, Duxbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Ivanhoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DUXBTH00120037 on Town Highway 12 crossing Ridley Brook, Duxbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north central Vermont. The 10.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Ridley Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 67 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 123 mm (0.404 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 12 crossing of Ridley Brook is a 33-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of five 30-ft steel rolled beams (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. A scour hole 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 17 (LYNDTH00020017) on Town Highway 2, crossing Hawkins Brook, Lyndon, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LYNDTH00020017 on Town Highway 2 crossing Hawkins Brook, Lyndon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 7.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the left and right upstream overbanks. The downstream left and right overbanks are brushland.In the study area, Hawkins Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 78 ft and an average bank height of 7.3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 46.6 mm (0.153 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 4, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with the presence of point bars and side bars.The Town Highway 2 crossing of Hawkins Brook is a 49-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 46-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 43 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is zero

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7H (HUNTTH0001007H) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH001007H on Town Highway 1 crossing the Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–10). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.In August 1976, Hurricane Belle caused flooding at this site which resulted in road and bridge damage (figures 7-8). This was approximately a 25-year flood event (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1978). The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. Downstream of the bridge is brushland and pasture.In the study area, the Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 65.5 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 24, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Cobb Brook is a 23-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 20-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, June 21, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 36 (DUXBTH00040036) on Town Highway 4, crossing Crossett Brook, Duxbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DUXBTH00040036 on Town Highway 4 crossing the Crossett Brook, Duxbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 4.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the upstream left overbank is pasture. The upstream and downstream right overbanks are forested. The downstream left overbank is brushland, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation.In the study area, the Crossett Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 55 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 51.6 mm (0.169 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 4 crossing of the Crossett Brook is a 29-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 67 (MTHOTH00120067) on Town Highway 12, crossing Freeman Brook, Mount Holly, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Severance, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MTHOTH00120067 on Town Highway 12 crossing Freeman Brook, Mount Holly, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 11.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forested. In the study area, Freeman Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 51 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 55.7 mm (0.183 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 12 crossing of Freeman Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 30-foot prestressed concrete-slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 15, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. Along the upstream right wingwall, the right abutment and the downstream right wingwall, a scour hole approximately 1.0 to 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (NEWFTH00010008) on Town Highway 1, crossing Wardsboro Brook, Newfane, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Degnan, James

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWFTH00010008 on Town Highway 1 crossing Wardsboro Brook, Newfane, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (Federal Highway Administration, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southestern Vermont. The 6.91-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream right overbank and downstream left and right overbanks. The surface cover on the upstream left overbank is pasture. In the study area, Wardsboro Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 63 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 95.4 mm (0.313 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 21, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Wardsboro Brook is a 32-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the computed opening while the openingskew-to-roadway is 45 degrees

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (ROCHTH00400025) on Town Highway 40, crossing Corporation Brook, Rochester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHTH00400025 on Town Highway 40 crossing Corporation Brook, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, from Vermont Agency of Transportation files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.97-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream left and right overbanks, and the downstream left overbank. On the downstream right overbank, the surface cover is predominately brushland. In the study area, Corporation Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 101 mm (0.332 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 12, 1995 and Level I and II site visit on July 8, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Corporation Brook is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (WWINTH00370034) on Town Highway 37, crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WWINTH00370034 on Town Highway 37 crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture except for the upstream left bank where there is mostly shrubs and brush. In the study area, Mill Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ ft, an average channel top width of 52 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 43.4 mm (0.142 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. Point bars were observed upstream and downstream of this site. Furthermore, slip failure of the bank material was noted downstream at a cut-bank on the left side of the channel across from a point bar. The Town Highway 37 crossing of Mill Brook is a 37-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of one 32-foot wood thru-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutment walls with

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (JERITH00350031) on Town Highway 35, crossing Mill Brook, Jericho, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JERITH00350031 on Town Highway 35 crossing Mill Brook, Jericho, Vermont (figures 1– 8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gathered from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province and the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 15.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. The downstream left overbank is pasture. The downstream right overbank is brushland. In the study area, the Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 117 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 81.1 mm (0.266 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 3, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The Town Highway 35 crossing of the Mill Brook is a 53-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 50-foot steel-beam span with a wooden deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 48 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete abutment with wingwalls on the left. On the right, the abutment and wingwalls

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (ROCHTH00370028) on Town Highway 37, crossing Brandon Brook, Rochester, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHTH00370028 on Town Highway 37 crossing Brandon Brook, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 8.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the upstream left overbank although the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The upstream right overbank and downstream left and right overbanks are forested. In the study area, the Brandon Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 84.2 mm (0.276 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 12, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 8, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 37 crossing of the Brandon Brook is a 33-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 31-foot timber-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, timber log cribbing abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is zero

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 15 (BOLTTH00150015) on Town Highway 15, crossing Joiner Brook, Bolton, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BOLTTH00150015 on Town Highway 15 crossing Joiner Brook, Bolton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north central Vermont. The 9.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture (lawn) downstream of the bridge and on the upstream right bank. The surface cover on the upstream left bank is shrub and brushland. In the study area, Joiner Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 61 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 43.6 mm (0.143 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 15 crossing of Joiner Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 36-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 3, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 34.6 ft. The bridge is supported by nearly vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (LINCTH00010013) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cota Brook, Lincoln, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LINCTH00010013 on Town Highway 1 crossing Cota Brook, Lincoln, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 3.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest along the upstream right bank and brushland along the upstream left bank. Downstream of the bridge, the surface cover is pasture along the left and right banks. In the study area, Cota Brook has an sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 34.7 mm (0.114 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 10, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to cut-banks and wide, vegetated point bars upstream and downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Cota Brook is a 38-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 36-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 14, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 34.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (SHARTH00040013) on Town Highway 4, crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHARTH00040013 on Town Highway 4 crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is brushland on the downstream left overbank and row crops on the right overbank, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Upstream of the bridge, the overbanks are forested.In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 112 mm (0.369 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 11, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 23, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 4 crossing of Broad Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete tee beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while

  9. Location of quarries of non traditional stony materials in the architecture of Madrid: the Crypt of the Cathedral of Santa María la Real de la Almudena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Heras, M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination between petrological data and historical documentation sources is necessary to establish an accurate methodology for the location of the original quarries of the stony materials used in a determinate historical building. The petrographical and petrophisical data correlation combined with a multivariate statistical analysis, by means of similarity indexes of both the materials in the building and the probable source geological formations, allows the location even when the documental sources would he incomplete or lost, or when the source areas would be modified. The works of location of original quarries used in architectural heritage are important since they allow improving the works of restoration on a building by means of the possibility of using identical materials for substitution or reintegration of decayed elements. The establishment of the original areas also offers the possibility of obtaining unaltered semipiés to evaluate the state and processes of decay of the building as well as to use this rough material to test the effectivity and durability of protective arid consolidant treatments in the building and monuments. The aim of this work has been to characterize and to locate the origin of the stony material in the stonework of the Crypt of the Cathedral of Santa María la Real de la Almudena (Madrid. These stone types came from quarries located in Viana de Jadraque (Guadalajara, Spain and in the central area of Portugal. These materials do not correspond with the traditional ones used in the city of Madrid and its presence is due to the opening of new ways of transport in the second half of the 19"' centuiy.

    Para establecer una metodología adecuada con el fin de localizar las canteras originales de los materiales pétreos de construcción utilizados en un determinado edificio histórico se necesita combinar datos petrológicos y fuentes de documentación histórica. La correlación de los datos petrogr

  10. Twenty-year inter-annual trends and seasonal variations in precipitation and stream water chemistry at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Tomas; Norton, Stephen A; Fernandez, Ivan J; Nelson, Sarah J

    2010-12-01

    Mean annual concentration of SO4(-2) in wet-only deposition has decreased between 1988 and 2006 at the paired watershed study at Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA (BBWM) due to substantially decreased emissions of SO(2). Emissions of NO(x) have not changed substantially, but deposition has declined slightly at BBWM. Base cations, NH4+, and Cl(-) concentrations were largely unchanged, with small irregular changes of Bear Brook (EB), the reference stream, has been slowly responding to reduced but still elevated acid deposition. Calcium and Mg have declined fairly steadily and faster than SO4(-2), with consequent acidification (lower pH and higher inorganic Al). Eighteen years of experimental treatment with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) enhanced acidification of West Bear Brook's (WB) watershed. Despite the manipulation, NH4+ concentration remained below detection limits at WB, while leaching of NO3- increased. The seasonal pattern for NO3- concentrations in WB, however, remained similar to EB. Mean monthly concentrations of SO4(-2) have increased in WB since 1989, initially only during periods of high flow, but gradually also during base flow. Increases in mean monthly concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) due to the manipulation occurred from 1989 until about 1995, during the depletion of base cations in shallow flow paths in WB. Progressive depletion of Ca and Mg at greater soil depth occurred, causing stream concentrations to decline to pre-manipulation values. Mean monthly Si concentrations did not change in EB or WB, suggesting that the manipulation had no effect on mineral weathering rates. DOC concentrations in both streams did not exhibit inter- or intra-annual trends.

  11. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chang Kee [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Douglas, Michaek [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Hobbs, John [State University of New York at Stony Brook; McGrew, Clark [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Rijssenbeek, Michael [State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2013-07-29

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  12. Preference and avoidance pH of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta exposed to different holding pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fost, B A; Ferreri, C P

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if short-term exposure of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta to a lower pH than found in their source stream results in a shift in preference or avoidance pH. The lack of a shift in preference or avoidance pH of adult S. fontinalis and S. trutta suggests that these species can be held at a pH different from the source waterbody for a short period of time without altering preference or avoidance pH behaviour. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. Final-Independent Confirmatory Survey Report For The Reactor Building, Hot Laboratory, Primary Pump House, And Land Areas At The Plum Brook Reactor Facility, Sandusky, Ohio DCN:2036-SR-01-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Erika N.

    2011-01-01

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities

  14. A VRML-Based Data Portal: Hydrology of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and Mirror Lake Sub-Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M. W.; Bursik, M. I.; Schuetz, J. W.

    2001-05-01

    The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) of Central New Hampshire has been a focal point for collaborative hydrologic research for over 40 years. A tremendous amount of data from this area is available through the internet and other sources, but is not organized in a manner that facilitates teaching of hydrologic concepts. The Mirror Lake Watershed Interactive Teaching Database is making hydrologic data from the HBEF and associated interactive problem sets available to upper-level and post-graduate university students through a web-based resource. Hydrologic data are offered via a three-dimensional VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) interface, that facilitates viewing and retrieval in a spatially meaningful manner. Available data are mapped onto a topographic base, and hot spots representing data collection points (e.g. weirs) lead to time-series displays (e.g. hydrographs) that provide a temporal link to the spatially organized data. Associated instructional exercises are designed to increase understanding of both hydrologic data and hydrologic methods. A pedagogical module concerning numerical ground-water modeling will be presented as an example. Numerical modeling of ground-water flow involves choosing the combination of hydrogeologic parameters (e.g. hydraulic conductivity, recharge) that cause model-predicted heads to best match measured heads in the aquifer. Choosing the right combination of parameters requires careful judgment based upon knowledge of the hydrogeologic system and the physics of ground-water flow. Unfortunately, students often get caught up in the technical aspects and lose sight of the fundamentals when working with real ground-water software. This module provides exercises in which a student chooses model parameters and immediately sees the predicted results as a 3-D VRML object. VRML objects are based upon actual Modflow model results corresponding to the range of model input parameters available to the student. This way, the

  15. Results of the radiological survey of the Saddle River's East Bank, from State Highway 46 to the River's confluence with Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ083)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Saddle River's East Bank, from State Highway 46 to the River's Confluence with Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ083), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Flood-Inundation maps for the Hohokus Brook in Waldwick Borough, Ho-Ho-Kus Borough, and the Village of Ridgewood, New Jersey, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kara M.; Niemoczynski, Michal J.

    2015-07-20

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6-mile reach of the Hohokus Brook in New Jersey from White's Lake Dam in Waldwick Borough, through Ho-Ho-Kus Borough to Grove Street in the Village of Ridgewood were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. The flood inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Hohokus Brook at Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey (station number 01391000). Stage data at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=01391000 or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?gage=hohn4&wfo=okx.

  17. Assessment of aquifer properties, evapotranspiration, and the effects of ditching in the Stoney Brook watershed, Fond du Lac Reservation, Minnesota, 2006-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Tomasek, Abigail A.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, assessed hydraulic properties of geologic material, recharge, and evapotranspiration, and the effects of ditching on the groundwater resources in the Stoney Brook watershed in the Fond du Lac Reservation. Geologic, groundwater, and surface-water data were collected during 2006–9 to estimate hydrologic properties in the watershed. Streamflow and groundwater levels in the shallow glacial deposits in the Stoney Brook watershed were analyzed to estimate groundwater-flow directions, groundwater recharge, and evapotranspiration within the watershed and to assess the effect of ditches on surrounding groundwater resources. Groundwater, streamflow, and precipitation data collected during the study (2006–9) can be used to update the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resource Conservation Service and Fond du Lac Resource Management Division surface-water models, which are used to evaluate the effect of proposed adjustments to the ditching system on streamflow on wild rice production and aquatic habitats.

  18. Simulation of groundwater flow and streamflow depletion in the Branch Brook, Merriland River, and parts of the Mousam River watersheds in southern Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Martha G.; Locke, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Watersheds of three streams, the Mousam River, Branch Brook, and Merriland River in southeastern Maine were investigated from 2010 through 2013 under a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Maine Geological Survey. The Branch Brook watershed previously had been deemed “at risk” by the Maine Geological Survey because of the proportionally large water withdrawals compared to estimates of the in-stream flow requirements for habitat protection. The primary groundwater withdrawals in the study area include a water-supply well in the headwaters of the system and three water-supply wells in the coastal plain near the downstream end of the system. A steady-state groundwater flow model was used to understand the movement of water within the system, to evaluate the water budget and the effect of groundwater withdrawals on streamflows, and to understand streamflow depletion in relation to the State of Maine’s requirements to maintain in-stream flows for habitat protection.

  19. Thermal onset of cellular and endocrine stress responses correspond to ecological limits in brook trout, an iconic cold-water fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Joseph G; Nislow, Kieth H; McCormick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to change the distribution and abundance of species, yet underlying physiological mechanisms are complex and methods for detecting populations at risk from rising temperature are poorly developed. There is increasing interest in using physiological mediators of the stress response as indicators of individual and population-level response to environmental stressors. Here, we use laboratory experiments to show that the temperature thresholds in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) for increased gill heat shock protein-70 (20.7°C) and plasma glucose (21.2°C) are similar to their proposed thermal ecological limit of 21.0°C. Field assays demonstrated increased plasma glucose, cortisol and heat shock protein-70 concentrations at field sites where mean daily temperature exceeded 21.0°C. Furthermore, population densities of brook trout were lowest at field sites where temperatures were warm enough to induce a stress response, and a co-occurring species with a higher thermal tolerance showed no evidence of physiological stress at a warm site. The congruence of stress responses and proposed thermal limits supports the use of these thresholds in models of changes in trout distribution under climate change scenarios and suggests that the induction of the stress response by elevated temperature may play a key role in driving the distribution of species.

  20. The physiological stress response and oxidative stress biomarkers in rainbow trout and brook trout from selenium-impacted streams in a coal mining region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.L.; Rasmussen, J.B.; Palace, V.P.; Hontela, A. [University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Science

    2009-11-15

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element that can be toxic at concentrations slightly greater than those required for homeostasis. The main chronic toxic effects of Se in fish are teratogenic deformities, but Se can also activate the physiological stress response and redox cycle with reduced glutathione causing oxidative damage. Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, appear to be more sensitive to Se than brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis. The objective of this study was to compare the physiological stress response (plasma cortisol, glucose, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, gill Na+/K+ ATPase, cortisol secretory capacity, K and liver somatic index) and oxidative stress biomarkers (liver GSH, GPx, lipid peroxidation, vitamin A and vitamin E) in rainbow trout (RNTR) and brook trout (BKTR) collected from reference and Se-exposed streams. The physiological stress response was not impaired (cortisol secretory capacity unchanged); although there were species differences in plasma cortisol and plasma glucose levels. Liver GSH, GPx and vitamin levels were higher in RNTR than BKTR, but lipid peroxidation levels were not different. The elevated GSH reserves may make RNTR more sensitive to Se-induced lipid peroxidation, but this may be offset by the RNTR's higher antioxidant (GPx and vitamin) levels. Species-specific biochemical differences may mediate differences in Se sensitivity and be used in aquatic Se risk assessments.

  1. The diet of introduced brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; Mitchill, 1814 in an alpine area and a literature review on its feeding ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Tiberti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduced fish are a major threat for high altitude aquatic habitats and Salvelinus fontinalis have been widely used throughout the Alps for stocking lakes and rivers. Understanding its feeding ecology is a basic, but essential tool for interpreting its impact. To assess which factors determine the diet of S. fontinalis we analyzed more than 500 stomachs from several introduced populations from the Gran Paradiso National Park (GPNP, Western Italian Alps and we measured the availability of several prey groups (zooplankton, aquatic invertebrates, terrestrial invertebrates. We complemented the study with a short, but exhaustive literature review on the S. fontinalis feeding ecology. In general the food composition reflected the availability of prey -confirming that S. fontinalis is an opportunistic predator- and was influenced by habitat type (stream vs lake, fish size, and seasonality. The obtained results were discussed in the light of the existing literature on the feeding ecology and ecological impact of S. fontinalis. Large benthonic insects account for a substantial part of  the diet of stream dwelling brook trout, while they are almost absent both in the diet and in the prey species pool of lake-dwelling brook trout, probably reflecting a stronger ecological impact in the lakes.

  2. Provenance and detrital zircon geochronologic evolution of lower Brookian foreland basin deposits of the western Brooks Range, Alaska, and implications for early Brookian tectonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Potter, Christopher J.; Donelick, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    The Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous part of the Brookian sequence of northern Alaska consists of syntectonic deposits shed from the north-directed, early Brookian orogenic belt. We employ sandstone petrography, detrital zircon U-Pb age analysis, and zircon fission-track double-dating methods to investigate these deposits in a succession of thin regional thrust sheets in the western Brooks Range and in the adjacent Colville foreland basin to determine sediment provenance, sedimentary dispersal patterns, and to reconstruct the evolution of the Brookian orogen. The oldest and structurally highest deposits are allochthonous Upper Jurassic volcanic arc–derived sandstones that rest on accreted ophiolitic and/or subduction assemblage mafic igneous rocks. These strata contain a nearly unimodal Late Jurassic zircon population and are interpreted to be a fragment of a forearc basin that was emplaced onto the Brooks Range during arc-continent collision. Synorogenic deposits found at structurally lower levels contain decreasing amounts of ophiolite and arc debris, Jurassic zircons, and increasing amounts of continentally derived sedimentary detritus accompanied by broadly distributed late Paleozoic and Triassic (359–200 Ma), early Paleozoic (542–359 Ma), and Paleoproterozoic (2000–1750 Ma) zircon populations. The zircon populations display fission-track evidence of cooling during the Brookian event and evidence of an earlier episode of cooling in the late Paleozoic and Triassic. Surprisingly, there is little evidence for erosion of the continental basement of Arctic Alaska, its Paleozoic sedimentary cover, or its hinterland metamorphic rocks in early foreland basin strata at any structural and/or stratigraphic level in the western Brooks Range. Detritus from exhumation of these sources did not arrive in the foreland basin until the middle or late Albian in the central part of the Colville Basin.These observations indicate that two primary provenance areas provided

  3. The stony way to renewable energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    of the development of knowledge on the transition from fossil fuels to renewable and sustainable energy and thus on how to curb climate impacts from energy supply. (b) When following the myth of wholesale carbon neutrality, planning subjects may be set out of control (or hindered in establishing it) over...... was conditioned by the expansion of fossil fuel use (RCD 2009a). When wood use is grossly expanded in order to (re-)substitute wood for fossil energy, this can, therefore, become a threat against forests. And: it threatens climate policies, because the lower energy-efficiency of biomass(RCD2009b) creates a net...... the reproduction of specific plant matter and its biodiversity impacts - especially regarding the material and energy chain from forests to harvested wood with its long lead times of reproduction. The historical (re-)expansion of forests in early industrialising countries known as the forest transition hypothesis...

  4. Stony Ground but not Entirely”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Mads Peter

    2018-01-01

    the metaphor of “grace”, and thus to contribute to a more precise understanding of what he means by this metaphor. The paper will identify the key instances in which Badiou employs the term “grace” in an effort to clarify how he understands it and what ends he intends it to serve. And in contrast...... throughout his work. This paper focuses on Badiou’s substantial use of the term “grace” as a metaphor for the exceptional occurrence that he defines in philosophical terms as an “event”. The aim of the paper is to identify the context in which Badiou comes to use, and the sources from which he draws...... to the existing research concerning the issue of grace, in which there has been a tendency to centre the attention almost entirely on Badiou’s book on Paul, it will consider a number of different instances in which he uses this term....

  5. Deep-Sea Stony Coral Habitat Suitability

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deep-sea corals, also known as cold water corals, create complex communities that provide habitat for a variety of invertebrate and fish species, such as grouper,...

  6. Physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-29 to 2010-09-02 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-29 to 2010-09-02 in response to the Deepwater...

  7. Use of the Rigor Mortis Process as a Tool for Better Understanding of Skeletal Muscle Physiology: Effect of the Ante-Mortem Stress on the Progression of Rigor Mortis in Brook Charr (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Boucar; Rioux, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Presents the rigor mortis process in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) as a tool for better understanding skeletal muscle metabolism. Describes an activity that demonstrates how rigor mortis is related to the post-mortem decrease of muscular glycogen and ATP, how glycogen degradation produces lactic acid that lowers muscle pH, and how…

  8. Physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-02 to 2010-09-06 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-02 to 2010-09-06 in response to the Deepwater...

  9. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Zn-Pb-Ag Mineralization in the Northern Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Layer, Paul W.; Newberry, Rainer J.

    2004-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar laser step-heating method potentially can be used to provide absolute ages for a number of formerly undatable, low-temperature ore deposits. This study demonstrates the use of this method by determining absolute ages for Zn-Pb-Ag sediment-hosted massive sulfide deposits and vein-breccia occurrences found throughout a 300-km-long, east-west-trending belt in the northern Brooks Range, Alaska. Massive sulfide deposits are hosted by Mississippian to Pennsylvanian(?) black carbonaceous shale, siliceous mudstone, and lesser chert and carbonate turbidites of the Kuna Formation (e.g., Red Dog, Anarraaq, Lik (Su), and Drenchwater). The vein-breccia occurrences (e.g., Husky, Story Creek, West Kivliktort Mountain, Vidlee, and Kady) are hosted by a deformed but only weakly metamorphosed package of Upper Devonian to Lower Mississippian mixed continental and marine clastic rocks (the Endicott Group) that stratigraphically underlie the Kuna Formation. The vein-breccias are mineralogically similar to, but not spatially associated with, known massive sulfide deposits. The region's largest shale-hosted massive sulfide deposit is Red Dog; it has reserves of 148 Mt grading 16.6 percent zinc, 4.5 percent lead, and 77 g of silver per tonne. Hydrothermally produced white mica in a whole-rock sample from a sulfide-bearing igneous sill within the Red Dog deposit yielded a plateau age of 314.5 Ma. The plateau age of this whole-rock sample records the time at which temperatures cooled below the argon closure temperature of the white mica and is interpreted to represent the minimum age limit for massive sulfide-related hydrothermal activity in the Red Dog deposit. Sulfide-bearing quartz veins at Drenchwater crosscut a hypabyssal intrusion with a maximum biotite age of 337.0 Ma. Despite relatively low sulfide deposition temperatures in the vein-breccia occurrences (162°-251°C), detrital white mica in sandstone immediately adjacent to large vein-breccia zones was partially to

  10. Forsmark site investigation. Monitoring of brook water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges January-December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult (Sweden)); Juston, John (Juston Konsult (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    This document reports the monitoring of water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges at four brook discharge gauging stations, and the monitoring of water electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden in the Forsmark area. The report presents data from 1 January through 31 December 2009 and is a continuation of reporting from Johansson and Juston (2007, 2009), which covered the periods from 1 April 2004 through 31 March 2007 and 1 April 2007 through 31 December 2008, respectively. Long-throated flumes equipped with automatically recording devices were used for the discharge measurements. Every c. 14 days the water depths at the upstream edge of the flumes were measured manually by a ruler as a check. Electrical conductivity and temperature were automatically recorded and these parameters were also measured manually every c. 14 days with the site investigation field devices. SKB's Hydro Monitoring System (HMS) was used to collect and store all data. From HMS quality assured data were transferred to SKB's primary database Sicada. Measurements of levels, electrical conductivities and temperatures were made every 10 minutes (every 30 minutes for electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden). For the calculation of discharge, quality assured water level data from the flumes were used. The calculation procedure included consolidation of the time series to hourly averages, screening of data for removal of short-term spikes, noise and other data that were judged erroneous. After the calculations were performed, the results were delivered to Sicada. The amplitudes of water level variations during this reporting period were 0.26-0.33 m at the four stations. The mean electrical conductivities varied between 26 and 41 mS/m at the four discharge stations. The electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden varied between 53 and 188 mS/m during the period with the higher values at the end of the

  11. Forsmark site investigation. Monitoring of brook water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges January-December 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult (Sweden)); Juston, John (Juston Konsult (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    This document reports the monitoring of water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges at four brook discharge gauging stations, and the monitoring of water electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden in the Forsmark area. The report presents data from 1 January through 31 December 2010 and is a continuation of reporting from Johansson and Juston (2007, 2009, 2011), which covered the periods from 1 April 2004 through 31 March 2007, 1 April 2007 through 31 December 2008, and 1 January through 31 December 2009, respectively. Long-throated flumes equipped with automatically recording devices were used for the discharge measurements. Every c. 14 days the water depths at the upstream edge of the flumes were measured manually by a ruler as a check. Electrical conductivity and temperature were automatically recorded and these parameters were also measured manually every c. 14 days with the site investigation field devices. SKB's Hydro Monitoring System (HMS) was used to collect and store all data. From HMS quality assured data were transferred to SKB's primary database Sicada. Measurements of levels, electrical conductivities and temperatures were made every 10 minutes (every 30 minutes for electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden). For the calculation of discharge, quality assured water level data from the flumes were used. The calculation procedure included consolidation of the time series to hourly averages, screening of data for removal of short-term spikes, noise and other data that were judged erroneous. After the calculations were performed, the results were delivered to Sicada. The amplitudes of water level variations during this reporting period were 0.41-0.55 m and the mean electrical conductivities varied between 23 and 39 mS/m at the four discharge stations. However, due to mal-function of measuring devices for electrical conductivity, data were missing for relatively long time periods. Due

  12. Flood inundation maps and water-surface profiles for tropical storm Irene and selected annual exceedance probability floods for Flint Brook and the Third Branch White River in Roxbury, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.; Lombard, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Flint Brook, a tributary to the Third Branch White River in Roxbury, Vermont, has a history of flooding the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department’s Roxbury Fish Culture Station (the hatchery) and surrounding infrastructure. Flooding resulting from tropical storm Irene on August 28–29, 2011, caused widespread destruction in the region, including extensive and costly damages to the State-owned hatchery and the transportation infrastructure in the Town of Roxbury, Vermont. Sections of State Route 12A were washed out, and several bridges and culverts on Oxbow Road, Thurston Hill Road, and the New England Central Railroad in Roxbury were heavily damaged. Record high peak-discharge estimates of 2,140 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) and 4,320 ft3/s were calculated for Flint Brook at its confluence with the Third Branch White River and for the Third Branch White River at about 350 feet (ft) downstream from the hatchery, respectively. The annual exceedance probabilities (AEPs) of the peak discharges for Flint Brook and the Third Branch White River were less than 0.2 percent (less than a one in 500 chance of occurring in a given year). Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses of Flint Brook and the Third Branch White River were done to investigate flooding at the hatchery in Roxbury and support efforts by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to assist State and local mitigation and reconstruction efforts. During the August 2011 flood, the majority of flow from Flint Brook (97 percent or 2,070 ft3/s) diverged from its primary watercourse due to a retaining wall failure immediately upstream of Oxbow Road and inundated the hatchery. Although a minor amount of flow from the Third Branch White River could have overtopped State Route 12A and spilled into the hatchery, the Third Branch White River did not cause flood damages or exacerbate flooding at the hatchery during the August 2011 flood. The Third Branch White River which flows adjacent to the hatchery does not flood the hatchery

  13. Areas contributing recharge to production wells and effects of climate change on the groundwater system in the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesz, Paul J.; Stone, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins in southern Rhode Island are an important water resource for public and domestic supply, irrigation, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Health, began a study in 2012 as part of an effort to protect the source of water to six large-capacity production wells that supply drinking water and to increase understanding of how climate change might affect the water resources in the basins. Soil-water-balance and groundwater-flow models were developed to delineate the areas contributing recharge to the wells and to quantify the hydrologic response to climate change. Surficial deposits of glacial origin ranging from a few feet to more than 200 feet thick overlie bedrock in the 24.4-square mile study area. These deposits comprise a complex and productive aquifer system.

  14. The Jeffers Brook diorite-granodiorite pluton: style of emplacement and role of volatiles at various crustal levels in Avalonian appinites, Canadian Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe-Piper, Georgia; Piper, David J. W.

    2018-04-01

    Small appinite plutons ca. 610 Ma outcrop in the peri-Gondwanan Avalon terrane of northern Nova Scotia, with different structural levels exposed. Field mapping shows that the Jeffers Brook pluton is a laccolith emplaced along an upper crustal thrust zone, likely in a dilational jog in a regional dextral strike-slip system. The oldest rocks are probably mafic sills, which heated the area facilitating emplacement of intermediate magmas. Cross-cutting relationships show that both mafic and intermediate magmas were supplied throughout the history of pluton emplacement. The modal composition, mineral chemistry, and bulk chemistry of gabbro, diorite, tonalite, granodiorite, and granite have been studied in the main plutonic phases, dykes, and sills, and mafic microgranular enclaves. As with the type appinites in the Scottish Caledonides, the pluton shows evidence of high water content: the dominance of hornblende, locally within pegmatitic texture; vesicles and irregular felsic patches in enclaves; and late aplite dykes. Analyzed mafic microgranular enclaves are geochemically similar to larger diorite bodies in the pluton. Tonalite-granodiorite is distinct from the diorite in trace-element geochemistry and radiogenic isotopes. Elsewhere to the east, similar rocks of the same age form vertically sheeted complexes in major shear zones; hornblende chemistry shows that they were emplaced at a deeper upper crustal level. This implies that little of the observed geochemical variability in the Jeffers Brook pluton was developed within the pluton. The general requirements to form appinites are proposed to be small magma volumes of subduction-related magmas that reach the upper crust because of continual heating by mafic magmas moving through strike-slip fault pathways and trapping of aqueous fluids rather than venting through volcanic activity.

  15. Esterification and hydrolysis of vitamin A in the liver of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and the influence of a coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndayibagira, A.; Spear, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Recent reports of extremely low retinoid stores in fish living in contaminated river systems prompted an initial investigation of the mechanisms of hepatic storage and mobilization in brook trout. Enzyme characterization in microsomes revealed a lecithin:retinol acyltransferase activity (LRAT) optimum in the alkaline range (pH 9.0; V max =0.6 nmol per mg prot. h -1 ; K m =10.2 μM) which is not known to occur in mammals, in addition to a secondary optimum at pH 6.5 typical of mammals. Acyl CoA:retinol acyltransferase (ARAT) kinetic parameters were quite different to those of mammals. The substrate affinity of trout ARAT (K m =1.6 μM) was approximately 22-fold greater than that of the rat while maximal velocity (V max =0.2 nmol per mg prot. h -1 ) was 18-fold less. Retinyl ester hydrolase activity (REH) was optimal under acid conditions (pH 4.2; V max =6.6 nmol per mg prot. h -1 ; K m =0.6 mM), was inhibited by a bile salt analogue and was greater in males than females. This REH was tentatively categorized as a bile salt-independent, acid retinyl ester hydrolase (BSI-AREH). REH was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner following in vivo exposure to a representative environmental contaminant the coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), 3,3minutes or feet,4,4minutes or feet-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCBP). Inhibition may be an indirect effect because enzyme activity was not affected by in vitro exposure of control microsomes. REH inhibition in the brook trout may affect the uptake of retinyl esters (REs) from chylomicron remnants as well as the mobilization of stored REs. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.

    2012-10-01

    Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the swim bladder) and the rupture of the swim bladder ultimately leading to exopthalmia, emboli and hemorrhaging. In fish that lack a swim bladder, such as lamprey, the rate and severity of barotraumas due to rapid decompression may be reduced however; this has yet to be extensively studied. Another mechanism for barotrauma can be gases coming out of solution and the rate of this occurrence may vary among species. In this study, juvenile brook and Pacific lamprey acclimated to 146.2 kPa (equivalent to a depth of 4.6 m) were subjected to rapid (<1 sec; brook lamprey only) or sustained decompression (17 minutes) to a very low pressure (13.8 kPa) using a protocol previously applied to juvenile Chinook salmon. No mortality or evidence of barotraumas, as indicated by the presence of hemorrhages, emboli or exopthalmia, were observed during rapid or sustained decompression, nor following recovery for up to 120 h following sustained decompression. In contrast, mortality or injury would be expected for 97.5% of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to a similar rapid decompression to these very low pressures. Additionally, juvenile Chinook salmon experiencing sustained decompression died within 7 minutes, accompanied by emboli in the fins and gills and hemorrhaging in the tissues. Thus, juvenile lamprey may not be susceptible to barotraumas associated with hydroturbine passage to the same degree as juvenile salmonids, and management of these species should be tailored to their specific morphological and physiological characteristics.

  17. Integrative phylogeography of Calotriton newts (Amphibia, Salamandridae, with special remarks on the conservation of the endangered Montseny brook newt (Calotriton arnoldi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Valbuena-Ureña

    Full Text Available The genus Calotriton includes two species of newts highly adapted to live in cold and fast-flowing mountain springs. The Pyrenean brook newt (Calotriton asper, restricted to the Pyrenean region, and the Montseny brook newt (Calotriton arnoldi, endemic to the Montseny massif and one of the most endangered amphibian species in Europe. In the present manuscript, we use an integrative approach including species distribution modeling (SDM, molecular analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data and morphology to unravel the historical processes that have contributed to shaping the biogeography and genetic structure of the genus Calotriton, with special emphasis on the conservation of C. arnoldi. The results of the molecular analyses confirm that, despite having originated recently, being ecologically similar and geographically very close, there is no signal of hybridization between C. asper and C. arnoldi. SDM results suggest that tough environmental conditions on mountains tops during glacial periods, together with subsequent warmer periods could have prevented the contact between the two species. Within the critically endangered C. arnoldi, a high genetic structure is revealed despite its extremely small distribution range compared to C. asper. Haplotype networks, AMOVA and SAMOVA analyses suggest that two distinct groups of populations can be clearly differentiated with absence of gene flow. This is in concordance with morphological differentiation and correlates with its geographical distribution, as the two groups are situated on the eastern and western sides of a river valley that acts as a barrier. The genetic and morphological results are highly important for the ongoing conservation program of C. arnoldi and strongly justify the management of this species into at least two independent evolutionary significant units (eastern and western sectors to guarantee the long-term population viability.

  18. Reclutamiento de corales pétreos en arrecifes coralinos a diferentes distancias de fuentes de contaminación en La Habana, Cuba Stony coral recruitment in coral reefs at different distances from pollution sources in Habana, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alcolado-Prieto

    2012-09-01

    í como entre de las distintas fechas de muestreo. El análisis de variancia bifactorial no mostró interacción significativa espacio-tiemporal. Malecón, sitio más contaminado, presentó menor reclutamiento y mayor presencia de especies consideradas indicadoras de contaminación orgánica, sedimentación y abrasión. Las densidades fueron mayores en Octubre 2007 y menores en Mayo 2008, al parecer influenciados por las épocas de reproducción y la acción de los frentes fríos respectivamente. El mayor predominio y abundancia de reclutas de S. siderea, S. radians y P. astreoides parece responder a sus elevados potenciales reproductivos y altas resistencias a disturbios. La identidad de las especies dominantes estuvo relacionada aparentemente con las distancias de las principales fuentes de contaminación. Se recomienda replicar esta investigación en otros lugares de la región del Caribe para probar la generalidad de estos resultados. Estudios futuros debieran tener en cuenta la influencia de otros factores ambientales, junto con una valoración de la tolerancia de las especies de reclutas a estos factores, para ponderar mejor el efecto de la contaminación urbana sobre el reclutamiento.The effect of pollution on coral recruitment has been insufficiently studied. This research deals with coral recruitment in coastal areas and aimed to determine the variations of density and dominant species of corals recruits in sites at different distances from pollution sources. The composition and structure of stony coral (scleractinian and milleporids recruit associations were characterized in the fringing reef of Western Havana, Cuba. This reef is influenced by urban pollution from the Almendares River and a sewage outlet located at its mouth. Four sites were sampled on the upper fore reef escarpment at 10m deep every three months between July 2007 and May 2008. A 25cm side quadrat was used to determine the density and taxonomic composition of recruits smaller than 3cm in

  19. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-18 to 2010-05-22 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, laboratory analysis, tows and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-18...

  20. NRDA-processed CTD data from the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico, Cruise 11 Leg 1, collected from 2010-07-05 to 2010-07-06, associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NCEI Accession 0130008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements were collected aboard the R/V Brooks McCall, Cruise 11, to determine physical oceanographic parameters of the...

  1. Geographic Place Names, GNIS data for Atkinson, Bacon, Ben Hill, Berrien, Brantley, Brooks, Charlton, Clinch, Coffee, Cook, Echols, Irwin, Lanier, Lowndes, Pierce, Tift, Turner, Ware counties., Published in 1999, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Geographic Place Names dataset current as of 1999. GNIS data for Atkinson, Bacon, Ben Hill, Berrien, Brantley, Brooks, Charlton, Clinch, Coffee, Cook, Echols, Irwin,...

  2. NRDA-processed CTD data from the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico, Cruise 2 Leg 1, collected from 2010-05-15 to 2010-05-17, associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NCEI Accession 0130011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements were collected aboard the R/V Brooks McCall, Cruise 02 to determine physical oceanographic parameters of the...

  3. NRDA-processed CTD data from the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico, Cruise 12 Leg 1, collected from 2010-07-11 to 2010-07-13, associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NCEI Accession 0130009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements were collected aboard the R/V Brooks McCall, Cruise 12, to determine physical oceanographic parameters of the...

  4. NRDA-processed CTD data from the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico, Cruise 9 Leg 1, collected from 2010-06-23 to 2010-06-25, associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NCEI Accession 0130015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements were collected aboard the R/V Brooks McCall, Cruise 09 to determine physical oceanographic parameters of the...

  5. NRDA-processed CTD data from the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico, Cruise 7 Leg 1, collected from 2010-06-11 to 2010-06-13, associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NCEI Accession 0130013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements were collected aboard the R/V Brooks McCall, Cruise 07, to determine physical oceanographic parameters of the...

  6. Robust estimates of environmental effects on population vital rates: an integrated capture–recapture model of seasonal brook trout growth, survival and movement in a stream network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letcher, Benjamin H.; Schueller, Paul; Bassar, Ronald D.; Nislow, Keith H.; Coombs, Jason A.; Sakrejda, Krzysztof; Morrissey, Michael; Sigourney, Douglas B.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Dubreuil, Todd L.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling the effects of environmental change on populations is a key challenge for ecologists, particularly as the pace of change increases. Currently, modelling efforts are limited by difficulties in establishing robust relationships between environmental drivers and population responses.We developed an integrated capture–recapture state-space model to estimate the effects of two key environmental drivers (stream flow and temperature) on demographic rates (body growth, movement and survival) using a long-term (11 years), high-resolution (individually tagged, sampled seasonally) data set of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from four sites in a stream network. Our integrated model provides an effective context within which to estimate environmental driver effects because it takes full advantage of data by estimating (latent) state values for missing observations, because it propagates uncertainty among model components and because it accounts for the major demographic rates and interactions that contribute to annual survival.We found that stream flow and temperature had strong effects on brook trout demography. Some effects, such as reduction in survival associated with low stream flow and high temperature during the summer season, were consistent across sites and age classes, suggesting that they may serve as robust indicators of vulnerability to environmental change. Other survival effects varied across ages, sites and seasons, indicating that flow and temperature may not be the primary drivers of survival in those cases. Flow and temperature also affected body growth rates; these responses were consistent across sites but differed dramatically between age classes and seasons. Finally, we found that tributary and mainstem sites responded differently to variation in flow and temperature.Annual survival (combination of survival and body growth across seasons) was insensitive to body growth and was most sensitive to flow (positive) and temperature (negative

  7. Species-specific sensitivity to selenium-induced impairment of cortisol secretion in adrenocortical cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.L.; Hontela, A.

    2011-01-01

    Species differences in physiological and biochemical attributes exist even among closely related species and may underlie species-specific sensitivity to toxicants. Rainbow trout (RT) are more sensitive than brook trout (BT) to the teratogenic effects of selenium (Se), but it is not known whether all tissues exhibit this pattern of vulnerability. In this study, primary cultures of RT and BT adrenocortical cells were exposed to selenite (Na 2 SO 3 ) and selenomethionine (Se-Met) to compare cell viability and ACTH-stimulated cortisol secretion in the two fish species. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone in fish, facilitates maintenance of homeostasis when fish are exposed to stressors, including toxicants. Cell viability was not affected by Se, but selenite impaired cortisol secretion, while Se-Met did not (RT and BT EC 50 > 2000 mg/L). RT cells were more sensitive (EC 50 = 8.7 mg/L) to selenite than BT cells (EC 50 = 90.4 mg/L). To identify the targets where Se disrupts cortisol synthesis, selenite-impaired RT and BT cells were stimulated with ACTH, dbcAMP, OH-cholesterol, and pregnenolone. Selenite acted at different steps in the cortisol biosynthesis pathway in RT and BT cells, confirming a species-specific toxicity mechanism. To test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates Se-induced toxicity, selenite-impaired RT cells were exposed to NAC, BSO and antioxidants (DETCA, ATA, Vit A, and Vit E). Inhibition of SOD by DETCA enhanced selenite-induced cortisol impairment, indicating that oxidative stress plays a role in Se toxicity; however, modifying GSH content of the cells did not have an effect. The results of this study, with two closely related salmonids, provided additional evidence for species-specific differences in sensitivity to Se which should be considered when setting thresholds and water quality guidelines. - Research Highlights: → We investigated species-specific sensitivity to Se in trout adrenocortical cells. → Selenite, not Se-Met, disrupts

  8. Brooks, T., y Nussbaum, M. C. (eds.. (2015. Rawls's Political Liberalism. Nueva York, Estados Unidos de América: Columbia University. 206 pp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Josue Cunningham-Matamoros

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Poco más de dos décadas después de la publicación de Political Liberalism (1993 del filósofo estadounidense John Rawls, Thom Brooks y Martha Nussbaum se dieron la tarea de editar una compilación de seis ensayos que muestran la actualidad de este libro. Los escritos que participan en esta recopilación se aproximan al texto rawlsiano de manera variopinta, tanto a nivel disciplinar como en lo referido a la finalidad con la cual lo abordan. A grandes rasgos, estos se dividen en tres grupos: el primer grupo, cuya pretensión es realizar una revisión crítica de la obra o de conceptos medulares de esta (Frank I. Michelman, Martha Nussbaum y Onora O'Neill; el segundo conjunto, donde se realiza una labor exegética capaz de responder a múltiples críticas que ha enfrentado el texto desde su publicación (Jeremy Waldron y Paul Weithman y, finalmente, un artículo ―el tercer grupo― que muestra la consistencia práctica en el modo en que Rawls concibió el derecho constitucional estadounidense.

  9. Analysis of trade-offs between threats of invasion by nonnative brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and intentional isolation for native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D.P.; Rieman, B.E.; Dunham, J.B.; Fausch, K.D.; Young, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    Native salmonid fishes often face simultaneous threats from habitat fragmentation and invasion by nonnative trout species. Unfortunately, management actions to address one may create or exacerbate the other. A consistent decision process would include a systematic analysis of when and where intentional use or removal of barriers is the most appropriate action. We developed a Bayesian belief network as a tool for such analyses. We focused on native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) and nonnative brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and considered the environmental factors influencing both species, their potential interactions, and the effects of isolation on the persistence of local cutthroat trout populations. The trade-offs between isolation and invasion were strongly influenced by size and habitat quality of the stream network to be isolated and existing demographic linkages within and among populations. An application of the model in several sites in western Montana (USA) showed the process could help clarify management objectives and options and prioritize conservation actions among streams. The approach can also facilitate communication among parties concerned with native salmonids, nonnative fish invasions, barriers and intentional isolation, and management of the associated habitats and populations. ?? 2008 NRC.

  10. Tephrochronology of the Brooks River Archaeological District, Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska: What can and cannot be done with tephra deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, J.R.; Dumond, D.E.; Meyer, C.E.; Schaaf, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Brooks River Archaeological District (BRAD) in Katmai National Park and Preserve is a classical site for the study of early humans in Alaska. Because of proximity to the active Aleutian volcanic arc, there are numerous tephra deposits in the BRAD, which are potentially useful for correlating among sites of archaeological investigations. Microprobe analyses of glass separates show, however, that most of these tephra deposits are heterogeneous mixtures of multiple glass populations. Some glasses are highly similar to pyroclasts of Aniakchak Crater (160 km to the south), others are similar to pyroclasts in the nearby Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, and some are similar to no other tephra samples from the Alaska Peninsula. Moreover, tephra deposits in any one archaeological study site are not always similar to those from nearby sites, indicating inconsistent preservation of these mainly thin, fine-grained deposits. At least 15, late Holocene tephra deposits are inferred at the BRAD. Their heterogeneity is the result of either eruptions of mixed or heterogeneous magmas, like the 1912 Katmai eruption, or secondary mixing of closely succeeding tephra deposits. Because most cannot be reliably distinguished from one another on the basis of megascopic properties, their utility for correlations is limited. At least one deposit can be reliably identified because of its thickness (10 cm) and colour stratification. Early humans seem not to have been significantly affected by these tephra falls, which is not surprising in view of the resilience exhibited by both plants and animals following the 1912 Katmai eruption.

  11. Behavioural and physiological responses of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis to midwinter flow reduction in a small ice-free mountain stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, A N; Paul, A J; Hontela, A; Rasmussen, J B

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an experimental analysis of the effects of midwinter flow reduction (50-75%, reduction in discharge in 4 h daily pulses) on the physical habitat and on behaviour and physiology of overwintering brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in a small mountain stream. Flow reduction did not result in significant lowering of temperature or formation of surface or subsurface ice. The main findings were (1) daily movement by S. fontinalis increased (c. 2·5-fold) during flow reduction, but was limited to small-scale relocations (reduced during flow reduction. (3) Although both experimental and reference fish did lose mass and condition during the experiment, no effects of flow reduction on stress indicators (blood cortisol or glucose) or bioenergetics (total body fat, water content or mass loss) were detected, probably because access to the preferred type of cover remained available. Like other salmonids, S. fontinalis moves little and seeks physical cover during winter. Unlike many of the more studied salmonids, however, this species overwinters successfully in small groundwater-rich streams that often remain ice-free, and this study identifies undercut banks as the critical winter habitat rather than substratum cover. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  12. Perturbation in protein expression of the sterile salmonid hybrids between female brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and male masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou during early spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liang; Senda, Yoshie; Abe, Syuiti

    2013-05-01

    Most males and females of intergeneric hybrid (BM) between female brook trout (Bt) Salvelinus fontinalis and male masu salmon (Ms) Oncorhynchus masou had undeveloped gonads, with abnormal germ cell development shown by histological examination. To understand the cause of this hybrid sterility, expression profiles of testicular proteins in the BM and parental species were examined with 2-DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Compared with the parental species, more than 60% of differentially expressed protein spots were down-regulated in BM. A total of 16 up-regulated and 48 down-regulated proteins were identified in BM. Up-regulated were transferrin and other somatic cell-predominant proteins, whereas down-regulated were some germ cell-specific proteins such as DEAD box RNA helicase Vasa. Other pronouncedly down-regulated proteins included tubulins and heat shock proteins that are supposed to have roles in spermatogenesis. The present findings suggest direct association of the observed perturbation in protein expression with the failure of spermatogenesis and the sterility in the examined salmonid hybrids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, and to use the information gained to help guide the design of a comprehensive water-quality monitoring program for the source area. Assessments of the quality and trophic state of the three primary storage reservoirs, Hobbs Brook Reservoir, Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond, were conducted (September 1997-November 1998) to provide baseline information on the state of these resources and to determine the vulnerability of the reservoirs to increased loads of nutrients and other contaminants. The effects of land use, land cover, and other drainage-basin characteristics on sources, transport, and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria, highway deicing chemicals, nutrients, selected metals, and naturally occurring organic compounds in 11 subbasins that contribute water to the reservoirs also was investigated, and the data used to select sampling stations for incorporation into a water-quality monitoring network for the source area. All three reservoirs exhibited thermal and chemical stratification, despite artificial mixing by air hoses in Stony Brook Reservoir and Fresh Pond. The stratification produced anoxic or hypoxic conditions in the deepest parts of the reservoirs and these conditions resulted in the release of ammonia nitrogen orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved iron and manganese from the reservoir bed sediments. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the reservoirs usually were higher than the amounts recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for drinking-water sources (20 milligrams per liter for sodium and 250 milligrams per liter for chloride). Maximum measured sodium concentrations were highest in Hobbs Brook Reservoir (113 milligrams per liter), intermediate in Stony Brook Reservoir (62

  14. Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994 - October 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive η photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the Λ, Λ*(1520), and f 0 (975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the φ meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments

  15. Middle Stone Age stratigraphy and excavations at Die Kelders Cave 1 (Western Cape Province, South Africa): the 1992, 1993, and 1995 field seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marean, C W; Goldberg, P; Avery, G; Grine, F E; Klein, R G

    2000-01-01

    Die Kelders Cave 1, first excavated under the direction of Franz Schweitzer in 1969-1973, was re-excavated between 1992 and 1995 by a combined team from the South African Museum, SUNY at Stony Brook, and Stanford University. These renewed excavations enlarged the artefactual and faunal samples from the inadequately sampled and less intensively excavated lower Middle Stone Age (MSA) layers, increased our understanding of the complex site formation processes within the cave, enlarged the hominid sample from the MSA deposits, and generated ESR, TL, and OSL dates for the MSA layers. Importantly, these new excavations dramatically improved our comprehension of the vertical and lateral characteristics of the MSA stratigraphy. Surface plotting of the MSA layers has led to the identification of at least two major zones of subsidence that significantly warped the layers, draping some along the eroding surface contours of major blocks of fallen limestone roof rock. A third zone of subsidence is probably present in the older excavations. Dramatic roof falls of very large limestone blocks occurred at least twice-once in the middle of Layer 4/5 where the roof blocks were only slightly weathered after collapse, and at the top of Layer 6 where the blocks weathered heavily after collapse, producing a zone of decomposed rock around the blocks. Many of the sandy strata are cut by small and localized faults and slippages. All of the strata documented by Schweitzer's excavations are present throughout the exposed area to the west of his excavated area, where many of them thicken and become more complex. Layer 6, the thickest MSA layer, becomes less diagenetically altered and compressed to the west. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball James W

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad™ AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan. Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad™ AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns.

  17. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.K.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstorm, D.K.; Ball, J.W.; Xu, Y.; Cohn, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad??? AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab) and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern) and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan). Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad??? AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Division of Geochemistry of the American Chemical Society 2003.

  18. Summer Schools In Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Sue; Herbert, Mieva; Mantica, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This the report for the 5 year activities for the ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry. The American Chemical Society's Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry were held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and San Jose State University (San Jose, CA) during the award period February 1, 2002 to January 31, 2007. The Summer Schools are intensive, six-week program involving both a lecture component covering fundamental principles of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry and a laboratory component allowing hands-on experience for the students to test many of the basic principles they learn about in lecture. Each site hosted 12 undergraduate students annually, and students received coursework credits towards their undergraduate degrees. Up to 7 student credit hours were earned at San Jose State University, and Brookhaven students received up to 6 college credits through BNL's management partner, SUNY Stony Brook. Funding from the award period covered travel, housing, educational expenses, and student stipends, for the 24 undergraduate participants. Furthermore, funding was also used to cover expenses for lecturers and staff to run the programs at the two facilities. The students were provided with nuclear and radiochemistry training equivalent to a three-hour upper-level undergraduate course along with a two-hour hands-on laboratory experience within the six-week summer period. Lectures were held 5 days per week. Students completed an extensive laboratory sequence, as well as radiation safety training at the start of the Summer Schools. The summer school curriculum was enhanced with a Guest Lecture series, as well as through several one-day symposia and organized field trips to nuclear-related research and applied science laboratories. This enrichment afforded an opportunity for students to see the broader impacts of nuclear science in today's world, and to experience some of the future challenges through formal and informal discussions with

  19. Low reproductive isolation and highly variable levels of gene flow reveal limited progress towards speciation between European river and brook lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougemont, Q; Gaigher, A; Lasne, E; Côte, J; Coke, M; Besnard, A-L; Launey, S; Evanno, G

    2015-12-01

    Ecologically based divergent selection is a factor that could drive reproductive isolation even in the presence of gene flow. Population pairs arrayed along a continuum of divergence provide a good opportunity to address this issue. Here, we used a combination of mating trials, experimental crosses and population genetic analyses to investigate the evolution of reproductive isolation between two closely related species of lampreys with distinct life histories. We used microsatellite markers to genotype over 1000 individuals of the migratory parasitic river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and freshwater-resident nonparasitic brook lamprey (Lampetra planeri) distributed in 10 sympatric and parapatric population pairs in France. Mating trials, parentage analyses and artificial fertilizations demonstrated a low level of reproductive isolation between species even though size-assortative mating may contribute to isolation. Most parapatric population pairs were strongly differentiated due to the joint effects of geographic distance and barriers to migration. In contrast, we found variable levels of gene flow between sympatric populations ranging from panmixia to moderate differentiation, which indicates a gradient of divergence with some population pairs that may correspond to alternative morphs or ecotypes of a single species and others that remain partially isolated. Ecologically based divergent selection may explain these variable levels of divergence among sympatric population pairs, but incomplete genome swamping following secondary contact could have also played a role. Overall, this study illustrates how highly differentiated phenotypes can be maintained despite high levels of gene flow that limit the progress towards speciation. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Exotic "Gill Lice" Species (Copepoda: Lernaeopodidae: Salmincola SPP.) Infect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Carlos F; Rash, Jacob M; Besler, Doug A; Roberts, Jackson R; Warren, Micah B; Arias, Cova R; Bullard, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    Salmincola californiensis infected 25 of 31 (prevalence 0.8; intensity 2-35 [mean 6.6 ± standard deviation 7.7; n = 25]) rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, from a private trout farm connected to the Watauga River, North Carolina. Salmincola edwardsii infected all of 9 (1.0; 2-43 [9.3 ± 13.0; 9]) brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, from Big Norton Prong, a tributary of the Little Tennessee River, North Carolina. Both lernaeopodids are well-known salmonid pathogens, but neither is native to, nor has been previously taxonomically confirmed from, the southeastern United States. Herein, we (1) use light and scanning electron microscopy to identify and provide supplemental morphological observations of these lernaeopodids, (2) furnish complementary molecular sequence data from the 28S rDNA (28S), and (3) document the pathological effects of gill infections. We identified and differentiated these lernaeopodids by the second antenna (exopod tip with large [S. californiensis] vs. slender [S. edwardsii] spines; endopod terminal segment with subequal ventral processes shorter than [S. californiensis] vs. longer than or equal to [S. edwardsii] dorsal hook), maxilliped palp (length typically ≤1/3 [S. californiensis] vs. 1/3-1/2 [S. edwardsii] subchela length exclusive of claw), and bulla (sub-circular and concave on manubrium's side [S. californiensis] vs. non-stellate [S. edwardsii]). Analysis of the 28S rDNA sequences confirmed our taxonomic assignments as demonstrated by 100% sequence similarity among the sympatric, morphologically-conspecific isolates. Histopathology revealed focal gill epithelial hyperplasia, obstruction of interlamellar water channels, lamellar fusion, and crypting of gill filaments. High intensity infections by either lernaeopodid are surveillance-worthy because they are potentially pathogenic to trout in the southeastern United States.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 63 (MTH0TH00120063) on Town Highway 12, crossing Russell Brook, Mount Holly, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Severance, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MTHOTH00120063 on Town Highway 12 crossing Russell Brook, Mount Holly, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 3.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Russell Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.0263 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 29 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from cobbles to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 97.1 mm (0.318 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 4, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 12 crossing of Russell Brook is a 29-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 21, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. During the Level I assessment, it was observed that the upstream left wingwall footing was exposed 0.2 ft, in reference to

  2. Signal- and Listener-Based Factors in Complex Auditory Pattern Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-09

    manuscripts to leading journals . Two of these were based on research that was summarized in last year’s Annual Technical Report . The current report ...PERFORMING ORGANI1ZATION REPORT NUMIERIIS) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NuMBERISk ______________________AM USR- Th-, Ga NAME Of PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Ob. OFFICE SYMBOL 7&. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZAFON Department of Psychol1ogy 4f apgdscabde,t Air Force O)ff ice of S cientific Researcl SUNY Stony

  3. Iodine-131 in sewage sludge from a small water pollution control plant serving a thyroid cancer treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Paula S; Swanson, R Lawrence

    2013-08-01

    Iodine-131 (half-life = 8.04 d) is the most widely used radionuclide in medicine for therapeutic purposes. It is excreted by patients and is discharged directly to sewer systems. Despite considerable dilution in waste water and the relatively short half-life of I, it is readily measured in sewage. This work presents I concentrations in sewage sludge from three water pollution control plants (WPCPs) on Long Island, NY. Iodine-131 concentrations ranged from 0.027 ± 0.002 to 148 ± 4 Bq g dry weight. The highest concentrations were measured in the Stony Brook WPCP, a relatively small plant (average flow = 6.8 × 10 L d) serving a regional thyroid cancer treatment facility in Stony Brook, NY. Preliminary radiation dose calculations suggested further evaluation of dose to treatment plant workers in the Stony Brook WPCP based on the recommendations of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards.

  4. Dose-dependent stimulation of hepatic retinoic acid hydroxylation/oxidation and glucuronidation in brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, after exposure to 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, P.M.; Ndayibagira, A.; Spear, P.A.

    2000-03-01

    Extremely low stores of vitamin A have been reported in fish and birds inhabiting regions contaminated by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other organochlorines, suggesting many possible effects on retinoid biochemical pathways. Metabolic imbalances associated with biologically active retinoids (e.g., retinoic acid) could be associated with tetratogenesis, edema, growth inhibition, reproductive impairment, immunosuppression, and susceptibility to cancer. Sexually mature brook trout were injected imtraperitoneally with the coplanar PCB 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCBP) and again 4 weeks later. At 8 weeks, retinoic acid metabolism was measured in liver microsomes. To the authors' knowledge, retinoic acid conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase is described here for the first time in fish. A substantial rate of glucuronidation was detected in the microsomes from control brook trout, which tended to increase over the dose range of TCBP. Glucuronidation was significantly greater in fish receiving the 10 {micro}g/g body weight dose level. Metabolism through the cytochrome P450 system was also dose-dependent, resulting in significantly greater production of 4-hydroxyretinoic acid at the 10 {micro}g/g dose level. In contrast, subsequent oxidation to 4-oxo-retinoic acid was greatest at the 1 {micro}g/g dose level and did not increase further at higher doses. Liver stores of dehydroretinyl palmitate/oleate were significantly decreased at the 5 and 10 {micro}g/g dose levels.

  5. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, P.

    1993-01-01

    This document presents information concerning: crystallography (single crystal studies); crystallography (powder diffraction); crystallography (surface structure); exafs and interface studies; and small angle scattering

  6. SUNY beam line X3, National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses: beamline change and upgrades at NSLS; crystallography; surface structure; small angle scattering; EXAFS, glazing angle and fluorescence studies; and high temperature superconductors. (LSP)

  7. [SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discussions on the following topics which mainly deal with superconductors: crystallography; surface structure; scattering and EXAFS studies; small angle scattering of x-rays

  8. (SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains short discussions on the following topics which mainly deal with superconductors: crystallography; surface structure; scattering and EXAFS studies; small angle scattering of x-rays. (LSP)

  9. SUNY beam line X3, National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses: beamline change and upgrades at NSLS; crystallography; surface structure; small angle scattering; EXAFS, glazing angle and fluorescence studies; and high temperature superconductors. (LSP).

  10. DOE SUNY Cobleskill Final Report Part 5/5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-03-31

    This research evaluated a rotary kiln gasification system utilizing agricultural wastes to generate syn gas. The goal of the project was to develop an efficient methodology for harnessing energy from agricultural waste. Objectives included: installation and cold testing of the gasification system; hot testing the gasification system with two agricultural wastes; development of an operations plan, including a data procurement and analysis plan; development of a predictive model and validation of the model; developing process improvement recommendations; and construction of two deployment pathway models (e.g., institutional and farm).

  11. Educating the Democratic Mind. SUNY Series, Democracy and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Walter C., Ed.

    This volume features 16 essays about educating young people for the amorphous state called democracy. The collections addresses the central questions: (1) How and what might children be taught so that they respond well and creatively to the demands of an increasingly diverse society that is organized under and struggling to realize the democratic…

  12. DOE SUNY Cobleskill Final Report 3/5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-03-31

    This research evaluated a rotary kiln gasification system utilizing agricultural wastes to generate syn gas. The goal of the project was to develop an efficient methodology for harnessing energy from agricultural waste. Objectives included: installation and cold testing of the gasification system; hot testing the gasification system with two agricultural wastes; development of an operations plan, including a data procurement and analysis plan; development of a predictive model and validation of the model; developing process improvement recommendations; and construction of two deployment pathway models (e.g., institutional and farm).

  13. DOE SUNY Cobleskill Final Report - Part 1/5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-03-31

    This research evaluated a rotary kiln gasification system utilizing agricultural wastes to generate syn gas. The goal of the project was to develop an efficient methodology for harnessing energy from agricultural waste. Objectives included: installation and cold testing of the gasification system; hot testing the gasification system with two agricultural wastes; development of an operations plan, including a data procurement and analysis plan; development of a predictive model and validation of the model; developing process improvement recommendations; and construction of two deployment pathway models (e.g., institutional and farm).

  14. Hydrothermal, biogenic, and seawater components in metalliferous black shales of the Brooks Range, Alaska: Synsedimentary metal enrichment in a carbonate ramp setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Selby, David; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Trace element and Os isotope data for Lisburne Group metalliferous black shales of Middle Mississippian (early Chesterian) age in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska suggest that metals were sourced chiefly from local seawater (including biogenic detritus) but also from externally derived hydrothermal fluids. These black shales are interbedded with phosphorites and limestones in sequences 3 to 35 m thick; deposition occurred mainly on a carbonate ramp during intermittent upwelling under varying redox conditions, from suboxic to anoxic to sulfidic. Deposition of the black shales at ~335 Ma was broadly contemporaneous with sulfide mineralization in the Red Dog and Drenchwater Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, which formed in a distal marginal basin.Relative to the composition of average black shale, the metalliferous black shales (n = 29) display large average enrichment factors (>10) for Zn (10.1), Cd (11.0), and Ag (20.1). Small enrichments (>2–rare earth elements except Ce, Nd, and Sm. A detailed stratigraphic profile over 23 m in the Skimo Creek area (central Brooks Range) indicates that samples from at and near the top of the section, which accumulated during a period of major upwelling and is broadly correlative with the stratigraphic levels of the Red Dog and Drenchwater Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, have the highest Zn/TOC (total organic carbon), Cu/TOC, and Tl/TOC ratios for calculated marine fractions (no detrital component) of these three metals.Average authigenic (detrital-free) contents of Mo, V, U, Ni, Cu, Cd, Pb, Ge, Re, Se, As, Sb, Tl, Pd, and Au show enrichment factors of 4.3 × 103 to 1.2 × 106 relative to modern seawater. Such moderate enrichments, which are common in other metalliferous black shales, suggest wholly marine sources (seawater and biogenic material) for these metals, given similar trends for enrichment factors in organic-rich sediments of modern upwelling zones on the Namibian, Peruvian, and Chilean shelves. The largest enrichment factors for Zn and Ag

  15. Beckett elab edasi / Richard Brooks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brooks, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Dublini Gate Theatre, Blue Angel Films, RTE ja Channel 4 on jäädvustanud üheks telesarjaks kõik 19 Samuel Becketi näidendit. Mõnest filmist pikemalt, näiteks John Gielgudi kuu aega enne surma tehtud rollist David Mameti lavastatud "Katastroofis"

  16. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-04 to 2010-06-08 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-04 to 2010-06-08 in...

  17. Brad Patterson, Tom Brooking, and Jim McAloon, Unpacking the Kist: The Scots in New Zealand. McGill-Queen's Studies in Ethnic History Series, No. 2.33. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2013. Pp. 412. ISBN 978-0-7735-4190-0. CAD $100.00.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán Gerard Brosnahan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Brad Patterson, Tom Brooking, and Jim McAloon, Unpacking the Kist: The Scots in New Zealand. McGill-Queen's Studies in Ethnic History Series, No. 2.33. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2013. Pp. 412. ISBN 978-0-7735-4190-0. CAD $100.00.

  18. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-04 to 2010-07-08 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-04 to 2010-07-08 in...

  19. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-30 to 2010-06-02 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-30 to 2010-06-02 in...

  20. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-03 to 2010-08-07 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-03 to 2010-08-07 in...

  1. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-21 to 2010-08-25 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-21 to 2010-08-25 in...

  2. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-16 to 2010-07-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-16 to 2010-07-20 in...

  3. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-22 to 2010-06-26 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-22 to 2010-06-26 in...

  4. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-15 to 2010-08-19 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-15 to 2010-08-19 in...

  5. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-09 to 2010-08-12 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-09 to 2010-08-12 in...

  6. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-28 to 2010-08-01 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-28 to 2010-08-01 in...

  7. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-23 to 2010-05-25 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-23 to 2010-05-25 in...

  8. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-10 to 2010-06-14 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-10 to 2010-06-14 in...

  9. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-07 to 2010-09-11 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-07 to 2010-09-11 in...

  10. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-16 to 2010-06-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-16 to 2010-06-20 in...

  11. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-14 to 2010-05-18 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074372)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-14 to 2010-05-18 in...

  12. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-10 to 2010-07-14 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-10 to 2010-07-14 in...

  13. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-07 to 2010-05-12 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, tows and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-07 to 2010-05-12 in...

  14. Impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the diversity of shallow stony corals in the Veracruz Reef System National Park Impacto de perturbaciones antrópicas sobre la diversidad de corales pétreos superficiales en el Parque Nacional Sistema Arrecifal veracruzano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla V. Gutiérrez-Ruiz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic disturbances may affect the development and maintenance of coral reefs by promoting diseases and other syndromes. In turn, this may cause local decreases in coral species diversity. In this study, we compared the prevalence of syndromes (including diseases and non-disease syndromes and the diversity of stony coral species between reefs located close (Sacrificios reef and far away (Santiaguillo reef of the port of Veracruz, Mexico. The prevalence of syndromes was higher at Sacrificios than at Santiaguillo, and it also increased with the abundance of coral colonies at the former reef. On the other hand, coral diversity was lower at Sacrificios than at Santiaguillo, suggesting that anthropogenic disturbances, besides promoting diseases and other syndromes, also lead to local decreases in species diversity.Las perturbaciones antropogénicas pueden afectar el desarrollo y mantenimiento de los arrecifes de coral mediante la promoción de las enfermedades y otros síndromes. A su vez, esto puede producir un descenso en la diversidad local de especies. En este estudio, se comparó la prevalencia de síndromes (tanto aquellos causados por enfermedades, como por otros factores y la diversidad de especies de corales pétreos entre arrecifes ubicados cerca (Sacrificios y lejos (Santiaguillo del puerto de Veracruz, México. La prevalencia de síndromes fue mayor en Sacrificios que en Santiaguillo, y también se incrementó con la abundancia de colonias de coral en Sacrificios. Por otra parte, la diversidad de corales fue menor en Sacrificios que en Santiaguillo, sugiriendo que las perturbaciones antropogénicas, además de promover las enfermedades y otros síndromes, también disminuyen localmente la diversidad de especies.

  15. Delineation and Characterization of Furnace Brook Watershed in Marshfield, Massachusetts: A Study of Effects upon Conjunctive Water Use within a Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, E. D.; Enright, R.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of conjunctive use between surface and ground water is essential to resource management both for sustained public use and watershed conservation practices. The Furnace Brook watershed in Marshfield, Massachusetts supplies a coastal community of 25,132 residents with nearly 50% of the town water supply. As with many other coastal communities, development pressure has increased creating a growing demand for freshwater extraction. It has been observed, however, that portions of the stream and Furnace Pond disappear entirely. This has created a conflict between protection of the designated wetland areas and meeting public pressure for water resources, even within what is traditionally viewed as a humid region. Questions have arisen as to whether the town water extraction is influencing this losing behavior by excessively lowering water-table elevations and potentially endangering the health of the stream. This study set out to initially characterize these behaviors and identify possible influences of anthropogenic and natural sources acting upon the watershed including stream flow obstructions, water extraction, and geologic conditions. The initial characterization was conducted utilizing simple, low-cost and minimally intrusive methods as outlined by Lee and Cherry (1978), Rosenberry and LaBaugh (2008) and others during a six week period. Five monitoring stations were established along a 3.0 mile reach of the basin consisting of mini-piezometers, seepage meters, survey elevation base-lines, and utilizing a Marsh-McBirney flow velocity meter. At each station stream discharge, seepage flux rates and hydraulic gradients were determined to develop trends of stream behavior. This methodology had the benefit of demonstrating the efficacy of an intrinsically low-expense, minimally intrusive initial approach to characterizing interactions between surface and ground water resources. The data was correlated with town pumping information, previous geologic

  16. Hydrothermal, biogenic, and seawater components in metalliferous black shales of the Brooks Range, Alaska: Synsedimentary metal enrichment in a carbonate ramp setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Selby, David; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Trace element and Os isotope data for Lisburne Group metalliferous black shales of Middle Mississippian (early Chesterian) age in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska suggest that metals were sourced chiefly from local seawater (including biogenic detritus) but also from externally derived hydrothermal fluids. These black shales are interbedded with phosphorites and limestones in sequences 3 to 35 m thick; deposition occurred mainly on a carbonate ramp during intermittent upwelling under varying redox conditions, from suboxic to anoxic to sulfidic. Deposition of the black shales at ~335 Ma was broadly contemporaneous with sulfide mineralization in the Red Dog and Drenchwater Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, which formed in a distal marginal basin.Relative to the composition of average black shale, the metalliferous black shales (n = 29) display large average enrichment factors (>10) for Zn (10.1), Cd (11.0), and Ag (20.1). Small enrichments (>2–seawater. Such moderate enrichments, which are common in other metalliferous black shales, suggest wholly marine sources (seawater and biogenic material) for these metals, given similar trends for enrichment factors in organic-rich sediments of modern upwelling zones on the Namibian, Peruvian, and Chilean shelves. The largest enrichment factors for Zn and Ag are much higher (1.4 × 107 and 2.9 × 107, respectively), consistent with an appreciable hydrothermal component. Other metals such as Cu, Pb, and Tl that are concentrated in several black shale samples, and are locally abundant in the Red Dog and Drenchwater Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, may have a partly hydrothermal origin but this cannot be fully established with the available data. Enrichments in Cr (up to 7.8 × 106) are attributed to marine and not hydrothermal processes. The presence in some samples of large enrichments in Eu (up to 6.1 × 107) relative to modern seawater and of small positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* up to 1.12) are considered unrelated to hydrothermal activity, instead

  17. La construcción del personaje lésbico en los relatos cubanos de Sonia Rivera-Valdés y Jacqueline Herranz-Brooks: de la “abyección” a la subversión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Cabaloue

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available En este ensayo se analizan las obras de dos autoras cubanas de la diáspora, Sonia Rivera-Valdés y Jacqueline Herranz-Brooks, enfocando especialmente la temática lesbiana de estas narraciones, con especial atención a la forma como nos revelan la situación de las lesbianas en Cuba, sobre todo en el “Periodo especial”, a la vez que se convierte en un modo de subvertir la heterosexualidad obligatoria. De este modo se indaga sobre cómo en sus relatos se construye el sujeto “abyecto” (el personaje lésbico en oposición al sistema heteronormativo y cómo este sujeto pasa de la “abyección” a la subversión, al desafiar la heterosexualidad obligatoria.

  18. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome presenting multiple concurrent cutaneous and parotid gland neoplasms: cytologic findings on fine-needle sample and description of a novel mutation of the CYLD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Campanile, Anna Cipolletta; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Longo, Francesco; Perri, Francesco; Caponigro, Francesco; Schiavone, Concetta; Ionna, Franco; Maiello, Francesco; Martinuzzi, Claudia; Nasti, Sabina; Botti, Gerardo; Fulciniti, Franco

    2015-08-01

    Multiple dermal cylindromas and membranous basal cell adenoma of parotid gland in a 67-year-old woman with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome (BSS) were examined by fine-needle cytology. Histology, immunochemistry, and CYLD germline mutation testing were also performed. Cytomorphology and immunochemistry of the two lesions showed basaloid neoplasms, remarkably similar, composed by proliferating epithelial cells of basal type accompanied by a smaller proportion of myoepithelial cells. CYLD gene showed a novel germline splice acceptor site mutation (c.2042-1G>C) with skipping of the entire exon 15. The occurrence of analogous tumors, dermal cylindromas, and membranous basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland, in the same patient may result from the action of a single gene on ontogenetically similar stem cells. Therefore, patients with BSS should be offered a genetic counselling for an early and correct diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Use of Hedonic Analysis Within An Ecosystem Services Assessment To Inform Post-Hurricane Sandy Recovery and Resiliency Planning in Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the wake of Hurricane Sandy- the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history- the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Stony Brook University, The Nature Conservancy, and New York State (NYS) Department of State partnered...

  20. Lessons Learned From Applying An Ecosystem Services Framework for Post-Hurricane Sand Recovery and Resiliency Planning in Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Stony Brook University, The Nature Conservancy, and New York State (NYS) Department of State partnered with ...

  1. 11th International Workshop on Critical Point and Onset of Deconfinement

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, Stony Brook University and Beam Energy Scan Theory (BEST) Collaboration co-hosted this international event. The purpose of the CPOD conference series is to discuss theoretical and experimental progress in studies of the QCD phase diagram and the properties of strongly interacting matter, particularly focusing on the physics at large baryon densities.

  2. Theory of computational complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ding-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    DING-ZHU DU, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Minnesota. KER-I KO, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

  3. Methylphenidate in Treatment of ADHD and Comorbid Chronic Tic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The safety and efficacy of immediate-release methylphenidate (MPH-IR for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in children (ages 6-12 years with Tourette's syndrome (96% or chronic motor tic disorder (4% were evaluated at State University of New York, Stony Brook.

  4. A blessing in disguise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    career. While all my six elder brothers chose science and math- ematics as their subjects, my elder sister opted for ... One of my teachers, Dr. Pankaj Sharan, was a Ph.D. from I.I.T., Kanpur, ... luck would have it, the physics test took place before the math- ... doctoral fellowship at State University of New York at Stony Brook.

  5. 76 FR 58469 - Endangered Species; File Nos. 16526, 16323, 16436, 16422, 16438, 16431, 16507, 16547, 16375...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... gastric lavaged. Stony Brook University (Keith Dunton, Responsible Party) [File No. 16422], School of... Wildlife Service, 11110 Kimages Road, Charles City, VA 23030 (Responsible Party) [File No. 16547] requests... tag. Young of the year fish would be captured using trawls, and measured and weighed; larval fish...

  6. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This report discusses the following areas of investigation of the Stony Brook Nuclear Theory Group: the physics of hadrons; QCD and the nucleus; QCD at finite temperature and high density; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure and many-body theory; and heavy ion physics

  7. Electric dipole moments of the nucleon and light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirzba, Andreas

    2014-08-15

    The electric dipole moments of the nucleon and light ions are discussed and strategies for disentangling the underlying sources of CP violation beyond the Kobayashi–Maskawa quark-mixing mechanism of the Standard Model are indicated. Contribution to “45 years of nuclear theory at Stony Brook: a tribute to Gerald E. Brown”.

  8. A Predoctoral Program in Dental Care for the Developmentally Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Fred S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In 1980, the State University of New York at Stony Brook began a program, integrated into the program of children's dentistry, to train students in care for the developmentally disabled. Management of developmentally disabled patients is provided over three years, and represents an extension of pediatric behavior management. (MSE)

  9. The Making of a Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truxal, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the concepts that are central to the courses offered by the Department of Technology and Society at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Emphasizes the integration of technology concepts into courses dealing with problem solving, space technology, military technology and environmental studies. (TW)

  10. 4π detector for correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design of a 4π detector for ISA-BELLE involves a counter hodoscope with 302 elements and an array of proportional wire chambers with 8950 wires. Such a detector could be used for correlation experiments and measurements of total cross section, as has been done by the Pisa-Stony Brook group at the ISR. (U.S.)

  11. Design and construction of superconductor resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Goliak, T.; Holmgren, D.W.; Storm, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    A low beta resonator was fabricated at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, then plated and successfully tested at Stony Brook. The basic design is a quarter wave, cylindrical cavity excited by a magnetic coupling loop. Before the copper prototype was made the exact design parameters were measured by the construction and RF testing of a brass model

  12. The Solnhofen Limestone: A stony heritage of many uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölbl-Ebert, Martina; Kramar, Sabina; Cooper, Barry J.

    2016-04-01

    High above the valley of the River Altmühl (Bavaria, Germany), between Solnhofen to the west and Kelheim to the east, numerous quarries give access to thinly plated limestone from the Upper Jurassic, some 150 million years before the present. The main quarry areas lie around the town of Eichstätt and between the villages of Solnhofen, Langenaltheim and Mörnsheim. Here limestone slabs have been quarried for several hundred years, some even in Roman times. Solnhofen Limestone is famous worldwide; not only because it is a beautiful building stone of high quality, but also because of the exceptionally well-preserved fossils it contains -among them the early bird Archaeopteryx. The quarry industry between Solnhofen and Eichstätt has shaped a cultural landscape, with old and new quarries sunk into the plain and numerous spoil heaps rising above it, for the rock is not all economically useful. But many of the spoil heaps and the old quarries are environmentally protected as they provide a habitat for some rare plants and animals. It is not necessary to cut the Solnhofen Limestone with a saw: it is split by hand into thin and even slabs or sheets which are used for flagstones and wall covers, which since centuries are sold world-wide. Locally it also serves as roof tiles for traditional houses. Thick slabs of especially fine quality may be found near Solnhofen and Mörnsheim and are used for lithography printing.

  13. Integrated care in Germany – a stony but necessary road!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Amelung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available German healthcare provides a very comprehensive benefits catalogue, high quality standards, low access barriers and in particular healthcare which is independent from one's income. But at the same time it is one of the most expensive systems in the world. Reasons for the high costs of care are mainly due to the separation of the outpatient, inpatient and rehabilitation sectors, the poor information flow between the service providers and insufficient competition in healthcare provision. In the last 15 years the German government has introduced various reform acts and in doing so has followed a continual path of development: more competition for care concepts between health insurances, more options for the insured and more leeway for players in the various sectors of healthcare. The following article gives an overview of new forms of contracting that have been introduced and provides recommendations for the further development of integrated care in the German healthcare system.

  14. Nõela all : Igakuine vinüülitutvustus / Stony Place

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stony Place

    1998-01-01

    Uutest vinüülplaatidest Daddy's Favourite "I Feel Good Things For You", Kenny Lattimore "Days Like This", 70̀ s Age "Reach For The Sky","Grindlocked EP", Bill Riley "Closing In EP", Moodymann "Forevernevermore", Frankie Valentine "Staring In The face Of Extinction", "Norman Jay presents Philadelphia" International 1973-81"

  15. The digestive system of the stony coral Stylophora pistillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz-Bahat, M; Douek, J; Moiseeva, E; Peters, E C; Rinkevich, B

    2017-05-01

    Because hermatypic species use symbiotic algal photosynthesis, most of the literature in this field focuses on this autotrophic mode and very little research has studied the morphology of the coral's digestive system or the digestion process of particulate food. Using histology and histochemestry, our research reveals that Stylophora pistillata's digestive system is concentrated at the corals' peristome, actinopharynx and mesenterial filaments (MF). We used in-situ hybridization (ISH) of the RNA transcript of the gene that codes for the S. pistillata digestive enzyme, chymotrypsinogen, to shed light on the functionality of the digestive system. Both the histochemistry and the ISH pointed to the MF being specialized digestive organs, equipped with large numbers of acidophilic and basophilic granular gland cells, as well as acidophilic non-granular gland cells, some of which produce chymotrypsinogen. We identified two types of MF: short, trilobed MF and unilobed, long and convoluted MF. Each S. pistillata polyp harbors two long convoluted MF and 10 short MF. While the short MF have neither secreting nor stinging cells, each of the convoluted MF display gradual cytological changes along their longitudinal axis, alternating between stinging and secreting cells and three distinctive types of secretory cells. These observations indicate the important digestive role of the long convoluted MF. They also indicate the existence of novel feeding compartments in the gastric cavity of the polyp, primarily in the nutritionally active peristome, in the actinopharynx and in three regions of the MF that differ from each other in their cellular components, general morphology and chymotrypsinogen excretion.

  16. Nephrolithiasis and hematuria--sometimes a stony road to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, L; Quack, I; Weiner, S M; Waldherr, R; Henning, B; Hofebauer, S; Rump, L C

    2005-08-01

    We report a case of a young man with a history of kidney stones. Occurrence of gross hematuria several months after the extracorporeal shock wave, lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment lead to hospitalization. By ultrasound and abdominal CT scan, the urologist could exclude post-renal causes of the gross hematuria and acute renal failure. After transfer to a department of nephrology hemodialysis was started, an immediate kidney biopsy was performed and prednisolone was administered on the same day. The kidney biopsy revealed an anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease. The renal function did not recover and the patient remained on hemodialysis. In the literature it has been hypothesized that ESWL-treated patients are prone to develop anti-GBM disease by liberation of glomerular basement antigen through the ESWL high energy shock waves. An additional hypothesis considering the higher susceptibility for anti-GBM disease among certain HLA-tissue types is discussed with regard to our case. Unfortunately, the prolonged track to diagnosis and delayed immunosuppressive treatment could not prevent poor clinical outcome. Although anti-GBM disease is a rather rare disease, it should be included as a differential diagnosis for hematuria--especially months after ESWL treatment. Otherwise early diagnosis may be missed and as in our patient immunosuppressive treatment will remain unsuccessful to recover renal function.

  17. Microbial Populations of Stony Meteorites: Substrate Controls on First Colonizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair W. Tait

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Finding fresh, sterilized rocks provides ecologists with a clean slate to test ideas about first colonization and the evolution of soils de novo. Lava has been used previously in first colonizer studies due to the sterilizing heat required for its formation. However, fresh lava typically falls upon older volcanic successions of similar chemistry and modal mineral abundance. Given enough time, this results in the development of similar microbial communities in the newly erupted lava due to a lack of contrast between the new and old substrates. Meteorites, which are sterile when they fall to Earth, provide such contrast because their reduced and mafic chemistry commonly differs to the surfaces on which they land; thus allowing investigation of how community membership and structure respond to this new substrate over time. We conducted 16S rRNA gene analysis on meteorites and soil from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. We found that the meteorites have low species richness and evenness compared to soil sampled from directly beneath each meteorite. Despite the meteorites being found kilometers apart, the community structure of each meteorite bore more similarity to those of other meteorites (of similar composition than to the community structure of the soil on which it resided. Meteorites were dominated by sequences that affiliated with the Actinobacteria with the major Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU classified as Rubrobacter radiotolerans. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the next most abundant phyla. The soils were also dominated by Actinobacteria but to a lesser extent than the meteorites. We also found OTUs affiliated with iron/sulfur cycling organisms Geobacter spp. and Desulfovibrio spp. This is an important finding as meteorites contain abundant metal and sulfur for use as energy sources. These ecological findings demonstrate that the structure of the microbial community in these meteorites is controlled by the substrate, and will not reach homeostasis with the Nullarbor community, even after ca. 35,000 years. Our findings show that meteorites provide a unique, sterile substrate with which to test ideas relating to first-colonizers. Although meteorites are colonized by microorganisms, the microbial population is unlikely to match the community of the surrounding soil on which they fall.

  18. Effects of acid-sulfate weathering and cyanide-containing gold tailings on the transport and fate of mercury and other metals in Gossan Creek: Murray Brook mine, New Brunswick, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al, Tom A. [Department of Geology and Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada)]. E-mail: tal@unb.ca; Leybourne, Matthew I. [Department of Geosciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Box 830688 Richardson, TX 75083-0688 (United States); Maprani, Antu C. [Department of Geology and Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada); MacQuarrie, Kerry T. [Department of Civil Engineering and Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3 (Canada); Dalziel, John A. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Marine Chemistry Section, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B2Y 4A2 (Canada); Fox, Don [New Brunswick Department of Environment and Local Government, Marysville Place 20 McGloin Street, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3A 5T8 (Canada); Yeats, Phillip A. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Marine Chemistry Section, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B2Y 4A2 (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    Gossan Creek, a headwater stream in the SE Upsalquitch River watershed in New Brunswick, Canada, contains elevated concentrations of total Hg (Hg{sub T} up to 60 {mu}g/L). Aqueous geochemical investigations of the shallow groundwater at the headwaters of the creek confirm that the source of Hg is a contaminated groundwater plume (neutral pH with Hg and Cl concentrations up to 150 {mu}g/L and 20 mg/L, respectively), originating from the Murray Brook mine tailings, that discharges at the headwaters of the creek. The discharge area of the contaminant plume was partially delineated based on elevated pH and Cl concentrations in the groundwater. The local groundwater outside of the plume contains much lower concentrations of Hg and Cl (<0.1 {mu}g/L and 3.8 mg/L, respectively) and displays the chemical characteristics of an acid-sulfate weathering system, with low pH (4.1-5.5) and elevated concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb and SO{sub 4} (up to 5400 {mu}g Cu/L, 8700 {mu}g Zn/L, 70 {mu}g Pb/L and 330 mg SO{sub 4}/L), derived from oxidation of sulfide minerals in the Murray Brook volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit and surrounding bedrock. The Hg{sub T} mass loads measured at various hydrologic control points along the stream system indicate that 95-99% of the dissolved Hg{sub T} is attenuated in the first 3-4 km from the source. Analyses of creek bed sediments for Au, Ag, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg indicate that these metals have partitioned strongly to the sediments. Mineralogical investigations of the contaminated sediments using analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), reveal discrete particles (<1-2 {mu}m) of metacinnabar (HgS), mixed Au-Ag-Hg amalgam, Cu sulfide and Ag sulfide.

  19. Water-chemistry and on-site sulfur-speciation data for selected springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 1994-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, James W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Cunningham, Kirk M.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Xu, Yong; DeMonge, Jennifer M.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two water analyses are reported for samples collected at 8 hot springs and their overflow drainages, two geysers, and two ambient-temperature acid streams in Yellowstone National Park during 1994-95. These water samples were collected and analyzed as part of the initial research investigations on sulfur redox speciation in the hot springs of Yellowstone and to document chemical changes in overflows that affect major ions, redox species, and trace elements. The sulfur redox speciation research is a collaboration between the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Four hot springs, Ojo Caliente, Azure, Frying Pan, and Angel Terrace, were studied in detail. Analyses were performed adjacent to the sampling site or in an on-site mobile lab truck constructed by the USGS, or later in a USGS laboratory. Water temperature, specific conductance, pH, Eh, D.O., and dissolved H2S were determined adjacent to the sample source at the time of sampling. Alkalinity and F- were determined on-site on the day of sample collection. Thiosulfate and polythionates were determined as soon as possible (minutes to hours later) by ion chromatography (IC). Other major anions (Cl-, SO4 2-, Br-) also were determined on-site by IC within two days of sample collection. Ammonium, Fe(II), and Fe(total) were determined on-site by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry within two days of sample collection. Later in the USGS laboratory, densities were determined. Concentrations of Ca, Mg, Li, Na, and K were determined by flame atomic absorption and emission (Na, K) spectrometry. Concentrations of Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe(total), K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Si, Sr, V, and Zn were determined by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Trace concentrations of Al and Mg were determined by Zeeman-corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Three important conclusions from the sampling and analyses are: (1

  20. Introduction to the physics of the total cross section at LHC. A review of data and models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancheri, Giulia [INFN Frascati National Laboratory, Frascati (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Theoretical Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Srivastava, Yogendra N. [University of Perugia, Physics Department, Perugia (Italy); Northeastern University, Physics Department, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This review describes the development of the physics of hadronic cross sections up to recent LHC results and cosmic ray experiments. We present here a comprehensive review - written with a historical perspective - about total cross sections from medium to the highest energies explored experimentally and studied through a variety of methods and theoretical models for over 60 years. We begin by recalling the analytic properties of the elastic amplitude and the theorems about the asymptotic behavior of the total cross section. A discussion of how proton-proton cross sections are extracted from cosmic rays at higher than accelerator energies and help the study of these asymptotic limits, is presented. This is followed by a description of the advent of particle colliders, through which high energies and unmatched experimental precisions have been attained. Thus the measured hadronic elastic and total cross sections have become crucial instruments to probe the so called soft part of QCD physics, where quarks and gluons are confined, and have led to test and refine Regge behavior and a number of diffractive models. As the c.m. energy increases, the total cross section also probes the transition into hard scattering describable with perturbative QCD, the so-called mini-jet region. Further tests are provided by cross section measurements of γp, γ*p and γ*γ* for models based on vector meson dominance, scaling limits of virtual photons at high Q{sup 2} and the BFKL formalism. Models interpolating from virtual to real photons are also tested. It seems to us to be a necessary task to explore bit-by-bit the rigorous consequences of analyticity, unitarity and crossing. Who knows if someday one will not be able to reassemble the pieces of the puzzle. - A. Martin and F. Cheung, based on 1967 A.M. Lectures at Brandeis Summer School and Lectures at SUNY and Stony Brook (Martin and Cheung in Analyticity properties and bounds of the scattering amplitudes. Gordon and Breach Science

  1. Timing and processes for exhumation of HP/LT rocks of the southern Brooks Range (AK): Insight from combined geochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of white mica

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T.; Miller, E. L.; Grove, M. J.; Hayden, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The obduction of an island arc onto the Arctic Alaska continental margin in the Jura-Cretaceous led to southward subduction of continental crust and high-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) epidote-blueschist facies metamorphism in the southern Brooks Range (BR). A regionally developed greenschist facies normal-sense shear zone system along the southern margin of the BR suggests that extensional faulting had an influential role in the exhumation of the metamorphic core. To better constrain the exhumation history of the metamorphic core of the BR, samples were collected from a N-S transect through the metamorphic core of the orogen. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of white micas reveal that they are composed of phengite (Si > 3.0 pfu) or a combination of phengite + paragonite. Si-content of phengites reveal a southward increase in Si from 3.1 to 3.4 pfu (corresponding to an increase in pressure). Si-contents in higher-P phengites are scattered, reflecting subsequent muscovite growth. The Si trend is matched by a southward increase in the 40Ar/39Ar total gas ages of white micas. Phengite from the north are characterized by younger ages (~115 Ma) and flatter 40Ar/39Ar spectra. Farther south, phengites and paragonites yield older 40Ar/39Ar ages. These samples yield convex, staircase 40Ar/39Ar spectra that initiate ~115-120 Ma and flatten-out ~130-138 Ma. Modeling using MacArgon proposes that an initial cooling of HP/LT metamorphism occurred ~130-138 Ma, recorded in the high-Si phengites and paragonites. Following initial cooling, modeling suggests HP/LT rocks stalled in the greenschist facies field before subsequent exhumation, resulting in the staircase 40Ar/39Ar spectra. Flatter 40Ar/39Ar spectra recorded by the northern samples and modeling of 40Ar/39Ar results from the southern samples suggest that these rocks from metamorphic core of the BR were exhumed to temperatures < 300°C by ~115 Ma.

  2. VT Foote Brook Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring - Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) 79% similar to the reference stream, then it is in a non-impaired state, reflecting a good population of pollution intolerant organisms and good...

  3. VT Foote Brook Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring - Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) 79% similar to the reference stream, then it is in a non-impaired state, reflecting a good population of pollution intolerant organisms and good...

  4. Autor pole kapten Corelliga rahul / Richard Brooks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brooks, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Menuromaani "Kapten Corelli mandoliin" autori Louis de Bernieres'i hinnanguid samanimelise filmi kohta : "Captain Corelli's Mandolin" : režissöör John Madden : Suurbritannia-Prantsusmaa-Ameerika Ühendriigid 2001

  5. FLOODPLAIN, BROOKE COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  6. Playboy Hefner meenutab ja naeratab / Brooks Barnes

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Barnes, Brooks

    2009-01-01

    Kuigi meediaettevõte Playboy Enterprises on rahalistes raskustes, kärpides ka reklaamijatele lubatud levinumbrit 2,6 miljonilt eksemplarilt 1,5 miljonile, väidab ettevõtte asutaja Hugh Hefner, et Playboy ei ole kokkukukkumise äärel

  7. PREFACE: Workshop Photograph and Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Workshop photograph Workshop Program Sunday 28 March 201019:00-21:00 Reception at Okura Frontier Hotel Tsukuba(Buffet style dinner with drink) Monday 29 March 2010Introduction (Chair: André Rubbia (ETH Zurich))09:00 Welcome address (05') Atsuto Suzuki (KEK)09:05 Message from CERN on neutrino physics (10') Sergio Bertolucci (CERN)09:15 Message from FNAL on neutrino physics (10') Young Kee Kim (FNAL)09:25 Message from KEK on neutrino physics (10') Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK)09:35 Introductory remark on GLA2010 (10') Takuya Hasegawa (KEK) Special session (Chair: Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK))09:45 The ICARUS Liquid Argon TPC (45') Carlo Rubbia (CERN)10:30-11:00 Coffee break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments I (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))11:00 Results from massive underground detectors (non accelerator) (30') Takaaki Kajita (ICRR, U. of Tokyo)11:30 Present long baseline neutrino experiments (30') Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook)12:00-12:10 Workshop picture12:10-14:00 Lunch break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments II (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))14:00 Physics goals of the next generation massive underground experiments (30') David Wark (Imperial College London)14:30 Near detectors for long baseline neutrino experiments (20') Tsuyoshi Nakaya (Kyoto U.) Lessons on Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology from ongoing developments (Chair: Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook))14:50 WARP (30') Claudio Montanari (U. of Pavia)15:20 ArDM (30') Alberto Marchionni (ETH Zurich)15:50 From ArgoNeuT to MicroBooNE (30') Bonnie Fleming (Yale U.)16:20 250L (30') Takasumi Maruyama (KEK)16:50 The DEAP/CLEAN project (20') Mark Boulay (Queen's U.)17:10-17:40 Coffee break Lessons from Xe based Liquids Imaging detectors (Chair: Flavio Cavanna (U. of L'Aquilla))17:30 MEG (20') Satoshi Mihara (KEK)17:50 The XENON project (20') Elena Aprile (Columbia U.)18:10 XMASS (20') Hiroyuki Sekiya (ICRR, U. of Tokyo) Studies on physics performance (Chair

  8. CERN theorist gets a Heineman

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A CERN theorist is among the recipients of the American Physical Society's annual Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics. The 2006 recipients of the Dannie Heineman Prize. From left to right : Peter van Nieuwenhuizen of the Stony Brook University (New York), Sergio Ferrara of CERN and Daniel Freedman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Picture taken in Rome in June 2005. The 2006 prize recognises the development of supergravity by Sergio Ferrara of CERN, Daniel Freedman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Peter van Nieuwenhuizen of the State University of New York, Stony Brook. The trio won the award for constructing and developing the first super-symmetric extension of Einstein's theory of general relativity. By providing a special class of field theories for the low-energy manifestation of superstrings, supergravity has played an important role in theoretical physics in the last thirty years. This is not the first time that supergravity has won an award. In 1993, the trio ...

  9. Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2011-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and five subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water years 2007-08 (October 2006 through September 2008). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. Composite samples of stormwater also were analyzed for concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons and suspended sediment in one subbasin in the Stony Brook Reservoir drainage basin. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply.

  10. Heavy-ion-linac post-accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the tandem-linac system for heavy-ion acceleration are reviewed and illustrated in terms of the technology and performance of the superconducting heavy-ion energy booster at Argonne. This technology is compared briefly with the corresponding technologies of the superconducting linac at Stony Brook and the room-temperature linac at Heidelberg. The performance possibilities for the near-term future are illustrated in terms of the proposed extension of the Argonne booster to form ATLAS

  11. Audio App Brings a Better Nights Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neuroscientist Seth Horowitz was part of a NASA-funded team at State University of New York Stony Brook demonstrating that low-amplitude vestibular stimulation could induce sleep. After recognizing the same stimulation could be applied through sound, Horowitz founded Sleep Genius, located in Park City, Utah, and released a mobile app of the same name that helps people to get a more restful sleep.

  12. Neutron star news and puzzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Madappa

    2014-01-01

    Gerry Brown has had the most influence on my career in Physics, and my life after graduate studies. This article gives a brief account of some of the many ways in which Gerry shaped my research. Focus is placed on the significant strides on neutron star research made by the group at Stony Brook, which Gerry built from scratch. Selected puzzles about neutron stars that remain to be solved are noted

  13. Genesee River Basin Study; Reconnaissance Report. Volume 1. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    River in the Towns of Chili and Riga, Monroe County, New York" was prepared in September 1969. The report gives a history of flooding and outlines...a benefit - cost ratio of less than unity. 9 A report entitled "Flood Recovery Planning Program - Preliminary Evaluation of Stony Brook and Mill Creek...Creek, Town ot (a Chili , and Ogden, Monroe County, New York," was prepared in August 1915. Ttl- report presents a brief history of flooding and

  14. Proceedings of the CAP meetings, November 1990--February 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains viewgraph material on the following topics: on beam emittance -- application to ATF; a review of Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (AFT); on development of a superconducting RFQ at Stony Brook University; development of new methods for charged particle acceleration at Yerevan Physics Institute; theory of high gain free electron laser; on ultra violet free electron laser at BNL; high luminosity at SSC; and nonlinear dynamics studies of accelerators

  15. Alan Alda visits the ATLAS Experiment cavern at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2012-01-01

    Alan Alda, is an American actor, director, screenwriter, and author. A six-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award winner, he is best known for his role as Hawkeye Pierce in the TV series M*A*S*H. He is currently a Visiting Professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Journalism and a member of the advisory board of The Center for Communicating Science.[1

  16. Proceedings of the CAP meetings, November 1990--February 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains viewgraph material on the following topics: on beam emittance -- application to ATF; a review of Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (AFT); on development of a superconducting RFQ at Stony Brook University; development of new methods for charged particle acceleration at Yerevan Physics Institute; theory of high gain free electron laser; on ultra violet free electron laser at BNL; high luminosity at SSC; and nonlinear dynamics studies of accelerators.

  17. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The introductory section describes the goals, main thrusts, and interrelationships between the various activities in the program and principal achievements of the Stony Brook Nuclear Theory Group during 1992--93. Details and specific accomplishments are related in abstract form. Current research is taking place in the following areas: strong interaction physics (the physics of hadrons, QCD and the nucleus, QCD at finite temperature and high density), relativistic heavy-ion physics, nuclear structure and nuclear many- body theory, and nuclear astrophysics

  18. Obituary: Philip M. Solomon, 1939-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Philip Solomon, one of the pioneers and leading researchers in molecular astrophysics, died on 30 April 2008 at his apartment on the upper west side of Manhattan after a battle with cancer. His pioneering research included both theoretical and very extensive observational studies of stellar atmospheres, interstellar molecules, high redshift galaxies, and the Earth's stratosphere. Phil was Distinguished Professor at The State University of New York [SUNY], Stony Brook, where he had been since 1974. Phil was born on 29 March 1939 in Manhattan, New York City, to Nat and Betty Solomon. Nat Solomon was a labor organizer and a printer. Phil attended the University of Wisconsin, where he received his BS in 1959 and where he met his future wife Sheila who was studying art. His Ph.D., "On the Role of Light Molecules in Astrophysics," was also from the University of Wisconsin under the guidance of Art Code and Bob Bless. After postdoctoral positions at Princeton and lectureships at Columbia and the University of California, San Diego, Phil spent two years as a Professor at the University of Minnesota. After two years at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, he came to SUNY, Stony Brook, as Professor of Astronomy in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences. In 1988 Phil was selected as a Humboldt Senior Distinguished Scientist, and, in 1999, he was honored with the rank of Distinguished Professor at SUNY. Phil took sabbatical and other leaves at Churchill College and the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge; the Institute for Advanced Study; l'Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris; Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris; and the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique [IRAM], France. Phil published more than 160 papers and supervised seven Ph.D. students. He served on numerous review, visiting, and advisory panels. Phil's first theoretical research focused on opacity and abundance of light molecules such as H2, CO, and CN in stellar atmospheres, but then shifted quickly to the

  19. The Learning Disabilities Unit at the State College of Optometry/SUNY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, Harold A.; Springer, Florence E.

    1986-01-01

    The Learning Disabilities Unit of New York's State College of Optometry, providing testing and research for learning disabled adults and children and professional instruction and clinical experience for students of optometry and related fields, is described. (MSE)

  20. The Citizen Factory: Schooling and Cultural Production in Bolivia. SUNY Series: Power, Social Identity, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luykx, Aurolyn

    This book attempts to engage theoretical questions of ethnicity, ideology, and identity as they are lived out by Aymara students in a small teachers' college in rural Bolivia. A year of fieldwork at the Escuela Normal Rural "Kollasuyo" focused on the experiences of Aymara students during their intensive training to become rural teachers,…

  1. Meditation and the Classroom: Contemplative Pedagogy for Religious Studies. SUNY Series in Religious Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer-Brown, Judith, Ed.; Grace, Fran, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Meditation and the Classroom" inventively articulates how educators can use meditation to educate the whole student. Notably, a number of universities have initiated contemplative studies options and others have opened contemplative spaces. This represents an attempt to address the inner life. It is also a sign of a new era, one in…

  2. Characterizing ICF Neutron Scintillation Diagnostics on the nTOF line at SUNY Geneseo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson-Keister, Pat; Padawar-Curry, Jonah; Visca, Hannah; Fletcher, Kurt; Padalino, Stephen; Sangster, T. Craig; Regan, Sean

    2015-11-01

    Neutron scintillator diagnostics for ICF and HEDP can be characterized using the neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) line on Geneseo's 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. Neutron signals can be differentiated from gamma signals by employing coincidence methods. A 1.8-MeV beam of deuterons incident on a deuterated polyethylene target produces neutrons via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. Neutrons emerging at a lab angle of 88° have an energy of 2.96 MeV; the 3He ions associated with these neutrons are detected at a scattering angle of 43° using a surface barrier detector. The time of flight of the neutron can be measured by using the 3He detection as a ``start'' signal and the scintillation detection as a ``stop'' signal. This time of flight requirement is used to identify the 2.96-MeV neutron signals in the scintillator. To measure the light curve produced by these monoenergetic neutrons, two photomultiplier (PMT) tubes are attached to the scintillator. The full aperture PMT establishes the nTOF coincidence. The other PMT is fitted with a pinhole to collect single events. The time between the full aperture PMT signal and the arrival of the signal in the pinhole PMT is used to determine the light curve for the scintillator. This system will enable the neutron response of various scintillators to be compared. Supported in part by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Characterizing ICF Neutron Diagnostics on the nTOF line at SUNY Geneseo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Angela; Padalino, Stephen; Turner, Ethan; Ginnane, Mary Kate; Dubois, Natalie; Fletcher, Kurtis; Giordano, Michael; Lawson-Keister, Patrick; Harrison, Hannah; Visca, Hannah; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2014-10-01

    Charged particle beams from the Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator produce nuclear reactions that emit neutrons in the range of 0.5 to 17.9 MeV via the d(d,n)3He and 11B(d,n)12C reactions. The neutron energy and flux can be adjusted by controlling the accelerator beam current and potential. This adjustable neutron source makes it possible to calibrate ICF and HEDP neutron scintillator diagnostics. However, gamma rays which are often present during an accelerator-based calibration are difficult to differentiate from neutron signals in scintillators. To identify neutrons from gamma rays and to determine their energy, a permanent neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) line is being constructed. By detecting the scintillator signal in coincidence with an associated charged particle (ACP) produced in the reaction, the identity of the neutron can be known and its energy determined by time of flight. Using a 100% efficient surface barrier detector to count the ACPs, the absolute efficiency of the scintillator as a function of neutron energy can be determined. This is done by determining the ratio of the ACP counts in the singles spectrum to coincidence counts for matched solid angles of the SBD and scintillator. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  4. Dreaming in the Classroom: Practices, Methods, and Resources in Dream Education. SUNY Series in Dream Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Philip; Bulkeley, Kelly; Welt, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    "Dreaming in the Classroom" provides teachers from virtually all fields with a uniquely informative guidebook for introducing their students to the universal human phenomenon of dreaming. Although dreaming may not be held in high esteem in mainstream Western society, students at all education levels consistently enjoy learning about…

  5. The water retention of a granite rock fragments in High Tatras stony soils

    OpenAIRE

    Novák, Viliam; Šurda, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The water retention capacity of coarse rock fragments is usually considered negligible. But the presence of rock fragments in a soil can play an important role in both water holding capacity and in hydraulic conductivity as well. This paper presents results of maximum water holding capacity measured in coarse rock fragments in the soil classified as cobbly sandy loam sampled at High Tatra mountains. It is shown, that those coarse rock (granite) fragments have the maximum retention capacity up...

  6. Tradable permits. The stony path to a market economy; Umweltzertifikate. Der steinige Weg zur Marktwirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonus, H. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    Thirty years ago, Thomas D. Crocker and John H. Dales came up with the idea of tradable permits for making environmental protection both economically and ecologically efficient. Since then, a heated and controversial discussion has been going on. Tradable permits were considered as unrealistic, contra-competitive, incompatible with political structures, and even as an attempt to treat Mother Nature as a whore. As a result, Germany still operates by the command-and-control principle, and there are no significant examples of emission trading. The first part of this publication reviews the theoretical discussion and practical experiemce so far, while the second part discusses the requirements that must be met by tradable permit systmes in order to make them practicable. [Deutsch] Dreissig Jahre Diskussion ueber Zertifikate zeigen, dass der Weg zu einer marktwirtschaftlich ausgerichteten Umweltpolitik steinig ist. Die bahnbrechende Idee von Thomas D. Crocker und John H. Dales, mit Zertifikaten Umweltschutz sowohl oekonomisch effizient wie auch oekologisch treffsicher zu realisieren, wurde in der Vergangenheit immer wieder von Zweifeln an der Praktikabilitaet einer solchen Loesung ueberlagert. So wurde der Handel mit Zertifikaten als unrealisierbar angesehen, wettbewerbs- und strukturpolitische Einwaende wurden angefuehrt, und man empfand die Vergabe von Rechten zur Umweltnutzung sogar als Prostitution von Mutter Natur. Als Folge hat Deutschland bis heute kein signifikantes Umsetzungsbeispiel vorzuweisen; das Ordnungsrecht beherrscht nach wie vor die Szene. Der erste Teil des Bandes beleuchtet zunaechst den Stand der theoretischen Diskussion und die bisher gemachten Erfahrungen mit Zertifikaten. Der zweite Teil ist den Anforderungen gewidmet, denen Zertifikatesysteme gerecht werden muessen, um Eingang in die Praxis zu finden. (orig.)

  7. The Haptic Sublime and the ‘cold stony reality’ of Mountaineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan McNee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at how the Victorian sport of mountaineering, and the new genre of literature associated with it, mirrored the wider societal preoccupation with physicality and tactility. It traces the various ways in which developments in physiology, psychophysiology, and aesthetics in the late nineteenth century were reflected in the accounts of mountaineers, and suggests that a new aesthetic of mountain appreciation - the ‘haptic sublime’ - emerged in this period, as an expression of this new emphasis on physical engagement.

  8. Slope-Velocity-Equilibrium and evolution of surface roughness on a stony hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slope-velocity equilibrium is hypothesized as a state that evolves naturally over time due to the interaction between overland flow and bed morphology, wherein steeper areas develop a relative increase in physical and hydraulic roughness such that flow velocity is a unique function of overland flow ...

  9. Vibrio harveyi as a causative agent of the White Syndrome in tropical stony corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Gian Marco; Bongiorni, Lucia; Gili, Claudia; Biavasco, Francesca; Danovaro, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    We investigated bacterial assemblages associated with corals displaying symptoms of the 'White Syndrome' (WS), a general term used for indicating the appearance of bands, spots or patches of tissue loss, which is devastating wide areas of tropical ecosystems worldwide. We collected WS-diseased (n = 15) and healthy (n = 15) corals from the natural reef (Indonesia, Indian Ocean) and from four large public aquaria. By using culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, we found that a large fraction (73%) of the investigated WS events was associated with the presence of a high bacterial abundance and, specifically, of Vibrio spp. Vibrio harveyi, a pathogen of many marine organisms and recently involved in coral Yellow Band disease, was the most represented species, being recovered from five out of 15 diseased corals. In experimental infection assays, two V. harveyi strains, isolated from diseased corals, were inoculated on a total of 62 healthy colonies of Pocillopora damicornis. WS signs appeared in 57 corals, confirming the ability of V. harveyi strains to induce the disease. We conclude that V. harveyi is one of the coral pathogens involved in the appearance of WS. However, not all of the investigated WSs were associated to V. harveyi detection, nor to other Vibrio species (such as V. coralliilyticus), which supports the hypothesis that WS is not caused exclusively by Vibrio spp., but rather can have a multifactorial aetiology, or can represent a group of diseases caused by a variety of agents. Further investigations to identify specific virulence traits will contribute to the understanding of the role of V. harveyi in WS pathogenesis. © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Slope-velocity equilibrium and evolution of surface roughness on a stony hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Mark A.; Polyakov, Viktor O.; Nichols, Mary H.; Hernandez, Mariano; Li, Li; Zhao, Ying; Armendariz, Gerardo

    2017-06-01

    Slope-velocity equilibrium is hypothesized as a state that evolves naturally over time due to the interaction between overland flow and surface morphology, wherein steeper areas develop a relative increase in physical and hydraulic roughness such that flow velocity is a unique function of overland flow rate independent of slope gradient. This study tests this hypothesis under controlled conditions. Artificial rainfall was applied to 2 m by 6 m plots at 5, 12, and 20 % slope gradients. A series of simulations were made with two replications for each treatment with measurements of runoff rate, velocity, rock cover, and surface roughness. Velocities measured at the end of each experiment were a unique function of discharge rates, independent of slope gradient or rainfall intensity. Physical surface roughness was greater at steeper slopes. The data clearly showed that there was no unique hydraulic coefficient for a given slope, surface condition, or rainfall rate, with hydraulic roughness greater at steeper slopes and lower intensities. This study supports the hypothesis of slope-velocity equilibrium, implying that use of hydraulic equations, such as Chezy and Manning, in hillslope-scale runoff models is problematic because the coefficients vary with both slope and rainfall intensity.

  11. Eager sellers and stony buyers: understanding the psychology of new-product adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourville, John T

    2006-06-01

    Companies that introduce new innovations are the most likely to flourish, so they spend billions of dollars making better products. But studies show that new innovations fail at a staggering rate. While many blame these misses on lackluster products, the reality isn't so simple. The goods that consumers dismiss often do offer improvements over existing ones. So why don't people purchase them? And why do companies keep peddling products that buyers are likely to reject? The answer, says the author, can be found in the brain. New products force consumers to change their behavior, and that has a psychological cost. Many products fail because people irrationally over-value the benefits of the goods they own over those they don't possess. Executives, meanwhile, overvalue their own innovations. This leads to a serious clash. Studies show, in fact, that there is a mismatch of nine to one, or 9x, between what innovators think consumers want and what consumers truly desire. Fortunately, companies can overcome this disconnect. To start, they can determine where their products fall in a matrix with four categories: easy sells, sure failures, long hauls, and smash hits. Each has a different ratio of product improvement to change required from the consumer. Once businesses know where their products fit into this grid, they can manage the resistance to change. For some innovations, major behavior change is a given. In those cases, companies can either wait for consumers to warm to the product, make the improvement so great that buyers get past their apprehension, or try to eliminate the incumbent product. Firms can also try to minimize buyer resistance by making products that are compatible with incumbent goods, seeking out those who are not yet users of the existing product, or finding true believers.

  12. Sovremennye podkhody k vedeniyu bol'nykh s neyro-ishemicheskoy formoy sindroma diabeticheskoy stony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yu Tokmakova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Несмотря на очевидные успехи современной диабетологии, проблема поражения нижних конечностей у пациентов с диабетом как 1, так и 2 типов сохраняет свою актуальность. Проведенные в ряде стран эпидемиологические исследования показали, что различная патология стоп и голеней, и в первую очередь синдром диабетической стопы, является важной медико-социальной и экономической проблемой. На основании обследования больших групп пациентов показано, что наиболее значимыми факторами риска развития хронических раневых дефектов стоп при СД является потеря чувствительности, развивающаяся на фоне диабетической нейропатии и снижение периферического артериального кровотока. Вместе с тем, некоторые исследователи не нашли прямой зависимости риска развития поражений конечностей от уровня компенсации углеводного обмена. Также одним из значимых факторов риска является деформация стопы.

  13. Toxicity of crude oils and a dispersant to the stony coral Madracis mirabilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgershuizen, J H.B.W.; De Kruijf, H A.M.

    1976-02-01

    Coral reefs play a crucial role in the ecology of coastal tropical waters. In many areas they are now exposed to pollution hazards which have sometimes caused severe damage. Increasingly they are exposed to oil and, where clean-up methods are used, to dispersants. The report shows that the clean-up may be more damaging than the oil. (auth)

  14. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2008-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual

  15. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2007-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey

  16. Time and cost analysis: pediatric dental rehabilitation with general anesthesia in the office and the hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board-approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36-60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P average total time (anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance.

  17. A Brooks type theorem for the maximum local edge connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiebitz, Michael; Toft, Bjarne

    2018-01-01

    For a graph $G$, let $\\cn(G)$ and $\\la(G)$ denote the chromatic number of $G$ and the maximum local edge connectivity of $G$, respectively. A result of Dirac \\cite{Dirac53} implies that every graph $G$ satisfies $\\cn(G)\\leq \\la(G)+1$. In this paper we characterize the graphs $G$ for which $\\cn......(G)=\\la(G)+1$. The case $\\la(G)=3$ was already solved by Alboulker {\\em et al.\\,} \\cite{AlboukerV2016}. We show that a graph $G$ with $\\la(G)=k\\geq 4$ satisfies $\\cn(G)=k+1$ if and only if $G$ contains a block which can be obtained from copies of $K_{k+1}$ by repeated applications of the Haj\\'os join....

  18. Brooks under colliery heaps in the Walloon Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardinois, J.P. [IGRETEC, Charleroi (Belgium); Flamion, B. [Mines et Geologie, Dir. Generale des Ressources Naturelles et de l' Environnement. Dir. des Eaux Souterraines, Jambes (Belgium); Zech, Y. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Unite de Genie civil, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    Several studies are presently under progress in the Walloon Region so as to assess the long term environmental impact caused by the closing of coal mines. Among the effects on water resources management, mining wastes deposits in the major bed of small rivers becomes a concern since the lack of maintenance of the works leads to difficulties of drainage in period of storm and to situations at risk for the vicinity. A first characterization carried out by the IGRETEC at the request of the Walloon Region leads to the selection of nine spoil heaps for more detailed investigations. The purpose is to update the administrative data by establishing the profile and cross sections of the works, to collect hydrological data and to evaluate measures to be proposed according to the risks and to the dimensioning of the works. The in situ investigations called upon specialized speleologists and the use of video cameras. (authors)

  19. THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE. (R825762)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Unique wing scale photonics of male Rajah Brooke's birdwing butterflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Giraldo, Marco A.; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrastructures in butterfly wing scales can take many shapes, resulting in the often striking coloration of many butterflies due to interference of light. The plethora of coloration mechanisms is dazzling, but often only single mechanisms are described for specific animals. Results: We

  1. Installation Restoration Program. Phase I. Records Search, Brooks AFB, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    decay of the cadavers occurred. The waste was packaged in plastic bags, placed in seven 55-gallon drums and buried in a hole 7 to 8 feet deep. The drums...Receptors subscore (I x factor score subtotal/maximm score subtotal) 44 - II. WASTE CARACTERISTICS A. Select the factor score based on the estimated quantity...subtotal) 44 II. WASTE CARACTERISTICS A. Select the factor score based on the estimated quantity, the degree of hazard, and the confidence level of the

  2. Malaria vector control in South Africa | Brooke | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 103, No 10 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  3. Sampling strategies for estimating brook trout effective population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew R. Whiteley; Jason A. Coombs; Mark Hudy; Zachary Robinson; Keith H. Nislow; Benjamin H. Letcher

    2012-01-01

    The influence of sampling strategy on estimates of effective population size (Ne) from single-sample genetic methods has not been rigorously examined, though these methods are increasingly used. For headwater salmonids, spatially close kin association among age-0 individuals suggests that sampling strategy (number of individuals and location from...

  4. Making quark matter at brook haven's new collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.

    2002-01-01

    Quarks are believed to come in 6 flavours, only the lightest of which, the up and down quarks, are found in protons and neutrons. Isolated quarks have never been observed. As quarks are brought closer together, the force between them decreases dramatically, vanishing as the separation becomes very small. This suggests that quarks may become unbound if the density of quarks could be increased by squeezing a nucleus. The nucleus would have melted their constituent quarks, now free to roam the extended volume of the compressed nucleus. This situation would make a significant change in the structure of matter corresponding to a change of phase, rather like the transition from solid to liquid, but in this case from quark confined matter, to a quark gluon plasma (QGP). This new state of matter is thought to have been the natural phase of matter until 10 micro-seconds after the big-bang, and also to exist today in the core of neutron stars. Calculations show that the energy density needed to observe the phase transition is around 1 GeV/fm 3 , approximately 8 times that of normal nuclear matter. Attempts to recreate QGP have been underway at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and at the CERN by colliding heavy-ion beams at the maximal energy possible. Between 4000 and 5000 charged particles are produced in the most violent events. The experimental challenge is to establish the existence of QGP from all this wealth of data. (A.C.)

  5. From Seas to Surgeries, from Babbling Brooks to Baby Scans:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, T. G.

    Gas bubbles are the most potent naturally-occurring entities that influence the acoustic environment in liquids. Upon entrainment under breaking waves, waterfalls, or rainfall over water, each bubble undergoes small amplitude decaying pulsations with a natural frequency that varies approximately inversely with the bubble radius, giving rise to the "plink" of a dripping tap or the roar of a cataract. When they occur in their millions per cubic metre in the top few metres of the ocean, bubbles can dominate the underwater sound field. Similarly, when driven by an incident sound field, bubbles exhibit a strong pulsation resonance. Acoustic scatter by bubbles can confound sonar in the shallow waters which typify many modern maritime military operations. If they are driven by sound fields of sufficient amplitude, the bubble pulsations can become highly nonlinear. These nonlinearities might be exploited to enhance sonar, or to monitor the bubble population. Such oceanic monitoring is important, for example, because of the significant contribution made by bubbles to the greenhouse gas budget. In industry, bubble monitoring is required for sparging, electrochemical processes, the production of paints, pharamaceuticals and foodstuffs. At yet higher amplitudes of pulsation, gas compression within the collapsing bubble can generate temperatures of several thousand Kelvin whilst, in the liquid, shock waves and shear can produce erosion and bioeffects. Not only can these effects be exploited in industrial cleaning and manufacturing, and research into novel chemical processes, but we need to understand (and if possible control) their occurrence when biomedical ultrasound is passed through the body. This is because the potential of such bubble-related physical and chemical processes to damage tissue will be desireable in some circumstances (e.g. ultrasonic kidney stone therapy), and undesireable in others (e.g. foetal scanning). This paper describes this range of behaviour. Further information on these topics, including sound and video files, can be found at .

  6. Brooks under colliery heaps in the Walloon Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardinois, J.P.; Flamion, B.; Zech, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies are presently under progress in the Walloon Region so as to assess the long term environmental impact caused by the closing of coal mines. Among the effects on water resources management, mining wastes deposits in the major bed of small rivers becomes a concern since the lack of maintenance of the works leads to difficulties of drainage in period of storm and to situations at risk for the vicinity. A first characterization carried out by the IGRETEC at the request of the Walloon Region leads to the selection of nine spoil heaps for more detailed investigations. The purpose is to update the administrative data by establishing the profile and cross sections of the works, to collect hydrological data and to evaluate measures to be proposed according to the risks and to the dimensioning of the works. The in situ investigations called upon specialized speleologists and the use of video cameras. (authors)

  7. Biogeochemical consequences of winter flooding in brook valleys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, V.; Wirdum, G. van; Beltman, B.; Griffioen, J.; Verhoeven, J.T.A.

    2007-01-01

    Climatic change has great impacts on stream catchments and their ecology. Expectations are that more extreme climate events will result in undesired flooding in stream catchments. In the Netherlands, former floodplains with a history of agricultural use are put into use again as flooding areas for

  8. Brooks Grease Service, Inc. - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Forterra Concrete Products, Inc., a business located at 511 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Irving, TX, 75062, for alleged violations at its facility located at 23600 W. 40th St

  9. The Fountain of Living Water and the Deceitful Brook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Else Kragelund

    2005-01-01

    The metaphor "God is Water" is distinctive for the Book of Jeremiah in different variants. The core metaphor is found in Jer 2:13, it is elaborated in other instances as: "God is a fountain", or "God is not a wasteland" (chapter 2), and it is gainsaid in 15:18 which reads: "You are to me like a d...

  10. Superconducting heavy-ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A summary is given of plans developed by four different groups for the construction of small superconducting linacs to boost the energy of heavy ions from existing tandem electrostatic accelerators. The projects considered are the linac under construction at Argonne and the design efforts at Karlsruhe, at Stanford, and by a Cal Tech-Stony Brook collaboration. The intended uses of the accelerator systems are stated. Beam dynamics of linacs formed of short independently-phased resonators are reviewed, and the implications for performance are discussed. The main parameters of the four linacs are compared, and a brief analysis of accelerating structures is given

  11. Internal pair decay of giant resonances- signature from ISGMR in hot and heavy nucleus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental observation of isoscalar giant monopole resonance built on highly excited nuclear states is still eluding the experimental nuclear physicists although a lot of effort has been put into it. Two very highly sophisticated specific detector systems had been constructed for this study and intense experimental activities were indulged in. Stony Brook pair detector array is being augmented currently to cover about 60% solid angle. There will be another spate of experimental activities and new results will be coming in, but presently there is no experimental observation of ISGMR in hot nucleus

  12. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  13. 2016 FACET-II Science Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Mark J., ed.

    2017-07-19

    The second in a series of FACET-II Science Workshops was held at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on October 17-19, 2016 [1]. The workshop drew thirty-five participants from eighteen different institutions including CERN, DESY, Ecole Polytechnique, FNAL, JAI, LBNL, LLNL, Radiabeam, Radiasoft, SLAC, Stony Brook, Strathclyde, Tech-X, Tsinghua, UC Boulder, UCLA and UT Austin. The 2015 workshop [2, 3] helped prioritize research directions for FACET-II. The 2016 workshop was focused on understanding what improvements are needed at the facility to support the next generation of experiments. All presentations are linked to the workshop website as a permanent record.

  14. Quark Matter 2001 - Final report [Program and list of poster presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, Michael D.

    2002-02-01

    The Fifteenth International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (QM2001) was held on Long Island, New York on January 15-20, 2001. The main site of the conference was the campus of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The conference included an afternoon of parallel sessions and tours of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. There were nearly 700 paid attendees. The conference program and a list of poster exhibits is included.

  15. Inverse relationship between nonadherence to original GOLD treatment guidelines and exacerbations of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foda HD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hussein D Foda,1,2 Anthony Brehm,1,2 Karen Goldsteen,3 Norman H Edelman2,4 1Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Northport, 2Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, 3MPH Program, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, 4Department of Preventative Medicine and Program in Public Health, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, USA Background: Prescriber disagreement is among the reasons for poor adherence to COPD treatment guidelines; it is yet not clear whether this leads to adverse outcomes. We tested whether undertreatment according to the original Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD guidelines led to increased exacerbations.Methods: Records of 878 patients with spirometrically confirmed COPD who were followed from 2005 to 2010 at one Veterans Administration (VA Medical Center were analyzed. Analysis of variance was performed to assess differences in exacerbation rates between severity groups. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between noncompliance with guidelines and exacerbation rates.Findings: About 19% were appropriately treated by guidelines; 14% overtreated, 44% undertreated, and in 23% treatment did not follow any guideline. Logistic regression revealed a strong inverse relationship between undertreatment and exacerbation rate when severity of obstruction was held constant. Exacerbations per year by GOLD stage were significantly different from each other: mild 0.15, moderate 0.27, severe 0.38, very severe 0.72, and substantially fewer than previously reported.Interpretation: The guidelines were largely not followed. Undertreatment predominated but, contrary to expectations, was associated with fewer exacerbations. Thus, clinicians were likely

  16. Extreme QCD 2012 (xQCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Acknowledgements This conference would not have been possible without the generous support from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the George Washington University INS and IMPACT institutes, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Vice-President for Research, and the Department of Physics. We thank them wholeheartedly. We are also very grateful for the support of our colleagues on the local organizing committee, Walter Freeman and Frank Lee, and on the International Advisory Committee: Simon Hands, Tetsuo Hatsuda, Frithjof Karsch, Maria Paola Lombardo, Tereza Mendes, Atsushi Nakamura, Owe Philipsen, Claudia Ratti, Paul Romatschke, Misha Stephanov, and Nu Xu. List of participants Alexandru, Andrei George Washington University Bazavov, Alexei Brookhaven National Laboratory Bloch, Jacques University of Regensburg Braun-Munzinger, Peter EMMI, GSI Breto Rangel, Guillermo CMS/UC Davis D'Elia, Massimo University of Pisa, INFN Dexheimer, Veronica UFSC - Federal University of Santa Catarina Ding, Heng-Tong Brookhaven National Laboratory Dion, Alan Stony Brook University Dumitru, Adrian RBRC and Baruch College, CUNY Freeman, Walter George Washington University Gavai, Rajiv Tata Institute (TIFR), Mumbai Hanada, Masanori KEK Theory Center Hands, Simon Swansea University Hegde, Prasad Brookhaven National Laboratory Heinke, Craig University of Alberta Horvath, Ivan University of Kentucky Karsch, Frithjof Brookhaven National Laboratory Krieg, Stefan Wuppertal University Lattimer, James Stony Brook University Lee, Frank George Washington University Li, Anyi Institute for Nuclear Theory Liu, Keh-Fei University of Kentucky Lombardo, Maria Paola INFN - LNF Lottini, Stefano Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main Maezawa, Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory Miura, Kohtaroh Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati - INFN Monnai, Akihiko The University of Tokyo Mukherjee, Swagato Brookhaven National Laboratory Myers, Joyce University of Groningen Nakamura, Atsushi RIISE, Hiroshima

  17. Optimization of the cooling power distribution in a superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendl, C.M.; Noe, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits of setting the resonators in a superconducting heavy-ion linac to a certain optimum distribution of cooling power have been evaluated in terms of the total acceleration such a distribution may produce, compared to a distribution in which each resonator dissipates power equally. The optimum power distribution can be expressed in closed form in certain simplified cases, but the general case is solved by equalizing the 'marginal power cost' of the resonators by iteration in a computer simulation. For the Stony Brook linac an additional possible acceleration of several percent is thus predicted for typical beams. (author)

  18. Hypochondriasis and Tendency to Adopt the Sick Role as Moderators of the Relationship between Life Events and Somatic Symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    A A C -! a" ’s Av~liI 2 Hypochondriasis and Tendency to Adopt the Sick Role as Moderators of the Relationship Between Life Events and Somatic ...AD-A096 846 STATE UNIV OF NEW YORK AT STONY BROOK F/B 5/10 HYPOCHONDRIASIS AND TENDENCY TO ADOPT THE SICK ROLE AS NODERATO-ETC(U) JAN 81 A A STONE. J...ofteRelationship ~etween Life Events and Somatic ~* Syrptomatology,-. .. JO Arthur A./Stone Th A e/W /Z. Long Island Research Institute and Department of

  19. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  20. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an RΦ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against γ → e + e - events

  1. Fermionic solution of the Andrews-Baxter-Forrester model. II. Proof of Melzer's polynomial identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnaar, S.O.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the one-dimensional configuration sums of the AFB model using the fermionic techniques introduced in part I of this paper. Combined with the results of Andrews, Baxter, and Forrester, we prove polynominal identities for finitizations of the Virasoro characters χb, a (r-1, r) (q) as conjectured by Melzer. In the thermodynamic limit these identities reproduce Rogers-Ramanujan-type identities for the unitary minimal Virasoro characters conjectured by the Stony Brook group. We also present a list of additional Virasoro character identities which follow from our proof of Melzer's identities and application of Bailey's lemma

  2. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  3. Simulations of mixing in Inertial Confinement Fusion with front tracking and sub-grid scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Verinder; Lim, Hyunkyung; Melvin, Jeremy; Cheng, Baolian; Glimm, James; Sharp, David

    2015-11-01

    We present two related results. The first discusses the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) and their evolution in Inertial Confinement Fusion simulations. We show the evolution of the RMI to the late time RTI under transport effects and tracking. The role of the sub-grid scales helps capture the interaction of turbulence with diffusive processes. The second assesses the effects of concentration on the physics model and examines the mixing properties in the low Reynolds number hot spot. We discuss the effect of concentration on the Schmidt number. The simulation results are produced using the University of Chicago code FLASH and Stony Brook University's front tracking algorithm.

  4. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  5. A superconducting RFQ for an ECR injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1988-01-01

    The beam dynamics and resonator properties of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for heavy ions are discussed. The motivation is its use as a very low velocity section following an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source for injection into a superconducting heavy-ion linac. The constraints on the design and performance of this accelerating structure are presented. Expressions for a limiting stable phase angle and longitudinal and transverse acceptance are derived. A numerical example is given, using the SUNYLAC linac at Sony Stony Brook. Beam-dynamics calculations with PARMTEQ are reported, verifying the theoretical beam-dynamics calculations. (author) 12 refs., 1 tab

  6. Sığırlarda Suni Tohumlama Uygulamaları Yönünden Genomik Seleksiyonun Önemi

    OpenAIRE

    INANÇ, Muhammed Enes; DAŞKIN, Ali

    2015-01-01

     Ekonomik önemi olan verim özelliklerinin çok sayıda gen tarafından belirleniyor olması, hayvan ıslahını karmaşık bir bilim haline getirmektedir. Hayvan ıslahının temel taşlarından biri olan damızlık seçiminde, kullanılmakta olan yöntemlerde generasyon aralığının uzun olması nedeniyle genetik ilerleme hızı da yavaş olmaktadır. Bu nedenle, genomik seleksiyon damızlık seçimi, damızlık kontrolü ve ıslah çalışmalarına hız kazandırmaktadır. Bu seleksiyon yoluyla boğa seçimi sayesinde, boğalar daha...

  7. Paulo Freire on Higher Education: A Dialogue at the National University of Mexico. SUNY Series, Teacher Empowerment and School Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Miguel; And Others

    This volume presents a dialogue in 1984 between internationally recognized philosopher/educator, Paulo Freire, and Miguel Escobar, Alfredo L. Fernandez, and Gilberto Guevara-Niebla, educators at the National University of Mexico, on educational emancipation and the role of higher education. The dialogues address the relationships between education…

  8. Teaching Medical Students to Communicate With Empathy and Clarity Using Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Liss, Evonne; Lantz-Gefroh, Valeri; Bass, Elizabeth; Killebrew, Deirdre; Ponzio, Nicholas M; Savi, Christine; O'Connell, Christine

    2018-03-01

    Medical educators widely accept that health care providers need strong communication skills. The authors sought to develop a course incorporating improvisation to teach health professions students communication skills and build empathy. Teaching health care professionals to communicate more effectively with patients, the public, and each other is a goal of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. The authors designed an interprofessional elective for medical, nursing, and dental students that differed in several respects from traditional communication training. The Communicating Science elective, which was offered by the Alda Center from 2012 to 2016, used verbal and nonverbal exercises, role-playing, and storytelling, including improvisation exercises, to teach students to communicate with empathy and clarity. In course evaluations completed by 76 students in 2012 and 2013, 100% said they would recommend the course to fellow students, saw the relevance of the course content to their careers, and desired more of the course content in their school's curriculum. As a result of this positive feedback, from 2014 to 2016, 10 hours of instruction pairing empathy and communication training was embedded in the preclinical curriculum at the Stony Brook University School of Medicine. This course could be an effective model, and one that other institutions could employ, for improving communication skills and empathy in the next generation of health care professionals. Next steps include advocating for communication skills training to be embedded throughout the curriculum of a four-year medical school program.

  9. Comparison of vegetation patterns and soil nutrient relations in an oak-pine forest and a mixed deciduous forest on Long Island, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S.C.; Curtis, P.S.

    1980-11-01

    An analysis of soil nutrient relations in two forest communities on Long Island, NY, yielded a correlation between the fertility of the top-soil and vegetational composition. The oak-pine forest soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory contain lower average concentrations of NH/sub 3/, Ca, K, and organic matter than the mixed deciduous forest soils in the Stony Brook area. The pH of the topsoil is also more acidic at Brookhaven. The observed differences between localities are greater than within-locality differences between the two soil series tested (Plymouth and Riverhead), which are common to both localities. Nutrient concentrations in the subsoil are not consistently correlated with either locality or soil series, although organic matter and NH/sub 3/ show significantly higher concentrations at Stony Brook. Supporting data on density and basal area of trees and coverage of shrubs and herbs also reveals significant variation between the two forest communities. An ordination of the vegetation data shows higher similarity within than between localities, while no obvious pattern of within-locality variation due to soil series treatments is apparent. These data support the hypothesis that fertility gradients may influence forest community composition and structure. This hypothesis is discussed with reference to vegetation-soil interactions and other factors, such as frequency of burning, which may direct the future development of the Brookhaven oak-pine forest.

  10. Anabolic steroids, acute myocardial infarction and polycythemia: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Stergiopoulos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Stergiopoulos1, Joseph J Brennan2, Robin Mathews1, John F Setaro2, Smadar Kort11Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, USA; 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: The association between testosterone-replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk remains unclear with most reports suggesting a neutral or possibly beneficial effect of the hormone in men and women. However, several cardiovascular complications including hypertension, cardiomyopathy, stroke, pulmonary embolism, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, and myocardial infarction have been reported with supraphysiologic doses of anabolic steroids. We report a case of an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with traditional cardiac risk factors using supraphysiologic doses of supplemental, intramuscular testosterone. In addition, this patient also had polycythemia, likely secondary to high-dose testosterone. The patient underwent successful percutaneous intervention of the right coronary artery. Phlebotomy was used to treat the polycythemia acutely. We suggest that the chronic and recent “stacked” use of intramuscular testosterone as well as the resultant polycythemia and likely increased plasma viscosity may have been contributing factors to this cardiovascular event, in addition to traditional coronary risk factors. Physicians and patients should be aware of the clinical consequences of anabolic steroid abuse.Keywords: acute myocardial infarction, anabolic steroid use, polycythemia

  11. Update on emerging regional techniques and novel local anesthetics in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szafran MJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Martin J Szafran, Eldhose Abrahams, Tong Joo Gan Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA Abstract: New regional anesthetic techniques have been incorporated into the multimodal approach to postoperative analgesia. Blocks such as the transversus abdominis plane block, adductor canal block, and pectoral nerves blocks all show promise as potential tools used in opioid-sparing techniques, but at the same time have significant limitations to their utility. Novel long-acting formulations of local anesthetics further add to the possible benefit of these blocks, but their application to peripheral nerve blocks is currently being investigated and is not well defined. This review focuses on evaluating the relevant anatomy, technique, and indications of several newer peripheral nerve blocks, the emerging evidence supporting the use of liposomal bupivacaine and SABER®-Bupivacaine, and the application of both in ambulatory anesthesia. Keywords: transversus abdominis plane (TAP block, adductor canal block, pectoral nerves block, regional anesthesia, liposomal bupivacaine, SABER®-Bupivacaine

  12. Dual recognition activity of a rhamnose-binding lectin to pathogenic bacteria and zooxanthellae in stony coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Yu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Jia; Zhu, Yunjie; Chen, Guangmei; Guo, Liping; Huang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) is a type of Ca 2+ -independent lectin with tandem repeat carbohydrate-recognition domain, and is crucial for the innate immunity in many invertebrates. In this study, the cDNA sequence encoding RBL in coral Pocillopora damicornis (PdRBL-1) was cloned. The PdRBL-1 protein shared highest amino acid sequence similarity (55%) with the polyp of Hydra vulgaris, and contained a signal peptide and two tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains in which all cysteine residues were conserved. Surface plasmon resonance method revealed that the recombinant PdRBL-1 protein bound to LPS and Lipid A, but not to LTA, β-glucan, mannose and Poly (I:C). Results also showed that it bonded with zooxanthellae using western blotting method, and that the bound protein was detectable only at concentrations higher than 10 2 zooxanthellae cell mL -1 . When recombinant PdRBL-1 protein was preincubated with LPS, lower amounts of protein bound to zooxanthellae compared to cells not preincubated with LPS. Furthermore, PdRBL-1 mRNA expression increased significantly at 12 h, and declined to the baseline at 24 h after heat stress at 31 °C. These results collectively suggest that PdRBL-1 could recognize not only pathogenic bacteria but also symbiotic zooxanthellae, and that the recognition of zooxanthellae by PdRBL-1 could be repressed by pathogenic bacteria through competitive binding. This information allows us to gain new insights in the mechanisms influencing the establishment and maintenance of coral-zooxanthella symbiosis in coral P. damicornis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The stony road we tread: The challenges and contributions of Black Liberation Theology in post-apartheid South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothoagae, Itumeleng Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Great Trek of 1838 brought about a belief in the supremacy of the Dutch descendants in South Africa. Their 1948 election victory authenticated for them their interpretation of theology and their historical experiences of Gods involvement in their lives. Black Theology challenged the perception of Afrikaner supremacy and their theological hegemony, although Mosala argued against the blindness of black theologians in their criticism of white theology because they were actually using the same tools of analysis that whites had traditionally used to justify their case (Mosala and Tlhagale 1986:175196. Mosala . This article discusses a paper presented at a conference in Cairo by Takatso Mofokeng on the issue of land, and further outlines the challenges and contributions of Black Theology today.

  14. Falling on stony ground? A qualitative study of implementation of clinical guidelines' prescribing recommendations in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Eccles, Martin P; Russell, Ian

    2008-02-01

    We aimed to explore key themes for the implementation of guidelines' prescribing recommendations. We interviewed a purposeful sample of 25 participants in British primary care in late 2000 and early 2001. Thirteen were academics in primary care and 12 were non-academic GPs. We asked about implementation of guidelines for five conditions (asthma, coronary heart disease prevention, depression, epilepsy, menorrhagia) ensuring variation in complexity, role of prescribing in patient management, GP role in prescribing and GP awareness of guidelines. We used the Theory of Planned Behaviour to design the study and the framework method for the analysis. Seven themes explain implementation of prescribing recommendations in primary care: credibility of content, credibility of source, presentation, influential people, organisational factors, disease characteristics, and dissemination strategy. Change in recommendations may hinder implementation. This is important since the development of evidence-based guidelines requires change in recommendations. Practitioners do not have a universal view or a common understanding of valid 'evidence'. Credibility is improved if national bodies develop primary care guidelines with less input from secondary care and industry, and with simple and systematic presentation. Dissemination should target GPs' perceived needs, improve ownership and get things right in the first implementation attempt. Enforcement strategies should not be used routinely. GPs were critical of guidelines' development, relevance and implementation. Guidelines should be clear about changes they propose. Future studies should quantify the relationship between evidence base of recommendations and implementation, and between change in recommendations and implementation. Small but important costs and side effects of implementing guidelines should be measured in evaluative studies.

  15. Chloride concentrations, loads, and yields in four watersheds along Interstate 95, southeastern Connecticut, 2008-11: factors that affect peak chloride concentrations during winter storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Mullaney, John R.; Morrison, Jonathan; Martin, Joseph W.; Trombley, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    Chloride (Cl-) concentrations and loads and other water chemistry characteristics were assessed to evaluate potential effects of road-deicer applications on streamwater quality in four watersheds along Interstate 95 (I–95) in southeastern Connecticut from November 1, 2008, through September 30, 2011. Streamflow and water quality were studied in the Four Mile River, Oil Mill Brook, Stony Brook, and Jordan Brook watersheds, where developed land ranged from 9 to 32 percent. Water-quality samples were collected and specific conductance was measured continuously at paired water-quality monitoring sites, upstream and downstream from I–95. Specific conductance values were related to Cl- concentrations to assist in determining the effects of road-deicing operations on the levels of Cl-in the streams. Streamflow and water-quality data were compared with weather data and with the timing, amount, and composition of deicers applied to State highways. Grab samples were collected during winter stormwater-runoff events, such as winter storms or periods of rain or warm temperatures in which melting takes place. Grab samples were also collected periodically during the spring and summer and during base-flow conditions.

  16. Operation, maintenance and upgrading of SUNY facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report, 1 October 1980-31 May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prewitt, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    A general facility is how operating and generating research results in x-ray scattering, diffraction, and spectroscopy. The contract just completed involved the construction and development of a single beamlines at NSLS subdivided to allow for diversity of experimental techniques. These include single-crystal diffraction at low temperatures and at high pressures, uhv surface studies using standing waves, time-resolved, small-angle scattering, and x-ray spectroscopy

  17. Red Genesis: The Hunan First Normal School and the Creation of Chinese Communism, 1903-1921. SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyan

    2012-01-01

    How did an obscure provincial teachers college produce graduates who would go on to become founders and ideologues of the Chinese Communist Party? Mao Zedong, Cai Hesen, Xiao Zisheng, and others attended the Hunan First Normal School. Focusing on their alma mater, this work explores the critical but overlooked role modern schools played in sowing…

  18. Making and Molding Identity in Schools: Student Narratives on Race, Gender, and Academic Engagement. SUNY Series, Power, Social Identity, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ann Locke

    This book focuses on the relationship between ethnic and racial identity and academic engagement, examining in particular the role that schools and classrooms play in shaping this relationship. It examines the lives of students to ask how they conceptualize and assert their ethnic and racial identities across varied curricular settings. The case…

  19. Construction and maintenance of SUNY facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Progress report, 1 July 1982-1 July 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental facilities on the X-21 beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source are described, and synchrotron radiation experiments performed by PRT members are discussed. The report includes a description of the beam line development stages and the experimental equipment

  20. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, W. Brent; Jones, Keith W.; Um, Wooyong; Rockhold, mark; Peters, Catherine A.; Celia, Michael A.

    2013-02-15

    secondary mineral precipitates (cancrinite), conducting experiments under conditions with and without Al allowed us to experimentally separate the conditions that lead to quartz dissolution from the conditions that lead to quartz dissolution plus cancrinite precipitation. Consistent with our expectations, in the experiments without Al, there was a substantial reduction in volume of the solid matrix. With Al there was a net increase in the volume of the solid matrix. The rate and extent of reaction was found to increase with temperature. These results demonstrate a successful effort to identify conditions that lead to increases and conditions that lead to decreases in solid matrix volume due to reactions of caustic tank wastes with quartz sands. In addition, we have begun to work with slightly larger, intermediate-scale columns packed with Hanford natural sediments and quartz. Similar dissolution and precipitation were observed in these colums. The measurements are being interpreted with reactive transport modeling using STOMP; preliminary observations are reported here. 2) Multi-Scale Imaging and Analysis. Mineral dissolution and precipitation rates within a porous medium will be different in different pores due to natural heterogeneity and the heterogeneity that is created from the reactions themselves. We used a combination of X-ray computed microtomography, backscattered electron and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with computational image analysis to quantify pore structure, mineral distribution, structure changes and fluid-air and fluid-grain interfaces. Results and Key Findings: Three of the columns from the reactive flow experiments at PNNL (S1, S3, S4) were imaged using 3D X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) at BNL and analyzed using 3DMA-rock at SUNY Stony Brook. The imaging results support the mass balance findings reported by Dr. Um’s group, regarding the substantial dissolution of quartz in column S1. An important observation is that of grain

  1. Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (431st Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the celebration of Brookhaven Lab's 60th anniversary, Robert P. Crease, the Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University and BNL's historian, will present the second of two talks on the Lab's history. In 'Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider,' Dr. Crease will focus on the creation of the world's most powerful colliding accelerator for nuclear physics. Known as RHIC, the collider, as Dr. Crease will recount, was formally proposed in 1984, received initial construction funding from the U.S. Department of Energy in 1991, and started operating in 2000. In 2005, the discovery at RHIC of the world's most perfect liquid, a state of matter that last existed just moments after the Big Bang, was announced, and, since then, this perfect liquid of quarks and gluons has been the subject of intense study.

  2. Public Science Education and Outreach as a Modality for Teaching Science Communication Skills to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Douglas; OConnell, Christine; Lowenthal, James; Hickox, Ryan C.; Lyons, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University is working with Carthage College, Dartmouth College, and Smith College, in partnership with the Appalachian Mountain Club, to develop and disseminate curriculum to incorporate science communication education into undergraduate science programs. The public science education and outreach program operating since 2012 as a partnership between Carthage and the Appalachian Mountain Club is being used as the testbed for evaluating the training methods. This talk will review the processes that have been developed and the results from the first cohort of students trained in these methods and tested during the summer 2017 education and outreach efforts, which reached some 12,000 members of the public. A variety of evaluation and assessment tools were utilized, including surveys of public participants and video recording of the interactions of the students with the public. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant number 1625316.

  3. Science policy up close

    CERN Document Server

    Marburger, John H

    2015-01-01

    In a career that included tenures as president of Stony Brook University, director of Brookhaven National Laboratory, and science advisor to President George W. Bush, John Marburger (1941 2011) found himself on the front line of battles that pulled science ever deeper into the political arena. From nuclear power to global warming and stem cell research, science controversies, he discovered, are never just about science. Science Policy Up Close" presents Marburger s reflections on the challenges science administrators face in the twenty-first century. In each phase of public service Marburger came into contact with a new dimension of science policy. The Shoreham Commission exposed him to the problem of handling a volatile public controversy over nuclear power. The Superconducting Super Collider episode gave him insights into the collision between government requirements and scientists expectations and feelings of entitlement. The Directorship of Brookhaven taught him how to talk to the public about the risks ...

  4. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLIMM,J.

    2002-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  5. Experiments around I-8

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The lithium transition-radiation detectors and the large liquid argon calorimeters of experiment R806T are shown above and below the intersection at I-8 (Brookhaven-CERN-Saclay-Syracuse-Yale Collaboration, Study of large transverse momentum phenomena by electron and photon detection). At 90 deg to the intersecting beams are the monitoring proporional chambers of experiment R805 (Measurement of real to imaginary ratio of forward scattering amplitude - Coulomb interference - by the CERN-Rome Collaboration). Left and right of the intersection one sees, symmetrically placed around the interaction region, the large scintillation counters hodoscopes used by R801 (Pisa-Stony Brook Collaboration) to measure the pp total cross section and the features of inelastic collisions.

  6. Lifetime measurements in odd-even 125La, 127La isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosta, K.; Droste, Ch.; Gundel, S.

    1995-01-01

    Recoil Distance Method (RDM); lifetime measurements have been carried out for the 125 La and 127 La nuclei to examine the collective structure of the decoupled band based on the unique parity πh 11/2 [550]1/2 orbital. The Stony Brook array of five BGO-suppressed Ge detectors placed at +/- 30, 90, 125 and 150 degree relative to the beam direction in conjunction with the Notre Dame/Argonne plunger was used to measure the stopped and shifted γ-ray peaks as a function of target-stopper distance. The 94 Mo( 35 Cl,2p2n) reaction at beam energy of 155 MeV was used to populate the excited states of 125 La and the 112 Cd( 19 F, 4n) reaction for the 127 La. The preliminary results of lifetime measurements are presented

  7. Observation of the UPSILON''' at the Cornell electron-storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Giannini, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Schamberger, R.D. Jr.; Sivertz, M.; Spencer, L.J.; Tuts, P.M.; Boehringer, T.; Costantini, F.; Dobbins, J.; Franzini, P.; Han, K.; Herb, S.W.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Mageras, G.; Peterson, D.; Rice, E.; Yoh, J.K.; Levman, G.

    1980-01-01

    During an energy scan at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, with use of the Columbia University-Stony Brook NaI detector, an enhancement in sigma(e + e - →hadrons) is observed at center-of-mass energy approx.10.55 GeV. The mass and leptonic width of this state (UPSILON''') suggest that it is the 4 3 S 1 bound state of the b quark and its anitquark. After applying to the data a cut in a (pseudo) thrust variable, the natural width is measured to be GAMMA=12.6 +- 6.0 MeV, indicating that the UPSILON''' is above the threshold for BB-bar production

  8. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  9. Process and outcomes evaluation of retention strategies within a nursing workforce diversity project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escallier, Lori A; Fullerton, Judith T

    2009-09-01

    A commitment to enhancing the diversity of the nursing workforce is reflected in the recruitment and retention strategies designed by Stony Brook University with support of a grant received from the Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration. Three specific student retention strategies are evaluated in terms of their influence on student inclusion and promotion of student success. A review of the cultural competence of teaching and learning strategies and the promotion of cultural self-awareness underpinned these strategies. A mentorship program designed to provide individual support for students, particularly for those engaged in distance learning, proved to be challenging to implement and underused by students. Students found other means of support in their workplace and through individual connections with the faculty. Instructional programs that enhanced individual skills in the use of computer hardware and software were particularly effective in promoting student success.

  10. Hyperfine splitting of B mesons and Bs production at the Υ(5S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Franzini, J.; Heintz, U.; Lovelock, D.M.J.; Narain, M.; Schamberger, R.D.; Willins, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    Using the Columbia University--Stony Brook (CUSB-II) detector we have studied the inclusive photon spectrum from 2.9x10 4 Υ(5S) decays. We observe a strong signal due to B * →Bγ decays. From this we obtain (i) the average B * -B mass difference, 46.7±0.4 MeV, (ii) the photon yield per Υ(5S) decay, left-angle γ/Υ(5S)right-angle=1.09±0.06, and (iii) the average velocity of the B * 's, left-angle β right-angle=0.156±0.010, for a mix of nonstrange (B) and strange (B s ) B * mesons from Υ(5S) decays. From the shape of the photon line, we find that both B and B s mesons are produced with nearly equal values for the hyperfine splitting of the B and B s meson systems

  11. "Music & Memory" and improved swallowing in advanced dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dan; Post, Stephen G; Lo, Angela; Lombardo, Robin; Pfeffer, Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Background Dysphagia and difficulty with eating affects a significant portion of individuals with advanced dementia. Such problems with oral intake can have serious health consequences including mealtime distress, dehydration and malnutrition, aspiration, reduced quality of life, and increased mortality risk. Design We present the first data indicating that "Music & Memory" interventions improve swallowing in individuals with advanced dementia, thereby making oral feeding easier and potentially diminishing reliance on PEG. Setting Columbia Health Care Center, Wyocena, WI (with Music&Memory.org, Mineola, NY and Stony Brook University). Participants Residents with advanced dementia (N = 5). Observation by eight professional caregivers. Results (1) Enhanced swallowing mechanism with Music & Memory prior to dining; (2) decreased incidents of choking during mealtime; (3) improved nutritional status; (4) reduced weight loss; (5) reduced need for speech interventions; (6) enhanced quality of life. Conclusions The preliminary results call for additional research.

  12. Light Hydrocarbons Adsorption Mechanisms in Two Calcium-based Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Plonka, Anna M.

    2016-01-25

    The adsorption mechanism of ethane, ethylene and acetylene (C2Hn; n=2, 4, 6) on two microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) is described here that is consistent with observations from single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, calorimetric measurments and gas adsorption isotherm measurements. Two calcium-based MOFs, designated as SBMOF-1 and SBMOF-2 (SB: Stony Brook), form three-dimensional frameworks with one-dimensional open channels. As determined form single crystal diffraction experiments channel geometries of both SBMOF-1 and SBMOF-2 provide multiple adsorption sites for hydrocarbon molecules trough C-H…π and C-H…O interactions, similarly to interactions in the molecular and protein crystals. Both materials selectively adsorb C2 hydrocarbon gases over methane as determined with IAST and breakthrough calculations, with C2H6/CH4 selectivity as high as 74 in SBMOF-1.

  13. Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Barry; Allen, Barbara; Barca, Stefania; Bohme, Susanna Rankin; Henry, Emmanuel; Kaur, Amarjit; Massard-Guilbaud, Genvieve; Melling, Joseph; Menendez-Navarro, Alfredo; Renfrew, Daniel; Santiago, Myrna; Sellers, Christopher; Tweedale, Geoffrey; Zalik, Anna; Zavestoski, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    At a conference held at Stony Brook University in December 2007, "Dangerous Trade: Histories of Industrial Hazard across a Globalizing World," participants endorsed a Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations. The Code outlines practices that would ensure corporations enact the highest health and environmentally protective measures in all the locations in which they operate. Corporations should observe international guidelines on occupational exposure to air contaminants, plant safety, air and water pollutant releases, hazardous waste disposal practices, remediation of polluted sites, public disclosure of toxic releases, product hazard labeling, sale of products for specific uses, storage and transport of toxic intermediates and products, corporate safety and health auditing, and corporate environmental auditing. Protective measures in all locations should be consonant with the most protective measures applied anywhere in the world, and should apply to the corporations' subsidiaries, contractors, suppliers, distributors, and licensees of technology. Key words: corporations, sustainability, environmental protection, occupational health, code of practice.

  14. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  15. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  16. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point

  17. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLIMM, J.

    2001-01-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook

  18. National Nuclear Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 National Nuclear Physics Summer School (NNPSS) will be held from Monday July 18 through Friday July 29, 2016, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The summer school is open to graduate students and postdocs within a few years of their PhD (on either side) with a strong interest in experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. The program will include the following speakers: Accelerators and Detectors - Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, Brookhaven National Laboratory Data Analysis - Michael Williams, MIT Double Beta Decay - Lindley Winslow, MIT Electron-Ion Collider - Abhay Deshpande, Stony Brook University Fundamental Symmetries - Vincenzo Cirigliano, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hadronic Spectroscopy - Matthew Shepherd, Indiana University Hadronic Structure - Jianwei Qiu, Brookhaven National Laboratory Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 1 - Jamie Nagle, Colorado University Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 2 - Wilke van der Schee, MIT Lattice QCD - Sinead Ryan, Trinity College Dublin Neutrino Theory - Cecil...

  19. The discovery of the b quark at Fermilab in 1977: The experiment coordinator`s story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J.

    1997-12-01

    I present the history of the discovery of the Upsilon ({Upsilon}) particle (the first member of the b-quark family to be observed) at Fermilab in 1977 by the CFS (Columbia-Fermilab-Stony Brook collaboration) E288 experiment headed by Leon Lederman. We found the first evidence of the {Upsilon} in November 1976 in an early phase of E288. The subsequent discovery in the spring of 1977 resulted from an upgraded E288 the {mu}{mu}II phase, optimized for dimuons, with about 100 times the sensitivity of the previous investigatory dimuon phase (which had been optimized for dielectrons). The events leading to the discovery, the planning of {mu}{mu}II and the running, including a misadventure (the infamous Shunt Fire of May 1977), are described. Some discussions of the aftermath, a summary, and an acknowledgement list end this brief historical note.

  20. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLIMM,J.

    2001-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.