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Sample records for sunpower m87 cryocooler

  1. Empirical model of the M 87 jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shklovskij, I.S.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the M87 jet is discussed. Recent observations of the M87 jet in radio, optical and X-ray regions, carried out with a sufficiently high resolving power, have revealed an identity of the brightness distribution at all frequencies. This points to a decisive role of the regular magnetic field variations along the jet for its overall structure. The bright knots of the jet are in the places where the field is enhanced. In the same places, a small fraction of relativistic electrons acquires large pitch-angles due to the interaction with plasma waves, leading to the synchrotron emission of the knots. The velocity of the plasma ejected from the nucleus of M87 should be 0.1 c. Thus, the M87 jet is one-sided

  2. Study of Remote Globular Cluster Satellites of M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Arushi; Shao, Andrew; Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) with previously unknown parent galaxies, which we determine to be remote satellites of M87, a massive elliptical galaxy at the center of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. Because GCs were formed in the early universe along with their original parent galaxies, which were cannibalized by massive galaxies such as M87, they share similar age and chemical properties. In this study, we first confirm that M87 is the adoptive parent galaxy of our orphan GCs using photometric and spectroscopic data to analyze spatial and velocity distributions. Next, we increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our samples’ spectra through a process known as coaddition. We utilize spectroscopic absorption lines to determine the age and metallicity of our orphan GCs through comparison to stellar population synthesis models, which we then relate to the GCs’ original parent galaxies using a mass-metallicity relation. Our finding that remote GCs of M87 likely developed in galaxies with ~1010 solar masses implies that M87’s outer halo is formed of relatively massive galaxies, serving as important parameters for developing theories about the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.This research was funded in part by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  3. M 87 at metre wavelengths: the LOFAR picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gasperin, F.; et al., [Unknown; Alexov, A.; Hessels, J.; Swinbank, J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wise, M.

    2012-01-01

    Context.M 87 is a giant elliptical galaxy located in the centre of the Virgo cluster, which harbours a supermassive black hole of mass 6.4 × 109 M⊙, whose activity is responsible for the extended (80 kpc) radio lobes that surround the galaxy. The energy generated by matter falling onto the central

  4. M87 at metre wavelengths: the LOFAR picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gasperin, F.; Orrú, E.; Murgia, M.; Merloni, A.; Falcke, H.; Beck, R.; Beswick, R.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Chyzy, K.; Conway, J.; Croston, J.H.; Ensslin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Heidenreich, S.; Jackson, N.; Macario, G.; McKean, J.; Miley, G.; Morganti, R.; Offringa, A.; Pizzo, R.; Rafferty, D.; Röttgering, H.; Shulevski, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Tasse, C.; van der Tol, S.; van Driel, W.; van Weeren, R.J.; van Zwieten, J.E.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Bell, M.; Bell, M.R.; Bentum, M.J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.W.; Butcher, A.; Ciardi, B.; Dettmar, R.J.; Eislöffel, J.; Frieswijk, W.; Gankema, H.; Garrett, M.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J.M.; Gunst, A.W.; Hassall, T.E.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Köhler, J.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Mevius, M.; Mulcahy, D.D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Paas, H.; Pandey, M.; Pandey, V.N.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; Schoenmakers, A.P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; van Bemmel, I.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A.P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; White, S.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context: M 87 is a giant elliptical galaxy located in the centre of the Virgo cluster, which harbours a supermassive black hole of mass 6.4 × 109 M⊙, whose activity is responsible for the extended (80 kpc) radio lobes that surround the galaxy. The energy generated by matter falling onto the central

  5. M 87 at metre wavelengths : The LOFAR picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gasperin, F.; Orru, E.; Murgia, M.; Merloni, A.; Falcke, H.; Beck, R.; Beswick, R.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Brueggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Chyzy, K.; Conway, J.; Croston, J. H.; Ensslin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Heidenreich, S.; Jackson, N.; Macario, G.; McKean, J.; Miley, G.; Morganti, R.; Offringa, A.; Pizzo, R.; Rafferty, D.; Rottgering, H.; Shulevski, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Tasse, C.; van der Tol, S.; van Driel, W.; van Weeren, R. J.; van Zwieten, J. E.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Bell, M.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Butcher, A.; Ciardi, B.; Dettmar, R. J.; Eisloeffel, J.; Frieswijk, W.; Gankema, H.; Garrett, M.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Koehler, J.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Mevius, M.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Paas, Harm; Pandey, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; Schoenmakers, A. P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; van Bemmel, I.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A. P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; White, S.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. M87 is a giant elliptical galaxy located in the centre of the Virgo cluster, which harbours a supermassive black hole of mass 6.4x10(9) M-circle dot, whose activity is responsible for the extended (80 kpc) radio lobes that surround the galaxy. The energy generated by matter falling onto the

  6. Spatial Substructure in the M87 Globular Cluster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuting; Zhang, Yunhao; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    Based on the observation of Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) project, we obtained the u,g,r,i,z and Ks band photometric information of all the objects in the 2 degree × 2 degree area (Pilot Region) around M87, the major subcluster of Virgo. By adapting an Extreme Deconvolution method, which classifies objects into Globular Clusters (GCs), galaxies and foreground stars with their color and morphology data, we got a purer-than-ever GC distribution map with a depth to gmag=25 in Pilot Region. After masking galaxy GCs, smoothing with a 10arcmin Gaussian kernel and performing a flat field correction, we show the GC density map of M87, and got a good sersic fitting of GC radial distribution with a sersic index~2.2 in the central ellipse part (45arcmin semi major axis area of M87). We quantitatively compared our GC sample with a substructure-free mock data set, which was generated from the smoothed density map as well as the sersic fitting, by calculating the 2 point correlation function (TPCF) value in different parts of the map. After separately performing such comparison with mocks based on different galaxy masking radii which vary from 4 times g band effective radius to 10, we found signals of remarkable spatial enhancement in certain directions in the central ellipse of M87, as well as halo substructures shown as lumpiness and holes in the outer region. We present the estimated scales of these substructures from the TPCF results, and, managed to locate them with a statistical analysis of the pixelized GC map. Apart from all results listed above, we discuss the constant, extra-galactic substructure signal at a scale of ~3kpc, which does not diminish with masking sizes, as the evidence of merging and accretion history of M87.

  7. Acoustic cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K

  8. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  9. A theoretical model of the M87 jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falle, S.A.E.G.; Wilson, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical model of the knots in the M87 jet based on the idea that it is a steady fluid jet propagating through a non-uniform atmosphere. It is argued that knots D, E and F can be explained by the jet being underexpanded as it emerges from the central source, while knot A is due to reconfinement of the jet. Very high resolution numerical calculations are used to show that good agreement with the observed positions of the knots can be obtained with reasonable jet parameters and an atmosphere consistent with the X-ray observations. (author)

  10. Polarimetry and photometry of M87: is the jet fading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren-Smith, R F; King, D J; Scarrott, S M [Durham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1984-09-15

    Optical linear polarization mapping and photometry of M87 is presented in B and R wavebands. The results indicate significant polarization in the galactic nucleus. Polarization in the jet in B is consistent with other recent maps obtained for this area in blue light and no significant variation with wavelength between B and R wavebands is found. The spectral index of the jet radiation is measured to be S=-1.65+-0.2 over the wavelength range observed. Comparison of the integrated B magnitude of the jet with previous independent measurements over the period 1934-80 suggests that the jet is variable and has been fading more or less uniformly by about 0.8 mag per decade between 1964 and 1980.

  11. The dark matter distribution of M87 and NGC 1399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies indicate that, outside the innermost about 100 kpc region, the ratio of dark matter density to baryonic matter density declines with radius. We show that this result is consistent with a cold dark matter simulation, suggesting the presence of dissipationless dark matter in the observed clusters. This is contrary to previous suggestions that dissipational baryonic dark matter is required to explain the decline in the density ratio. The simulation further shows that, in the inner 100 kpc region, the density ratio should rise with radius. We confirm this property in M87 and NGC 1399, which are close enough to allow the determination of the density ratio in the required inner region. X-ray mappings of the dark matter distribution in clusters of galaxies are therefore consistent with the presence of dissipationless dark matter.

  12. DISCOVERY OF C IV EMISSION FILAMENTS IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Cracraft, M.; Donahue, M.; Voit, M.; Carswell, R.; Martin, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    Gas at intermediate temperatures between the hot X-ray-emitting coronal gas in galaxies at the centers of galaxy clusters and the much cooler optical line emitting filaments yields information on transport processes and plausible scenarios for the relationship between X-ray cool cores and other galactic phenomena such as mergers or the onset of an active galactic nucleus. Hitherto, detection of intermediate temperature gas has proven elusive. Here, we present FUV imaging of the 'low excitation' emission filaments of M87 and show strong evidence for the presence of C IV 1549 A emission which arises in gas at temperature ∼10 5 K co-located with Hα+[N II] emission from cooler ∼10 4 K gas. We infer that the hot and cool phases are in thermal communication, and show that quantitatively the emission strength is consistent with thermal conduction, which in turn may account for many of the observed characteristics of cool-core galaxy clusters.

  13. A Rotation Measure Gradient on the M87 VLA Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algaba Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotation measures (RMs have proven to be an excellent tool to study magnetic field structures in AGNs. Here we study RM properties on kiloparsec scales of theM87 jet via stacked multi wavelength polarized VLA observations. Our results show for the first time an indication of the RM gradient transverse to the jet in knot A, and possibly knot C and HST-1. Motivated by the shape of the RM in knots A and B, we discuss that part of it may be a filamentary structure of higher RM due to an external Faraday screen, although we consider this unlikely The data presented here can be easily explained by a helical magnetic field. By combining this result together with polarization direction plus the shape and degree of the fractional polarization across the jet, we can fairly conclude the presence of systematically wrapped, possibly helical, magnetic fields tightly wounded in knots A and C, in agreement with an MHD quad shock model.

  14. Emission and Absorption in the M87 LINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Bassem M.; Shields, Joseph C.; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2003-02-01

    The nucleus of M87 displays a LINER spectrum at optical wavelengths, with a nuclear disk of nebulosity that is resolved by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We present new results from optical and ultraviolet spectra of the central ~40 pc as measured by HST. In contrast with previous results for the extended disk, the emission-line spectrum of the central region is best reproduced by a multicomponent photoionization scenario, rather than shock heating. The nebular properties as well as energetic considerations suggest a transition on scales of several tens of parsecs, from predominantly photoionization by a central accretion source to shock ionization within the disk. If this source is at all representative, it suggests that many LINERs may be composite in terms of the energetic processes that give rise to the emission spectrum. We also report measurements of resonance-line absorption for the nucleus. The absorption spectrum, like the emission lines, is characterized by low ionization. The absorption-line measurements coupled with independent constraints suggest a total hydrogen column density of 1019-1020 cm-2, outflowing from the galaxy center with a velocity of ~126 km s-1. The kinematic signature of an outflow, along with evidence that the absorber covers the power-law continuum source but not the emission-line clouds, suggests that the absorbing matter is related to accretion phenomena in the nucleus. The presence of such an outflow resembles similar behavior in luminous active galactic nuclei, although the low ionization that characterizes LINERs is probably indicative of a different mode of accretion in these sources. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  15. OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN THE M87 JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Cara, Mihai; Bourque, Matthew; Simons, Raymond C. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Blvd., Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Adams, Steven C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Harris, D. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madrid, Juan P. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Clausen-Brown, Eric [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Cheung, C. C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Stawarz, Lukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Georganopoulos, Markos [Department of Physics, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A., E-mail: eperlman@fit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    During the last decade, M87's jet has been the site of an extraordinary variability event, with one knot (HST-1) increasing by over a factor 100 in brightness. Variability has also been seen on timescales of months in the nuclear flux. Here we discuss the optical-UV polarization and spectral variability of these components, which show vastly different behavior. HST-1 shows a highly significant correlation between flux and polarization, with P increasing from {approx}20% at minimum to >40% at maximum, while the orientation of its electric vector stayed constant. HST-1's optical-UV spectrum is very hard ({alpha}{sub UV-O} {approx} 0.5, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -{alpha}}), and displays 'hard lags' during epochs 2004.9-2005.5, including the peak of the flare, with soft lags at later epochs. We interpret the behavior of HST-1 as enhanced particle acceleration in a shock, with cooling from both particle aging and the relaxation of the compression. We set 2{sigma} upper limits of 0.5{delta} pc and 1.02c on the size and advance speed of the flaring region. The slight deviation of the electric vector orientation from the jet position angle (P.A.) makes it likely that on smaller scales the flaring region has either a double or twisted structure. By contrast, the nucleus displays much more rapid variability, with a highly variable electric vector orientation and 'looping' in the (I, P) plane. The nucleus has a much steeper spectrum ({alpha}{sub UV-O} {approx} 1.5) but does not show UV-optical spectral variability. Its behavior can be interpreted as either a helical distortion to a steady jet or a shock propagating through a helical jet.

  16. OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN THE M87 JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Cara, Mihai; Bourque, Matthew; Simons, Raymond C.; Adams, Steven C.; Harris, D. E.; Madrid, Juan P.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, Lukasz; Georganopoulos, Markos; Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, M87's jet has been the site of an extraordinary variability event, with one knot (HST-1) increasing by over a factor 100 in brightness. Variability has also been seen on timescales of months in the nuclear flux. Here we discuss the optical-UV polarization and spectral variability of these components, which show vastly different behavior. HST-1 shows a highly significant correlation between flux and polarization, with P increasing from ∼20% at minimum to >40% at maximum, while the orientation of its electric vector stayed constant. HST-1's optical-UV spectrum is very hard (α UV-O ∼ 0.5, F ν ∝ν –α ), and displays 'hard lags' during epochs 2004.9-2005.5, including the peak of the flare, with soft lags at later epochs. We interpret the behavior of HST-1 as enhanced particle acceleration in a shock, with cooling from both particle aging and the relaxation of the compression. We set 2σ upper limits of 0.5δ pc and 1.02c on the size and advance speed of the flaring region. The slight deviation of the electric vector orientation from the jet position angle (P.A.) makes it likely that on smaller scales the flaring region has either a double or twisted structure. By contrast, the nucleus displays much more rapid variability, with a highly variable electric vector orientation and 'looping' in the (I, P) plane. The nucleus has a much steeper spectrum (α UV-O ∼ 1.5) but does not show UV-optical spectral variability. Its behavior can be interpreted as either a helical distortion to a steady jet or a shock propagating through a helical jet.

  17. 8th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed a substantial maturing of long life Stirling-cycle cryocoolers built upon the heritage of the flexure-bearing cryocoolers from Oxford University, and have seen the emergence of mature pulse tube cryocoolers competing head-to-head with the Stirling cryocoolers. Hydrogen sorption cryocoolers, Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers with rare earth regenerators, and helium Joule-Thomson cryocoolers have also made tremendous progress in opening up applications in the 4 K to 10 K temperature range. Tactical Stirling cryocoolers, now commonplace in the defense industry, are finding application in a number of cost­ constrained commercial applications and space missions, and are achieving ever longer lives as they move to linear-drive, clearance-seal compressors. Building on this expanding availability of commercially viable cryocoolers, numerous new applications are being enabled; many of these involve infrared imaging systems, and high­ temperature superconductors in the medical and ...

  18. XMM-Newton high-resolution spectroscopy reveals the chemical evolution of M 87

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, N.; Boehringer, H.; Kaastra, J.S.; de Plaa, J.; Simionescu, D.; Vink, J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of chemical abundances in the giant elliptical galaxy M 87 using high-resolution spectra obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers during two deep XMM-Newton observations. While we confirm the two-temperature structure of the inter-stellar medium (ISM) in M 87, we also

  19. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  20. Modeling Polarized Emission from Black Hole Jets: Application to M87 Core Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Mościbrodzka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We combine three-dimensional general-relativistic numerical models of hot, magnetized Advection Dominated Accretion Flows around a supermassive black hole and the corresponding outflows from them with a general relativistic polarized radiative transfer model to produce synthetic radio images and spectra of jet outflows. We apply the model to the underluminous core of M87 galaxy. The assumptions and results of the calculations are discussed in context of millimeter observations of the M87 jet launching zone. Our ab initio polarized emission and rotation measure models allow us to address the constrains on the mass accretion rate onto the M87 supermassive black hole.

  1. 17th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    Cryocoolers 17 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 17th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Los Angeles, California, on July 9-12, 2012. The program of this conference consisted of 94 papers; of these, 71 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  2. 16th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Cryocoolers 16 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 16th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 17-20, 2010. The program of this conference consisted of 116 papers; of these, 89 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  3. Globular clusters as a source of X-ray emission from the neighbourhood of M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, A.C.; Pringle, J.E.; Rees, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the X-ray emission from globular clusters may be attributable to accretion on to compact objects, the accreting material being supplied from binary companions, or gas trapped in the potential well of the cluster. Counts of objects in the vicinity of the M87 have revealed that it has an extensive halo of globular clusters, the number of which may exceed 10,000 within a radius of 23 arc min. Most of these clusters may be explicable as a population effect, and the similarity of their optical properties to those of cluster in our own Galaxy suggests that they may also contain X-ray sources. The brighter globular clusters in M87 may, however, be substantially more X-ray luminous, and there may be proportionally more gas available in globular clusters in M87 compared with our Galaxy. The average X-ray luminosity of individual globular clusters may be of the order of 10 38 erg/sec., which raises the possibility that the integrated globular cluster emission may account for a substantial fraction of the X-ray emission observed from the region of M87. In support of this it is noted that the extended X-ray emission from the Virgo cluster is centered on M87, which lies approximately 45 arc min from the cluster centroid, and it is expected that the general X-ray emission from the globular cluster will appear to be smoothly and symmetrically distributed about M87 at moderate spatial resolution. A similar situation may apply to the elliptical galaxy NGC 3311 in Abell 1060 which, as a cluster, has been suggested as the identification for the X-ray source 3 U 1044-40, and it seems possible that that galaxy is surrounded by a similar globular cluster population to that of M87. (U.K.)

  4. THE OBSERVATIONAL AND THEORETICAL TIDAL RADII OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R gc < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  5. The Observational and Theoretical Tidal Radii of Globular Clusters in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Globular clusters have linear sizes (tidal radii) which theory tells us are determined by their masses and by the gravitational potential of their host galaxy. To explore the relationship between observed and expected radii, we utilize the globular cluster population of the Virgo giant M87. Unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 are used to measure the effective and limiting radii of approximately 2000 globular clusters. To compare with these observations, we simulate a globular cluster population that has the same characteristics as the observed M87 cluster population. Placing these simulated clusters in the well-studied tidal field of M87, the orbit of each cluster is solved and the theoretical tidal radius of each cluster is determined. We compare the predicted relationship between cluster size and projected galactocentric distance to observations. We find that for an isotropic distribution of cluster velocities, theoretical tidal radii are approximately equal to observed limiting radii for R gc < 10 kpc. However, the isotropic simulation predicts a steep increase in cluster size at larger radii, which is not observed in large galaxies beyond the Milky Way. To minimize the discrepancy between theory and observations, we explore the effects of orbital anisotropy on cluster sizes, and suggest a possible orbital anisotropy profile for M87 which yields a better match between theory and observations. Finally, we suggest future studies which will establish a stronger link between theoretical tidal radii and observed radii.

  6. Development of the Sunpower 35 We Free-Piston Stirling Convertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Lane, Neill

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the development and performance of the Sunpower 35 We free-piston Stirling convertor. Exceptional thermodynamic performance has been achieved in a small lightweight machine. Efficiency of over 30 percent, at a temperature ratio of 2.6 has been achieved. Specific power of the convertor in final low mass hermetically-sealed form is projected to exceed 90 watts/Kg. This convertor was developed under NASA SBIR funding. Potential applications for this convertor include highly efficient and low mass radioisotope fueled space power systems, as well as terrestrial use as a fuel fired battery replacement.

  7. 18th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Cryocoolers 18 Cryocoolers 18 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 18th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Syracuse, New York, on June 9-12, 2014. The program of this conference lead to the 76 peer-reviewed papers that are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  8. Toy Model of Frame-Dragging Magnetosphere for the M87 Jet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Toy Model of Frame-Dragging Magnetosphere for the M87 Jet ... The outermost layer of jet is driven by the frame-dragging effect in the Kerr ... All these have helped shorten the publication time and have improved the visibility ...

  9. The Ongoing Growth of the M87 Halo through Accretion Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Longobardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Planetary nebulas (PNs offer a unique tool to investigate the outer regions of massive galaxies because their strong [OIII]λ5007Å emission line makes them detectable out to several effective radii from the galaxy’s centre. We use a deep and extended spectroscopic survey of PNs (∼300 objects to study the spatial distribution, the kinematics and the stellar populations in the extended outer halo of the bright elliptical galaxy M87 (NGC 4486 in the Virgo cluster. We show that in the Virgo core, M87 stellar halo and the intracluster light are two distinct dynamical components, with different velocity distributions. Moreover the synergy of the PN kinematical information and the deep V/B-band photometry revealed an ongoing accretion event in the outer regions of M87. This satellite accretion represents a non-negligible perturbation of the halo properties: beyond 60 kpc the M87 halo is still growing with 60% of its light being added by the accretion event at the distance where it is detected.

  10. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  11. 10th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Cryocoolers 10 is the premier archival publication of the latest advances and performance of small cryogenic refrigerators designed to provide localized cooling for military, space, semi-conductor, medical, computing, and high-temperature superconductor cryogenic applications in the 2-200 K temperature range. Composed of papers written by leading engineers and scientists in the field, Cryocoolers 10 reports the most recent advances in cryocooler development, contains extensive performance test results and comparisons, and relates the latest experience in integrating cryocoolers into advanced applications.

  12. Comparison of Intra-cluster and M87 Halo Orphan Globular Clusters in the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Tiffany Kaye; Tuan, Jin Zong; Martellini, Adhara; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Toloba, Elisa; Peng, Eric; Longobardi, Alessia; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) — GCs with no identifiable nearby host galaxy — discovered in NGVS, a 104 deg2 CFHT/MegaCam imaging survey. At the distance of the Virgo cluster, GCs are bright enough to make good spectroscopic targets and many are barely resolved in good ground-based seeing. Our orphan GC sample is derived from a subset of NGVS-selected GC candidates that were followed up with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy. While our primary spectroscopic targets were candidate GC satellites of Virgo dwarf elliptical and ultra-diffuse galaxies, many objects turned out to be non-satellites based on a radial velocity mismatch with the Virgo galaxy they are projected close to. Using a combination of spectral characteristics (e.g., absorption vs. emission), Gaussian mixture modeling of radial velocity and positions, and extreme deconvolution analysis of ugrizk photometry and image morphology, these non-satellites were classified into: (1) intra-cluster GCs (ICGCs) in the Virgo cluster, (2) GCs in the outer halo of M87, (3) foreground Milky Way stars, and (4) background galaxies. The statistical distinction between ICGCs and M87 halo GCs is based on velocity distributions (mean of 1100 vs. 1300 km/s and dispersions of 700 vs. 400 km/s, respectively) and radial distribution (diffuse vs. centrally concentrated, respectively). We used coaddition to increase the spectral SNR for the two classes of orphan GCs and measured the equivalent widths (EWs) of the Mg b and H-beta absorption lines. These EWs were compared to single stellar population models to obtain mean age and metallicity estimates. The ICGCs and M87 halo GCs have = –0.6+/–0.3 and –0.4+/–0.3 dex, respectively, and mean ages of >~ 5 and >~ 10 Gyr, respectively. This suggests the M87 halo GCs formed in relatively high-mass galaxies that avoided being tidally disrupted by M87 until they were close to the cluster center, while IGCCs formed in relatively low-mass galaxies that were

  13. 4th International Cryocoolers Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, George; Knox, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    The Cryocoolers 4 proceedings archives the contributions of leading international experts at the 4th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Easton, Maryland on September 25-26, 1986. About 170 people attended the conference representing 11 countries, 14 universities, 21 government laboratories and 60 industrial companies. Thirty-one papers were presented describing advancements and applications of cryocoolers in the temperature range below 80K. This year's conference was sponsored by the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center of Annapolis, Maryland, and the conference proceedings reproduced here was published by them.

  14. An Experiment to Locate the Site of TeV Flaring in M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Massaro, F.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Cheung, C.C.; /Natl. Acad. Sci. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Horns, D.; Raue, M.; /Hamburg U.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Wagner, S.; /Heidelberg Observ.; Colin, P.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Mazin, D.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Wagner, R.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Beilicke, M.; /McDonnell Ctr. Space Sci.; LeBohec, S.; Hui, M.; /Utah U.; Mukherjee, R.; /Barnard Coll.

    2012-05-18

    We describe a Chandra X-ray target-of-opportunity project designed to isolate the site of TeV flaring in the radio galaxy M87. To date, we have triggered the Chandra observations only once (2010 April) and by the time of the first of our nine observations, the TeV flare had ended. However, we found that the X-ray intensity of the unresolved nucleus was at an elevated level for our first observation. Of the more than 60 Chandra observations we have made of the M87 jet covering nine years, the nucleus was measured at a comparably high level only three times. Two of these occasions can be associated with TeV flaring, and at the time of the third event, there were no TeV monitoring activities. From the rapidity of the intensity drop of the nucleus, we infer that the size of the emitting region is of order a few light days x the unknown beaming factor; comparable to the same sort of estimate for the TeV emitting region. We also find evidence of spectral evolution in the X-ray band which seems consistent with radiative losses affecting the non-thermal population of the emitting electrons within the unresolved nucleus.

  15. 15th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    This is the 15th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocooler Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  16. 14th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    This is the 14th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  17. Building the better cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radebaugh, R.

    1992-01-01

    This article focuses on the present and future status of small cryocoolers that may be useful for cooling superconducting electronics or magnets no larger than those of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems. In a few cases superconductors have found their way into a large market. The best example is superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and other accelerators use an enormous amount of superconducting wire and require large liquid helium plants for cooling. The costs of these large accelerator systems greatly restricts the number of such installations. Thin film superconducting electronic devices have the potential of being made relatively inexpensively and have a performance advantage over conventional electronic systems. The possible market size for superconducting electronics could be extremely large is one serious problem would simply disappear

  18. THE BLACK HOLE MASS, STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIO, AND DARK HALO IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, Karl; Thomas, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We model the dynamical structure of M87 (NGC4486) using high spatial resolution long-slit observations of stellar light in the central regions, two-dimensional stellar light kinematics out to half of the effective radius, and globular cluster velocities out to eight effective radii. We simultaneously fit for four parameters: black hole mass, dark halo core radius, dark halo circular velocity, and stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. We find a black hole mass of 6.4(±0.5) x 10 9 M sun (the uncertainty is 68% confidence marginalized over the other parameters). The stellar M/L V = 6.3 ± 0.8. The best-fit dark halo core radius is 14 ± 2 kpc, assuming a cored logarithmic potential. The best-fit dark halo circular velocity is 715 ± 15 km s -1 . Our black hole mass is over a factor of 2 larger than previous stellar dynamical measures, and our derived stellar M/L ratio is two times lower than previous dynamical measures. When we do not include a dark halo, we measure a black hole mass and stellar M/L ratio that is consistent with previous measures, implying that the major difference is in the model assumptions. The stellar M/L ratio from our models is very similar to that derived from stellar population models of M87. The reason for the difference in the black hole mass is because we allow the M/L ratio to change with radius. The dark halo is degenerate with the stellar M/L ratio, which is subsequently degenerate with the black hole mass. We argue that dynamical models of galaxies that do not include the contribution from a dark halo may produce a biased result for the black hole mass. This bias is especially large for a galaxy with a shallow light profile such as M87, and may not be as severe in galaxies with steeper light profiles unless they have a large stellar population change with radius.

  19. Plasma jet in M87: energy balance and the spectral index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The author's theory of ultrarelativistic-electron acceleration through Cerenkov resonance with magnetoacoustic waves that are generated by an ion beam reflected from a shock front is applied to calculate the parameters and radiation spectrum of the plasma jet emerging from the nucleus of the galaxy M87. The abrupt steepening of the optical spectrum toward short wavelengths may indicate that the higher-energy electrons, accelerated predominantly along the magnetic fieldlines, are experiencing too little scattering with respect to pitch angle. In the soft x-ray range the spectrum flattens again because MHD turbulence in the plasma jet reinstates the pitch-angle scattering. At the highest energies, synchrotron losses once more steepen the spectrum

  20. Hadronic origin of the TeV flare of M87 in April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarira [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, C.U., A., Postal 70-543, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Palacios, Eddie [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-02-01

    M87 is a giant radio galaxy with FR-I morphology. It underwent three episodes of TeV flaring in recent years with the strongest one in April 2010 which was jointly monitored by MAGIC, VERITAS and H.E.S.S. We explain its spectral energy distribution in the energy range 0.3-5 TeV by assuming that the flaring occurs in the innermost region of the jet. In this region the low energy SSC photons serve as the target for the Fermi-accelerated high energy protons of energy ≤30 TeV to form a delta resonance. The TeV photons are produced from the subsequent decay of the delta resonance to neutral pions. In this scenario the observed TeV flux of April 2010 flare is fitted very well. (orig.)

  1. Hadronic origin of the TeV flare of M87 in April 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Sarira; Palacios, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    M87 is a giant radio galaxy with FR-I morphology. It underwent three episodes of TeV flaring in recent years with the strongest one in April 2010 which was jointly monitored by MAGIC, VERITAS and H.E.S.S. We explain its spectral energy distribution in the energy range 0.3-5 TeV by assuming that the flaring occurs in the innermost region of the jet. In this region the low energy SSC photons serve as the target for the Fermi-accelerated high energy protons of energy ≤30 TeV to form a delta resonance. The TeV photons are produced from the subsequent decay of the delta resonance to neutral pions. In this scenario the observed TeV flux of April 2010 flare is fitted very well. (orig.)

  2. Faraday rotation in the M87 radio/X-ray halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, B.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of polarization maps at various wavelengths demonstrates the existence of a large Faraday rotation uniform over the radio core of M87. Much of this rotation must be external to the core, lest it appear completely depolarized when the rotation is about 90 degrees. The Faraday rotation is shown to occur primarily in the surrounding radio/X-ray halo. Using the electron density inferred from X-ray observations, the magnetic field in the halo is found to be 2.5 microgauss. The deduced magnetic field strength permits an evaluation of the importance of Compton scattering of 3 K background photons by relativistic electrons in the radio halo. The emergent Compton-scattered spectrum is calculated, and its contribution to the observed X-ray flux is small, probably about a percent or so, while the rest is due to thermal bremsstrahlung.

  3. A Jet Source of Event Horizon Telescope Correlated Flux in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian

    2017-12-01

    Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) observations at 230 GHz are combined with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations at 86 GHz and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope optical observations in order to constrain the broadband spectrum of the emission from the base of the jet in M87. The recent VLBI observations of Hada et al. provide much stricter limits on the 86 GHz luminosity and component acceleration in the jet base than were available to previous modelers. They reveal an almost hollow jet on sub-mas scales. Thus, tubular models of the jet base emanating from the innermost accretion disk are considered within the region responsible for the EHT correlated flux. There is substantial synchrotron self-absorbed opacity at 86 GHz. A parametric analysis indicates that the jet dimensions and power depend strongly on the 86 GHz flux density and the black hole spin, but depend weakly on other parameters, such as jet speed, 230 GHz flux density, and optical flux. The entire power budget of the M87 jet, ≲ {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, can be accommodated by the tubular jet. No invisible, powerful spine is required. Even though this analysis never employs the resolution of the EHT, the spectral shape implies a dimension transverse to the jet direction of 12-21 μ {as} (˜ 24{--}27 μ {as}) for 0.99> a/M> 0.95 (a/M˜ 0.7), where M is the mass and a is the angular momentum per unit mass of the central black hole.

  4. LOCALIZING SAGITTARIUS A* AND M87 ON MICROARCSECOND SCALES WITH MILLIMETER VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Loeb, Abraham [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard University, Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Reid, Mark J., E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.ca [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    With the advent of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a millimeter/submillimeter very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), it has become possible to image a handful of black holes with sub-horizon resolutions. However, these images do not translate into microarcsecond absolute positions due to the lack of absolute phase information when an external phase reference is not used. Due to the short atmospheric coherence time at these wavelengths, nodding between the source and phase reference is impractical. However, here we suggest an alternative scheme which makes use of the fact that many of the VLBI stations within the EHT are arrays in their own right. With this we show that it should be possible to absolutely position the supermassive black holes at the centers of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M87 relative to nearby objects with precisions of roughly 1 {mu}as. This is sufficient to detect the perturbations to Sgr A*'s position resulting from interactions with the stars and stellar-mass black holes in the Galactic cusp on year timescales, and severely constrain the astrophysically relevant parameter space for an orbiting intermediate-mass black hole, implicated in some mechanisms for producing the young massive stars in the Galactic center. For M87, it allows the registering of millimeter images, in which the black hole may be identified by its silhouette against nearby emission, and existing larger-scale radio images, eliminating present ambiguities in the nature of the radio core and inclination, opening angle, and source of the radio jet.

  5. THE INNERMOST COLLIMATION STRUCTURE OF THE M87 JET DOWN TO ∼10 SCHWARZSCHILD RADII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Kino, Motoki; Doi, Akihiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-09-20

    We investigated the detailed inner jet structure of M87 using Very Long Baseline Array data at 2, 5, 8.4, 15, 23.8, 43, and 86 GHz, especially focusing on the multi-frequency properties of the radio core at the jet base. First, we measured the size of the core region transverse to the jet axis, defined as W{sub c}, at each frequency ν, and found a relation between W{sub c} and ν: W{sub c}(ν)∝ν{sup –0.71±0.05}. Then, by combining W{sub c}(ν) and the frequency dependence of the core position r{sub c}(ν), which was obtained in our previous study, we constructed a collimation profile of the innermost jet W{sub c}(r) down to ∼10 Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) from the central black hole. We found that W{sub c}(r) smoothly connects with the width profile of the outer edge-brightened, parabolic jet and then follows a similar radial dependence down to several tens of R{sub s}. Closer to the black hole, the measured radial profile suggests a possible change in the jet collimation shape from the outer parabolic one, where the jet shape tends to become more radially oriented. This result could be related to a magnetic collimation process or/and interactions with surrounding materials at the jet base. The present results shed light on the importance of higher-sensitivity/resolution imaging studies of M87 at 86, 43, and 22 GHz; these studies should be examined more rigorously.

  6. INDICATION OF THE BLACK HOLE POWERED JET IN M87 BY VSOP OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Keiichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Pu, Hung-Yi, E-mail: asada@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: nakamura@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: hypu@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-10

    In order to study the collimation and acceleration mechanism of relativistic jets, the jet streamline of M87 at milliarcsecond scale is extensively investigated with images from VSOP observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz. Thanks to the higher angular resolution of VSOP, especially in the direction transverse to the jet, we resolved the jet streamline into three ridgelines at the scale of milli arcseconds. While the properties of the outer two ridgelines are in good agreement with those measured in previous observations and can be expressed by one power-law line with a power law index of 1.7, an inner ridgeline is clearly observed for the first time. We compared the measured size with the outermost streamline expected by Blandford and Znajek's parabolic solutions, which are anchored at the event horizon, with different black hole spin parameters. We revealed that the observed inner ridgeline is narrower than the prediction, suggesting the origin of the inner ridgeline to be part of a spine originating from the spinning black hole. The inner ridgeline becomes very dim at large distances from the central engine at 5 GHz. We considered two possible cases for this; Doppler beaming and/or radiative cooling. Either case seems to be reasonable for its explanation, and future multi-frequency observations will discriminate those two possibilities.

  7. Long-term millimeter VLBI monitoring of M 87 with KVN at milliarcsecond resolution: nuclear spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Sang-Sung; Hodgson, Jeffrey A.; Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Kino, Motoki; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Sincheol

    2018-02-01

    We study the centimeter- to millimeter-wavelength synchrotron spectrum of the core of the radio galaxy M 87 at ≲0.8 mas 110Rs spatial scales using four years of fully simultaneous, multi-frequency VLBI data obtained by the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). We find a core spectral index α of ≳‑0.37 (S ∝ ν+α) between 22 and 129 GHz. By combining resolution-matched flux measurements from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 15 GHz and taking the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) 230 GHz core flux measurements in epochs 2009 and 2012 as lower limits, we find evidence of a nearly flat core spectrum across 15 and 129 GHz, which could naturally connect the 230 GHz VLBI core flux. The extremely flat spectrum is a strong indication that the jet base does not consist of a simple homogeneous plasma, but of inhomogeneous multi-energy components, with at least one component with the turn-over frequency ≳ 100 GHz. The spectral shape can be qualitatively explained if both the strongly (compact, optically thick at >100 GHz) and the relatively weakly magnetized (more extended, optically thin at <100 GHz) plasma components are colocated in the footprint of the relativistic jet.

  8. Galaxy structure from multiple tracers - III. Radial variations in M87's IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Lindsay; Auger, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    We present the first constraints on stellar mass-to-light ratio gradients in an early-type galaxy (ETG) using multiple dynamical tracer populations to model the dark and luminous mass structure simultaneously. We combine the kinematics of the central starlight, two globular cluster populations and satellite galaxies in a Jeans analysis to obtain new constraints on M87's mass structure, employing a flexible mass model which allows for radial gradients in the stellar-mass-to-light ratio. We find that, in the context of our model, a radially declining stellar-mass-to-light ratio is strongly favoured. Modelling the stellar-mass-to-light ratio as following a power law, ϒ⋆ ˜ R-μ, we infer a power-law slope μ = -0.54 ± 0.05; equally, parametrizing the stellar-mass-to-light ratio via a central mismatch parameter relative to a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF), α, and scale radius RM, we find α > 1.48 at 95% confidence and RM = 0.35 ± 0.04 kpc. We use stellar population modelling of high-resolution 11-band HST photometry to show that such a steep gradient cannot be achieved by variations in only the metallicity, age, dust extinction and star formation history if the stellar IMF remains spatially constant. On the other hand, the stellar-mass-to-light ratio gradient that we find is consistent with an IMF whose inner slope changes such that it is Salpeter-like in the central ˜0.5 kpc and becomes Chabrier-like within the stellar effective radius. This adds to recent evidence that the non-universality of the IMF in ETGs may be confined to their core regions, and points towards a picture in which the stars in these central regions may have formed in fundamentally different physical conditions.

  9. Energy distribution of relativistic electrons in the kiloparsec scale jet of M 87 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Na; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Rieger, Frank M.; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Aharonian, Felix

    2018-05-01

    The X-ray emission from the jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) carries important information on the distributions of relativistic electrons and magnetic fields on large scales. We reanalysed archival Chandra observations on the jet of M 87 from 2000 to 2016 with a total exposure of 1460 kiloseconds to explore the X-ray emission characteristics along the jet. We investigated the variability behaviours of the nucleus and the inner jet component HST-1, and confirm indications for day-scale X-ray variability in the nucleus contemporaneous to the 2010 high TeV γ-ray state. HST-1 shows a general decline in X-ray flux over the last few years consistent with its synchrotron interpretation. We extracted the X-ray spectra for the nucleus and all knots in the jet, showing that they are compatible with a single power law within the X-ray band. There are indications that the resultant X-ray photon index exhibit a trend, with slight but significant index variations ranging from ≃ 2.2 (e.g. in knot D) to ≃ 2.4-2.6 (in the outer knots F, A, and B). When viewed in a multiwavelength context, a more complex situation can be seen. Fitting the radio to X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) assuming a synchrotron origin, we show that a broken power-law electron spectrum with break energy Eb around 1 (300 μG/B)1/2 TeV allows a satisfactory description of the multiband SEDs for most of the knots. However, in the case of knots B, C, and D we find indications that an additional high-energy component is needed to adequately reproduce the broad-band SEDs. We discuss the implications and suggest that a stratified jet model may account for the differences.

  10. ON THE NATURE OF X-RAY SURFACE BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS IN M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arévalo, P. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretana N 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso (Chile); Churazov, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Zhuravleva, I. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Forman, W. R.; Jones, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7′ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3′ from the center. For features of ∼5–10 kpc, we show that the central 4′ × 4′ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14′ × 14′ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ∼30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  11. MULTI-WAVELENGTH POLARIMETRY AND SPECTRAL STUDY OF THE M87 JET DURING 2002–2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Boulevard, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Adams, Steven C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30605 (United States); Cara, Mihai; Sparks, William B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Owen, Frazer [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Georganopoulos, Markos [Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We present a multi-wavelength polarimetric and spectral study of the M87 jet obtained at sub-arcsecond resolution between 2002 and 2008. The observations include multi-band archival VLA polarimetry data sets along with Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) imaging polarimetry. These observations have better angular resolution than previous work by factors of 2–3 and in addition, allow us to explore the time domain. These observations envelop the huge flare in HST-1 located 0.″86 from the nucleus. The increased resolution enables us to view more structure in each knot, showing several resolved sub-components. We also see apparent helical structure in the polarization vectors in several knots, with polarization vectors turning either clockwise or counterclockwise near the flux maxima in various places as well as showing filamentary undulations. Some of these characteristics are correlated with flux and polarization maxima while others are not. We also examine the total flux and fractional polarization and look for changes in both radio and optical since the observations of Perlman et al. (1999) and test them against various models based on shocks and instabilities in the jet. Our results are broadly consistent with previous spine-sheath models and recollimation shock models; however, they require additional combinations of features to explain the observed complexity, e.g., shearing of magnetic field lines near the jet surface and compression of the toroidal component near shocks. In particular, in many regions we find apparently helical features both in total flux and polarization. We discuss the physical interpretation of these features.

  12. MUSE observations of M87: radial gradients for the stellar initial-mass function and the abundance of Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzi, Marc; Spiniello, Chiara; Barbera, Francesco La; Krajnović, Davor; Bosch, Remco van den

    2018-05-01

    Based on MUSE integral-field data we present evidence for a radial variation at the low-mass end of the stellar initial-mass function (IMF) in the central regions of the giant early-type galaxy NGC 4486 (M87). We used state-of-the-art stellar population models and the observed strength of various IMF-sensitive absorption-line features to solve for the best low-mass tapered "bimodal" form of the IMF, while accounting also for variations in stellar metallicity, the overall α-elements abundance and the abundance of individual elements such as Ti, O, Na and Ca. Our analysis reveals a strong negative IMF gradient corresponding to an exceeding fraction of low-mass stars compared to the case of the Milky Way toward the center of M87, which drops to nearly Milky-way levels by 0.4 Re. Such IMF variations correspond to over a factor two increase in stellar mass-to-light M/L ratio compared to the case of a Milky-way IMF, consistent with independent constraints on M/L radial variations in M87 from dynamical models. We also looked into the abundance of Sodium in M87, which turned up to be super-Solar over the entire radial range of our MUSE observations and to exhibit a considerable negative gradient. These findings suggest an additional role of metallicity in boosting the Na-yields in the central, metal-rich regions of M87 during its early and brief star-formation history. Our work adds M87 to the few objects that presently have radial constraints on their IMF or [Na/Fe] abundance, while also illustrating the accuracy that MUSE could bring to this kind of investigations.

  13. THE 2010 VERY HIGH ENERGY gamma-RAY FLARE AND 10 YEARS OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF M 87

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernloehr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.

    2012-01-01

    The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3-6) x 10(9) M-circle dot) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of supermassive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE gamma-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE gamma-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, resu...

  14. Enormous mass of the elliptical galaxy M87: A model for the extended X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the X-ray data from the Virgo cluster indicates that the mass of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 exceeds 10 13 M/sub sun/ or greater. This large mass is required in order to confine the extended thermal X-ray source to its observed projected size - provided that the gas which radiates X-rays is essentially isothermal (T=3 x 10 7 K) and in hydrostatic equilibrium. Isothermality follows from the efficiency of heat conduction and the suggested origin of the gas. If these assumptions are correct, the bulk of the mass in M87 must be distributed in a low-density, low luminosity component quite unlike the distribution of luminous matter. The mass of this component could account for the ''missing mass'' in the Virgo cluster. Observations of polarized radio emission from the core source in M87 provide further indirect support for the existence of a massive, low-luminosity halo. The hot gas (Tapprox. =3 x 10 7 K), trapped in the potential well of the dark halo, and the magnetic field associated with the M87 radio halo account for the Faraday depolarization and rotation measure observed in the radio core source (jet and nucleus).The gas at Tapprox. =3 x 10 7 K which surrounds M87 cools at its center in less than a Hubble time, and produces the H II region which is observed there. Observations of the Balmer decrement could be useful in verifying the origin of the nuclear H II gas. This gas, which falls as clouds into the nucleus at a rate of approx.10 M/sub sun/ yr -1 , may be responsible for maintaining the nonthermal activity there. The total mass of hot gas in M87 is, very approximately, 5 x 10 12 M/sub sun/. A likely source for the hot gas surrounding M87 would be the interaction of galactic winds among the cluster members, followed by infall into the potential well of M87

  15. 5th International Conference on Cryocoolers

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    The Cryocoolers 5 proceedings archives the contributions of leading international experts at the 5th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Monterey, California on August 18-19, 1988. The authors submitted twenty six papers describing advancements and applications of cryocoolers in the temperature range below 80K. This year's conference was hosted by the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and the conference proceedings reproduced here were published by the Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio.

  16. To the Edge of M87 and Beyond: Spectroscopy of Intracluster Globular Clusters and Ultracompact Dwarfs in the Virgo Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Youkyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [Quantum Universe Center, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hong Soo; Hwang, Narae; Park, Byeong-Gon [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sungsoon [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sohn, Jubee, E-mail: ykko@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a wide-field spectroscopic survey of globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster. We obtain spectra for 201 GCs and 55 ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs) using Hectospec on the Multiple-Mirror Telescope and derive their radial velocities. We identify 46 genuine intracluster GCs (IGCs), not associated with any Virgo galaxies, using the 3D GMM test on the spatial and radial velocity distribution. They are located at a projected distance 200 kpc≲R ≲500 kpc from the center of M87. The radial velocity distribution of these IGCs shows two peaks, one at v{sub r} = 1023 km s{sup −1}, associated with the Virgo main body, and another at v {sub r}=36 km s{sup −1}, associated with the infalling structure. The velocity dispersion of the IGCs in the Virgo main body is σ{sub GC}∼314 km s{sup −1}, which is smoothly connected to the velocity dispersion profile of M87 GCs but is much lower than that of dwarf galaxies in the same survey field, σ {sub dwarf}∼608 km s{sup −1}. The UCDs are more centrally concentrated on massive galaxies - M87, M86, and M84. The radial velocity dispersion of the UCD system is much smaller than that of dwarf galaxies. Our results confirm the large-scale distribution of Virgo IGCs indicated by previous photometric surveys. The color distribution of the confirmed IGCs shows a bimodality similar to that of M87 GCs. This indicates that most IGCs are stripped off dwarf galaxies and some off massive galaxies in the Virgo.

  17. Upper limits of a cosmic infrared background flux as determined by X- and gamma-ray observations on M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Cambridge Univ.; Harwit, M.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY

    1982-01-01

    Upper limits on the energy density of infrared photons in the radio lobe regions of M87 are derived using measurements of the X-ray and gamma-ray emission. The calculations are based on an inverse Compton scattering model initiated by radio-flux producing electrons. It is shown that the energy density of infrared photons in the radio lobe regions is similar than 2 eV cm -3 . (orig.)

  18. Engineering model cryocooler test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skimko, M.A.; Stacy, W.D.; McCormick, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent testing of diaphragm-defined, Stirling-cycle machines and components has demonstrated cooling performance potential, validated the design code, and confirmed several critical operating characteristics. A breadboard cryocooler was rebuilt and tested from cryogenic to near-ambient cold end temperatures. There was a significant increase in capacity at cryogenic temperatures and the performance results compared will with code predictions at all temperatures. Further testing on a breadboard diaphragm compressor validated the calculated requirement for a minimum axial clearance between diaphragms and mating heads

  19. Advanced cryocooler electronics for space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, D.; Danial, A.; Godden, J.; Jackson, M.; McCuskey, J.; Valenzuela, P. [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA (United States); Davis, T. [Air Force Research Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Space pulse-tube cryocoolers require electronics to control the cooling temperature and self-induced vibration. Other functions include engineering diagnostics, telemetry and safety protection of the unit against extreme environments and operational anomalies. The electronics must survive the harsh conditions of launch and orbit, and in some cases severe radiation environments for periods exceeding 10 years. A number of our current generation high reliability radiation hardened electronics units have been launched and others are in various stages of assembly or integration on a number of space flight programs. This paper describes the design features and performance of our next generation flight electronics designed for the STSS payloads. The electronics provides temperature control with better than +/-50 mK short-term stability. Self-induced vibration is controlled to low levels on all harmonics up to the 16th. A unique active power filter limits peak-to-peak reflected ripple current on the primary power bus to less than 3% of the average DC current. The 3 kg unit is capable of delivering 180 W continuous to NGST's high-efficiency cryocooler (HEC). (author)

  20. Exploring the accretion model of M87 and 3C 84 with the Faraday rotation measure observations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) are believed to be powered by an accretion-jet model, consisting of an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), an outer truncated standard thin disk, and a jet. But model degeneracy still exists in this framework. For example, the X-ray emission can originate from either the ADAF or jet. The aim of the present work is to check these models with the Faraday rotation measure (RM) observations recently detected for two LLAGNs, M87 and 3C 84...

  1. Black hole spin from wobbling and rotation of the M87 jet and a sign of a magnetically arrested disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2018-06-01

    New long-term Very Long Baseline Array observations of the well-known jet in the M87 radio galaxy at 43 GHz show that the jet experiences a sideways shift with an approximately 8-10 yr quasi-periodicity. Such jet wobbling can be indicative of a relativistic Lense-Thirring precession resulting from a tilted accretion disc. The wobbling period together with up-to-date kinematic data on jet rotation opens up the possibility for estimating angular momentum of the central supermassive black hole. In the case of a test-particle precession, the specific angular momentum is J/Mc = (2.7 ± 1.5) × 1014 cm, implying moderate dimensionless spin parameters a = 0.5 ± 0.3 and 0.31 ± 0.17 for controversial gas-dynamic and stellar-dynamic black hole masses. However, in the case of a solid-body-like precession, the spin parameter is much smaller for both masses, 0.15 ± 0.05. Rejecting this value on the basis of other independent spin estimations requires the existence of a magnetically arrested disc in M87.

  2. Imaging the Schwarzschild-radius-scale Structure of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope Using Sparse Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Kuramochi, Kazuki; Tazaki, Fumie; Honma, Mareki [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ikeda, Shiro [Department of Statistical Science, School of Multidisciplinary Sciences, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8562 (Japan); Broderick, Avery E. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street, North Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Dexter, Jason [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mościbrodzka, Monika [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bouman, Katherine L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chael, Andrew A. [Black Hole Initiative, Harvard University, 20 Garden Street,Cambridge, MA 02138,USA (United States); Zaizen, Masamichi, E-mail: kazu@haystack.mit.edu [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-03-20

    We propose a new imaging technique for radio and optical/infrared interferometry. The proposed technique reconstructs the image from the visibility amplitude and closure phase, which are standard data products of short-millimeter very long baseline interferometers such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and optical/infrared interferometers, by utilizing two regularization functions: the ℓ {sub 1}-norm and total variation (TV) of the brightness distribution. In the proposed method, optimal regularization parameters, which represent the sparseness and effective spatial resolution of the image, are derived from data themselves using cross-validation (CV). As an application of this technique, we present simulated observations of M87 with the EHT based on four physically motivated models. We confirm that ℓ {sub 1} + TV regularization can achieve an optimal resolution of ∼20%–30% of the diffraction limit λ / D {sub max}, which is the nominal spatial resolution of a radio interferometer. With the proposed technique, the EHT can robustly and reasonably achieve super-resolution sufficient to clearly resolve the black hole shadow. These results make it promising for the EHT to provide an unprecedented view of the event-horizon-scale structure in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole in M87 and also the Galactic center Sgr A*.

  3. EXPLORING THE ACCRETION MODEL OF M87 AND 3C 84 WITH THE FARADAY ROTATION MEASURE OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Xie, Fu-Guo, E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2016-10-20

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) are believed to be powered by an accretion-jet model, consisting of an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), an outer truncated standard thin disk, and a jet; however, model degeneracy still exists in this framework. For example, the X-ray emission can originate from either the ADAF or the jet. The aim of the present work is to check these models with the Faraday rotation measure (RM) observations recently detected for two LLAGNs, M87 and 3C 84, in the sub-mm band. For M87, we find that the RM predicted by the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the ADAF is larger than the observed upper limit of RM by over two orders of magnitude, while the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the jet predicts a RM lower than the observed upper limit. For 3C 84, the sub-mm emission is found to be dominated by the jet component, while the Faraday screen is attributed to the ADAFs. This scenario can naturally explain the observed external origin of the RM and why the RM is found to be stable during a two-year interval although the sub-mm emission increases at the same period.

  4. EXPLORING THE ACCRETION MODEL OF M87 AND 3C 84 WITH THE FARADAY ROTATION MEASURE OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) are believed to be powered by an accretion-jet model, consisting of an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), an outer truncated standard thin disk, and a jet; however, model degeneracy still exists in this framework. For example, the X-ray emission can originate from either the ADAF or the jet. The aim of the present work is to check these models with the Faraday rotation measure (RM) observations recently detected for two LLAGNs, M87 and 3C 84, in the sub-mm band. For M87, we find that the RM predicted by the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the ADAF is larger than the observed upper limit of RM by over two orders of magnitude, while the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the jet predicts a RM lower than the observed upper limit. For 3C 84, the sub-mm emission is found to be dominated by the jet component, while the Faraday screen is attributed to the ADAFs. This scenario can naturally explain the observed external origin of the RM and why the RM is found to be stable during a two-year interval although the sub-mm emission increases at the same period.

  5. Exploring the Accretion Model of M87 and 3C 84 with the Faraday Rotation Measure Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) are believed to be powered by an accretion-jet model, consisting of an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), an outer truncated standard thin disk, and a jet; however, model degeneracy still exists in this framework. For example, the X-ray emission can originate from either the ADAF or the jet. The aim of the present work is to check these models with the Faraday rotation measure (RM) observations recently detected for two LLAGNs, M87 and 3C 84, in the sub-mm band. For M87, we find that the RM predicted by the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the ADAF is larger than the observed upper limit of RM by over two orders of magnitude, while the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the jet predicts a RM lower than the observed upper limit. For 3C 84, the sub-mm emission is found to be dominated by the jet component, while the Faraday screen is attributed to the ADAFs. This scenario can naturally explain the observed external origin of the RM and why the RM is found to be stable during a two-year interval although the sub-mm emission increases at the same period.

  6. THE 2010 VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY FLARE AND 10 YEARS OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF M 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowski, A. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Acero, F. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, CC 72, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Aharonian, F.; Bernloehr, K.; Bochow, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 103980, D 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Akhperjanian, A. G. [National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, 24 Marshall Baghramian Avenue, 0019 Yerevan (Armenia); Anton, G.; Balzer, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Barnacka, A. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Barres de Almeida, U. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Becherini, Y. [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Becker, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D 44780 Bochum (Germany); Behera, B. [Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl, D 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Birsin, E. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D 12489 Berlin (Germany); Biteau, J. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Boisson, C. [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France); Bolmont, J. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252, Paris Cedex 5 (France); Bordas, P., E-mail: martin.raue@desy.de [Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Sand 1, D 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: H.E.S.S. Collaboration; MAGIC Collaboration; VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2012-02-20

    The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3 - 6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of supermassive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE {gamma}-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE {gamma}-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M 87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array, VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE {gamma}-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times of {tau}{sup rise}{sub d} = (1.69 {+-} 0.30) days and {tau}{sup decay}{sub d} = (0.611 {+-} 0.080) days, respectively. While the overall variability pattern of the 2010 flare appears somewhat different from that of previous VHE flares in 2005 and 2008, they share very similar timescales ({approx}day), peak fluxes ({Phi}{sub >0.35TeV} {approx_equal} (1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}), and VHE spectra. VLBA radio observations of 43 GHz of the inner jet regions indicate no enhanced flux in 2010 in contrast to observations in 2008, where an increase of the radio flux of the innermost core regions coincided with a VHE flare. On the other hand, Chandra X-ray observations taken {approx}3 days after the peak of the VHE {gamma}-ray emission reveal an enhanced flux from the core (flux increased by factor {approx}2; variability timescale <2 days). The long-term (2001-2010) multi-wavelength (MWL

  7. Raytheon Stirling/pulse Tube Cryocooler Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkconnell, C. S.; Hon, R. C.; Kesler, C. H.; Roberts, T.

    2008-03-01

    The first generation flight-design Stirling/pulse tube "hybrid" two-stage cryocooler has entered initial performance and environmental testing. The status and early results of the testing are presented. Numerous improvements have been implemented as compared to the preceding brassboard versions to improve performance, extend life, and enhance launch survivability. This has largely been accomplished by incorporating successful flight-design features from the Raytheon Stirling one-stage cryocooler product line. These design improvements are described. In parallel with these mechanical cryocooler development efforts, a third generation electronics module is being developed that will support hybrid Stirling/pulse tube and Stirling cryocoolers. Improvements relative to the second generation design relate to improved radiation hardness, reduced parts count, and improved vibration cancellation capability. Progress on the electronics is also presented.

  8. Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenger F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in this temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined

  9. Review of the Oxford Cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Oxford Cryocooler incorporates a linear drive compressor operating close to resonance. All dynamic seals are noncontacting clearance seals maintained by mounting the piston and displacer on mechanical suspension systems with infinite fatigue life. The displacer is pneumatically driven but controlled by a miniature linear motor. The cooler is therefore nonwearing and performance can be maintained even in adverse environments by servo control of piston and displacer strokes and relative phase. Split and integral, single- and two-stage coolers have been produced with operating temperatures between 30 K and 200 K, refrigeration powers between 50 mW and several watts and capable of operating in ambient temperatures from -40 C to 70 C. A current project aims to extend the refrigeration power to 500 watts at 80 K. Experimental optimisation techniques have been devised for rapid development of high efficiency coolers

  10. High resolution 2-D imaging polarimetry of the jet of M87, in the light of U, B and V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvanathan, N; Pickles, A J [Australian National Univ., Canberra. Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories

    1981-01-01

    Polarisation maps to a resolution of 1 arcsec in the jet of M87 are presented. The results show that small-scale structure exists in the magnetic field down to at least this resolution, as evidenced by the fact that the 1 arcsec resolution percentage polarisations are approximately 80% higher than those obtained at a lower resolution, 2 arcsec. The sudden change of position angles of the electric vector near knot B supports shock models of the jet. The jet is significantly broader in the light of U than in B or V. The continuous energy distribution in UBV can be described as a power law spectrum, with a slope of -1.7 +- 0.3 which indicates a turnover in the synchrotron spectrum in the vicinity of V.

  11. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  12. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  13. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. VI. THE KINEMATICS OF ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Blakeslee, John P. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bekki, Kenji [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia); Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Duc, Pierre-Alain, E-mail: hongxin@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, CEA/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2015-03-20

    The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs; r{sub h} ≳ 10 pc)—objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies—has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme star clusters, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs and 911 GCs associated with the central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M {sub *} ≳ 2× 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the confirmed sample of Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of blue GCs in the inner ∼70 kpc and as steep as that of red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than GCs, and blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have an orbital anisotropy profile that is tangentially biased at radii ≲40 kpc and radially biased farther out, whereas blue GCs become more tangentially biased at larger radii beyond ∼40 kpc; (4) GCs with M {sub *} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the 'tidally threshed dwarf galaxy' scenario.

  14. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. VI. THE KINEMATICS OF ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Blakeslee, John P.; Liu, Chengze; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Caldwell, Nelson; Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Bekki, Kenji; Boselli, Alessandro; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-01-01

    The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs; r h ≳ 10 pc)—objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies—has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme star clusters, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs and 911 GCs associated with the central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M *  ≳ 2× 10 6 M ☉ and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the confirmed sample of Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of blue GCs in the inner ∼70 kpc and as steep as that of red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than GCs, and blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have an orbital anisotropy profile that is tangentially biased at radii ≲40 kpc and radially biased farther out, whereas blue GCs become more tangentially biased at larger radii beyond ∼40 kpc; (4) GCs with M *  ≳ 2 × 10 6 M ☉ have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the 'tidally threshed dwarf galaxy' scenario

  15. VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF THE JET IN M 87 DURING THE VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY FLARE IN 2010 APRIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Doi, Akihiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Honma, Mareki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-11-20

    We report on the detailed radio status of the M 87 jet during the very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray flaring event in 2010 April, obtained from high-resolution, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We especially focus on the properties of the jet base (the radio core) and the peculiar knot HST-1, which are currently favored as the {gamma}-ray emitting sites. During the VHE flaring event, the HST-1 region remains stable in terms of its structure and flux density in the optically thin regime above 2 GHz, being consistent with no signs of enhanced activities reported at X-ray for this feature. The radio core shows an inverted spectrum at least up to 43 GHz during this event. Astrometry of the core position, which is specified as {approx}20 R {sub s} from the central engine in our previous study, shows that the core position is stable on a level of 4 R {sub s}. The core at 43 and 22 GHz tends to show slightly ({approx}10%) higher flux level near the date of the VHE flux peak compared with the epochs before/after the event. The size of the 43 GHz core is estimated to be {approx}17 R {sub s}, which is close to the size of the emitting region suggested from the observed timescale of rapid variability at VHE. These results tend to favor the scenario that the VHE {gamma}-ray flare in 2010 April is associated with the radio core.

  16. Planetary Nebulae and their parent stellar populations. Tracing the mass assembly of M87 and Intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, Magda; Longobardi, Alessia; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-08-01

    The diffuse extended outer regions of galaxies are hard to study because they are faint, with typical surface brightness of 1% of the dark night sky. We can tackle this problem by using resolved star tracers which remain visible at large distances from the galaxy centers. This article describes the use of Planetary Nebulae as tracers and the calibration of their properties as indicators of the star formation history, mean age and metallicity of the parent stars in the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies. We then report on the results from a deep, extended, planetary nebulae survey in a 0.5 deg2 region centered on the brightest cluster galaxy NGC 4486 (M87) in the Virgo cluster core, carried out with SuprimeCam@Subaru and FLAMES-GIRAFFE@VLT. Two planetary nebulae populations are identified out to 150 kpc distance from the center of M87. One population is associated with the M87 halo and the second one with the intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core. They have different line-of-sight velocity and spatial distributions, as well as different planetary nebulae specific frequencies and luminosity functions. The intracluster planetary nebulae in the surveyed region correspond to a luminosity of four times the luminosity of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The M87 halo planetary nebulae trace an older, more metal-rich, parent stellar population. A substructure detected in the projected phase-space of the line-of-sight velocity vs. major axis distance for the M87 halo planetary nebulae provides evidence for the recent accretion event of a satellite galaxy with luminosity twice that of M33. The satellite stars were tidally stripped about 1 Gyr ago, and reached apocenter at a major axis distance of 60-90 kpc from the center of M87. The M87 halo is still growing significantly at the distances where the substructure is detected.

  17. Stellar Population Properties of Ultracompact Dwarfs in M87: A Mass–Metallicity Correlation Connecting Low-metallicity Globular Clusters and Compact Ellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Puzia, Thomas H.; Peng, Eric W.; Liu, Chengze; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Eigenthaler, Paul; Lim, Sungsoon; Lançon, Ariane; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Ruben; Taylor, Matthew A.; Yu, Jincheng

    2018-05-01

    We derive stellar population parameters for a representative sample of ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs) and a large sample of massive globular clusters (GCs) with stellar masses ≳ 106 M ⊙ in the central galaxy M87 of the Virgo galaxy cluster, based on model fitting to the Lick-index measurements from both the literature and new observations. After necessary spectral stacking of the relatively faint objects in our initial sample of 40 UCDs and 118 GCs, we obtain 30 sets of Lick-index measurements for UCDs and 80 for GCs. The M87 UCDs have ages ≳ 8 Gyr and [α/Fe] ≃ 0.4 dex, in agreement with previous studies based on smaller samples. The literature UCDs, located in lower-density environments than M87, extend to younger ages and smaller [α/Fe] (at given metallicities) than M87 UCDs, resembling the environmental dependence of the stellar nuclei of dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster. The UCDs exhibit a positive mass–metallicity relation (MZR), which flattens and connects compact ellipticals at stellar masses ≳ 108 M ⊙. The Virgo dE nuclei largely follow the average MZR of UCDs, whereas most of the M87 GCs are offset toward higher metallicities for given stellar masses. The difference between the mass–metallicity distributions of UCDs and GCs may be qualitatively understood as a result of their different physical sizes at birth in a self-enrichment scenario or of galactic nuclear cluster star formation efficiency being relatively low in a tidal stripping scenario for UCD formation. The existing observations provide the necessary but not sufficient evidence for tidally stripped dE nuclei being the dominant contributors to the M87 UCDs.

  18. A Hubble Space Telescope survey for novae in M87 - III. Are novae good standard candles 15 d after maximum brightness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shara, Michael M.; Doyle, Trisha F.; Pagnotta, Ashley; Garland, James T.; Lauer, Tod R.; Zurek, David; Baltz, Edward A.; Goerl, Ariel; Kovetz, Attay; Machac, Tamara; Madrid, Juan P.; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Neill, J. D.; Prialnik, Dina; Welch, D. L.; Yaron, Ofer

    2018-02-01

    Ten weeks of daily imaging of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has yielded 41 nova light curves of unprecedented quality for extragalactic cataclysmic variables. We have recently used these light curves to demonstrate that the observational scatter in the so-called maximum-magnitude rate of decline (MMRD) relation for classical novae is so large as to render the nova-MMRD useless as a standard candle. Here, we demonstrate that a modified Buscombe-de Vaucouleurs hypothesis, namely that novae with decline times t2 > 10 d converge to nearly the same absolute magnitude about two weeks after maximum light in a giant elliptical galaxy, is supported by our M87 nova data. For 13 novae with daily sampled light curves, well determined times of maximum light in both the F606W and F814W filters, and decline times t2 > 10 d we find that M87 novae display M606W,15 = -6.37 ± 0.46 and M814W,15 = -6.11 ± 0.43. If very fast novae with decline times t2 < 10 d are excluded, the distances to novae in elliptical galaxies with stellar binary populations similar to those of M87 should be determinable with 1σ accuracies of ± 20 per cent with the above calibrations.

  19. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britchcliffe, Michael J.; Conroy, Bruce L.; Anderson, Paul E.; Wilson, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This software is used in an automated cryogenic control system developed to monitor and control the operation of small-scale cryocoolers. The system was designed to automate the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier system described in "Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System" (NPO-47246), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 5 (May 2011), page 7a. The software contains algorithms necessary to convert non-linear output voltages from the cryogenic diode-type thermometers and vacuum pressure and helium pressure sensors, to temperature and pressure units. The control function algorithms use the monitor data to control the cooler power, vacuum solenoid, vacuum pump, and electrical warm-up heaters. The control algorithms are based on a rule-based system that activates the required device based on the operating mode. The external interface is Web-based. It acts as a Web server, providing pages for monitor, control, and configuration. No client software from the external user is required.

  20. Temperature oscillation suppression of GM cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okidono, K.; Oota, T.; Kurihara, H.; Sumida, T.; Nishioka, T.; Kato, H.; Matsumura, M.; Sasaki, O.

    2012-12-01

    GM cryocooler is a convenient refrigerator to achieve low temperatures about 4 K, while it is not suitable for precise measurements because of the large temperature oscillation of typically about 0.3 K. To resolve this problem, we have developed an adapter (He-pot) with a simple structure as possible. From the thermodynamic consideration, both heat capacity and thermal conductance should be large in order to reduce the temperature oscillation without compromising cooling power. Optimal structure of the He-pot is a copper cylinder filled with high pressure He-gas at room temperature. This can reduce the temperature oscillation to less than 10 mK below a certain temperature TH without compromising cooling power. TH are 3.8 and 4.5 for filled He-gas pressures of 90 and 60 atm, respectively. By using this He-pot, GM cryocooler can be applied to such as precise physical property measurements and THz detection.

  1. MODIL cryocooler producibility demonstration project results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.E.; Franks, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The production of large quantities of spacecraft needed by SDIO will require a cultural change in design and production practices. Low rates production and the need for exceedingly high reliability has driven the industry to custom designed, hand crafted, and exhaustively tested satellites. These factors have mitigated against employing design and manufacturing cost reduction methods commonly used in tactical missile production. Additional challenges to achieving production efficiencies are presented by the SDI spacecraft mission requirement. IR sensor systems, for example, are comprised of subassemblies and components that require the design, manufacture, and maintenance of ultra precision tolerances over challenging operational lifetimes. These IR sensors demand the use of reliable, closed loop, cryogenic refrigerators or active cryocoolers to meet stringent system acquisition and pointing requirements. The authors summarize some spacecraft cryocooler requirements and discuss observations regarding Industry's current production capabilities of cryocoolers. The results of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Spacecraft Fabrication and Test (SF and T) MODIL's Phase I producibility demonstration project is presented

  2. A 4 K tactical cryocooler using reverse-Brayton machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarola, M.; Cragin, K.; McCormick, J.; Hill, R.

    2017-12-01

    Superconducting electronics and spectral-spatial holography have the potential to revolutionize digital communications, but must operate at cryogenic temperatures, near 4 K. Liquid helium is undesirable for military missions due to logistics and scarcity, and commercial low temperature cryocoolers are unable to meet size, weight, power, and environmental requirements for many missions. To address this need, Creare is developing a reverse turbo-Brayton cryocooler that provides refrigeration at 4.2 K and rejects heat at 77 K to an upper-stage cryocooler or through boil-off of liquid nitrogen. The cooling system is predicted to reduce size, weight, and input power by at least an order of magnitude as compared to the current state-of-the-art 4.2 K cryocooler. For systems utilizing nitrogen boil-off, the boil-off rate is reasonable. This paper reviews the design of the cryocooler, the key components, and component test results.

  3. AIM cryocooler developments for HOT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Withopf, A.; Rosenhagen, C.

    2014-06-01

    Significantly increased FPA temperatures for both Mid Wave and Long Wave IR detectors, i.e. HOT detectors, which have been developed in recent years are now leaving the development phase and are entering real application. HOT detectors allowing to push size weight and power (SWaP) of Integrated Detectors Cooler Assemblies (IDCA's) to a new level. Key component mainly driving achievable weight, volume and power consumption is the cryocooler. AIM cryocooler developments are focused on compact, lightweight linear cryocoolers driven by compact and high efficient digital cooler drive electronics (DCE) to also achieve highest MTTF targets. This technology is using moving magnet driving mechanisms and dual or single piston compressors. Whereas SX030 which was presented at SPIE in 2012 consuming less 3 WDC to operate a typical IDCA at 140K, next smaller cooler SX020 is designed to provide sufficient cooling power at detector temperature above 160K. The cooler weight of less than 200g and a total compressor length of 60mm makes it an ideal solution for all applications with limited weight and power budget, like in handheld applications. For operating a typical 640x512, 15μm MW IR detector the power consumption will be less than 1.5WDC. MTTF for the cooler will be in excess of 30,000h and thus achieving low maintenance cost also in 24/7 applications. The SX020 compressor is based on a single piston design with integrated passive balancer in a new design achieves very low exported vibration in the order of 100mN in the compressor axis. AIM is using a modular approach, allowing the chose between 5 different compressor types for one common Stirling expander. The 6mm expander with a total length of 74mm is now available in a new design that fits into standard dewar bores originally designed for rotary coolers. Also available is a 9mm coldfinger in both versions. In development is an ultra-short expander with around 35mm total length to achieve highest compactness. Technical

  4. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. X. PROPERTIES OF ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE M87, M49, AND M60 REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hong-Xin [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen; Blakeslee, John P. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg and CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [CEA/IRFU/SAp, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boselli, Alessandro [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Durrell, Patrick R., E-mail: czliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); and others

    2015-10-10

    We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive red-sequence galaxies M87, M49, and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color–color diagrams (u*iK{sub s} or u*gz). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ∼3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters (GCs), and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ∼85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.

  5. Toward a comprehensive model for feedback by active galactic nuclei: New insights from M87 observations by LOFAR, Fermi, and H.E.S.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfrommer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centers of galaxy clusters and in mitigating the star formation of elliptical galaxies. New observations of M87 enable us to put forward a comprehensive model for the physical heating mechanism. Low-frequency radio observations by LOFAR revealed the absence of fossil cosmic-ray (CR) electrons in the radio halo surrounding M87. This puzzle can be resolved by accounting for the CR release from the radio lobes and the subsequent mixing of CRs with the dense ambient intracluster gas, which thermalizes the electrons on a timescale similar to the radio halo age of 40 Myr. Hadronic interactions of similarly injected CR protons with the ambient gas should produce an observable gamma-ray signal in accordance with the steady emission of the low state of M87 detected by Fermi and H.E.S.S. Hence, we normalize the CR population to the gamma-ray emission, which shows the same spectral slope as the CR injection spectrum probed by LOFAR, thereby supporting a common origin. We show that CRs, which stream at the Alfvén velocity with respect to the plasma rest frame, heat the surrounding thermal plasma at a rate that balances that of radiative cooling on average at each radius. However, the resulting global thermal equilibrium is locally unstable and allows for the formation of the observed cooling multi-phase medium through thermal instability. Provided that CR heating balances cooling during the emerging 'cooling flow', the collapse of the majority of the gas is halted around 1 keV—in accordance with X-ray data. We show that both the existence of a temperature floor and the similar radial scaling of the heating and cooling rates are generic predictions of the CR heating model.

  6. Study of low vibration 4 K pulse tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingyao; Nakano, Kyosuke; Saito, Motokazu; Takayama, Hirokazu; Tsuchiya, Akihiro; Maruyama, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) has been continuously improving the efficiency and reducing the vibration of a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler. One advantage of a pulse tube cryocooler over a GM cryocooler is low vibration. In order to reduce vibration, both the displacement and the acceleration have to be reduced. The vibration acceleration can be reduced by splitting the valve unit from the cold head. One simple way to reduce vibration displacement is to increase the wall thickness of the tubes on the cylinder. However, heat conduction loss increases while the wall thickness increases. To overcome this dilemma, a novel concept, a tube with non-uniform wall thickness, is proposed. Theoretical analysis of this concept, and the measured vibration results of an SHI lowvibration pulse tube cryocooler, will be introduced in this paper.

  7. Cryocooler With Cold Compressor for Deep Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The unique built-in design features of the proposed mini pulse tube cryocooler avoid all thermal expansion issues enabling it to operate within a cold, 150 K...

  8. Applications concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducitng magnet systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, M.T.G.; van der Laan, M.T.G.; Tax, R.B.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting magnets are in growing use outside laboratories for example MRI scanners in hospitals. Other applications under development are magnet systems for separation, levitated trains and ship propulsion. The application of cryocoolers can make these systems more practical. Interfacing these

  9. Low-T, Low-Q Cryocoolers for Science Instruments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the planned research is to advance the current space science instruments through the development of light weight and low power cryocoolers. Currently,...

  10. Highly Effective Thermal Regenerator for Low Temperature Cryocoolers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, low-temperature cryocoolers for low-noise detector systems. We...

  11. Performance Characterization of the Astrium 10k Developmental Cryocooler

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bruninghaus, C. H; Kallman, J. P; Tomlinson, B. J., Jr; Myrick, E

    2002-01-01

    .... Under the technology development program, Astrium (formerly Matra Marconi Space) in Stevenage, United Kingdom, developed a Stirling cycle cryocooler with four Oxford flexure compressors and a two-stage expansion cold end...

  12. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping

  13. Miniature Joule-Thomson cryocooling principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Maytal, Ben-Zion

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first in English being entirely dedicated to Miniature Joule-Thomson Cryocooling. The category of Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers takes us back to the roots of cryogenics, in 1895, with figures like Linde and Hampson. The "cold finger" of these cryocoolers is compact, lacks moving parts, and sustains a large heat flux extraction at a steady temperature. Potentially, they cool down unbeatably fast. For example, cooling to below 100 K (minus 173 Celsius) might be accomplished within only a few seconds by liquefying argon. A level of about 120 K can be reached almost instantly with krypton. Indeed, the species of coolant plays a central role dictating the size, the intensity and the level of cryocooling. It is the JT effect that drives these cryocoolers and reflects the deviation of the "real" gas from the ideal gas properties. The nine chapters of the book are arranged in five parts. • The Common Principle of Cyrocoolers shared across the broad variety of cryocooler types • Theoretical Aspec...

  14. Outgas analysis of mechanical cryocoolers for long lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Sawada, Kenichiro; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Nakagawa, Takao; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Otsuka, Kiyomi; Kanao, Kenichi; Yoshida, Seiji; Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers for space applications are required to have high reliability to achieve long-term operation in orbit. ASTRO-H (Hitomi), the 6th Japanese X-ray astronomy mission, has a major scientific instrument onboard-the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) with several 20K-class two-stage Stirling (2ST) coolers and a 4K-class Joule Thomson (JT) cooler, which must operate for 3 years to ensure the lifetime of liquid helium as a cryogen for cooling of its detectors [1,2]. Other astronomical missions such as SPICA [3,4], LiteBIRD [5], and Athena [6] also have top requirements for these mechanical cryocoolers, including a 1K-class JT cooler to be operated for more than 3-5 years with no cryogen system. The reliability and lifetime of mechanical cryocoolers are generally understood to depend on (1) mechanical wear of the piston seal and valve seal, and (2) He working gas contaminated by impurity outgases, mainly H2O and CO2 released from the materials in the components of the cryocoolers. The second factor could be critical relative to causing blockage in the JT heat exchanger plumbing and the JT orifice or resulting in blockage in the Stirling regenerator and thereby degrading its performance. Thus, reducing the potential for outgassing in the cryocooler design and fabrication process, and predicting the total amount of outgases in the cryocooler are very important to ensure cryocooler lifetime and cooling performance in orbit. This paper investigates the outgas analysis of the 2ST and the 1K/4K-JT coolers for achieving a long lifetime. First, gas analysis was conducted for the materials and components of the mechanical cryocoolers, focusing on non-metallic materials as impurity gas sources. Then gas analysis of the mechanical wear effect of the piston seal materials and linear ball bearings was investigated. Finally, outgassing from a fully assembled cryocooler was measured to evaluate whether the outgas reduction process works properly to meet the requirement

  15. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. [Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, 2000 E. El Segundo Blvd., El Segundo, CA 90245 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  16. A high efficiency hybrid stirling-pulse tube cryocooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presented a hybrid cryocooler which combines the room temperature displacers and the pulse tube in one system. Compared with a traditional pulse tube cryocooler, the system uses the rod-less ambient displacer to recover the expansion work from the pulse tube cold end to improve the efficiency while still keeps the advantage of the pulse tube cryocooler with no moving parts at the cold region. In the meantime, dual-opposed configurations for both the compression pistons and displacers reduce the cooler vibration to a very low level. In the experiments, a lowest no-load temperature of 38.5 K has been obtained and the cooling power at 80K was 26.4 W with an input electric power of 290 W. This leads to an efficiency of 24.2% of Carnot, marginally higher than that of an ordinary pulse tube cryocooler. The hybrid configuration herein provides a very competitive option when a high efficiency, high-reliability and robust cryocooler is desired.

  17. Tactical versus space cryocoolers: a comparision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, R.; Mullié, J.; Leenders, H.; de Jonge, G.; Benschop, T.

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, several space cryocooler developments have been performed in parallel at Thales Cryogenics. On one end of the spectrum are research programmes such as the ESA-funded 30-50 K system developed in cooperation with CEA and Absolut System and the LPT6510 cooler developed in cooperation with Absolut System. On the other end of the spectrum are commercial designs adapted for space applications, such as the LPT9310 commercial coolers delivered for JPL's ECOSTRESS instrument and the LSF9199/30 SADA-compatible cooler delivered for various space programmes at Sofradir. In this paper, an overview is presented of the latest developments regarding these coolers. Initial performance results of the 30-50K cooler are discussed, pending developments for the LPT6510 cooler are presented, and the synergies between COTS and space are reviewed, such as design principles from space coolers being applied to an upgraded variant of the COTS LPT9310, as well as design principles from COTS coolers being applied to the LPT6510 for improved manufacturability.

  18. The Structure and Dynamics of the Subparsec Jet in M87 Based on 50 VLBA Observations over 17 Years at 43 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. Craig; Hardee, Philip E.; Davies, Frederick B.; Ly, Chun; Junor, William

    2018-03-01

    The central radio source in M87 provides the best opportunity to study jet formation because it has a large angular size for the gravitational radius of the black hole and has a bright jet that is well resolved by very long baseline interferometry observations. We present intensive monitoring observations from 2007 and 2008, plus roughly annual observations that span 17 years, all made with the the Very Long Baseline Array at 43 GHz with a resolution of about 30 by 60R S. Our high dynamic range images clearly show the wide opening angle structure and the counterjet. The jet and counterjet are nearly symmetric in the inner 1.5 mas (0.12 pc in projection), with both being edge brightened. Both show deviations from parabolic shape in the form of an initial rapid expansion and subsequent contraction followed by further rapid expansion and, beyond the visible counterjet, subsequent collimation. Proper motions and counterjet/jet intensity ratios both indicate acceleration from apparent speeds of ≲0.5c to ≳2c in the inner ∼2 mas and suggest a helical flow. The jet displays a sideways shift with an approximately 8–10 yr quasi-periodicity. The shift propagates outward nonballistically and significantly more slowly than the flow speed revealed by the fastest-moving components. Polarization data show a systematic structure with magnetic field vectors that suggest a toroidal field close to the core.

  19. CFD analysis of a diaphragm free-piston Stirling cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a novel free-piston Stirling cryocooler that uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicated the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. The diaphragm's large diameter and short stroke produces a significant radial component to the oscillating flow fields inside the cryocooler which were not modelled in the one-dimensional analysis tool Sage that was used to design the prototypes. Compared with standard pistons, the diaphragm geometry increases the gas-to-wall heat transfer due to the higher velocities and smaller hydraulic diameters. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the cryocooler was constructed to understand the underlying fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms with the aim of further improving performance. The CFD modelling of the heat transfer in the radial flow fields created by the diaphragms shows the possibility of utilizing the flat geometry for heat transfer, reducing the need for, and the size of, expensive heat exchangers. This paper presents details of a CFD analysis used to model the flow and gas-to-wall heat transfer inside the second prototype cryocooler, including experimental validation of the CFD to produce a robust analysis.

  20. Fatigue stress detection of VIRTIS cryocoolers on board Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuppi, Stefano; Politi, Romolo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Piccioni, Giuseppe; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Erard, Stéphane; Tosi, Federico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico

    Rosetta is a planetary cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is devoted to the study of minor bodies of our solar system and it will be the first mission ever to land on a comet (the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko). VIRTIS-M is a sophisticated imaging spectrometer that combines two data channels in one compact instrument, respectively for the visible and the infrared range (0.25-5.0 μm). VIRTIS-H is devoted to infrared spectroscopy (2.5-5.0 μm) with high spectral resolution. Since the satellite will be inside the tail of the comet during one of the most important phases of the mission, it would not be appropriate to use a passive cooling system, due to the high flux of contaminants on the radiator. Therefore the IR sensors are cooled by two Stirling cycle cryocoolers produced by RICOR. Since RICOR operated life tests only on ground, it was decided to conduct an analysis on VIRTIS onboard Rosetta telemetries with the purpose of study possible differences in the cryocooler performancies. The analysis led to the conclusion that cryocoolers, when operating on board, are subject to a fatigue stress not present in the on ground life tests. The telemetries analysis shows a cyclic variation in cryocooler rotor angular velocity when -M or -H or both channel are operating (it has been also noted an influence of -M channel operations in -H cryocooler rotor angular velocity and vice versa) with frequencies mostly linked to operational parameters values. The frequencies have been calculated for each mission observation applying the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). In order to evaluate possible hedge effects it has been also applied the Hanning window to compare the results. For a more complete evaluation of cryocoolers fatigue stress, for each mission observation the angular acceleration and the angular jerk have been calculated.

  1. Recent development status of compact 2 K GM cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Q.; Xu, M. Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Li, R.

    2015-12-01

    To meet the growing demand for a compact cooling solution for superconducting electronic devices, we developed a two-stage 2 K GM cryocooler and a cryostat system, which can reach 46.3 K / 2.2 K on the first and second stages under no-load conditions. Nevertheless, with several innovative technologies applied, the total length of the expander cylinder is reduced to under 70% of the smallest conventional 4 K GM cryocooler. In this paper we will present the design method, including material selection and structure design with detailed explanation, which has been confirmed by both simulation and experiment.

  2. A nonproprietary, nonsecret program for calculating Stirling cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A design program for an integrated Stirling cycle cryocooler was written on an IBM-PC computer. The program is easy to use and shows the trends and itemizes the losses. The calculated results were compared with some measured performance values. The program predicts somewhat optimistic performance and needs to be calibrated more with experimental measurements. Adding a multiplier to the friction factor can bring the calculated rsults in line with the limited test results so far available. The program is offered as a good framework on which to build a truly useful design program for all types of cryocoolers.

  3. A free-piston Stirling cryocooler using metal diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-12-01

    A novel concept for a free-piston Stirling cryocooler has been proposed. The concept uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer of a free-piston Stirling cryocooler. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals, potentially resulting in a long-life mechanism. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicates the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. Sage predicted the macroscopic behaviour of the prototype well but did not provide sufficient insights to improve performance significantly. This paper presents details of the development, modelling and testing of the proof-of-concept prototype and a second, improved prototype.

  4. Development of High Capacity Split Stirling Cryocooler for HTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kenta; Nakano, Kyosuke; Hiratsuka, Yoshikatsu

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) developed a high-power Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler for cooling high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, such as superconductor motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), and fault current limiters. The experimental results of a prototype pulse tube cryocooler were reported in September 2013. For a U-type expander, the cooling capacity was 151 W at 70 K with a compressor input power of 4 kW. Correspondingly, the coefficient of performance (COP) was about 0.038. However, the efficiency of the cryocooler is required to be COP > 0.1 and it was found that, theoretically, it is difficult to further improve the efficiency of a pulse tube cryocooler because the workflow generated at the hot end of the pulse tube cannot be recovered. Therefore, it was decided to change the expander to a free-piston type from a pulse tube type. A prototype was developed and preliminary experiments were conducted. A cooling capacity of 120 W at 70 K with a compressor input power of 2.15 kW with corresponding COP of 0.056, was obtained. The detailed results are reported in this paper.

  5. Application of a Cryocooler in the Superconducting Magnet Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, W.; Malinowski, H.

    1998-01-01

    The application of the cryocooler working with a OGMS separator was suggested. It is very important to decrease the heat leak into the electromagnet. It was discussed how to reduce the heat leak into the separator's coils. The use of a high temperature superconducting current leads is proposed and calculated. (author)

  6. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehahn, A; Krüger, L; Gschrey, M; Schulze, J-H; Rodt, S; Strittmatter, A; Heindel, T; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g((2))(0) Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g((2))(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  7. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T., E-mail: tobias.heindel@tu-berlin.de; Reitzenstein, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  8. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcliffe, Michael J.; Hanscon, Theodore R.; Fowler, Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    A system was designed to automate cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier systems used in the NASA Deep Space Network. It automates the entire operation of the system including cool-down, warm-up, and performance monitoring. The system is based on a single-board computer with custom software and hardware to monitor and control the cryogenic operation of the system. The system provides local display and control, and can be operated remotely via a Web interface. The system controller is based on a commercial single-board computer with onboard data acquisition capability. The commercial hardware includes a microprocessor, an LCD (liquid crystal display), seven LED (light emitting diode) displays, a seven-key keypad, an Ethernet interface, 40 digital I/O (input/output) ports, 11 A/D (analog to digital) inputs, four D/A (digital to analog) outputs, and an external relay board to control the high-current devices. The temperature sensors used are commercial silicon diode devices that provide a non-linear voltage output proportional to temperature. The devices are excited with a 10-microamp bias current. The system is capable of monitoring and displaying three temperatures. The vacuum sensors are commercial thermistor devices. The output of the sensors is a non-linear voltage proportional to vacuum pressure in the 1-Torr to 1-millitorr range. Two sensors are used. One measures the vacuum pressure in the cryocooler and the other the pressure at the input to the vacuum pump. The helium pressure sensor is a commercial device that provides a linear voltage output from 1 to 5 volts, corresponding to a gas pressure from 0 to 3.5 MPa (approx. = 500 psig). Control of the vacuum process is accomplished with a commercial electrically operated solenoid valve. A commercial motor starter is used to control the input power of the compressor. The warm-up heaters are commercial power resistors sized to provide the appropriate power for the thermal mass of the particular system, and

  9. An efficient cooling loop for connecting cryocooler to a helium reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.E.; Abbott, C.S.R.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnet system of the VENUS ECR Ion Source at LBNL has two 1.5-watt cryocoolers suspended in the cryostat vacuum. Helium vapor from the liquid reservoir is admitted to a finned condenser bolted to the cryocooler 2nd stage and returns as liquid via gravity. Small-diameter flexible tubes allow the cryocoolers to be located remotely from the reservoir. With 3.1 watts load, the helium reservoir is maintained at 4.35 K, 0.05K above the cryocooler temperature. Design, analysis, and performance are presented

  10. A novel method to hit the limit temperature of Stirling-type cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Pan, Changzhao; Zhang, Tong; Luo, Kaiqi; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2018-02-01

    The Stirling-type cryocooler with its compact size and high efficiency is always expected to obtain its temperature limit of below 3 K. However, the pressure drop losses caused by high-frequency oscillation create large obstacles for this objective. This paper reports a novel thermal-driven Stirling-type cryocooler to obtain the lowest temperature of a Stirling-type cryocooler. The advantages of a thermal-driven cryocooler (Vuilleumier cryocooler) and pulse tube cryocooler are combined with a new type of cryocooler, called the Vuilleumier gas-coupling pulse tube hybrid cryocooler (VM-PT). A prototype of the VM-PT was recently developed and optimized in our laboratory. By using helium-4 as the working gas and magnetic regenerative materials (HoCu2 and Er3Ni), the lowest temperature of 2.5 K was obtained, which can be regarded as an important breakthrough for the Stirling-type cryocooler to achieve its limit temperature of below 3 K. It can supply >30 mW cooling power at 4.2 K and >500 mW cooling power at 20 K simultaneously. Theoretically, it is feasible to use this VM-PT for cooling the superconducting devices in space applications.

  11. Stirling cryocooler test results and design model verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimko, M.A.; Stacy, W.D.; McCormick, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on progress in developing a long-life Stirling cycle cryocooler for space borne applications. It presents the results from tests on a preliminary breadboard version of the cryocooler used to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and to validate the regenerator design code used in its development. This machine achieved a cold-end temperature of 65 K while carrying a 1/2 Watt cooling load. The basic machine is a double-acting, flexure-bearing, split Stirling design with linear electromagnetic drives for the expander and compressors. Flat metal diaphragms replace pistons for both sweeping and sealing the machine working volumes. In addition, the double-acting expander couples to a laminar-channel counterflow recuperative heat exchanger for regeneration. A PC compatible design code was developed for this design approach that calculates regenerator loss including heat transfer irreversibilities, pressure drop, and axial conduction in the regenerator walls

  12. A miniature pulse tube cryocooler used in a superspectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhenhua; Wu, Yinong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a hihg0 frequency pulse tube cryocooler used in a superspectral imager to be launched in 2020. The superspectral imager is a field-dividing optical imaging system and uses 14 sets of integrated IR detector cryocooler dewar assembly. For the requirements of less heat loss an smaller size, each set is highly integrated by directly mounting the IR dectector's sapphire substrate on the pulse tube's cold tip, and welding the dewar's housing to the flange of the cold finger. Driven by a pair of moving magnet linear motors, the dual-opposed piston compressor of the croycooler is running at 120Hz. Filled with customized stainless screens in the regenerator, the cryolooler reaches 8.1% carnot efficiency at the cooling power of 1W@80K with 34Wac input power.

  13. Multimodal tuned dynamic absorber for split Stirling linear cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Tuito, A.

    2017-02-01

    Forthcoming low size, weight, power and price split Stirling linear cryocoolers may rely on electro-dynamically driven single-piston compressors and pneumatically driven expanders interconnected by the configurable transfer line. For compactness, compressor and expander units may be placed in a side-by-side manner, thus producing tonal vibration export comprising force and moment components. In vibration sensitive applications, this may result in excessive angular line of sight jitter and translational defocusing affecting the image quality. The authors present Multimodal Tuned Dynamic Absorber (MTDA), having one translational and two tilting modes essentially tuned to the driving frequency. The dynamic reactions (force and moment) produced by such a MTDA are simultaneously counterbalancing force and moment vibration export produced by the cryocooler. The authors reveal the design details, the method of fine modal tuning and outcomes of numerical simulation on attainable performance.

  14. Space Stirling Cryocooler Contamination Lessons Learned and Recommended Control Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, D. S.; Price, K.; Gully, W.; Castles, S.; Reilly, J.

    The most important characteristic of a space cryocooler is its reliability over a lifetime typically in excess of 7 years. While design improvements have reduced the probability of mechanical failure, the risk of internal contamination is still significant and has not been addressed in a consistent approach across the industry. A significant fraction of the endurance test and flight units have experienced some performance degradation related to internal contamination. The purpose of this paper is to describe and assess the contamination issues inside long life, space cryocoolers and to recommend procedures to minimize the probability of encountering contamination related failures and degradation. The paper covers the sources of contamination, the degradation and failure mechanisms, the theoretical and observed cryocooler sensitivity, and the recommended prevention procedures and their impact. We begin with a discussion of the contamination sources, both artificial and intrinsic. Next, the degradation and failure mechanisms are discussed in an attempt to arrive at a contaminant susceptibility, from which we can derive a contamination budget for the machine. This theoretical sensitivity is then compared with the observed sensitivity to illustrate the conservative nature of the assumed scenarios. A number of lessons learned on Raytheon, Ball, Air Force Research Laboratory, and NASA GSFC programs are shared to convey the practical aspects of the contamination problem. Then, the materials and processes required to meet the proposed budget are outlined. An attempt is made to present a survey of processes across industry.

  15. Dynamic Simulation of a Periodic 10 K Sorption Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, P.; Rodriguez, J.; Bard, S.; Wade, L.

    1994-01-01

    A transient thermal simulation model has been developed to simulate the dynamic performance of a multiple-stage 10 K sorption cryocooler for spacecraft sensor cooling applications that require periodic quick-cooldown (under 2 minutes) , negligible vibration, low power consumption, and long life (5 to 10 years). The model was specifically designed to represent the Brilliant Eyes Ten-Kelvin Sorption Cryocooler Experiment (BETSCE), but it can be adapted to represent other sorption cryocooler systems as well. The model simulates the heat transfer, mass transfer, and thermodynamic processes in the cryostat and the sorbent beds for the entire refrigeration cycle, and includes the transient effects of variable hydrogen supply pressures due to expansion and overflow of hydrogen during the cooldown operation. The paper describes model limitations and simplifying assumptions, with estimates of errors induced by them, and presents comparisons of performance predictions with ground experiments. An important benefit of the model is its ability to predict performance sensitivities to variations of key design and operational parameters. The insights thus obtained are expected to lead to higher efficiencies and lower weights for future designs.

  16. Performance degradation of space Stirling cryocoolers due to gas contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-guang; Wu, Yi-nong; Yang, Shao-hua; Zhang, Xiao-ming; Lu, Guo-hua; Zhang, Li

    2011-08-01

    With extensive application of infrared detective techniques, Stirling cryocoolers, used as an active cooling source, have been developed vigorously in China. After the cooler's cooling performance can satisfy the mission's request, its reliability level is crucial for its application. Among all the possible failure mechanisms, gas contamination has been found to be the most notorious cause of cooler's performance degradation by failure analyses. To analyze the characteristic of gas contamination, some experiments were designed and carried out to quantitatively analyze the relationship between failure and performance. Combined with the test results and the outgassing characteristic of non-metal materials in the cryocooler, a degradation model of cooling performance was given by T(t)=T0+A[1-exp(-t/B)] under some assumptions, where t is the running time, T is the Kelvin cooling temperature, and T0, A, B are model parameters, which can be given by the least square method. Here T0 is the fitting initial cooling temperature, A is the maximum range of performance degradation, and B is the time dependent constant of degradation. But the model parameters vary when a cryocooler is running at different cooling temperature ranges, or it is treated by different cleaning process. In order to verify the applicability of the degradation model, data fit analysis on eight groups of cooler's lifetime test was carried out. The final work indicated this model fit well with the performance degradation of space Stirling cryocoolers due to gas contamination and this model could be used to predict or evaluation the cooler's lifetime. Gaseous contamination will not arouse severe performance degradation until the contaminants accumulate to a certain amount, but it could be fatal when it works. So it is more serious to the coolers whose lifetime is more than 10,000 h. The measures taken to control or minimize its damage were discussed as well. To the long-life cryocooler, internal materials

  17. Ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler system - cooling capacity and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Yuki; Li, Rui; Tomaru, Takayuki; Sato, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Shintomi, Takakazu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2008-09-01

    This report describes the development of low-vibration cooling systems with pulse-tube (PT) cryocoolers. Generally, PT cryocoolers have the advantage of lower vibrations in comparison to those of GM cryocoolers. However, cooling systems for the cryogenic laser interferometer observatory (CLIO), which is a gravitational wave detector, require an operational vibration that is sufficiently lower than that of a commercial PT cryocooler. The required specification for the vibration amplitude in cold stages is less than ±1 μm. Therefore, during the development of low-vibration cooling systems for the CLIO, we introduced advanced countermeasures for commercial PT cryocoolers. The cooling performance and the vibration amplitude were evaluated. The results revealed that 4 K and 80 K PT cooling systems with a vibration amplitude of less than ±1 μm and cooling performance of 4.5 K and 70 K at heat loads of 0.5 W and 50 W, respectively, were developed successfully.

  18. Design of a Two-stage High-capacity Stirling Cryocooler Operating below 30K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Dai, Wei; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Li, Haibing; Luo, Ercang

    The high capacity cryocooler working below 30K can find many applications such as superconducting motors, superconducting cables and cryopump. Compared to the GM cryocooler, the Stirling cryocooler can achieve higher efficiency and more compact structure. Because of these obvious advantages, we have designed a two stage free piston Stirling cryocooler system, which is driven by a moving magnet linear compressor with an operating frequency of 40 Hz and a maximum 5 kW input electric power. The first stage of the cryocooler is designed to operate in the liquid nitrogen temperature and output a cooling power of 100 W. And the second stage is expected to simultaneously provide a cooling power of 50 W below the temperature of 30 K. In order to achieve the best system efficiency, a numerical model based on the thermoacoustic model was developed to optimize the system operating and structure parameters.

  19. Performance analysis on free-piston Stirling cryocooler based on an idealized mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. X.; Chao, Y. J.; Gan, Z. H.; Li, S. Z.; Wang, B.

    2017-12-01

    Free-piston Stirling cryocoolers have extensive applications for its simplicity in structure and decrease in mass. However, the elimination of the motor and the crankshaft has made its thermodynamic characteristic different from that of Stirling cryocoolers with displacer driving mechanism. Therefore, an idealized mathematical model has been established, and with this model, an attempt has been made to analyse the thermodynamic characteristic and the performance of free-piston Stirling cryocooler. To certify this mathematical model, a comparison has been made between the model and a numerical model. This study reveals that due to the displacer damping force necessary for the production of cooling capacity, the free-piston Stirling cryocooler is inherently less efficient than Stirling cryocooler with displacer driving mechanism. Viscous flow resistance and incomplete heat transfer in the regenerator are the two major causes of the discrepancy between the results of the idealized mathematical model and the numerical model.

  20. Effects of cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performance of integral crank driven stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Ko, Jun Seok; Kim, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    An integral crank driven Stirling cryocooler is solidly based on concepts of direct IR detector mounting on the cryocooler's cold finger, and the integral construction of the cryocooler and Dewar envelope. Performance factors of the cryocooler depend on operating conditions of the cryocooler such as a cyclic mean pressure of the working fluid, a rotational speed of driving mechanism, a thermal environment, a targeted operation temperature and etc.. At given charging condition of helium gas, the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas in the cryocooler changes with temperatures of the cold end and the environment. In this study, effects of the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performances of the Stirling cryocooler were investigated by numerical analyses using the Sage software. The simulation model takes into account thermodynamic losses due to an inefficiency of regenerator, a pressure drop, a shuttle heat transfer and solid conductions. Simulations are performed for the performance variation according to the cyclic mean pressure induced by the temperature of the cold end and the environment. This paper presents P-V works in the compression and expansion space, cooling capacity, contribution of losses in the expansion space.

  1. Effects of cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performance of integral crank driven stirling cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Ko, Jun Seok; Kim, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je

    2016-01-01

    An integral crank driven Stirling cryocooler is solidly based on concepts of direct IR detector mounting on the cryocooler's cold finger, and the integral construction of the cryocooler and Dewar envelope. Performance factors of the cryocooler depend on operating conditions of the cryocooler such as a cyclic mean pressure of the working fluid, a rotational speed of driving mechanism, a thermal environment, a targeted operation temperature and etc.. At given charging condition of helium gas, the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas in the cryocooler changes with temperatures of the cold end and the environment. In this study, effects of the cyclic mean pressure of helium gas on performances of the Stirling cryocooler were investigated by numerical analyses using the Sage software. The simulation model takes into account thermodynamic losses due to an inefficiency of regenerator, a pressure drop, a shuttle heat transfer and solid conductions. Simulations are performed for the performance variation according to the cyclic mean pressure induced by the temperature of the cold end and the environment. This paper presents P-V works in the compression and expansion space, cooling capacity, contribution of losses in the expansion space

  2. Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Facility Closing Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.; Martin, K. W.; Fraser, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Spacecraft Component Thermal Research Group has been devoted to evaluating lifetime performance of space cryocooler technology for over twenty years. Long-life data is essential for confirming design lifetimes for space cryocoolers. Continuous operation in a simulated space environment is the only accepted method to test for degradation. AFRL has provided raw data and detailed evaluations to cryocooler developers for advancing the technology, correcting discovered deficiencies, and improving cryocooler designs. At AFRL, units of varying design and refrigeration cycles were instrumented in state-of-the-art experiment stands to provide spacelike conditions and were equipped with software data acquisition to track critical cryocooler operating parameters. This data allowed an assessment of the technology's ability to meet the desired lifetime and documented any long-term changes in performance. This paper will outline a final report of the various flight cryocoolers tested in our laboratory. The data summarized includes the seven cryocoolers tested during 2014-2015. These seven coolers have a combined total of 433,326 hours (49.5 years) of operation.

  3. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cold reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, K. H.; Qiu, L. M.; Gan, Z. H.; Shen, X.; Xiang, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    Phase difference between pressure wave and mass flow is decisive to the cooling capacity of regenerative cryocoolers. Unlike the direct phase shifting using a piston or displacer in conventional Stirling or GM cryocoolers, the pulse tube cyocooler (PTC) indirectly adjusts the cold phase due to the absence of moving parts at the cold end. The present paper proposed and validated theoretically and experimentally a novel configuration of PTC, termed cold reservoir PTC, in which a reservoir together with an adjustable orifice is connected to the cold end of the pulse tube. The impedance from the additional orifice to the cold end helps to increase the mass flow in phase with the pressure wave at the cold end. Theoretical analyses with the linear model for the orifice and double-inlet PTCs indicate that the cooling performance can be improved by introducing the cold reservoir. The preliminary experiments with a home-made single-stage GM PTC further validated the results on the premise of minor opening of the cold-end orifice.

  4. Partitioning the Outburst Energy of a Low Eddington Accretion Rate AGN at the Center of an Elliptical Galaxy: The Recent 12 Myr History of the Supermassive Black Hole in M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Kraft, R.; Vikhlinin, A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Churazov, E. [MPI für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Heinz, S., E-mail: wrf@cfa.harvard.edu [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2017-08-01

    M87, the active galaxy at the center of the Virgo cluster, is ideal for studying the interaction of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with a hot, gas-rich environment. A deep Chandra observation of M87 exhibits an approximately circular shock front (13 kpc radius, in projection) driven by the expansion of the central cavity (filled by the SMBH with relativistic radio-emitting plasma) with projected radius ∼1.9 kpc. We combine constraints from X-ray and radio observations of M87 with a shock model to derive the properties of the outburst that created the 13 kpc shock. Principal constraints for the model are (1) the measured Mach number ( M ∼ 1.2), (2) the radius of the 13 kpc shock, and (3) the observed size of the central cavity/bubble (the radio-bright cocoon) that serves as the piston to drive the shock. We find that an outburst of ∼5 × 10{sup 57} erg that began about 12 Myr ago and lasted ∼2 Myr matches all the constraints. In this model, ∼22% of the energy is carried by the shock as it expands. The remaining ∼80% of the outburst energy is available to heat the core gas. More than half the total outburst energy initially goes into the enthalpy of the central bubble, the radio cocoon. As the buoyant bubble rises, much of its energy is transferred to the ambient thermal gas. For an outburst repetition rate of about 12 Myr (the age of the outburst), 80% of the outburst energy is sufficient to balance the radiative cooling.

  5. Development of miniature moving magnet cryocooler SX040

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Rosenhagen, C.; Schreiter, A.; Möhl, C.

    2011-06-01

    State of the art high performance cooled IR systems need to have more than just excellent E/O performance. Minimum size weight and power (SWaP) are the design goals to meet our forces' mission requirements. Key enabler for minimum SWaP of IR imagers is the operation temperature of the focal plane array (FPA) employed. State of the art MCT or InAsSb nBn technology has the potential to rise the FPA temperature from 77 K to 130-150 K (high operation temperature HOT) depending on the specific cut-off wavelength. Using a HOT FPA will significantly lower SWaP and keep those parameters finally dominated by the employed cryocooler. Therefore compact high performance cryocoolers are mandatory. For highest MTTF life AIM developed its Flexure Bearing Moving Magnet product family "SF". Such coolers achieve more than 20000 h MTTF with Stirling type expander and more than 5 years MTTF life with Pulse Tube coldfinger (like for Space applications). To keep the high lifetime potential but to significantly improve SWaP AIM is developing its "SX" type cooler family. The new SX040 cooler incorporates a highly efficient dual piston Moving Magnet driving mechanism resulting in very compact compressor of less than 100mm length. The cooler's high lifetime is also achieved by placing the coils outside the helium vessel as usual for moving magnet motors. The mating ¼" expander is extremely compact with less than 63 mm length. This allows a total dewar length from optical window to expander warm end of less than 100 mm even for large cold shields. The cooler is optimized for HOT detectors with operating temperatures exceeding 95 K. While this kind of cooler is the perfect match for many applications, handheld sights or targeting devices for the dismounted soldier are even more challenging with respect to SWaP. AIM therefore started to develop an even smaller cooler type with single piston and balancer. This paper gives an overview on the development of this new compact cryocooler. Technical

  6. Magnet/cryocooler integration for thermal stability in conduction-cooled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-M.; Kwon, K. B.

    2002-05-01

    The stability conditions that take into accounts the size of superconducting magnets and the refrigeration capacity of cryocoolers are investigated for the conduction-cooled systems without liquid cryogens. The worst scenario in the superconducting systems is that the heat generation in the resistive state exceeds the refrigeration, causing a rise in the temperature of the magnet winding and leading to burnout. It is shown by an analytical solution that in the continuously resistive state, the temperature may increase indefinitely or a stable steady state may be reached, depending upon the relative size of the magnet with respect to the refrigeration capacity of the cryocooler. The stability criteria include the temperature-dependent properties of the magnet materials and the refrigeration characteristics of the cryocooler. A useful graphical scheme is presented and the design of the stable magnet/cryocooler interface is demonstrated.

  7. Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Update: FY98-99

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomlinson, B

    1999-01-01

    The need for long term endurance evaluation data on space cryocoolers has long been an issue due to the 10-year plus design life of this technology and the absence of any accepted accelerated testing methodology...

  8. Development of a 77K Reverse-Brayton Cryocooler with Multiple Coldheads, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RTI will design and optimize an 80 W, 77K cryocooler based on the reverse turbo Brayton cycle (RTBC) with four identical coldheads for distributed cooling. Based on...

  9. An experimental study for the phase shift between piston and displacer in the Stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. J.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, H. B. [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Son, H. K.; Yu, B. K. [Wooyoung Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The small cryocooler is being widely applied to the areas of infrared detector, superconductor filter, satellite communication, and cryopump. The cryocooler working on the Stirling cycle are characterized by small size, lightweight, low power consumption and high reliability. For these reasons, FPFD (Free Piston Free Displacer) Stirling cryocooler is widely used not only tactical infrared imaging camera but also medical diagnostic apparatus. In this study, Stirling cryocooler actuated by the dual linear motor is designed and manufactured. And, displacement of the piston is measured by LVDTs (Linear Variable Differential Transformers), displacement of the displacer is measured by laser optic method, and phase shift between piston and displacer is discussed. Finally, when the phase shift between displacements of the piston and displacer is 45 .deg., operating frequency is optimum and is decided by resonant frequency of the expander, mass and cross section area of the displacer and constant by friction and flow resistance.

  10. An experimental study for the phase shift between piston and displacer in the Stirling cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, H. B.; Son, H. K.; Yu, B. K.

    2002-01-01

    The small cryocooler is being widely applied to the areas of infrared detector, superconductor filter, satellite communication, and cryopump. The cryocooler working on the Stirling cycle are characterized by small size, lightweight, low power consumption and high reliability. For these reasons, FPFD (Free Piston Free Displacer) Stirling cryocooler is widely used not only tactical infrared imaging camera but also medical diagnostic apparatus. In this study, Stirling cryocooler actuated by the dual linear motor is designed and manufactured. And, displacement of the piston is measured by LVDTs (Linear Variable Differential Transformers), displacement of the displacer is measured by laser optic method, and phase shift between piston and displacer is discussed. Finally, when the phase shift between displacements of the piston and displacer is 45 .deg., operating frequency is optimum and is decided by resonant frequency of the expander, mass and cross section area of the displacer and constant by friction and flow resistance

  11. Advanced, Long-Life Cryocooler Technology for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-life, high-capacity cryocoolers are a critical need for future space systems utilizing stored cryogens. The cooling requirements for planetary and...

  12. Advanced, Long-Life Cryocooler Technology for Zero-Boil-Off Cryogen Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-life, high-capacity cryocoolers are a critical need for future space systems utilizing stored cryogens. The cooling requirements for planetary and...

  13. Influence of minor geometric features on Stirling pulse tube cryocooler performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Spoor, P. S.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Perrella, M.

    2017-12-01

    Minor geometric features and imperfections are commonly introduced into the basic design of multi-component systems to simplify or reduce the manufacturing expense. In this work, the cooling performance of a Stirling type cryocooler was tested in different driving powers, cold-end temperatures and inclination angles. A series of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations based on a prototypical cold tip was carried out. Detailed CFD model predictions were compared with the experiment and were used to investigate the impact of such apparently minor geometric imperfections on the performance of Stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers. Predictions of cooling performance and gravity orientation sensitivity were compared with experimental results obtained with the cryocooler prototypes. The results indicate that minor geometry features in the cold tip assembly can have considerable negative effects on the gravity orientation sensitivity of a pulse tube cryocooler.

  14. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey for Novae in M87. II. Snuffing out the Maximum Magnitude–Rate of Decline Relation for Novae as a Non-standard Candle, and a Prediction of the Existence of Ultrafast Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Doyle, Trisha; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Lauer, Tod R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Baltz, Edward A. [KIPAC, SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kovetz, Attay [School of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Madrid, Juan P. [CSIRO, Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Mikołajewska, Joanna [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Neill, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 278-17, Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Prialnik, Dina [Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Welch, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, L8S 4M1, Ontario (Canada); Yaron, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2017-04-20

    The extensive grid of numerical simulations of nova eruptions from the work of Yaron et al. first predicted that some classical novae might significantly deviate from the Maximum Magnitude–Rate of Decline (MMRD) relation, which purports to characterize novae as standard candles. Kasliwal et al. have announced the observational detection of a new class of faint, fast classical novae in the Andromeda galaxy. These objects deviate strongly from the MMRD relationship, as predicted by Yaron et al. Recently, Shara et al. reported the first detections of faint, fast novae in M87. These previously overlooked objects are as common in the giant elliptical galaxy M87 as they are in the giant spiral M31; they comprise about 40% of all classical nova eruptions and greatly increase the observational scatter in the MMRD relation. We use the extensive grid of the nova simulations of Yaron et al. to identify the underlying causes of the existence of faint, fast novae. These are systems that have accreted, and can thus eject, only very low-mass envelopes, of the order of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −8} M {sub ⊙}, on massive white dwarfs. Such binaries include, but are not limited to, the recurrent novae. These same models predict the existence of ultrafast novae that display decline times, t {sub 2,} to be as short as five hours. We outline a strategy for their future detection.

  15. Development of Pulse Tube Cryocoolers at SITP for Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ankuo; Wu, Yinong; Liu, Shaoshuai; Yu, Huiqin; Yang, Baoyu

    2018-05-01

    Over the last 10 years, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has developed very high-efficiency pulse tube cryocoolers (PTCs) for aerospace applications. These PTCs can provide cooling power from milliwatt scale to tens of watts over a range of temperatures from 30 to 170 K and can be used to cool a variety of detectors in space applications (such as quantum interference devices, radiometers and ocean color sensors) that must operate at a specific cryogenic temperature to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity and optical resolution. This paper reviews the development of single-stage PTCs over a range of weights from 1.6 to 12 kg that offer cooling powers at the cold temperature range from 40 to 170 K. In addition, a two-stage 30 K-PTC is under development.

  16. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschneidner, K.A.; Pecharsky, A.O.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from ∼3 to ∼350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature ( 2 , Er 3 Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K

  17. Thermal Analysis of Cryocooler-Cooled Bi2223 Pulsed Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, H; Chigusa, S; Tanaka, I; Iwakuma, M; Funaki, K; Hayashi, H; Tomioka, A

    2006-01-01

    We fabricated a cryocooler-cooled Bi2223 superconducting pulsed coil and experimentally studied thermal runaway in dc or ac operation. We carried out numerical simulation of thermal properties of the coil in order to explain thermal runaway of the coil. Firstly, we analyzed the total heat generation of flux-flow loss and ac loss inside the winding from the experimental results of the external field losses and the E-J characteristics for the Bi2223 strands. Secondly, we numerically simulated the thermal properties by using 2- dimensional heat conduction equation with axial symmetry. The numerical simulation shows the relation between the initiation of thermal runaway and the temperature distribution with highly concentrated heat source in the winding. We have a semi-quantitative agreement between the numerical results and the experimental ones for the condition of the thermal runaway

  18. The effect of low temperature cryocoolers on the development of low temperature superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The commercial development of reliable 4 K cryocoolers improves the future prospects for magnets made from low temperature superconductors (LTS). The hope of the developers of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has been to replace liquid helium cooled LTS magnets with HTS magnets that operate at or near liquid nitrogen temperature. There has been limited success in this endeavor, but continued problems with HTS conductors have greatly slowed progress toward this goal. The development of cryocoolers that reliably operate below 4 K will allow magnets made from LTS conductor to remain very competitive for many years to come. A key enabling technology for the use of low temperature cryocoolers on LTS magnets has been the development of HTS leads. This report describes the characteristics of LTS magnets that can be successfully melded to low-temperature cryocoolers. This report will also show when it is not appropriate to consider the use of low-temperature cryocoolers to cool magnets made with LTS conductor. A couple of specific examples of LTS magnets where cryocoolers can be used are given

  19. The Ricor K508 cryocooler operational experience on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Lysek, Mark J.; Morookian, John Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) landed successfully on Mars on August 5, 2012, eight months after launch. The chosen landing site of Gale Crater, located at 4.5 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degrees east longitude, has provided a much more benign environment than was originally planned for during the critical design and integration phases of the MSL Project when all possible landing sites were still being considered. The expected near-surface atmospheric temperatures at the Gale Crater landing site during Curiosity's primary mission (1 Martian year or 687 Earth days) are from −90°C to 0°C. However, enclosed within Curiosity's thermal control fluid loops the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument is maintained at approximately +20°C. The CheMin instrument uses X-ray diffraction spectroscopy to make precise measurements of mineral constituents of Mars rocks and soil. The instrument incorporated the commercially available Ricor K508 Stirling cycle cryocooler to cool the CCD detector. After several months of brushing itself off, stretching and testing out its subsystems, Curiosity began the exploration of the Mars surface in October 2012. The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) received its first soil sample from Curiosity on October 24, and successfully analyzed its first soil sample. After a brief review of the rigorous Ricor K508 cooler qualification tests and life tests based on the original MSL environmental requirements this paper presents final pre-launch instrument integration and testing results, and details the operational data of the CheMin cryocooler, providing a snapshot of the resulting CheMin instrument analytical data

  20. The Ricor K508 cryocooler operational experience on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Lysek, Mark J.; Morookian, John Michael [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) landed successfully on Mars on August 5, 2012, eight months after launch. The chosen landing site of Gale Crater, located at 4.5 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degrees east longitude, has provided a much more benign environment than was originally planned for during the critical design and integration phases of the MSL Project when all possible landing sites were still being considered. The expected near-surface atmospheric temperatures at the Gale Crater landing site during Curiosity's primary mission (1 Martian year or 687 Earth days) are from −90°C to 0°C. However, enclosed within Curiosity's thermal control fluid loops the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument is maintained at approximately +20°C. The CheMin instrument uses X-ray diffraction spectroscopy to make precise measurements of mineral constituents of Mars rocks and soil. The instrument incorporated the commercially available Ricor K508 Stirling cycle cryocooler to cool the CCD detector. After several months of brushing itself off, stretching and testing out its subsystems, Curiosity began the exploration of the Mars surface in October 2012. The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) received its first soil sample from Curiosity on October 24, and successfully analyzed its first soil sample. After a brief review of the rigorous Ricor K508 cooler qualification tests and life tests based on the original MSL environmental requirements this paper presents final pre-launch instrument integration and testing results, and details the operational data of the CheMin cryocooler, providing a snapshot of the resulting CheMin instrument analytical data.

  1. Vibration-free stirling cryocooler for high definition microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabzev, S. V.; Veprik, A. M.; Vilenchik, H. S.; Pundak, N.; Castiel, E.

    2009-12-01

    The normal operation of high definition Scanning Electronic and Helium Ion microscope tools often relies on maintaining particular components at cryogenic temperatures. This has traditionally been accomplished by using liquid coolants such as liquid Nitrogen. This inherently limits the useful temperature range to above 77 K, produces various operational hazards and typically involves elevated ownership costs, inconvenient logistics and maintenance. Mechanical coolers, over-performing the above traditional method and capable of delivering required (even below 77 K) cooling to the above cooled components, have been well-known elsewhere for many years, but their typical drawbacks, such as high purchasing cost, cooler size, low reliability and high power consumption have so far prevented their wide-spreading. Additional critical drawback is inevitable degradation of imagery performance originated from the wideband vibration export as typical for the operation of the mechanical cooler incorporating numerous movable components. Recent advances in the development of reliable, compact, reasonably priced and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic coolers gave rise to so-called "dry cooling" technologies aimed at eventually replacing the traditional use of outdated liquid Nitrogen cooling facilities. Although much improved these newer cryogenic coolers still produce relatively high vibration export which makes them incompatible with modern high definition microscopy tools. This has motivated further research activity towards developing a vibration free closed-cycle mechanical cryocooler. The authors have successfully adapted the standard low vibration Stirling cryogenic refrigerator (Ricor model K535-LV) delivering 5 W@40 K heat lift for use in vibration-sensitive high definition microscopy. This has been achieved by using passive mechanical counterbalancing of the main portion of the low frequency vibration export in combination with an active feed-forward multi

  2. Role of size on the relative importance of fluid dynamic losses in linear cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkconnell, Carl; Ghavami, Ali; Ghiaasiaan, S. Mostafa; Perrella, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    Thermodynamic modeling results for a novel small satellite (SmallSat) Stirling Cryocooler, capable of delivering over 200 mW net cooling power at 80 K for less than 6 W DC input power, are used in this paper as the basis for related pulse tube computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Industry and government requirements for SmallSat infrared sensors are driving the development of ever-more miniaturized cryocooler systems. Such cryocoolers must be extremely compact and lightweight, a challenge met by this research team through operating a Stirling cryocooler at a frequency of approximately 300 Hz. The primary advantage of operating at such a high frequency is that the required compression and expansion swept volumes are reduced relative to linear coolers operating at lower frequencies, which evidently reduces the size of the motor mechanisms and the thermodynamic components. In the case of a pulse tube cryocooler, this includes a reduction in diameter of the pulse tube itself. This unfortunately leads to high boundary layer losses, as the presented results demonstrate. Using a Stirling approach with a mechanical moving expander piston eliminates this small pulse tube loss mechanism, but other challenges are introduced, such as maintaining very tight clearance gaps between moving and stationary elements. This paper focuses on CFD modelling results for a highly miniaturized pulse tube cooler.

  3. Cryocooled superconducting magnets for high magnetic fields at the HFLSM and future collaboration with the TML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, K; Nishijima, G; Awaji, S; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K; Kobayashi, N; Kiyoshi, T

    2006-01-01

    A hybrid magnet needs a large amount of liquid helium for operation. In order to make an easy-to-operate hybrid magnet system, we constructed a cryocooled 28 T hybrid magnet, consisting of an outer cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet and an inner traditional water-cooled 19 T resistive magnet. As a performance test, the cryocooled hybrid magnet generated 27.5 T in a 32 mm room temperature experimental bore. As long as Nb3Sn superconducting wires are employed, the expected maximum high field generation in the cryocooled superconducting magnet will be 17 T at 5 K. We adopted the high temperature superconducting insert coil, employing Ag-sheathed Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 superconducting tape. In combination with the low temperature 16.5 T back-up coil with a 174 mm cold bore, the cryocooled high temperature superconducting magnet successfully generated the total central field of 18.1 T in a 52 mm room temperature bore. As a next step, we start the collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science for the new developmental works of a 30 T high temperature superconducting magnet and a 50 T-class hybrid magnet

  4. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo; Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1˜3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

  5. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo; Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1∼3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system

  6. Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1∼3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

  7. Development of 1 kW Stirling cryocooler using a linear compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, J; Kim, H; Hong, Y J; Yeom, H; In, S; Park, S J

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic cooling systems for HTS electric power devices require a reliable and efficient high-capacity cryocooler. A Striling cryocooler with a linear compressor can be a good candidate. It has advantages of low vibration and long maintenance cycle compared with a kinematic-driven Stirling cryocooler. In this study, we developed a dual-opposed linear compressor of 12 kW electric input power with two 6 kW linear motors. Electrical performance of the fabricated linear compressor is verified by experimental measurement of thrust constant. The developed Stirling cryocooler has a gamma-type configuration. The piston and displacer are supported with a flexure spring. A slit-type heat exchanger is adopted for the cold and warm-end, and the generated heat is rejected by cooling water. In the cooling performance test, waveforms of voltage, current, displacement and pressure are obtained and their amplitude and phase difference are analysed. The developed cryocooler reaches 47.8 K within 23.4 min. with no-load. Heat load tests shows a cooling capacity of 440 W at 78.1 K with 6.45 kW of electric input power and 19.4 of % Carnot COP. (paper)

  8. Operating characteristics of a single-stage Stirling cryocooler capable of providing 700 W cooling power at 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ya; Sun, Daming; Qiao, Xin; Yu, Yan S. W.; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Yachao

    2017-04-01

    High cooling capacity Stirling cryocooler generally has hundreds to thousands watts of cooling power at liquid nitrogen temperature. It is promising in boil-off gas (BOG) recondensation and high temperature superconducting (HTS) applications. A high cooling capacity Stirling cryocooler driven by a crank-rod mechanism was developed and studied systematically. The pressure and frequency characteristics of the cryocooler, the heat rejection from the ambient heat exchanger, and the cooling performance are studied under different charging pressure. Energy conversion and distribution in the cryocooler are analyzed theoretically. With an electric input power of 10.9 kW and a rotating speed of 1450 r/min of the motor, a cooling power of 700 W at 77 K and a relative Carnot efficiency of 18.2% of the cryocooler have been achieved in the present study, and the corresponding pressure ratio in the compression space reaches 2.46.

  9. New application of plate-fin heat exchanger with regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    A design idea is newly proposed and investigated for the application of plate-fin heat exchanger (PFHX) with regenerative cryocoolers. The role of this heat exchanger is to effectively absorb heat from the stream of coolant and deliver it to the cold-head of a cryocooler. While various types of tubular HX's have been developed so far, a small PFHX could be more useful for this purpose by taking advantage of compactness and design flexibility. In order to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness, a prototype of aluminum-brazed PFHX is designed, fabricated, and tested with a single-stage GM cryocooler in experiments for subcooling liquid nitrogen from 78 K to 65-70 K. The results show that the PFHX is 30-50% more effective in cooling rate than the tubular HX's. Several potential applications of PFHX are presented and discussed with specific design concepts.

  10. Design and test of the Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong-Ju; Ko, Junseok; Kim, Hyo-Bong; Yeom, Han-Kil; In, Sehwan; Park, Seong-Je

    2017-12-01

    Stirling type pulse tube cryocoolers are very attractive for cooling of diverse application because it has it has several inherent advantages such as no moving part in the cold end, low manufacturing cost and long operation life. To develop the Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler, we need to design a linear compressor to drive the pulse tube cryocooler. A moving magnet type linear motor of dual piston configuration is designed and fabricated, and this compressor could be operated with the electric power of 100 W and the frequency up to 60 Hz. A single stage coaxial type pulse tube cold finger aiming at over 1.5 W at 80K is built and tested with the linear compressor. Experimental investigations have been conducted to evaluate their performance characteristics with respect to several parameters such as the phase shifter, the charging pressure and the operating frequency of the linear compressor.

  11. Estimation of Freezing Point of Hydrocarbon and Hydrofluorocarbon Mixtures for Mixed Refrigerant jt Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G.; Lee, J.; Jeong, S.

    2010-04-01

    Estimating the freezing point of refrigerant is an essential part in designing an MR JT (Mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson) cryocooler to prevent itself from clogging and to operate with stability. There were researches on estimating freezing point, but some of them resulted in the wrong prediction of clogging. In this paper, the freezing point of the MR is precisely estimated with caution of clogging. The solubility of HC (hydrocarbon) and HFC (hydrofluorocarbon) mixture components are obtained with their activity coefficients, which represent the molecular interaction among the components. The freezing points of the MR JT cryocooler are systematically investigated in the operating temperature range from 70 K to 90 K.

  12. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiura, Akifumi; Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. This is the first ultra-high-resolution structure obtained from a high-pressure cryocooled crystal. Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005 ▶) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method

  13. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. A TEST ON THE NONLINEARITY SCENARIO FOR COLOR BIMODALITY USING THE u-BAND COLORS: THE CASE OF M87 (NGC 4486)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Hak-Sub; Cho, Jaeil; Chung, Chul; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Blakeslee, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The optical color distributions of globular clusters (GCs) in most large elliptical galaxies are bimodal. Based on the assumed linear relationship between GC colors and their metallicities, the bimodality has been taken as evidence of two GC subsystems with different metallicities in each galaxy and has led to a number of theories in the context of galaxy formation. More recent observations and modeling of GCs, however, suggests that the color-metallicity relations (CMRs) are inflected, and thus colors likely trace metallicities in a nonlinear manner. The nonlinearity could produce bimodal color distributions from a broad underlying metallicity spread, even if it is unimodal. Despite the far-reaching implications, whether CMRs are nonlinear and whether the nonlinearity indeed causes the color bimodality are still open questions. Given that the spectroscopic refinement of CMRs is still very challenging, we here propose a new photometric technique to probe the possible nonlinear nature of CMRs. In essence, a color distribution of GCs is a 'projected' distribution of their metallicities. Since the form of CMRs hinges on which color is used, the shape of color distributions varies depending significantly on the colors. Among other optical colors, the u-band related colors (e.g., u – g and u – z) are theoretically predicted to exhibit significantly less inflected CMRs than other preferred CMRs (e.g., for g – z). As a case study, we performed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 archival u-band photometry for the M87 (NGC 4486) GC system with confirmed color bimodality. We show that the u-band color distributions are significantly different from that of g – z and consistent with our model predictions. With more u-band measurements, this method will support or rule out the nonlinear CMR scenario for the origin of GC color bimodality with high confidence. The HST/WFC3 observations in F336W for nearby large elliptical galaxies are highly anticipated in this regard.

  14. Study on a high capacity two-stage free piston Stirling cryocooler working around 30 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Dai, Wei; Li, Ke; Pang, Xiaomin; Yu, Guoyao; Luo, Ercang

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a two-stage high-capacity free-piston Stirling cryocooler driven by a linear compressor to meet the requirement of the high temperature superconductor (HTS) motor applications. The cryocooler system comprises a single piston linear compressor, a two-stage free piston Stirling cryocooler and a passive oscillator. A single stepped displacer configuration was adopted. A numerical model based on the thermoacoustic theory was used to optimize the system operating and structure parameters. Distributions of pressure wave, phase differences between the pressure wave and the volume flow rate and different energy flows are presented for a better understanding of the system. Some characterizing experimental results are presented. Thus far, the cryocooler has reached a lowest cold-head temperature of 27.6 K and achieved a cooling power of 78 W at 40 K with an input electric power of 3.2 kW, which indicates a relative Carnot efficiency of 14.8%. When the cold-head temperature increased to 77 K, the cooling power reached 284 W with a relative Carnot efficiency of 25.9%. The influences of different parameters such as mean pressure, input electric power and cold-head temperature are also investigated.

  15. A 1 T, 0.33 m bore superconducting magnet operating with cryocoolers at 12 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, M.T.G.; van der Laan, M.T.G.; Tax, R.B.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of small cryocoolers to cooling a superconducting magnet at 12 K has important advantages, especially for small and medium-size magnets. Simple construction and a helium-free magnet system were obtained. The demonstration magnet developed is a six-coil system with a volume of 75 L

  16. Miniature PT Cryocooler Activated by Resonant Piezoelectric Compressor and Passive Warm Expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, S.; Grossman, G.

    2017-12-01

    A novel type of PZT-based compressor operating at mechanical resonance, suitable for pneumatically-driven Stirling-type cryocoolers, was presented at CEC-ICMC 2015. The detailed concept, analytical model and the test results on the preliminary prototype were reported earlier and presented at ICC17. Despite some mismatch between the impedances and insufficient structural stiffness, this compressor demonstrated the feasibility to drive our miniature Pulse Tube cryocooler MTSa, operating at 103 Hz and requiring an average PV power of 11 W, filling pressure of 40 Bar and a pressure ratio of 1.3. At ICC19 the prototype of a miniature passive warm expander (WE) was presented. The WE mechanism included a phase shifting piston suspended on a silicone diaphragm, a mass element, and a viscous damping system. Several technical drawbacks prevented perfect matching between the WE and MTSa; however, the presented prototype proved the ability to create any flow-to-pressure phase appropriate for a PT cryocooler. This paper concentrates on integration of the MTSa cryocooler with the recently modified PZT compressor operating at corrected mechanical resonance and the modified WE, which was also updated recently to match the MTSa requirements.

  17. Recent development status of stirling type pulse tube cryocooler for HTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiratsuka, Y; Nakano, K; Kato, T

    2014-01-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) has been developing a high power stirling type pulse tube cryocooler. For the purpose of cooling high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, such as superconductor motor, SMES and current fault limiter, requested specifications from the devices to a cryocooler are compact size, light weight, high efficiency and high reliability. Especially, the cryocooler must be demanded COP > 0.1 in the efficiency. The experimental results of prototype pulse tube cryocooler were reported in June 2012 [1]. For an In-line type expander, the cooling capacity was 210 W at 77 K and the minimum temperature was 37 K when the compressor input power was 3.8 kW and the operating frequency was 49 Hz. Accordingly, COP was about 0.055. Moreover, for miniaturization a U type expander was tested and the performance is about 10 % less than that of an In-line type expander. After that, we have estimated that the cooling performance is influenced by the environment such as the effect of the pulse-tube inclination, the temperature and the flowing quantity of cooling water. The detailed results are reported in this paper.

  18. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models

  19. Analysis and comparison of different phase shifters for Stirling pulse tube cryocooler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Pfotenhauer, John M.; Zhou, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of phase shifters and power recovery mechanisms are of sustainable interest for developing Stirling pulse tube cryocoolers (SPTC) with higher power density, more compact design and higher efficiency. This paper investigates the phase shifting capacity and the applications of four...

  20. Modified-Collins cryocooler for zero-boiloff storage of cryogenic fuels in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Charles L.; Krass, Brady; Hogan, Jake; Brisson, John

    2012-06-01

    Future lunar and planetary explorations will require the storage of cryogenic propellants, particularly liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2), in low earth orbit (LEO) for periods of time ranging from days to months, and possibly longer. Without careful thermal management, significant quantities of stored liquid cryogens can be lost due to boil-off. Boil-off can be minimized by a variety of passive means including insulation, sun shades and passive radiational cooling. However, it has been shown that active cooling using space cryocoolers has the potential to result in Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) and the launch-mass savings using active cooling exceeds that of passive cooling of LOX for mission durations in LEO of less than 1 week, and for LH2 after about 2 months in LEO. Large-scale DC-flow cryogenic refrigeration systems operate at a fraction of the specific power levels required by small-scale AC-flow cryocoolers. The efficiency advantage of DC-flow cryogenic cycles motivates the current development of a cryocooler based on a modification of the Collins Cycle. The modified Collins cycle design employs piston type expanders that support high operating pressure ratios, electromagnetic valves that enable "floating pistons", and recuperative heat transfer. This paper will describe the design of a prototype Modified-Collins cryocooler for ZBO storage of cryogenic fuels in space.

  1. Thermal properties of a large-bore cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet for a hybrid magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, M.; Hamajima, T.; Itou, T.; Sakuraba, J.; Nishijima, G.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2010-01-01

    A cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet with a 360 mm room temperature bore has been developed for a hybrid magnet. The superconducting magnet cooled by four Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers has been designed to generate a magnetic field of 10 T. Since superconducting wires composed of coils were subjected to large hoop stress over 150 MPa and Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires particularly showed a low mechanical strength due to those brittle property, Nb 3 Sn wires strengthened by NbTi-filaments were developed for the cryocooled superconducting magnet. We have already reported that the hybrid magnet could generate the resultant magnetic field of 27.5 T by adding 8.5 T from the superconducting magnet and 19 T from a water-cooled Bitter resistive magnet, after the water-cooled resistive magnet was inserted into the 360 mm room temperature bore of the cryocooled superconducting magnet. When the hybrid magnet generated the field of 27.5 T, it achieved the high magnetic-force field (B x ∂Bz/∂z) of 4500 T 2 /m, which was useful for magneto-science in high fields such as materials levitation research. In this paper, we particularly focus on the cause that the cryocooled superconducting magnet was limited to generate the designed magnetic field of 10 T in the hybrid magnet operation. As a result, it was found that there existed mainly two causes as the limitation of the magnetic field generation. One was a decrease of thermal conductive passes due to exfoliation from the coil bobbin of the cooling flange. The other was large AC loss due to both a thick Nb 3 Sn layer and its large diameter formed on Nb-barrier component in Nb 3 Sn wires.

  2. Thermodynamic design of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, C. W.; Yang, H. S.; Sohn, Song Ho; Lim, Ji Hyun; Oh, S. R.; Hwang, Si Dole

    2012-06-01

    Thermodynamic design of Brayton cryocooler is presented as part of an ongoing governmental project in Korea, aiming at 1 km HTS power cable in the transmission grid. The refrigeration requirement is 10 kW for continuously sub-cooling liquid nitrogen from 72 K to 65 K. An ideal Brayton cycle for this application is first investigated to examine the fundamental features. Then a practical cycle for a Brayton cryocooler is designed, taking into account the performance of compressor, expander, and heat exchangers. Commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) is used for simulating the refrigeration cycle with real fluid properties of refrigerant. Helium is selected as a refrigerant, as it is superior to neon in thermodynamic efficiency. The operating pressure and flow rate of refrigerant are decided with a constraint to avoid the freezing of liquid nitrogen

  3. Calorimetric thermal-vacuum performance characterization of the BAe 80K space cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsubo, V.Y.; Johnson, D.L.; Ross, R.G. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper on a comprehensive characterization program which is underway at JPL to generate test data on long-life, miniature Stirling-cycle cryocoolers for space application. The key focus of this paper is on the thermal performance of the British Aerospace (BAe) 80K split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler as measured in a unique calorimetric thermal-vacuum test chamber that accurately simulates the heat-transfer interfaces of space. Two separate cooling fluid loops provide precis individual control of the compressor and displacer heatsink temperatures. In addition, heatflow transducers enable calorimetric measurements of the heat rejected separately by the compressor and displacer. Cooler thermal performance has been mapped for coldtip temperatures ranging from below 45 K to above 150 K, for heat-sink temperatures ranging from 280 K to 320 K, and for a wide variety of operational variables including compressor-displacer phase, compressor-displacer stoke, drive frequency, and piston-displacer dc offset

  4. Simulation of thermal processes in superconducting pancake coils cooled by GM cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebioda, M; Rymaszewski, J; Korzeniewska, E

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the thermal model of a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system with the closed cycle helium cryocooler. The authors propose the use of contact-cooled coils with maintaining the possibility of the system reconfiguring. The model assumes the use of the second generation superconducting tapes to make the windings in the form of flat discs (pancakes). The paper presents results for a field model of the single pancake coil and the winding system consisting of several coils.

  5. Thermal analysis of the cryocooled superconducting magnet for the liquid helium-free hybrid magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Masayuki; Hamajima, Takataro; Itou, Tomoyuki; Sakuraba, Junji; Nishijima, Gen; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The liquid helium-free hybrid magnet, which consists of an outer large bore cryocooled superconducting magnet and an inner water-cooled resistive magnet, was developed for magneto-science in high fields. The characteristic features of the cryogen-free outsert superconducting magnet are described in detail in this paper. The superconducting magnet cooled by Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers, which has a 360 mm room temperature bore in diameter, was designed to generate high magnetic fields up to 10 T. The hybrid magnet has generated the magnetic field of 27.5 T by combining 8.5 T generation of the cryogen-free superconducting magnet with 19 T generation of the water-cooled resistive magnet. The superconducting magnet was composed of inner Nb 3 Sn coils and outer NbTi coils. In particular, inner Nb 3 Sn coils were wound using high-strength CuNi-NbTi/Nb 3 Sn wires in consideration of large hoop stress. Although the cryocooled outsert superconducting magnet achieved 9.5 T, we found that the outsert magnet has a thermal problem to generate the designed maximum field of 10 T in the hybrid magnet operation. This problem is associated with unexpected AC losses in Nb 3 Sn wires.

  6. Linear-drive cryocoolers for the Department of Defense standard advanced dewar assembly (SADA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Garin S.

    2005-05-01

    The Standard Advanced Dewar Assembly (SADA) is the critical module in the Department of Defense (DoD) standardization of scanning second-generation thermal imaging systems. The DoD has established a family of SADAs to fulfill a range of performance requirements for various platforms. The SADA consists of the Infrared Focal Plane Array (IRFPA), Dewar, Command & Control Electronics (C&CE), and the cryogenic cooler, and is used in platforms such as the Apache helicopter, the M1A2 Abrams main battle tank, the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle, and the Javelin Command Launch Unit (CLU). In support of the family of SADAs, the DoD defined a complementary family of tactical linear drive cryocoolers. The Stirling cycle linear drive cryocoolers are utilized to cool the Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPAs) in the SADAs. These coolers are required to have low input power, a quick cool-down time, low vibration output, low audible noise, and a higher reliability than currently fielded rotary coolers. These coolers must also operate in a military environment with its inherent high vibration level and temperature extremes. This paper will (1) outline the characteristics of each cryocooler, (2) present the status and results of qualification tests, (3) present the status of production efforts, and (4) present the status of efforts to increase linear drive cooler reliability.

  7. Linear Resonance Compressor for Stirling-Type Cryocoolers Activated by Piezoelectric Stack-Type Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobol, S; Grossman, G

    2015-01-01

    A novel type of a PZT- based compressor operating at mechanical resonance, suitable for pneumatically-driven Stirling-type cryocoolers was developed theoretically and built practically during this research. A resonance operation at relatively low frequency was achieved by incorporating the piezo ceramics into the moving part, and by reducing the effective piezo stiffness using hydraulic amplification. The detailed concept, analytical model and the test results of the preliminary prototype were reported earlier and presented at ICC17 [2]. A fine agreement between the simulations and experiments spurred development of the current actual compressor designed to drive a miniature Pulse Tube cryocooler, particularly our MTSa model, which operates at 103 Hz and requires an average PV power of 11 W, filling pressure of 40 Bar and a pressure ratio of 1.3. The paper concentrates on design aspects and optimization of the governing parameters. The small stroke to diameter ratio (about 1:10) allows for the use of a composite diaphragm instead of a clearance-seal piston. The motivation is to create an adequate separation between the working fluid and the buffer gas of the compressor, thus preventing possible contamination in the cryocooler. Providing efficiency and power density similar to those of conventional linear compressors, the piezo compressor may serve as a good alternative for cryogenic applications requiring extreme reliability and absence of magnetic field interference. (paper)

  8. Development of a miniature Stirling cryocooler for LWIR small satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkconnell, C. S.; Hon, R. C.; Perella, M. D.; Crittenden, T. M.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    The optimum small satellite (SmallSat) cryocooler system must be extremely compact and lightweight, achieved in this paper by operating a linear cryocooler at a frequency of approximately 300 Hz. Operation at this frequency, which is well in excess of the 100-150 Hz reported in recent papers on related efforts, requires an evolution beyond the traditional Oxford-class, flexure-based methods of setting the mechanical resonance. A novel approach that optimizes the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design together to simultaneously achieve the required dynamic and thermodynamic performances is described. Since highly miniaturized pulse tube coolers are fundamentally ill-suited for the sub-80K temperature range of interest because the boundary layer losses inside the pulse tube become dominant at the associated very small pulse tube size, a moving displacer Stirling cryocooler architecture is used. Compact compressor mechanisms developed on a previous program are reused for this design, and they have been adapted to yield an extremely compact Stirling warm end motor mechanism. Supporting thermodynamic and electromagnetic analysis results are reported.

  9. RMs1: qualification results of the rotary miniature Stirling cryocooler at Thales Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Yves; Seguineau, Cédric; Van-Acker, Sébastien; Sacau, Mikel; Le Bordays, Julien; Etchanchu, Thierry; Vasse, Christophe; Abadie, Christian; Laplagne, Gilles; Benschop, Tonny

    2017-05-01

    The trend for miniaturized Integrated Dewar and Cooler Assemblies (IDCA) has been confirmed over the past few years with several mentions of a new generation of IR detector working at High Operating Temperature (HOT). This key technology enables the use of cryocooler with reduced needs of cryogenics power. As a consequence, miniaturized IDCA are the combination of a HOT IR detector coupled with a low-size, low-weight and low-power (SWaP) cryocooler. Thales Cryogenics has developed his own line of SWaP products. Qualification results on linear solution where shown last year. The current paper focuses on the latest results obtained on RMs1 prototypes, the new rotary SWaP cryocooler from Thales Cryogenics. Cryogenic performances and induced vibrations are presented. In a second part, progress is discussed on compactness and weight on one side, and on power consumption on the other side. It shows how the trade-off made between weight and power consumption could lead to an optimized solution at system level. At least, an update is made on the qualification status.

  10. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiura, Akifumi; Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

  11. Low-Cost High-Performance Cryocoolers for In-Situ Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. L.; Corey, J. A.; Peters, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    A key feature of many In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) schemes is the production of rocket fuel and oxidizer from the Martian atmosphere. Many of the fuels under consideration will require cryogenic cooling for efficient long-term storage. Although significant research has been focused on the techniques for producing the fuels from Martian resources, little effort has been expended on the development of cryocoolers to efficiently liquefy these fuels. This paper describes the design of a pulse tube liquefier optimized for liquefying oxygen produced by an In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) plant on Mars.

  12. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D. [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  13. High efficiency, low frequency linear compressor proposed for Gifford-McMahon and pulse tube cryocoolers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhne, Jens [Pressure Wave Systems GmbH, Häberlstr. 8, 80337 Munich (Germany)

    2014-01-29

    In order to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions, which are most likely the cause of substantial global warming, a reduction of overall energy consumption is crucial. Low frequency Gifford-McMahon and pulse tube cryocoolers are usually powered by a scroll compressor together with a rotary valve. It has been theoretically shown that the efficiency losses within the rotary valve can be close to 50%{sup 1}. In order to eliminate these losses we propose to use a low frequency linear compressor, which directly generates the pressure wave without using a rotary valve. First results of this development will be presented.

  14. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L B; Liu, S X; Gu, K X; Zhou, Y; Wang, J J

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper. (paper)

  15. Numerical Simulation of Magnetic Field Effect on Cryocooler Regenerators: Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative types of cryogenic refrigerators (or cryocoolers employ magnetic intermetallic compounds of 3d and 4f elements to work well below 10 K. This paper presents the analysis of temperature distribution in regenerators of such cryocoolers under the influence of magnetic fields of 1 T, 3 T, and 4.3 T. Commercial code of finite element analysis (FEA package, ANSYS (APDL 14.5, is used to investigate the temperature distribution under above-mentioned fields. Er3Ni is selected as regenerator material and the criteria for its selection are discussed in detail. The cold end temperature is varied from 4.2 K to 10 K and hot end temperature is fixed at 20 K. The values obtained from FEA clearly show that the ineffectiveness of Er3Ni is at 8 K and 10 K at 3 T and 4.3 T.

  16. Validation of accelerated ageing of Thales rotary Stirling cryocoolers for the estimation of MTTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguineau, C.,; Cauquil, J.-M.; Martin, J.-Y.; Benschop, T.

    2016-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. The current market needs tend to reliability figures higher than 15,000hrs in "standard conditions". Field returns are hardly useable mostly because of the uncertain environmental conditions of use, or the differences in user profiles. A previous paper explains how Thales Cryogenics has developed an approach based on accelerated ageing and statistical analysis [1]. The aim of the current paper is to compare results obtained on accelerated ageing on one side, and on the other side, specific field returns where the conditions of use are well known. The comparison between prediction and effective failure rate is discussed. Moreover, a specific focus is done on how some new applications of cryocoolers (continuous operation at a specific temperature) can increase the MTTF. Some assumptions are also exposed on how the failure modes, effects and criticality analysis evolves for continuous operation at a specific temperature and compared to experimental data.

  17. Study of reverse Brayton cryocooler with Helium-Neon mixture for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, A. K.; Ghosh, P.

    2017-12-01

    As observed in the earlier studies, helium is more efficient than neon as a refrigerant in a reverse Brayton cryocooler (RBC) from the thermodynamic point of view. However, the lower molecular weight of helium leads to higher refrigerant inventory as compared to neon. Thus, helium is suitable to realize the high thermodynamic efficiency of RBC whereas neon is appropriate for the compactness of the RBC. A binary mixture of helium and neon can be used to achieve high thermodynamic efficiency in the compact reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) based cryocooler. In this paper, an attempt has been made to analyze the thermodynamic performance of the RBC with a binary mixture of helium and neon as the working fluid to provide 1 kW cooling load for high temperature superconductor (HTS) power cables working with a temperature range of 50 K to 70 K. The basic RBC is simulated using Aspen HYSYS V8.6®, a commercial process simulator. Sizing of each component based on the optimized process parameters for each refrigerant is performed based on a computer code developed using Engineering Equation Solver (EES-V9.1). The recommendation is provided for the optimum mixture composition of the refrigerant based on the trade-off factors like thermodynamic efficiency such as the exergy efficiency and equipment considerations. The outcome of this study may be useful for recommending a suitable refrigerant for the RBC operating at a temperature level of 50 K to 70 K.

  18. Studies of cryocooler based cryosorption pump with activated carbon panels operating at 11K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasthurirengan, S; Behera, Upendra; Gangradey, Ranjana; Udgata, Swarup; Krishnamoorthy, V

    2012-01-01

    Cryosorption pump is the only solution for pumping helium and hydrogen in fusion reactors. It is chosen because it offers highest pumping speed as well as the only suitable pump for the harsh environments in a tokamak. Towards the development of such cryosorption pumps, the optimal choice of the right activated carbon panels is essential. In order to characterize the performance of the panels with indigenously developed activated carbon, a cryocooler based cryosorption pump with scaled down sizes of panels is experimented. The results are compared with the commercial cryopanel used in a CTI cryosorption (model: Cryotorr 7) pump. The cryopanel is mounted on the cold head of the second stage GM cryocooler which cools the cryopanel down to 11K with first stage reaching about ∼50K. With no heat load, cryopump gives the ultimate vacuum of 2.1E-7 mbar. The pumping speed of different gases such as nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, helium are tested both on indigenous and commercial cryopanel. These studies serve as a bench mark towards the development of better cryopanels to be cooled by liquid helium for use with tokamak.

  19. Application of smart structure concepts to vibration suppression of a cryocooler coldfinger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, R.J.; Kuo, Chinpo, Garba, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    A flight experiment demonstrating vibration suppression using smart structure technology is being flown on a small British satellite in late 1993. Piezo actuators are used to suppress motion of the tip of a cryocooler coldfinger in three dimensions. Two actuation methods are being demonstrated: low voltage piezo translators and applique ceramics. The applique ceramics stretch the coldfinger to cancel the tip motion and is discussed in detail in a companion paper. Commercially available piezo translators displace the entire cryocooler to cancel the motion of the tip of the coldfinger as measured by three eddy current transducers. Two types of control systems are being demonstrated: a real time analog control system using position feedback, and a digital feed forward controller that updates it's waveform every second or so. The flight experiment is a technology demonstration. The coldfinger is not being used to cool an operational sensor. Instead, the cooler vibration experiment will demonstrate that this class of hardware can be flown successfully. This includes qualification of the piezos for launch, and for the space environment; the design and qualification of low-power flight piezo drivers; and design and implementation of the control systems

  20. The study on a gas-coupled two-stage stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. L.; Chen, L. B.; Zhu, X. S.; Pan, C. Z.; Guo, J.; Wang, J. J.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A two-stage gas-coupled Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) driven by a linear dual-opposed compressor has been designed, manufactured and tested. Both of the stages adopted coaxial structure for compactness. The effect of a cold double-inlet at the second stage on the cooling performance was investigated. The test results show that the cold double-inlet will help to achieve a lower cooling temperature, but it is not conducive to achieving a higher cooling capacity. At present, without the cold double-inlet, the second stage has achieved a no-load temperature of 11.28 K and a cooling capacity of 620 mW/20 K with an input electric power of 450 W. With the cold double-inlet, the no-load temperature is lowered to 9.4 K, but the cooling capacity is reduced to 400 mW/20 K. The structure of the developed cryocooler and the influences of charge pressure, operating frequency and hot end temperature will also be introduced in this paper.

  1. Opposed piston linear compressor driven two-stage Stirling Cryocooler for cooling of IR sensors in space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Virendra; Inamdar, Asif; Lele, Mandar; Tendolkar, Mandar; Atrey, Milind; Bapat, Shridhar; Narayankhedkar, Kisan

    2017-04-01

    A two-stage Stirling Cryocooler has been developed and tested for cooling IR sensors in space application. The concept uses an opposed piston linear compressor to drive the two-stage Stirling expander. The configuration used a moving coil linear motor for the compressor as well as for the expander unit. Electrical phase difference of 80 degrees was maintained between the voltage waveforms supplied to the compressor motor and expander motor. The piston and displacer surface were coated with Rulon an anti-friction material to ensure oil less operation of the unit. The present article discusses analysis results, features of the cryocooler and experimental tests conducted on the developed unit. The two-stages of Cryo-cylinder and the expander units were manufactured from a single piece to ensure precise alignment between the two-stages. Flexure bearings were used to suspend the piston and displacer about its mean position. The objective of the work was to develop a two-stage Stirling cryocooler with 2 W at 120 K and 0.5 W at 60 K cooling capacity for the two-stages and input power of less than 120 W. The Cryocooler achieved a minimum temperature of 40.7 K at stage 2.

  2. Theoretical study of effect of working fluid on the performance of 77–100 K adsorption cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, B.J.; Wang, Z.L.; Yan, T.; Hong, G.T.; Li, Y.L.; Liang, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigate the effects of nitrogen, argon and oxygen on the performance of adsorption cryocooler in the range 77–100 K. • A model of adsorption compressor with a two-stage adsorption compressor is constructed and optimized with genetic algorithm. • Working fluid has larger effects on the adsorption compressor than on the cold stage. • The best selection of working fluid depends on the operating parameters. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of working fluid (nitrogen, argon and oxygen) on the performance of adsorption cryocooler in the range 77–100 K. A thermodynamic model of adsorption cryocooler with two-stage compressor has been constructed. The model is based on quasi-static conditions without considering the temperature profiles and pressure drops across the compressor. It is then analyzed with an optimization toolbox to determine the optimum operating conditions to obtain the optimum performance of adsorption cryocooler. The Coefficient of Performance (COP) for each working fluid in the range 77–100 K is obtained and compared. It is found that working fluid has larger effects on adsorption compressor than on cold stage, and the optimum selection of working fluid depends on the operating parameters

  3. Methodology of Accelerated Life-Time Tests For Stirling-Type "Bae-Co"-Made Cryocoolers Against Displacer-Blockage by Cryo-Pollutant Deposits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Getmanits, Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    ...: The contractor will investigate techniques for accelerated testing of cryocooler technology. During this phase of the effort the contractor will perform a detailed design of the equipment needed to conduct accelerated testing...

  4. Microcrystallography, high-pressure cryocooling and BioSAXS at MacCHESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englich, Ulrich, E-mail: ue22@cornell.edu; Kriksunov, Irina A. [MacCHESS (Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cerione, Richard A. [MacCHESS (Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cook, Michael J.; Gillilan, Richard [MacCHESS (Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Field of Biophysics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Physics Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Huang, Qingqui; Kim, Chae Un; Miller, William; Nielsen, Soren; Schuller, David; Smith, Scott; Szebenyi, Doletha M. E. [MacCHESS (Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Three research initiatives pursued by the Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (MacCHESS) are presented. The Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (MacCHESS) is a national research resource supported by the National Center for Research Resources of the US National Institutes of Health. MacCHESS is pursuing several research initiatives designed to benefit both CHESS users and the wider structural biology community. Three initiatives are presented in further detail: microcrystallography, which aims to improve the collection of diffraction data from crystals a few micrometers across, or small well diffracting regions of inhomogeneous crystals, so as to obtain high-resolution structures; pressure cryocooling, which can stabilize transient structures and reduce lattice damage during the cooling process; and BioSAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering on biological solutions), which can extract molecular shape and other structural information from macromolecules in solution.

  5. Cycle Design of Reverse Brayton Cryocooler for HTS Cable Cooling Using Exergy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sudeep Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi

    2017-02-01

    The reliability and price of cryogenic refrigeration play an important role in the successful commercialization of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. For cooling HTS cable, sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN2) circulation system is used. One of the options to maintain LN2 in its sub-cooled state is by providing refrigeration with the help of Reverse Brayton Cryo-cooler (RBC). The refrigeration requirement is 10 kW for continuously sub-cooling LN2 from 72 K to 65 K for cooling 1 km length of HTS cable [1]. In this paper, a parametric evaluation of RBC for sub-cooling LN2 has been performed using helium as a process fluid. Exergy approach has been adopted for this analysis. A commercial process simulator, Aspen HYSYS® V8.6 has been used for this purpose. The critical components have been identified and their exergy destruction and exergy efficiency have been obtained for a given heat load condition.

  6. Three-stage linear, split-Stirling cryocooler for 1 to 2K magnetic cold stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longsworth, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    A long-life, linear, high efficiency 8K split Stirling cycle cryocooler was designed, built, and tested. The refrigerator is designed for cooling a 50 mW, 1.5K magnetic cold stage. Dual opposed piston compressors are driven by moving-coil linear motors. The three stage expander, although not completed, is also driven by a linear motor and is designed to produce 1 SW at 60K, 4W at 16K, and 1.2W at 8K. The cold regenerator employs a parallel gap construction for high efficiency. The key technology areas addressed include warm and cold flexible suspension bearings and a new cold regenerator geometry for high efficiency at 8K

  7. Observation of quantized vortices by cryocooler-based scanning Hall probe microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Tokunaga, M.; Tamegai, T

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) system utilizing closed-cycle cryocooler. The Hall probe used in this system is fabricated from a GaAs/GaAlAs two-dimensional electron gas. A stepping-motor-driven XYZ translator is used with a resolution better than 0.1 {mu}m and maximum scan range of 20 x 20 mm{sup 2}. The spatial resolution of the system is about 5 {mu}m and magnetic resolution is about 100 mG. By using this system, we have successfully resolved the quantized vortices on the cleaved surface of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+y} single crystal.

  8. Cryocooled wideband digital channelizing radio-frequency receiver based on low-pass ADC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernik, Igor V; Kirichenko, Dmitri E; Dotsenko, Vladimir V; Miller, Robert; Webber, Robert J; Shevchenko, Pavel; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Gupta, Deepnarayan; Mukhanov, Oleg A

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated a digital receiver performing direct digitization of radio-frequency signals over a wide frequency range from kilohertz to gigahertz. The complete system, consisting of a cryopackaged superconductor all-digital receiver (ADR) chip followed by room-temperature interface electronics and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based post-processing module, has been developed. The ADR chip comprises a low-pass analog-to-digital converter (ADC) delta modulator with phase modulation-demodulation architecture together with digital in-phase and quadrature mixer and a pair of digital decimation filters. The chip is fabricated using a 4.5 kA cm -2 process and is cryopackaged using a commercial-off-the-shelf cryocooler. Experimental results in HF, VHF, UHF and L bands and their analysis, proving consistent operation of the cryopackaged ADR chip up to 24.32 GHz clock frequency, are presented and discussed

  9. Comparative simulation of Stirling and Sibling cycle cryocoolers with two codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, M.P.; Wilson, K.J.; Bauwens, L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a comparative analysis of Stirling and Sibling Cycle cryocoolers conducted with two different computer simulation codes. One code (CRYOWEISS) performs an initial analysis on the assumption of isothermal conditions in the machines and adjusts that result with decoupled loss calculations. The other code (MS*2) models fluid flows and heat transfers more realistically but ignores significant loss mechanisms, including flow friction and heat conduction through the metal of the machines. Surprisingly, MS*2 is less optimistic about performance of all machines even though it ignores losses that are modelled by CRYOWEISS. Comparison between constant-bore Stirling and Sibling machines shows that their performance is generally comparable over a range of temperatures, pressures and operating speeds. No machine was consistently superior or inferior according to both codes over the whole range of conditions studied

  10. High efficiency 40 K single-stage Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. L.; Chen, L. B.; Pan, C. Z.; Cui, C.; Wang, J. J.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A high efficiency single-stage Stirling-type coaxial pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) operating at around 40 K has been designed, built and tested. The double-inlet and the inertance tubes together with the gas reservoir were adopted as the phase shifters. Under the conditions of 2.5 MPa charging pressure and 30 Hz operating frequency, the prototype has achieved a no-load temperature of 23.8 K with 330 W of electric input power at a rejection temperature of 279 K. When the input power increases to 400 W, it can achieve a cooling capacity of 4.7 W/40 K while rejecting heat at 279 K yielding an efficiency of 7.02% relative to Carnot. It achieves a cooling capacity of 5 W/40 K with an input power of 450 W. It takes 10 minutes for the SPTC to cool to its no-load temperature of 40 K from 295 K.

  11. Testing CAN/CSA-N288.1-M87 (Air-to-forage-to-milk or -beef pathways for 131I and 137Cs and the water-to-fish and sediment pathways for 137Cs) against post-Chernobyl observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S-R.

    1993-05-01

    The Canadian Standards Association's 'Guidelines for Calculating Derived Release Limits for Radioactive Material in Airborne and Liquid Effluents for Normal Operation of Nuclear Facilities' (CAN/CSA-N288.1-M87) is a steady-state chronic release model. Although it has been assumed that (because dose calculations involve several steps and because each step has some degree of conservatism) predictions usually should be conservative, the model had not been tested. An opportunity to test the model arose due to the activities of BIOMOVS (Biospheric Model Validation Study), which developed several scenarios with which to assess model performance. Each of these scenarios asked for predictions for several steps in the pathways studied (e.g., deposition, concentrations in forage and concentrations in milk or meat). The first of these, Scenario B1, was a chronic release over 30 years of 131 I and 137 Cs; predictions of CSA-N288.1-M87 have been compared with those of the sixteen models participating in the scenario. Scenario A4 was developed using world-wide 131 I and 137 Cs data from the Chernobyl accident, and from the following six months. Predictions made using CSA-N288.1-M87 were compared with observations. In addition, the results were compared with those of the 25 participating models. Finally, the model was used to calculate 137 Cs concentrations in water, sediment and fish in a Swedish lake for 18 months post-Chernobyl, for comparison with observations and other predictions. As assumed, most of the transfer parameters are conservative, so that the predictions are usually conservative for a source term of atmospheric 131 I. However, estimates of deposition for both 131 I and 137 Cs are not conservative, which has profound implications for estimating external dose. Furthermore, at some of the sites in the A4 Scenario, concentrations in milk and beef are underestimated for 137C s, which suggests that the transfer parameters are not as conservative as might be desired

  12. The 4 K Stirling cryocooler demonstration. Final report No. 8, 1 May 1990-30 April 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacy, W.D.

    1992-09-01

    This report briefly summarizes the results and conclusions from an SBIR program intended to demonstrate an innovative Stirling cycle cryocooler concept for efficiently lifting heat from 4 K. Refrigeration at 4 K, a temperature useful for superconductors and sensitive instruments, is beyond the reach of conventional regenerative thermodynamic cycles due to the rapid loss of regenerator matrix heat capacity at temperatures below about 20 K. To overcome this fundamental limit, the cryocooler developed under this program integrated three unique features: recuperative regeneration between the displacement gas flow streams of two independent Stirling cycles operating at a 180 degree phase angle, tailored distortion of the two expander volume waveforms from sinusoidal to perfectly match the instantaneous regenerator heat flux from the two cycles and thereby unload the regenerator, and metal diaphragm working volumes to promote near isothermal expansion and compression processes. Use of diaphragms also provides unlimited operating life potential and eliminates bearings and high precision running seals. A phase 1 proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that counterflow regenerator operation between 77 K and 4 K increases regenerator effectiveness by minimizing metal temperature transient cycling. In phase 2, a detailed design package for a breadboard cryocooler was completed. Fabrication techniques were successfully developed for manufacturing high precision miniature parallel plate recuperators, and samples were produced and inspected. Process development for fabricating suitably flat diaphragms proved more difficult and expensive than anticipated, and construction of the cryocooler was suspended at a completion level of approximately 75%. Subsequent development efforts on other projects have successfully overcome diaphragm fabrication difficulties

  13. Design of High Voltage Electrical Breakdown Strength measuring system at 1.8K with a G-M cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Xu; Xu, Dong; Liu, Huiming; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Impregnating resins as electrical insulation materials for use in ITER magnets and feeder system are required to be radiation stable, good mechanical performance and high voltage electrical breakdown strength. In present ITER project, the breakdown strength need over 30 kV/mm, for future DEMO reactor, it will be greater than this value. In order to develop good property insulation materials to satisfy the requirements of future fusion reactor, high voltage breakdown strength measurement system at low temperature is necessary. In this paper, we will introduce our work on the design of this system. This measuring system has two parts: one is an electrical supply system which provides the high voltage from a high voltage power between two electrodes; the other is a cooling system which consists of a G-M cryocooler, a superfluid chamber and a heat switch. The two stage G-M cryocooler pre-cool down the system to 4K, the superfluid helium pot is used for a container to depress the helium to superfluid helium which cool down the sample to 1.8K and a mechanical heat switch connect or disconnect the cryocooler and the pot. In order to provide the sufficient time for the test, the cooling system is designed to keep the sample at 1.8K for 300 seconds.

  14. Hydrodynamic parameters of micro porous media for steady and oscillatory flow: Application to cryocooler regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jeesung Jeff

    Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTC) are a class of rugged and high-endurance refrigeration systems that operate without a moving part at their low temperature ends, and are capable of easily reaching 120°K. These devices can also be configured in multiple stages to reach temperatures below 10 °K. PTCs are particularly suitable for applications in space, missile guiding systems, cryosurgery, medicine preservation, superconducting electronics, magnetic resonance imaging, weather observation, and liquefaction of nitrogen. Although various designs of PTCs have been in use for a few decades, they represent a dynamic and developmental field. PTCs ruggedness comes at the price of relatively low efficiency, however, and thus far they have been primarily used in high-end applications. They have the potential of extensive use in consumer products, however, should sufficiently higher efficiencies be achieved. Intense research competition is underway worldwide, and newer designs are continuously introduced. Some of the fundamental processes that are responsible for their performance are at best not fully understood, however, and consequently systematic modeling of PTC systems is difficult. Among the challenges facing the PTC research community, besides improvement in terms of system efficiency, is the possible miniaturization (total fluid volume of few cubic centimeters (cc)) of these systems. The operating characteristics of a PTC are significantly different from the conventional refrigeration cycles. A PTC implements the theory of oscillatory compression and expansion of the gas within a closed volume to achieve desired refrigeration. Regenerators and pulse tubes are often viewed as the two most complex and essential components in cryocoolers. An important deficiency with respect to the state of art models dealing with PTCs is the essentially total lack of understanding about the directional hydrodynamic and thermal transport parameters associated with periodic flow in

  15. Cryocooler-cooled 10 T superconducting magnet; Reitoki chokurei hoshiki no 10T chodendo jishaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Urata, M. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    A superconducting magnet totally free of such cooling agents as liquefied helium has been developed, which can be cooled by a cryocooler alone in a direct cooler cooled method, and a success was attained when a 10T magnetic field was generated in a vacancy 10cm in diameter. The value is the highest in the world realized by a system not using a cooling medium (only 7.7T attained before this). The coil comprises a coil of an NbTi superconducting lead and a coil of Nb3Sn superconducting lead, and is impregnated with epoxy resin for reduction in size. It is cooled only by heat conduction thanks to a thermally coupled 4K cooler in vacuum, and necessitates the insertion of indium between the coil and a copper made cooling board which combination is further tightened up by a stainless steel wire. Furthermore, a superconducting oxide lead has been developed, with its performance not lowered even in an intensive magnetic field, for the supply of power to the coil, and this suppresses the infiltration of conduction caused heat and the generation of Joule heat. The magnet is designed small and light with dimensions 650{times}500{times}490mm (height), and can be operated by mere manipulation of a switch. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Characterization of a low frequency magnetic noise from a two stage pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshraghi, Mohamad Javad; Sasada, Ichiro; Kim, Jin Mok; Lee, Yong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic noise of a two stage pulse tube cryocooler(PT) has been measured by a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer and by a LTS SQUID gradiometer. The magnetometer was installed in a Dewar made of aluminum at 12 cm apart from a section containing magnetic regenerative materials of the PT. The magnetic noise shows a clear peak at 1.8 Hz which is the fundamental frequency of the He gas pumping rate. The 1.8 Hz magnetic noise took a peak, during the cooling process, when the cold stage temperature was at (or close to) 12 K, which resembles the variation of the temperature of the second cold stage of 1.8 Hz. Hence we attributed the main source of this magnetic noise to the temperature dependency of magnetic susceptibility of magnetic regenerative materials such as Er3Ni and HoCu2 used at the second stage. We pointed out that the superconducting magnetic shield by lead sheets reduced the interfering magnetic noise generated from this part. With this scheme, the magnetic noise amplitude measured with the first order gradiometer DROS, mounted in the vicinity of the magnetic regenerator, when the noise amplitude is minimum, which could be found from the fluxgate measurement results, was less than 500 pT peak to peak. Whereas without lead shielding the noise level was higher than the dynamic range of SQUID instrumentations which is around ±10nT. (author)

  17. Investigation of a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler driven by a standing wave thermoacoustic engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroujerdi, A.A.; Ziabasharhagh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A nonlinear numerical model of a high frequency TADPTC has been developed. • The finite volume method has been used for discretization of governing equations. • The self-excitation process has been simulated very well. • The effects of APAT on the performance of the device have been investigated. • Lagrangian approach has been used to trace the thermodynamic cycle of gas parcels. - Abstract: In this work, a typical thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler as a no-moving part device has been investigated by a numerical method. A standing wave thermoacoustic engine as a prime mover in coupled with an inertance tube pulse tube cryocooler has been modeled. Nonlinear equations of unsteady one-dimensional compressible flow have been solved by the finite volume method. The model presents an important step towards the development of nonlinear simulation tools for the high amplitude thermoacoustic systems that are needed for practical use. The results of the computations show that the self-excited oscillations are well accompanied by the increasing of the pressure amplitude. The necessity of implementation of a nonlinear model to investigate such devices has been proven. The effect of APAT length as an amplifier coupler on the performance of the cooler has been investigated. Furthermore, by using Lagrangian approach, thermodynamic cycle of gas parcels has been attained

  18. Operating characteristics of a three-stage Stirling pulse tube cryocooler operating around 5 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L. M.; Cao, Q.; Zhi, X. Q.; Han, L.; Gan, Z. H.; Yu, Y. B.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    A Stirling pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) operating at the liquid-helium temperatures represents an excellent prospect for satisfying the requirements of space applications because of its compactness, high efficiency and reliability. However, the working mechanism of a 4 K SPTC is more complicated than that of the Gifford McMahon (GM) PTC that operates at the relatively low frequency of 1-2 Hz, and has not yet been well understood. In this study, the primary operating parameters, including frequency, charge pressure, input power and precooling temperature, are systematically investigated in a home-developed separate three-stage SPTC. The investigation demonstrates that the frequency and precooling temperature are closely coupled via phase shift. In order to improve the cooling capacity it is important to lower the frequency and the precooling temperature simultaneously. In contrast to the behavior predicted by previous studies, the pressure dependence of the gas properties results in an optimized pressure that decreases significantly as the temperature is lowered. The third stage reaches a lowest temperature of 4.97 K at 29.9 Hz and 0.91 MPa. A cooling power of 25 mW is measured at 6.0 K. The precooling temperature is 23.7 K and the input power is 100 W.

  19. Development of a hermetically sealed brushless DC motor for a J-T cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joscelyn, Edwin; Hochler, Irwin; Ferri, Andrew; Rott, Heinz; Soukaris, Ted

    1996-01-01

    This development was sponsored by Ball Aerospace for the Cryogenic On-Orbit LongLife Active Refrigerator (COOLLAR) program. The cryocooler is designed to cool objects to 65 K and operate in space for at least 7 years. The system also imports minimal impact to the spacecraft in terms of vibration and heat. The basic Joule-Thompson cycle involves compressing a working fluid, nitrogen in this case, at near-constant temperature from 17.2 KPa to 6.89 MPa. The nitrogen is then expanded through a Joule-Thompson valve. The pure nitrogen gas must be kept clean; therefore, any contamination from motor organic materials must be eliminated. This requirement drove the design towards sealing of the motor within a titanium housing without sacrificing motor performance. It is estimated that an unsealed motor would have contributed 1.65 g of contaminants, due to the organic insulation and potting materials, over the 7-year life. This paper describes the motor electrical and mechanical design, as well as the sealing difficulties encountered, along with their solutions.

  20. MODELLING AND FAILURE ANALYSIS OF FLEXURE SPRINGS FOR A STIRLING CRYOCOOLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJESH V. R.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the range of milliwatt to a few watts cooling capacity, Stirling cycle and pulse tube coolers are most suitable for producing cryogenic temperatures owing to their eco-friendliness, high efficiency, cooling capacity to mass ratio etc. The compressor of a Stirling cooler is powered by a linear motor. The power piston of the cooler is held in position and moves to and fro with the support of so called flexure springs or flexure bearings. Flexures avoid direct contact between moving parts of the compressor of the cooler. Thus, if designed adequately to withstand fatigue, flexure bearings can easily outlast rolling element bearings and slider bearings. In this work, a computational analysis is used to study the performance of flexure spring by varying the geometrical parameters. Three of the most common spring materials namely, SS304, beryllium copper and spring steel are considered for analysis. The analysis was made by varying the parameters like spiral sweep angle, slot width, number of spirals and disc thickness. The influence of each of these parameters on the fatigue life of the spring has been investigated. The results suggest that flexure springs of three spiral arms would be the ideal choice for the selected cryocooler. The variation of stress developed with respect to different design parameters and fatigue damage factor are presented graphically.

  1. A space-qualified experiment integrating HTS digital circuits and small cryocoolers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, A.; Akerling, G.; Auten, R.

    1996-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) promise to achieve electrical performance superior to that of conventional electronics. For application in space systems, HTS systems must simultaneously achieve lower power, weight, and volume than conventional electronics, and meet stringent space qualification and reliability requirements. Most effort to date has focused on passive RF/microwave applications. However, incorporation of active microwave components such as amplifiers, mixers, and phase shifters, and on-board high data rate digital signal processing is limited by the power and weight of their spacecraft electronic and support modules. Absence of data on active HTS components will prevent their utilization in space. To validate the feasibility in space of HTS circuits and components based on Josephson junctions, one needs to demonstrate HTS circuits and critical supporting technologies, such as space-qualified packaging and interconnects, closed-cycle cryocooling, and interface electronics. This paper describes the packaging, performance, and space test plan of an integrated, space-qualified experimental package consisting of HTS Josephson junction circuits and all the supporting components for NRL's high temperature superconductor space experiment (HTSSE-II). Most of the technical challenges and approaches are equally applicable to passive and active RF/microwave and digital electronic components, and this experiment will provide valuable validation data

  2. Development of a linear compressor for compact 2 K Gifford- McMahon cryocoolers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiratsuka, Y

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new, compact Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler for cooling superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) has been developed at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) [1, 2]. The objective is to reduce the total height of the expander by 33% relative to the existing RDK-101 GM expander and to reduce the total volume of the compressor unit by 50% relative to the existing CNA-11 compressor. In addition, considering the targeted cooling application, we set the design temperature targets of the first and the second stages to 1 W and 20 mW of heat load at 60 K and 2.3 K, respectively. Although optimization of the internal components is one way to miniaturize the volume of the compressor unit, major design changes are required because the volume of the adsorber and the oil separator is almost the same as the volume of the compressor capsule. Thus, one approach is to develop a non-lubricated compressor, such as a valved linear compressor. An experimental unit of a valved linear compressor was designed and built, and preliminary experiments were conducted. Under no-load condition, a low temperature of 2.19 K has been achieved. With 1 W and 14 mW heat load, the temperature is 48 K at the first stage and 2.3 K at the second stage, with an input power of about 1.2 KW. The detailed experimental results will be discussed in this paper. (paper)

  3. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF A MINIATURE STIRLING CRYOCOOLER WITH A MULTI MESH REGENERATOR DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KISHOR KUMAR V. V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A parametric study has been carried out using the software REGEN 3.3 to optimize the regenerator of a miniature Stirling cryocooler operating with a warm end temperature of 300 K and cold end temperature of 80 K. Regenerator designs which produce the maximum coefficient of performance (COP of the system is considered as an optimized regenerator. The length and diameter of the regenerator were fixed from the cooler system requirements. Single mesh regenerators made of 200, 250, 300, 400 and 450 Stainless Steel wire meshes were considered and the optimum phase angle and mesh size were obtained. A maximum COP of 0.1475 was obtained for 300 mesh regenerator at 70° phase angle. Then multi mesh regenerators were considered with finer mesh on the cold end and coarser mesh on the hot end. The optimum size and length of each mesh in the multi mesh regenerator and the optimum phase angle were calculated. The maximum COP of 0.156 was obtained for 200 300-400 multi mesh regenerator at 70° phase angle. The COP and net refrigeration obtained for an optimized multi mesh regenerator was found to be significantly higher than that of a single mesh regenerator. Thus a multi mesh regenerator design with a proper combination of regenerator mesh size and length can enhance the regenerator effectiveness.

  4. Study on the flow nonuniformity in a high capacity Stirling pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, X.; Zhi, X.; Duan, C.; Jiang, X.; Qiu, L.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    High capacity Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers (SPTC) have promising applications in high temperature superconductive motor and gas liquefaction. However, with the increase of cooling capacity, its performance deviates from well-accepted one-dimensional model simulation, such as Sage and Regen, mainly due to the strong field nonuniformity. In this study, several flow straighteners placed at both ends of the pulse tube are investigated to improve the flow distribution. A two-dimensional model of the pulse tube based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been built to study the flow distribution of the pulse tube with different flow straighteners including copper screens, copper slots, taper transition and taper stainless slot. A SPTC set-up which has more than one hundred Watts cooling power at 80 K has been built and tested. The flow straighteners mentioned above have been applied and tested. The results show that with the best flow straightener the cooling performance of the SPTC can be significantly improved. Both CFD simulation and experiment show that the straighteners have impacts on the flow distribution and the performance of the high capacity SPTC.

  5. How to manage MTTF larger than 30,000hr on rotary cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauquil, Jean-Marc; Seguineau, Cédric; Martin, Jean-Yves; Van-Acker, Sébastien; Benschop, Tonny

    2017-05-01

    The cooled IR detectors are used in a wide range of applications. Most of the time, the cryocoolers are one of the components dimensioning the lifetime of the system. Indeed, Stirling coolers are mechanical systems where wear occurs on millimetric mechanisms. The exponential law classically used in electronics for Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) calculation cannot be directly used for mechanical devices. With new applications for thermal sensor like border surveillance, an increasing reliability has become mandatory for rotary cooler. The current needs are above several tens of thousands of continuous hour of cooling. Thales Cryogenics made specific development on that topic, for both linear and rotary applications. The time needed for validating changes in processes through suited experimental design is hardly affordable by following a robust and rigorous standard scientific approach. The targeted Mean Time to Failure (MTTF) led us to adopt an innovative approach to keep development phases in line with expected time to market. This innovative approach is today widespread on all of Thales Cryogenics rotary products and results in a proven increase of MTTF for RM2, RM3 and recently RM1. This paper will then focused on the current MTTF figures measured on RM1, RM2 and RM3. After explaining the limit of a conventional approach, the paper will then describe the current method. At last, the authors will explain how these principles are taken into account for the new SWaP rotary cooler of Thales Cryogénie SAS.

  6. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200  μm, for two final bunch charges: 10^{5} electrons (16 fC and 10^{6} electrons (160 fC. Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}=0.27  nm/μm was obtained for a final bunch charge of 10^{5} electrons and final bunch length of σ_{t}≈100  fs. For a final charge of 10^{6} electrons the cryogun produces L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.1  nm/μm for σ_{t}≈100–200  fs and σ_{x}≥50  μm. These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  7. Numerical simulation of tubes-in-tube heat exchanger in a mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, R. M.; Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MRJT) cryocoolers can produce cryogenic temperatures with high efficiency and low operating pressures. As compared to the high system pressures of around 150-200 bar with nitrogen, the operational pressures with non-azeotropic mixtures (e.g., nitrogen-hydrocarbons) come down to 10-25 bar. With mixtures, the heat transfer in the recuperative heat exchanger takes place in the two-phase region. The simultaneous boiling and condensation of the cold and hot gas streams lead to higher heat transfer coefficients as compared to single phase heat exchange. The two-phase heat transfer in the recuperative heat exchanger drastically affects the performance of a MRJT cryocooler. In this work, a previously reported numerical model for a simple tube-in-tube heat exchanger is extended to a multi tubes-in-tube heat exchanger with a transient formulation. Additionally, the J-T expansion process is also considered to simulate the cooling process of the heat exchanger from ambient temperature conditions. A tubes-in-tube heat exchanger offers more heat transfer area per unit volume resulting in a compact design. Also, the division of flow in multiple tubes reduces the pressure drop in the heat exchanger. Simulations with different mixtures of nitrogen-hydrocarbons are carried out and the numerical results are compared with the experimental data.

  8. Modelling of a stirling cryocooler regenerator under steady and steady - periodic flow conditions using a correlation based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishor Kumar, V. V.; Kuzhiveli, B. T.

    2017-12-01

    The performance of a Stirling cryocooler depends on the thermal and hydrodynamic properties of the regenerator in the system. CFD modelling is the best technique to design and predict the performance of a Stirling cooler. The accuracy of the simulation results depend on the hydrodynamic and thermal transport parameters used as the closure relations for the volume averaged governing equations. A methodology has been developed to quantify the viscous and inertial resistance terms required for modelling the regenerator as a porous medium in Fluent. Using these terms, the steady and steady - periodic flow of helium through regenerator was modelled and simulated. Comparison of the predicted and experimental pressure drop reveals the good predictive power of the correlation based method. For oscillatory flow, the simulation could predict the exit pressure amplitude and the phase difference accurately. Therefore the method was extended to obtain the Darcy permeability and Forchheimer’s inertial coefficient of other wire mesh matrices applicable to Stirling coolers. Simulation of regenerator using these parameters will help to better understand the thermal and hydrodynamic interactions between working fluid and the regenerator material, and pave the way to contrive high performance, ultra-compact free displacers used in miniature Stirling cryocoolers in the future.

  9. Preliminary test Results for a 25K Sorption Cryocooler Designed for the UCSB Long Duration Balloon Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, L. A.; Levy, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous operation, vibration-free, long-life 25K sorption cryocooler has been built and is now in final integration and performance testing. This cooler wil be flown on the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) Long Duration Balloon (LDB) Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment.

  10. Optimized autonomous operations of a 20 K space hydrogen sorption cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, J.; Morgante, G.; Prina, M.; Pearson, D.; Bhandari, P.

    2004-06-01

    A fully redundant hydrogen sorption cryocooler is being developed for the European Space Agency Planck mission, dedicated to the measurement of the temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution [Advances in Cryogenic Engineering 45A (2000) 499]. In order to achieve this ambitious scientific task, this cooler is required to provide a stable temperature reference (˜20 K) and appropriate cooling (˜1 W) to the two instruments on-board, with a flight operational lifetime of 18 months. During mission operations, communication with the spacecraft will be possible in a restricted time-window, not longer than 2 h/day. This implies the need for an operations control structure with the required robustness to safely perform autonomous procedures. The cooler performance depends on many operating parameters (such as the temperatures of the pre-cooling stages and the warm radiator), therefore the operation control system needs the capability to adapt to variations of these boundary conditions, while maintaining safe operating procedures. An engineering bread board (EBB) cooler was assembled and tested to evaluate the behavior of the system under conditions simulating flight operations and the test data were used to refine and improve the operation control software. In order to minimize scientific data loss, the cooler is required to detect all possible failure modes and to autonomously react to them by taking the appropriate action in a rapid fashion. Various procedures and schemes both general and specific in nature were developed, tested and implemented to achieve these goals. In general, the robustness to malfunctions was increased by implementing an automatic classification of anomalies in different levels relative to the seriousness of the error. The response is therefore proportional to the failure level. Specifically, the start-up sequence duration was significantly reduced, allowing a much faster

  11. Computer analysis of an adiabatic Stirling cryocooler using a two-phase two-component working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfroe, D.A.; Cheung, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the performance and behavior of a Stirling cyrocooler incorporating a working fluid composed of helium and nitrogen. At the operating temperature of the cryocooler (80 K), the nitrogen component will condense in the freezer section. It is shown that the phase change in the working fluid increased the heat lifted for a given size and weight of machine and the coefficient of performance. The magnitude of these effects was dependent on the mass ratio of nitrogen to helium, phase angle between the compression and expansion processes, and the ratio of the compression space volume to the expansion space volume. The optimum heat lifted performance was obtained for a mass ratio of four parts of nitrogen to one part of helium, a phase angle of approximately 100 degrees, and a volume ratio of two which resulted in a heat lifted increase of 75% over the single phase, 90 degree phase angle configuration. The coefficient of performance showed a 20% improvement

  12. Theoretical modeling of a gas clearance phase regulation mechanism for a pneumatically-driven split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cun-quan; Zhong, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    The concept of a new type of pneumatically-driven split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler with clearance-phase-adjustor is proposed. In this implementation, the gap between the phase-adjusting part and the cylinder of the spring chamber is used, instead of dry friction acting on the pneumatically-driven rod to control motion damping of the displacer and to adjust the phase difference between the compression piston and displacer. It has the advantages of easy damping adjustment, low cost, and simplified manufacturing and assembly. A theoretical model has been established to simulate its dynamic performance. The linear compressor is modeled under adiabatic conditions, and the displacement of the compression piston is experimentally rectified. The working characteristics of the compressor motor and the principal losses of cooling, including regenerator inefficiency loss, solid conduction loss, shuttle loss, pump loss and radiation loss, are taken into account. The displacer motion was modeled as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) forced system. A set of governing equations can be solved numerically to simulate the cooler's performance. The simulation is useful for understanding the physical processes occurring in the cooler and for predicting the cooler's performance.

  13. Design And Tests Of A Superconducting Magnet With A Cryocooler For The Ion Source Decris-sc

    CERN Document Server

    Datskov, V I; Bekhterev, V V; Bogomolov, S L; Bondarenko, P G; Dmitriev, S N; Drobin, V M; Efremov, A A; Iakovlev, B I; Leporis, M; Malinowski, H; Nikiforov, S A; Paschenko, S V; Seleznev, V V; Shishov, Yu A; Tsvineva, G P; Yazvitsky, N Yu

    2004-01-01

    A superconducting magnet system (SMS) for the multicharged ion source DECRIS-SC was designed and manufactured at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. Successful tests of the SMS were conducted in late 2003 - early 2004. The peculiarities of this system are stipulated by using of a cryocooler 1 W in power for the cryostabilization of the magnet, and also by a special configuration of the magnetic field demanded for the source of ions. Four coils ensure induction of a magnetic field on the axes of the source of up to 3T (the mirror ratio of ~6) which considerably extends possibilities of the ion source from the point of view of producing intense highly charged ion beams. The problem of compensating large forces of interaction between the coils and surrounding iron yoke in this magnet has been successfully solved, and a reliable suspension of the magnet in a cryostat realized. For compounding of the windings working in vacuum at indirect cryostabilization prepreg is used. There has been applied a new techno...

  14. Numerical investigation of transient behaviour of the recuperative heat exchanger in a MR J-T cryocooler using different heat transfer correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, R. M.; Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Atrey, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    In J-T cryocoolers operating with mixed refrigerants (nitrogen-hydrocarbons), the recuperative heat exchange takes place under two-phase conditions. Simultaneous boiling of the low pressure stream and condensation of the high pressure stream results in higher heat transfer coefficients. The mixture composition, operating conditions and the heat exchanger design are crucial for obtaining the required cryogenic temperature. In this work, a one-dimensional transient algorithm is developed for the simulation of the two-phase heat transfer in the recuperative heat exchanger of a mixed refrigerant J-T cryocooler. Modified correlation is used for flow boiling of the high pressure fluid while different condensation correlations are employed with and without the correction for the low pressure fluid. Simulations are carried out for different mixture compositions and numerical predictions are compared with the experimental data. The overall heat transfer is predicted reasonably well and the qualitative trends of the temperature profiles are also captured by the developed numerical model.

  15. Performance estimation of an oil-free linear compressor unit for a new compact 2K Gifford-McMahon cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Y.; Bao, Q.; Y Xu, M.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2012, a new, compact Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler for cooling superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) has been developed and reported by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI). Also, it was reported that National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) developed a multi-channel, conduction-cooled SSPD system. However, the size and power consumption reduction becomes indispensable to apply such a system to the optical communication of AdHoc for a mobile system installed in a vehicle. The objective is to reduce the total height of the expander by 33% relative to the existing RDK-101 GM expander and to reduce the total volume of the compressor unit by 50% relative to the existing CNA-11 compressor. In addition, considering the targeted cooling application, we set the design cooling capacity targets of the first and the second stages 1 W at 60 K and 20 mW at 2.3 K respectively. In 2016, Hiratsuka et al. reported that an oil-free compressor was developed for a 2K GM cryocooler. The cooling performance of a 2K GM expander driven by an experimental unit of the linear compressor was measured. No-load temperature less than 2.1 K and the cooling capacity of 20 mW at 2.3 K were successfully achieved with an electric input power of only 1.1 kW. After that, the compressor capsule and the heat exchanger, etc. were assembled into one enclosure as a compressor unit. The total volume of the compressor unit and electrical box was significantly reduced to about 38 L, which was close to the target of 35 L. Also, the sound noise, vibration characteristics, the effect of the compressor unit inclination and the ambient temperature on the cooling performance, were evaluated. The detailed experimental results are discussed in this paper.

  16. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, J.; Frederking, T.H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  17. Sunpower : how Ontario is jump-starting the solar-energy economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorinc, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many families are now taking advantage of Ontario's new standard offers program which was initiated to promote small renewable energy projects using guaranteed rates. The program was designed to show homeowners that solar energy is financially viable. Programs and initiatives such as the West Toronto Initiative for Solar Energy (WISE) have resulted in communities investing in solar equipment and becoming more knowledgeable about renewable energy resources. The standard offer subsidy was designed to get solar power into the marketplace alongside traditional forms of electricity generation. A 1-kw photovoltaic (PV) cell was designed to earn its owner between $400 and $500 per year. The WISE program allowed its members to purchase an entry-level system that cost only $150 per month. The PV system is expected to pay for itself within 5 to 6 years. Although the federal government has invested $36 million in a renewable energy fund, many environmentalists believe that Ontario's emerging solar sector is not growing quickly enough. Countries such as Germany and Japan have seen significant growth in the solar industry over the last 20 years. 14 figs

  18. Effect of Low Temperature on a 4 W/60 K Pulse-Tube Cryocooler for Cooling HgCdTe Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ankuo; Liu, Shaoshuai; Wu, Yinong

    2018-04-01

    Temperature is an extremely important parameter for the material of the space-borne infrared detector. To cool an HgCdTe-infrared detector, a Stirling-type pulse-tube cryocooler (PTC) has been developed based on a great deal of numerical simulations, which are performed to investigate the thermodynamic behaviors of the PTC. The effects of different low temperatures are presented to analyze different energy flows, losses, phase shifts, and impedance matching of the PTC at a temperature range of 40-120 K, where woven wire screens are used. Finally, a high-efficiency coaxial PTC has been designed, built, and tested, operating around 60 K after a number of theoretical and experimental studies. The PTC can offer a no-load refrigeration temperature of 40 K with an input electric power of 150 W, and a cooling power of 4 W at 60 K is obtained with Carnot efficiency of 12%. In addition, a comparative study of simulation and experiment has been carried out, and some studies on reject temperatures have been presented for a thorough understanding of the PTC system.

  19. Advances in single- and multi-stage Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers for space applications in NLIP/SITP/CAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Haizheng; Tan, Jun; Zha, Rui; Li, Jiaqi; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yibo; Gao, Zhiqian; Bao, Dingli; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Yongjiang; Zhao, Bangjian

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a review of recent advances in single- and multi-stage Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers (SPTCs) for space applications developed at the National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NLIP/SITP/CAS). A variety of single-stage SPTCs operating at 25-150 K have been developed, including several mid-sized ones operating at 80-110 K. Significant progress has been achieved in coolers operating at 30-40 K which use common stainless steel meshes as regenerator matrices. Another important advance is the micro SPTCs with an overall mass of 300-800 g operating at high frequencies varying from 100 Hz to 400 Hz. The main purpose of developing two-stage SPTCs is to simultaneously acquire cooling capacities at both stages, obviating the need for auxiliary precooling in various applications. The three-stage SPTCs are developed mainly for applications at around 10 K, which are also used for precooling the J-T coolers to achieve further lower temperatures. The four-stage SPTCs are developed to directly achieve the liquid helium temperature for cooling space low-Tc superconducting devices and for the deep space exploration as well. Several typical development programs are described and an overview of the cooler performances is presented.

  20. CFD modeling and experimental verification of oscillating flow and heat transfer processes in the micro coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 90-170 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yibo; Yu, Guorui; Tan, Jun; Mao, Xiaochen; Li, Jiaqi; Zha, Rui; Li, Ning; Dang, Haizheng

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the CFD modeling and experimental verifications of oscillating flow and heat transfer processes in the micro coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (MCSPTC) operating at 90-170 Hz. It uses neither double-inlet nor multi-bypass while the inertance tube with a gas reservoir becomes the only phase-shifter. The effects of the frequency on flow and heat transfer processes in the pulse tube are investigated, which indicates that a low enough frequency would lead to a strong mixing between warm and cold fluids, thereby significantly deteriorating the cooling performance, whereas a high enough frequency would produce the downward sloping streams flowing from the warm end to the axis and almost puncturing the gas displacer from the warm end, thereby creating larger temperature gradients in radial directions and thus undermining the cooling performance. The influence of the pulse tube length on the temperature and velocity when the frequencies are much higher than the optimal one are also discussed. A MCSPTC with an overall mass of 1.1 kg is worked out and tested. With an input electric power of 59 W and operating at 144 Hz, it achieves a no-load temperature of 61.4 K and a cooling capacity of 1.0 W at 77 K. The changing tendencies of tested results are in good agreement with the simulations. The above studies will help to thoroughly understand the underlying mechanism of the inertance MCSPTC operating at very high frequencies.

  1. Technical aspects: development, manufacture and installation of a cryo-cooled HTS coil system for high-resolution in-vivo imaging of the mouse at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Girard, Olivier; Darrasse, Luc

    2007-09-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio improvement is of major importance to achieve microscopic spatial resolution in magnetic resonance experiments. Magnetic resonance imaging of small animals is particularly concerned since it typically requires voxels of less than (100 microm)(3) to observe the small anatomical structures having size reduction by a factor of more than 10 as compared to human being. The signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by working at high static magnetic field strengths, but the biomedical interest of such high-field systems may be limited due to field-dependent contrast mechanisms and severe technological difficulties. An alternative approach that allows working in clinical imaging system is to improve the sensitivity of the radio-frequency receiver coil. This can be done using small cryogenically operated coils made either of copper or high-temperature superconducting material. We report the technological development of cryo-cooled superconducting coils for high-resolution imaging in a whole-body magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 T. The technological background supporting this development is first addressed, including HTS coil design, simulation tools, cryogenic mean description and electrical characterization procedure. To illustrate the performances of superconducting coils for magnetic resonance imaging at intermediate field strength, in-vivo mouse images of various anatomic sites acquired with a 12 mm diameter cryo-cooled superconducting coil are presented.

  2. Design and performance of a fast thermal response miniature Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill for use in a millikelvin cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J.; Hardy, G.; Hepburn, I. D.

    2015-01-01

    The design and performance of a fast thermal response miniature (24 mm outer diameter by 30 mm long) Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill is described. The need for a fast thermal response has been driven by the development of a continuously operating millikelvin cryocooler (mKCC) which uses 2 T superconducting magnets that can be ramped to full field in 30 s. The consequence of magnetising and demagnetising the CPA pill in such a short time is that thermal boundary resistance and eddy current heating have a significant impact on the performance of the pill, which was investigated in detail using modelling. The complete design of a prototype CPA pill is described in this paper, including the methods used to minimise thermal boundary resistance and eddy current heating as well as the manufacturing and assembly processes. The performance of the prototype CPA pill operated from a 3.6 K bath is presented, demonstrating that a complete CPA cycle (magnetising, cooling to bath and demagnetising) can be accomplished in under 2.5 min, with magnetisation and demagnetisation taking just 30 s each. The cold finger base temperature of the prototype varies with demagnetisation speed as a consequence of eddy current heating; for a 30 s demagnetisation, a base temperature of 161 mK is obtained, whilst for a 5 min demagnetisation, a base temperature of 149 mK was measured (both from a 3.6 K and 2 T starting position). The measured hold times of the CPA pill at 200 mK, 300 mK, and 1 K are given, proving that the hold time far exceeds the recycle time and demonstrating the potential for continuous operation when two ADRs are used in a tandem configuration. The ease and speed at which the CPA pill temperature can be changed and controlled when stepping between operating temperatures in the range of 200 mK to 4 K using a servo control program is also shown, once again highlighting the excellent thermal response of the pill. All of the test results are in good agreement with the

  3. A new view on the M87 jet origin: Turbulent loading leading to large-scale episodic wiggling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Britzen, S.; Fendt, C.; Eckart, A.; Karas, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 601, May (2017), A52/1-A52/17 E-ISSN 1432-0746 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : interferometric techniques * active galaxies * jets Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.014, year: 2016

  4. Theoretical and experimental investigations on the cooling capacity distributions at the stages in the thermally-coupled two-stage Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler without external precooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jun; Dang, Haizheng

    2017-03-01

    The two-stage Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) has advantages in simultaneously providing the cooling powers at two different temperatures, and the capacity in distributing these cooling capacities between the stages is significant to its practical applications. In this paper, a theoretical model of the thermally-coupled two-stage SPTC without external precooling is established based on the electric circuit analogy with considering real gas effects, and the simulations of both the cooling performances and PV power distribution between stages are conducted. The results indicate that the PV power is inversely proportional to the acoustic impedance of each stage, and the cooling capacity distribution is determined by the cold finger cooling efficiency and the PV power into each stage together. The design methods of the cold fingers to achieve both the desired PV power and the cooling capacity distribution between the stages are summarized. The two-stage SPTC is developed and tested based on the above theoretical investigations, and the experimental results show that it can simultaneously achieve 0.69 W at 30 K and 3.1 W at 85 K with an electric input power of 330 W and a reject temperature of 300 K. The consistency between the simulated and the experimental results is observed and the theoretical investigations are experimentally verified.

  5. Air liquide's space pulse tube cryocooler systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trollier, T.; Tanchon, J.; Buquet, J.; Ravex, A.

    2017-11-01

    Thanks to important development efforts completed with ESA funding, Air Liquide Advanced Technology Division (AL/DTA), is now in position to propose two Pulse Tube cooler systems in the 40-80K temperature range for coming Earth Observation missions such as Meteosat Third Generation (MTG), SIFTI, etc… The Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler (MPTC) is lifting up to 2.47W@80K with 50W compressor input power and 10°C rejection temperature. The weight is 2.8 kg. The Large Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) is providing 2.3W@50K for 160W input power and 10°C rejection temperature. This product is weighing 5.1 kg. The two pulse tube coolers thermo-mechanical units are qualified against environmental constraints as per ECSS-E-30. They are both using dual opposed pistons flexure bearing compressor with moving magnet linear motors in order to ensure very high lifetime. The associated Cooler Drive Electronics is also an important aspect specifically regarding the active control of the cooler thermo-mechanical unit during the launch phase and the active reduction of the vibrations induced by the compressor (partly supported by the French Agency CNES). This paper details the presentation of the two Pulse Tube Coolers together with the Cooler Drive Electronics aspects.

  6. Deep Space Cryocooler System (DSCS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As NASA missions continue to extend the horizon beyond near-Earth missions, higher performance systems must evolve to address the challenges of reduced power...

  7. Advanced Compressor for Long Life Space Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    625 and 718, or beryllium copper. When both high-yield and high- fatigue strength are required, Inconel 718 is usually the material of choice. As shown...with wear debris and life in the case of rubbing seals, and long-term stability and alignment in the case of precision noncontacting clearance seals, are...the bearings’ wear pv, and hence increased life, with decreasing stroke. In summary, the results of the compressor optimization studies showed that a

  8. Large Propellant Tank Cryo-Cooler (LPTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In rocket test and launch facilities, cryogenic propellants stored in tanks boils off due to heat leakage, with the following impacts:Ø   Waste, propellants boil off...

  9. An Investigation of Certain Thermodynamic Loses in Miniature Cryocoolers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, Charles R

    2006-01-01

    ... Having allowed for the pumping loss due to the clearance seal, the work done on the gas was evaluated, and this data was compared with expressions derived by Kornhauser and others using sliding seal...

  10. Cold electron beams from cryocooled, alkali antimonide photocathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cultrera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on the generation of cold electron beams using a Cs_{3}Sb photocathode grown by codeposition of Sb and Cs. By cooling the photocathode to 90 K we demonstrate a significant reduction in the mean transverse energy validating the long-standing speculation that the lattice temperature contributes to limiting the mean transverse energy or intrinsic emittance near the photoemission threshold, opening new frontiers in generating ultrabright beams. At 90 K, we achieve a record low intrinsic emittance of 0.2  μm (rms per mm of laser spot diameter from an ultrafast (subpicosecond photocathode with quantum efficiency greater than 7×10^{−5} using a visible laser wavelength of 690 nm.

  11. An Investigation of Certain Thermodynamic Losses in Miniature Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-02

    system Channel Measurement Parameter Sensor Gain Offset 1 Pressure in Volume A Endevco 2.408 bar/V 6.0206 bar 2 Pressure in Volume C Druck 200...1.9677 bar/V 15.444 bar 3 N/C 4 Pressure in compressor body Druck 820 6.0046 bar/V 8.3174 bar 5 Piston Position Sch’ LVDT 2.0884 mm/V -5.5968 mm...probe (courtesy of Prof. Moriyoshi). Left: 3D view showing two fine thermocouples are in a cross configuration. Right: Side elevation Results

  12. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++, GAMANL, GRPANL and MGAU, typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service . The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted

  13. A 4-Kelvin Pulse-Tube/Reverse-Brayton Hybrid Cryocooler, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's ability to perform cutting edge space science, including lunar and planetary exploration, requires the use of cryogenically cooled detectors and sensors for...

  14. A Turbo-Brayton Cryocooler for Aircraft Superconducting Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hybrid turboelectric aircraft with gas turbines driving electric generators connected to electric propulsion motors have the potential to transform the aircraft...

  15. Lifetime validation of high-reliability (>30,000hr) rotary cryocoolers for specific customer profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauquil, Jean-Marc; Seguineau, Cédric; Vasse, Christophe; Raynal, Gaetan; Benschop, Tonny

    2018-05-01

    The cooler reliability is a major performance requested by the customers, especially for 24h/24h applications, which are a growing market. Thales has built a reliability policy based on accelerate ageing and tests to establish a robust knowledge on acceleration factors. The current trend seems to prove that the RM2 mean time to failure is now higher than 30,000hr. Even with accelerate ageing; the reliability growth becomes hardly manageable for such large figures. The paper focuses on these figures and comments the robustness of such a method when projections over 30,000hr of MTTF are needed.

  16. Development of a low cost, low temperature cryocooler using the Gifford McMahon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanayaka, A.; Mani, R.

    2008-03-01

    Although Helium is the second most abundant element, its concentration in the earth's atmosphere is fairly low and constant, as the portion that escapes from the atmosphere is replace by new emission. Historically, Helium was extracted as a byproduct of natural gas production, and stored in gas fields in a National Helium Reserve, in an attempt to conserve this interesting element. National policy has changed and the cost of liquid Helium has increased rapidly in the recent past. These new circumstances have created new interest in alternative eco-friendly methods to realizing and maintaining low temperatures in the laboratory. There have been number of successful attempts at making low temperature closed cycle Helium refrigerators by modifying an existing closed cycle system, and usually the regenerator has been replaced in order to achieve the desired results. Here, we discus our attempt to fabricate a low cost, low temperature closed cycle Helium refrigerator starting from a 15K Gifford McMahon system. We reexamine the barriers to realizing lower temperature here and our attempts at overcoming them.

  17. SmallSat Stirling Cryocooler for Earth Science and Interplanetary Exploration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — West Coast Solutions (WCS) and the Georgia Institute of Technology, in collaboration with Creare and Micro Cooling Concepts, proposes the development a SmallSat...

  18. Electromagnetic compatibility characterization of a BAe Stirling-cycle cryocooler for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) measurements of an 80-K Stirling-cycle cooler. The measurements, performed in the JPL EMC test facility, include dc magnetic field characterization, radiated magnetic and electric field emissions, and conducted emissions on the internal lines between the cooler electronics and the cooler. The measurements conform to both the MILSTD-461C specifications as well as to the specifications for the NASA Earth Observing System.

  19. Cryocooler and Thermal Systems for Improved GeD Gamma-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Place Germanium detectors (GeDs) in a few-MeV γ-ray Compton instrument on a satellite will enable unprecedented insight into nuclear astrophysics, key multimessenger...

  20. Two-Stage, 20 K Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Space Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — American competitiveness and success are directly correlated with technological innovation and scientific research. NASA is known for its advanced concepts and...

  1. Cryo-cooled high-power window for high-frequency plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.; Bojarsky, E.; Reiser, H.; Haefner, H.E.

    1991-09-01

    Within the framework of gyrotron window development, IMF pursues the concept of a single-disk window with edge cooling. Compared to a double-disk window with surface cooling, this concept offers a number of advantages in terms of safety, reliability, and ease of design and fabrication. The coolants which can be used for this purpose are liquid nitrogen and helium at very low temperature. (orig.) [de

  2. A New Cryocooler for MgB2 Superconducting Systems in Turboelectric Aircraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Turboelectric aircraft with gas turbines driving electric generators connected to electric propulsion motors have the potential to transform the aircraft design...

  3. A New Cryocooler for MgB2 Superconducting Systems in Turboelectric Aircraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Turboelectric aircraft with gas turbines driving electric generators connected to electric propulsion motors have the potential to transform the aircraft design...

  4. Miniature Turbine for Pulse-Tube/Reverse-Brayton Hybrid Cryocooler, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many future advances in NASA's ability to perform cutting edge space science will require improvements in cryogenic system technology, including the development of...

  5. Design of a cryo-cooled artificial channel-cut crystal monochromator for the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Xiaohao, E-mail: xiaohao.dong@xfel.eu; Sinn, Harald, E-mail: harald.sinn@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg, D-22761 (Germany); Shu, Deming, E-mail: shu@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, U.S.A (United States)

    2016-07-27

    An artificial channel-cut crystal monochromator for the hard X-Ray beamlines of SASE 1&2, cryogenically cooled by the so-called pulse tube cooler (cryorefrigerator), is currently under development at the European XFEL ( http://www.xfel.eu/ ). The fabrication is on-going. We present here the crystal optical consideration and the novel cooling configuration, according to the X-Ray FEL pulses proprieties. The mechanical design improvements are pointed out as well to implement such kind of monochromator based on the previous similar design.

  6. 100J-level nanosecond pulsed Yb:YAG cryo-cooled DPSSL amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. M.; Butcher, T. J.; Mason, P. D.; Ertel, K.; Phillips, P. J.; Banerjee, S.; De Vido, M.; Chekhlov, O.; Divoky, M.; Pilar, J.; Shaikh, W.; Hooker, C.; Lucianetti, A.; Hernandez Gomez, C.; Mocek, T.; Edwards, C.; Collier, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of the world's first kW average power, 100 Joule-class, high-energy, nanosecond pulsed diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL), DiPOLE100. Results from the first long-term test for amplification will be presented; the system was operated for 1 hour with 10 ns duration pulses at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate and an average output energy of 105 J and RMS energy stability of approximately 1%. The laser system is based on scalable cryogenic gas-cooled multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. The DiPOLE100 system comprises three major sub-systems, a spatially and temporally shaped front end, a 10 J cryo-amplifier and a 100 J cryo-amplifier. The 10 J cryo-amplifier contain four Yb:YAG ceramic gain media slabs, which are diode pumped from both sides, while a multi-pass architecture configured for seven passes enables 10 J of energy to be extracted at 10 Hz. This seeds the 100 J cryo-amplifier, which contains six Yb:YAG ceramic gain media slabs with the multi-pass configured for four passes. Our future development plans for this architecture will be introduced including closed-loop pulse shaping, increased energy, higher repetition rates and picosecond operation. This laser architecture unlocks the potential for practical applications including new sources for industrial materials processing and high intensity laser matter studies as envisioned for ELI [1], HiLASE [2], and the European XFEL [3]. Alternatively, it can be used as a pump source for higher repetition rate PW-class amplifiers, which can themselves generate high-brightness secondary radiation and ion sources leading to new remote imaging and medical applications.

  7. Thermo-Acoustic Convertor for Space Power, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sunpower will introduce thermoacoustic Stirling heat engine (TASHE) technology into its existing Stirling convertor technology to eliminate the moving mechanical...

  8. Design and Operation of a Cryogenic Nitrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Luis Diego; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2015-01-01

    We report the design, experimental setup and successful test results using an innovative passive cooling system called a “Pulsating Heat Pipe” (PHP) operating at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 80 K and using nitrogen as the working fluid. PHPs, which transfer heat by two phase flow mechanisms through a closed loop tubing have the advantage that no electrical pumps are needed to drive the fluid flow. In addition, PHPs have an advantage over copper straps and thermal conductors since they are lighter in weight, exhibit lower temperature gradients and have higher heat transfer rates. PHPs consist of an evaporator section, thermally anchored to a solid, where heat is received at the saturation temperature where the liquid portion of the two-phase flow evaporates, and a condenser where heat is rejected at the saturation temperature where the vapor is condensed. The condenser section in our experiment has been thermally interfaced to a CT cryocooler from SunPower that has a cooling capacity of 10 W at 77 K. Alternating regions of liquid slugs and small vapor plugs fill the capillary tubing, with the vapor regions contracting in the condenser section and expanding in the evaporator section due to an electric heater that will generate heat loads up to 10 W. This volumetric expansion and contraction provides the oscillatory flow of the fluid throughout the capillary tubing thereby transferring heat from one end to the other. The thermal performance and temperature characteristics of the PHP will be correlated as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill liquid ratio, and evaporator heat load. The experimental data show that the heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections can produce an effective thermal conductivity up to 35000 W/m-K at a 3.5 W heat load. (paper)

  9. Design and Operation of a Cryogenic Nitrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Fonseca, Luis; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2015-12-01

    We report the design, experimental setup and successful test results using an innovative passive cooling system called a “Pulsating Heat Pipe” (PHP) operating at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 80 K and using nitrogen as the working fluid. PHPs, which transfer heat by two phase flow mechanisms through a closed loop tubing have the advantage that no electrical pumps are needed to drive the fluid flow. In addition, PHPs have an advantage over copper straps and thermal conductors since they are lighter in weight, exhibit lower temperature gradients and have higher heat transfer rates. PHPs consist of an evaporator section, thermally anchored to a solid, where heat is received at the saturation temperature where the liquid portion of the two-phase flow evaporates, and a condenser where heat is rejected at the saturation temperature where the vapor is condensed. The condenser section in our experiment has been thermally interfaced to a CT cryocooler from SunPower that has a cooling capacity of 10 W at 77 K. Alternating regions of liquid slugs and small vapor plugs fill the capillary tubing, with the vapor regions contracting in the condenser section and expanding in the evaporator section due to an electric heater that will generate heat loads up to 10 W. This volumetric expansion and contraction provides the oscillatory flow of the fluid throughout the capillary tubing thereby transferring heat from one end to the other. The thermal performance and temperature characteristics of the PHP will be correlated as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill liquid ratio, and evaporator heat load. The experimental data show that the heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections can produce an effective thermal conductivity up to 35000 W/m-K at a 3.5 W heat load.

  10. Automated Manufacturing of High Efficiency Modules: Final Subcontract Technical Status Report, 21 March 2005 - 31 August 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.; Jester, T.; Bunea, G.

    2008-02-01

    SunPower Corp. describes its research to develop low-cost, next-generation SunPower modules with 30-year warranties and at least 50% higher energy production per area relative to today's typical multicrystalline Si modules.

  11. Design of a large heat lift 40 K to 80 K pulse tube cryocooler for space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trollier, T.; Tanchon, J.; Buquet, J.; Ravex, A.; Charles, I.; Coynel, A.; Duband, L.; Ercolani, E.; Guillemet, L.; Mullié, J.; Dam, J.A.M.; Benschop, T.; Linder, M.; Miller, S.D.; Ross, Jr. R.G.

    2007-01-01

    A Large heat lift Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) is under development in partnership with AL/ DTA, CEA/SBT and THALES Cryogenics. The engineering model is expected to provide 2.3 W at 50 K at a 10 °C rejection temperature and 160 watts of electrical input power to the compressor. The split coaxial design

  12. Experimental study on a co-axial pulse tube cryocooler driven by a small thermoacoustic stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Ju, L. Y.; Hao, H. X.

    2014-01-01

    Small scale thermoacoustic heat engines have advantages in fields like space exploration and domestic applications considering small space occupation and ease of transport. In the present paper, the influence of resonator diameter on the general performance of a small thermoacoustic Stirling engine was experimentally investigated using helium as the working gas. Reducing the diameter of the resonator appropriately is beneficial for lower onset heating temperature, lower frequency and higher pressure amplitude. Based on the pressure distribution in the small thermoacoustic engine, an outlet for the acoustic work transmission was made to combine the engine and a miniature co-axial pulse tube cooler. The cooling performance of the whole refrigeration system without any moving part was tested. Experimental results showed that further efforts are required to optimize the engine performance and its match with the co-axial pulse tube cooler in order to obtain better cooling performance, compared with its original operating condition, driven by a traditional electrical linear compressor.

  13. Proceedings of the International Cryocoolers Conference (6th) Held in Plymouth, Massachusetts on October 25-26, 1990. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    ions per minutl). (’ arboll glass resistance thermonicters \\’\\cr" placed ill c’ontac(’t %it it he (’lliilcltnd r a1 both rc’rrigeratiion stage:. A\\r...supplies 2.0 to 2.2 .11’a helium gas. Weturn pres- sure was 0.6 to 1.0 M11’a. The pre.ssure range and helium l gas flow rate de - perided o( tihe operating...flight operation was a major factor in the decision to use active positicn control over both moving pistons in the compressor. Selection of the

  14. Thermo-Acoustic Convertor for Space Power, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase Sunpower looked at Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engines (TASHEs). These ranged from a TASHE which was sized for the heat from a single General Purpose Heat...

  15. Thermal contact resistance measurement of conduction cooled binary current lead joint block in cryocooler based self field I-V characterization facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Ananya, E-mail: ananya@ipr.res.in; Das, Subrat Kumar; Agarwal, Anees Bano Pooja; Pradhan, Subrata [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In the present study thermal resistance of conduction cooled current lead joint block employing two different interfacial material namely AlN sheet and Kapton Film have been studied in the temperature range 5K-35K. In each case, the performance of different interlayer materials e.g. Indium foil for moderately pressurized contacts (contact pressure <1 MPa), and Apiezon N Grease, GE varnish for low pressurized contact (contact pressure <1 MPa) is studied. The performances of AlN joint with Indium foil and with Apeizon N Grease are studied and it is observed that the contact resistance reduces more with indium foil as compared to greased contact. The contact resistance measurements of Kapton film with Apiezon N grease and with GE varnish were also carried out in the same temperature range. A comparative study of AlN joint with Indium foil and Kapton with GE varnish as filler material is carried out to demonstrate better candidate material among Kapton and AlN for a particular filler material in the same temperature range.

  16. Proceedings of the International Cryocooler Conference (7th) Held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 17-19 November 1992. Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    A STANDARD GIFFORD- McMAHON REFRIGERATOR ....J. Chafe, G . Green, and R. C. Riedy ................................. 1157 SOLVAY REFRIGERATOR...hexadecane and n-octadecane PCM materials. In addition, they are constructing prototype copper fin and carbon fiber heat exchange structures for...of 212.2 J/kg-K at 60 K. Other candidate materials with high specific heats include sodium , lithium, and magnesium. Use of these materials may result

  17. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  18. Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

    2011-08-26

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

  19. Heat exchanger versus regenerator: A fundamental comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Will, M.E.; Waele, de A.T.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Irreversible processes in regenerators and heat exchangers limit the performance of cryocoolers. In this paper we compare the performance of cryocoolers, operating with regenerators and heat exchangers from a fundamental point of view. The losses in the two systems are calculated from the entropy

  20. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; Ter Brake, H. J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower

  1. Experimental study on the Stirling refrigerator for cooling of infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. J.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, H. B.; Koh, D. Y. [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. H.; Yu, B. K. [Wooyoung, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    A Stirling cryocooler is relatively compact, reliable, commercially available, and uses helium as a working fluid. The FPFD Stirling cryocooler consists of two compressor pistons driven by linear motors which makes pressure waves and a pneumatically driven displacer piston with regenerator. A Free Piston and Free Displacer (FPFD) Stirling cryocooler for cooling infrared and cryo-sensors is currently under development at KIMM(Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials). In order to evaluate the feasibility of using a linear motor driving cryocooler, prototype Stirling cryocooler with a nominal cooling capacity of 0.5W at 80K was designed, fabricated and tested. The prototype has achieved no load temperature of 51K and cooling power of 0.33W.

  2. Experimental study on the Stirling refrigerator for cooling of infrared detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Hong, Y. J.; Kim, H. B.; Koh, D. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Yu, B. K.

    2001-01-01

    A Stirling cryocooler is relatively compact, reliable, commercially available, and uses helium as a working fluid. The FPFD Stirling cryocooler consists of two compressor pistons driven by linear motors which makes pressure waves and a pneumatically driven displacer piston with regenerator. A Free Piston and Free Displacer (FPFD) Stirling cryocooler for cooling infrared and cryo-sensors is currently under development at KIMM(Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials). In order to evaluate the feasibility of using a linear motor driving cryocooler, prototype Stirling cryocooler with a nominal cooling capacity of 0.5W at 80K was designed, fabricated and tested. The prototype has achieved no load temperature of 51K and cooling power of 0.33W

  3. Palm Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Douglas E.; Holliday, Ezekiel

    2007-01-01

    A prototype 35We, JP-8 fueled, soldier-wearable power system for the DARPA Palm Power program has been developed and tested by Sunpower. A hermetically-sealed 42We Sunpower Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) with integral linear alternator is the prime mover for this system. To maximize system efficiency over a broad range of output power, a non-dissipative, highly efficient electronic control system which modulates engine output power by varying piston stroke and converts the AC output voltage of the FPSE into 28Vdc for the Palm Power end user, has been designed and demonstrated as an integral component of the Palm Power system. This paper reviews the current status and progress made in developing the control electronics for the Palm Power system, in addition to describing the operation and demonstrated performance of the engine controller in the context of the current JP-8 fueled Palm Power system.

  4. Bioremediation at a global scale: from the test tube to planet Earth

    OpenAIRE

    de Lorenzo, V?ctor; Marli?re, Philippe; Sol?, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Summary Planet Earth's biosphere has evolved over billions of years as a balanced bio?geological system ultimately sustained by sunpower and the large?scale cycling of elements largely run by the global environmental microbiome. Humans have been part of this picture for much of their existence. But the industrial revolution started in the XIX century and the subsequent advances in medicine, chemistry, agriculture and communications have impacted such balances to an unprecedented degree ? and ...

  5. Advanced Small Free-Piston Stirling Convertors for Space Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Lane, Neill

    2004-02-01

    This paper reports on the current status of an advanced 35 We free-piston Stirling convertor currently being developed under NASA SBIR Phase II funding. Also described is a further advanced and higher performance ~80 watt free-piston convertor being developed by Sunpower and Boeing/Rocketdyne for NASA under NRA funding. Exceptional overall convertor (engine plus linear alternator) thermodynamic performance (greater than 50% of Carnot) with specific powers around 100 We /kg appear reasonable at these low power levels.

  6. Leading Players of the Global Renewable Energy Equipment Industry. Overview of Groups - SWOTs - Benchmarking - Company Profiles and Financials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    This study presents: The medium-term and mega trends of the industry market developments and geographical segments; The competitive landscape and the main corporate rankings; The main conclusions of the report, summarised in 10 analytical slides. Content: 1. Overview: The Sector, Ranking, Performance Analysis; 2. Company Profiles: Toshiba, Vestas, Dong Energy, GE Renewable Energy, Siemens, Goldwind, First Solar, SunPower, Andritz, Yingli Green Energy; 3. Sources; 4. Annexes

  7. Continuous Acoustic Sensing With an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System for Anti-Submarine Warfare in a High-Threat Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    utilize the sonobuoy at all. Overall, this technology needs to be updated and improved Now imagine a sonobuoy powered by sonar panels , increasing its...cell array uses monocrystalline Si SunPower E60 cells with roughly 24% efficiency. These cells are the sole source of energy for all operations of...solar panels there is a watertight enclosure that will hold all of the electronics that includes both the processor and power board. This

  8. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Development for NASA RPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) initiated development under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and after a series of successful demonstrations, the ASC began transitioning from a technology development project to flight development project. The ASC has very high power conversion efficiency making it attractive for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) in order to make best use of the low plutonium-238 fuel inventory in the U.S. In recent years, the ASC became part of the NASA-Department of Energy Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Integrated Project. Sunpower held two parallel contracts to produce ASC convertors, one with the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin to produce the ASC-F flight convertors, and one with NASA GRC for the production of ASC-E3 engineering units, the initial units of which served as production pathfinders. The integrated ASC technical team successfully overcame various technical challenges that led to the completion and delivery of the first two pairs of flight-like ASC-E3 by 2013. However, in late Fall 2013, the DOE initiated termination of the Lockheed Martin ASRG flight development contract driven primarily by budget constraints. NASA continues to recognize the importance of high efficiency ASC power conversion for RPS and continues investment in the technology including the continuation of ASC-E3 production at Sunpower and the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit #2. This paper provides a summary of ASC technical accomplishments, overview of tests at GRC, plans for continued ASC production at Sunpower, and status of Stirling technology development.

  9. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh; Wilson, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) development effort was initiated by NASA Glenn Research Center with contractor Sunpower, Inc., to develop high-efficiency thermal-to-electric power conversion technology for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs). Early successful performance demonstrations led to the expansion of the project as well as adoption of the technology by the Department of Energy (DOE) and system integration contractor Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company as part of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight project. The ASRG integrates a pair of ASCs to convert the heat from a pair of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules into electrical power. The expanded NASA ASC effort included development of several generations of ASC prototypes or engineering units to help prepare the ASC technology and Sunpower for flight implementation. Sunpower later had two parallel contracts allowing the last of the NASA engineering units called ASC-E3 to serve as pathfinders for the ASC-F flight convertors being built for DOE. The ASC-E3 convertors utilized the ASC-F flight specifications and were built using the ASC-F design and process documentation. Shortly after the first ASC-F pair achieved initial operation, due to budget constraints, the DOE ASRG flight development contract was terminated. NASA continues to invest in the development of Stirling RPS technology including continued production of the ASC-E3 convertors, seven of which have been delivered with one additional unit in production. Starting in fiscal year 2015, Stirling Convertor Technology Maturation has been reorganized as an element of the RPS Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project and long-term plans for continued Stirling technology advancement are in reformulation. This paper provides a status on the ASC project, an overview of advancements made in the design and production of the ASC at Sunpower, and a summary of acceptance tests, reliability tests, and tactical

  10. Advanced Stirling Convertor Development for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott D.; Collins, Josh

    2015-01-01

    Sunpower Inc.'s Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) initiated development under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center and after a series of successful demonstrations, the ASC began transitioning from a technology development project to a flight development project. The ASC has very high power conversion efficiency making it attractive for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) in order to make best use of the low plutonium-238 fuel inventory in the United States. In recent years, the ASC became part of the NASA and Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Integrated Project. Sunpower held two parallel contracts to produce ASCs, one with the DOE and Lockheed Martin to produce the ASC-F flight convertors, and one with NASA Glenn for the production of ASC-E3 engineering units, the initial units of which served as production pathfinders. The integrated ASC technical team successfully overcame various technical challenges that led to the completion and delivery of the first two pairs of flightlike ASC-E3 by 2013. However, in late fall 2013, the DOE initiated termination of the Lockheed Martin ASRG flight development contract driven primarily by budget constraints. NASA continues to recognize the importance of high-efficiency ASC power conversion for RPS and continues investment in the technology including the continuation of ASC-E3 production at Sunpower and the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit #2. This paper provides a summary of ASC technical accomplishments, overview of tests at Glenn, plans for continued ASC production at Sunpower, and status of Stirling technology development.

  11. Pathfinding the Flight Advanced Stirling Convertor Design with the ASC-E3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Kyle; Smith, Eddie; Collins, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) was initially developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as a technology development project. The ASC technology fulfills NASA's need for high efficiency power convertors for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Early successful technology demonstrations between 2003 to 2005 eventually led to the expansion of the project including the decision in 2006 to use the ASC technology on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). Sunpower has delivered 22 ASC convertors of progressively mature designs to date to GRC. Currently, Sunpower with support from GRC, Lockheed Martin Space System Company (LMSSC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the flight ASC-F in parallel with the ASC-E3 pathfinders. Sunpower will deliver four pairs of ASC-E3 convertors to GRC which will be used for extended operation reliability assessment, independent validation and verification testing, system interaction tests, and to support LMSSC controller verification. The ASC-E3 and -F convertors are being built to the same design and processing documentation and the same product specification. The initial two pairs of ASC-E3 are built before the flight units and will validate design and processing changes prior to implementation on the ASC-F flight convertors. This paper provides a summary on development of the ASC technology and the status of the ASC-E3 build and how they serve the vital pathfinder role ahead of the flight build for ASRG. The ASRG is part of two of the three candidate missions being considered for selection for the Discovery 12 mission.

  12. Thermal conductance of heat transfer interfaces for conductively cooled superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.L.; Walters, J.D.; Fikse, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Minimizing thermal resistances across interfaces is critical for efficient thermal performance of conductively cooled superconducting magnet systems. Thermal conductance measurements have been made for a flexible thermal coupling, designed to accommodate magnet-to-cryocooler and cryocooler-to-shield relative motion, and an interface incorporating Multilam designed as a sliding thermal connector for cryocoolers. Temperature changes were measured across each interface as a function of heat input. Thermal conductances have been calculated for each interface, and the impact of each interface on conductively cooled magnet systems will be discussed

  13. High Efficiency Regenerative Helium Compressor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Helium plays several critical rolls in spacecraft propulsion. High pressure helium is commonly used to pressurize propellant fuel tanks. Helium cryocoolers can be...

  14. A High Performance Frequency Standard and Distribution System for Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, R. T; Calhoun, M. D; Kirk, A; Diener, W. A; Dick, G. J; Tjoelker, R. L

    2005-01-01

    ...), and 10 Kelvin Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator (10K CSO) and frequency-lock-loop, are integrated to achieve the very high performance, ground based frequency reference at a remote antenna site located 16 km from the hydrogen maser...

  15. Thermal analysis of the conduction cooling system for HTS SMES system of 600 kJ class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Yeom, Han Kil; Park, Seong Je; Kim, Hyo Bong; Koh, Deuk Yong

    2007-01-01

    SMES systems need cryogenic cooling systems. Conduction cooling system has more effective, compact structure than cryogen. In general, 2 stage GM cryocoolers are used for conduction cooling of HTS SMES system. 1st stages of cryocoolers are used for the cooling of current leads and radiation shields, and 2nd stages of cryocoolers for HTS coil. For the effective conduction cooling of the HTS SMES system, the temperature difference between the cryocooler and HTS coil should be minimized. In this paper, a cryogenic conduction cooling system for HTS SMES is analyzed to evaluate the performance of the cooling system. The analysis is carried out for the steady state with the heat generation of the HTS coil and effects of the thermal contact resistance. The results show the effects of the heat generation and thermal contact resistance on the temperature distribution

  16. Research of the cold shield in cryogenic liquid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. B.; Zheng, J. P.; Wu, X. L.; Cui, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    To realize zero boil-off storage of cryogenic liquids, a cryocooler that can achieve a temperature below the boiling point temperature of the cryogenic liquid is generally needed. Taking into account that the efficiency of the cryocooler will be higher at a higher operating temperature, a novel thermal insulation system using a sandwich container filled with cryogenic liquid with a higher boiling point as a cold radiation shield between the cryogenic tank and the vacuum shield in room temperature is proposed to reduce the electricity power consumption. A two-stage cryocooler or two separate cryocoolers are adopted to condense the evaporated gas from the cold shield and the cryogenic tank. The calculation result of a 55 liter liquid hydrogen tank with a liquid nitrogen shield shows that only 14.4 W of electrical power is needed to make all the evaporated gas condensation while 121.7 W will be needed without the liquid nitrogen shield.

  17. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  18. Decentralized electricity generation by using photovoltaic grid-connected solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutyundziev, N.; Vitanov, P.; Radkov, R.; Grottke, M.

    2006-01-01

    AcadPV is the first demonstration installation connected permanently to LV grid in Sofia, Bulgaria aiming at assessment of PV efficiencies and cost-effectiveness. A thorough analysis has been carried out in order to select PV system site, supporting construction design and orientation. The PV generator is divided to 3 PV subfields equipped by 3 SUNPOWER inverters connected to 3 separated phases of the grid. The performance of 10kWp PV system has been evaluated during the first year of operation and compared to PV simulation software results

  19. Development of the superconducting gravimeter using a new type of diaphragm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, H., E-mail: ikeda@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp [Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, Cryogenics Division, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Aoyama, Y.; Hayakawa, H.; Doi, K.; Shibuya, K. [National Institute of Polar Research, Midori-Machi, Tchikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-8518 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    During the period from December 2009 to February 2010, a new superconducting gravimeter with a cryocooler was installed to replace the former one at Syowa Station on the Antarctica. It has a high sensitivity of one nano-gal enabling measurement inside the Earth for the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP network). A new type of diaphragm was confirmed to well isolate the vibration from refrigerator cold-head and to prevent the solid air contamination perfectly. The Dewar refrigeration system consists of a newly designed Dewar interfaced with a cryocooler capable of obtaining temperatures below the vaporization point of liquid helium. The system is based on the Coolpower 0.1 W, 4.2 K cryocooler manufactured by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. Real time remote monitoring system from Japan was also established. The recent large earthquake in the Republic of Chile was observed at Syowa Station with the superconducting gravimeter.

  20. Development of the superconducting gravimeter using a new type of diaphragm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, H.; Aoyama, Y.; Hayakawa, H.; Doi, K.; Shibuya, K.

    2011-01-01

    During the period from December 2009 to February 2010, a new superconducting gravimeter with a cryocooler was installed to replace the former one at Syowa Station on the Antarctica. It has a high sensitivity of one nano-gal enabling measurement inside the Earth for the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP network). A new type of diaphragm was confirmed to well isolate the vibration from refrigerator cold-head and to prevent the solid air contamination perfectly. The Dewar refrigeration system consists of a newly designed Dewar interfaced with a cryocooler capable of obtaining temperatures below the vaporization point of liquid helium. The system is based on the Coolpower 0.1 W, 4.2 K cryocooler manufactured by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. Real time remote monitoring system from Japan was also established. The recent large earthquake in the Republic of Chile was observed at Syowa Station with the superconducting gravimeter.

  1. Experimental study of the pressure characteristics in the Stirling refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Park, Seong Je; Kim, Hyo Bong; Koh, Deuk Yong

    2001-01-01

    The linear compressor have been widely used for pressure wave generation in the Stirling cryocooler and Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler for tactical purpose. The linear compressor has small and compact structure, and long life due to having non-contact sealing mechanism and the pressure drop through regenerator was ver important role in the motion of displacer in the expander of the Stirling cryocooler. In this study, the characteristic of the linear compressor and the pressure drop through regenerator in the expander was experimentally investigated. The results show resonance of the compressor is very important to get maximum performance and the gas spring force in the compression space of the compressor has effect on the characteristic of resonance and the results show the pressure drop through regenerator is very small than operating pressure change

  2. Demonstration of a Reduced Boil-Off Dewar with Broad Area Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, W. J.; Glaister, D.; Mills, G. L.

    2010-04-01

    Pumped helium circulation loops are an efficient and reliable way of transferring heat from a cooled device to a cryocooler. Such loops have been proposed for cooling IR detectors and their associated optics. A Broad Area Cooling (BAC) concept, in which a helium circulation loop is used to transfer heat from a dewar shield to a cryocooler has been proposed[1]. Ball has built a novel system that uses the Stirling refrigerator's compressor to drive the circulating flow by means of valves in its transfer line, eliminating the need for a separate circulation pump. The BAC system will be described and subsystem test results will be presented. An upcoming test, in which the cryocooler will be used to cool a shield in a special test dewar[2], will be discussed.

  3. Conceptual design of the superconducting magnet for the 250 MeV proton cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Gao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting cyclotron is of great importance to treat cancer parts of the body. To reduce the operation costs, a superconducting magnet system for the 250 MeV proton cyclotron was designed to confirm the feasibility of the superconducting cyclotron. The superconducting magnet system consists of a pair of split coils, the cryostat and a pair of binary high temperature superconductor current leads. The superconducting magnet can reach a central magnetic field of about 1.155 T at 160 A. The three GM cryocooler with cooling capacities of 1.5 W at 4.5 K and 35 W at 50 K and one GM cryocooler of 100 W at 50 K were adopted to cool the superconducting magnet system through the thermosiphon technology. The four GM cryocoolers were used to cool the superconducting magnet to realize zero evaporation of the liquid helium.

  4. Performance Analysis of Joule-Thomson Cooler Supplied with Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, A.; Chorowski, M.; Dorosz, P.

    2017-02-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryo-coolers working in closed cycles and supplied with gas mixtures are the subject of intensive research in different laboratories. The replacement of pure nitrogen by nitrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures allows to improve both thermodynamic parameters and economy of the refrigerators. It is possible to avoid high pressures in the heat exchanger and to use standard refrigeration compressor instead of gas bottles or high-pressure oil free compressor. Closed cycle and mixture filled Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigerator providing 10-20 W of cooling power at temperature range 90-100 K has been designed and manufactured. Thermodynamic analysis including the optimization of the cryo-cooler mixture has been performed with ASPEN HYSYS software. The paper describes the design of the cryo-cooler and provides thermodynamic analysis of the system. The test results are presented and discussed.

  5. Experimental studies on twin PTCs driven by dual piston head linear compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Abhay S.; Joy, Joewin; Sagar, Pankaj; Sudharshan, H.; Mallappa, A.; Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.

    2017-02-01

    An experimental study on pulse tube cryocooler is presented with a twin pulse tube configuration. The study is conducted with a dual piston head linear compressor design which is developed indigenously. The two identical pulse tube cryocoolers are operated by a single linear motor which generates 1800 out of phase dual pressure waves. The advantages of the configuration being the reduction in fabrication cost and the increased cooling power. The compressor is driven at a frequency of 48 Hz using indigenously developed PWM based power supply. The CFD study of pulse tube cryocooler is discussed along with the experimental cool down results. A detailed experimental and FEM based studies on the fabrication procedure of heat exchangers is conducted to ensure better heat transfer in the same.

  6. Operating Modes and Cooling Capabilities of the 3-Stage ADR Developed for the Soft-X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument on Astro-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theo; DiPirro, Michael J.; Letmate, Richard V.; Sampson, Michael A.; Bialas, Tom G.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Porter, Frederick S.; hide

    2015-01-01

    A 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is used on the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on Astro-H to cool a 6x6 array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 50 mK. The ADR is supported by a cryogenic system consisting of a superfluid helium tank, a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler, and additional 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers that pre-cool the JT cooler and cool radiation shields within the cryostat. The ADR is configured so that it can use either the liquid helium or the JT cryocooler as its heat sink, giving the instrument an unusual degree of tolerance for component failures or degradation in the cryogenic system. The flight detector assembly, ADR and dewar were integrated into the flight dewar in early 2014, and have since been extensively characterized and calibrated. This paper summarizes the operation and performance of the ADR in all of its operating modes

  7. A comparative reliability analysis of free-piston Stirling machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2001-02-01

    A free-piston Stirling power convertor is being developed for use in an advanced radioisotope power system to provide electric power for NASA deep space missions. These missions are typically long lived, lasting for up to 14 years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for providing the radioisotope power system for the NASA missions, and has managed the development of the free-piston power convertor for this application. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been involved in the development of Stirling power conversion technology for over 25 years and is currently providing support to DOE. Due to the nature of the potential missions, long life and high reliability are important features for the power system. Substantial resources have been spent on the development of long life Stirling cryocoolers for space applications. As a very general statement, free-piston Stirling power convertors have many features in common with free-piston Stirling cryocoolers, however there are also significant differences. For example, designs exist for both power convertors and cryocoolers that use the flexure bearing support system to provide noncontacting operation of the close-clearance moving parts. This technology and the operating experience derived from one application may be readily applied to the other application. This similarity does not pertain in the case of outgassing and contamination. In the cryocooler, the contaminants normally condense in the critical heat exchangers and foul the performance. In the Stirling power convertor just the opposite is true as contaminants condense on non-critical surfaces. A methodology was recently published that provides a relative comparison of reliability, and is applicable to systems. The methodology has been applied to compare the reliability of a Stirling cryocooler relative to that of a free-piston Stirling power convertor. The reliability analysis indicates that the power convertor should be able to have superior reliability

  8. Liquid Nitrogen Zero Boiloff Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David; Feller, Jeffrey; Johnson, Wesley; Robinson, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASAs future space exploration due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages suitable for transporting 10s to 100s of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit and for their return. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several months. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler to control tank pressure. The active thermal control technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center, in a vacuum chamber and cryo-shroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. Testing consisted of three passive tests with the active cryo-cooler system off, and 7 active tests, with the cryocooler powered up. The test matrix included zero boil-off tests performed at 90 full and 25 full, and several demonstrations at excess cooling capacity and reduced cooling capacity. From this, the tank pressure response with varied cryocooler power inputs was determined. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  9. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  10. Development of a Power Electronics Controller for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Douglas K.; Priest, Joel F.; Keiter, Douglas E.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Under a U.S. Department of Energy program for radioisotope power systems, Lockheed Martin is developing an Engineering Unit of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). This is an advanced version of the previously reported SRG110 generator. The ASRG uses Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) developed by Sunpower Incorporated under a NASA Research Announcement contract. The ASRG makes use of a Stirling controller based on power electronics that eliminates the tuning capacitors. The power electronics controller synchronizes dual-opposed convertors and maintains a fixed frequency operating point. The controller is single-fault tolerant and uses high-frequency pulse width modulation to create the sinusoidal currents that are nearly in phase with the piston velocity, eliminating the need for large series tuning capacitors. Sunpower supports this effort through an extension of their controller development intended for other applications. Glenn Research Center (GRC) supports this effort through system dynamic modeling, analysis and test support. The ASRG design arrived at a new baseline based on a system-level trade study and extensive feedback from mission planners on the necessity of single-fault tolerance. This paper presents the baseline design with an emphasis on the power electronics controller detailed design concept that will meet space mission requirements including single fault tolerance.

  11. Test Rack Development for Extended Operation of Advanced Stirling Convertors at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunpower Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system on space science missions. This generator will make use of free-piston Stirling convertors to achieve higher conversion efficiency than with currently available alternatives. One part of NASA GRC's support of ASRG development includes extended operation testing of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) developed by Sunpower Inc. and GRC. The ASC consists of a free-piston Stirling engine integrated with a linear alternator. NASA GRC has been building test facilities to support extended operation of the ASCs for several years. Operation of the convertors in the test facility provides convertor performance data over an extended period of time. One part of the test facility is the test rack, which provides a means for data collection, convertor control, and safe operation. Over the years, the test rack requirements have changed. The initial ASC test rack utilized an alternating-current (AC) bus for convertor control; the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) test rack can operate with AC bus control or with an ASC Control Unit (ACU). A new test rack is being developed to support extended operation of the ASC-E2s with higher standards of documentation, component selection, and assembly practices. This paper discusses the differences among the ASC, ASRG EU, and ASC-E2 test racks.

  12. NASA Glenn Research Center Support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    A high-efficiency radioisotope power system was being developed for long-duration NASA space science missions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managed a flight contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company to build Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs), with support from NASA Glenn Research Center. DOE initiated termination of that contract in late 2013, primarily due to budget constraints. Sunpower, Inc., held two parallel contracts to produce Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), one with Lockheed Martin to produce ASC-F flight units, and one with Glenn for the production of ASC-E3 engineering unit "pathfinders" that are built to the flight design. In support of those contracts, Glenn provided testing, materials expertise, Government-furnished equipment, inspection capabilities, and related data products to Lockheed Martin and Sunpower. The technical support included material evaluations, component tests, convertor characterization, and technology transfer. Material evaluations and component tests were performed on various ASC components in order to assess potential life-limiting mechanisms and provide data for reliability models. Convertor level tests were conducted to characterize performance under operating conditions that are representative of various mission conditions. Despite termination of the ASRG flight development contract, NASA continues to recognize the importance of high-efficiency ASC power conversion for Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) and continues investment in the technology, including the continuation of the ASC-E3 contract. This paper describes key Government support for the ASRG project and future tests to be used to provide data for ongoing reliability assessments.

  13. Structural Dynamics Testing of Advanced Stirling Convertor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.; Williams, Zachary Douglas

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been supporting the development of Stirling energy conversion for use in space. Lockheed Martin has been contracted by the Department of Energy to design and fabricate flight-unit Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators, which utilize Sunpower, Inc., free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertors. The engineering unit generator has demonstrated conversion efficiency in excess of 20 percent, offering a significant improvement over existing radioisotope-fueled power systems. NASA Glenn has been supporting the development of this generator by developing the convertors through a technology development contract with Sunpower, and conducting research and experiments in a multitude of areas, such as high-temperature material properties, organics testing, and convertor-level extended operation. Since the generator must undergo launch, several launch simulation tests have also been performed at the convertor level. The standard test sequence for launch vibration exposure has consisted of workmanship and flight acceptance levels. Together, these exposures simulate what a flight convertor will experience. Recently, two supplementary tests were added to the launch vibration simulation activity. First was a vibration durability test of the convertor, intended to quantify the effect of vibration levels up to qualification level in both the lateral and axial directions. Second was qualification-level vibration of several heater heads with small oxide inclusions in the material. The goal of this test was to ascertain the effect of the inclusions on launch survivability to determine if the heater heads were suitable for flight.

  14. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator EU2 Anomaly Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Dobbs, Michael W.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Engineering Unit 2 (EU2) is the highest fidelity electrically-heated Stirling radioisotope generator built to date. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) completed the assembly of the ASRG EU2 in September, 2014 using hardware from the now cancelled ASRG flight development project. The ASRG EU2 integrated the first pair of Sunpower's ASC-E3 Stirling convertors (ASC-E3 #1 and #2) in an aluminum generator housing with Lockheed Martin's Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller. After just 179 hours of EU2 generator operation, the first power fluctuation occurred on ASC-E3 #1. The first power fluctuation occurred 175 hours later on ASC-E3 #2. Over time, the power fluctuations became more frequent on both convertors and larger in magnitude. Eventually the EU2 was shut down in January, 2015. An anomaly investigation was chartered to determine root cause of the power fluctuations and other anomalous observations. A team with members from GRC, Sunpower, and Lockheed Martin conducted a thorough investigation of the EU2 anomalies. Findings from the EU2 disassembly identified proximate causes of the anomalous observations. Discussion of the team's assessment of the primary possible failure theories, root cause, and conclusions is provided. Recommendations are made for future Stirling generator development to address the findings from the anomaly investigation. Additional findings from the investigation are also discussed.

  15. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation in Preparation for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Cornell, Peggy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) is being developed by an integrated team of Sunpower and National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA s) Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASC development, funded by NASA s Science Mission Directorate, started as a technology development effort in 2003 and has since evolved through progressive convertor builds and successful testing to demonstrate high conversion efficiency, low mass, and capability to meet long-life Radioisotope Power System (RPS) requirements. The technology has been adopted by the Department of Energy and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company s Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which has been selected for potential flight demonstration on Discovery 12. This paper provides an overview of the status of ASC development including the most recent ASC-E2 convertors that have been delivered to GRC and an introduction to the ASC-E3 and ASC flight convertors that Sunpower will build next. The paper also describes the technology maturation and support tasks being conducted at GRC to support ASC and ASRG development in the areas of convertor and generator extended operation, high-temperature materials, heater head life assessment, organics, nondestructive inspection, spring fatigue testing, and other reliability verification tasks.

  16. Performance Measurement of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance testing data of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The latest version of the ASC (ASC-E3, to represent the third cycle of engineering model test hardware) is of a design identical to the forthcoming flight convertors. For this generation of hardware, a joint Sunpower and GRC effort was initiated to improve and standardize the test support hardware. After this effort was completed, the first pair of ASC-E3 units was produced by Sunpower and then delivered to GRC in December 2012. GRC has begun operation of these units. This process included performance verification, which examined the data from various tests to validate the convertor performance to the product specification. Other tests included detailed performance mapping that encompassed the wide range of operating conditions that will exist during a mission. These convertors were then transferred to Lockheed Martin for controller checkout testing. The results of this latest convertor performance verification activity are summarized here.

  17. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit 2 Anomaly Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Dobbs, Michael W.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2018-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Engineering Unit 2 (EU2) is the highest fidelity electrically heated Stirling radioisotope generator built to date. NASA Glenn Research Center completed the assembly of the ASRG EU2 in September 2014 using hardware from the now cancelled ASRG flight development project. The ASRG EU2 integrated the first pair of Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E3 #1 and #2) in an aluminum generator housing with Lockheed Martin's (LM's) Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller. After just 179 hr of EU2 generator operation, the first power fluctuation occurred on ASC-E3 #1. The first power fluctuation occurred 175 hr later on ASC-E3 #2. Over time, the power fluctuations became more frequent on both convertors and larger in magnitude. Eventually the EU2 was shut down in January 2015. An anomaly investigation was chartered to determine root cause of the power fluctuations and other anomalous observations. A team with members from Glenn, Sunpower, and LM conducted a thorough investigation of the EU2 anomalies. Findings from the EU2 disassembly identified proximate causes of the anomalous observations. Discussion of the team's assessment of the primary possible failure theories, root cause, and conclusions is provided. Recommendations are made for future Stirling generator development to address the findings from the anomaly investigation. Additional findings from the investigation are also discussed.

  18. Large-Scale Demonstration of Liquid Hydrogen Storage with Zero Boiloff for In-Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bryant, C. B.; Flachbart, R. H.; Holt, K. A.; Johnson, E.; Hedayat, A.; Hipp, B.; Plachta, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cryocooler and passive insulation technology advances have substantially improved prospects for zero-boiloff cryogenic storage. Therefore, a cooperative effort by NASA s Ames Research Center, Glenn Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was implemented to develop zero-boiloff concepts for in-space cryogenic storage. Described herein is one program element - a large-scale, zero-boiloff demonstration using the MSFC multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB). A commercial cryocooler was interfaced with an existing MHTB spray bar mixer and insulation system in a manner that enabled a balance between incoming and extracted thermal energy.

  19. The development of a low vibration, long life pulse tube employing flexural bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.B.; Riggle, P.; Gedeon, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a 1/3 watt, 80 K Technology Demonstration Model (TDM) pulse tube cryocooler which has been developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC). The pulse tube expander has no moving parts, making it simpler, more reliable, lower in cost, and lower in vibration than a Stirling expander. The pulse tube expander was designed, built, and tested with SBIR Phase I funding from NASA Ames Research Center. The pulse tube expander was driven using an existing dual opposed compressor module from a TDM Stirling cryocooler. Two numerical models were developed for pulse tube cryocoler design, evaluation, and analysis

  20. Cryogenic Thermal Absorptance Measurements on Small-Diameter Stainless Steel Tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 Kelvin operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  1. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; den Ouden, A.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Wieland, J.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron beam. A two-stage GM cryocooler, equipped with a first generation ErNi5 regenerator, cools the epoxy impregnated solenoid down to the operating temperature of about 7.5 K. This leaves a conservati...

  2. Thermal Design of a Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Suk Yang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System (PSICS cooled by a stirling cryocooler has been designed. The PSICS has an IR sensor inside the cold box which is cooled by a stirling cryocooler with refrigeration capacity of 500mW at 80K in a vacuum vessel. It is important to minimize the heat load so that the background thermal noise can be reduced. In order to design the cryogenic system with low heat load and to reduce the remained heat load, we have performed numerical analyses. In this paper, we present the design factors and the results obtained by the thermal analysis of the PSICS.

  3. Proceedings of the 27th intersociety energy conversion engineering conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 27th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference. Topics included: Stirling Cycle Analysis; Stirling Cycle Models; Stirling Refrigerators/Heat Pumps and Cryocoolers; Domestic Policy; Efficiency/Conservation; Stirling Solar Terrestrial; Stirling Component Technology; Environmental Impacts; Renewable Resource Systems; Stirling Power Generation; Stirling Heat Transport System Technology; and Stirling Cycle Loss Understanding

  4. Design analysis of a Helium re-condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, P. K.; Bapat, S. L.; Atrey, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Modern helium cryostats deploy a cryocooler with a re-condenser at its II stage for in-situ re-condensation of boil-off vapor. The present work is a vital step in the ongoing research work of design of cryocooler based 100 litre helium cryostat with in-situ re-condensation. The cryostat incorporates a two stage Gifford McMahon cryocooler having specified refrigerating capacity of 40 W at 43 K for I stage and 1 W at 4.2 K for II stage. Although design of cryostat ensures thermal load for cryocooler below its specified refrigerating capacity at the second stage, successful in-situ re-condensation depends on proper design of re-condenser which forms the objective of this work. The present work proposes design of helium re-condenser with straight rectangular fins. Fins are analyzed for optimization of thermal performance parameters such as condensation heat transfer coefficient, surface area for heat transfer, re-condensing capacity, efficiency and effectiveness. The present work provides design of re-condenser with 19 integral fins each of 10 mm height and 1.5 mm thickness with a gap of 1.5 mm between two fins, keeping in mind the manufacturing feasibility, having efficiency of 80.96 % and effectiveness of 10.34.

  5. Gas adsorption/absorption heat switch, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The service life and/or reliability of far-infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is presently limited by the cryocooler. The life and/or reliability, however, can be extended by using redundant cryocoolers. To reduce parasitic heat leak, each stage of the inactive redundant cryocooler must be thermally isolated from the optical system, while each stage of the active cryocooler must be thermally connected to the system. The thermal break or the thermal contact can be controlled by heat switches. Among different physical mechanisms for heat switching, mechanically activated heat switches tend to have low reliability and, furthermore, require a large contact force. Magnetoresistive heat switches are, except at very low temperatures, of very low efficiency. Heat switches operated by the heat pipe principle usually require a long response time. A sealed gas gap heat switch operated by an adsorption pump has no mechanical motion and should provide the reliability and long lifetime required in long-term space missions. Another potential application of a heat switch is the thermal isolation of the optical plane during decontamination.

  6. On the design of lubricant free piston compressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owczarek, P.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the development on long lifetime and an efficient piston compressor operating in a clean environment where oil lubrication must be excluded. Particularly in cooling systems including cryocoolers the presence of oil is a well known problem. A growing number of applications of

  7. Development of a stainless steel check valve for cryogenic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, T.T.; Venhorst, G.C.F.; Venhorst, G.C.F.; Burger, Johannes Faas; Holland, Herman J.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Sirbi, A.; Rogalla, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a check valve for use in a sorption compressor that will drive a 10 mW 4.5 K Joule–Thomson cryocooler. For the check valve extremely low backflow rates are tolerable at an operating temperature of the valve of 50 K. To fulfill these requirements, the sealing

  8. A Stirling Idea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Stirling Technology Company developed the components for its BeCOOL line of Cryocoolers with the help of a series of NASA SBIRs (Small Business Innovative Research), through Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center. Features include a hermetically sealed design, compact size, and silent operation. The company has already placed several units with commercial customers for computer applications and laboratory use.

  9. A nitrogen triple-point thermal storage unit for cooling a SQUID magnetometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Meenderink, D.J.; Reincke, H.A.; Venhorst, G.C.F.; Holland, H.J.; Brake, ter H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to achieve turnkey operation, the use is planned of cryocoolers to cool a SQUID magnetometer system. To minimize the magnetical and mech. interference from the coolers, they are switched off during the actual measurements. Consequently, a thermal storage unit (TSU) is required with

  10. A nitrogen triple-point thermal storage unit for cooling a SQUID magnetometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Meenderink, D.J.; Reincke, H.A.; Venhorst, G.C.F.; Venhorst, G.C.F.; Holland, Herman J.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to achieve turnkey operation, we plan to use cryocoolers to cool a SQUID magnetometer system. To minimize the magnetical and mechanical interference from the coolers, we intend to switch them off during the actual measurements. Consequently, a thermal storage unit (TSU) is required with

  11. Superconductor Digital-RF Receiver Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhanov, Oleg A.; Kirichenko, Dmitri; Vernik, Igor V.; Filippov, Timur V.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Webber, Robert; Dotsenko, Vladimir; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Tang, Jia Cao; Sahu, Anubhav; Shevchenko, Pavel; Miller, Robert; Kaplan, Steven B.; Sarwana, Saad; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    Digital superconductor electronics has been experiencing rapid maturation with the emergence of smaller-scale, lower-cost communications applications which became the major technology drivers. These applications are primarily in the area of wireless communications, radar, and surveillance as well as in imaging and sensor systems. In these areas, the fundamental advantages of superconductivity translate into system benefits through novel Digital-RF architectures with direct digitization of wide band, high frequency radio frequency (RF) signals. At the same time the availability of relatively small 4K cryocoolers has lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled digital electronic systems. Recently, we have achieved a major breakthrough in the development, demonstration, and successful delivery of the cryocooled superconductor digital-RF receivers directly digitizing signals in a broad range from kilohertz to gigahertz. These essentially hybrid-technology systems combine a variety of superconductor and semiconductor technologies packaged with two-stage commercial cryocoolers: cryogenic Nb mixed-signal and digital circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, room-temperature amplifiers, FPGA processing and control circuitry. The demonstrated cryocooled digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals in X-band and performing signal acquisition in HF to L-band at ˜30GHz clock frequencies.

  12. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic refrigeration or cryocooling. Design, development, testing, and evaluation of cryogenic cooling systems are discussed. Design applications in spacecraft, magnet cooling, superconductors, liquid fuel storage, radioastronomy, and medicine are presented. Material properties at cryogenic temperatures and cryogenic rocket propellants are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Closed-cycle gas flow system for cooling a HTc dc-SQUID magnetometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den P.J.; Holland, H.J.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Rogalla, H.

    1994-01-01

    A closed-cycle gas flow system for cooling a high-crit. temp. d.c.-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer by means of a cryocooler has been designed, constructed and tested. The magnetometer is aimed to measure heart signals with a sensitivity of 0.1 pT/Hz1/2. The required

  14. Thermodynamical aspects of pulse tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waele, de A.T.A.M.; Steijaert, P.P.; Gijzen, J.

    1997-01-01

    The cooling power of cryocoolers is determined by the work done by the compressor and the entropy produced by the irreversible processes in the various components of the system. In this paper we discuss the thermodynamics of pulse tubes, but many of the relationships are equally valid for other

  15. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; den Ouden, A.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Wieland, J.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron

  16. A micromachined Joule–Thomson cryogenic cooler with parallel two-stage expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Haishan; Vanapalli, Srinivas; Holland, Herman J.; Vermeer, Cristian Hendrik; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for localized cooling in integrated circuit/microfluidic chips, where cooling is currently achieved by relatively large and bulky cooling systems. Joule–Thomson (JT) cryocoolers are suitable to address these size limitations because they have no cold moving parts and,

  17. Spacecraft fabrication and test MODIL. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T.T.

    1994-05-01

    This report covers the period from October 1992 through the close of the project. FY 92 closed out with the successful briefing to industry and with many potential and important initiatives in the spacecraft arena. Due to the funding uncertainties, we were directed to proceed as if our funding would be approximately the same as FY 92 ($2M), but not to make any major new commitments. However, the MODIL`s FY 93 funding was reduced to $810K and we were directed to concentrate on the cryocooler area. The cryocooler effort completed its demonstration project. The final meetings with the cryocooler fabricators were very encouraging as we witnessed the enthusiastic reception of technology to help them reduce fabrication uncertainties. Support of the USAF Phillips Laboratory cryocooler program was continued including kick-off meetings for the Prototype Spacecraft Cryocooler (PSC). Under Phillips Laboratory support, Gill Cruz visited British Aerospace and Lucas Aerospace in the United Kingdom to assess their manufacturing capabilities. In the Automated Spacecraft & Assembly Project (ASAP), contracts were pursued for the analysis by four Brilliant Eyes prime contractors to provide a proprietary snap shot of their current status of Integrated Product Development. In the materials and structure thrust the final analysis was completed of the samples made under the contract (``Partial Automation of Matched Metal Net Shape Molding of Continuous Fiber Composites``) to SPARTA. The Precision Technologies thrust funded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to prepare a plan to develop a Computer Aided Alignment capability to significantly reduce the time for alignment and even possibly provide real time and remote alignment capability of systems in flight.

  18. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gadeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    An actual-size microfabricated regenerator comprised of a stack of 42 disks, 19 mm diameter and 0.25 mm thick, with layers of microscopic, segmented, involute-shaped flow channels was fabricated and tested. The geometry resembles layers of uniformly-spaced segmented-parallel-plates, except the plates are curved. Each disk was made from electro-plated nickel using the LiGA process. This regenerator had feature sizes close to those required for an actual Stirling engine but the overall regenerator dimensions were sized for the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow regenerator test rig. Testing in the oscillating-flow test rig showed the regenerator performed extremely well, significantly better than currently used random-fiber material, producing the highest figures of merit ever recorded for any regenerator tested in that rig over its approximately 20 years of use.

  19. Performance Testing of a High Temperature Linear Alternator for Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted performance testing of a high temperature linear alternator (HTLA) in support of Stirling power convertor development for potential future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). The high temperature linear alternator is a modified version of that used in Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and is capable of operation at temperatures up to 200 deg. Increasing the temperature capability of the linear alternator could expand the mission set of future Stirling RPS designs. High temperature Neodymium-Iron-Boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets were selected for the HTLA application, and were fully characterized and tested prior to use. Higher temperature epoxy for alternator assembly was also selected and tested for thermal stability and strength. A characterization test was performed on the HTLA to measure its performance at various amplitudes, loads, and temperatures. HTLA endurance testing at 200 deg is currently underway.

  20. Overview 2004 of NASA Stirling-Convertor CFD-Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in development of Stirling-convertor CFD model at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeor Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  1. Proceedings of a Symposium on Perspectives in Fluid Mechanics Held in Pasadena, California on 10-12 January 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-29

    shows a famous externai galaxy 17 known as M87. It lies in the Virgo cluster of galaxies and it contains the first jet ever discovered. If we take an...created much closer to the origin than the radio components shown in Fig. 8. 23 FIG. 10. The radio jet 17 emerging from galaxy M87 in the Virgo cluster ...sailplanes and soaring as scientific research topics further fanned my interest in and awe of the flight of soaring birds. A paper by Woodcock4 , titled

  2. Compact terahertz passive spectrometer with wideband superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K; Kohjiro, S; Yamada, T; Shimizu, N; Wakatsuki, A

    2012-02-01

    We developed a compact terahertz (THz) spectrometer with a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer, aiming to realize a portable and highly sensitive spectrometer to detect dangerous gases at disaster sites. The receiver cryostat which incorporates the SIS mixer and a small cryocooler except for a helium compressor has a weight of 27 kg and dimensions of 200 mm × 270 mm × 690 mm. In spite of the small cooling capacity of the cryocooler, the SIS mixer is successfully cooled lower than 4 K, and the temperature variation is suppressed for the sensitive measurement. By adopting a frequency sweeping system using photonic local oscillator, we demonstrated a spectroscopic measurement of CH(3)CN gas in 0.2-0.5 THz range.

  3. Cryogenic system options for a superconducting aircraft propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, F; Dodds, Graham; Palmer, J; Bertola, L; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a perceived need in the future for a move away from traditional aircraft designs in order to meet ambitious emissions and fuel burn targets. High temperature superconducting distributed propulsion may be an enabler for aircraft designs that have better propulsive efficiency and lower drag. There has been significant work considering the electrical systems required, but less on the cryogenics to enable it. This paper discusses some of the major choices to be faced in cryocooling for aircraft. The likely need for a disposable cryogen to reduce power demand is explained. A set of cryocooling methods are considered in a sensitivity study, which shows that the feasibility of the cryogenic system will depend strongly on the superconducting technology and the aircraft platform. It is argued that all three aspects must be researched and designed in close collaboration to reach a viable solution. (paper)

  4. New Paradigm for Macromolecular Crystallography Experiments at SSRL: Automated Crystal Screening And Remote Data Collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltis, S.M.; Cohen, A.E.; Deacon, A.; Eriksson, T.; Gonzalez, A.; McPhillips, S.; Chui, H.; Dunten, P.; Hollenbeck, M.; Mathews, I.; Miller, M.; Moorhead, P.; Phizackerley, R.P.; Smith, C.; Song, J.; Bedem, H. van dem; Ellis, P.; Kuhn, P.; McPhillips, T.; Sauter, N.; Sharp, K.

    2009-01-01

    Complete automation of the macromolecular crystallography experiment has been achieved at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) through the combination of robust mechanized experimental hardware and a flexible control system with an intuitive user interface. These highly reliable systems have enabled crystallography experiments to be carried out from the researchers' home institutions and other remote locations while retaining complete control over even the most challenging systems. A breakthrough component of the system, the Stanford Auto-Mounter (SAM), has enabled the efficient mounting of cryocooled samples without human intervention. Taking advantage of this automation, researchers have successfully screened more than 200 000 samples to select the crystals with the best diffraction quality for data collection as well as to determine optimal crystallization and cryocooling conditions. These systems, which have been deployed on all SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines and several beamlines worldwide, are used by more than 80 research groups in remote locations, establishing a new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography experimentation.

  5. Rocket Propulsion (RP) 21 Steering Committee Meeting - NASA Spacecraft Propulsion Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Lander Tech is three separate but synergistic efforts: Lunar CATALYST (Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown) Support U.S. industry led robotic lunar lander development via three public-private efforts. Support U.S. industry led robotic lunar lander development via three public-private partnerships. Infuse or transfer landing technologies into these public private partnerships. Advanced Exploration Systems-Automated Propellant Loading (APL) -Integrated Ground Operations. Demonstrate LH2 zero loss storage, loading and transfer operations via testing on a large scale in a relevant launch vehicle servicing environment. (KSC, GRC). Game Changing Technology-20 Kelvin -20 Watt Cryocooler Development of a Reverse Turbo-Brayton Cryocooler operating at 20 Kelvin with 20 Watts of refrigeration lift.

  6. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  7. Concepts for a low-vibration and cryogen-free tabletop dilution refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe several concepts of how to cool a modern tabletop dilution refrigerator (DR) with a cryogen-free pulse tube cryocooler (PTC). Tabletop DRs have come more and more into the focus of scientists, recently, because they offer easy access to the mixing chamber mounting plate from all directions and because of their very short cooldown times. However, these milli-Kelvin coolers are precooled with LHe which makes their handling inconvenient and often expensive. In the paper it is explained how a cryocooler can be directly coupled to a DR unit making the use of LHe superfluous. Furthermore, concepts are discussed where a tabletop DR is cooled by a remote PTC; PTC and DR are mounted in separate vacuum containers which are connected by a stainless steel bellows tube. This kind of apparatus would offer an extremely low level of vibration at the mixing chamber mounting plate.

  8. Design of a scanning gate microscope for mesoscopic electron systems in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccione, M; Sciambi, A; Bartel, J; Keller, A J; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2013-03-01

    We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design. Using Coulomb blockade thermometry on a GaAs/AlGaAs gate-defined quantum dot, we demonstrate an electron temperature of 45 mK.

  9. High-heat-load monochromator options for the RIXS beamline at the APS with the MBA lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zunping, E-mail: zpliu@anl.gov; Gog, Thomas, E-mail: gog@aps.anl.gov; Stoupin, Stanislav A.; Upton, Mary H.; Ding, Yang; Kim, Jung-Ho; Casa, Diego M.; Said, Ayman H.; Carter, Jason A.; Navrotski, Gary [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    With the MBA lattice for APS-Upgrade, tuning curves of 2.6 cm period undulators meet the source requirements for the RIXS beamline. The high-heat-load monochromator (HHLM) is the first optical white beam component. There are four options for the HHLM such as diamond monochromators with refrigerant of either water or liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}), and silicon monochromators of either direct or indirect cooling system. Their performances are evaluated at energy 11.215 keV (Ir L-III edge). The cryo-cooled diamond monochromator has similar performance as the water-cooled diamond monochromator because GaIn of the Cu-GaIn-diamond interface becomes solid. The cryo-cooled silicon monochromators perform better, not only in terms of surface slope error due to thermal deformation, but also in terms of thermal capacity.

  10. Temperature Control Diagnostics for Sample Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santodonato, Louis J.; Walker, Lakeisha M.H.; Church, Andrew J.; Redmon, Christopher Mckenzie

    2010-01-01

    In a scientific laboratory setting, standard equipment such as cryocoolers are often used as part of a custom sample environment system designed to regulate temperature over a wide range. The end user may be more concerned with precise sample temperature control than with base temperature. But cryogenic systems tend to be specified mainly in terms of cooling capacity and base temperature. Technical staff at scientific user facilities (and perhaps elsewhere) often wonder how to best specify and evaluate temperature control capabilities. Here we describe test methods and give results obtained at a user facility that operates a large sample environment inventory. Although this inventory includes a wide variety of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field devices, the present work focuses on cryocooler-based systems.

  11. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  12. Simulation program for multiple expansion Stirling machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, G.; Weiss, M.; Fauvel, R.; Reader, G.; Bingham, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple expansion Stirling machines have been a topic of interest at the University of Calgary for some years. Recently a second-order computer simulation program with integral graphics package for Stirling cryocoolers with up to four stages of expansion were developed and made available to the Stirling community. Adaptation of the program to multiple expansion Stirling power systems is anticipated. This paper briefly introduces the program and presents a specimen result

  13. NASA space applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Sokoloski, Martin M.; Aron, Paul R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1992-01-01

    The application of superconducting technology in space has been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. The only means of attaining these temperatures has been with cryogenic fluids which severely limits mission lifetime. The development of materials with superconducting transition temperatures (T sub c) above 77 K has made superconducting technology more attractive and feasible for employment in aerospace systems. Potential applications of high-temperature superconducting technology in cryocoolers and remote sensing, communications, and power systems are discussed.

  14. Magnet coils made from high-temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.G.; Yang, M.; Grovenor, C.R.M.; Goringe, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    We review the progress we have made in constructing HTS coils and report our latest results. Also we describe the cryogen-free operation of one of our HTS coils cooled to 55 K using a Stirling cycle cryocooler. Lastly, we describe how 4 Oxford coils are being used in a project to investigate the controllability of HTS magnets in applications such as ''maglev'' suspension systems. We briefly report the initial findings of this work and describe developments in progress. (orig.)

  15. A High Performance Frequency Standard and Distribution System for Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Orthogonal Polarization In Anisotropic Dielectric Resonators”, Proceedings of the 2002 IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium , pp. 553-558...2002. [9] G. J. Dick, Rabi T. Wang, Robert Tjoelker, “Design and Progress Report for Compact Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator "VCSO"”, Proc. 2005 Joint...IEEE FCS/ PTTI. [10] R. Basu, G. J. Dick, Rabi T. Wang,” Novel Design of an All- Cryogenic RF Pound Circuit “,Proc. 2005 Joint IEEE FCS/ PTTI

  16. Laser cooling of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  17. Flow boiling heat transfer coefficients at cryogenic temperatures for multi-component refrigerant mixtures of nitrogen-hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The recuperative heat exchanger governs the overall performance of the mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler. In these heat exchangers, the non-azeotropic refrigerant mixture of nitrogen-hydrocarbons undergoes boiling and condensation simultaneously at cryogenic temperature. Hence, the design of such heat exchanger is crucial. However, due to lack of empirical correlations to predict two-phase heat transfer coefficients of multi-component mixtures at low temperature, the design of such heat exchanger is difficult.

  18. Design and component test performance of an efficient 4 W, 130 K sorption refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.; Ryba, E.; Sywulka, P.; Wade, L.

    1990-01-01

    A recent advance in sorption cooler technology has resulted in cryocooler designs offering high performance and the promise of long-life operation. A 4-W, 130 K sorption refrigeration stage which incorporates the advanced concept design is presently being constructed. Powdered charcoal is used as the sorbent, and methane is used as the refrigerant. Expansion is accomplished using a passive Joule-Thomson expansion valve. The design details of this cooler and the component performance test results are discussed. 5 refs

  19. Development of a superconducting claw-pole motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, E.; Kikukawa, K.; Satoh, Y.; Torii, S.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and produced a superconducting claw-pole motor for a trial purpose as a method to make the best use of the characteristic of superconductivity without collector rings or rotating superconducting coils that need to be cryocooled, and made some examinations. The unique feature in this motor is to have the mechanism that supports the reaction magnetic force generated in the axial direction

  20. Smart Energy Cryo-refrigerator Technology for the next generation Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagna, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    We describe a “smart energy” cryocooler technology architecture for the next generation Very Large Array that makes use of multiple variable frequency cold heads driven from a single variable speed air cooled compressor. Preliminary experiments indicate that the compressor variable flow control, advanced diagnostics, and the cryo-refrigerator low vibration, provide a unique energy efficient capability for the very large number of antennas that will be employed in this array.

  1. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  2. Development of a hand-portable photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    ANL is currently developing a portable chemical sensor system based on laser desorption photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It will incorporate direct sampling, a cryocooler base sample adsorption and concentration, and direct surface multiphoton ionization. All components will be in a package 9 x 11 x 4 in., weighing 15-18 lbs. A sample spectrum is given for a NaCl sample

  3. Ricor's anniversary of 50 innovative years in cryogenic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Avishai; Segal, Victor; Pundak, Nachman; Bar Haim, Zvi; Danziger, Menachem

    2017-05-01

    Ricor cryogenics was founded in 1967 and since then it has focused on innovative technologies in the cryogenic field. The paper reviews the initial research and development efforts invested in various technologies that have yielded products such as Cryostats for Mossbauer Effect measurement, Liquid gas Dewar containers, Liquid helium vacuum transfer tubes, Cryosurgery and other innovative products. The major registered patents that matured to products such as a magnetic vacuum valve operator, pumped out safety valve and other innovations are reviewed here. As a result of continuous R and D investment, over the years a new generation of innovative Stirling cryogenic products has developed. This development began with massive split slip-on coolers and has progressed as far as miniature IDDCA coolers mainly for IR applications. The accumulated experience in Stirling technology is used also as a platform for developing self-contained water vapor pumps known as MicroStar and NanoStar. These products are also used in collaboration with a research institute in the field of High Temperature Superconductors. The continuous growth in the cryogenic products range and the need to meet market demands have motivated the expansion, of Ricor's manufacturing facility enabling it to become a world leader in the cryocooler field. To date Ricor has manufactured more than 120,000 cryocoolers. The actual cryogenic development efforts and challenges are also reviewed, mainly in the field of long life cryocoolers, ruggedized products, miniaturization and products for space applications.

  4. Conductive-cooled superconducting magnets and their applications; Chodendo wo mijikanishita reitoki chokurei hoshiki no chodendo jishaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, T.; Sasaki, T.; Urata, M. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an outline of conductive-cooled superconducting magnets, magnetic regenerator materials, and their applications. This magnet is composed of a 4K cryocooler, superconducting current lead, heat shield plate, support, and vacuum vessel. Cooling of the conductive coil is initiated by the operation of 4K cryocooler. It takes two days to one week for the cooling-down time from room temperature to the given temperature. During that time, users need to do nothing for the superconducting magnet. When the superconducting coil is cooled to the given temperature, current is applied to the coil for excitation. Thus, magnetic field is formed. Paying attention to the magnetic anomaly specific heat accompanied with magnetic phase transition of magnetic substance at the extremely low temperature, Toshiba has developed a 4K cryocooler using magnetic regenerator material by utilizing magnetic specific heat. Oxide superconductor is adopted for the current lead which is used at the temperature level below 80K. Inflow of the heat can be suppressed in one-tenth of the conventional current lead. As a result, a small size device having easy operability without using liquid helium has been developed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (MOE), and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Shiwei, E-mail: swwu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (MOE), and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world.

  6. A cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope capable of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Di; Wu, Shiwei

    2016-06-01

    The design and performance of a cryogen-free low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) housed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are reported. The cryogen-free design was done by directly integrating a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler to a Besocke-type STM, and the vibration isolation was achieved by using a two-stage rubber bellow between the cryocooler and a UHV-STM interface with helium exchange gas cooling. A base temperature of 15 K at the STM was achieved, with a possibility to further decrease by using a cryocooler with higher cooling power and adding additional low temperature stage under the exchange gas interface. Atomically sharp STM images and high resolution dI/dV spectra on various samples were demonstrated. Furthermore, we reported the inelastic tunneling spectroscopy on a single carbon monoxide molecule adsorbed on Ag(110) surface with a cryogen-free STM for the first time. Being totally cryogen-free, the system not only saves the running cost significantly but also enables uninterrupted data acquisitions and variable temperature measurements with much ease. In addition, the system is capable of coupling light to the STM junction by a pair of lens inside the UHV chamber. We expect that these enhanced capabilities could further broaden our views to the atomic-scale world.

  7. Thermal study of a cryogen-less MgB{sub 2} cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzbauer, J.P., E-mail: jeremiah@fnal.gov; Nassiri, A.

    2014-12-11

    Recent efforts towards production of high-quality magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) coatings have raised the possibility of producing usable accelerating cavities. Work continues to reliably produce films of sufficient quality over the large, complex surface area of an accelerating cavity, but this technology would open many interesting technical opportunities. One of these is to replace the traditionally required liquid helium cryogenic systems with a dry system based on cryocoolers. This is made possible by the much higher T{sub c} of MgB{sub 2}, allowing operation closer to 30 K where cryocooler efficiency becomes competitive with alternative systems. This removes the need for pressure vessels in the cryomodule as well as internal distribution systems, greatly simplifying cryomodule design and fabrication. The lack of uniform cooling over the cavity surface, however, complicates behavior by coupling RF losses, heat leak, and cooling design in a way not seen in traditional SRF cavities. In this paper, these complexities are explored, including realistic cryocooler performance, temperature dependant RF losses, and standard thermal management challenges.

  8. Superconducting Meissner effect bearings for cryogenic turbomachines, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Martin, Jerry L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the final report of a Phase 2 SBIR project to develop Meissner effect bearings for miniature cryogenic turbomachines. The bearing system was designed for use in miniature cryogenic turboexpanders in reverse-Brayton-cycle cryocoolers. The cryocoolers are designed to cool sensors on satellites. Existing gas bearings for this application run in a relatively warm state. The heat loss from the bearings into the shaft and into the cold process gas imposes a penalty on the cycle efficiency. By using cold Meissner effect bearings, this heat loss could be minimized, and the input power per unit of cooling for these cryocoolers could be reduced. Two bearing concepts were explored in this project. The first used an all-magnetic passive radial suspension to position the shaft over a range of temperatures from room temperature to 77 K. This bearing concept was proven to be feasible, but impractical for the miniature high-speed turbine application since it lacked the required shaft positioning accuracy. A second bearing concept was then developed. In this concept, the Meissner effect bearings are combined with self-acting gas bearings. The Meissner effect bearing provides the additional stiffness and damping required to stabilize the shaft at low temperature, while the gas bearing provides the necessary accuracy to allow very small turbine tip clearances (5mm) and high speeds (greater than 500,000 rpm).

  9. SBIR Grant:No-Vibration Agile Cryogenic Optical Refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard

    2013-04-09

    Optical refrigeration is currently the only all-solid-state cryocooling technology that has been demonstrated. Optical cryocoolers are devices that use laser light to cool small crystal or glass cooling elements. The cooling element absorbs the laser light and reradiates it at higher energy, an example of anti-Stokes fluorescence. The dif-ference between the energy of the outgoing and incoming light comes from the thermal energy of the cooling element, which in turn becomes colder. Entitled No-Vibration Agile Cryocoolers using Optical Refrigeration, this Phase I proposal directly addressed the continued development of the optical refrigerator components necessary to transition this scientific breakthrough into National Nu-clear Security Administration (NNSA) sensor applications in line with the objectives of topic 50b. ThermoDynamic Films LLC (TDF), in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), cooled an optical-refrigerator cooling element comprised of an ytterbium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Yb:YLF) crystal from room tempera-ture to 123 K with about 2% efficiency. This is the world record in optical refrigera-tion and an important step toward revolutionizing cryogenic systems for sensor ap-plications. During this period, they also designed and analyzed the crucial elements of a prototype optical refrigerator including the thermal link that connects the cool-ing element with the load.

  10. Multi-Stage ADRs for Current and Future Astronomy Missions: Performance and Requirements for Cryogen-Free Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; Vlahacos, Kosta

    2010-01-01

    The cooling requirements for current (e.g. Astro-H) and future (e.g. IXO and ASP) astronomy missions pose significant challenges for the sub-Kelvin Cooler. In particular, the use of large detector arrays increases the cooling power needed, and the variety of cryocoolers that can be used for pre-cooling greatly expands the range of temperatures at which the sub-Kelvin cooler can be designed to reject heat. In most cases, there is also a need for a stable higher temperature stage for cooling amplifiers or telescope components. NASA/GSFC is currently building a 3-stage ADR for the Astro-H mission, and is developing a 5-stage ADR suitable for IXO and ASP, as well as many other missions in the early planning stages. The architecture of these ADRs allows them to be adapted rather easily for different cooling requirements and to accommodate different cryocooler capabilities (operating temperature and cooling power). This paper will discuss the performance of these ADRs, which operate in both continuous, and single-shot cooling modes, and the minimum cryocooler capabilities needed to meet the requirements of future missions.

  11. Mars Propellant Liquefaction Modeling in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pooja; Hauser, Dan; Sutherlin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASAs current Mars architectures are assuming the production and storage of 23 tons of liquid oxygen on the surface of Mars over a duration of 500+ days. In order to do this in a mass efficient manner, an energy efficient refrigeration system will be required. Based on previous analysis NASA has decided to do all liquefaction in the propulsion vehicle storage tanks. In order to allow for transient Martian environmental effects, a propellant liquefaction and storage system for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) was modeled using Thermal Desktop. The model consisted of a propellant tank containing a broad area cooling loop heat exchanger integrated with a reverse turbo Brayton cryocooler. Cryocooler sizing and performance modeling was conducted using MAV diurnal heat loads and radiator rejection temperatures predicted from a previous thermal model of the MAV. A system was also sized and modeled using an alternative heat rejection system that relies on a forced convection heat exchanger. Cryocooler mass, input power, and heat rejection for both systems were estimated and compared against sizing based on non-transient sizing estimates.

  12. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jerr; Plachta, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing both thermally and structurally were performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  13. Characterization of the frictional losses and heat transfer of oscillatory viscous flow through wire-mesh regenerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Boroujerdi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new relations for calculating heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of oscillatory flow through wire-mesh screen regenerator such as Darcy permeability, Forchheimer’s inertial coefficient, and heat transfer area per unit volume, as a function of the wire diameter are presented. According to the derived relations, thinner wires have higher pressure drop and higher heat transfer rate. The relations are applicable for all regenerative cryocoolers. Embedding the new relations into a numerical model, three Stirling-type orifice pulse tube cryocoolers with three regenerators different in length and diameter but same volume in a variety of wire diameters, have been modeled. The results achieved by the model reveal that the local heat transfer coefficient decreases with increase of the wire diameter and the length-to-diameter ratio. In addition, it was shown that the mean absolute gas–solid wire temperature difference is a linear function of wire diameter in the range investigated. The results show that for larger length-to-diameter ratios, Forchheimer’s effect will dominate frictional losses, and the variations of the frictional losses are proportional to the inverse of the wire diameter. Wire diameter has been optimized to maximize the coefficient of performance of the cryocooler. Shorter regenerators have thinner optimum wires.

  14. Disease: H01529 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PD) is a particular type of femoral head necrosis occurring in children. It is mo...re common among boys, and bilateral involvement occurs in 8-24% of cases. The disease is usually diagnosed among children...particular type of ANFH occurring in children. ICD-10: M87.8 MeSH: D005271 OMIM: 608805 PMID:15179599 ... AUTH

  15. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We report on VLA observations of HST-1 in M87 at 8 GHz from 2003–2007, during which a long major outburst occurs from radio to X-ray wave bands. At the ... This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1. Articles ...

  16. Chandra Reviews Black Hole Musical: Epic But Off-Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    A gigantic sonic boom generated by a supermassive black hole has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, along with evidence for a cacophony of deep sound. This discovery was made by using data from the longest X-ray observation ever of M87, a nearby giant elliptical galaxy. M87 is centrally located in the Virgo cluster of galaxies and is known to harbor one of the Universe's most massive black holes. Scientists detected loops and rings in the hot, X-ray emitting gas that permeates the cluster and surrounds the galaxy. These loops provide evidence for periodic eruptions that occurred near the supermassive black hole, and that generate changes in pressure, or pressure waves, in the cluster gas that manifested themselves as sound. Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 "We can tell that many deep and different sounds have been rumbling through this cluster for most of the lifetime of the Universe," said William Forman of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The outbursts in M87, which happen every few million years, prevent the huge reservoir of gas in the cluster from cooling and forming many new stars. Without these outbursts and resultant heating, M87 would not be the elliptical galaxy it is today. "If this black hole wasn't making all of this noise, M87 could have been a completely different type of galaxy," said team member Paul Nulsen, also of the CfA, "possibly a huge spiral galaxy about 30 times brighter than the Milky Way." Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 The outbursts result when material falls toward the black hole. While most of the matter is swallowed, some of it was violently ejected in jets. These jets are launched from regions close to the black hole (neither light nor sound can escape from the black hole itself) and push into the cluster's gas, generating cavities and sound which then propagate outwards. Chandra's M87 observations also

  17. Experimental Creep Life Assessment for the Advanced Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is planning to develop the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for potential use on future space missions. The ASRG provides substantial efficiency and specific power improvements over radioisotope power systems of heritage designs. The ASRG would use General Purpose Heat Source modules as energy sources and the free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) to convert heat into electrical energy. Lockheed Martin Corporation of Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, is integrating the ASRG systems, and Sunpower, Inc., of Athens, Ohio, is designing and building the ASC. NASA Glenn Research Center of Cleveland, Ohio, manages the Sunpower contract and provides technology development in several areas for the ASC. One area is reliability assessment for the ASC heater head, a critical pressure vessel within which heat is converted into mechanical oscillation of a displacer piston. For high system efficiency, the ASC heater head operates at very high temperature (850 C) and therefore is fabricated from an advanced heat-resistant nickel-based superalloy Microcast MarM-247. Since use of MarM-247 in a thin-walled pressure vessel is atypical, much effort is required to assure that the system will operate reliably for its design life of 17 years. One life-limiting structural response for this application is creep; creep deformation is the accumulation of time-dependent inelastic strain under sustained loading over time. If allowed to progress, the deformation eventually results in creep rupture. Since creep material properties are not available in the open literature, a detailed creep life assessment of the ASC heater head effort is underway. This paper presents an overview of that creep life assessment approach, including the reliability-based creep criteria developed from coupon testing, and the associated heater head deterministic and probabilistic analyses. The approach also

  18. An Improved X-Band Maser System for Deep Space Network Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcliffe, M.; Hanson, T.; Fernandez, J.

    2000-01-01

    An 8450-MHz (X-band) maser system utilizing a commercial Gifford--McMahon (GM) closed-cycle cryocooler (CCR) was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The CCR system was used to cool a maser operating at 8450 MHz. The prototype GM CCR system meets or exceeds all Deep Space Network requirements for maser performance. The two-stage GM CCR operates at 4.2 K; for comparison, the DSN's current three-stage cryocooler, which uses a Joule--Thompson cooling stage in addition to GM cooling, operates at 4.5 K. The new CCR withstands heat loads of 1.5 W at 4.2 K as compared to 1 W at 4.5 K for the existing DSN cryocooler used for cooling masers. The measured noise temperature, T_e, of the maser used for these tests is defined at the ambient connection to the antenna feed system. The T_e measured 5.0 K at a CCR temperature of 4.5 K, about 1.5 K higher than the noise temperature of a typical DSN Block II-A X-band traveling-wave maser (TWM). Reducing the temperature of the CCR significantly lowers the maser noise temperature and increases maser gain and bandwidth. The new GM CCR gives future maser systems significant operational advantages, including reduced maintenance time and logistics requirements. The results of a demonstration of this new system are presented. Advantages of using a GM-cooled maser and the effects of the reduced CCR temperature on maser performance are discussed.

  19. Summary of Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in Support of Stirling Radioisotope Power System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifer, Nicholas A.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing 100 We class, free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for space science and exploration missions. Free-piston Stirling convertors are capable of achieving a 38% conversion efficiency, making Stirling attractive for meeting future power system needs in light of the shrinking U.S. plutonium fuel supply. Convertors currently on test include four Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDCs), manufactured by the Stirling Technology Company (STC), and six Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), manufactured by Sunpower, Inc. Total hours of operation is greater than 514,000 hours (59 years). Several tests have been initiated to demonstrate the functionality of Stirling convertors for space applications, including: in-air extended operation, thermal vacuum extended operation. Other tests have also been conducted to characterize Stirling performance in anticipated mission scenarios. Data collected during testing has been used to support life and reliability estimates, drive design changes and improve quality, and plan for expected mission scenarios. This paper will provide a summary of convertors tested at NASA GRC and discuss lessons learned through extended testing.

  20. AeroVironment technician checks a Helios solar cell panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A technician at AeroVironment's Design Development Center in Simi Valley, California, checks a panel of silicon solar cells for conductivity and voltage. The bi-facial cells, fabricated by SunPower, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, are among 64,000 solar cells which have been installed on the Helios Prototype solar-powered aircraft to provide power to its 14 electric motors and operating systems. Developed by AeroVironment under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude aircraft which can perform atmospheric science missions and serve as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere. Target goals set by NASA for the giant 246-foot span flying wing include reaching and sustaining subsonic horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude in 2001, and sustained continuous flight for at least four days and nights above 50,000 feet altitude with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now under development in 2003.

  1. Technician Marshall MacCready installs solar cells on the Helios Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Technician Marshall MacCready carefully lays a panel of solar cells into place on a wing section of the Helios Prototype flying wing at AeroVironment's Design Development Center in Simi Valley, California. The bi-facial cells, manufactured by SunPower, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, are among 64,000 solar cells which have been installed on the solar-powered aircraft to provide electricity to its 14 motors and operating systems. Developed by AeroVironment under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude aircraft which can perform atmospheric science missions and serve as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere. Target goals set by NASA for the giant 246-foot span flying wing include reaching and sustaining subsonic horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude in 2001, and sustained continuous flight for at least four days and nights above 50,000 feet altitude 2003 with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now being developed.

  2. Characterization of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator EU2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a 140-watt radioisotope power system. While the ASRG flight development project has ended, the hardware that was designed and built under the project is continuing to be tested to support future Stirling-based power system development. NASA GRC recently completed the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2). The ASRG EU2 consists of the first pair of Sunpower's ASC-E3 Stirling convertors mounted in an aluminum housing, and Lockheed Martin's Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller (a fourth generation controller). The ASC-E3 convertors and Generator Housing Assembly (GHA) closely match the intended ASRG Qualification Unit flight design. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the EU2, its controller, and the convertors in the flight-like GHA. The GHA contained an argon cover gas for these tests. The tests included: measurement of convertor, controller, and generator performance and efficiency, quantification of control authority of the controller, disturbance force measurement with varying piston phase and piston amplitude, and measurement of the effect of spacecraft DC bus voltage on EU2 performance. The results of these tests are discussed and summarized, providing a basic understanding of EU2 characteristics and the performance and capability of the EDU 4 controller.

  3. Characterization of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Niholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) 140-W radioisotope power system. While the ASRG flight development project has ended, the hardware that was designed and built under the project is continuing to be tested to support future Stirling-based power system development. NASA Glenn Research Center recently completed the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2). The ASRG EU2 consists of the first pair of Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor E3 (ASC-E3) Stirling convertors mounted in an aluminum housing, and Lockheed Martin's Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller (a fourth-generation controller). The ASC-E3 convertors and Generator Housing Assembly (GHA) closely match the intended ASRG Qualification Unit flight design. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the EU2, its controller, and the convertors in the flight-like GHA. The GHA contained an argon cover gas for these tests. The tests included measurement of convertor, controller, and generator performance and efficiency; quantification of control authority of the controller; disturbance force measurement with varying piston phase and piston amplitude; and measurement of the effect of spacecraft direct current (DC) bus voltage on EU2 performance. The results of these tests are discussed and summarized, providing a basic understanding of EU2 characteristics and the performance and capability of the EDU 4 controller.

  4. The NASA Next Generation Stirling Technology Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J. G.; Shaltens, R. K.; Wong, W. A.

    2005-12-01

    NASAs Science Mission Directorate is developing the next generation Stirling technology for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for surface and deep space missions. The next generation Stirling convertor is one of two advanced power conversion technologies currently being developed for future NASA missions, and is capable of operating for both planetary atmospheres and deep space environments. The Stirling convertor (free-piston engine integrated with a linear alternator) produces about 90 We(ac) and has a specific power of about 90 We/kg. Operating conditions of Thot at 850 degree C and Trej at 90 degree C results in the Stirling convertor estimated efficiency of about 40 per cent. Using the next generation Stirling convertor in future RPS, the "system" specific power is estimated at 8 We/kg. The design lifetime is three years on the surface of Mars and fourteen years in deep space missions. Electrical power of about 160 We (BOM) is produced by two (2) free-piston Stirling convertors heated by two (2) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. This development is being performed by Sunpower, Athens, OH with Pratt & Whitney, Rocketdyne, Canoga Park, CA under contract to Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio. GRC is guiding the independent testing and technology development for the next generation Stirling generator.

  5. Design, Qualification and Integration Testing of the High-Temperature Resistance Temperature Device for Stirling Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jack; Hill, Dennis H.; Elisii, Remo; White, Jonathan R.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), developed from 2006 to 2013 under the joint sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide a high-efficiency power system for future deep space missions, employed Sunpower Incorporated's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) with operating temperature up to 840 C. High-temperature operation was made possible by advanced heater head materials developed to increase reliability and thermal-to-mechanical conversion efficiency. During a mission, it is desirable to monitor the Stirling hot-end temperature as a measure of convertor health status and assist in making appropriate operating parameter adjustments to maintain the desired hot-end temperature as the radioisotope fuel decays. To facilitate these operations, a Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) that is capable of high-temperature, continuous long-life service was designed, developed and qualified for use in the ASRG. A thermal bridge was also implemented to reduce the RTD temperature exposure while still allowing an accurate projection of the ASC hot-end temperature. NASA integrated two flight-design RTDs on the ASCs and assembled into the high-fidelity Engineering Unit, the ASRG EU2, at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for extended operation and system characterization. This paper presents the design implementation and qualification of the RTD, and its performance characteristics and calibration in the ASRG EU2 testing.

  6. Performance of an Advanced Stirling Convertor Based on Heat Flux Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dcott D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two highefficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower, Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center. The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot-end and cold-end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given heat input. It is difficult to measure heat input to Stirling convertors due to the complex geometries of the hot components, temperature limits of sensor materials, and invasive integration of sensors. A thin-film heat flux sensor was used to directly measure heat input to an ASC. The effort succeeded in designing and fabricating unique sensors, which were integrated into a Stirling convertor ground test and exposed to test temperatures exceeding 700 C in air for 10,000 hr. Sensor measurements were used to calculate thermal efficiency for ASC-E (Engineering Unit) #1 and #4. The post-disassembly condition of the sensors is also discussed.

  7. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of free-piston Stirling conversion technology for spaceflight electrical power generation since 1999. GRC has also been supporting the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance data for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The Thermal Energy Conversion branch at GRC is conducting extended operation of several free-piston Stirling convertors. The goal of this effort is to generate long-term performance data (tens of thousands of hours) on multiple units to build a life and reliability database. Currently, GRC is operating 18 convertors. This hardware set includes Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDCs) from Infinia Corporation, of which one pair (TDCs #13 and #14) has accumulated over 60,000 hr (6.8 years) of operation. Also under test are various Sunpower, Inc. convertors that were fabricated during the ASC development activity, including ASC-0, ASC-E (including those in the ASRG engineering unit), and ASC-E2. The ASC-E2s also completed, or are in progress of completing workmanship vibration testing, performance mapping, and extended operation. Two ASC-E2 units will also be used for durability testing, during which components will be stressed to levels above nominal mission usage. Extended operation data analyses from these tests are covered in this paper.

  8. Development of free-piston Stirling engine performance and optimization codes based on Martini simulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, William R.

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code is described that could be used to design and optimize a free-displacer, free-piston Stirling engine similar to the RE-1000 engine made by Sunpower. The code contains options for specifying displacer and power piston motion or for allowing these motions to be calculated by a force balance. The engine load may be a dashpot, inertial compressor, hydraulic pump or linear alternator. Cycle analysis may be done by isothermal analysis or adiabatic analysis. Adiabatic analysis may be done using the Martini moving gas node analysis or the Rios second-order Runge-Kutta analysis. Flow loss and heat loss equations are included. Graphical display of engine motions and pressures and temperatures are included. Programming for optimizing up to 15 independent dimensions is included. Sample performance results are shown for both specified and unconstrained piston motions; these results are shown as generated by each of the two Martini analyses. Two sample optimization searches are shown using specified piston motion isothermal analysis. One is for three adjustable input and one is for four. Also, two optimization searches for calculated piston motion are presented for three and for four adjustable inputs. The effect of leakage is evaluated. Suggestions for further work are given.

  9. Design and test of a short mockup magnet for the superconducting undulator at the SSRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jieping, E-mail: jpxu@sinap.ac.cn; Ding, Yi; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hongfei; Yin, Lixin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2016-07-27

    A superconducting planar undulator is under development at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to provide the SSRF users with higher photon fluxes at higher photon energies. A 5-period magnet was designed and built for feasibility study. The short mockup magnet is composed of NbTi/Cu winding and low carbon steel former and was tested in a vertical cryocooler-cooled cryostat. The nominal current of 387 A was reached after 2 quenches and the maximum current of 433.2 A was achieved. The magnetic field profile was measured and a peak field of 0.93 T was obtained when stably operating at 400 A.

  10. X-ray powder diffraction camera for high-field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, K; Mitsui, Y; Takahashi, K; Watanabe, K

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a high-field X-ray diffraction (HF-XRD) camera which will be inserted into an experimental room temperature bore (100 mm) of a conventional solenoid-type cryocooled superconducting magnet (10T-CSM). Using the prototype camera that is same size of the HF-XRD camera, a XRD pattern of Si is taken at room temperature in a zero magnetic field. From the obtained results, the expected ability of the designed HF-XRD camera is presented.

  11. Small satellite technologies and applications II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 21, 22, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horais, Brian J.

    The present conference on small satellite (SS) systems and their supporting technologies discusses the Medsat SS for malaria early warning and control, results of the Uosat earth-imaging system, commercial applications for MSSs, an SS family for LEO communications, videosignal signature-synthesis for fast narrow-bandwidth transmission, and NiH battery applications in SSs. Also discussed are the 'PegaStar' spacecraft concept for remote sensing, dual-cone scanning earth sensor processing algorithms, SS radiation-budget instrumentation, SDI's relevance to SSs, spacecraft fabrication and test integration, and cryocooler producibility. (For individual items see A93-28077 to A93-28100)

  12. Development of A Super High Speed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM Controller and Analysis of The Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Zhao

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a DSP-based controller for a super high-speed (>80,000 rpm permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM. The PMSM is a key component of the centrifugal compressor drive of a reverse Brayton cryocooler that is currently under development for NASA and Florida Solar Energy Center. The design of the PMSM open-loop control is presented. Experimental results with open-loop control schemes are presented. System optimization and analysis are also illustrated. They verify the effectiveness of the controller design and the optimization scheme.

  13. High-temperature superconducting passive microwave devices, filters and antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, S.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) passive microwave devices, such as filters and antennas, are promising devices. In particular, HTS filters may be successfully marketed in the near future. Cross-coupled filters, ring filters, and coplanar waveguide filters are good options to reduce filter size. On the other hand, HTS patch antennas which can be cooled by a cryo-cooler are also promising devices as well, since they show higher efficiency than normal antennas. This paper examines the design process and filter properties of HTS filters as well as the gains, directivity, and cooling system of HTS patch antennas. (author)

  14. 900-L liquid xenon cryogenic system operation for the MEG experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Hisamatsu, Y; Iawamoto, W; Mori, T; Nishiguchi, H; Otani, W; Sawada, R; Uchiyama, Y; Nishitani, T

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic system for the MEG (muon rare decay) experiment has started operation at the Paul Sherrer Institute in Zurich. The main part of the MEG detector is the 900-L liquid xenon calorimeter for gamma ray detection, equipped with 850 photo multipliers directly immersed in liquid xenon. A 200 W pulse tube cryocooler enabled LN2-free operation of this calorimeter. A liquid purification system; using a liquid pump and a zero boil-off 1000-L cryogenic buffer dewar is also included in the system. The first entire engineering run was carried out in November-December 2007 and satisfactory cryogenic performances were confirmed.

  15. Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated from an amorphous Mo0.75Ge0.25 thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, V. B.; Lita, A. E.; Vissers, M. R.; Marsili, F.; Pappas, D. P.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the characteristics of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) fabricated from amorphous Mo 0.75 Ge 0.25 thin-films. Fabricated devices show a saturation of the internal detection efficiency at temperatures below 1 K, with system dark count rates below 500 cps. Operation in a closed-cycle cryocooler at 2.5 K is possible with system detection efficiencies exceeding 20% for SNSPDs which have not been optimized for high detection efficiency. Jitter is observed to vary between 69 ps at 250 mK and 187 ps at 2.5 K using room temperature amplifiers.

  16. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Baudouy, B

    2014-07-17

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  17. Characterisation and Control of a Prototype HTS SMES Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, C J; Cuiuri, D; Cook, C D; Gower, S A; Beales, T P

    2006-01-01

    A 2.79 kJ prototype high transition temperature Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) device has been constructed. The coil for the prototype has been wound using High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) BSCCO-2223 tape. The refrigeration system is a gaseous helium cold head cryocooler used to maintain the SMES coil at a temperature of 30 K, improving the I c characteristic of the coil by a factor of 4.7 compared to that at 77 K. The SMES device is capable of supplying a 3-phase load during power interruptions, and has been constructed during a program to develop a larger 20 kJ system aimed at industrial applications

  18. Radiation detection at very low temperature. DRTBT 1999 - Balaruc-les-Bains - Course collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapellier, M.; Ravex, A.; Pari, P.; Bossy, J.; Garoche, P.; Perrin, Nicole; Loidl, M.; Den Hartog, Roland; Navick, Xavier-Francois; Mailly, Dominique; Chardin, Gabriel; Joyez, Philippe; Goyot, M.; Dumoulin, L.; Aprilli, M.; Torre, J.P.; Bouchez, J.; Benoit, Alain

    1992-01-01

    After four contributions (Introduction to cryogenics, Pulsed tube or recent developments in cryo-coolers, Dilution-based cooling, Adiabatic demagnetisation), the contributions addressed various themes: Low temperature physics (Specific and abnormal heats, Thermal conductivity, Anderson insulator, Superconductors); Physics within bolometers (basic principle of a bolometer, Energy conversion and ionisation, electron-phonon interaction, Edge sensor transition); Example of cryogenic sensors (Sub-millimetre / spider-web, Superconducting Tunnel Junction as photon detectors, ionization-heat massive bolometers); Signal processing (SQUID amplifiers, Elementary statistics, Signal processing and data analysis, Measurement electronics for bolometers, Single electron transistor, Preamplifiers)

  19. Performance of a conduction-cooled high-temperature superconducting bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasik, M.; Hull, J.R.; Johnson, P.E.; Mittleider, J.; McCrary, K.E.; McIver, C.R.; Day, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    We report rotational loss measurements for a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing whose cooling consists of a thermal conduction path to the cold head of a cryocooler. Losses have been measured for rotational rates up to 14,500 rpm at different HTS temperatures. The rotational losses decrease with decreasing HTS temperature. For temperatures that can be obtained in a liquid-nitrogen thermosiphon system, at a given speed and gap, the loss of the conduction-cooled HTS bearing is not significantly higher than the loss of a nearly identical HTS bearing cooled by flowing nitrogen from the thermosiphon

  20. A second-generation superconducting undulator cryostat for the APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, J.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A second-generation cryocooler-based cryostat has been designed and built to support a new helically wound superconducting undulator (SCU) magnet for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design represents an evolution of existing SCU cryostats currently in operation in the APS storage ring. Value engineering and lessons learned have resulted in a smaller, cheaper, and simpler cryostat design compatible with existing planar magnets as well as the new helically wound device. We describe heat load and quench response results, design and operational details, and the “build-to-spec” procurement strategy.

  1. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudouy, B [Saclay (France)

    2014-07-01

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  2. Computational Investigation on the performance of thermo-acoustically driven pulse tube refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaria, Mathew; Rasheed, K. K. Abdul; Shafi, K. A.; Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra

    2017-02-01

    A Thermoacoustic Pulse Tube Refrigeration (TAPTR) system employs a thermo acoustic engine as the pressure wave generator instead of mechanical compressor. Such refrigeration systems are highly reliable due to the absence of moving components, structural simplicity and the use of environmental friendly working fluids. In the present work, a traveling wave thermoacoustic primmover (TWTAPM) has been developed and it is coupled to a pulse tube cryocooler. The performance of TAPTR depends on the operating and working fluid parameters. Simulation studies of the system has been performed using ANSYS Fluent and compared with experimental results.

  3. Electrical and thermal characteristics of Bi2212/Ag HTS coils for conduction-cooled SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, N; Noguchi, S; Kurupakorn, C; Kojima, H; Endo, F; Hirano, N; Nagaya, S; Okubo, H

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electrical and thermal performance of conduction-cooled Bi2212/Ag HTS coils with 4K-GM cryocooler system. First, we measured the critical current I c for different ambient temperatures T 0 at 4.2 K - 40 K. Experimental results revealed that I c increased with the decrease in T 0 and was saturated at T 0 0 = 4.8 K. Experimental results revealed the criterion of thermal runaway, which was discussed in terms of heat generation and propagation in the test coil

  4. Conceptual design Alcator C-MOD magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Becker, H.; Fertl, K.; Gwinn, D.; Montgomery, D.B.; Pierce, N.T.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.; Thome, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The conceptual designs of the magnetic systems for Alcator C-MOD, a proposed tokamak at M.I.T., are described, including the toroidal magnet, the poloidal field coils and the cryogenic system. The toroidal magnet is constructed from rectangular plates, connected by sliding joints. Toroidal magnet forces are contained by a steel superstructure. Poloidal coil system options are largely or wholly inside the TF magnet, in order to control plasmas with high current, strong shaping, and expanded boundaries. All magnets are cryocooled by the natural circulation of boiling liquid nitrogen. 3 refs., 5 figs

  5. Multi-channeled NbN superconducting single photon detectors (SSPDs) system with NbN meander nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Miki, Shigehito; Wang Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting single photon detector (SSPD) is promising candidate of the detector in a quantum key distribution (QKD) system, because of its low dark count and high speed repetition rate. We have developed the SSPD system cooled by a GM cryocooler. In this system, and the work surface can be cooled 2.95 K and up to 6 SSPDs can be installed. The active areas of SSPDs are 10x10 μm 2 or 20x20 μm 2 , and the system detection efficiency at dark count rate of 100 Hz reached 2.6% at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  6. Development and applications of a two-dimensional tip-tilting stage system with nanoradian-level positioning resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Deming, E-mail: shu@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lee, Wah-Keat; Liu, Wenjun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ice, Gene E. [MST Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6132 (United States); Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Kim, Kwang-Je [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, designs of a novel rotary weak-link stage for a vertical rotation axis and a two-dimensional tip-tilting system are presented. Applications of these new stage systems include: an advanced X-ray stereo imaging instrument for particle tracking velocimetry, an alignment stage system for hard X-ray nano-focusing Montel mirror optics, and an ultra-precision crystal manipulator for cryo-cooling optical cavities of an X-ray free-electron-laser oscillator (XFELO).

  7. Recommended food chain parameter values and distributions for use around CANDU sites in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S R

    1996-07-01

    Site-specific parameter values should be used whenever possible to increase the accuracy of dose predictions. Parameter values specific to agricultural practices and human lifestyles in southern Ontario are presented for use in CSA-N288.1-M87 (Canadian Standards Association Guidelines for Calculating Derived Release Limits for Radioactive Material in Airborne and Liquid Effluents for Normal Operation of Nuclear Facilities) and CHERPAC (Chalk River Environmental Research Pathways Analysis Code). Use of these values in place of the default parameter values in CSA-N288.1-M87 is shown to reduce the predicted dose by nearly a factor of 2. (author). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig.

  8. Recommended food chain parameter values and distributions for use around CANDU sites in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.

    1996-07-01

    Site-specific parameter values should be used whenever possible to increase the accuracy of dose predictions. Parameter values specific to agricultural practices and human lifestyles in southern Ontario are presented for use in CSA-N288.1-M87 (Canadian Standards Association Guidelines for Calculating Derived Release Limits for Radioactive Material in Airborne and Liquid Effluents for Normal Operation of Nuclear Facilities) and CHERPAC (Chalk River Environmental Research Pathways Analysis Code). Use of these values in place of the default parameter values in CSA-N288.1-M87 is shown to reduce the predicted dose by nearly a factor of 2. (author). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  10. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (no. 20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987. The latest report, for 1985, is JAERI-M 87-046. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  11. Aerospace Medicine and Biology. A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Measurements, Plenary Meeting, 26th, Topical Meeting and HORNECK, H. BUECKER, R. FACIUS, and M. SCHAEFER (DFVLR, Workshop VII on Life Sciences and...582791 p 281 M87-27392 arid Bliotechnology (5th) held in University Park. SCHAEFER . U. Pennsylvania on February 5. 1906 and July 30 - August w Genetic...UnIv.. Cali. on maime~d apame fnWsna p 277 A07- 4926 Changes in pitatary growth hormone cells prepared from Clualityr requirements for

  12. Reserve Component Programs, Fiscal Year 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    would fight. War- time missions are executed with United States and foreign forces, just as would occur &WV ft Ra RDdNemv cowei hr ~u~, FY M87 Exwutdm...Luxembourg Somalia Bermuda Greece Madagascar South Korea Bolivia Greenland Malaysia Spain Brazil Grenada Marshall Islands Sweden Cameroon Guam Mexico...Major Dell M. Dempsey, USMCR Ecuadoran Military attache in Panama 0 Colonel James V. Dugar, ANGUS * Young, Colonel Ralph R. (USAR) 0 Colonel

  13. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from radio to γ-ray (e.g., Harris et al. 2009; Aharonian et al. 2006), M87 is well studied from various frequencies and spatial scales. It shows a long and resolved jet in the X-ray, optical and radio wave bands (Wilson & Yang 2002), which are widely used to explore the radiative process down the jet (Liu & Shen 2007). With its.

  14. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XXXII. A Search for Globular Cluster Substructures in the Virgo Galaxy Cluster Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Longobardi, Alessia; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Durrell, Patrick; Eigenthaler, Paul; Ferrarese, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Hudelot, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2018-03-01

    Substructure in globular cluster (GC) populations around large galaxies is expected in galaxy formation scenarios that involve accretion or merger events, and it has been searched for using direct associations between GCs and structure in the diffuse galaxy light, or with GC kinematics. Here, we present a search for candidate substructures in the GC population around the Virgo cD galaxy M87 through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the GC colors. The study is based on a sample of ∼1800 bright GCs with high-quality u, g, r, i, z, K s photometry, selected to ensure a low contamination by foreground stars or background galaxies. The spectral energy distributions of the GCs are associated with formal estimates of age and metallicity, which are representative of its position in a 4D color space relative to standard single stellar population models. Dividing the sample into broad bins based on the relative formal ages, we observe inhomogeneities that reveal signatures of GC substructures. The most significant of these is a spatial overdensity of GCs with relatively young age labels, of diameter ∼0.°1 (∼30 kpc), located to the south of M87. The significance of this detection is larger than about 5σ after accounting for estimates of random and systematic errors. Surprisingly, no large Virgo galaxy is present in this area that could potentially host these GCs. But candidate substructures in the M87 halo with equally elusive hosts have been described based on kinematic studies in the past. The number of GC spectra available around M87 is currently insufficient to clarify the nature of the new candidate substructure.

  15. THE IMPACT OF FREQUENCY STANDARDS ON COHERENCE IN VLBI AT THE HIGHEST FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioja, M.; Dodson, R. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Asaki, Y. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuou, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hartnett, J. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Tingay, S., E-mail: maria.rioja@icrar.org [ICRAR, Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2012-10-01

    We have carried out full imaging simulation studies to explore the impact of frequency standards in millimeter and submillimeter very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), focusing on the coherence time and sensitivity. In particular, we compare the performance of the H-maser, traditionally used in VLBI, to that of ultra-stable cryocooled sapphire oscillators over a range of observing frequencies, weather conditions, and analysis strategies. Our simulations show that at the highest frequencies, the losses induced by H-maser instabilities are comparable to those from high-quality tropospheric conditions. We find significant benefits in replacing H-masers with cryocooled sapphire oscillator based frequency references in VLBI observations at frequencies above 175 GHz in sites which have the best weather conditions; at 350 GHz we estimate a 20%-40% increase in sensitivity over that obtained when the sites have H-masers, for coherence losses of 20%-10%, respectively. Maximum benefits are to be expected by using co-located Water Vapor Radiometers for atmospheric correction. In this case, we estimate a 60%-120% increase in sensitivity over the H-maser at 350 GHz.

  16. Development of large bore superconducting magnet for wastewater treatment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui Ming; Xu, Dong; Shen, Fuzhi; Zhang, Hengcheng; Li, Lafeng [State Key Laboratory of Technologies in Space Cryogenic Propellants, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Water issue, especially water pollution, is a serious issue of 21st century. Being an significant technique for securing water resources, superconducting magnetic separation wastewater system was indispensable. A large bore conduction-cooled magnet was custom-tailored for wastewater treatment. The superconducting magnet has been designed, fabricated and tested. The superconducting magnet was composed of NbTi solenoid coils with an effective horizontal warm bore of 400 mm and a maximum central field of 2.56T. The superconducting magnet system was cooled by a two-stage 1.5W 4K GM cryocooler. The NbTi solenoid coils were wound around an aluminum former that is thermally connected to the second stage cold head of the cryocooler through a conductive copper link. The temperature distribution along the conductive link was measured during the cool-down process as well as at steady state. The magnet was cooled down to 4.8K in approximately 65 hours. The test of the magnetic field and quench analysis has been performed to verify the safe operation for the magnet system. Experimental results show that the superconducting magnet reached the designed magnetic performance.

  17. Cryogen free low temperature sample environment for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichek, O; Evans, B E; Down, R B E; Bowden, Z A

    2009-01-01

    Recent increase in liquid helium cost caused by global helium supply problems rose significant concern about affordability of conventional cryogenic equipment. Luckily the progress in cryo-cooler technology offers a new generation of cryogenic systems with significantly reduced consumption and in some cases nearly complete elimination of cryogens. These cryogen-free systems also offer the advantage of operational simplicity and require less space than conventional cryogen-cooled systems. The ISIS facility carries on an internal development program intended to substitute gradually all conventional cryogenic systems with cryogen free systems preferably based on pulse tube refrigerators. A unique feature of this cryo-cooler is the absence of cold moving parts. This considerably reduces vibrations and increases the reliability of the cold head. The program includes few development projects which are aiming to deliver range of cryogen free equipment including top-loading cryostat, superconducting magnets and dilution refrigerators. Here we are going to describe the design of these systems and discuss the results of prototypes testing.

  18. Fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Olof; Malbet-Monaco, Stéphanie; Popov, Alexander; Nurizzo, Didier; Bowler, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    A fully automatic system has been developed that performs X-ray centring and characterization of, and data collection from, large numbers of cryocooled crystals without human intervention. Considerable effort is dedicated to evaluating macromolecular crystals at synchrotron sources, even for well established and robust systems. Much of this work is repetitive, and the time spent could be better invested in the interpretation of the results. In order to decrease the need for manual intervention in the most repetitive steps of structural biology projects, initial screening and data collection, a fully automatic system has been developed to mount, locate, centre to the optimal diffraction volume, characterize and, if possible, collect data from multiple cryocooled crystals. Using the capabilities of pixel-array detectors, the system is as fast as a human operator, taking an average of 6 min per sample depending on the sample size and the level of characterization required. Using a fast X-ray-based routine, samples are located and centred systematically at the position of highest diffraction signal and important parameters for sample characterization, such as flux, beam size and crystal volume, are automatically taken into account, ensuring the calculation of optimal data-collection strategies. The system is now in operation at the new ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 and has been used by both industrial and academic users for many different sample types, including crystals of less than 20 µm in the smallest dimension. To date, over 8000 samples have been evaluated on MASSIF-1 without any human intervention

  19. High Tc Superconducting Magnet Excited by a Semiconductor Thermoelectric Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, T.; Ono, M.; Tabe, S.; Oguchi, A.; Okamura, T.

    2006-04-01

    A high Tc superconducting (HTS) magnet excited by a thermal electromotive force of a thermoelectric element is studied. This HTS magnet has the advantages of compactness, lightweight and continuous excitation in comparison with conventional HTS magnets, because this HTS magnet does not need a large external power source. In this system, a heat input into the cryogenic environment is necessary to excite the thermoelectric element for constant operation. This heat generation, however, causes a rise in temperature of an HTS coil and reduces the system performance. In this paper, a newly designed magnet system which adopted a two-stage GM cryocooler was investigated. It enabled us to control the temperature of a thermoelectric element and that of an HTS coil independently. The temperature of the HTS coil could be kept at 10-20 K at the second stage of the GM cryocooler, while the thermoelectric element could be excited at higher temperature in the range of 50-70 K at the first stage, where the performance of the thermoelectric element was higher. The experimental results on this HTS magnet are shown and the possibility of the thermoelectric element as a main power source of the HTS magnets is discussed.

  20. A Dual Operational Refrigerator/Flow Cryostat with Wide Bore Medium Field Magnet for Application Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. A.; Bailey, W. O. S.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Beduz, C.; Yang, Y.; Chappell, S.; Twin, A.

    Since stand alone cryocooler systems have become more widely available, there has been increased commercial interest in superconductor applications in the temperature range intermediate to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen. There are however few facilities that have large in-field bore size with variable temperatures. A large bore system can reduce costs associated with full scale demonstration magnets by testing smaller coils and qualify medium length (up to meters) conductors. A 5 T, wide bore, (170 mm) Nb3Sn Oxford Instrument magnet has been integrated into a custom built dual mode refrigerator/helium flow cryostat with 600A HTS current leads. In one mode the system can be used with zero field without cost of liquid helium relying for cooling on a Sumitomo GM cryocooler with 1.5W at 4.2K: (no He) this can be used either as the sole characterisation method, or as a preliminary check before more expensive and extensive measurements are taken. The first measurements using MgB2 wire from 10 to 20K were made using a transient current step of ∼5s duration, as opposed to a DC measurement. This has the advantage of not requiring thermal equilibrium to be achieved at nominal current. The feasibility of this technique for determining critical transport properties is discussed.

  1. Atmosphere Processing Module Automation and Catalyst Durability Analysis for Mars ISRU Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Elspeth M.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization Pathfinder was designed to create fuel using components found in the planet’s atmosphere and regolith for an ascension vehicle to return a potential sample return or crew return vehicle from Mars. The Atmosphere Processing Module (APM), a subunit of the pathfinder, uses cryocoolers to isolate and collect carbon dioxide from Mars simulant gas. The carbon dioxide is fed with hydrogen into a Sabatier reactor where methane is produced. The APM is currently undergoing the final stages of testing at Kennedy Space Center prior to process integration testing with the other subunits of the pathfinder. The automation software for the APM cryocoolers was tested and found to perform nominally. The catalyst used for the Sabatier reactor was investigated to determine the factors contributing to catalyst failure. The results from the catalyst testing require further analysis, but it appears that the rapid change in temperature during reactor start up or the elevated operating temperature is responsible for the changes observed in the catalyst.

  2. Basic study of HTS magnet using 2G wires for maglev train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Hasegawa, H.; Sasakawa, T.; Nagashima, K.

    2010-01-01

    There are several advantages by applying a high-temperature superconducting wire to an on-board superconducting magnet for the maglev train. At first, an increase of thermal capacity of superconducting coils contributes a stability of the superconducting state of the coils. In addition, a reliability of superconducting magnet improves by simplification of the magnet structure. And the weight of the superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of the on-board cryocooler will decrease. Therefore, we examined the possibility on application of the 2G wire with a high critical current density in a high magnetic field. We performed numerical analysis regarding the weight of a superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of an on-board cryocooler in consideration of the characteristics of the 2G wire. Furthermore, we have carried out the I c measurement for the commercial 2G wires under various experimental conditions such as temperature, magnetic field strength and angle. We also performed the trial manufacture and evaluation of I c characteristics for the small race track-shaped superconducting coil.

  3. Preliminary study of HTS magnet using 2G wires for maglev train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Masafumi; Miyazaki, Yoshiki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Sasakawa, Takashi; Nagashima, Ken

    2010-01-01

    There are several advantages by applying a high temperature superconducting wire to an on-board superconducting magnet for the maglev train. At first, an increase of thermal capacity of superconducting coils contributes a stability of the superconducting state of the coils. In addition, a reliability of superconducting magnet improves by simplification of the magnet structure. And the weight of the superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of the on-board cryocooler will decrease. Therefore, we examined the possibility on application of the 2G wire with a high critical current density in a high magnetic field. We performed numerical analysis regarding the weight of a superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of an on-board cryocooler in consideration of the characteristics of the 2G wire. Furthermore, we have carried out the I c measurement for the commercial 2G wires under various experimental conditions such as temperature, magnetic field strength and angle. We also performed the trial manufacture and evaluation of I c characteristics for the small race track-shaped superconducting coil.

  4. Thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a HTS NMR magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Se Hwan; Hong, Yong Jun; Yeom, Han Kil; Ko, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The superconducting NMR magnets have used cryogen such as liquid helium for their cooling. The conduction cooling method using cryocoolers, however, makes the cryogenic cooling system for NMR magnets more compact and user-friendly than the cryogen cooling method. This paper describes the thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a 400 MHz HTS NMR magnet, focusing on the magnet assembly. The highly thermo-conductive cooling plates between HTS double pancake coils are used to transfer the heat generated in coils, namely Joule heating at lap splice joints, to thermal link blocks and finally the cryocooler. The conduction cooling structure of the HTS magnet assembly preliminarily designed is verified by thermal and structural analysis. The orthotropic thermal properties of the HTS coil, thermal contact resistance and radiation heat load are considered in the thermal analysis. The thermal analysis confirms the uniform temperature distribution for the present thermal design of the NMR magnet within 0.2 K. The mechanical stress and the displacement by the electromagnetic force and the thermal contraction are checked to verify structural stability. The structural analysis indicates that the mechanical stress on each component of the magnet is less than its material yield strength and the displacement is acceptable in comparison with the magnet dimension.

  5. Study of Transport and Micro-structural properties of Magnesium Di-Boride Strand under react and bend mode and bend and react mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Ananya; Kumar Das, Subrat; Bano, Anees; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-01-01

    I-V characterization of commercial multi-filamentary Magnesium Di-Boride (MgB 2 ) wire of diameter 0.83 mm were studied in Cryocooler at self-field I-V characterization system under both react and bend mode and bend and react mode for a range of temperature 6 K - 25 K. This study is of practical technical relevance where the heat treatment of the superconducting wire makes the wire less flexible for winding in magnet and in other applications. In the present work the bending diameter was varied from 40 mm to 20 mm and for each case critical current (I c ) of the strand is measured for above range of temperature. A customized sample holder is fabricated and thermally anchored with the 2 nd cold stage of Cryocooler. It is observed from the measurement that the strand is more susceptible to degradation for react and bend cases. The transport measurement of the strand was accompanied by SEM analyses of bend samples. Also the tensile strength of the raw strands and the heat treated strands were carried out at room temperature in Universal Testing Machine (UTM) to have an estimate about the limiting winding tension value during magnet fabrication. (paper)

  6. Thermal conductivity measurements of impregnated Nb3Sn coil samples in the temperature range of 3.5 K to 100 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koettig, T.; Maciocha, W.; Bermudez, S.; Rysti, J.; Tavares, S.; Cacherat, F.; Bremer, J.

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the luminosity upgrade of the LHC, high-field magnets are under development. Magnetic flux densities of up to 13 T require the use of Nb3Sn superconducting coils. Quench protection becomes challenging due to the high stored energy density and the low stabilizer fraction. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the combination of insulating layers and Nb3Sn based cables are an important thermodynamic input parameter for quench protection systems and superfluid helium cooling studies. A two-stage cryocooler based test stand is used to measure the thermal conductance of the coil sample in two different heat flow directions with respect to the coil package geometry. Variable base temperatures of the experimental platform at the cryocooler allow for a steady-state heat flux method up to 100 K. The heat is applied at wedges style copper interfaces of the Rutherford cables. The respective temperature difference represents the absolute value of thermal conductance of the sample arrangement. We report about the measurement methodology applied to this kind of non-uniform sample composition and the evaluation of the used resin composite materials.

  7. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, D.W.; Kwon, J.M.; Baik, S.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Han, K.S.; Ko, R.K.; Sohn, M.H.; Seong, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic separation using cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet was applied for the purification of condenser water. Iron oxides in condenser water were effectively removed by superconducting magnetic separation. The effect of magnetic field strength and filter size was determined. Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly α-Fe 2 O 3 (hematite) and γ-Fe 2 O 3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  8. Efficient biostorage below -150 °C, without sacrificial cryogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoor, Philip S.

    2017-12-01

    Biostorage is a multi-billion dollar business worldwide and growing rapidly; yet the commercially available options force the user to choose either optimal storage temperature (below -137 °C, the “glass transition temperature” of water) or convenience (no cryogen refill). Passive liquid-nitrogen freezers (storage Dewars with liquid nitrogen pooled at the bottom) provide very cold storage (-190 °C) but the LN2 must be replenished as it boils off. The alternative, so-called “ultra-low” vapor-compression freezers, have no cryogens to replenish and are convenient to use, but only reach storage temperatures above -90 °C. In addition, these tend to be inefficient and costly. Chart Industries is introducing a novel combination of a storage Dewar with a cryocooler (the “Fusion” freezer), that can maintain storage temperatures below -150 °C without the need to replenish any cryogen, while drawing less electricity than any ultra-low on the market. This new product also fits into a relatively narrow “demand window” where on-site cryocooling is not merely more convenient, but also more costeffective than liquid nitrogen delivery.

  9. Vibration measurements of high-heat-load monochromators for DESY PETRA III extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, Paw, E-mail: paw.kristiansen@fmb-oxford.com [FMB Oxford Ltd, Unit 1 Ferry Mills, Oxford OX2 0ES (United Kingdom); Horbach, Jan; Döhrmann, Ralph; Heuer, Joachim [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-05-09

    Vibration measurements of a cryocooled double-crystal monochromator are presented. The origins of the vibrations are identified. The minimum achieved vibration of the relative pitch between the two crystals is 48 nrad RMS and the minimum achieved absolute vibration of the second crystal is 82 nrad RMS. The requirement for vibrational stability of beamline optics continues to evolve rapidly to comply with the demands created by the improved brilliance of the third-generation low-emittance storage rings around the world. The challenge is to quantify the performance of the instrument before it is installed at the beamline. In this article, measurement techniques are presented that directly and accurately measure (i) the relative vibration between the two crystals of a double-crystal monochromator (DCM) and (ii) the absolute vibration of the second-crystal cage of a DCM. Excluding a synchrotron beam, the measurements are conducted under in situ conditions, connected to a liquid-nitrogen cryocooler. The investigated DCM utilizes a direct-drive (no gearing) goniometer for the Bragg rotation. The main causes of the DCM vibration are found to be the servoing of the direct-drive goniometer and the flexibility in the crystal cage motion stages. It is found that the investigated DCM can offer relative pitch vibration down to 48 nrad RMS (capacitive sensors, 0–5 kHz bandwidth) and absolute pitch vibration down to 82 nrad RMS (laser interferometer, 0–50 kHz bandwidth), with the Bragg axis brake engaged.

  10. Development and test of a cryogenic trap system dedicated to confinement of radioactive volatile isotopes in SPIRAL2 post-accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souli, M.; Dolégiéviez, P.; Fadil, M.; Gallardo, P.; Levallois, R.; Munoz, H.; Ozille, M.; Rouillé, G.; Galet, F.

    2011-12-01

    A cryogenic trap system called Cryotrap has been studied and developed in the framework of nuclear safety studies for SPIRAL2 accelerator. The main objective of Cryotrap is to confine and reduce strongly the migration of radioactive volatile isotopes in beam lines. These radioactive gases are produced after interaction between a deuteron beam and a fissile target. Mainly, Cryotrap is composed by a vacuum vessel and two copper thermal screens maintained separately at two temperatures T1=80 K and T2=20 K. A Cryocooler with two stages at previous temperatures is used to remove static heat losses of the cryostat and ensure an efficient cooling of the system. Due to strong radiological constraints that surround Cryotrap, the coupling system between Cryocooler and thermal screens is based on aluminum thermo-mechanical contraction. The main objective of this original design is to limit direct human maintenance interventions and provide maximum automated operations. A preliminary prototype of Cryotrap has been developed and tested at GANIL laboratory to validate its design, and determine its thermal performance and trapping efficiency. In this paper, we will first introduce briefly SPIRAL2 project and discuss the main role of Cryotrap in nuclear safety of the accelerator. Then, we will describe the proposed conceptual design of Cryotrap and its main characteristics. After that, we will focus on test experiment and analyze experimental data. Finally, we will present preliminary results of gas trapping efficiency tests.

  11. Cooling System for a Frame-Store PN-CCD Detector for Low Background Application

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, H; Santos Silva, P; Kuster, M; Lang, P

    2012-01-01

    The astroparticle physics experiment CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) aims to detect hypothetical axions or axion-like particles produced in the Sun by the Primakoff process. A Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype superconducting dipole magnet provides a 9 T transverse magnetic field for the conversion of axions into detectable X-ray photons. These photons are detected with an X-ray telescope and a novel type of frame-store CCD detector built from radio-pure materials, installed in the optics focal plane. A novel type of cooling system has been designed and built based on krypton-filled cryogenic heat pipes, made out of oxygen-free radiopure copper, and a Stirling cryocooler as cold source. The heat pipes provide an efficient thermal coupling between the cryocooler and the CCD which is kept at stable temperatures between 150 and 230 K within an accuracy of 0.1 K. A graded-Z radiation shield, also serving as a gas cold-trap operated at 120 K, is implemented to reduce the surface contamination of the CCD wind...

  12. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  13. Basic study of HTS magnet using 2G wires for maglev train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, M., E-mail: ogata@rtri.or.j [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Miyazaki, Y.; Hasegawa, H.; Sasakawa, T.; Nagashima, K. [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    There are several advantages by applying a high-temperature superconducting wire to an on-board superconducting magnet for the maglev train. At first, an increase of thermal capacity of superconducting coils contributes a stability of the superconducting state of the coils. In addition, a reliability of superconducting magnet improves by simplification of the magnet structure. And the weight of the superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of the on-board cryocooler will decrease. Therefore, we examined the possibility on application of the 2G wire with a high critical current density in a high magnetic field. We performed numerical analysis regarding the weight of a superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of an on-board cryocooler in consideration of the characteristics of the 2G wire. Furthermore, we have carried out the I{sub c} measurement for the commercial 2G wires under various experimental conditions such as temperature, magnetic field strength and angle. We also performed the trial manufacture and evaluation of I{sub c} characteristics for the small race track-shaped superconducting coil.

  14. Preliminary study of HTS magnet using 2G wires for maglev train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Masafumi; Miyazaki, Yoshiki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Sasakawa, Takashi; Nagashima, Ken, E-mail: ogata@rtri.or.j [Railway Technical Research Institute, Hikari-cho 2-8-38, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    There are several advantages by applying a high temperature superconducting wire to an on-board superconducting magnet for the maglev train. At first, an increase of thermal capacity of superconducting coils contributes a stability of the superconducting state of the coils. In addition, a reliability of superconducting magnet improves by simplification of the magnet structure. And the weight of the superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of the on-board cryocooler will decrease. Therefore, we examined the possibility on application of the 2G wire with a high critical current density in a high magnetic field. We performed numerical analysis regarding the weight of a superconducting magnet and the energy consumption of an on-board cryocooler in consideration of the characteristics of the 2G wire. Furthermore, we have carried out the I{sub c} measurement for the commercial 2G wires under various experimental conditions such as temperature, magnetic field strength and angle. We also performed the trial manufacture and evaluation of I{sub c} characteristics for the small race track-shaped superconducting coil.

  15. Results of KEPCO HTS cable system tests and design of hybrid cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.H.; Sohn, S.H.; Yang, H.S.; Hwang, S.D.; Kim, D.L.; Ryoo, H.S.; Choi, H.O.

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the compatibility as a power utility facility, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) had installed a 22.9 kV, 1250 A, 100 m long high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable system. Using the HTS cable, various tests have been performed to investigate electrical and thermo-mechanical properties. Since 2005, a series of thermal cycle tests between liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) and ambient temperatures have been conducted using a vacuum-pump driven open-loop cryogenic system with a capacity of 3 kW. In the tests, although the open-loop cryogenic system was reliable to operate the HTS cable system, it was not effective in economic view point because LN 2 consumption was larger than expected. In order to secure against unexpected emergencies and solve the problem of LN 2 consumption, a hybrid cryogenic system was designed and installed. A stirling cryocooler was employed and combined with the open-loop cryogenic system. Considering the average heat load at rated condition, the cooling capacity of the cryocooler was determined to 4 kW at 77 K. In this paper, results of performance tests and the design of the hybrid cooling system are presented.

  16. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourme, Roger, E-mail: roger.fourme@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, Eric [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dhaussy, Anne-Claire [CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Maréchal Juin, 14000 Caen (France); Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Prangé, Thierry [LCRB (UMR 8015 CNRS), Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75270 Paris (France); Ascone, Isabella [ENSCP (UMR CNRS 7223), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mezouar, Mohamed [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kahn, Richard [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined.

  17. Suppression of acoustic streaming in tapered pulse tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, J.R.; Swift, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    In a pulse tube cryocooler, the gas in the pulse tube can be thought of as an insulating piston, transmitting pressure and velocity from the cold heat exchanger to the hot end of the pulse tube. Unfortunately, convective heat transfer can carry heat from the hot end to the cold end and reduce the net cooling power. Here, the authors discuss one driver of such convection: steady acoustic streaming as generated by interactions between the boundary and the oscillating pressure, velocity, and temperature. Using a perturbation method, they have derived an analytical expression for the streaming in a tapered pulse tube with axially varying mean temperature in the acoustic boundary layer limit. The calculations showed that the streaming depends strongly on the taper angle, the ratio of velocity and pressure amplitudes, and the phase between the velocity and pressure, but it depends only weakly on the mean temperature profile and is independent of the overall oscillatory amplitude. With the appropriate tapering of the tube, streaming can be eliminated for a particular operating condition. Experimentally, the authors have demonstrated that an orifice pulse tube cryocooler with the calculated zero-streaming taper has more cooling power than one with either a cylindrical tube or a tapered pulse tube with twice the optimum taper angle

  18. A numerical and experimental investigation of the thermal control performance of a spaceborne compressor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Ung; Lee, Min-Kyu; Shin, Somin; Hong, Joo-Sung

    2011-09-01

    Spaceborne pulse tube type cryocoolers are widely used for providing cryogenic temperatures for sensitive infrared, gamma-ray and X-ray detectors. Thermal control for the compressor of the cryocooler is one of the important technologies for the cooling performance, mission life time, and jitter stability of the cooler. The thermal design of the compressor assembly proposed in this study is basically composed of a heat pipe, a radiator, and a heater. In the present work, a method for heat pipe implementation is proposed and investigated to ensure the jitter stability of the compressor under the condition that one heat pipe is not working. An optimal design of the radiator that uses ribs for effective use by minimizing the temperature gradient on the radiator and reducing its weight is introduced. The effectiveness of the thermal design of the compressor assembly is demonstrated by on-orbit thermal analysis using the correlated thermal model obtained from the thermal balance test that is performed under a space simulating environment.

  19. Available pressure amplitude of linear compressor based on phasor triangle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, C. X.; Jiang, X.; Zhi, X. Q.; You, X. K.; Qiu, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    The linear compressor for cryocoolers possess the advantages of long-life operation, high efficiency, low vibration and compact structure. It is significant to study the match mechanisms between the compressor and the cold finger, which determines the working efficiency of the cryocooler. However, the output characteristics of linear compressor are complicated since it is affected by many interacting parameters. The existing matching methods are simplified and mainly focus on the compressor efficiency and output acoustic power, while neglecting the important output parameter of pressure amplitude. In this study, a phasor triangle model basing on analyzing the forces of the piston is proposed. It can be used to predict not only the output acoustic power, the efficiency, but also the pressure amplitude of the linear compressor. Calculated results agree well with the measurement results of the experiment. By this phasor triangle model, the theoretical maximum output pressure amplitude of the linear compressor can be calculated simply based on a known charging pressure and operating frequency. Compared with the mechanical and electrical model of the linear compressor, the new model can provide an intuitionistic understanding on the match mechanism with faster computational process. The model can also explain the experimental phenomenon of the proportional relationship between the output pressure amplitude and the piston displacement in experiments. By further model analysis, such phenomenon is confirmed as an expression of the unmatched design of the compressor. The phasor triangle model may provide an alternative method for the compressor design and matching with the cold finger.

  20. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  1. Fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Olof; Malbet-Monaco, Stéphanie; Popov, Alexander; Nurizzo, Didier, E-mail: nurizzo@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Bowler, Matthew W., E-mail: nurizzo@esrf.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-31

    A fully automatic system has been developed that performs X-ray centring and characterization of, and data collection from, large numbers of cryocooled crystals without human intervention. Considerable effort is dedicated to evaluating macromolecular crystals at synchrotron sources, even for well established and robust systems. Much of this work is repetitive, and the time spent could be better invested in the interpretation of the results. In order to decrease the need for manual intervention in the most repetitive steps of structural biology projects, initial screening and data collection, a fully automatic system has been developed to mount, locate, centre to the optimal diffraction volume, characterize and, if possible, collect data from multiple cryocooled crystals. Using the capabilities of pixel-array detectors, the system is as fast as a human operator, taking an average of 6 min per sample depending on the sample size and the level of characterization required. Using a fast X-ray-based routine, samples are located and centred systematically at the position of highest diffraction signal and important parameters for sample characterization, such as flux, beam size and crystal volume, are automatically taken into account, ensuring the calculation of optimal data-collection strategies. The system is now in operation at the new ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 and has been used by both industrial and academic users for many different sample types, including crystals of less than 20 µm in the smallest dimension. To date, over 8000 samples have been evaluated on MASSIF-1 without any human intervention.

  2. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, J; De Sousa, P Borges; Martins, D; Bonfait, G; Catarino, I; Kar, S

    2015-01-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported. (paper)

  3. Flux mapping at 77 K and local measurement at lower temperature of thin-wall YBaCuO single-domain samples oxygenated under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaud, X., E-mail: Xavier.chaud@grenoble.cnrs.f [CRETA, CNRS, 25, Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Noudem, J. [CRISMAT/ENSICAEN, CNRS, 6 bd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Prikhna, T.; Savchuk, Y. [ISM, National Acad. of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Avtozavodskaya Street, Kiev, 04074 (Ukraine); Haanappel, E. [LNCMP, UMR 5147, 143 avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Diko, P. [IEP, Slovak Acad. of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53, Kosice (Slovakia); Zhang, C.P. [SMRC, NIN, 96 Weiyang Road, Xi' an 710016 (China)

    2009-10-15

    YBCO single-domain samples are suitable for the production of high trapped fields in the range 20-77 K using a cryocooler or liquid nitrogen. But the oxygenation process required to actually transform the single domains into superconductors induces an extensive crack network that is limiting the material performances. Thin-wall geometry has been introduced to reduce the diffusion paths and to enable a progressive oxygenation strategy. As a consequence cracks are drastically reduced. In addition the use of a high oxygen pressure (16 MPa) speeds up further the process by displacing the oxygen-temperature equilibrium towards the higher temperature of the phase diagram. The advantage of thin-wall geometry is that such an annealing can be applied directly to a much larger sample. Remarkable results are obtained without any doping by the combination of thin walls and oxygen high pressure. While classical plain samples yield 300-400 mT, a trapped field of 840 mT has been measured at 77 K on a 16 mm diameter Y123 thin-wall single-domain sample with an annealing time as short as 3 days. Local measurements with a fixed Hall probe on top of the sample were performed at lower temperature after magnetization either in a static field or in a pulse field. The trapped field is significantly higher at lower temperature. Cryocoolers become the key to compromise between performances and cryogenic cost around 40 K.

  4. CALCULATED REGENERATOR PERFORMANCE AT 4 K WITH HELIUM-4 AND HELIUM-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radebaugh, Ray; Huang Yonghua; O'Gallagher, Agnes; Gary, John

    2008-01-01

    The helium-4 working fluid in regenerative cryocoolers operating with the cold end near 4 K deviates considerably from an ideal gas. As a result, losses in the regenerator, given by the time-averaged enthalpy flux, are increased and are strong functions of the operating pressure and temperature. Helium-3, with its lower boiling point, behaves somewhat closer to an ideal gas in this low temperature range and can reduce the losses in 4 K regenerators. An analytical model is used to find the fluid properties that strongly influence the regenerator losses as well as the gross refrigeration power. The thermodynamic and transport properties of helium-3 were incorporated into the latest NIST regenerator numerical model, known as REGEN3.3, which was used to model regenerator performance with either helium-4 or helium-3. With this model we show how the use of helium-3 in place of helium-4 can improve the performance of 4 K regenerative cryocoolers. The effects of operating pressure, warm-end temperature, and frequency on regenerators with helium-4 and helium-3 are investigated and compared. The results are used to find optimum operating conditions. The frequency range investigated varies from 1 Hz to 30 Hz, with particular emphasis on higher frequencies

  5. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection

  6. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi, E-mail: kumasaka@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  7. FAR-UV EMISSION PROPERTIES OF FR1 RADIO GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Stocke, John T.; France, Kevin; Begelman, Mitchell C. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perlman, Eric, E-mail: danforth@colorado.edu [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 W. University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The power mechanism and accretion geometry for low-power FR 1 radio galaxies are poorly understood in comparison to those for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs. In this paper, we use the diagnostic power of the Ly α recombination line observed using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) to investigate the accretion flows in three well-known, nearby FR 1s: M87, NGC 4696, and Hydra A. The Ly α emission line’s luminosity, velocity structure, and the limited knowledge of its spatial extent provided by COS are used to assess conditions within a few parsecs of the supermassive black hole in these radio-mode active galactic nuclei. We observe strong Ly α emission in all three objects with total luminosity similar to that seen in BL Lacertae objects. M87 shows a complicated emission-line profile in Ly α , which varies spatially across the COS aperture and possibly temporally over several epochs of observation. In both NGC 4696 and M87, the Ly α luminosities ∼10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} are closely consistent with the observed strength of the ionizing continuum in Case B recombination theory and with the assumption of a near-unity covering factor. It is possible that the Ly α -emitting clouds are ionized largely by beamed radiation associated with the jets. Long-slit UV spectroscopy can be used to test this hypothesis. Hydra A and the several BL Lac objects studied in this and previous papers have Ly α luminosities larger than M87 but their extrapolated, nonthermal continua are so luminous that they overpredict the observed strength of Ly α , a clear indicator of relativistic beaming in our direction. Given their substantial space density (∼4 × 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}), the unbeamed Lyman continuum radiation of FR 1s may make a substantial minority contribution (∼10%) to the local UV background if all FR 1s are similar to M87 in ionizing flux level.

  8. The next generation Virgo cluster survey. VIII. The spatial distribution of globular clusters in the Virgo cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrell, Patrick R.; Accetta, Katharine [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan; Gwyn, Stephen [Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hongxin [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Puzia, Thomas H.; Jordán, Andrés [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Av. Vicu' a Mackenna 4860, Macul 7820436, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Courteau, Stéphane [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Duc, Pierre-Alain [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Emsellem, Eric [Université de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 av. Charles André, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, ENS de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters (Virgo A = M87 and Virgo B = M49) out to their virial radii. Using the g{sub o}{sup ′}, (g' – i') {sub o} color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally resolved sources within the NGVS, we have constructed two-dimensional maps of the (irregular) GC distribution over 100 deg{sup 2} to a depth of g{sub o}{sup ′} = 24. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the full extent of the cluster, where the red (more metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies in Virgo, while the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a much more extended spatial distribution with significant populations still present beyond 83' (∼215 kpc) along the major axes of both M49 and M87. A comparison of our GC maps to the diffuse light in the outermost regions of M49 and M87 show remarkable agreement in the shape, ellipticity, and boxiness of both luminous systems. We also find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to that of the locations of Virgo galaxies and the X-ray intracluster gas, and find generally good agreement between these various baryonic structures. We calculate the Virgo cluster contains a total population of N {sub GC} = 67, 300 ± 14, 400, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. For the first time, we compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S {sub N,} {sub CL} = 2.8 ± 0.7, after correcting for Virgo's diffuse light. We also find a GC-to-baryonic mass fraction ε {sub b} = 5.7 ± 1.1 × 10{sup –4} and a GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency ε {sub t} = 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10{sup –5

  9. Giant Galaxy's Violent Past Comes Into Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Long-exposure images of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, together with radio observations, have provided spectacular evidence of repetitive outbursts from the vicinity of the galaxy's supermassive black hole. Magnetized rings, bubbles, plumes and jets ranging in size from a few thousand to a few hundred thousand light years point to ongoing violent activity for hundreds of millions of years. "The hot X-ray emitting gas extending for hundreds of thousands of light years around M87 reveals a record of episodes of black hole activity," said Paul Nulsen of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass. and an author of an Astrophysical Journal paper describing the latest Chandra observations. "With these detailed observations, we are beginning to understand how the central supermassive black hole transfers enormous amounts of energy over vast reaches of space." M87, located in the middle of the Virgo galaxy cluster, is surrounded by an extensive atmosphere of multi-million degree Celsius gas. Chandra's long-exposure image has allowed astronomers to see in more detail structures discovered by previous observations with Chandra and other X-ray telescopes, to discover new features, and to make specific comparisons with radio images, which trace the presence of high-energy electrons in a magnetic field." X-ray Image of M87 Chandra X-ray Image of M87, Close-Up The picture that emerges is one in which the infall of material toward a central supermassive black hole produces a magnetized jet of high-energy particles that blasts away from the vicinity of the black hole at near the speed of light. As a jet plows into the surrounding gas, a buoyant, magnetized bubble of high-energy particles is created, and an intense sound wave rushes ahead of the expanding bubble. In Chandra's image of M87, X-rays from the jet dominate the central region of the galaxy. The jet is thought to be pointed at a small angle toward the

  10. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  11. Bioremediation at a global scale: from the test tube to planet Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Víctor; Marlière, Philippe; Solé, Ricard

    2016-09-01

    Planet Earth's biosphere has evolved over billions of years as a balanced bio-geological system ultimately sustained by sunpower and the large-scale cycling of elements largely run by the global environmental microbiome. Humans have been part of this picture for much of their existence. But the industrial revolution started in the XIX century and the subsequent advances in medicine, chemistry, agriculture and communications have impacted such balances to an unprecedented degree - and the problem has nothing but exacerbated in the last 20 years. Human overpopulation, industrial growth along with unsustainable use of natural resources have driven many sites and perhaps the planetary ecosystem as a whole, beyond recovery by spontaneous natural means, even if the immediate causes could be stopped. The most conspicuous indications of such a state of affairs include the massive change in land use, the accelerated increase in the levels of greenhouse gases, the frequent natural disasters associated to climate change and the growing non-recyclable waste (e.g. plastics and recalcitrant chemicals) that we release to the Environment. While the whole planet is afflicted at a global scale by chemical pollution and anthropogenic emissions, the ongoing development of systems and synthetic biology, metagenomics, modern chemistry and some key concepts from ecological theory allow us to tackle this phenomenal challenge and propose large-scale interventions aimed at reversing and even improving the situation. This involves (i) identification of key reactions or processes that need to be re-established (or altogether created) for ecosystem reinstallation, (ii) implementation of such reactions in natural or designer hosts able to self-replicate and deliver the corresponding activities when/where needed in a fashion guided by sound ecological modelling, (iii) dispersal of niche-creating agents at a global scale and (iv) containment, monitoring and risk assessment of the whole process

  12. Small Radioisotope Power System Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina; Bell, Mark; Oriti, Salvatore; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David; Duven, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer. A single ASC produces approximately 80 We making this system advantageous for small distributed lunar science stations. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with a passive balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with a passive balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. The single ASC with a passive balancer, simulated lunar lander test stand, and SCC were delivered to GRC and were tested as a system. The testing sequence at GRC included SCC fault tolerance, integration, electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and extended operation testing. The SCC fault tolerance test characterized the SCCs ability to handle various fault conditions, including high or low bus power consumption, total open load or short circuit, and replacing a failed SCC card while the backup maintains control of the ASC. The integrated test characterized the behavior of the system across a range of operating conditions, including variations in cold-end temperature and piston amplitude, including the emitted vibration to both the sensors on the lunar lander and the lunar surface. The EMI test characterized the AC and DC magnetic and electric fields emitted by the SCC and single ASC. The vibration test confirms the SCCs ability to control the single ASC during launch. The extended operation test allows data to be collected over a period of thousands of hours to obtain long term performance data of the ASC with a passive balancer and the SCC. This paper will discuss the results of each of these tests.

  13. Sacramento Municipal Utility District PV and Smart Grid Pilot at Anatolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawson, Mark; Sanchez, Eddie Paul

    2013-12-30

    Under DE-FOA-0000085 High Penetration Solar Deployment, the U. S. Department of Energy funded agreements with SMUD and Navigant Consulting, SunPower, GridPoint, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the California Energy Commission for this pilot demonstration project. Funding was $5,962,409.00. Cost share of $500,000 was also provided by the California Energy Commission. The project has strategic implications for SMUD, other utilities and the PV and energy-storage industries in business and resource planning, technology deployment and asset management. These implications include: -At this point, no dominant business models have emerged and the industry is open for new ideas. -Demonstrated two business models for using distributed PV and energy storage, and brainstormed several dozen more, each with different pros and cons for SMUD, its customers and the industry. -Energy storage can be used to manage high penetrations of PV and mitigate potential issues such as reverse power flow, voltage control violations, power quality issues, increased wear and tear on utility equipment, and system wide power supply issues. - Smart meters are another tool utilities can use to manage high penetrations of PV. The necessary equipment and protocols exist, and the next step is to determine how to integrate the functionality with utility programs and what level of utility control is required. - Time-of-use rates for the residential customers who hosted energy storage systems did not cause a significant change in energy usage patterns. However, the rates we used were not optimized for PV and energy storage. Opportunities exist for utilities to develop new structures.

  14. Demonstrating leadership inside and out : green building project trains employees, educates clients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-01-15

    This article described a full-scale green renovation project undertaken by a construction management firm in Newton, Massachusetts. Chapman Construction and Design began renovating its own office building in late 2007 and completed it in September 2008. The firm set out to achieve LEED Platinum certification from the United States Green Building Council. The project involved energy saving modifications to its mechanical systems; replacing plumbing fixtures with high efficiency alternatives to reduce water consumption by at least 40 per cent; installing skylights and additional windows to allow more natural light into the interior space; salvaging doors, lighting, metal studs and masonry whenever possible; and using sustainable products such as recyclable carpets, tiles and low-VOC paint. The main feature of the renovation was a new 47 kW (DC) photovoltaic (PV) solar power array installed on the rooftop. The PV array includes 208 panels and a SunPower SPR-225 system that produces 55,000 kWh of clean power per year. This grid connected system will supply 90 per cent of the company's electricity needs. During times of peak production, excess power will be sent back to the utility. This article also described the 3 different roofing systems upon which the PV system was installed. All of the roofing systems were manufactured by the Firestone Building Products Company and included an innovative and highly reflective white thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) single-ply roofing system; a RubberGard EPDM roofing system that was coated with Firestone's white AcryliTop coating which exceeds Energy Star requirements for energy efficiency; and a 1.5 mm Firestone UltraPly TPO membrane. The easy to install roofing systems were designed to prolong the service life of the roof and reflect solar radiation. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  15. ETUDE DE L’INFLUENCE DES DIFFERENTS PARAMETRES SUR UN MODULE PHOTOVOLTAÏQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assia ZERDOUDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available L’Algérie dispose d’environ 3200 heures d’ensoleillement par année, bénéficiant d’une situation climatique favorable à l’application des techniques solaires. La conception des installations efficaces et rentables sur la base des modules solaires est particulièrement importante. Des logiciels dédiés à la simulation des systèmes photovoltaïques peuvent réaliser une vaste et précise analyse, mais ils ne permettent généralement pas à l'utilisateur de modifier les algorithmes. Dans le présent travail, un programme fonctionnant en environnement MATLAB, de la simulation de l'application d'un système photovoltaïque sur la base des modèles mathématiques, de ses composants a été conçu, nous avons modélisé un générateur photovoltaïque en se basant sur les équations électriques et mathématiques qui régissent son comportement ainsi que la dégradation  des caractéristiques de ce générateur en fonction des conditions météorologiques (température et éclairement. Nous avons  réalisé notre étude sur le module SPR 315 E de chez SUNPOWER, qui fournit une puissance de 315 W..

  16. Keeping Cool Close to the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-01

    critical. The detector is kept cool by an electromechanical cryocooler attached to the outside of the device. However, the cryocooler has a limited cooling capacity because of size and weight constraints. To ensure the cryocooler would sufficiently cool the detector, Livermore scientists used SINDA/FLUINT, a commercial program originally developed by NASA, to model the thermal environments that the spectrometer was expected to encounter--during liftoff, in space while en route to Mercury, and in orbit around the planet. Using the data from the model, scientists from Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley developed a design that included three closely spaced and highly reflective thermal shields held in place with DuPont KEVLAR(reg s ign) fiber

  17. ngVLA Cryogenic Subsystem Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, Al; Urbain, Denis; Grammer, Wes; Durand, S.

    2018-01-01

    The VLA’s success over 35 years of operations stems in part from dramatically upgraded components over the years. The time has come to build a new array to lead the radio astronomical science into its next 40 years. To accomplish that, a next generation VLA (ngVLA) is envisioned to have 214 antennas with diameters of 18m. The core of the array will be centered at the current VLA location, but the arms will extend out to 1000km.The VLA cryogenic subsystem equipment and technology have remained virtually unchanged since the early 1980s. While adequate for a 27-antenna array, scaling the current system for an array of 214 antennas would be prohibitively expensive in terms of operating cost and maintenance. The overall goal is to limit operating cost to within three times the current level, despite having 8 times the number of antennas. To help realize this goal, broadband receivers and compact feeds will be utilized to reduce both the size and number of cryostats required. The current baseline front end concept calls for just two moderately-sized cryostats for the entire 1.2-116 GHz frequency range, as opposed to 8 in the VLA.For the ngVLA cryogenics, our objective is a well-optimized and efficient system that uses state-of-the-art technology to minimize per-antenna power consumption and maximize reliability. Application of modern technologies, such as variable-speed operation for the scroll compressors and cryocooler motor drives, allow the cooling capacity of the system to be dynamically matched to thermal loading in each cryostat. Significantly, power savings may be realized while the maintenance interval of the cryocoolers is also extended.Finally, a receiver designed to minimize thermal loading can produce savings directly translating to lower operating cost when variable-speed drives are used. Multi-layer insulation (MLI) on radiation shields and improved IR filters on feed windows can significantly reduce heat loading.Measurements done on existing cryogenic

  18. Examining physiological responses across different driving maneuvers during an on-road driving task: a pilot study comparing older and younger drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, S; Kuo, J; Berecki-Gisolf, J; Boag, R; Hue, Y-X; Charlton, J L

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate physiological responses during an on-road driving task for older and younger drivers. Five older drivers (mean age = 74.60 years [2.97]) and 5 younger drivers (mean age = 30.00 years [3.08]) completed a series of cognitive assessments (Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA], Mini Mental Status Examination [MMSE]; Trail Making Test [Trails A and Trails B]) and an on-road driving task along a predetermined, standardized urban route in their own vehicle. Driving performance was observed and scored by a single trained observer using a standardized procedure, where driving behaviors (appropriate and inappropriate) were scored for intersection negotiation, lane changing, and merging. During the on-road driving task, participants' heart rate (HR) was monitored with an unobtrusive physiological monitor. Younger drivers performed significantly better on all cognitive assessments compared to older drivers (MoCA: t(8) = 3.882, P task revealed a high level of appropriate overall driving behavior (M = 87%, SD = 7.62, range = 73-95%), including intersection negotiation (M = 89%, SD = 8.37%), lane changing (M = 100%), and merging (M = 53%, SD = 28.28%). The overall proportion of appropriate driving behavior did not significantly differ across age groups (younger drivers: M = 87.6%, SD = 9.04; older drivers: M = 87.0%, SD = 6.96; t(8) = 0.118, P =.91). Although older drivers scored lower than younger drivers on the cognitive assessments, there was no indication of cognitive overload among older drivers based on HR response to the on-road driving task. The results provide preliminary evidence that mild age-related cognitive impairment may not pose a motor vehicle crash hazard for the wider older driver population. To maintain safe mobility of the aging population, further research into the specific crash risk factors in the older driver population is warranted.

  19. Determination of relative krypton fission product yields from 14 MeV neutron induced fission of 238U at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, E R; Cassata, W S; Velsko, C A; Yeamans, C B; Shaughnessy, D A

    2016-11-01

    Precisely-known fission yield distributions are needed to determine a fissioning isotope and the incident neutron energy in nuclear security applications. 14 MeV neutrons from DT fusion at the National Ignition Facility induce fission in depleted uranium contained in the target assembly hohlraum. The fission yields of Kr isotopes (85m, 87, 88, and 89) are measured relative to the cumulative yield of 88 Kr and compared to previously tabulated values. The results from this experiment and England and Rider are in agreement, except for the 85m Kr/ 88 Kr ratio, which may be the result of incorrect nuclear data.

  20. The maximum energy of cosmic rays gained in the jet of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tascau, Oana; Biermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we will present the results of the calculation of maximum energy gained by a particle in the acceleration process done by the black hole mechanism. We are using here the model of P. Biermann and H. Falcke to determine if and how the black holes contribute to the cosmic rays that reach the Earth. The conclusion is that at the highest energy only M87 contributes, as has been claimed for many years. Secondly, at lower energy, Cen A may indeed take over as second most important source, again as expected for some time. (authors)

  1. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A galactic "super-volcano" in the massive galaxy M87 is erupting and blasting gas outwards, as witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF's Very Large Array. The cosmic volcano is being driven by a giant black hole in the galaxy's center and preventing hundreds of millions of new stars from forming. Astronomers studying this black hole and its effects have been struck by the remarkable similarities between it and a volcano in Iceland that made headlines earlier this year. At a distance of about 50 million light years, M87 is relatively close to Earth and lies at the center of the Virgo cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies. M87's location, coupled with long observations over Chandra's lifetime, has made it an excellent subject for investigations of how a massive black hole impacts its environment. "Our results show in great detail that supermassive black holes have a surprisingly good control over the evolution of the galaxies in which they live," said Norbert Werner of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led one of two papers describing the study. "And it doesn't stop there. The black hole's reach extends ever farther into the entire cluster, similar to how one small volcano can affect practically an entire hemisphere on Earth." The cluster surrounding M87 is filled with hot gas glowing in X-ray light, which is detected by Chandra. As this gas cools, it can fall toward the galaxy's center where it should continue to cool even faster and form new stars. However, radio observations with the Very Large Array suggest that in M87 jets of very energetic particles produced by the black hole interrupt this process. These jets lift up the relatively cool gas near the center of the galaxy and produce shock waves in the galaxy's atmosphere because of their supersonic speed. The scientists involved in this research have found the interaction of this cosmic

  2. 2000 NRL Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    extensive back files maintained as bound volumes or on microfilm; and a research reports collection of more than one million items stored in paper , micro...thousands of research reports, and NRL publications including press re- leases, journal articles, and conference papers . InfoWeb also links users to another...MHz with the Very Large Array,” Astron. J. 106, 2218-2228 (1993). 2 F.N. Owen, J.A. Eilek, and N.E. Kassim, “The Virgo Cluster and the M 87 Radio Halo

  3. How elevated is the dynamical-to-stellar mass ratio of the ultra-compact dwarf S999?

    OpenAIRE

    Janz, Joachim; Forbes, Duncan A.; Norris, Mark A.; Strader, Jay; Penny, Samantha J.; Fagioli, Martina; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present new Keck ESI high-resolution spectroscopy and deep archival HST/ACS imaging for S999, an ultra-compact dwarf in the vicinity of M87, which was claimed to have an extremely high dynamical-to-stellar mass ratio. Our data increase the total integration times by a factor of 5 and 60 for spectroscopy and imaging, respectively. This allows us to constrain the stellar population parameters for the first time (simple stellar population equivalent age $=7.6^{+2.0}_{-1.6}$ Gyr; $[Z/\\tex...

  4. Dual radiofrequency drive quantum voltage standard with nanovolt resolution based on a closed-loop refrigeration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgakopoulos, D; Budovsky, I; Hagen, T; Sasaki, H; Yamamori, H

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a programmable Josephson voltage standard that can produce voltages up to 20 V with a resolution of better than 0.1 µV over the whole voltage range and better than 1 nV for voltages up to 10 mV. The standard has two superconductor–normal metal–superconductor junction arrays connected in series and driven by two radiofrequency oscillators. The cryogenic part of the standard is based on a cryocooler. The new standard agrees with the primary quantum voltage standard maintained at the National Measurement Institute, Australia, within 10 nV and forms the basis of an automated calibration system for digital multimeters and voltage references. (paper)

  5. Thermoacoustic refrigerator for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Adeff, Jay A.; Hofler, Thomas J.

    1993-10-01

    A new spacecraft cryocooler which uses resonant high-amplitude sound waves in inert gases to pump heat is described. The phasing of the thermoacoustic cycle is provided by thermal conduction. This 'natural' phasing allows the entire refrigerator to operate with only one moving part (the loudspeaker diaphragm). A space-qualified thermoacoustic refrigerator was flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-42) in January, 1992. It was entirely autonomous, had no sliding seals, required no lubrication, used mostly low-tolerance machined parts, and contained no expensive components. Thermoacoustics is shown to be a competitive candidate for food refrigerator/freezers and commercial/residential air conditioners. The design and performance of the Space Thermo/Acoustic Refrigerator (STAR) is described.

  6. Stirling Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Noboru

    A Stirling cooler (refrigerator) was proposed in 1862 and the first Stirling cooler was put on market in 1955. Since then, many Stirling coolers have been developed and marketed as cryocoolers. Recently, Stirling cycle machines for heating and cooling at near-ambient temperatures between 173 and 400K, are recognized as promising candidates for alternative system which are more compatible with people and the Earth. The ideal cycles of Stirling cycle machine offer the highest thermal efficiencies and the working fluids do not cause serious environmental problems of ozone depletion and global warming. In this review, the basic thermodynamics of Stirling cycle are briefly described to quantify the attractive cycle performance. The fundamentals to realize actual Stirling coolers and heat pumps are introduced in detail. The current status of the Stirling cycle machine technologies is reviewed. Some machines have almost achieved the target performance. Also, duplex-Stirling-cycle and Vuilleumier-cycle machines and their performance are introduced.

  7. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  8. IECEC '92; Proceedings of the 27th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, San Diego, CA, Aug. 3-7, 1992. Vols. 1-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses spacecraft power requirements, spacecraft nuclear power reactors, power electronics, aerospace fuel cells and batteries, automated spacecraft power systems and power electronics, small excore heat pipe thermionic reactor technology, spacecraft solar power, thermoelectrics for reactors, high voltage systems, spacecraft static/dynamic conversion component technology, wireless power transmission, isotopic-fueled power systems, and aircraft electric power. Also discussed are alkali-metal thermoelectric converters, advanced heat engine cycles, terrestrial electric propulsion, fuel cells for terrestrial applications, MHD systems, magnetic bearings and flywheels, aquifer thermal storage, superconducting devices, nucler fusion power, marine energy systems, Stirling engine cycle analyses and models, Stirling refrigerators and cryocoolers, efficiency and conservation-related practices, Stirling heat pumps, Stirling cycle solar (terrestrial) energy systems, Stirling engine component technologies, environmental impacts of energy systems, Stirling-based power generation, and Stirling heat transport systems

  9. Crystallization and diffraction analysis of thioredoxin reductase from Streptomyces coelicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koháryová, Michaela; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase from S. coelicolor was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Thioredoxin reductases are homodimeric flavoenzymes that catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADPH to oxidized thioredoxin substrate. Bacterial thioredoxin reductases represent a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. Recombinant thioredoxin reductase TrxB from Streptomyces coelicolor was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals to 2.4 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the primitive monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 82.9, b = 60.6, c = 135.4 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 96.5°

  10. A new cryostat for precise temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, B.; Zhou, G.; Liu, L. Q.; Zhang, X.; Xiong, L. Y.; Li, Q.

    2013-09-01

    Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocoolers are often used in cryostat as cold sources. It has advantages of simple structure and low operating cost as well as disadvantages of vibration and temperature oscillation, which are fatal for some applications that are very sensitive to temperature stability at low temperature. To solve the problem, a thermal analysis model which is used to simulate heat transfer in the cryostat is built and discussed. According to the analysis results, a cryostat that can provide variable temperature (4-20 K) for the accurate temperature control experiments is designed and manufactured. In this cryostat, a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet is used as a thermal damper to reduce the temperature oscillation, with which, the temperature oscillation of the sample cooling holder is less than 4 mK at the 20 K region.

  11. Analysis of DC control in double-inlet GM type pulse tube refrigerators for detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, B. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Pulse tube refrigerators have demonstrated many advantages with respect to temperature stability, vibration, reliability and lifetime among cryo-coolers for detectors. Double-inlet type pulse tube refrigerators are popular in GM type pulse tube refrigerators. The single double-inlet valve may introduce DC flow in refrigerator, which deteriorates the performance of pulse tube refrigerator. One new type of DC control mode is introduced in this paper. Two parallel-placed needle valves with opposite direction named double-valve configuration, instead of single double-inlet valve, are used in our experiment to reduce the DC flow. With two double-inlet operating, the lowest cold end temperature of 18.1K and a coolant of 1.2W@20K have been obtained. It has proved that this method is useful for controlling DC flow of the pulse tube refrigerators, which is very important to understand the characters of pulse tube refrigerators for detectors.

  12. Robot-arm-based mobile HTS SQUID system for NDE of structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yotsugi, K; Hatsukade, Y; Tanaka, S [Department of Ecological Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tenpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: hatukade@eco.tut.ac.jp

    2008-02-01

    A robot-arm-based mobile HTS SQUID system was developed for NDE of fixed targets. To realize the system, active magnetic shielding technique using fluxgate as reference sensor for ambient field was applied to a cryocooler-based HTS SQUID gradiometer that was mounted on commercial robot-arm. In this technique, ambient field noise and pulse noise of 550 nT from robot were measured by the fluxgate near the SQUID, and then the fluxgate output was negatively fed back to generate compensation field around the SQUID and fluxgate. The noise from robot was reduced by a factor of about 20 and the shielding technique enabled the HTS SQUID to move in unshielded environment by the robot-arm without flux-trapping or unlocking at 10 mm/s. System noise measurement and inspection of hidden cracks in multi-layer composite-metal structure were demonstrated using the mobile SQUID-NDE system.

  13. From screen to structure with a harvestable microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Jakoncic, Jean; Oren, Deena A.; Nagarajan, V.; Navarro Poulsen, Jens-Christian; Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; Bergfors, Terese; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic crystallization using the Crystal Former improves the identification of initial crystallization conditions relative to screening via vapour diffusion. Advances in automation have facilitated the widespread adoption of high-throughput vapour-diffusion methods for initial crystallization screening. However, for many proteins, screening thousands of crystallization conditions fails to yield crystals of sufficient quality for structural characterization. Here, the rates of crystal identification for thaumatin, catalase and myoglobin using microfluidic Crystal Former devices and sitting-drop vapour-diffusion plates are compared. It is shown that the Crystal Former results in a greater number of identified initial crystallization conditions compared with vapour diffusion. Furthermore, crystals of thaumatin and lysozyme obtained in the Crystal Former were used directly for structure determination both in situ and upon harvesting and cryocooling. On the basis of these results, a crystallization strategy is proposed that uses multiple methods with distinct kinetic trajectories through the protein phase diagram to increase the output of crystallization pipelines

  14. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K, E-mail: M.Lyatti@fz-juelich.d, E-mail: Y.Divin@fz-juelich.d [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T{sub c} Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  15. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatti, M.; Divin, Y.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.

    2009-11-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- Tc Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  16. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K

    2009-01-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T c Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  17. Liquid helium-free 15 T superconducting magnet at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuraba, J.; Mikami, Y.; Watazawa, K.; Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S.

    2000-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a 15.1 T liquid helium-free superconducting magnet with a room-temperature bore of 52 mm using a Nb 3 Sn/NbTi hybrid coil, Bi2223 current leads and two Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers. The magnet has 830 mm outside diameter, 1221 mm height and 720 kg weight. The magnet was cooled to 3.6 K in 114 h. A central magnetic field of 15.1 T was achieved in 38 min. The temperature of the coil increased to 5.7 K due to ac losses during the excitation, but it decreased to 4.0 K before reaching 15.1 T. The temperature of the coil remained at a constant value of 3.8 K over the 24 h of operation. The demonstration indicated the usefulness of a liquid helium-free superconducting magnet to generate high magnetic fields up to 15 T. (author)

  18. The IASI detection chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Patrick; Fleury, Joel; Le Naour, Claire; Bernard, Frédéric

    2017-11-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) is an infrared atmospheric sounder. It will provide meteorologist and scientific community with atmospheric spectra. The instrument is composed of a Fourier transform spectrometer and an associated infrared imager. The presentation will describe the spectrometer detection chain architecture, composed by three different detectors cooled in a passive cryo-cooler (so called CBS : Cold Box Subsystem) and associated analog electronics up to digital conversion. It will mainly focus on design choices with regards to environment constraints, implemented technologies, and associated performances. CNES is leading the IASI program in collaboration with EUMETSAT. The instrument Prime is ALCATEL SPACE responsible, notably, of the detection chain architecture. SAGEM SA provides the detector package (so called CAU : Cold Acquisition Unit).

  19. Progress of MICE RFCC Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Green, M.; Li, N.; Niinikoski, T.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Bross, A.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Sylvester, C.; Chen, A. B.; Guo, Bin; Li, Liyi; Xu, Fengyu; Cao, Y.; Sun, S.; Wang, Li; Yin, Lixin; Luo, Tianhuan; Summers, Don; Smith, B.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-20

    Recent progress on the design and fabrication of the RFCC (RF and superconducting Coupling Coil) module for the international MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) are reported. The MICE ionization cooling channel has two RFCC modules, each having four 201- MHz normal conducting RF cavities surrounded by one superconducting coupling coil (solenoid) magnet. The magnet is designed to be cooled by three cryocoolers. Fabrication of the RF cavities is complete; preparation for the cavity electro-polishing, low power RF measurements, and tuning are in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Fabrication of the cold mass of the first coupling coil magnet has been completed in China and the cold mass arrived at LBNL in late 2011. Preparations for testing the cold mass are currently under way at Fermilab. Plans for the RFCC module assembly and integration are being developed and are described.

  20. Conceptual thermal design and analysis of a far-infrared/mid-infrared remote sensing instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettker, William A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual thermal design and analysis results for the Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far-Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) instrument. SAFIRE has been proposed for Mission to Planet Earth to study ozone chemistry in the middle atmosphere using remote sensing of the atmosphere in the far-infrared (21-87 microns) and mid-infrared (9-16 microns) spectra. SAFIRE requires that far-IR detectors be cooled to 3-4 K and mid-IR detectors to 80 K for the expected mission lifetime of five years. A superfluid helium dewar and Stirling-cycle cryocoolers provide the cryogenic temperatures required by the infrared detectors. The proposed instrument thermal design uses passive thermal control techniques to reject 465 watts of waste heat from the instrument.

  1. Mid Infrared Instrument cooler subsystem test facility overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B.; Zan, J.; Hannah, B.; Chui, T.; Penanen, K.; Weilert, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Cryocooler for the Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) provides cooling at 6.2K on the instrument interface. The cooler system design has been incrementally documented in previous publications [1][2][3][4][5]. It has components that traverse three primary thermal regions on JWST: Region 1, approximated by 40K; Region 2, approximated by 100K; and Region 3, which is at the allowable flight temperatures for the spacecraft bus. However, there are several sub-regions that exist in the transition between primary regions and at the heat reject interfaces of the Cooler Compressor Assembly (CCA) and Cooler Control Electronics Assembly (CCEA). The design and performance of the test facility to provide a flight representative thermal environment for acceptance testing and characterization of the complete MIRI cooler subsystem are presented.

  2. The role of thermoacoustics in the world of commercial cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    2005-09-01

    The science of thermoacoustics has been with us for nearly 30 years, but as yet few applications have made their way to the marketplace. Acoustic Stirling cryocoolers (also called pulse-tube Stirling or high-frequency pulse-tube coolers) have been the most successful commercial thermoacoustic devices, because they address a region of the cooling market in terms of temperature and cooling power that is not well served by existing technology. This talk will explore how thermoacoustics might fare in attempting to compete with existing technologies in refrigeration and air conditioning, what niche markets make the most sense as entry points, and how thermoacoustics compares to conventional (kinematic or free-piston) Stirling machines. In particular, why there are relatively few commercial Stirling devices in the marketplace (although Stirling cycle machines have been around for over 150 years) will be discussed, and what lessons learned with Stirlings are applicable to thermoacoustics.

  3. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  4. A compact 3 T all HTS cryogen-free MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, B. J.; Bouloukakis, K.; Slade, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    We have designed and built a passively shielded, cryogen-free 3 T 160 mm bore bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide HTS magnet with shielded gradient coils suitable for use in small animal imaging applications. The magnet is cooled to approximately 16 K using a two-stage cryocooler and is operated at 200 A. The magnet has been passively shimmed so as to achieve ±10 parts per million (ppm) homogeneity over a 60 mm diameter imaging volume. We have demonstrated that B 0 temporal stability is fit-for-purpose despite the magnet operating in the driven mode. The system has produced good quality spin-echo and gradient echo images. This compact HTS-MRI system is emerging as a true alternative to conventional low temperature superconductor based cryogen-free MRI systems, with much more efficient cryogenics since it operates entirely from a single phase alternating current electrical supply.

  5. Superfluid stirling refrigerator: A new method for cooling below 1 Kelvin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsubo, V.; Swift, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    We have invented and built a new type of cryocooler, which we call the superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR). The first prototype reached 0.6 K from a starting temperature of 1.2 K. The working fluid of the SSR is the 3 He solute in a superfluid 3 He-- 4 He solution. At low temperatures, the superfluid 4 He is in its quantum ground state, and therefore is thermodynamically inert, while the 3 He solute has the thermodynamic properties of a dense ideal gas. Thus, in principle, any refrigeration cycle that can use an ideal gas can also use the 3 He solute as working fluid. In our SSR prototype, bellows-sealed superleak pistons driven by a room-temperature camshaft work on the 3 He solute. Ultimately, we anticipate elimination of moving parts by analogy with pulse-tube refrigeration. 15 refs., 6 figs

  6. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z. [Midwest Superconductivity Inc., Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  7. Development of a Superconducting Magnet System for the ONR/General Atomics Homopolar Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubel, K. M.; Langhorn, A. R.; Creedon, W. P.; Johanson, N. W.; Sheynin, S.; Thome, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the design, testing and operational experience of a superconducting magnet system presently in use on the Homopolar Motor Program. The homopolar motor is presently being tested at General Atomics in San Diego, California for the U.S Navy Office of Naval Research. The magnet system consists of two identical superconducting solenoid coils housed in two cryostats mounted integrally within the homopolar motor housing. The coils provide the static magnetic field required for motor operation and are wound using NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix. Each magnet is conduction cooled using a Gifford McMahon cryocooler. The coils are in close proximity to the iron motor housing requiring a cold to warm support structure with high stiffness and strength. The design of the coils, cold to warm support structure, cryogenic system, and the overall magnet system design will be described. The test results and operational experience will also be described.

  8. Improvement in the heat transfer of a gas filled thermal switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, J.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter attempts to clarify the heat transfer mechanism of a gas filled stainless steel tube, and shows how the maximum heat transfer rate is determined under various filling pressures. The thermal switch is a convenient device for a thermal link between the cold heat of a cryocooler and a magnet dewar, because the switch acts as an active thermal conductor at the precooling stage and as an insulator after collecting liquid helium in the dewar. Topics considered include the switch structure, the heat transfer process, the delay of condensation, and the precooling stage and switching. It is determined that the heat transfer mechanism of the gas filled switch is due to normal nucleate boiling at the bottom and condensation on the upper cone. The higher the initial pressure, the larger the maximum heat flow obtained. Evaporation and condensation surfaces play an important role in the heat transfer rate

  9. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  10. Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated from an amorphous Mo{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, V. B.; Lita, A. E.; Vissers, M. R.; Marsili, F.; Pappas, D. P.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    We present the characteristics of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) fabricated from amorphous Mo{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} thin-films. Fabricated devices show a saturation of the internal detection efficiency at temperatures below 1 K, with system dark count rates below 500 cps. Operation in a closed-cycle cryocooler at 2.5 K is possible with system detection efficiencies exceeding 20% for SNSPDs which have not been optimized for high detection efficiency. Jitter is observed to vary between 69 ps at 250 mK and 187 ps at 2.5 K using room temperature amplifiers.

  11. Vibrations on pulse tube based Dry Dilution Refrigerators for low noise measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, E. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France); Billard, J.; De Jesus, M.; Juillard, A. [Univ Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, IPN-Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Leder, A. [Massachussets Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2017-06-21

    Dry Dilution Refrigerators (DDR) based on pulse tube cryo-coolers have started to replace Wet Dilution Refrigerators (WDR) due to the ease and low cost of operation. However these advantages come at the cost of increased vibrations, induced by the pulse tube. In this work, we present the vibration measurements performed on three different commercial DDRs. We describe in detail the vibration measurement system we assembled, based on commercial accelerometers, conditioner and DAQ, and examined the effects of the various damping solutions utilized on three different DDRs, both in the low and high frequency regions. Finally, we ran low temperature, pseudo-massive (30 and 250 g) germanium bolometers in the best vibration-performing system under study and report on the results.

  12. Mars Atmospheric In Situ Resource Utilization Projects at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, A. C.; Hintze, P. E.; Caraccio, A. J.; Bayliss, J. A.; Karr, L. J.; Paley, M. S.; Marone, M. J.; Gibson, T. L.; Surma, J. M.; Mansell, J. M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars, which is approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), is a rich resource for the human exploration of the red planet, primarily by the production of rocket propellants and oxygen for life support. Three recent projects led by NASA's Kennedy Space Center have been investigating the processing of CO2. The first project successfully demonstrated the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module (APM), which freezes CO2 with cryocoolers and combines sublimated CO2 with hydrogen to make methane and water. The second project absorbs CO2 with Ionic Liquids and electrolyzes it with water to make methane and oxygen, but with limited success so far. A third project plans to recover up to 100% of the oxygen in spacecraft respiratory CO2. A combination of the Reverse Water Gas Shift reaction and the Boudouard reaction eventually fill the reactor up with carbon, stopping the process. A system to continuously remove and collect carbon is under construction.

  13. Apparatus and Method for Low-Temperature Training of Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Trigwell, S.; Gibson, T. L.; Williams, M. K.; Benafan, O.

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the low-temperature thermo-mechanical training of shape memory alloys (SMA) has been developed. The experimental SMA materials are being evaluated as prototypes for applicability in novel thermal management systems for future cryogenic applications. Alloys providing two-way actuation at cryogenic temperatures are the chief target. The mechanical training regimen was focused on the controlled movement of rectangular strips, with S-bend configurations, at temperatures as low as 30 K. The custom holding fixture included temperature sensors and a low heat-leak linear actuator with a magnetic coupling. The fixture was mounted to a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler providing up to 25 W of cooling power at 20 K and housed within a custom vacuum chamber. Operations included both training cycles and verification of shape memory movement. The system design and operation are discussed. Results of the training for select prototype alloys are presented.

  14. Insertion Device Upgrade Plans at the NSLS

    CERN Document Server

    Tanabe, Toshiya; Harder, David; Lehecka, Michael; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes plans to upgrade insertion devices at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, U.S.A. The aging wiggler (W80) at X25 is being replaced by a 1 m long in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU-18) optimized for a dedicated macromolecular crystallography program. A new, 1/3 m long, in-vacuum undulator (MGU-13.5), will be installed between a pair of RF cavities at X9, and will serve a new beamline dedicated for small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Both MGU’s will have provision for cryocooling the NdFeB hybrid arrays to 150K to raise the field and K-value and to obtain better spectral coverage. Design issues of the devices and other considerations, especially magnetic measurement methods in low temperature will be discussed.

  15. Combination of thermal and electric properties' measurement techniques in a single setup suitable for radioactive materials in controlled environments and based on the 3ω approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K.; Gofryk, K.

    2018-04-01

    We have designed and developed a new experimental setup, based on the 3ω method, to measure thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of a variety of samples in a broad temperature range (2-550 K) and under magnetic fields up to 9 T. The validity of this method is tested by measuring various types of metallic (copper, platinum, and constantan) and insulating (SiO2) materials, which have a wide range of thermal conductivity values (1-400 W m-1 K-1). We have successfully employed this technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of two actinide single crystals: uranium dioxide and uranium nitride. This new experimental approach for studying nuclear materials will help us to advance reactor fuel development and understanding. We have also shown that this experimental setup can be adapted to the Physical Property Measurement System (Quantum Design) environment and/or other cryocooler systems.

  16. Repetitive fueling pellet injection in large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Sakamoto, R.; Viniar, I.; Oda, Y.; Kikuchi, K.; Lukin, A.; Skoblikov, S.; Umov, A.; Takaura, K.; Onozuka, M.; Kato, S.; Sudo, S.

    2003-01-01

    A repetitive pellet injector has been developed for investigation of fueling issues towards the steady-state operation in Large Helical Device (LHD). The goal of this approach is achievement of the plasma operation for longer than 1000 s. A principal technical element of the pellet injector is solidification of hydrogen and extrusion of a solid hydrogen rod through a cryogenic screw extruder cooled by Giffard-McMahon (GM) cryo-coolers. Continuous operation of more than 10000 pellet launches at 10 Hz has been demonstrated. The reliability of pellet launch exceeds 99%. The pellet mass and velocity, the consumption of propellant gas and quality of pellets have been successfully tested to fit the experimental requirement in LHD

  17. Repetitive fueling pellet injection in large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H. E-mail: hyamada@lhd.nifs.ac.jp; Sakamoto, R.; Viniar, I.; Oda, Y.; Kikuchi, K.; Lukin, A.; Skoblikov, S.; Umov, A.; Takaura, K.; Onozuka, M.; Kato, S.; Sudo, S

    2003-09-01

    A repetitive pellet injector has been developed for investigation of fueling issues towards the steady-state operation in Large Helical Device (LHD). The goal of this approach is achievement of the plasma operation for longer than 1000 s. A principal technical element of the pellet injector is solidification of hydrogen and extrusion of a solid hydrogen rod through a cryogenic screw extruder cooled by Giffard-McMahon (GM) cryo-coolers. Continuous operation of more than 10000 pellet launches at 10 Hz has been demonstrated. The reliability of pellet launch exceeds 99%. The pellet mass and velocity, the consumption of propellant gas and quality of pellets have been successfully tested to fit the experimental requirement in LHD.

  18. The development of the advanced cryogenic radiometer facility at NRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamouras, A.; Todd, A. D. W.; Côté, É.; Rowell, N. L.

    2018-02-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) of Canada has established a next generation facility for the primary realization of optical radiant power. The main feature of this facility is a new cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer with a closed-cycle helium cryocooler. A monochromator-based approach allows for detector calibrations at any desired wavelength. A custom-designed motion apparatus includes two transfer standard radiometer mounting ports which has increased our measurement capability by allowing the calibration of two photodetectors in one measurement cycle. Measurement uncertainties have been improved through several upgrades, including newly designed and constructed transimpedance amplifiers for the transfer standard radiometers, and a higher power broadband light source. The most significant improvements in uncertainty arise from the enhanced characteristics of the new cryogenic radiometer including its higher cavity absorptance and reduced non-equivalence effects.

  19. Measurement of Total Condensation on a Shrouded Cryogenic Surface using a Single Quart Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haid, B.J.; Malsbury, T.N.; Gibson, C.R.; Warren, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    A single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is cooled to 18 K to measure condensation rates inside of a retractable ''shroud'' enclosure. The shroud is of a design intended to minimize condensate on fusion targets to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The shroud has a double-wall construction with an inner wall that may be cooled to 75-100 K. The QCM and the shroud system were mounted in a vacuum chamber and cooled using a cryocooler. Condensation rates were measured at various vacuum levels and compositions, and with the shroud open or closed. A technique for measuring total condensate during the cooldown of the system with an accuracy of better than 1.0 x 10 -6 g/cm 2 was also demonstrated. The technique involved a separate measurement of the condensate-free crystal frequency as a function of temperature that was later applied to the measurement of interest

  20. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections

  1. Numerical investigation on pulsating heat pipes with nitrogen or hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Han, D.; Sun, X.; Gan, Z. H.; Y Luo, R.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Jiao, B.

    2017-12-01

    With flexible structure and excellent performance, pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are regarded as a great solution to distribute cooling power for cryocoolers. The experiments on PHPs with cryogenic fluids have been carried out, indicating their efficient performances in cryogenics. There are large differences in physical properties between the fluids at room and cryogenic temperature, resulting in their different heat transfer and oscillation characteristics. Up to now, the numerical investigations on cryogenic fluids have rarely been carried out. In this paper, the model of the closed-loop PHP with multiple liquid slugs and vapor plugs is performed with nitrogen and hydrogen as working fluids, respectively. The effects of heating wall temperature on the performance of close-looped PHPs are investigated and compared with that of water PHP.

  2. Development of portable HPGe spectrometer for in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kail Artjoms

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ applications require a very high level of portability of high-resolution spectrometric equipment. Usage of HPGe detectors for radioactivity measurements in the environment or for nuclear safeguard applications, to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear materials or uranium and plutonium monitoring in nuclear wastes, has become a norm in the recent years. Portable HPGe-based radionuclide spectrometer with electrical cooling has lately appeared on the market for in situ applications. At the same time deterioration of energy resolution associated with vibrations produced by cryocooler or high weight of the instrument, short time of autonomous operation and high price of these spectrometers are limiting their usage in many cases. In this paper we present development results of ultra compact hand held all-in-one spectrometer for in situ measurements based on HPGe detector cooled by liquid nitrogen without listing the above disadvantages.

  3. Mechanical design of a high-resolution x-ray powder diffractometer at the Advanced Photon Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D.; Lee, P.; Preissner, C.; Ramanathan, M.; Beno, M.; VonDreele, R.; Ranay, R.; Ribaud, L.; Kurtz, C.; Jiao, X.; Kline, D.; Jemian, P.; Toby, B.

    2007-01-01

    A novel high-resolution x-ray powder diffractometer has been designed and commissioned at the bending magnet beamline 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This state-of-the-art instrument is designed to meet challenging mechanical and optical specifications for producing high-quality powder diffraction data with high throughput. The 2600 mm (H) X 2100 mm (L) X 1700 mm (W) diffractometer consists of five subassemblies: a customized two-circle goniometer with a 3-D adjustable supporting base; a twelve-channel high-resolution crystal analyzer system with an array of precision x-ray slits; a manipulator system for a twelve scintillator x-ray detectors; a 4-D sample manipulator with cryo-cooling capability; and a robot-based sample exchange automation system. The mechanical design of the diffractometer as well as the test results of its positioning performance are presented in this paper.

  4. Mechanical design of a high-resolution x-ray powder diffractometer at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Lee, P.; Preissner, C.; Ramanathan, M.; Beno, M.; VonDreele, R.; Ranay, R.; Ribaud, L.; Kurtz, C.; Jiao, X.; Kline, D.; Jemian, P.; Toby, B.

    2007-01-01

    A novel high-resolution x-ray powder diffractometer has been designed and commissioned at the bending magnet beamline 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This state-of-the-art instrument is designed to meet challenging mechanical and optical specifications for producing high-quality powder diffraction data with high throughput. The 2600 mm (H) X 2100 mm (L) X 1700 mm (W) diffractometer consists of five subassemblies: a customized two-circle goniometer with a 3-D adjustable supporting base; a twelve-channel high-resolution crystal analyzer system with an array of precision x-ray slits; a manipulator system for a twelve scintillator x-ray detectors; a 4-D sample manipulator with cryo-cooling capability; and a robot-based sample exchange automation system. The mechanical design of the diffractometer as well as the test results of its positioning performance are presented in this paper.

  5. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of highly porous copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomás, G; Bonfait, G; Martins, D; Cooper, A

    2015-01-01

    The development and characterization of new materials is of extreme importance in the design of cryogenic apparatus. Recently Versarien ® PLC developed a technique capable of producing copper foam with controlled porosity and pore size. Such porous materials could be interesting for cryogenic heat exchangers as well as of special interest in some devices used in microgravit.y environments where a cryogenic liquid is confined by capillarity.In the present work, a system was developed to measure the thermal conductivity by the differential steady-state mode of four copper foam samples with porosity between 58% and 73%, within the temperatures range 20 - 260 K, using a 2 W @ 20 K cryocooler. Our measurements were validated using a copper control sample and by the estimation of the Lorenz number obtained from electrical resistivity measurements at room temperature. With these measurements, the Resistivity Residual Ratio and the tortuosity were obtained. (paper)

  6. Crystallization and initial X-ray analysis of polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein from Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Minglian; Li, Zhenguo; Zheng, Wei; Lou, Zhiyong [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@stu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Multidisciplinary Research Center, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)

    2006-08-01

    The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from A. hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins (phasins) were discovered in PHA-accumulating bacteria. They play a crucial role as a structural protein during initial PHA-granule formation and granule growth and also serve as interfaces for granule stabilization in vivo. The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from Aeromonas hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single crystals were cryocooled for X-ray diffraction analysis. The phasin crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.8, b = 108.9, c = 134.4 Å.

  7. A Conduction-Cooled Superconducting Magnet System-Design, Fabrication and Thermal Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Holbøll, Joachim; Wang, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high-vacuumed c......A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high......-vacuumed cryostat. A two-stage GM cryocooler with a cooling power of 1.5 W at 4.2 K in the second stage is used to cool the system from room temperature to 4.2 K. In this paper, the detailed design, fabrication, thermal analysis and tests of the system are presented....

  8. Cryogenics a textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thipse, S S

    2013-01-01

    A Textbook covers lucidly various cryogenic applications including cryogenic engines and space and electronic applications. Importance of cryogenic engines in space propulsion, complete thermodynamic analysis of cryogenic systems with special emphasis on cryogenic cycles, Dewar vessels used to store cryogenic fluids and their applications in various industries have also been discussed in detail. Explanation of Superconductivity and its applications with a description of various Cryocoolers used in industry has also been provided with extensive details. Further technical information on cryogens has been specified alongwith the vacuum technology which has been sufficiently described with examples. Science of Cryonics has been elaborated and all aspects of technology related to functioning of cryogenic plants and their construction including valves, pipes has been incorporated in this book.

  9. Heat Treatment of Iron-Carbon Alloys in a Magnetic Field (Phase 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Thermomagnetic processing was shown to shift the phase transformation temperatures and therefore microstructural evolution in the high performance engine valve spring 9254 steel alloy by applying a high magnetic field during cooling. These effects would be anticipated to improve performance such as high cycle fatigue as demonstrated in prior projects. Thermomagnetic processing of gears and crank shafts was constrained by the size of the prototype equipment currently available at ORNL. However, the commercial procurement viability of production scale 9-Tesla, 16-inch diameter bore thermomagnetic processing equipment for truck idler gears up to ~11-inch diameter and potential crank shaft applications was shown, as multiple superconducting magnet manufacturing companies (in conjunction with an induction heat treating company, AjaxTOCCO Magnethermic) offered cryogen-free or cryocooler equipment designs to Cummins.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamic Investigation of Loss Mechanisms in a Pulse-Tube Refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, K; Esguerra, J; Dodson, C; Razani, A

    2015-01-01

    In predicting Pulse-Tube Cryocooler (PTC) performance, One-Dimensional (1-D) PTR design and analysis tools such as Gedeon Associates SAGE® typically include models for performance degradation due to thermodynamically irreversible processes. SAGE®, in particular, accounts for convective loss, turbulent conductive loss and numerical diffusion “loss” via correlation functions based on analysis and empirical testing.In this study, we compare CFD and SAGE® estimates of PTR refrigeration performance for four distinct pulse-tube lengths. Performance predictions from PTR CFD models are compared to SAGE® predictions for all four cases. Then, to further demonstrate the benefits of higher-fidelity and multidimensional CFD simulation, the PTR loss mechanisms are characterized in terms of their spatial and temporal locations. (paper)

  11. Mars Atmospheric In Situ Resource Utilization Projects at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Hintze, Paul; Meier, Anne; Bayliss, Jon; Karr, Laurel; Paley, Steve; Marone, Matt; Gibson, Tracy; Surma, Jan; Mansell, Matt; hide

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars, which is 96 percent carbon dioxide (CO2), is a rich resource for the human exploration of the red planet, primarily by the production of rocket propellants and oxygen for life support. Three recent projects led by NASAs Kennedy Space Center have been investigating the processing of CO2. The first project successfully demonstrated the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module (APM), which freezes CO2 with cryocoolers and combines sublimated CO2 with hydrogen to make methane and water. The second project absorbs CO2 with Ionic Liquids and electrolyzes it with water to make methane and oxygen, but with limited success so far. A third project plans to recover up to 100 of the oxygen in spacecraft respiratory CO2. A combination of the Reverse Water Gas Shift reaction and the Boudouard reaction eventually fill the reactor up with carbon, stopping the process. A system to continuously remove and collect carbon has been tested with encouraging results.

  12. Electrical and thermal characteristics of Bi2212/Ag HTS coils for conduction-cooled SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, N.; Noguchi, S.; Kurupakorn, C.; Kojima, H.; Endo, F.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.; Okubo, H.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electrical and thermal performance of conduction-cooled Bi2212/Ag HTS coils with 4K-GM cryocooler system. First, we measured the critical current Ic for different ambient temperatures T0 at 4.2 K - 40 K. Experimental results revealed that Ic increased with the decrease in T0 and was saturated at T0 account of temperature dependence of specific heat and thermal conductivity of the materials. We also measured the temperature rise of Bi2212/Ag HTS coil for different continuous current levels at T0 = 4.8 K. Experimental results revealed the criterion of thermal runaway, which was discussed in terms of heat generation and propagation in the test coil.

  13. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z.

    1994-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology

  14. Final Summary of On-Orbit ADR Operation on Hitomis Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on the Astro-H observatory contains a 6x6 array of x-ray microcalorimeters that are cooled to 50 mK by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR consists of three stages in order to provide stable detector cooling using either a 1.2 K superfluid helium bath or a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler as its heat sink. Astro-H was renamed Hitomi after it was successfully launched in February 2016. The SXS carried approximately 36 liters of helium into orbit, and by day 5 the helium had cooled sufficiently (1.4 K) to allow operation of the ADR. This paper summarizes the ADRs performance during the 38 days that the satellite was operational.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of a Melan-A pMHC–TCR complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Fang; Georgiou, Theonie; Hillon, Theresa; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Moysey, Ruth; Gavarret, Jessie; Vuidepot, Annelise; Sami, Malkit; Bell, John I.; Gao, George F.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Jakobsen, Bent K.

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary X-ray crystal structural study of a soluble cognate T-cell receptor (TCR) in complex with a pMHC presenting the Melan-A peptide (ELAGIGILTV) is reported. The TCR and pMHC were refolded, purified and mixed together to form complexes, which were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single TCR–pMHC complex crystals were cryocooled and used for data collection. Melanocytes are specialized pigmented cells that are found in all healthy skin tissue. In certain individuals, diseased melanocytes can form malignant tumours, melanomas, which cause the majority of skin-cancer-related deaths. The melanoma-associated antigenic peptides are presented on cell surfaces via the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Among the melanoma-associated antigens, the melanoma self-antigen A/melanoma antigen recognized by T cells (Melan-A/MART-1) has attracted attention because of its wide expression in primary and metastatic melanomas. Here, a preliminary X-ray crystal structural study of a soluble cognate T-cell receptor (TCR) in complex with a pMHC presenting the Melan-A peptide (ELAGIGILTV) is reported. The TCR and pMHC were refolded, purified and mixed together to form complexes, which were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single TCR–pMHC complex crystals were cryocooled and used for data collection. Diffraction data showed that these crystals belonged to space group P4 1 /P4 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.4, c = 81.6 Å. A complete data set was collected to 3.1 Å and the structure is currently being analysed

  16. Cryogenic refrigeration requirements for superconducting insertion devices in a light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses cryogenic cooling superconducting insertion devices for modern light sources. The introductory part of the report discusses the difference between wiggler and undulators and how the bore temperature may affect the performance of the magnets. The steps one would take to reduce the gap between the cold magnet pole are discussed. One section of the report is devoted to showing how one would calculate the heat that enters the device. Source of heat include, heat entering through the vacuum chamber, heating due to stray electrons and synchrotron radiation, heating due to image current on the bore, heat flow by conduction and radiation, and heat transfer into the cryostat through the magnet leads. A section of the report is devoted to cooling options such as small cryo-cooler and larger conventional helium refrigerators. This section contains a discussion as to when it is appropriate to use small coolers that do not have J-T circuits. Candidate small cryo-coolers are discussed in this section of the report. Cooling circuits for cooling with a conventional refrigerator are also discussed. A section of the report is devoted to vibration isolation and how this may affect how the cooling is attached to the device. Vibration isolation using straps is compared to vibration isolation using helium heat pipes. The vibration isolation of a conventional refrigeration system is also discussed. Finally, the cool down of an insertion device is discussed. The device can either be cooled down using liquid cryogenic nitrogen and liquid helium or by using the cooler used to keep the devices cold over the long haul

  17. Design of high–order HTS dual–band bandpass filters with receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, N., E-mail: nsekiya@yamanashi.ac.jp

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • We have developed two high-order HTS dual-band BPFs with a receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems. • We developed a method for flexibly adjusting the coupling coefficient for the two passbands. • We demonstrated an HTS dual-band BPF receiver subsystem that uses a pulse tube cryocooler and a wideband LNA. • The proposed BPF is evaluated by simulation and measurement with good agreement. - Abstract: We have developed two high-order high-temperature superconducting (HTS) dual-band bandpass filters (BPFs) with a receiver subsystem for future mobile communication systems. They feature stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with two types of microstrip lines between them. One has a six-pole design, and the other has an eight-pole design. Both were designed to operate at 2.15 GHz with a 43-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the lower passband and at 3.50 GHz with a 70-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the upper one. They were fabricated using YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} thin film on a CeO{sub 2}-bufferd r-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The measured results for both filters agree well with the simulated ones. The HTS dual-band BPF receiver subsystem uses a pulse tube cryocooler and a wideband low noise amplifier (LNA). We measured the frequency response of the six-pole dual-band BPF with and without a wideband LNA with a gain of 10 dB. The measured return losses were close.

  18. Method for estimating off-axis pulse tube losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Mulcahey, T. I.; Taylor, R. P.; Spoor, P. S.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Some Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers (PTCs) exhibit sensitivity to gravitational orientation and often exhibit significant cooling performance losses unless situated with the cold end pointing downward. Prior investigations have indicated that some coolers exhibit sensitivity while others do not; however, a reliable method of predicting the level of sensitivity during the design process has not been developed. In this study, we present a relationship that estimates an upper limit to gravitationally induced losses as a function of the dimensionless pulse tube convection number (NPTC) that can be used to ensure that a PTC would remain functional at adverse static tilt conditions. The empirical relationship is based on experimental data as well as experimentally validated 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulations that examine the effects of frequency, mass flow rate, pressure ratio, mass-pressure phase difference, hot and cold end temperatures, and static tilt angle. The validation of the computational model is based on experimental data collected from six commercial pulse tube cryocoolers. The simulation results are obtained from component-level models of the pulse tube and heat exchangers. Parameter ranges covered in component level simulations are 0-180° for tilt angle, 4-8 for length to diameter ratios, 4-80 K cold tip temperatures, -30° to +30° for mass flow to pressure phase angles, and 25-60 Hz operating frequencies. Simulation results and experimental data are aggregated to yield the relationship between inclined PTC performance and pulse tube convection numbers. The results indicate that the pulse tube convection number can be used as an order of magnitude indicator of the orientation sensitivity, but CFD simulations should be used to calculate the change in energy flow more accurately.

  19. High power green lasers for gamma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Magali; Sevillano, Pierre; Alexaline, Olivier; Sangla, Damien; Casanova, Alexis; Aubourg, Adrien; Saci, Abdelhak; Courjaud, Antoine

    2018-02-01

    A high intensity Gamma source is required for Nuclear Spectroscopy, it will be delivered by the interaction between accelerated electron and intense laser beams. Those two interactions lasers are based on a multi-stage amplification scheme that ended with a second harmonics generation to deliver 200 mJ, 5 ps pulses at 515 nm and 100 Hz. A t-Pulse oscillator with slow and fast feedback loop implemented inside the oscillator cavity allows the possibility of synchronization to an optical reference. A temporal jitter of 120 fs rms is achieved, integrated from 10 Hz to 10 MHz. Then a regenerative amplifier, based on Yb:YAG technology, pumped by fiber-coupled QCW laser diodes, delivers pulses up to 30 mJ. The 1 nm bandwidth was compressed to 1.5 ps with a good spatial quality: M2 of 1.1. This amplifier is integrated in a compact sealed housing (750 x 500 x 150 mm), which allows a pulse-pulse stability of 0.1 % rms, and a long-term stability of 1,9 % over 100 hours (with +/-1°C environment). The main amplification stage uses a cryocooled Yb:YAG crystal in an active mirror configuration. The crystal is cooled at 130 K via a compact and low-vibration cryocooler, avoiding any additional phase noise contribution, 340 mJ in a six pass scheme was achieved, with 0.9 of Strehl ratio. The trade off to the gain of a cryogenic amplifier is the bandwidth reduction, however the 1030 nm pulse was compressed to 4.4 ps. As for the regenerative amplifier a long-term stability of 1.9 % over 30 hours was achieved in an environment with +/-1°C temperature fluctuations The compression and Second Harmonics Generation Stages have allowed the conversion of 150 mJ of uncompressed infrared beam into 60 mJ at 515 nm.

  20. Contribution to the development of dry R and W MgB2 superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquet, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the majority of superconducting magnets, including MRI, are cooled by a bath of liquid helium at atmospheric pressure. Nevertheless, this type of cooling is expensive and imposes significant security constraints for large volumes. For these reasons, the cooling of superconducting magnets is desirable without liquid helium. Cryo-cooler provides dry cooling to 4 K without any liquid helium. However, the power available is low and dry cooling is difficult. In these conditions, it is complicate to use NbTi with dry cooling. But if we increase the operating temperature to 10 K, the power of cryo-cooler increases by a factor of ten. Nevertheless in this case, it is necessary to use of a high critical temperature superconductor. We choose to use MgB 2 R and W conductors because it is relatively low cost but it has the handicap to be sensible at mechanical stress. It is therefore necessary to be careful during their winding to not degrade their superconducting performance. As part of this thesis, we have developed a dry test facility to measure the critical current of MgB 2 R and W conductors as well as mock-ups. To do this, a new type of thermal contact based on aluminum nitride has been developed. In addition to this development, we designed two MgB 2 R and W magnet mock-ups: a solenoid and a double pancake. The double pancake was manufactured (with a new patented winding method) and it has been successfully tested. (author) [fr