WorldWideScience

Sample records for sunlight spectra measured

  1. Retrieval of stratospheric aerosol size information from OSIRIS limb scattered sunlight spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Bourassa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that the retrieval of stratospheric aerosol vertical profiles is possible using limb scattered sunlight measurements at optical wavelengths. The aerosol number density profile is retrieved for an assumed particle size distribution and composition. This result can be used to derive the extinction at the measured wavelength. However, large systematic error can result from the uncertainty in the assumed size distribution when the result is used to estimate the extinction at other wavelengths. It is shown in this work that the addition of information obtained from the near infrared limb radiance profile at 1530 nm measured by the imaging module of the OSIRIS instrument yields an indication of the aerosol size distribution profile that can be used to improve the fidelity of the retrievals. A comparison of the estimated extinction profile at 1020 nm with coincident occultation measurements demonstrates agreement to within approximately 15% from 12 to 27 km altitude.

  2. Effect of HITRAN Database Improvement on Retrievals of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide from Reflected Sunlight Spectra in the 1.61-μm Spectral Window

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Tie; SHI Guangyu; ZHANG Xingying

    2012-01-01

    A large number of experimental and theoretical investigations of carbon dioxide (CO2) spectra have been conducted since the most recent update of the High-Resolution Transmission Molecular Absorption (HITRAN) database.To maintain optimal parameters,the HITRAN 2004 CO2 line list has been completely replaced by HITRAN 2008 data in the near-infrared region from 4300 cm-1 to 7000 cm-1.To examine the effect of this change on the retrieval of CO2 vertical column data from reflected sunlight spectra in the 1.61-μm spectral window,synthetic measurements for a given atmospheric state and instrument setup were generated and compared using radiative transfer model with the line-transition parameters from the HITRAN 2004 and 2008 databases.Simulated retrievals were then performed based on the optimal estimation retrieval theory.The results show that large systematic errors in atmospheric CO2 column retrievals were induced by the differences in the HITRAN laboratory line parameters in the 1.61-μm region.The retrieved CO2 columns were underestimated by >10 ppm using the HITRAN 2004 data,and improvements resulting from the use of the improved HITRAN database were more pronounced at a higher spectral resolution.

  3. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting Swarm and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal...... show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV emissions on the dayside and on particle precipitation at pre-midnight magnetic local times. In sunlight, the horizontal equivalent current flows in two cells, resembling an opposite ionospheric...

  4. Development and validation of sunlight exposure measurement questionnaire (SEM-Q) for use in adult population residing in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, Quratulain; Iqbal, Romaina; Azam, Iqbal; Khan, Aysha Habib; Siddiqui, Amna Rehana; Baig-Ansari, Naila

    2012-06-08

    Vitamin D deficiency has been identified as a major public health problem worldwide. Sunlight is the main source of vitamin D and its measurement using dosimeters is expensive and difficult for use in population-based studies. Hence, the aim of this study was to develop and validate questionnaires to assess sunlight exposure in healthy individuals residing in Karachi, Pakistan. Two questionnaires with seven important items for sunlight exposure assessment were developed. Fifty four healthy adults were enrolled based on their reported sunlight exposure (high = 17, moderate = 18, low = 19) from Aga Khan University, Karachi. Over four days, study participants were asked to wear a dosimeter between sunrise and sunset and report time spent and activities undertaken in the sun for questionnaire validation. Algorithm for item weightage was created as an average score based on ultraviolet B percentage received. Blood samples were obtained for serum vitamin D. The mean time (minutes) spent in sun over 4 days (±SD) was 69.5 (±32) for low, 83.5 (±29.7) for moderate and 329 (±115) for high exposure group. The correlation between average time (minutes) spent in sun over 4 days and mean change in absorbance of UV dosimeters for 4 days was 0.60 (p sunlight exposure measurement questionnaires were valid tools for use in large epidemiological studies to quantify sunlight exposure.

  5. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Laundal, Karl M; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere is associated with large-scale currents in the ionosphere at polar latitudes that flow along magnetic field lines (Birkeland currents) and horizontally. These current systems are tightly linked, but their global behaviors are rarely analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting $\\textit{Swarm}$ and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal and toroidal parts of the magnetic disturbance field, represented in magnetic apex coordinates. The use of apex coordinates reduces effects of longitudinal and hemispheric variations in the Earth's main field. We present global currents from both hemispheres during different sunlight conditions. The results show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV ...

  6. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  7. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  8. Thermoluminescence spectra measured with a Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschberger, P. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Elektrische Messtechnik)

    1991-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer was redesigned to prove its capabilities in the measurement of short-lived, low-intensity thermoluminescence spectra. Interferograms are collected during heating up the thermoluminescent probe in a heater plate. A personal computer controls the data acquisition and processes the Fourier transform. As the results show, even a comparatively simple and limited setup leads to relevant and reproducible spectra. (author).

  9. The sensitivity to polarization in stratospheric aerosol retrievals from limb scattered sunlight measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elash, B. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Rieger, L. A.; Dueck, S. R.; Zawada, D. J.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite measurements of limb scattered sunlight at visible and near infrared wavelengths have been used successfully for several years to retrieve the vertical profile of stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient. The existing satellite measurements are of the total radiance, with very little knowledge or impact of the polarization state of the limb radiance. Recently proposed instrument concepts for stratospheric aerosol profiling have been designed to measure the linearly polarized radiance. Yet, to date, the impact of the polarized measurement on the retrievals has not been systematically studied. Here we use a fully spherical, multiple scattering radiative transfer model to perform a sensitivity study on the effects of the polarized measurement on stratospheric aerosol extinction retrievals through specific investigations of the aerosol signal fraction in polarized measurements, potential retrieval bias, and achievable precision. In this study,we simulate both total and linearly polarized measurements, for a wide range of limb viewing geometries that are encountered in typical low earth orbits and for various aerosol loading scenarios. The orientation of the linear polarization with respect to the horizon is also studied. Taking into account instrument signal to noise levels it is found that in general, the linear polarization can be used as effectively as the total radiance measurement, with consideration of instrument signal to noise capabilities; however the horizontal polarization is more promising in terms of signal magnitude.

  10. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field from harmonic analysis of direct measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point-masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range-rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the Earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50 km half wavelength) from 1 D x 1 D gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of Geos 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows there is about 46 cm of geoid height remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  11. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, José A; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Hook, Simon J; Baldridge, Alice; Ibañez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 microm with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  12. Measurement of an Electric Arc Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, D.

    2015-01-01

    Article is focused on electric arc spectroscopy diagnostics related to electric low voltage apparatuses. The first attempts of spectroscopy measurements are dealt with. An example of radiation spectra of the electric arc burning between copper electrodes is presented. The problems connected with the measurements are discussed.

  13. Measurements of pulse rate using long-range imaging photoplethysmography and sunlight illumination outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography, a method using imagers to record absorption variations caused by microvascular blood volume pulsations, shows promise as a non-contact cardiovascular sensing technology. The first long-range imaging photoplethysmography measurements at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters from the participant was recently demonstrated. Degraded signal quality was observed with increasing imager-to-subject distances. The degradation in signal quality was hypothesized to be largely attributable to inadequate light return to the image sensor with increasing lens focal length. To test this hypothesis, a follow-up evaluation with 27 participants was conducted outdoors with natural sunlight illumination resulting in 5-33 times the illumination intensity. Video was recorded from cameras equipped with ultra-telephoto lenses and positioned at distances of 25, 50, 100, and 150 meters. The brighter illumination allowed high-definition video recordings at increased frame rates of 60fps, shorter exposure times, and lower ISO settings, leading to higher quality image formation than the previous indoor evaluation. Results were compared to simultaneous reference measurements from electrocardiography. Compared to the previous indoor study, we observed lower overall error in pulse rate measurement with the same pattern of degradation in signal quality with respect to increasing distance. This effect was corroborated by the signal-to-noise ratio of the blood volume pulse signal which also showed decreasing quality with respect to increasing distance. Finally, a popular chrominance-based method was compared to a blind source separation approach; while comparable in measurement of signal-to-noise ratio, we observed higher overall error in pulse rate measurement using the chrominance method in this data.

  14. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  15. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra Measured with PAMELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James; Bruno, Alessandro; Boezio, Mirko; Bravar, Ulisse; Christian, Eric; Georgia, De Nolfo; Martucci, Matteo; Merge, Matteo; Munini, Riccardo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Stochaj, Steven; Pamela Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the event integrated spectra from several SEP events from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high geographic latitudes. This means that the spectra have been assembled from regularly spaced measurements with gaps during the course of the event. Furthermore, the field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft moves. Correcting for data gaps and solid angle effects, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra that typically exhibit power law shapes in energy with an exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two, maybe three, GLEs. In those cases the roll over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold (1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events. National Science Foundation, NASA, Italian Space Agency, Russian Space Agency.

  16. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrino, Jose A.; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jimenez-Munoz, Juan C.; Hook, Simon J.; Baldridge, Alice; Ibanez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 {mu}m with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  17. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  18. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  19. Measurement of turbulence spectra using scanning pulsed wind lidars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sathe, A.; Mann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent velocity spectra, as measured by a scanning pulsed wind lidar (WindCube), are analyzed. The relationship between ordinary velocity spectra and lidar derived spectra is mathematically very complex, and deployment of the three-dimensional spectral velocity tensor is necessary. The resulting

  20. Measurement and interpretation of plutonium spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.S.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Crosswhite, H.

    1982-01-01

    The atomic spectroscopic data available for plutonium are among the rickest of any in the periodic system. They include high-resolution grating and Fourier-transform spectra as well as extensive Zeeman and isotope-shift studies. We summarize the present status of the term analysis and cite the configurations that have been identified. A least-squares adjustment of a parametric Hamiltonian for configurations of both Pu I and Pu II has shown that almost all of the expected low levels are now known. The use of a model Hamiltonian applicable to both lanthanide and actinide atomic species has been applied to the low configurations of Pu I and Pu II making use of trends predicted by ab initio calculations. This same model has been used to describe the energy levels of Pu/sup 3 +/ in LaCl/sub 3/, and an extension has permitted preliminary calculations of the spectra of other valence states.

  1. Accounting for the effect of horizontal gradients in limb measurements of scattered sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Limb measurements provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the ENVISAT satellite allow retrieving stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale, among them BrO for the first time. For limb observations in the UV/VIS spectral region the instrument measures scattered light with a complex distribution of light paths: the light is measured at different elevation angles and can be scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere or reflected by the ground. By means of spectroscopy and radiative transfer modelling the measurements can be inverted to retrieve the vertical distribution of stratospheric trace gases.

    A full spherical 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model "Tracy-II" is applied in this study. The Monte Carlo method benefits from conceptual simplicity and allows realizing the concept of full spherical geometry of the atmosphere and also its 3-D properties, which is important for a realistic description of the limb geometry. Furthermore it allows accounting for horizontal gradients in the distribution of trace gases.

    In this study the effect ofhorizontal inhomogeneous distributions of trace gases on the retrieval of profiles from limb measurements of scattered UV/VIS light is investigated. We introduce a method to correct for this effect by combining consecutive limb scanning sequences and utilizing the overlap in their measurement sensitivity regions. It is found that if horizontal inhomogenity is not properly accounted for, typical errors of 20% for NO2 and up to 50% for OClO around the altitude of the profile peak can arise for measurements close to the Arctic polar vortex boundary in boreal winter.

  2. Accounting for the effect of horizontal gradients in limb measurements of scattered sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Limb measurements provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the ENVISAT satellite allow retrieving stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale, among them BrO for the first time. For limb observations in the UV/VIS spectral region the instrument measures scattered light with a complex distribution of light paths: the light is measured at different tangent heights and can be scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere or reflected by the ground. By means of spectroscopy and radiative transfer modelling these measurements can be inverted to retrieve the vertical distribution of stratospheric trace gases.

    The fully spherical 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model "Tracy-II" is applied in this study. The Monte Carlo method benefits from conceptual simplicity and allows realizing the concept of full spherical geometry of the atmosphere and also its 3-D properties, which is important for a realistic description of the limb geometry. Furthermore it allows accounting for horizontal gradients in the distribution of trace gases.

    In this study the effect of horizontally inhomogeneous distributions of trace gases along flight/viewing direction on the retrieval of profiles is investigated. We introduce a tomographic method to correct for this effect by combining consecutive limb scanning sequences and utilizing the overlap in their measurement sensitivity regions. It is found that if horizontal inhomogenity is not properly accounted for, typical errors of 20% for NO2 and up to 50% for OClO around the altitude of the profile peak can arise for measurements close to the Arctic polar vortex boundary in boreal winter.

  3. Measurement of turbulence spectra using scanning pulsed wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent velocity spectra, as measured by a scanning pulsed wind lidar (WindCube), are analyzed. The relationship between ordinary velocity spectra and lidar derived spectra is mathematically very complex, and deployment of the three-dimensional spectral velocity tensor is necessary. The resulting...... scanning lidar spectra depend on beam angles, line-of-sight averaging, sampling rate, and the full three-dimensional structure of the turbulence being measured, in a convoluted way. The model captures the attenuation and redistribution of the spectral energy at high and low wave numbers very well...

  4. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  5. A flow cytometer for the measurement of Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dakota A; Brown, Leif O; Gaskill, Daniel F; Naivar, Mark; Graves, Steven W; Doorn, Stephen K; Nolan, John P

    2008-02-01

    Multiparameter measurements in flow cytometry are limited by the broad emission spectra of fluorescent labels. By contrast, Raman spectra are notable for their narrow spectral features. To increase the multiparameter analysis capabilities of flow cytometry, we investigated the possibility of measuring Raman signals in a flow cytometry-based system. We constructed a Raman Spectral Flow Cytometer, substituting a spectrograph and CCD detector for the traditional mirrors, optical filters, and photomultiplier tubes. Excitation at 633 nm was provided by a HeNe laser, and forward-angle light scatter is used to trigger acquisition of complete spectra from individual particles. Microspheres were labeled with nanoparticle surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags and measured using the RSFC. Fluorescence and Raman spectra from labeled microspheres were acquired using the Raman Spectral Flow Cytometer. SERS spectral intensities were dependent on integration time, laser power, and detector pixel binning. Spectra from particles labeled with one each of four different SERS tags could be distinguished by either a virtual bandpass approach using commercial flow cytometry data analysis software or by principal component analysis. Raman flow cytometry opens up new possibilities for highly multiparameter and multiplexed measurements of cells and other particles using a simple optical design and a single detector and light source.

  6. The SELEX Measurements in the Unified Picture for Hadron Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, A A

    2004-01-01

    We give an analysis of the experimental material presented by the SELEX Collaboration to find the true place for the SELEX state $D_{sJ}^+$(2632) in the unified picture for hadron spectra developed early. It is found that the SELEX measurements are excellently incorporated in the unified picture for hadron spectra. Our analysis shows that the measured values for the masses of the SELEX state exactly coincide with the calculated masses of the states living in the corresponding KK towers. We also found quite a natural but rather model dependent explanation of the decay pattern for the SELEX state being dominated by the $D_s^+\\eta$ decay mode.

  7. Standardization of near infrared spectra measured on multi-instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-11

    Calibration model transfer is essential for practical applications of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy because the measurements of the spectra may be performed on different instruments and the difference between the instruments must be corrected. An approach for calibration transfer based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithm is proposed in this work. From the three-way spectral matrix measured on different instruments, the relative intensity of concentration, spectrum and instrument is obtained using trilinear decomposition. Because the relative intensity of instrument is a reflection of the spectral difference between instruments, the spectra measured on different instruments can be standardized by a correction of the coefficients in the relative intensity. Two NIR datasets of corn and tobacco leaf samples measured with three instruments are used to test the performance of the method. The results show that, for both the datasets, the spectra measured on one instrument can be correctly predicted using the partial least squares (PLS) models built with the spectra measured on the other instruments.

  8. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  9. Status of measurements of fission neutron spectra of Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapchinsky, L.; Shiryaev, B. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The report considers experimental and theoretical works on studying the energy spectra of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission and neutron induced fission of Minor Actinides. It is noted that neutron spectra investigations were done for only a small number of such nuclei, most measurements, except those of Cf-252, having been carried out long ago by obsolete methods and imperfectapparatus. The works have no detailed description of experiments, analysis of errors, detailed numerical information about results of experiments. A conclusion is made that the available data do not come up to modern requirements. It is necessary to make new measurements of fission prompt neutron spectra of transuranium nuclides important for the objectives of working out a conception of minor actinides transmutation by means of special reactors. (author)

  10. Spatial Spectra of Jet Turbulence Measured by Particle Image Velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wänström, Maja; George, William K.; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2009-01-01

    The unique capabilities of particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been utilized together with two-point similarity theory to measure spatial spectra in a ‘homogenized’ fully-developed turbulence jet at relatively high Reynolds number (20,000). The theory developed by Ewing et al. [1] was found...... to be in excellent agreement with the data, and in fact key to the present application. Despite relatively poor spatial resolution of the scales of motion (up to 15 times the Kolmogorov microscale) and limited dynamic range due to progressive jet velocity decay, it was possible to produce highly accurate spectra...

  11. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  12. Measured-predicted molecular spectra at band-line resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, G. N.; Akagi, T.; Barton, P. B. C.

    2016-10-01

    Early ERIM measurements of hot-through-cold gas (CO2, H2O, N2) emission-absorption spectra are replicated by modern line-band computations that incorporate independent fundamental line strength-frequency information. Close agreement is achieved for all cases by empirical adjustment of the line broadening function. Line spectra for CO2 and H2O computed at 0.001 cm-1 resolution were integrated to 3.2 and 14 cm-1 using a triangular slit function consistent with ERIM measurements for the 4.3 and 2.7 μm spectral regions. Band spectra computed at 0.1 cm-1 resolution give close agreement with spectra generated at higher resolution. The findings demonstrate a merged line-band model for nonuniform path radiance and transmittance based on the line-sum spectral cross section for each piecewise-uniform path segment. The band-and-line transmittance become equivalent at high spectral resolution.

  13. Retrieving the vertical distribution of stratospheric OClO from Odin/OSIRIS limb-scattered sunlight measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Krecl

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The first vertical profiles of stratospheric OClO retrieved from Odin/OSIRIS limb-scattered sunlight radiances are presented. The retrieval method is based on a two-step approach, using differential optical absorption spectroscopy combined with the maximum a posteriori estimator. The details of the spectral window selection, spectral corrections and inversion technique are discussed. The results show that OClO can be detected inside the South polar vortex region between about 12 and 20 km altitude with a 2–5 km height resolution and an estimated retrieval error better than 60% at the peak. OClO concentrations are consistent with chemical transport model simulations and show the expected relation to the atmospheric conditions in the lower stratosphere in the austral spring 2002. This unique data set of OClO profiles is very promising to study the stratospheric chlorine activation in both polar regions.

  14. Retrieving the vertical distribution of stratospheric OClO from Odin/OSIRIS limb-scattered sunlight measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Krecl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first vertical profiles of stratospheric OClO retrieved from Odin/OSIRIS limb-scattered sunlight radiances are presented. The retrieval method is based on a two-step approach, using differential optical absorption spectroscopy combined with the maximum a posteriori estimator. The details of the spectral window selection, spectral corrections and inversion technique are discussed. The results show that OClO can be detected inside the South polar vortex region between about 14 and 22 km altitude with a 2–5 km height resolution and an estimated retrieval error better than 50% at the peak. OClO concentrations show the expected relation to the atmospheric conditions in the lower stratosphere in the austral spring 2002. This unique data set of OClO profiles is very promising to study the stratospheric chlorine activation in both polar regions.

  15. X-ray measurements on wood - spectra measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Kamp; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Gerward, Leif

    The report concerns simultaneous non-destructive measurements of water content and density of wood. Theoretically, this should be possible using a x-ray equipment newly build at BKM, and this work is an attempt to use the equipment for assessing water content and density of wood samples under...... laboratory conditions. A number of wood samples with different densities are placed at different relative humidities from 0.5 to 97 %RH. When equilibrium is obtained the samples are measured with the x-ray equipment such that 10 points are measured in the sample followed by measurements outside the sample...... (free-scanning). In this way 100 points are measured for each wood sample. This produces information about moisture content and density of the samples as water and wood attenuations of the x-rays are different for the different energy levels contained in the x-rays. The "real" density and moisture...

  16. Aspirated capacitor measurements of air conductivity and ion mobility spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, K L

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of ions in atmospheric air are used to investigate atmospheric electricity and particulate pollution. Commonly studied ion parameters are (1) air conductivity, related to the total ion number concentration, and (2) the ion mobility spectrum, which varies with atmospheric composition. The physical principles of air ion instrumentation are long-established. A recent development is the computerised aspirated capacitor, which measures ions from (a) the current of charged particles at a sensing electrode, and (b) the rate of charge exchange with an electrode at a known initial potential, relaxing to a lower potential. As the voltage decays, only ions of higher and higher mobility are collected by the central electrode and contribute to the further decay of the voltage. This enables extension of the classical theory to calculate ion mobility spectra by inverting voltage decay time series. In indoor air, ion mobility spectra determined from both the novel voltage decay inversion, and an established volt...

  17. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D. [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique. Université Laval (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  18. X-ray measurements on wood - spectra measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Kamp; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Gerward, Leif

    (free-scanning). In this way 100 points are measured for each wood sample. This produces information about moisture content and density of the samples as water and wood attenuations of the x-rays are different for the different energy levels contained in the x-rays. The "real" density and moisture...

  19. Measurement of neutron spectra in the experimental reactor LR-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenosil, Vaclav; Mravec, Filip; Veskrna, Martin [Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanicka 68a, 612 00 Brno, (Czech Republic); Kostal, Michal [Research Centre Rez, Hlavni 130, 250 68 Husinec-Rez, (Czech Republic); Matej, Zdenek [VF, a.s., Svitavska 588, 679 21 Cerna Hora, (Czech Republic); Cvachovec, Frantisek [Faculty of Military Technology, University of Defense, Brno, (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of fast neutron fluxes is important in many areas of nuclear technology. It affects the stability of the reactor structural components, performance of fuel, and also the fuel manner. The experiments performed at the LR-0 reactor were in the past focused on the measurement of neutron field far from the core, in reactor pressure vessel simulator or in biological shielding simulator. In the present the measurement in closer regions to core became more important, especially measurements in structural components like reactor baffle. This importance increases with both reactor power increase and also long term operation. Other important task is an increasing need for the measurement close to the fuel. The spectra near the fuel are aimed due to the planned measurements with the FLIBE salt, in FHR / MSR research, where one of the task is the measurement of the neutron spectra in it. In both types of experiments there is strong demand for high working count rate. The high count rate is caused mainly by high gamma background and by high fluxes. The fluxes in core or in its vicinity are relatively high to ensure safe reactor operation. This request is met in the digital spectroscopic apparatus. All experiments were realized in the LR-0 reactor. It is an extremely flexible light water zero-power research reactor, operated by the Research Center Rez (Czech Republic). (authors)

  20. Measurements of stellar magnetic fields with the autocorrelation of spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Borra, Ermanno F

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal to noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is si...

  1. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  2. Measurements of {sup 237}Np secondary neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornilov, N.V.

    1997-03-01

    The activities carried out during the first year of the project are summarized. The main problems for Np spectra measurements arise from high intrinsic gamma-ray activity of the sample and admixture of the oxygen and iron nuclei. The inelastically scattered neutrons and the fission neutrons spectra for {sup 237}Np were measured by time-of-flight spectrometer of the IPPE at incident neutron energies {approx_equal}1.5 MeV, and {approx_equal}0.5 MeV. A solid tritium target and a Li-metallic target were used as neutron sources. The neutron scattering on C sample (C(n,n) standard reaction) was measured to normalize the Np data. The experimental data should be simulated by Monte Carlo method to correct the experimental data for oxygen and iron admixture as well as for multiple scattering of the neutrons in the sample. Therefore the response function of the spectrometer, and the neutron energy distribution from the source were investigated in detail. (author)

  3. Measurements of {sup 237}Np secondary neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornilov, N.V.

    1997-03-01

    The activities carried out during the first year of the project are summarized. The main problems for Np spectra measurements arise from high intrinsic gamma-ray activity of the sample and admixture of the oxygen and iron nuclei. The inelastically scattered neutrons and the fission neutrons spectra for {sup 237}Np were measured by time-of-flight spectrometer of the IPPE at incident neutron energies {approx_equal}1.5 MeV, and {approx_equal}0.5 MeV. A solid tritium target and a Li-metallic target were used as neutron sources. The neutron scattering on C sample (C(n,n) standard reaction) was measured to normalize the Np data. The experimental data should be simulated by Monte Carlo method to correct the experimental data for oxygen and iron admixture as well as for multiple scattering of the neutrons in the sample. Therefore the response function of the spectrometer, and the neutron energy distribution from the source were investigated in detail. (author)

  4. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David C.; Sedillo, Robert; Shurter, Roger P.; Volegov, Petr; Webb, Timothy J.

    2015-08-01

    A Compton spectrometer has been re-commissioned for measurements of flash radiographic sources. The determination of the energy spectrum of these sources is difficult due to the high count rates and short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). The spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. Incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam incident on a converter foil. The ejected Compton electrons are collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the magnet's focal plane is a function of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent measurements of flash sources are presented.

  5. Technique to separate lidar signal and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; MacDonnell, David G; Weimer, Carl; Baize, Rosemary R

    2016-06-13

    Sunlight contamination dominates the backscatter noise in space-based lidar measurements during daytime. The background scattered sunlight is highly variable and dependent upon the surface and atmospheric albedo. The scattered sunlight contribution to noise increases over land and snow surfaces where surface albedos are high and thus overwhelm lidar backscatter from optically thin atmospheric constituents like aerosols and thin clouds. In this work, we developed a novel lidar remote sensing concept that potentially can eliminate sunlight induced noise. The new lidar concept requires: (1) a transmitted laser light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM); and (2) a photon sieve (PS) diffractive filter that separates scattered sunlight from laser light backscattered from the atmosphere, ocean and solid surfaces. The method is based on numerical modeling of the focusing of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) laser beam and plane-wave light by a PS. The model results show that after passing through a PS, laser light that carries the OAM is focused on a ring (called "focal ring" here) on the focal plane of the PS filter, very little energy arrives at the center of the focal plane. However, scattered sunlight, as a plane wave without the OAM, focuses at the center of the focal plane and thus can be effectively blocked or ducted out. We also find that the radius of the "focal ring" increases with the increase of azimuthal mode (L) of LG laser light, thus increasing L can more effectively separate the lidar signal away from the sunlight noise.

  6. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers,/sup 3/He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Taxicab tipping and sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Does the level of sunlight affect the tipping percentage in taxicab rides in New York City? We examined this question using data on 13.82 million cab rides from January to October in 2009 in New York City combined with data on hourly levels of solar radiation. We found a small but statistically significant positive relationship between sunlight and tipping, with an estimated tipping increase of 0.5 to 0.7 percentage points when transitioning from a dark sky to full sunshine. The findings are robust to two-way clustering of standard errors based on hour-of-the-day and day-of-the-year and controlling for day-of-the-year, month-of-the-year, cab driver fixed effects, weather conditions, and ride characteristics. The NYC cab ride context is suitable for testing the association between sunlight and tipping due to the largely random assignment of riders to drivers, direct exposure to sunlight, and low confounding from variation in service experiences. PMID:28594917

  8. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noda, Shusaku [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chatillon, Audrey [CEA-FRANCE; Granier, Thierry [CEA-FRANCE; Taieb, Julien [CEA-FRANCE; Laurent, Benoit [CEA-FRANCE; Belier, Gilbert [CEA-FRANCE; Becker, John A [LLNL; Wu, Ching - Yen [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  9. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomelli, L. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, 0X14 3DB, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Conroy, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, 0X14 3DB, United Kingdom and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Belli, F.; Riva, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Roma (Italy); Gorini, G. [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy and Istituto di Física del Plasma Piero Caldirola, Milan (Italy); Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, 0X14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  10. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements. [of surface field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1979-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field (in spherical harmonics) from harmonic analysis of direct (in situ) measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends (smoothed spectra) to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low-orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity (range rate) residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in a highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50-km half wavelength) from 1 x 1 deg gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of GEOS 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows that there is about 46 cm of geoid height (rms worldwide) remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  11. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jia; LI Yingying; SHI Yuejiang; WANG Fudi; ZHANG Wei; LV Bo; HUANG Juan; WAN Baonian; ZHOU Qian

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200-750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Da/Ha line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system.

  12. Measurement of P450 difference spectra using intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Wayne A; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2013-01-01

    Whole-cell assays provide a rapid means of determining expression and substrate binding for cytochrome P450 enzymes expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and, potentially, other host cells. Such assays are particularly useful for screening large libraries of mutant P450s, where rapid, high-throughput assays are needed for first-tier screens that can, firstly, quantify any P450 form independent of P450 subfamily and, secondly, suggest possible ligands before more labor-intensive direct measurement of substrate turnover. Whole-cell spectral techniques are derived from methods that have been used for a long time to study P450s in microsomal or other subcellular fractions (Omura T and Sato R, J Biol Chem 239:2370-2378, 1964; Schenkman JB et al., Biochemistry 11:4243-4251, 1972), but recent studies have detailed important modifications which allow quantitative results to be obtained in whole cells (Otey CR, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 230, Humana, Totowa, NJ, pp. 137-139, 2003; Johnston WA et al., J Biomol Screen 13:135-141, 2008). A general method is presented here for the measurement of difference spectra on recombinant P450 cultures that can be applied to both carbon monoxide and any number of alternative ligands that alter the characteristic spectral signature of P450s.

  13. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  14. The Impact of Sunlight Conditions on the Consistency of Vegetation Indices in Croplands—Effective Usage of Vegetation Indices from Continuous Ground-Based Spectral Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Ishihara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based network of spectral observations is useful for ecosystem monitoring and validation of satellite data. However, these observations contain inherent uncertainties due to the change of sunlight conditions. This study investigated the impact of changing solar zenith angles and diffuse/direct light conditions on the consistency of vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and green-red vegetation index (GRVI derived from ground-based spectral measurements in three different types of cropland (paddy field, upland field, cultivated grassland in Japan. In general, the vegetation indices decreased with decreasing solar zenith angle. This response was affected significantly by the growth stage and diffuse/direct light conditions. The decreasing response of the NDVI to the decreasing solar zenith angle was high during the middle growth stage (0.4 < NDVI < 0.8. On the other hand, a similar response of the GRVI was evident except in the early growth stage (GRVI < 0. The response of vegetation indices to the solar zenith angle was evident under clear sky conditions but almost negligible under cloudy sky conditions. At large solar zenith angles, neither the NDVI nor the GRVI were affected by diffuse/direct light conditions in any growth stage. These experimental results were supported well by the results of simulations based on a physically-based canopy reflectance model (PROSAIL. Systematic selection of the data from continuous diurnal spectral measurements in consideration of the solar light conditions would be effective for accurate and consistent assessment of the canopy structure and functioning.

  15. CCN Spectra Measurements as an Active Tracer of Stratocumulus Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    mechanisms outlined here are very important in the global cycle of CCN. Comparisons of the CCN spectra with cut sizes used in the counterflow virtual...penetrations. The CVI is a discriminating sampler which allows only particles above certain cut sizes to enter; smaller cloud droplets and interstitial

  16. [Measurement of atmosphere NO2 amounts and angle spacial distribution using zenith-light spectra and sky-light spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jing-Guo; Gong, Min; He, Jie; Cao, Ting-Ting; Liang, Hui-Min; Sun, Peng

    2009-07-01

    A novel approach to retrieving atmosphere NO2 slant column density is described, in which the sunlight scattered in the zenith direction and the skylight are used as the light sources. The slant column density of the same azimuth but different obliquities, which are between 0.5 x 10(16) and 11 x 10(16) molecule x cm(-2), with the angle from 85 degrees to 10 degrees, as well as that of the same obliquity but different azimuths, which are between 10(16) and 10(17) molecule cm(-2), were calculated. The study indicates that the results have good correlation with real atmosphere status. The angle spatial distribution could be embodied by the difference of NO2 slant column density in different azimuths and obliquities. The reference spectrum and sample spectrum were collected with the same instrument at the same time, so the measurement accuracy has been improved. This method favored not only real-time monitoring NO2 content of space arbitrary direction, especially near the ground NO2 pollution emergencies, but also overcast and rainy areas where it is very difficult to collect good direct solar spectrum.

  17. Research on Techniques and Devices of Nature Sunlight Irradiance Measurements%自然阳光辐照度测量技术和装置的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 董旭; 王玉鹏; 陈建功; 魏鹏; 廖小华

    2014-01-01

    There are some advantages to use nature sunlight as the source of solar cell calibration compared with the usage of solar simulator. It accords with the request for calibration of solar cell that recommended by international criterion. There is a cooperate research to do it between Fujian Metroiogy Institute and Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,.It uses the solar irradiance absolute radiometer as the main baseline with the automatic solar tracker. The uncertainty of direct solar irradiance measurement is U=1.0%(k=2), keeps ahead in the PV ifeld, it makes a foundation for calibration of reference solar cell.%采用自然阳光作为校准太阳能电池/组件的光源,与采用太阳模拟器作为光源相比有一系列优点,符合国际标准规定/推荐的对高级别光辐射标准和参考太阳能电池/组件校准的要求。福建省计量科学研究院与中国科学院长春光学精密机械与物理研究所合作研究,采用了锥型光接收腔与参考腔的腔型绝对辐射计和双轴双模式的太阳跟踪仪,太阳直接辐照度测量结果不确定度=1.0%(=2),在光伏领域达到国内领先水平,为校准参考太阳能电池/组件奠定了基础。

  18. Spectrometer equipment for photon spectra measurements in mixed neutron/photon fields

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, V A; Trykov, L A

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the description of spectrometers in the experimental laboratory of the IPPE for measuring, processing and systematizing of gamma-radiation spectra. The complete set includes spectrometers based on stilbene crystal and silicon Si(Li) detector. Spectrometers are used for photon spectra measuring of the mixed neutron/photon radiation radionuclide sources, nuclear reactors and accelerators; for the study of neutron and photon spectra in materials, including benchmark experiments; for the photon spectra measurements in the rooms of nuclear facilities in order to determine the radionuclide contents of the sources and to provide radiation safety.

  19. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Amanda Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haines, Todd Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mendez, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moir, David C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sedillo, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shurter, Roger P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Volegov, Petr Lvovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources are difficult to measure. The sources measured were Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (370 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse) and Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) (550 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse). Features of the Compton spectrometer are described, and spectra are shown. Additional slides present data on instrumental calibration.

  20. Measurements and parameterization of neutron energy spectra from targets bombarded with 120 GeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, T., E-mail: kajimoto@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Shigyo, N. [Kyushu University, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Sanami, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Iwamoto, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hagiwara, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Lee, H.S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Soha, A.; Ramberg, E.; Coleman, R.; Jensen, D.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.V.; Boehnlein, D.; Vaziri, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States); Sakamoto, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishibashi, K. [Kyushu University, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakashima, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Neutron energy spectra from targets bombarded with 120 GeV protons were measured. •The neutron energy was determined with the time-of-flight technique. •The measured spectra were compared with those calculated by PHITS and FLUKA. •Large differences were found between measured and calculated spectra. •The study shows the need to improve models for neutron production in the high energy region. -- Abstract: The energy spectra of neutrons were measured by a time-of-flight method for 120 GeV protons on thick graphite, aluminum, copper, and tungsten targets with an NE213 scintillator at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. Neutron energy spectra were obtained between 25 and 3000 MeV at emission angles of 30°, 45°, 120°, and 150°. The spectra were parameterized as neutron emissions from three moving sources and then compared with theoretical spectra calculated by PHITS and FLUKA codes. The yields of the theoretical spectra were substantially underestimated compared with the yields of measured spectra. The integrated neutron yields from 25 to 3000 MeV calculated with PHITS code were 16–36% of the experimental yields and those calculated with FLUKA code were 26–57% of the experimental yields for all targets and emission angles.

  1. Sunlight exposure assessment: can we accurately assess vitamin D exposure from sunlight questionnaires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Catherine A

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the peer-reviewed literature in relation to sunlight exposure assessment and the validity of using sunlight exposure questionnaires to quantify vitamin D status. There is greater variability in personal ultraviolet (UV) light exposure as the result of personal behavior than as the result of ambient UV light exposure. Although statistically significant, the correlation coefficients for the relation between personal report of sun exposure and ambient UV light measured by dosimetry (assessment of radiation dose) are relatively low. Moreover, the few studies to assess the relation between sunlight measures and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D show low correlations. These low correlations may not be surprising given that personal factors like melanin content in skin and age also influence cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D. In summary, sunlight exposure questionnaires currently provide imprecise estimates of vitamin D status. Research should be directed to develop more objective, nonintrusive, and economical measures of sunlight exposure to quantify personal vitamin D status.

  2. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Fallot M.; Cormon S.; Estienne M.; Algora A.; Bui V.M.; Cucoanes A.; Elnimr M.; Giot L.; Jordan D.; Martino J.; Onillon A.; Porta A.; Pronost G.; Remoto A.; Taín J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, ...

  3. Restricted Acoustic Modal Analysis Applied to Internal Combustor Spectra and Cross-Spectra Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    A treatment of the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a combustor as determined by two Kulite pressure measurements is developed herein. It is applied to a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 engine combustor over a range of operating conditions. For modes other than the plane wave the new part of the treatment is the assumption that there are distinct frequency bands in which the individual modes, including the plane wave mode, overlap such that if circumferential mode m and circumferential mode m-1 are present than circumferential mode m 2 is not. Consequently, in the analysis used herein at frequencies above the first cut-off mode frequency, only pairs of circumferential modes are individually present at each frequency. Consequently, this is a restricted modal analysis. A new result is that the successful use of the same modal span frequencies over a range of operating conditions for this particular engine suggests that the temperature, T, and the velocity, v, of the flow at each operating condition are related by c(sup 2)-v(sup 2) = a constant where c is the speed of sound.

  4. Sunlight and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Matthias; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin that has been produced on this earth for more than 500 million years. During exposure to sunlight 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin absorbs UV B radiation and is converted to previtamin D3 which in turn isomerizes into vitamin D3. Previtamin D3 and vitamin D3 also absorb UV B radiation and are converted into a variety of photoproducts some of which have unique biologic properties. Sun induced vitamin D synthesis is greatly influenced by season, time of day, latitude, altitude, air pollution, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, passing through glass and plastic, and aging. Vitamin D is metabolized sequentially in the liver and kidneys into 25-hydroxyvitamin D which is a major circulating form and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D which is the biologically active form respectively. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D plays an important role in regulating calcium and phosphate metabolism for maintenance of metabolic functions and for skeletal health. Most cells and organs in the body have a vitamin D receptor and many cells and organs are able to produce 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. As a result 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D influences a large number of biologic pathways which may help explain association studies relating vitamin D deficiency and living at higher latitudes with increased risk for many chronic diseases including autoimmune diseases, some cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes. A three-part strategy of increasing food fortification programs with vitamin D, sensible sun exposure recommendations and encouraging ingestion of a vitamin D supplement when needed should be implemented to prevent global vitamin D deficiency and its negative health consequences. PMID:24494042

  5. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Bo [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Lana [School of Electronics and Information, Guangdong Polytechnic Normal University, Guangzhou 510665 (China); Yue, Chengfeng [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie, E-mail: tangzhl@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-02-26

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex. - Highlights: • Different non-integer vortices cannot have three spiral spectra is demonstrated. • Relationship between the non-integer topological charge and the spiral spectra is presented. • Topological charge of non-integer vortices can be determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra.

  6. ON GRAPH MEASURES IN BANACH SPACES AND DESCRIPTION OF ESSENTIAL SPECTRA OF MULTIDIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boulbeba Abdelmoumen; Aref Jeribi; Maher Mnif

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we define new measures called respectively graph measure of noncompactness and graph measure of weak noncompactness.Moreover,we apply the obtained results to discuss the incidence of some perturbation results realized in [2] on the behavior of essential spectra of such closed densely defined linear operators on Banach spaces.These results are exploited to investigate the essential spectra of a multidimensional neutron transport operator on L1 spaces.

  7. The effect of cross flow on one-dimensional spectra measured using hot wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, D.

    Expressions were developed to estimate the cross-flow error that occurs in the one-dimensional velocity spectra determined by applying Taylor's frozen field hypothesis to measurements with single- and cross-wire probes. The cross-flow error and the error caused by the unsteady convection of the small-scale motions were evaluated for typical measurements. It was found that the cross-flow error could be significant in inertial range of the measured one-dimensional spectra, and was much larger than the error caused by the unsteady convection of the small-scale motions in the one-dimensional spectra of the cross-stream velocity components, $ F2}{22 {( {k1 } )} and F1}{33 {( {k1 } )} . The results indicate that the one-dimensional spectra of the streamwise velocity component F1}{11 {( {k1 } )} $ measured with a single-wire probe should be significantly more accurate than the spectra measured with a cross-wire probe. The cross-flow error in the one-dimensional spectra also becomes much less important in the dissipation range of the measured spectra.

  8. Spectrometer equipment for neutron spectra measurements in mixed neutron/photon fields

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, V A; Trykov, L A

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes spectrometer equipment in the IPPE experimental laboratory for neutron spectra measurement in mixed (n,gamma) fields. The laboratory was founded in 1957 and it occupies a leading position in the field of nuclear facilities radiation spectrometry and benchmark experiments in Russia. Spectrometer equipment includes spectrometers based on the organic stilbene scintillator, hydrogen counter and Bonner balls. Basic fields of spectrometer application are mixed radiation neutron spectra measurement of radionuclide sources, of nuclear reactors and accelerators; study of neutron transfer through the material, including benchmark experiments and measurement of neutron spectra in the rooms of nuclear facilities.

  9. Time-Resolved Raman Spectra Measured with an Aerosol Raman Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videen, G.; Doughty, D., III; Hill, S. C.; Wetmore, A.; James, D.

    2016-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy yields information about the composition of atmospheric particles, but generally requires offline analysis. To examine temporal trends in aerosol composition we use an automated aerosol Raman spectrometer (Battelle, Columbus, OH) which semi-continuously samples aerosol particles onto a metallized tape and within a few minutes measures the Raman spectra of these. We collected particles (24 hr at 15 minute intervals), clustered their Raman spectra, noted particle composition of many of them, and examined the time variations of numbers of spectra indicating different particle types. We discuss contemporaneous aerosol measurements, the heterogeneity of many particles as indicated by their Raman spectra, and the prevalence of Raman spectra similar to humic-like substances or soot, which we suggest may be related to the relatively large Raman cross sections of materials with extensively conjugated sp2 bonds.

  10. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  11. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  12. Capillary method for measuring near-infrared spectra of microlitre volume liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Bo; MURAYAMA Koichi

    2007-01-01

    The present study theoretically explored the feasibility of the capillary method for measuring near-infrared (NIR) spectra of liquid or solution samples with microlitre volume, which was proposed in our previous studies. Lambert-Beer absorbance rule was applied to establish a model for the integral absorbance of capillary, which was then implemented in numerical analyses of the effects of capillary on various spectral features and dynamic range of absorption measurement. The theoretical speculations indicated that the capillary method might be used in NIR spectroscopy, which was further supported by the empirical data collected from our experiments by comparison between capillary NIR spectra of several organic solvents and cuvette cell NIR spectra.

  13. Use of discrete Fourier transform to sum spectra in measurements with long counting times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilar Rubio Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Sta. Teresa de Jornet 38, E-06800, Merida (Spain); Garcia-Torano, Eduardo [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: E.garciatorano@ciemat.es

    2007-07-11

    When measuring nuclear spectra for long counting times, it is usual to split the acquisition in a set of spectra of shorter duration that are later added after correcting by drift during the measurements. We describe a method to determine the shifting correction by using the properties of the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). The method does not require assuming a particular spectral shape and the implementation is essentially independent of the kind of spectra being analyzed. The drift correction is defined for an integer number of channels. We present the results of the application to alpha-particle spectroscopy of long-lived nuclides.

  14. Thermocouple time constant measurement by cross power spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W. C.; Muthukrishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    A method of measuring thermocouple time constants is outlined which requires Fourier signal processing. In this method, two thermocouples of differing time constants are placed in a gas flow as closely as possible to one another, and the time constant of the first thermocouple is determined directly from the extremum of the imaginary part of the ratio of the ensemble averaged cross-power spectrum to the ensemble averaged auto-power spectrum of that thermocouple. A coherence function is given for assuring the quality of the data, and results are presented for an experimental test of the method. Some problems with the method are briefly noted.

  15. Measurement and analysis of sky background spectra in passive ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang; Liu, Bingqi; Yu, Hao; Li, Xiaoming; Yan, Zongqun; Hua, Wenshen; Shi, Yunsheng; Chen, Yichao

    2015-10-01

    Experimental program is designed to analyze the radiation and absorption characteristic of the sky background at near-infrared Oxygen A absorption band of passive ranging based on Oxygen spectral absorption; an acousto-optic tunable hyper spectral imaging spectrometer is used as the measuring device. Under the condition of sunny, cloudy, and snowy weather, the sky background spectral distribution is collected using the acousto-optic tunable hyper spectral imaging spectrometer. Then the Oxygen absorption rate is calculated according to the principle of Oxygen spectrum absorption passive ranging. The measurement result shows: absorption lines exist in the sky background spectral distribution at the Oxygen A absorption band, and the absorption rates are different at different weather conditions. The Oxygen absorption rates are the biggest under snowy weather, bigger under cloudy weather, and the smallest under sunny weather. The general change pattern of Oxygen absorption rate under different weather conditions is obtained and the result has laid solid foundation for suppressing the interference of the background and extracting target spectral accurately in subsequent passive ranging researching.

  16. How to measure CMB power spectra without losing information

    CERN Document Server

    Tegmark, M

    1997-01-01

    A new method for estimating the angular power spectrum C_l from cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps is presented, which has the following desirable properties: (1) It is unbeatable in the sense that no other method can measure C_\\l with smaller error bars. (2) It is quadratic, which makes the statistical properties of the measurements easy to compute and use for estimation of cosmological parameters. (3) It is computationally faster than rival high-precision methods such as the nonlinear maximum-likelihood technique, with the crucial steps scaling as n^2 rather than n^3, where n is the number of map pixels. (4) It is applicable to any survey geometry whatsoever, with arbitraty regions masked out and arbitrary noise behaviour. (5) It is not a "black-box" method, but quite simple to understand intuitively: it corresponds to a high-pass filtering and edge softening of the original map followed by a straight expansion in truncated spherical-harmonics. It is argued that this method is computationally feasible e...

  17. Measurement and numerical calculation of Rubidium Rydberg Stark spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmel, Jens; Karlewski, Florian; Jessen, Florian; Reinschmidt, Malte; Sándor, Nóra; Fortágh, József

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of Stark shifted energy levels of $^{87}$Rb Rydberg atoms in static electric fields by means of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Electric field strengths of up to 500V/cm, ranging beyond the classical ionisation threshold, were applied using electrodes inside a glass cell with rubidium vapour. Stark maps for principal quantum numbers $n=35$ and $n=70$ have been obtained with high signal-to-noise ratio for comparison with results from ab initio calculations following the method described in [M. L. Zimmerman et al., Phys. Rev. A 20, 2251 (1979)], which was originally only verified for states around $n=15$. We also calculate the dipole matrix elements between low-lying states and Stark shifted Rydberg states to give a theoretical estimate of the relative strength of the EIT signal. The present work significantly extends the experimental verification of this numerical method in the range of both high principal quantum numbers and high electric fields with an accuracy of...

  18. Interferometric measurement of charged particle spectra (Fourier-spectroscopy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Schaefer, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Wachendorfer, H. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1995-09-01

    Fourier spectroscopy, the most fundamental and, at least in principle, the most precise spectroscopy method, has been introduced by A.A. Michelson at the end of the last century. The method was restricted to electromagnetic waves until an optical component to shift the interfering wave packets longitudinally was invented [G. Moellensted and G. Wohland, Electron Microscopy 1980, eds. P. Bredoro and G. Boom, 7th Europ. Congr. on Electron Microscopy Foundation, Leiden, Vol. 1, p. 28] and refined [H. Gauch, Diploma thesis, University Tuebingen (1983); I. Daberkow et al., Joint Meeting on Electron Microscopy, Antwerp, Belgium, 1983, Program and Abstract Book, p. 100] to such a degree of perfection that the longitudinal shift could be controlled to a fraction of a percent of the wavelength. The Fourier spectrometer for charged matter waves is made up by a wave front splitting electron optical biprism in combination with crossed electric and magnetic fields (Wien-filter) as a wave-packet-shifting device. The contrast of the interference fringes as a function of the longitudinal shift is recorded by a CCD-line-camera, transferred to a PC and Fourier analyzed subsequently. As an example the spectrum of a field emission electron source was analyzed. At an energy of the electrons of 1 keV about 12 000 fringes with a contrast exceeding 10% were recorded. The measured full width at half maximum was 0.6 eV{+-}80 meV. The total error of 80 meV contains 40 meV error due to insufficient sampling of data and 40 meV since about 2000 low contrast fringes were neglected. The action of crossed electric and magnetic fields on electron wave packets including the major problems arising from their weak focusing action for the new method of spectroscopy is discussed extensively. (orig.).

  19. Mn K-edge XANES spectra of manganites measured by Kbeta emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J; Sánchez, M C; Subías, G; Blasco, J; Proietti, M G

    2001-03-01

    The electronic state of Mn atoms in mixed valence manganites has been studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Mn K-edge. Higher resolution than in conventional measurements has been achieved by measuring the Mn Kbeta fluorescence line. We have found a unique resonance at the edge in the XANES spectra of intermediate composition RE1-xCa(x)MnO3 samples. The features of these XANES spectra do not depend on small changes in the local structure around the Mn atom. However, the spectra of the intermediate composition samples can not be reproduced by a linear combination of REMnO3 and CaMnO3 spectra. Accordingly, the electronic state of Mn atoms in these compounds can not be considered as a mixture of Mn3+ and Mn4+ pure states.

  20. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Sinev, V V

    2009-01-01

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  1. Digital simulation of 3D turbulence wind field of Sutong Bridge based on measured wind spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao WANG; Zhou-hong ZONG; Ai-qun LI; Teng TONG; Jie NIU; Wen-ping DENG

    2012-01-01

    Time domain analysis is an essential implement to study the buffeting behavior of long-span bridges for it can consider the non-linear effect which is significant in long-span bridges.The prerequisite of time domain analysis is the accurate description of 3D turbulence winds.In this paper,some hypotheses for simplifying the 3D turbulence simulation of long-span cable-stayed bridges are conducted,considering the structural characteristics.The turbulence wind which is a 3D multivariate stochastic vector process is converted into four independent ID univariate stochastic processes.Based on recorded wind data from structural health monitoring system (SHMS) of the Sutong Bridge,China,the measured spectra expressions are then presented using the nonlinear least-squares fitting method.Turbulence winds at the Sutong Bridge site are simulated based on the spectral representation method and the Fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique,and the relevant results derived from target spectra including measured spectra and recommended spectra are compared.The reliability and accuracy of the presented turbulence simulation method are validated through comparisons between simulated and target spectra (measured and recommended spectra).The obtained turbulence simulations can not only serve further analysis of the buffeting behavior of the Sutong Bridge,but references for structural anti-wind design in adjacent regions.

  2. Measurement of CIB power spectra over large sky areas from Planck HFI maps

    CERN Document Server

    Ying, Suet; Challinor, Anthony; Efstathiou, Geroge; Lagache, Guilaine

    2016-01-01

    We present new measurements of the power spectra of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies using the Planck 2015 full-mission HFI data at 353, 545, and 857 GHz over 20000 square degrees. We use techniques similar to those applied for the cosmological analysis of Planck, subtracting dust emission at the power spectrum level. Our analysis gives stable solutions for the CIB power spectra with increasing sky coverage up to about 50% of the sky. These spectra agree well with Hi cleaned spectra from Planck measured on much smaller areas of sky with low Galactic dust emission. At 545 and 857 GHz our CIB spectra agree well with those measured from Herschel data. We find that the CIB spectra at l > 500 are well fitted by a power-law model for the clustered CIB, with a shallow index {\\gamma}^cib = 0.53\\pm0.02. This is consistent with the CIB results at 217 GHz from the cosmological parameter analysis of Planck. We show that a linear combination of the 545 and 857 GHz Planck maps is dominated by CIB fluctuati...

  3. Measurement of CIB power spectra over large sky areas from Planck HFI maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Daisy Suet Ying; Challinor, Anthony; Efstathiou, George; Lagache, Guilaine

    2017-04-01

    We present new measurements of the power spectra of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies using the Planck 2015 full-mission High frequency instrument data at 353, 545 and 857 GHz over 20 000 deg2. We use techniques similar to those applied for the cosmological analysis of Planck, subtracting dust emission at the power spectrum level. Our analysis gives stable solutions for the CIB power spectra with increasing sky coverage up to about 50 per cent of the sky. These spectra agree well with H I-cleaned spectra from Planck measured on much smaller areas of sky with low Galactic dust emission. At 545 and 857 GHz, our CIB spectra agree well with those measured from Herschel data. We find that the CIB spectra at ℓ ≳ 500 are well fitted by a power-law model for the clustered CIB, with a shallow index γcib = 0.53 ± 0.02. This is consistent with the CIB results at 217 GHz from the cosmological parameter analysis of Planck. We show that a linear combination of the 545 and 857 GHz Planck maps is dominated by the CIB fluctuations at multipoles ℓ ≳ 300.

  4. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  5. Measuring the response of canopy emissivity spectra to leaf area index variation using thermal hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinavaz, Elnaz; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Groen, Thomas A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the plant biophysical factors affecting the canopy spectral reflectance of plants in the optical domain to receive research attention in recent decades is leaf area index (LAI). Although it is expected that the value of LAI affects the emission of radiation, it not known how. To our knowledge, the effect of LAI on plant canopy emissivity spectra has not yet been investigated in the thermal infrared region (TIR 8-14 μm). The overall aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra of different species at the nadir position. The 279 spectral wavebands in the TIR domain were measured under controlled laboratory condition using a MIDAC spectrometer for four plant species. The corresponding LAI of each measurement was destructively calculated. We found a positive correlation between canopy emissivity spectra at various LAI values, indicating that emissivity increases concomitantly with LAI value. The canopy emissivity spectra of the four species were found to be statistically different at various wavebands even when the LAI values of the species were similar. It seems that other biophysical or biochemical factors also contribute to canopy emissivity spectra: this merits further investigation. We not only quantify the role of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra for the first time, but also demonstrate the potential of using hyperspectral thermal data to estimate LAI of plant species.

  6. The prediction and measurement of microdosimetric spectra relating to neutron cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G C

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of this work has been to characterise the beam of the MRC's high energy neutron cancer therapy cyclotron at the Clatterbridge Hospital, Bebington, the Wirral, by measuring a series of microdosimetric spectra for a variety of irradiation conditions. In order to interpret the variation between these spectra, so that the underlying physics of the neutron beam could be determined, it was necessary to identify the most influential factors in the production of microdosimetric responses. Experimental procedures were tested in a series of measurements using 14 and 15 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the Birmingham Dynamitron; these were instrumental in establishing the rigorous calibration regime necessary for the Clatterbridge measurement programme. The (analytical) predictive code NESLES was used to investigate the effect on microdosimetric spectra of having a low energy neutron component in the primary beam,, and also to highlight the shortcomings of the tissue-equivalent media used in microdosimetr...

  7. Measurements of energy spectra of fast electrons from PF-1000 in the upstream and downstream directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, R.; Czaus, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Malinowski, K.; Zebrowski, J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Kubes, P. [Czech Technical University (CVUT), 166-27 Prague, (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The paper describes measurements of energy spectra of electrons emitted in the upstream direction along the symmetry-axis of the PF-1000 facility, operated with the deuterium filling at 21 kV, 290 kJ. The measurements were performed with a magnetic analyzer. The same analyzer was used to measure also electron beams emitted in along the symmetry-axis in the downstream direction. The recorded spectra showed that the electron-beams emitted in the upstream direction have energies in the range from about 40 keV to about 800 keV, while those in the downstream direction have energies in the range from about 60 keV to about 200 keV. These spectra confirm that in the PF (Plasma Focus) plasma column there appear strong local fields accelerating charged particles in different directions. This document is composed of a paper and a poster. (authors)

  8. A multi-method approach to radial-velocity measurement for single-object spectra

    CERN Document Server

    David, M; Frémat, Y; Damerdji, Y; Luche, C Delle; Gosset, E; Katz, D; Viala, Y

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of radial velocities from large numbers of spectra that typically result from survey work, requires automation. However, except for the classical cases of slowly rotating late-type spectra, existing methods of measuring Doppler shifts require fine-tuning to avoid a loss of accuracy due to the idiosyncrasies of individual spectra. The radial velocity spectrometer (RVS) on the Gaia mission, which will start operating very soon, prompted a new attempt at creating a measurement pipeline to handle a wide variety of spectral types. The present paper describes the theoretical background on which this software is based. However, apart from the assumption that only synthetic templates are used, we do not rely on any of the characteristics of this instrument, so our results should be relevant for most telescope-detector combinations. We propose an approach based on the simultaneous use of several alternative measurement methods, each having its own merits and drawbacks, and conveying the spectral informa...

  9. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  10. Fourier Transform and Photoacoustic Absorption Spectra of Ethylene within 6035–6210 cm-1: Comparative Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venedikt A. Kapitanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of ethylene absorption spectra with Fourier Transform (FT and Photoacoustic (PA spectrometers within 6035–6210 cm−1 are described. The methodology used for building the frequency scale for both spectrometers is presented. The methane absorption spectrum, included into the HITRAN database, was used in both cases to calibrate the frequency scale. Ethylene absorption spectra were obtained with the two recording methods; a coincidence of the measured line center positions was obtained with an accuracy of 0.0005 cm−1.

  11. Precise Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Proton and Helium Spectra with the BESS Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sanuki, T; Matsumoto, H; Seo, E S; Wang, J Z; Abe, K; Anraku, K; Asaoka, Y; Fujikawa, M; Imori, M; Maeno, T; Makida, Y; Matsui, N; Matsunaga, H; Mitchell, J; Mitsui, T; Moiseev, A; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, S; Ormes, J F; Saeki, T; Sasaki, M; Shikaze, Y; Sonoda, T; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Ueda, I; Yajima, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2000-01-01

    We report cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra in energy ranges of 1 to 120GeV and 1 to 54 GeV/nucleon, respectively, measured by a balloon flight of theBESS spectrometer in 1998. The magnetic-rigidity of the cosmic-rays wasreliably determined by highly precise measurement of the circular track in auniform solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. Those spectra were determinedwithin overall uncertainties of +-5 0.000000or protons and +- 10 0.000000or helium nucleiincluding statistical and systematic errors.

  12. Representative spectra of the wave resource from real sea wave measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    When dealing with the estimation of the power production of Wave Energy Converters (WECs), from either physical laboratory or numerical models, or measured data from real sea testing of prototype, an accurate representation of the wave spectra at the target location is important for accurate power...... for defining representative spectra at a particular location, based on real sea wave measurements, is described, which allows a more accurate characterisation of the WEC performance. The analysis described here has been performed on wave data from a buoy at the location of DanWEC, approximately 1 nautical mile...

  13. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  14. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  15. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  16. Characterization of the Caliban and Prospero Critical Assemblies Neutron Spectra for Integral Measurements Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Jacquet, X.; Cartier, J.

    2014-04-01

    Caliban and Prospero are two highly enriched uranium metallic core reactors operated on the CEA Center of Valduc. These critical assemblies are suitable for integral experiments, such as fission yields measurements or perturbation measurements, which have been carried out recently on the Caliban reactor. Different unfolding methods, based on activation foils and fission chambers measurements, are used to characterize the reactor spectra and especially the Caliban spectrum, which is very close to a pure fission spectrum.

  17. A method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from the spectra of the LAMOST survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Han, Chen; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Ci, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Cao, Zi-Huang

    2016-07-01

    The [α/Fe] ratios in stars are good tracers to probe the formation history of stellar populations and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The spectroscopic survey of LAMOST provides a good opportunity to determine [α/Fe] of millions of stars in the Galaxy. We present a method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from LAMOST spectra using the template-matching technique of the LSP3 pipeline. We use three test samples of stars selected from the ELODIE and MILES libraries, as well as the LEGUE survey to validate our method. Based on the test results, we conclude that our method is valid for measuring [α/Fe] from low-resolution spectra acquired by the LAMOST survey. Within the range of the stellar parameters T eff = [5000, 7500] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0] dex and [Fe/H]= [-1.5, +0.5] dex, our [α/Fe] measurements are consistent with values derived from high-resolution spectra, and the accuracy of our [α/Fe] measurements from LAMOST spectra is better than 0.1 dex with spectral signal-to-noise higher than 20.

  18. Measurements of bubble size spectra within leads in the Arctic summer pack ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, S.J.; Brooks, I.M.; Leeuw, G. de; Sirevaag, A.; Leck, C.; Brooks, B.J.; Birch, C.E.; Tjernstrom, M.

    2010-01-01

    The first measurements of bubble size spectra within the near-surface waters of open leads in the central Arctic pack ice were obtained during the Artic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) in August 2008 at 87-87.6° N, 1-11° W. A significant number of small bubbles (30-100 μm diameter) were present, wi

  19. Measurements of bubble size spectra within leads in the Arctic summer pack ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, S.J.; Brooks, I.M.; Leeuw, G. de; Sirevaag, A.; Leck, C.; Brooks, B.J.; Birch, C.E.; Tjernström, M.

    2011-01-01

    The first measurements of bubble size spectra within the near-surface waters of open leads in the central Arctic pack ice were obtained during the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) in August 2008 at 87-87.6° N, 1-11° W. A significant number of small bubbles (30-100 μm diameter) were present, w

  20. Measurement of Day and Night Neutrino Energy Spectra at SNO and Constraints on Neutrino Mixing Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Q R; Andersen, T C; Anglin, J D; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S D; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Buhler, G; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, H H; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T H; Cowan, J H M; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Hamian, A A; Handler, W B; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J L; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C P; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Kazkaz, K; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Manor, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; Meijer-Drees, R; Miin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M E; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, Mamoru; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W P; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schwendener, M H; Schülke, A; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W E; Spreitzer, T; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P M; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2002-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted $^8$B spectrum, the night minus day rate is $14.0% \\pm 6.3% ^{+1.5}_{-1.4}%$ of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the $\

  1. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bo; Guo, Lana; Yue, Chengfeng; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex.

  2. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  3. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  4. Transmission properties of barite mortar using X-ray spectra measured with Cd Te detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J. C.; Mariano, L.; Costa, P. R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R. 187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: josilene@usp.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970 Goiania (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Current methods for calculating X-ray shielding barriers do not take into account spectral distribution of the beam transmitted by the protective material. This consideration is important in dose estimations for radiation workers and general public in diagnostic radiology facilities. The aim of the present study was to estimate barite mortar attenuation curves using X-ray spectra weighted by a workload distribution. These curves were described in units of ambient dose equivalent (H (10)), since it is the radiation quantity adopted by IAEA for dose assessment in medical environment. Attenuation curves were determined using the optimized model for shielding evaluation presented by Costa and Caldas (2002). Workload distribution presented by Simpkin (1996), measured primary spectra and mass attenuation coefficients of barite mortar were used as input data in this model. X-ray beams in diagnostic energy range were generated by an industrial X-ray tube with 3 mm of aluminum additional filtration. Primary experimental spectra were measured by a Cd Te detector and corrected by the response function of detector by means of a stripping procedure. Air kerma measurements were performed using an ionization chamber for normalization purpose of the spectra. The corrected spectra presented good agreement with spectra generated by a semi-empirical model. The variation of the ambient dose equivalent as a function of barite mortar thickness was calculated. Using these data, it was estimated the optimized thickness of protective barrier needed for shielding a particular area in an X-ray imaging facility. The results obtained for primary protective barriers exhibit qualitative agreement with those presented in literature. (Author)

  5. Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic Window System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millett, F,A; Byker,H, J

    2006-10-27

    Pleotint has embarked on a novel approach with our Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic, SRT™, windows. We are integrating dynamic sunlight control, high insulation values and low solar heat gain together in a high performance window. The Pleotint SRT window is dynamic because it reversibly changes light transmission based on thermochromics activated directly by the heating effect of sunlight. We can achieve a window package with low solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), a low U value and high insulation. At the same time our windows provide good daylighting. Our innovative window design offers architects and building designers the opportunity to choose their desired energy performance, excellent sound reduction, external pane can be self-cleaning, or a resistance to wind load, blasts, bullets or hurricanes. SRT windows would provide energy savings that are estimated at up to 30% over traditional window systems. Glass fabricators will be able to use existing equipment to make the SRT window while adding value and flexibility to the basic design. Glazing installers will have the ability to fit the windows with traditional methods without wires, power supplies and controllers. SRT windows can be retrofit into existing buildings,

  6. Microcalorimeter/EBIT measurements of X-ray spectra of highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kink, I.; Porto, J.V.; Gillaspy, J.D. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Laming, J.M. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Takacs, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Silver, E.; Schnopper, H.; Bandler, S.R.; Brickhouse, N.; Murray, S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Barbera, M. [Osservatorio Astronomico G.S. Vaiana, Palermo (Italy); Madden, N.; Landis, D.; Beeman, J.; Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Spectra of highly charged Ar, Kr, Xe and Fe ions, produced in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT), have been recorded in a broad X-ray energy band (0.2 keV to 10 keV) with a microcalorimeter detector. The first analysis of the Kr spectra has been completed and most of the spectral lines have been identified as transitions of B- to Al-like Kr. Line intensity ratios of Fe XVII have been measured and compared with theoretical models. (orig.)

  7. Spectral analysis of red scattered sunlight at sunrise

    CERN Document Server

    Zagury, F; Zagury, Frederic; Fujii, Mitsugu

    2003-01-01

    We analyze and fit visible spectra of a red horizon at sunrise. The shape of the spectra consist of a blue continuum followed by a red bump. The reddest spectra are well fitted by the product of a spectrum of extinguished sunlight (Rayleigh extinction + ozone absorption) and 1/lambda^4. The former is essentially the radiation field in the outer atmosphere, at the scattering volume location; the latter corresponds to Rayleigh scattering by the gas. Moving to higher altitudes, a second component, corresponding to the spectrum of a blue sky, must be added. The spectra we have obtained are similar to spectra of red nebulae, suggesting there may be other explanations than an emission process to the red color of some nebulae.

  8. Optical calculations and in-situ measurement of transmittance spectra of contaminant thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Kazunori; Miyazaki, Eiji; Kimoto, Yugo

    2016-09-01

    Molecular contaminants outgassed from organic materials used for the spacecraft degrade the performance of optical surfaces of spacecraft. The influence of contaminants outgassed from epoxy resin on the spectral transmittance of the quartz substrate was investigated with an in-situ measurement system. The system can deposit the contaminants on temperature-controlled quartz substrates and the transmittance spectra were measured immediately after deposition in vacuum ambient. We tried to obtain the optical constants of the contaminant using transmittance spectrum and simple optical models for optical calculations. The optical constants were described with a harmonic oscillator model and the effective medium approximation model. This paper reports the in-situ measurement results of transmittance spectra of the epoxy-resin-induced contaminants. In addition, the result of optical calculations using the obtained optical constants were compared to the measurement results.

  9. Measurement of XUV-absorption spectra of ZnS radiatively heated foils

    CERN Document Server

    Kontogiannopoulmos, Nikolaos; Thais, Frédéric; Chenais-Popovics, Claude; Sauvan, Pascal; Schott, R; Fölsner, Wolfgang; Arnault, Philippe; Poirier, Michel; Blenski, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved absorption of zinc sulfide (ZnS) and aluminum in the XUV-range has been measured. Thin foils in conditions close to local thermodynamic equilibrium were heated by radiation from laser-irradiated gold spherical cavities. Analysis of the aluminum foil radiative hydrodynamic expansion, based on the detailed atomic calculations of its absorption spectra, showed that the cavity emitted flux that heated the absorption foils corresponds to a radiation temperature in the range 55 60 eV. Comparison of the ZnS absorption spectra with calculations based on a superconfiguration approach identified the presence of species Zn6+ - Zn8+ and S5+ - S6+. Based on the validation of the radiative source simulations, experimental spectra were then compared to calculations performed by post-processing the radiative hydrodynamic simulations of ZnS. Satisfying agreement is found when temperature gradients are accounted for.

  10. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, J B

    2014-01-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium--argon calibration can be tracked with $\\sim$10\\,m\\,s$^{-1}$ precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders ($\\sim$50--100\\,\\AA) and entire spectrographs arms ($\\sim$1000--3000\\,\\AA). Using archival spectra from the past 20 years we have probed the supercalibration history of the VLT--UVES and Keck--HIRES spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically $\\pm$200\\,m\\,s$^{-1}$\\,per 1000\\,\\AA. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra which characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the ...

  11. Neutron spectra measurement and comparison of the HFR and THOR BNCT beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-07-01

    This paper aims to measure the spectra of HB11 (high flux reactor, HFR) and the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beams by multiple activation foils. The self-shielding corrections were made with the aid of MCNP calculations. The initial spectra were adjusted by a sophisticated process named coarse-scaling adjustment using SAND-EX, which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with excellent continuity. The epithermal neutron flux of the THOR beam is about three times of HB11. The thermal neutron flux, boron and gold reaction rates along the central axis of a PMMA phantom are calculated for both adjusted spectra for comparison.

  12. Measurements of excitation spectra and level lifetimes for highly charged neon ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王友德; 马新文; 杨治虎; 杜一飞; 刘惠萍; 赵孟春; 郭天瑞; 王春芳

    1997-01-01

    Beam foil experiments were carried out for 47 MeV Ne ions passing through C (39 μg/cm2) and Al (3 4mg/cm2) foils. Highly charged H-, He-, Li-, and Be-like ions were obtained after the foils. The excitation spectra and level lifetimes for these ions were measured, and transition configurations for most measured lines were identified

  13. Effect of sunlight exposure on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d concentration in women with vitamin d deficiency: using ambulatory lux meter and sunlight exposure questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Soo-Jung; Kim, Kwang-Min; Lee, Duck-Joo; Kim, Woo-Jae; Park, Rae-Woong; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin D is an important factor in human health. Yet, vitamin D deficiency is very common. We aimed to confirm serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration change after sunlight exposure and to elucidate the relationship between the amount of sunlight exposure and serum 25OHD level change by ambulatory lux meter and sunlight exposure questionnaire. Twenty healthy young women were enrolled. They were educated to obtain 20 minutes of sunlight exposure during weekdays from October to November, 2010, during which they were to wear an ambulatory lux meter on an arm. All subjects completed a one-week recall sunlight exposure questionnaire at the end of the study. Before and after sunlight exposure, serum 25OHD level was measured. Mean pre-exposure serum 25OHD concentration was 11.01 ng/mL. The mean change of pre- and post-exposure 25OHD level was -0.62 ng/mL, but it was not statistically significant. The mean personal sunlight exposure recorded by ambulatory lux meter, 292.6 lux/s, showed no significant relationship with average change of 25OHD and average weekly sunlight exposure score, 11.9, calculated by the sunlight exposure questionnaire. However, the mean change of serum 25OHD level and weekly sunlight exposure score showed significant negative correlation (r = -0.469, P = 0.037). Change of serum 25OHD concentration after four weeks of sunlight exposure was not statistically significant in women with vitamin D deficiency. However, serum 25OHD concentration change was significantly negatively correlated with the sunlight exposure score by the questionnaire.

  14. The measurement of neutron and neutron induced photon spectra in fusion reactor related assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Unholzer, S; Klein, H; Seidel, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral neutron and photon fluence (or flux) measured outside and inside of assemblies related to fusion reactor constructions are basic quantities of fusion neutronics. The comparison of measured spectra with the results of MCNP neutron and photon transport calculations allows a crucial test of evaluated nuclear data as generally used in fusion applications to be carried out. The experiments concern mixed neutron/photon fields with about the same intensity of the two components. An NE-213 scintillation spectrometer, well described by response matrices for both neutrons and photons, is used as proton-recoil and Compton spectrometer. The experiments described here in more detail address the background problematic of two applications, an iron benchmark experiment with an ns-pulsed neutron source and a deep penetration mock-up experiment for the investigation of the ITER in-board shield system. The measured spectral neutron and photon fluences are compared with spectra calculated with the MCNP code on the b...

  15. A Parameter-free Statistical Measurement of Halos with Power Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    He, P; Fang, L Z; He, Ping; Feng, Long-Long; Fang, Li-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    We show that, in the halo model of large-scale structure formation, the difference between the Fourier and the DWT (discrete wavelet transform) power spectra provides a statistical measurement of the halos. This statistical quantity is free from parameters related to the shape of the mass profile and the identification scheme of halos. That is, the statistical measurement is invariant in the sense that models with reasonably defined and selected parameters of the halo models should yield the same difference of the Fourier and DWT spectra. This feature is useful to extract ensemble averaged properties of halos, which cannot be obtained with the identification of individual halo. To demonstrate this point, we show with WIGEON hydrodynamical simulation samples that the spectrum difference provides a quantitative measurement of the discrepancy of the distribution of baryonic gas from that of the underlying dark matter field within halos. We also show that the mass density profile of halos in physical space can be...

  16. Elemental energy spectra of cosmic rays measured by CREAM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Maestro, P; Allison, P; Bagliesi, M G; Barbier, L; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Brandt, T J; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; DuVernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S W; Nutter, S; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Walpole, P; Wu, J; Yang, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass). The instrument (CREAM-II) was comprised of detectors based on different techniques (Cherenkov light, specific ionization in scintillators and silicon sensors) to provide a redundant charge identification and a thin ionization calorimeter capable of measuring the energy of cosmic rays up to several hundreds of TeV. The data analysis is described and the individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe are reported up to ~ 10^14 eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for all the primary elements and can be expressed as a power law in energy E^{-2.66+/-0.04}. The nitrogen absolute intensity in the energy range 100-800 GeV/n is also measured.

  17. Precision measurements of nuclear CR energy spectra and composition with the AMS-02 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandrini, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 02 (AMS-02) is a large acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 on board the International Space Station. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first four years of operation. AMS-02 offers a unique opportunity to study the Cosmic Rays (CRs) since it measures the spectra of all the species simultaneously. We report on the precision measurements of primary and secondary nuclear spectra, in the GeV-TeV energy interval. These measurements allow for the first time a detailed study of the spectral index variation with rigidity providing a new insight on the origin and propagation of CR.

  18. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaw, J. L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, Y. -H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alessi, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  19. [Application of PARAFAC method and 3-D fluorescence spectra in petroleum pollutant measurement and analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Wang, Yu-tian; Shao, Xiao-qing; Wu, Xi-jun; Yang, Li-li

    2012-03-01

    A method for identification and concentration measurement of petroleum pollutant by combining three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence spectra with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was proposed. The main emphasis of research was the measurement of coexisting different kinds of petroleum. The CCl4 solutions of a 0# diesel sample, a 97# gasoline sample, and a kerosene sample were used as measurement objects. The condition of multiple petroleum coexistence was simulated by petroleum solutions with different mixed ratios. The character of PARAFAC in complex mixture coexisting system analysis was studied. The spectra of three kinds of solutions and the spectra of gasoline-diesel mixed samples, diesel-kerosene mixed samples, and gas oline-diesel mixed with small counts of kerosene interference samples were analyzed respectively. The core consistency diagnostic method and residual sum of squares method were applied to calculate the number of factors in PARAFAC. In gasoline-diesel experiment, gasoline or diesel can be identified and measured as a whole respectively by 2-factors parallel factors analysis. In diesel-kerosene experiment, 2-factors parallel factors analysis can only obtain the characters of diesel, and the 3rd factor is needed to separate the kerosene spectral character from the mixture spectrum. When small counts of kerosene exist in gasoline-diesel solution, gasoline and diesel still can be identified and measured as principal components by a 2-factors parallel factor analysis, and the effect of interference on qualitative analysis is not significant. The experiment verified that the PARAFAC method can obtain characteristic spectrum of each kind of petroleum, and the concentration of petroleum in solutions can be predicted simultaneously, with recoveries shown in the paper. The results showed the possibility of petroleum pollutant identification and concentration measurement based on the 3-D fluorescence spectra and PARAFAC.

  20. Effect of Sunlight Exposure on Bone Mineral Density in Children with Severe Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Kazuo; Sano, Fumikazu; Yagasaki, Hideaki; Sugita, Kanji; Aihara, Masao

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of sunlight exposure for increasing bone mineral density (BMD) in children with severe disability. The subjects were five children with severe disability, aged 6 to 8 years. BMD was measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of starting sunlight exposure. All caregivers of patients were instructed to create opportunities to stay outdoors. Daily sunlight exposure time was defined as hours of staying outdoors. Mean hours of sunbathing per day were calculated at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of starting sunlight exposure. Sunlight exposure tended to be longer after starting than before starting in all patients, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.052). Along with the increase in sunlight exposure, BMD increased significantly after the start of sunlight exposure in all patients (p sunlight exposure. No patients had bone fractures after the start of sunlight exposure. These results suggest that sunlight exposure increased BMD, and that this may reduce the risk of bone fracture in children with disability. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Modeling of aircraft exhaust emissions and infrared spectra for remote measurement of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beier

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR molecular spectroscopy is proposed to perform remote measurements of NOx concentrations in the exhaust plume and wake of aircraft. The computer model NIRATAM is applied to simulate the physical and chemical properties of the exhaust plume and to generate low resolution IR spectra and synthetical thermal images of the aircraft in its natural surroundings. High-resolution IR spectra of the plume, including atmospheric absorption and emission, are simulated using the molecular line-by-line radiation model FASCODE2. Simulated IR spectra of a Boeing 747-400 at cruising altitude for different axial and radial positions in the jet region of the exhaust plume are presented. A number of spectral lines of NO can be identified that can be discriminated from lines of other exhaust gases and the natural atmospheric background in the region around 5.2 µm. These lines can be used to determine NO concentration profiles in the plume. The possibility of measuring nitrogen dioxide NO2 is also discussed briefly, although measurements turn out to be substantially less likely than those of NO. This feasibility study compiles fundamental data for the optical and radiometric design of an airborne Fourier transform spectrometer and the preparation of in-flight measurements for monitoring of aircraft pollutants.

  2. Hair cortisol and cortisone are decreased by natural sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Vincent L; van der Wulp, Nils R P; Koper, Jan W; de Rijke, Yolanda B; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2016-10-01

    Hair glucocorticoids (cortisol and cortisone) are increasingly used as measures of long-term integrated exposure to glucocorticoid hormones. Glucocorticoids gradually disappear from the hair shaft, which may result from exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation in natural sunlight. We aimed to study the influence of sun exposure on hair glucocorticoids. Scalp hair samples were obtained from nine volunteers (median age 33 [range 21-81], 7 females), and part of each hair sample was exposed to three experimental conditions: repeated exposure to natural sunlight for 40h (natural UV), exposure to a high amount of artificial UV radiation, and storage in the dark (control). Hair cortisol (HairF) and cortisone (HairE) were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. When compared to control, HairF was decreased in 9 out of 9 hair samples after natural sunlight exposure (median decrease -3.1pg/mg or -54%, PUV radiation (-4.7pg/mg or -75%, P=0.003). HairE decreased in 8 out of 9 samples, both after natural sunlight (-7.6pg/mg or -32%, P=0.012) and artificial UV (-10.7pg/mg or -52%, P=0.026). Exposure to natural sunlight decreases the glucocorticoid content of scalp hair, apparently through UV radiation, and is therefore an important confounder that should be considered in studies involving the measurement of hair glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-Resolved Measurement of Radiatively Heated Iron 2p-3d Transmission Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yang; SHANG Wan-Li; XIONG Gang; JIN Feng-Tao; HU Zhi-Min; WEI Min-Xi; YANG Guo-Hong; ZHANG Ji-Yan; YANG Jia-Min

    2010-01-01

    @@ An experimental measurement of radiatively heated iron plasma transmission spectra was performed on Shenguang Ⅱ laser facility.In the measurement,the self-emission spectrum,the backlighting spectrum,and the absorption spectrum were imaged with a fiat filed grating and recorded on a gated micro channel plate detector to obtain the time-resolved transmission spectra in the range 10-20 A (approximately 0.6-1.3 keV).Experimental results are compared with the calculation results of an unsolved transition array (UTA) code.The time-dependent relative shift in the positions of the 2p-3d transmission array is interpreted in terms of the plasma temperature variations.

  4. Modelling Solar Oscillation Power Spectra: II. Parametric Model of Spectral Lines Observed in Doppler Velocity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vorontsov, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudo modes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

  5. Energy Spectra of Geomagnetically Trapped Light Isotopes Measured by NINA-2 Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. V.; Bakaldin, A.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Korotkov, M.; Leonov, A.; Voronov, S.; Bidoli, V.; Caoslino, M.; De Pascale, M.; Furano, G.; Iannucci, A.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.; Boezio, M.; Bonvincini, V.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, N.; Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; Adriani, O.; Papini, P.; Spillantini, P.; Straulino, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Ricci, M.; Castellini, G.

    2003-07-01

    This paper reports about the energy spectrum of geomagnetically trapped protons, deuterons, tritons and He isotop es measured by the instrument NINA2 at the low boundary of the South Atlantic Anomaly. NINA-2 on board the satellite MITA has been in orbit from 15 July 2000 to 10 August 2001, flying with circular polar orbit (87° inclination), at an altitude between 300-440 km. Differential energy spectra were measured at L-shell ˜ 1.2 and local magnetic field b< 0.22 G. Data from NINA-2 are compared with measurements made onboard Resurs-01 N4 satellite with NINA instrument. Possible solar modulation effects are discussed.

  6. Diffuse reflectance spectra measured in vivo in human tissues during Photofrin-mediated pleural photodynamic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Optimal delivery of light in photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires not only optimal placement and power of light sources, but knowledge of the dynamics of light propagation in the tissue being treated and in the surrounding normal tissue, and of their respective accumulations of sensitizer. In an effort to quantify both tissue optical properties and sensitizer distribution, we have measured fluorescence emission and diffuse reflectance spectra at the surface of a variety of tissue types in the ...

  7. Successful pacing using a batteryless sunlight-powered pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Schaerer, Jakob; Wagner, Joerg; Walpen, Sébastien; Huber, Christoph; Haeberlin, Heinrich; Fuhrer, Juerg; Vogel, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Today's cardiac pacemakers are powered by batteries with limited energy capacity. As the battery's lifetime ends, the pacemaker needs to be replaced. This surgical re-intervention is costly and bears the risk of complications. Thus, a pacemaker without primary batteries is desirable. The goal of this study was to test whether transcutaneous solar light could power a pacemaker. We used a three-step approach to investigate the feasibility of sunlight-powered cardiac pacing. First, the harvestable power was estimated. Theoretically, a subcutaneously implanted 1 cm(2) solar module may harvest ∼2500 µW from sunlight (3 mm implantation depth). Secondly, ex vivo measurements were performed with solar cells placed under pig skin flaps exposed to a solar simulator and real sunlight. Ex vivo measurements under real sunlight resulted in a median output power of 4941 µW/cm(2) [interquartile range (IQR) 3767-5598 µW/cm(2), median skin flap thickness 3.0 mm (IQR 2.7-3.3 mm)]. The output power strongly depended on implantation depth (ρSpearman = -0.86, P pacemaker powered by a 3.24 cm(2) solar module was implanted in vivo in a pig to measure output power and to pace. In vivo measurements showed a median output power of >3500 µW/cm(2) (skin flap thickness 2.8-3.84 mm). Successful batteryless VVI pacing using a subcutaneously implanted solar module was performed. Based on our results, we estimate that a few minutes of direct sunlight (irradiating an implanted solar module) allow powering a pacemaker for 24 h using a suitable energy storage. Thus, powering a pacemaker by sunlight is feasible and may be an alternative energy supply for tomorrow's pacemakers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Sunlight exposure: Do health benefits outweigh harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2016-09-16

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin whose levels within the body are elevated following sunlight exposure. Numerous studies have shown that sunlight exposure can provide protection to a wide variety of diseases, ranging from different types of tumors to hypertension to type 1 diabetes to multiple sclerosis. Moreover, studies have shown that avoiding sunlight may influence the initiation and progression of some of these diseases. Avoidance of sunlight, coupled with the inclination towards consuming supplements, is becoming the primary choice to obtain vitamin D. The purpose of this article is to present evidences from published literature, to show that the expected benefits of vitamin D supplements are minimized by the potential risk of cardiovascular events and beyond. Since hypovitaminosis D status usually reflects reduced sunlight exposure, the obvious primary replacement should be safe sunlight exposure, and not exogenous supplements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of simulated and measured spectra of an industrial 450 kV X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, A.; Thierry, R.; Bettuzzi, M.; Flisch, A.; Hofmann, J.; Sennhauser, U.; Casali, F.

    2007-09-01

    An accurate knowledge of the X-ray source spectrum is required in order to optimize X-ray Computed Tomography systems. A simulation model based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4 was developed to determine the X-ray spectrum generated by a 450 kV tube. The X-ray spectra were measured using a Cadmium Telluride stack detector. The measured spectra were corrected for spurious detector effects and detector efficiency. The X-ray spectra simulated by GEANT4 were validated by comparison with X-ray spectra measured at 350, 400 and 450 kV. We observed a good agreement between the simulated and the measured X-ray spectra. In addition, we simulated and measured attenuation curves using aluminium and copper filtration. The comparison of the attenuation curves shows an excellent agreement.

  10. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—02: A Nested Neutron Spectrometer to Measure Neutron Spectra in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Licea, A [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission CNSC, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    During high-energy radiotherapy treatments, neutrons are produced in the head of the linac through photonuclear interactions. This has been a concern for many years as photoneutrons contribute to the accepted, yet unwanted, out-of-field doses that pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel. Presently, in-room neutron measurements are difficult and time-consuming and have traditionally been carried out using Bonner spheres with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a new detector, the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS) is tested for use in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional Bonner spheres. The NNS, operated in current mode, was used to measure the dose equivalent, average energy and energy spectrum at several positions in a radiotherapy bunker. The average energy and spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations while the dose equivalent was compared to bubble detector measurements. The average energies, as measured by the NNS and Monte Carlo simulations, differed by approximately 30% across the bunker. Measurements of the dose equivalent using the NNS and the bubble detectors agreed within 50% in the maze and less than 10% close to the linac head. Apart from some discrepancies at thermal energies, we also found reasonable agreement between NNS-measured and Monte Carlo-simulated spectra at a number of locations within our radiotherapy bunker. Our results demonstrate that the NNS is a suitable detector to be used in high dose-rate radiotherapy environments.

  11. Analysis of the muon spectra for inclined air showers measured with the KASCADE-grande experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteaga-Velazquez, Juan Carlos [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The solving of the mystery of the second knee in the cosmic ray spectrum is one of the main objectives of the KASCADE-grande observatory. KASCADE-grande is a ground array composed of different subsystems of detectors that, as a whole, allows to study simultaneously the electromagnetic and penetrating component of cosmic ray air showers in the energy range between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. Vertical showers (with zenith angles below 40 ) are studied in detail at KASCADE-grande. Now, the analyses are being extended to higher zenith angles as a way to study the muon content of air showers and to increase the statistics of the experiment. In this talk, the muon spectra reconstructed for vertical and inclined air showers measured by the KASCADE-grande observatory are presented and also confronted with Monte Carlos simulations based on the hadronic interaction models QGSJET II and EPOS. In addition, the result of the analysis of the observed spectra with the ''constant intensity cut method'' is shown. This method was applied in a first attempt to understand the origin of a systematic discrepancy found between the predicted and measured muon spectra, which increases with the zenith angle.

  12. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of high frequency cross-spectra of signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending to the 3.8 MHz inverse light crossing time of the apparatus. A model of universal exotic spatial shear correlations that matches the Planck scale holographic information bound of space-time position states is excluded to 4.6{\\sigma} significance.

  13. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  14. Spectra of Nearby Galaxies Measured with a New Very Broadband Receiver

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Gopal; Erickson, Neal R; Chung, Aeree; Heyer, Mark H; Yun, Min; Irvine, William M; 10.1017/S1743921308021698

    2008-01-01

    Three-millimeter-wavelength spectra of a number of nearby galaxies have been obtained at the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) using a new, very broadband receiver. This instrument, which we call the Redshift Search Receiver, has an instantaneous bandwidth of 36 GHz and operates from 74 to 110.5 GHz. The receiver has been built at UMass/FCRAO to be part of the initial instrumentation for the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) and is intended primarily for determination of the redshift of distant, dust-obscured galaxies. It is being tested on the FCRAO 14m by measuring the 3mm spectra of a number of nearby galaxies. There are interesting differences in the chemistry of these galaxies.

  15. Sunlight inactivation of viruses in open-water unit process treatment wetlands: modeling endogenous and exogenous inactivation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Andrea I; Nguyen, Mi T; Schilling, Iris E; Wenk, Jannis; Nelson, Kara L

    2015-03-03

    Sunlight inactivation is an important mode of disinfection for viruses in surface waters. In constructed wetlands, for example, open-water cells can be used to promote sunlight disinfection and remove pathogenic viruses from wastewater. To aid in the design of these systems, we developed predictive models of virus attenuation that account for endogenous and exogenous sunlight-mediated inactivation mechanisms. Inactivation rate models were developed for two viruses, MS2 and poliovirus type 3; laboratory- and field-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the models' ability to estimate inactivation rates in a pilot-scale, open-water, unit-process wetland cell. Endogenous inactivation rates were modeled using either photoaction spectra or total, incident UVB irradiance. Exogenous inactivation rates were modeled on the basis of virus susceptibilities to singlet oxygen. Results from both laboratory- and field-scale experiments showed good agreement between measured and modeled inactivation rates. The modeling approach presented here can be applied to any sunlit surface water and utilizes easily measured inputs such as depth, solar irradiance, water matrix absorbance, singlet oxygen concentration, and the virus-specific apparent second-order rate constant with singlet oxygen (k2). Interestingly, the MS2 k2 in the open-water wetland was found to be significantly larger than k2 observed in other waters in previous studies. Examples of how the model can be used to design and optimize natural treatment systems for virus inactivation are provided.

  16. Length dependent thermal conductivity measurements yield phonon mean free path spectra in nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Hua, Chengyun; Ding, Ding; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-03-13

    Thermal conductivity measurements over variable lengths on nanostructures such as nanowires provide important information about the mean free paths (MFPs) of the phonons responsible for heat conduction. However, nearly all of these measurements have been interpreted using an average MFP even though phonons in many crystals possess a broad MFP spectrum. Here, we present a reconstruction method to obtain MFP spectra of nanostructures from variable-length thermal conductivity measurements. Using this method, we investigate recently reported length-dependent thermal conductivity measurements on SiGe alloy nanowires and suspended graphene ribbons. We find that the recent measurements on graphene imply that 70% of the heat in graphene is carried by phonons with MFPs longer than 1 micron.

  17. Measurement of charged hadron spectra at the Z{sup 0} with Cherenkov ring imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel, Tomas Josef [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation attempts to probe hadronization, the process by which the fundamental quarks described by quantum chromodynamics produce the jets of hadrons that the author observed in experiments. The measurements are made using e+e- collisions at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), operating at the Z0 resonance with the SLC Large Detector (SLD), and the unique capabilities of the SLC/SLD facility are exploited. First, the spectra of charged hadrons (π±, K±, and p/$\\bar{p}$) are measured. This is accomplished with the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID), one of a first generation of devices that have been developed for efficient particle identification over a wide momentum range. The use of the CRID is central to this dissertation, and its design and performance are described in detail here. The measured spectra agree with other measurements at the Z0 and extend the momentum coverage. Next, the excellent spatial resolution of the SLD tracking systems, along with the small and stable beam spots of the SLC, is employed to identify jets produced from heavy b or c quarks and to separate them from the remaining light-quark (uds) jets. This removes the effects of heavy quark fragmentation and decays of heavy-quark hadrons from the study of hadronization. The first measurements of particle spectra in light-quark jets are then presented. Finally, the highly-polarized incident electron beam of the SLC, together with the electroweak asymmetries of the quarks, is exploited to separate quark and antiquark jets. Significant differences in quark-antiquark production of protons and of kaons are observed at high momenta. This signal suggests a leading particle effect, where the particles containing the primary quark of a jet are more likely to populate the high-momentum phase space than are other hadrons.

  18. Diffuse reflectance spectra measured in vivo in human tissues during Photofrin-mediated pleural photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2006-02-01

    Optimal delivery of light in photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires not only optimal placement and power of light sources, but knowledge of the dynamics of light propagation in the tissue being treated and in the surrounding normal tissue, and of their respective accumulations of sensitizer. In an effort to quantify both tissue optical properties and sensitizer distribution, we have measured fluorescence emission and diffuse reflectance spectra at the surface of a variety of tissue types in the thoracic cavities of human patients. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trials of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and cancers with pleural effusion. Patients were given Photofrin at dose of 2 mg per kg body weight 24 hours prior to treatment. Each patient received surgical resection of the affected lung and pleura. Patients received intracavity PDT at 630nm to a dose of 30 J/cm2, as determined by isotropic detectors sutured to the cavity walls. We measured the diffuse reflectance spectra before and after PDT in various positions within the cavity, including tumor, diaphragm, pericardium, skin, and chest wall muscle in 5 patients. The measurements we acquired using a specially designed fiber optic-based probe consisting of one fluorescence excitation fiber, one white light delivery fiber, and 9 detection fibers spaced at distances from 0.36 to 7.8 mm from the source, all of which are imaged via a spectrograph onto a CCD, allowing measurement of radially-resolved diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra. The light sources for these two measurements (a 403-nm diode laser and a halogen lamp, respectively) were blocked by computer-controlled shutters, allowing sequential fluorescence, reflectance, and background acquisition. The diffuse reflectance was analyzed to determine the absorption and scattering spectra of the tissue and from these, the concentration and oxygenation of hemoglobin and the local drug uptake

  19. Measurement of charged particle spectra at the LHC at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094899

    The measurement of charged particle spectra is performed for centre-of-mass energy \\sqrt(s) = 13 TeV in experiment ATLAS. It is an inclusive measurement aiming at fast comparison of particle activity between data and theoretical model. Data are acquired with minimal model dependence avoiding unnecessary bias. Various efficiencies and fractions are determined in order to correct reconstructed spectra of tracks in the Inner Detector to distributions of primary particles. Correction of certain distributions involves more sophisticated methods, such as Bayesian unfolding. The corrected distributions are compared to Monte Carlo generators - Pythia 8 (A2 and Monash tunes), Herwig++, EPOS and QGSJET. Though no generator describes measured data perfectly, in many cases the differences are within few percent. The measured average number of charged particles per unit of pseudorapidity is 2.876 ± 0.001922(stat.) ± 0.03526(syst.) and is found to be in a good agreement with EPOS generator. Apart from the analysis, an in...

  20. Characterization of Ring Wave Spectra for Natural Rain: Measurements and Model for Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliven, L.; Sobieski, P.; Craeye, C.

    1998-01-01

    Ring waves generated by natural rains from 1 to 100 mm/hr were measured in a small tank located in a field. Time series were obtained: (a) from a wire capacitance probe that measured surface elevation, (b) from an optical gauge that measured rain rates R, (c) from an anemometer that measured wind speeds and (d) from a 13.5 GHz scatterometer (w polarization, and 30 degree incidence angle). Ring wave frequency spectra are computed from the surface elevation data for each minute of rain. All the spectra have a similar shape, with a maximum near 5 Hz, and with a more rapid decay towards higher frequencies than towards lower frequencies. A log-Gaussian spectral model provides a useful representation of these data and analysis of the model coefficients shows that the peak frequency and bandwidth are approximately constant, but the magnitude increases as R increases, Additionally, the normalized radar cross section from the scatterometer varies approximately linearly with the spectral line corresponding to the Bragg-wavelength, so together the log-Gaussian ring wave model and the Bragg scattering theory should be useful for a broad range of applications. These findings can be used to help interpret remote sensing data during rain events and to guide model development for radar scattering from rain roughened seas.

  1. Dead time effects in turbulence spectra measured by burst-mode LDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velte, Clara; Buchhave, Preben; George, William

    2014-11-01

    Dead time effects in laser Doppler measurements have not so far been considered a major problem. We show how dead time occurs in burst-mode laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) when using a so-called burst-mode LDA processor and describe their effects on the measured power spectra. We show how dead time effects may be caused by more than one seed particle being present in the measurement volume at the same time and explain analytically how dead time causes a reduction in the power in the spectrum at low frequencies and an oscillation in the spectrum at the high frequency end. We also present a realistic model for the data sampled from a processor with dead time and use this model to generate turbulence velocity data in a computer. Finally we compare the spectrum computed from realistic values of dead time and sample rate in the computer generated data and compare this spectrum to a measured spectrum in a free turbulent jet with similar parameters. The excellent agreement between the features of these spectra show that our model and explanation of the dead time effect is a valid one.

  2. A Mathematical Assessment of the Precision of Parameters in Measuring Resonance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Elke M.; Golding, Raymund M.

    1998-12-01

    The accurate interpretation ofin vivomagnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra requires a complete understanding of the associated noise-induced errors. In this paper, we address the effect of complex correlated noise patterns on the measurement of a set ofpeakparameters. This is examined initially at the level of a single spectral analysis followed by addressing the noise-induced errors associated with determining thesignalparameters from thepeakparameters. We describe a relatively simple method for calculating these errors for any correlated noise pattern in terms of the noise standard deviation and correlation length. The results are presented in such a way that an estimate of the errors may be made from a single MRS spectrum. We also explore how, under certain circumstances, the lineshape of the signal may be determined. We then apply these results to reexamine a set ofin vivo31P MRS spectra obtained from rat brain prior to and following moderate fluid percussion injury. The approach outlined in this paper will demonstrate how meaningful results may be obtained from spectra where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is quite small and where knowledge of the precise shape of the signal and the detail of the noise pattern is unknown. In essence, we show how to determine the expected errors in the spectral parameters from an estimate of the SNR from a single spectrum, thereby allowing a more discriminative interpretation of the data.

  3. Measuring nickel masses in Type Ia supernovae using cobalt emission in nebular phase spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, Michael J; Seitenzahl, Ivo; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Taubenberger, Stefan; Scalzo, Richard; Ruiter, Ashley; Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Camacho, Yssavo; Castillo, Jayden; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Fraser, Morgan; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Graham, Melissa; Howell, D Andrew; Inserra, Cosimo; Jha, Saurabh W; Kumar, Sahana; Mazzali, Paolo A; McCully, Curtis; Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia; Pandya, Viraj; Polshaw, Joe; Schmidt, Brian; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken W; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Tucker, Brad; Valenti, Stefano; Walton, Nicholas; Wolf, Christian; Yaron, Ofer; Young, D R; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    The light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powered by the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni to $^{56}$Co at early times, and the decay of $^{56}$Co to $^{56}$Fe from ~60 days after explosion. We examine the evolution of the [Co III] 5892 A emission complex during the nebular phase for SNe Ia with multiple nebular spectra and show that the line flux follows the square of the mass of $^{56}$Co as a function of time. This result indicates both efficient local energy deposition from positrons produced in $^{56}$Co decay, and long-term stability of the ionization state of the nebula. We compile 77 nebular spectra of 25 SN Ia from the literature and present 17 new nebular spectra of 7 SNe Ia, including SN2014J. From these we measure the flux in the [Co III] 5892 A line and remove its well-behaved time dependence to infer the initial mass of $^{56}$Ni ($M_{Ni}$) produced in the explosion. We then examine $^{56}$Ni yields for different SN Ia ejected masses ($M_{ej}$ - calculated using the relation between light...

  4. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  5. Method of Fission Product Beta Spectra Measurements for Predicting Reactor Anti-neutrino Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, D M; Campbell, L W; Greenfield, B; Kos, M S; Orrell, J L; Schram, M; VanDevender, B; Wood, 1 L S; Wootan, D W

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron anti-neutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to current precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent re-considerations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable i...

  6. Deconvolution as a means of correcting turbulence power spectra measured by LDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of turbulence power spectra by means of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) has proven to be a difficult task. Among the problems affecting the shape of the spectrum are noise in the signal and changes in the sample rate caused by unintentional effects in the measuring apparatus or even in the mathematical algorithms used to evaluate the spectrum. We analyze the effect of various causes of bias in the sample rate and show that the effect is a convolution of the true spectrum with various spectral functions. We show that these spectral functions can be measured with the available data from a standard LDA processor and we use this knowledge to correct the measured spectrum by deconvolution. We present results supported by realistic computer generated data using two different spectral estimators, the so-called slotted autocovariance method and the so-called direct method.

  7. Measurement of fast electrons spectra generated by interaction between solid target and peta watt laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimoto, T; Habara, H; Tanaka, K A; Kodama, R [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakatsutsumi, M [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Laser Intenses (LULI), CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau, Cedex F 91128 (France); Lancaster, K L; Green, J S; Scott, R H H; Sherlock, M; Norreys, P A [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Evans, R G; Haines, M G [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Kar, S; Zepf, M [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); King, J; Ma, T; Wei, M S; Yabuuchi, T; Beg, F N [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC San Diego, 9500 Gillman Drive 0411, La Jolla, California 92093-0411, United States of America (United States); Key, M H, E-mail: tanimoto@ile.osaka-u.ac.j [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, Livermore, California 94550, United States of America (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Fast electron energy spectra have been measured for a range of intensities between 10{sup 18} Wcm{sup -2} and 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2} and for different target materials using electron spectrometers. Several experimental campaigns were conducted on peta watt laser facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and Osaka University. In these experimental campaigns, the pulse duration was varied from 0.5 ps to 5 ps. The laser incident angle was also changed from normal incidence to 40{sup 0} in p-polarized. The results show a reduction from the ponderomotive scaling on fast electrons over 10{sup 20} Wcm{sup -2}.

  8. Determining the Absorbance Spectra of Photochromic Materials From Measured Spectrophotometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, John D.

    1998-01-01

    If a two-state photochromic material is optically bleached, the absorbance spectrum data measured by a spectrophotometer is in general comprised of components from both the ground state and the upper state. Under general conditions, it may be difficult to extract the actual upper state spectrum from the spectrum of the bleached material. A simple algorithm is presented here for the recovery of the pure absorbance spectra of the upper state of a material such as bacteriorhodopsin, given single wavelength bleaching illumination, steady-state conditions, and accurate knowledge of phototransition rates and thermal decay rates.

  9. Measurement of day and night neutrino energy spectra at SNO and constraints on neutrino mixing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Q R; Allen, R C; Andersen, T C; Anglin, J D; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S D; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Bühler, G; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, H H; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T H; Cowan, J H M; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Hamian, A A; Handler, W B; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C P; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Kazkaz, K; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Manor, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; Meijer Drees, R; Mifflin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, M; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W P; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schwendener, M H; Schülke, A; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W E; Spreitzer, T; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P M; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y I; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J-X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2002-07-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted 8B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0%+/-6.3%(+1.5%)(-1.4%) of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the nu(e) asymmetry is found to be 7.0%+/-4.9%(+1.3%)(-1.2%). A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the large mixing angle solution.

  10. Measurements of very forward particles production spectra at LHC: the LHCf experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Eugenio; Bonechi, Lorenzo; Bongi, Massimo; Castellini, Guido; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Haguenauer, Maurice; Itow, Yoshitaka; Iwata, Taiki; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Makino, Yuya; Masuda, Kimiaki; Matsubayashi, Eri; Menjo, Hiroaki; Muraki, Yasushi; Papini, Paolo; Ricciarini, Sergio; Sako, Takashi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tamura, Tadahisa; Tiberio, Alessio; Torii, Shoji; Tricomi, Alessia; Turner, W C; Ueno, Mana; Zhou, Qi Dong

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to two small sampling calorimeters installed in the LHC tunnel at ±140 m from IP1, the LHC forward (LHCf) experiment is able to detect neutral particles produced by high energy proton-ion collisions in the very forward region (pseudo-rapidity η > 8.4). The main aim of LHCf is to provide precise measurements of the production spectra relative to these particles, in order to tune hadronic interaction models used by ground-based cosmic rays experiments. In this paper we will present the current status of the LHCf experiment, regarding in particular collected data and analysis results, as well as future prospects

  11. Influence of measurement procedure on quality of impedance spectra on lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde-Meiwes, Heide; Kowal, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Karden, Eckhard

    Many battery simulation models, but also electrochemical interpretations are based on impedance spectroscopy. However, the impedance of a battery is influenced by various factors, e.g. in the case of a lead-acid battery: state of charge (SOC), charging or discharging, superimposed dc current, short-term history or homogeneity of the electrolyte. This paper analyses the impact of those factors on impedance spectra of lead-acid batteries. The results show that very detailed information about the conditions during the measurement is crucial for the correct interpretation of a spectrum.

  12. Measurement of discrete energy-level spectra in individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Bolotin, Kirill I; Shi, Su-Fei

    2008-01-01

    We form single-electron transistors from individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles, 5-15 nm in diameter, with monolayers of organic molecules serving as tunnel barriers. These devices allow us to measure the discrete electronic energy levels of individual gold nanoparticles that are......, by virtue of chemical synthesis, well-defined in their composition, size and shape. We show that the nanoparticles are nonmagnetic and have spectra in good accord with random-matrix-theory predictions taking into account strong spin-orbit coupling....

  13. Measurement of discrete energy-level spectra in individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Bolotin, Kirill I; Shi, Su-Fei;

    2008-01-01

    We form single-electron transistors from individual chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles, 5-15 nm in diameter, with monolayers of organic molecules serving as tunnel barriers. These devices allow us to measure the discrete electronic energy levels of individual gold nanoparticles that are, b......, by virtue of chemical synthesis, well-defined in their composition, size and shape. We show that the nanoparticles are nonmagnetic and have spectra in good accord with random-matrix-theory predictions taking into account strong spin-orbit coupling....

  14. Direct Measurement of Mammographic X-Ray Spectra with a Digital CdTe Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Raso

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a detection system, based on a CdTe detector and an innovative digital pulse processing (DPP system, for high-rate X-ray spectroscopy in mammography (1–30 keV. The DPP system performs a height and shape analysis of the detector pulses, sampled and digitized by a 14-bit, 100 MHz ADC. We show the results of the characterization of the detection system both at low and high photon counting rates by using monoenergetic X-ray sources and a nonclinical X-ray tube. The detection system exhibits excellent performance up to 830 kcps with an energy resolution of 4.5% FWHM at 22.1 keV. Direct measurements of clinical molybdenum X-ray spectra were carried out by using a pinhole collimator and a custom alignment device. A comparison with the attenuation curves and the half value layer values, obtained from the measured and simulated spectra, from an ionization chamber and from a solid state dosimeter, also shows the accuracy of the measurements. These results make the proposed detection system a very attractive tool for both laboratory research, calibration of dosimeters and advanced quality controls in mammography.

  15. On inconsistency of experimental data on primary nuclei spectra with sea level muon intensity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lagutin, A A; Yushkov, A V

    2004-01-01

    For the first time a complete set of the most recent direct data on primary cosmic ray spectra is used as input into calculations of muon flux at sea level in wide energy range $E_\\mu=1-3\\cdot10^5$ GeV. Computations have been performed with the CORSIKA/QGSJET and CORSIKA/VENUS codes. The comparison of the obtained muon intensity with the data of muon experiments shows, that measurements of primary nuclei spectra conform to sea level muon data only up to several tens of GeV and result in essential deficit of muons at higher energies. As it follows from our examination, uncertainties in muon flux measurements and in the description of nuclear cascades development are not suitable to explain this contradiction, and the only remaining factor, leading to this situation, is underestimation of primary light nuclei fluxes. We have considered systematic effects, that may distort the results of the primary cosmic ray measurements with the application of the emulsion chambers. We suggest, that re-examination of these me...

  16. Field measurements of beta ray energy spectra in CANDU nuclear generating stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Physics); Hirning, C.R. (Ontario Hydro, Whitby, ON (Canada)); Yuen, P.S.; Aikens, M.S. (AECL Research, Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Labs.)

    1994-01-01

    Field measurements of beta ray energy spectra have been carried out at various locations in CANDU nuclear generating stations operated by Ontario Hydro. The beta ray energy spectrometer consists of a 5 cm diameter x 2 cm thick BC-404 plastic scintillator situated behind a 100 [mu]m thick, totally depleted, silicon detector. Photon events are rejected by requiring a coincidence between the two detectors. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from 125 keV to 3.5 MeV. Beta ray energy spectra have been measured for uncontaminated and contaminated fueling machine components, fueling machine swipes and a reactor containment vault. The degree of protection afforded by various articles of protective clothing has also been investigated for the various fueling machine components. Monte Carlo calculations have been used to estimate beta factors for 100 mg.cm[sup -2] and 240 mg.cm[sup -2] LiF-TLD chips, which are used as 'skin-and 'extremity' dosemeters in the Ontario Hydro Radiation Dosimetry Programme. (Author).

  17. KASCADE-Grande measurements of energy spectra for elemental groups of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Arteaga-Velàzquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Finger, M; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J

    2013-01-01

    The KASCADE-Grande air shower experiment [W. Apel, et al. (KASCADE-Grande collaboration), Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 620 (2010) 202] consists of, among others, a large scintillator array for measurements of charged particles, Nch, and of an array of shielded scintillation counters used for muon counting, Nmu. KASCADE-Grande is optimized for cosmic ray measurements in the energy range 10 PeV to about 2000 PeV, where exploring the composition is of fundamental importance for understanding the transition from galactic to extragalactic origin of cosmic rays. Following earlier studies of the all-particle and the elemental spectra reconstructed in the knee energy range from KASCADE data [T. Antoni, et al. (KASCADE collaboration), Astropart. Phys. 24 (2005) 1], we have now extended these measurements to beyond 200 PeV. By analysing the two-dimensional shower size spectrum Nch vs. Nmu for nearly vertical events, we reconstruct the energy spectra of different mass groups by means of unfolding methods over an energy rang...

  18. KASCADE-Grande measurements of energy spectra for elemental groups of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Fuhrmann, D; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    The KASCADE-Grande experiment, located at KIT-Karlsruhe, Germany, consists of a large scintillator array for measurements of charged particles, N_ch, and of an array of shielded scintillation counters used for muon counting, N_mu. KASCADE-Grande is optimized for cosmic ray measurements in the energy range 10 PeV to 1000 PeV, thereby enabling the verification of a knee in the iron spectrum expected at approximately 100 PeV. Exploring the composition in this energy range is of fundamental importance for understanding the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. Following earlier studies of elemental spectra reconstructed in the knee energy range from KASCADE data, we have now extended these measurements to beyond 100 PeV. By analysing the two-dimensional shower size spectrum N_ch vs. N_mu, we reconstruct the energy spectra of different mass groups by means of unfolding methods. The procedure and its results, giving evidence for a knee-like structure in the spectrum of iron nuclei, will be presente...

  19. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer; Holometer Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2 ×1 08 independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1 ×10-20m /√{Hz } sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidths Δ f >11 kHz , the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSDδ h

  20. Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Resonances in 234,236,238U Measured Using the Dance Detector at Lansce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the radiative strength function and level density is needed to calculate of neutron-capture cross sections. An additional constraint on these quantities is provided by measurements of γ-ray emission spectra following capture. We present γ-emission spectra from several neutron resonances in 234,236,238U, measured using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. The measurements are compared to preliminary calculations of the cascade. It is observed that the generalized Lorentzian form of the E1 strength function cannot reproduce the shape of the emission spectra, but a better description is made by adding low-lying M1 Lorentzian strength.

  1. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, concentration value based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.03 μg m-3) and reasonable normalized error (21 %). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment

  2. Formation of rutile fasciculate zone induced by sunlight irradiation at room temperature and its hemocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan-Hui; Zheng, Xiang; Cheng, Yuan [School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Li, Guo-Hua, E-mail: nanozjut@zjut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Research Center of Nanoscience and Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chen, Xiao-Ping, E-mail: chxp@zjut.edu.cn [School of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Zheng, Jian-Hui [School of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2013-08-01

    The fasciculate zone of phase pure rutile was fabricated under sunlight irradiation at room temperature, using titanium tetrachloride as a sole precursor. The crystal phase, morphology and microstructure, and optical absorption behavior of the samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) and UV–vis Diffuse Reflectance Spectra (DRS), respectively. XRD results show that the crystal phase of the sample is composed of rutile only, and a lattice distortion displays in the crystallite of the sample. HRTEM results show that the morphology of rutile particle is fasciculate zone constituted of nanoparticles with a diameter of 4–7 nm, and these particles grow one by one and step by step. The pattern of the selected area electron diffraction of the sample is Kikuchi type, which can be attributed to the predominant orientation growth of rutile nanoparticles along [001] induced by sunlight irradiation. DRS results show that the absorption threshold of the sample is 415 nm, corresponding to the band gap energy of 2.99 eV, which is lower than the band gap energy of rutile, 3.03 eV. Blood compatibility measurement shows that the sample has no remarkable effect on hemolytic and coagulation activity. The percent hemolysis of red blood cells is less than 5% even treated with a big dosage of the fasciculate rutile and under UV irradiation, and there are no obvious changes of plasma recalcification time after the rutile treatment. Thus, the novel structure of rutile fasciculate has low potential toxicity for blood and is hemocompatibility safe. Highlights: • A novel approach to fabricate the fasciculate zone of phase pure rutile • The fasciculate grows from a particle to nanorod and to fasciculate, step by step. • A preferred orientation growth induced by sunlight irradiation in the fasciculate • The rutile fasciculate is low toxicity for blood and is hemocompatibility safe.

  3. Measurement of branching fractions and mass spectra of B-->Kpipigamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-05-25

    We present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B-->Kpipigamma in the range m(Kpipi)pi(+)pi(-). Using 232 x 10(6) e(+)e(-)-->BB events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, we measure the branching fractions B(B(+)-->K(+)pi(-)pi(+)gamma)=[2.95+/-0.13(stat)+/-0.20(syst)] x 10(-5), B(B(0)-->K(+)pi(-)pi(0)gamma)=[4.07+/-0.22(stat)+/-0.31(syst)] x 10(-5), B(B(0)-->K(0)pi(+)pi(-)gamma)=[1.85+/-0.21(stat)+/-0.12(syst)] x 10(-5), and B(B(+)-->K(0)pi(+)pi(0)gamma)=[4.56+/-0.42(stat)+/-0.31(syst)] x 10(-5).

  4. Measurement of branching fractions and mass spectra of B -> K pi pi gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B -> K pi pi gamma in the range m_Kpipi pi+ pi-. Using 232 million e+ e- -> B Bbar events recorded by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, we measure the branching fractions BR(B+ -> K+ pi- pi+ gamma) = (2.95 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.20 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 -> K+ pi- pi0 gamma) = (4.07 +- 0.22 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 -> K0 pi+ pi- gamma) = (1.85 +- 0.21 (stat.) +- 0.12 (syst.)) x 10^-5, and BR(B+ -> K0 pi+ pi0 gamma) = (4.56 +- 0.42 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5.

  5. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  6. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  7. Measurements of beta ray spectra in CANDU nuclear generating stations using a silicon detector coincidence telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Weizman, Y. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Hirning, C.R. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby, ON (Canada). Health Physics Dept.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement of beta ray spectra at various work locations inside nuclear generating stations operated by Ontario Hydro is described. The measurements were carried out using an advanced coincidence telescope spectrometer using silicon detectors only. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies over the range 60 keV- 2500 keV with close to 100% coincidence efficiency. Photon rejection is carried out by requiring a coincidence between either two or three silicon detectors. Monte Carlo calculations were then used to estimate beta correction factors for the LiF:Mg,Ti elements used in the Ontario Hydro thermoluminescence dosemeters. Averaging over all the measured beta correction factors for the `skin` chip (100 mg.cm{sup -2}) results in a value of 2.73 {+-} 0.77 and for the extremity dosemeter (240 mg.cm{sup -2}) an average value of 4.42 {+-} 1.17 is obtained. These values are 57% and 120% greater, respectively, than the current values used by Ontario Hydro. In addition, beta correction factors for nine representative spectra were calculated for 40 mg.cm{sup -2} chips and 20 mg.cm{sup -2} chips and the results demonstrate the benefits of decreased dosemeter thickness. The average value of the beta correction factor, as well as the spread in the beta correction factor, decreases dramatically from 4.8 {+-} 2.1 (240 mg.cm{sup -2}) to 1.29 ``1.2`` +-`` 0.1 (20 mg.cm{sup -2}). (author).

  8. Reference-free, high-resolution measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Jeon, Chan-Gi; Shin, Junho; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Park, Sang Eon; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the most important properties of femtosecond mode-locked lasers and optical frequency combs. Accurate measurement of timing jitter power spectral density (PSD) is a critical prerequisite for optimizing overall noise performance and further advancing comb applications both in the time and frequency domains. Commonly used jitter measurement methods require a reference mode-locked laser with timing jitter similar to or lower than that of the laser-under-test, which is a demanding requirement for many laser laboratories, and/or have limited measurement resolution. Here we show a high-resolution and reference-source-free measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs using an optical fibre delay line and optical carrier interference. The demonstrated method works well for both mode-locked oscillators and supercontinua, with 2 × 10−9 fs2/Hz (equivalent to −174 dBc/Hz at 10-GHz carrier frequency) measurement noise floor. The demonstrated method can serve as a simple and powerful characterization tool for timing jitter PSDs of various comb sources including mode-locked oscillators, supercontinua and recently emerging Kerr-frequency combs; the jitter measurement results enabled by our method will provide new insights for understanding and optimizing timing noise in such comb sources. PMID:28102352

  9. Classical Heat-Flux Measurements in Coronal Plasmas from Collective Thomson-Scattering Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2016-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering was used to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas. The relative amplitude of the Thomson-scattered power into the up- and downshifted electron plasma wave features was used to determine the flux of electrons moving along the temperature gradient at three to four times the electron thermal velocity. Simultaneously, the ion-acoustic wave features were measured. Their relative amplitude was used to measure the flux of the return-current electrons. The frequencies of these ion-acoustic and electron plasma wave features provide local measurements of the electron temperature and density. These spectra were obtained at five locations along the temperature gradient in a laser-produced blowoff plasma. These measurements of plasma parameters are used to infer the Spitzer-Härm flux (qSH = - κ∇Te ) and are in good agreement with the values of the heat flux measured from the scattering-feature asymmetries. Additional experiments probed plasma waves perpendicular to the temperature gradient. The data show small effects resulting from heat flux compared to probing waves along the temperature gradient. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Measurements of X-ray doses and spectra produced by picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Yu, Minghai; Jiao, Jinlong; Lu, Wei; Yan, Yonghong; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhou, Weimin; Li, Junli; Zhang, Hui

    2017-02-09

    Experiments have shown that high-intensity laser interaction with a solid target can generate significant X-ray doses. This study was conducted to determine the X-ray doses and spectra produced for picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets. The photon doses and X-ray spectra in the laser forward and side directions were measured using an XG III ps 300 TW laser system. For laser intensities of 7×10(18)-4×10(19)W/cm(2), the maximum photon dose was 16.8 mSv at 50cm with a laser energy of ~153J on a 1-mm Ta target. The photon dose in the forward direction increased more significantly with increasing laser intensity than that in the side direction. For photon energies >300keV, the X-ray spectrum can be fit with an effective temperature distribution of the exponential form, dN/dE = k× exp(-E/Tx). The X-ray temperature Tx increased with the laser intensity in the forward direction with values of 0.46-0.75MeV. Tx was less strongly correlated with the laser intensity in the side direction with values of 0.29-0.32MeV. The escaping electron spectrum was also measured. The measured electron temperature was correlated with the electron temperature predicted by the ponderomotive law. The observations in this experiment were also investigated numerically. A good agreement was observed between the experimental and simulation results.

  11. Effects of concentrated sunlight on organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Katz, Eugene A.; Hirsch, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    gradually from 0.2 to 27 suns. Power conversion efficiency exhibited slow increase with C that was followed by saturation around 2% at C = 0.5–2.5 suns and subsequent strong reduction. Possible OPV applications in stationary solar concentrators (C ≤ 2 suns) are discussed. Finally, experiments at C = 55......We report the effects of concentrated sunlight on key photovoltaic parameters and stability of organic photovoltaics (OPV). Sunlight collected and concentrated outdoors was focused into an optical fiber and delivered onto a 1 cm2 bulk-heterojunction cell. Sunlight concentration C was varied...

  12. Amelioration of osteoporosis and hypovitaminosis D by sunlight exposure in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Jun; Honda, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A high incidence of fractures, particularly of the hip, represents an important problem in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), who are prone to falls and have osteoporosis. We previously showed that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) deficiency due to sunlight deprivation with compensatory hyperparathyroidism causes reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly patients with PD. The present study was undertaken to address the possibility that sunlight exposure may maintain BMD and reduce the incidence of hip fracture in elderly patients with PD. In a prospective study, PD patients were assigned to regular sunlight exposure (n=162) or usual lifestyle (n=162), and followed for 2 years. BMD of the second metacarpal bone was measured using a computed X-ray densitometer. Incidence of hip fracture in the two patient groups during the 2 year follow-up period was assessed. At baseline, patients of both groups showed vitamin D deficiency due to sunlight deprivation with compensatory hyperparathyroidism. The exposed group patients were exposed to sunlight (3231 min/year). BMD increased by 3.8% in the sunlight-exposed group and decreased by 2.6% in the usual lifestyle group (psunlight-exposed group. Eleven patients sustained hip fracture in the normal lifestyle group, and 3 fractures occurred among the sunlight-exposed group (p=.03; odds ratio=2.4). Sunlight exposure can increase the BMD of vitamin D deficient bone by increasing 25-OHD concentration and leads to the prevention of hip fracture. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of Day and Night Neutrino Energy Spectra at SNO and Constraints on Neutrino Mixing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Q. R.; Allen, R. C.; Andersen, T. C.; Anglin, J. D.; Barton, J. C.; Beier, E. W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S. D.; Black, R. A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R. J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowler, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Brice, S. J.; Browne, M. C.; Bullard, T. V.; Bühler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B. T.; Clifford, E. T.; Cowan, J. H.; Cowen, D. F.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W. F.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J. A.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A. P.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E. D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J. V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamer, A. S.; Hamian, A. A.; Handler, W. B.; Haq, R. U.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hepburn, J. D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.; Hykawy, J. G.; Isaac, M. C.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N. A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P. T.; Klein, J. R.; Knox, A. B.; Komar, R. J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H. W.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A. D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McDonald, D. S.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer Drees, R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G. G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B. A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C. W.; Neubauer, M. S.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ng, H. S.; Noble, A. J.; Norman, E. B.; Novikov, V. M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C. E.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Poon, A. W.; Radcliffe, T. J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G.; Rosendahl, S. S.; Rowley, J. K.; Rusu, V. L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schwendener, M. H.; Schülke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J. J.; Sims, C. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A. R.; Smith, M. W.; Spreitzer, T.; Starinsky, N.; Steiger, T. D.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stonehill, L. C.; Storey, R. S.; Sur, B.; Tafirout, R.; Tagg, N.; Tanner, N. W.; Taplin, R. K.; Thorman, M.; Thornewell, P. M.; Trent, P. T.; Tserkovnyak, Y. I.; van Berg, R.; van de Water, R. G.; Virtue, C. J.; Waltham, C. E.; Wang, J.-X.; Wark, D. L.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wittich, P.; Wouters, J. M.; Yeh, M.

    2002-07-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted (sup 8)B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0%[plus-or-minus]6.3%(sup +1.5)-1.4 % of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the [nu]e asymmetry is found to be 7.0%[plus-or-minus]4.9%(sup +1.3)-1.2% . A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the large mixing angle solution.

  14. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Feng [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei, E-mail: weicai@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Duan, Qianqian [College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Zhiguo, E-mail: zhangzhiguo@hit.edu.cn [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-Theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-Theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  15. [The measurement of temperature with Raman scattering spectra of polycrystal (SrNO3)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F; Gong, G; Zeng, Z; Liu, G

    2000-04-01

    We have developed a new method for the determination of temperature with Raman scattering spectra. The strontium nitrate was chosen as an experiment substance. It has two bands of Raman scattering, and their wavenumbers are 738 and 1,057 cm-1 in 600-1,700 cm-1. We have obtained the intensities of their Stokes and Anti-Stokes scattering, then we have got two temperatures of strontium nitrate according to the formula. The result from the 738 cm-1 scattering band has larger error than that from the 1,057 cm-1. This may account for the noise of the photocounter. This no touch method is fit to measure the temperature of the molecular.

  16. Measurement of separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, E Orlando J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sbarra, C; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20--100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV.

  17. Chemometric modelling based on 2D-fluorescence spectra without a calibration measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solle, D; Geissler, D; Stärk, E; Scheper, T; Hitzmann, B

    2003-01-22

    2D fluorescence spectra provide information from intracellular compounds. Fluorophores like trytophan, tyrosine and phenylalanin as well as NADH and flavins make the corresponding measurement systems very important for bioprocess supervision and control. The evaluation is usually based on chemometric modelling using for their calibration procedure off-line measurements of the desired process variables. Due to the data driven approach lots of off-line measurements are required. Here a methodology is presented, which enables to perform a calibration procedure of chemometric models without any further measurement. The necessary information for the calibration procedure is provided by means of the a priori knowledge about the process, i.e. a mathematical model, whose model parameters are estimated during the calibration procedure, as well as the fact that the substrate should be consumed at the end of the process run. The new methodology for chemometric calibration is applied for a batch cultivation of aerobically grown S. cerevisiae on the glucose Schatzmann medium. As will be presented the chemometric models, which are determined by this method, can be used for prediction during new process runs. The MATHLAB routine is free available on request from the authors.

  18. An indirect method of X-ray spectra measurement by simultaneous attenuations of the scattered beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, Raul T. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF), Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA-Cordoba (Argentina)], E-mail: mainardi@famaf.unc.edu.ar; Bonzi, Edgardo V. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF), Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA-Cordoba (Argentina)

    2008-05-15

    Direct and indirect methods of X-ray spectra determination present obstacles to their practical use since they must position either the collimator-detector assembly or the attenuators-ionization chamber, respectively, along the X-ray beam direction. These arrangements require considerable space and in many instances the detectors promptly saturate. An indirect procedure, which overcomes the aforementioned problems, is developed. It consists of the scattering of the X-ray beam from a carbon disk, which is detected simultaneously by several detectors placed away from the beam. The X-ray flux reaching each of these detectors is attenuated in metal sheets of different thicknesses, thus obtaining simultaneously the attenuation curve values. A set of analytical equations are derived to calculate attenuation curves by taking into account all the absorption and elastic and inelastic scattering processes that a beam of photons undergoes when going from the X-ray tube to the detector. Users, even those who are not well acquainted with computer programming, can easily obtain the X-ray spectrum by a least square fitting of a measured attenuation curve to a previously derived analytical expression. A simulated Monte Carlo program of photon transport from the X-ray tube to the detector provided simulated attenuation curves data. Analytically calculated and simulated attenuation curves for the same input spectrum wholly overlap and furthermore, reconstructed spectra from both sets of curves for different kilovoltages are also in full agreement. Finally, in addition to the importance of having the detectors out of the beam direction, the proposed arrangement features other main advantages, namely, only one X-ray tube shot is needed to obtain the required data, the physical processes involved are very well known, analytical equations are easily interpreted, and the measuring apparatuses can be comparatively simple to assemble and operate.

  19. Can Natural Sunlight Induce Coherent Exciton Dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Olšina, Jan; Wang, Chen; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-01-01

    Excitation of a model photosynthetic molecular aggregate by incoherent sunlight is systematically examined. For a closed system, the excited state coherence induced by the sunlight oscillates with an average amplitude that is inversely proportional to the excitonic gap, and reaches a stationary amplitude that depends on the temperature and coherence time of the radiation field. For an open system, the light-induced dynamical coherence relaxes to a static coherence determined by the non-canonical thermal distribution resulting from the entanglement with the phonon bath. The decay of the excited state population to the common ground state establishes a non-equilibrium steady-state flux driven by the sunlight, and it defines a time window to observe the transition from dynamical to static coherence. For the parameters relevant to photosynthetic systems, the exciton dynamics initiated by the sunlight exhibits a non-negligible amount of dynamical coherence (quantum beats) on the sub-picosecond timescale; however, ...

  20. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  1. Supplementing vitamin D through sunlight: associating health literacy with sunlight exposure behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela Yee Man; Cheung, Mike Kwun Ting; Chi, Iris

    2015-01-01

    To test whether health literacy is associated with sunlight exposure behavior, we interviewed 648 Chinese adults aged 65 years or older. Using the information-motivation-behavioral skills model and structural equation modeling, we tested whether health literacy was associated with the complex relationships among knowledge about vitamin D, attitudes toward sunlight exposure, doctor recommendations regarding sunlight exposure, and sunlight exposure behavior. Health literacy was directly associated with sunlight exposure (β=.20, psunlight exposure through health literacy (β=.46, psunlight exposure through health literacy (β=-.12, psunlight exposure. Providing relevant knowledge or making doctor recommendations might not be effective. Training should focus on individuals with low health literacy who may be less likely to receive sunlight exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcite dissolution rate spectra measured by in situ digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexander S.; Feng, Pan; Bullard, Jeffrey W.

    2017-09-01

    Digital holographic microscopy in reflection mode is used to track in situ, real-time nanoscale topography evolution of cleaved (104) calcite surfaces exposed to flowing or static deionized water. The method captures full-field holograms of the surface at frame rates of up to 12.5 s-1. Numerical reconstruction provides 3D surface topography with vertical resolution of a few nanometers and enables measurement of time-dependent local dissolution fluxes. A statistical distribution, or spectrum, of dissolution rates is generated by sampling multiple area domains on multiple crystals. The data show, as has been demonstrated by Fischer et al. (2012), that dissolution is most fully described by a rate spectrum, although the modal dissolution rate agrees well with published mean dissolution rates (e.g., 0.1 μmol m-2 s-1 to 0.3 μmol m-2 s-1). Rhombohedral etch pits and other morphological features resulting from rapid local dissolution appear at different times and are heterogeneously distributed across the surface and through the depth. This makes the distribution in rates measured on a single crystal dependent both on the sample observation field size and on time, even at nominally constant undersaturation. Statistical analysis of the inherent noise in the DHM measurements indicates that the technique is robust and that it likely can be applied to quantify and interpret rate spectra for the dissolution or growth of other minerals.

  3. The Cosmic-Ray Proton and Helium Spectra measured with the CAPRICE98 balloon experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Boezio, M; Schiavon, Paolo; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Bergström, D; Carlson, P J; Francke, T; Hansen, P; Mocchiutti, E; Suffert, Martin; Hof, M; Kremer, J; Menn, W; Simon, M; Ambriola, M; Bellotti, R; Cafagna, F; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; De Marzo, C N; Finetti, N; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Spillantini, P; Vannuccini, E; Bartalucci, S; Ricci, M; Casolino, M; De Pascale, M P; Morselli, A; Picozza, P; Sparvoli, R; Mitchell, J W; Ormes, J F; Stephens, S A; Streitmatter, R E; Bravar, U; Stochaj, S J

    2003-01-01

    A new measurement of the primary cosmic-ray proton and helium fluxes from 3 to 350 GeV was carried out by the balloon-borne CAPRICE experiment in 1998. This experimental setup combines different detector techniques and has excellent particle discrimination capabilities allowing clear particle identification. Our experiment has the capability to determine accurately detector selection efficiencies and systematic errors associated with them. Furthermore, it can check for the first time the energy determined by the magnet spectrometer by using the Cherenkov angle measured by the RICH detector well above 20 GeV/n. The analysis of the primary proton and helium components is described here and the results are compared with other recent measurements using other magnet spectrometers. The observed energy spectra at the top of the atmosphere can be represented by (1.27+-0.09)x10^4 E^(-2.75+-0.02) particles (m^2 GeV sr s)^-1, where E is the kinetic energy, for protons between 20 and 350 GeV and (4.8+-0.8)x10^2 E^(-2.67+...

  4. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bilous, A; Kramer, M; Keane, E; Hessels, J; Stappers, B; Malofeev, V; Sobey, C; Breton, R; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Karastergiou, A; Michilli, D; Osłowski, S; Sanidas, S; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Zarka, P; Grießmeier, J -M; Serylak, M; Bell, M; Broderick, J; Eislöffel, J; Markoff, S; Rowlinson, A

    2015-01-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec$> 8^\\circ$ and Galactic latitudes |Gb|$> 3^\\circ$, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed contiguously in the frequency range from 110$-$188 MHz and for $\\geq 20$ minutes, recording full-Stokes data. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures ($1.5 \\times 10^{-4}$ pc cm$^{-3}$) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, the choice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral bre...

  5. Lineshape measurements of He-β spectra on the ORION laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Shepherd, R.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.; Chung, H. K.; Hill, E.

    2016-10-01

    We have utilized a newly developed high-resolution X-ray spectrometer to measure the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. We present measurements of the He-β spectra of chlorine and chromium from targets irradiated by either a long-pulse or a short-pulse laser beam. The experimental conditions provide a spread in plasma density ranging from about 1019 to about 1024 cm-3. We present spectral calculations that show that the relative intensities of the Li-like satellite lines can be used to infer the density in the lower range, especially if the lithiumlike satellite lines are well resolved. In addition, we use the Stark-broadened width of the He-β line to infer densities above about 1022 cm-3. In the case of a short-pulse irradiated chromium foil, we find that the He-like chromium is produced at a density of almost 8 g/cm3, i.e., solid density. In addition, we can infer the electron temperature from the observation of dielectronic recombination satellite lines.

  6. Measurements of atomic parameters of highly charged ions for interpreting astrophysical spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Utter, S.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Boyce, K.R.; Gendreau, K.C.; Kelley, R.; Porter, F.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Savin, D.W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Gygax, J. [Swales and Associates, Beltsville, MD (United States)

    2001-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra obtained by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission put new demands on atomic data including line positions, excitation cross sections, and radiative rates of cosmically-abundant highly-charged ions. To address this need, we are performing measurements of the line emission from ions of cosmically abundant elements. The data are obtained at the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap and focus on cross sections for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination, and resonance excitation as well as atomic structure measurements. We find that ratios of the electron-impact excitation cross sections of singlet and triplet levels are systematically different from the calculated values in the case of many highly charged ions. This, for example, has a profound impact on inferring optical depths from solar and stellar atmospheres. Moreover, new line identifications are presented that resolve some long-standing puzzles in the interpretation of solar data, and the importance of resonance contributions to the spectral emission is assessed. (orig.)

  7. Energy spectra of primary and secondary cosmic-ray nuclei measured with TRACER

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, A; Boyle, P; Höppner, Ch; Hörandel, J; Müller, D

    2011-01-01

    The TRACER cosmic-ray detector, first flown on long-duration balloon (LDB) in 2003 for observations of the major primary cosmic-ray nuclei from oxygen (Z=8) to iron (Z=26), has been upgraded to also measure the energies of the lighter nuclei, including the secondary species boron (Z=5). The instrument was used in another LDB flight in 2006. The properties and performance of the modified detector system are described, and the analysis of the data from the 2006 flight is discussed. The energy spectra of the primary nuclei carbon (Z=6), oxygen, and iron over the range from 1 GeV amu$^{-1}$ to 2 TeV amu$^{-1}$ are reported. The data for oxygen and iron are found to be in good agreement with the results of the previous TRACER flight. The measurement of the energy spectrum of boron also extends into the TeV amu$^{-1}$ region. The relative abundances of the primary nuclei, such as carbon, oxygen, and iron, above $\\sim10$ GeV amu$^{-1}$ are independent of energy, while the boron abundance, i.e. the B/C abundance rati...

  8. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  9. Marvel Analysis of the Measured High-resolution Rovibronic Spectra of TiO

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKemmish, Laura K.; Masseron, Thomas; Sheppard, Samuel; Sandeman, Elizabeth; Schofield, Zak; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Sousa-Silva, Clara

    2017-02-01

    Accurate, experimental rovibronic energy levels, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for 11 low-lying electronic states of the diatomic {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} molecule, determined using the Marvel (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm. All levels are based on lines corresponding to critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 24 literature sources. The transition data are in the 2-22,160 cm-1 region. Out of the 49,679 measured transitions, 43,885 are triplet-triplet, 5710 are singlet-singlet, and 84 are triplet-singlet transitions. A careful analysis of the resulting experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 48,590 transitions to be validated. The transitions determine 93 vibrational band origins of {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}}, including 71 triplet and 22 singlet ones. There are 276 (73) triplet-triplet (singlet-singlet) band-heads derived from Marvel experimental energies, 123(38) of which have never been assigned in low- or high-resolution experiments. The highest J value, where J stands for the total angular momentum, for which an energy level is validated is 163. The number of experimentally derived triplet and singlet {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} rovibrational energy levels is 8682 and 1882, respectively. The lists of validated lines and levels for {}48{{Ti}}16{{O}} are deposited in the supporting information to this paper.

  10. MARVEL analysis of the measured high-resolution spectra of 14NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Császár, Attila G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate, experimental rotational-vibrational energy levels and line positions, with associated labels and uncertainties, are reported for the ground electronic state of the symmetric-top 14NH3 molecule. All levels and lines are based on critically reviewed and validated high-resolution experimental spectra taken from 56 literature sources. The transition data are in the 0.7-17 000 cm-1 region, with a large gap between 7000 and 15 000 cm-1. The MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm is used to determine the energy levels. Out of the 29 450 measured transitions 10 041 and 18 947 belong to ortho- and para-14NH3, respectively. A careful analysis of the related experimental spectroscopic network (SN) allows 28 530 of the measured transitions to be validated, 18 178 of these are unique, while 462 transitions belong to floating components. Despite the large number of spectroscopic measurements published over the last 80 years, the transitions determine only 30 vibrational band origins of 14NH3, 8 for ortho- and 22 for para-14NH3. The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, for which an energy level is validated is 31. The number of experimental-quality ortho- and para-14NH3 rovibrational energy levels is 1724 and 3237, respectively. The MARVEL energy levels are checked against ones in the BYTe first-principles database, determined previously. The lists of validated lines and levels for 14NH3 are deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper. Combination of the MARVEL energy levels with first-principles absorption intensities yields a huge number of experimental-quality rovibrational lines, which should prove to be useful for the understanding of future complex high-resolution spectroscopy on 14NH3; these lines are also deposited in the Supporting Information to this paper.

  11. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  12. Sunlight Exposure and Vitamin D Status in Breastfed Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Pinky; Dabas, Aashima; Shah, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Rajeev Kumar; Madhu, S V; Gupta, Piyush

    2017-02-15

    To correlate the sunlight exposure in first 6 months to vitamin D status at 6 months of age in predominantly breastfed infants; and to quantify the sunlight exposure required to achieve serum 25(OH)D level >20 ng/mL, by 6 months of age. Design: Prospective cohort. Tertiary-care hospital predominantly catering to urban poor population in Delhi. 132 healthy infants, delivered at term, and predominantly breastfed were enrolled at 6-8 weeks of age. Of these, 100 infants were available for final evaluation at 6 months of age (mean (SD) follow-up: 126 (17) days). Baseline maternal vitamin D (serum 25(OH)D) levels were obtained at enrolment. The mothers were asked to maintain a daily record of duration of sunlight exposure, timing of exposure, and body surface area exposed, for the infant, on a pre-designed proforma, till the child was 6 months of age. Infant's serum 25(OH)D was measured at 6 months of age. Cumulative Sun Index was calculated as a composite measure of overall duration/time/body surface area exposed to sunlight; and correlated with the infant serum 25(OH)D after adjusting for baseline maternal serum 25(OH)D levels, season of exposure, and skin color of the infant. Sun index for exposure in morning (before 10 am) and afternoon (10 am-3 pm) were also correlated to vitamin D status. Of 100 mother-infant pairs completing the study, 90 mothers had vitamin D deficiency (serum 25(OH)D exposure of infants to sunlight was 17 min per week, on 6% of body surface area. Vitamin D levels of 67 (67%) infants at 6 months were less than 12 ng/mL and another 23% had insufficient levels (12-20 ng/mL). Cumulative sun index correlated positively to infant's serum 25(OH)D level at 6 months of age (r= 0.461, Psunlight exposure, between 10 am and 3 pm, over 40% body area (infant clothed in diapers, in prone position) for at least 16 weeks, was estimated requirement to achieve sufficient vitamin D levels (>20 ng/mL) by 6 months of age. There is a significant positive correlation

  13. Indirect measurements of X-ray spectra; Mediciones indirectas de espectros de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, R.T. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    To the effects of measuring the spectral distribution of the radiation emitted by the x-ray tubes and electron accelerators, numerous procedures that are grouped in two big categories exist at the present time: direct and indirect methods. The first ones use high resolution detectors that should be positioned, together with the appropriate collimator, in the direction of the x ray beam. The user should be an expert in the use and correction of the obtained data by the different effects that affect the detector operation such as efficiency and resolution in terms of the energy of the detected radiation. The indirect procedures, although its are more simple to use, its also require a considerable space along the beam to position the ionization chamber and the necessary absorbents to construct by this way the denominated attenuation curve. We will analyze the operation principle of the indirect methods and a new proposal in which such important novelties are introduced as the beam dispersion to avoid to measure along the main beam and that of determination of the attenuation curve in simultaneous form. By this way, with a single shot of the tube, the attenuation curve is measured, being necessary at most a shot of additional calibration to know the relative response of the detectors used in the experimental array. The physical processes involved in the obtaining of an attenuation curve are very well well-known and this it finishes it can be theoretically calculated if the analytic form of the spectrum is supposed well-known. Finally, we will see a spectra reconstruction example with the Kramers parametric form and comparisons with numeric simulations carried out with broadly validated programs as well as the possibility of the use of solid state dosemeters in the obtention of the attenuation curve. (Author)

  14. [Progress in research of association between myopia and sunlight exposure in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, L L; Wu, X Y; Xu, S J; Tao, F B

    2016-11-10

    Myopia has become a major health problem on global scale due to its increasing high prevalence in the past few decades and gradual younger onset age. Accumulated epidemiological surveys have shown that decreased time of exposure to sunlight would be an inducement for the development of myopia. Increasing time spent outdoors and exposure to sunlight might be the most cost-effective and effective measure for children to prevent myopia. This paper summarizes the progress in research of the association between sunlight exposure and myopia in children and its mechanisms to provide new clues for the research on myopia prevention and control.

  15. The Slowly Varying Corona. I. Daily Differential Emission Measure Distributions Derived from EVE Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, S. J.; White, S. M.; Hock-Mysliwiec, R. A.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2017-08-01

    Daily differential emission measure (DEM) distributions of the solar corona are derived from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) over a 4 yr period starting in 2010 near solar minimum and continuing through the maximum of solar cycle 24. The DEMs are calculated using six strong emission features dominated by Fe lines of charge states viii, ix, xi, xii, xiv, and xvi that sample the nonflaring coronal temperature range 0.3-5 MK. A proxy for the non-Fe xviii emission in the wavelength band around the 93.9 Å line is demonstrated. There is little variability in the cool component of the corona (T 2.0 MK) varies by more than an order of magnitude. A discontinuity in the behavior of coronal diagnostics in 2011 February-March, around the time of the first X-class flare of cycle 24, suggests fundamentally different behavior in the corona under solar minimum and maximum conditions. This global state transition occurs over a period of several months. The DEMs are used to estimate the thermal energy of the visible solar corona (of order 1031 erg), its radiative energy loss rate ((2.5-8) × {10}27 erg s-1), and the corresponding energy turnover timescale (about an hour). The uncertainties associated with the DEMs and these derived values are mostly due to the coronal Fe abundance and density and the CHIANTI atomic line database.

  16. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  17. Single-shot laser pulse reconstruction based on self-phase modulated spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anashkina, Elena A.; Ginzburg, Vladislav N.; Kochetkov, Anton A.; Yakovlev, Ivan V.; Kim, Arkady V.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2016-09-01

    We report a method for ultrashort pulse reconstruction based only on the pulse spectrum and two self-phase modulated (SPM) spectra measured after pulse propagation through thin media with a Kerr nonlinearity. The advantage of this method is that it is a simple and very effective tool for characterization of complex signals. We have developed a new retrieval algorithm that was verified by reconstructing numerically generated fields, such as a complex electric field of double pulses and few-cycle pulses with noises, pedestals and dips down to zero spectral intensity, which is challenging for commonly used techniques. We have also demonstrated a single-shot implementation of the technique for the reconstruction of experimentally obtained pulses. This method can be used for high power laser systems operating in a single-shot mode in the optical, near- and mid-IR spectral ranges. The method is robust, low cost, stable to noise, does not require a priori information, and has no ambiguity related to time direction.

  18. Validation of reconstructed bremsstrahlung spectra between 6 MV and 25 MV from measured transmission data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, P; Coste, F; Bonnet, J; Caselles, O

    1997-05-01

    We have previously investigated a method of high-energy x-ray spectral reconstruction from transmission data by direct resolution of a matrix system. This technique uses the spectral vectorial algebra formalism. The resolution has previously been tested on a 12 MV photon beam. To extend and to test the validity of the results to the entire radiotherapy energy range, we have performed the method on photon beams with nominal energies of 6, 12, 15, and 25 MV. The influence on the 6 MV spectrum of a 60 degrees built-in wedge has also been investigated to test the sensitivity of the method and the results are reported. To validate our reconstructed spectra, dosimetric quantities such as tissue phantom ratios (TPR), water-to-air stopping power ratios (S/p) air water, and quality indexes TPR 10 (20) have been calculated. The results show good agreement between the measured and calculated data. Mean mass energy absorption coefficient ratios for different materials have also been computed and compared to data published recently and the results are very close (within +/- 0.5%). Primary depth dose functions in water have also been computed to deduce primary dose attenuation coefficients.

  19. Measurements of bubble size spectra within leads in the Arctic summer pack ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Norris

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The first measurements of bubble size spectra within the near-surface waters of open leads in the central Arctic pack ice were obtained during the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS in August 2008 at 87–87.6° N, 1–11° W. A significant number of small bubbles (30–100 μm diameter were present, with concentration decreasing rapidly with size from 100–560 μm; no bubbles larger than 560 μm were observed. The bubbles were present both during periods of low wind speed (U<6 m s−1 and when ice covered the surface of the lead. The low wind and short open-water fetch precludes production of bubbles by wave breaking suggesting that the bubbles are generated by processes below the surface. When the surface water was open to the atmosphere bubble concentrations increased with increasing heat loss to the atmosphere. The presence of substantial numbers of bubbles is significant because the bursting of bubbles at the surface provides a mechanism for the generation of aerosol and the ejection of biological material from the ocean into the atmosphere. Such a transfer has previously been proposed as a potential climate feedback linking marine biology and Arctic cloud properties.

  20. Velocity statistics and spectra over a forested site measured with a tall mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio; Alfredsson, Henrik; Dellwik, Ebba; Arnqvist, Johan; Bergström, Hans

    2012-11-01

    In the large expansion of wind power it becomes necessary to use also non-ideal sites for the placement of turbines. Such sites may have a complex terrain in terms of surface elevation as well as being forested. The atmospheric boundary layer is assumed to be severely different as compared to the one over flat, low-vegetation areas, which changes the mean velocity distribution as well as the turbulence intensity, thereby negatively affecting both the power production and loads on the turbines. In this study we use data from a 140 m tall mast in a forest in South-Eastern Sweden, where a unique measurement campaign with sonic anemometers has been running since November 2010 for 16 months. The sonic anemometers give the three velocity components with a frequency resolution of about 10 Hz. The site is covered by approximately 20 m high trees and a 40 degree sector, representative of an approximately homogeneous forest flow, is selected for the analysis of the velocity statistics. The screening of the results indicates the presence of a constant stress layer up to 3-5 canopy heights from the ground. An evaluation of the turbulence statistics in this layer and the levels above is presented. In addition, the spectra are evaluated and compared with the commonly used turbulence models.

  1. Analysis of reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol scenes measured by SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.; Aben, E. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    Reflectance spectra from 280-1750 nm of typical desert dust aerosol (DDA) and biomass burning aerosol (BBA) scenes over oceans are presented, measured by the space-borne spectrometer Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). DDA and BBA are both UV-absorbing aerosols, but their effect on the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance is different due to differences in the way mineral aerosols and smoke reflect and absorb radiation. Mineral aerosols are typically large, inert particles, found in warm, dry continental air. Smoke particles, on the other hand, are usually small particles, although often clustered, chemically very active and highly variable in composition. Moreover, BBA are hygroscopic and over oceans BBA were invariably found in cloudy scenes. TOA reflectance spectra of typical DDA and BBA scenes were analyzed, using radiative transfer simulations, and compared. The DDA spectrum was successfully simulated using a layer with a bimodal size distribution of mineral aerosols in a clear sky. The spectrum of the BBA scene, however, was determined by the interaction between cloud droplets and smoke particles, as is shown by simulations with a model of separate aerosol and cloud layers and models with internally and externally mixed aerosol/cloud layers. The occurrence of clouds in smoke scenes when sufficient water vapor is present usually prevents the detection of optical properties of these aerosol plumes using space-borne sensors. However, the Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI), a UV color index, is not sensitive to scattering aerosols and clouds and can be used to detect these otherwise obscured aerosol plumes over clouds. The amount of absorption of radiation can be expressed using the absorption optical thickness. The absorption optical thickness in the DDA case was 0.42 (340 nm) and 0.14 (550 nm) for an aerosol layer of optical thickness 1.74 (550 nm). In the BBA case the absorption optical thickness was 0.18 (340 nm) and 0

  2. Evaluation of ozone column amount from the solar backscattering spectra measured with the Airborne-OPUS and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, T.; Kita, K.; Suzuki, M.; Shiomi, K.; Okumura, S.; Ogawa, T.

    Satellite observation is one of the best methods to monitor the increase of atmospheric pollutants including tropospheric ozone especially due to industrial activities in Asia It is significant to investigate the satellite sensor and data processing algorithm for developing next generation monitoring system The Airborne Ozone and Pollution measuring Ultraviolet Spectrometer Airborne-OPUS sensor was developed by JAXA EORC to study the solar ultraviolet backscattering measurement of ozone nitrogen dioxide sulfur dioxide and some other species from a satellite In this study we deduced slant column amounts of ozone from the Airborne-OPUS data during an aircraft observation and estimated analytical errors The Airborne-OPUS which consists of a compact spectrometer Jobin-Yvon CP-200 thermoelectric-cooled CCD SpectraVideo SV11C and optics measures backward-scattered ultraviolet spectra between 300 and 455 nm with a spectral resolution of 0 9 nm FWHM from an aircraft In this study the spectra between 315 and 325 nm obtained during Pacific Exploration and Asia and Continental Emission phase-A campaign Parrish et al 2004 in January 2002 were analyzed to evaluate the ozone column amount In this analysis the absorption by ozone the scattering by atmospheric molecules and the Ring effect were estimated from the ratios between the target spectra derived when the solar zenith angle SZA exceeded about 60o and the reference spectra when SZA was minimum at the same day The scattering by aerosols surface albedo and artificial continuous

  3. ACCURACY OF MEASUREMENT OF NATURAL GAMMA RAY SPECTRA BY HD—8004 NaI(T1) GAMMA SPECTROMETER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱国钦; 郑仁淑

    1995-01-01

    The measurement principle and analysis method of natural gammaray spectra using NaI(T1) scintillation spectrometer are briefly described first,then block diagrams of the HD-8004 NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer,Finally,sample measurements are listed and discussed.The results are quite promising.Based on the analysis of these measurements,measures to improve the accuracy of spectrum measurement are proposed.It is well hoped that these measures can contribute to the development and application of gamma-ray spectrum measurement.

  4. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  5. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  6. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.J.; Bingham, C.; Goggin, R.; Lewandowski, A.A.; Netter, J.C.

    2000-06-13

    Process and apparatus are disclosed for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: (a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; (b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

  7. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Bingham, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Goggin, Rita (Englewood, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Netter, Judy C. (Westminster, CO)

    2000-06-13

    Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

  8. Sunlight-Induced Coloration of Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ya; Tang, Bin; Chen, Wu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Xungai

    2016-06-01

    Silk fabrics were colored by gold nanoparticles (NPs) that were in situ synthesized through the induction of sunlight. Owing to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold NPs, the treated silk fabrics presented vivid colors. The photo-induced synthesis of gold NPs was also realized on wet silk through adsorbing gold ions out of solution, which provides a water-saving coloration method for textiles. Besides, the patterning of silk was feasible using this simple sunlight-induced coloration approach. The key factors of coloration including gold ion concentration, pH value, and irradiation time were investigated. Moreover, it was demonstrated that either ultraviolet (UV) light or visible light could induce the generation of gold NPs on silk fabrics. The silk fabrics with gold NPs exhibited high light resistance including great UV-blocking property and excellent fastness to sunlight.

  9. Precise measurement of the line width of the photoassociation spectra of ultracold molecules by using a frequency shifter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Ji-Zhou; Ma Jie; Ji Zhong-Hua; Zhang Yi-Chi; Li Yu-Qing; Wang Li-Rong; Zhao Yan-Ting; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    We propose a technique to precisely measure the line width of the photoassociation spectra of the excited cesium molecule by using a frequency shifter to generate two laser beams with a precise frequency difference. A series of photoassociation (PA) spectra are recorded with two laser beam induced molecular lines,whose peak separation serves as an accurate frequency ruler to measure the line width of the PA spectra.The full width half maximum line width was studied as a function of PA laser intensity.The extrapolated value at zero laser intensity is (34.84 ± 0.22) MHz.By analyzing other broadening mechanisms,a value of (32.02 ± 0.70) MHz was deduced.It is shown that this scheme is inexpensive,simple,robust,and is promising for applications in a variety of other atomic species.

  10. Self-shielding effects in neutron spectra measurements for neutron capture therapy by means of activation foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Krzysztof; Józefowicz, Krystyna; Pytel, Beatrycze; Koziel, Alina

    2004-01-01

    The design and optimisation of a neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is accompanied by the neutron spectra measurements at the target position. The method of activation detectors was applied for the neutron spectra measurements. Epithermal neutron energy region imposes the resonance structure of activation cross sections resulting in strong self-shielding effects. The neutron self-shielding correction factor was calculated using a simple analytical model of a single absorption event. Such a procedure has been applied to individual cross sections from pointwise ENDF/B-VI library and new corrected activation cross sections were introduced to a spectra unfolding algorithm. The method has been verified experimentally both for isotropic and for parallel neutron beams. Two sets of diluted and non-diluted activation foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in the neutron field. The comparison of activation rates of diluted and non-diluted foils has demonstrated the correctness of the applied self-shielding model.

  11. Evaluation of approximate measurements of activation-free-energy spectra of shear transformation zones in metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, JongDoo [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Atzmon, Michael, E-mail: atzmon@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We simulate measured activation energy spectra for anelastic relaxation in metallic glasses. • Simulated spectra exhibit the same shape as earlier data obtained by temperature stepping. • The drop previously observed at high activation free energy is an artifact of the measurements. - Abstract: For many years, the only experimental activation free energy spectrum for shear transformations in metallic glasses had been obtained by quenching from high temperature during creep, followed by temperature stepping (Argon and Kuo, 1980). We show that the approximation associated with attributing a single activation energy to each temperature leads to an artificial drop in the spectrum at high activation energies. The detailed spectra of potential shear transformation zones we have recently obtained, which exhibit an atomically quantized hierarchy and are monotonic, lead to the same spectrum shape as obtained by Argon and Kuo when the approximation inherent to the temperature stepping method is applied.

  12. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  13. Degadation of semiconducting polymers by concentrated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manceau, Matthieu; Petersen, Martin Helgesen

    2011-01-01

    A lens based sunlight concentration setup was used to accelerate the degradation of semiconducting polymers. Sunlight was collected outdoor and focused into an optical fiber bundle allowing for indoor experimental work. Photo-degradation of several polymers was studied by UV–vis absorbance...... spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy. This showed that the degradation rate is significantly increased by increasing illumination intensity. Acceleration factors exceeding 100 compared to standard 1 sun illumination were observed for solar concentration of 200 suns in the case of P3HT. A comparison between...

  14. Sunlight Diffusing Tent for Lunar Worksite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Blair; Clark, Todd; Deese, Todd; Gentry, Ernest; Samad, Abdul

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to provide a solution to problems astronauts encounter with sunlight on the lunar surface. Due to the absence of an atmosphere the Moon is subjected to intense sunlight creating problems with color and contrast. This problem can be overcome by providing a way to reduce intensity and diffuse the light in a working environment. The solution to the problem utilizes an umbrella, tent-like structure covered with a diffusing material. The design takes into account structural materials, stresses, fabrics, and deployment.

  15. Vitamin D and Sunlight Exposure in Newly-Diagnosed Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yu, Yu; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo

    2016-03-04

    Circulating vitamin D has previously been found to be lower in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), while the effects of sunlight exposure have not yet been fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the associations between serum vitamin D, vitamin D intake, sunlight exposure, and newly-diagnosed PD patients in a Chinese population. This case-control study measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and sunlight exposure in 201 patients with newly-diagnosed PD and 199 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. Data on vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure were obtained using a self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were employed to evaluate the associations between serum 25(OH)D levels, sunlight exposure, and PD. Adjustments were made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, BMI, and vitamin D intake. There were significantly lower levels of serum 25(OH)D (20.6 ± 6.5 ng/mL), daily vitamin D intake (8.3 ± 3.7 g/day), and sunlight exposure (9.7 ± 4.1 h/week) in patients with PD compared to healthy controls (p sunlight exposure were 1 (reference), 0.809 (0.454, 1.443), 0.623 (0.345, 1.124) and 0.533 (0.294, 0.966), respectively. A significant positive correlation between serum 25(OH)D and sunlight exposure was found, but serum 25(OH)D was not correlated with daily vitamin D intake. This study indicates that lower levels of serum 25(OH)D and sunlight exposure are significantly associated with an increased risk for PD.

  16. Vitamin D and Sunlight Exposure in Newly-Diagnosed Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yu, Yu; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo

    2016-01-01

    Circulating vitamin D has previously been found to be lower in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), while the effects of sunlight exposure have not yet been fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the associations between serum vitamin D, vitamin D intake, sunlight exposure, and newly-diagnosed PD patients in a Chinese population. This case-control study measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and sunlight exposure in 201 patients with newly-diagnosed PD and 199 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. Data on vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure were obtained using a self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were employed to evaluate the associations between serum 25(OH)D levels, sunlight exposure, and PD. Adjustments were made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, BMI, and vitamin D intake. There were significantly lower levels of serum 25(OH)D (20.6 ± 6.5 ng/mL), daily vitamin D intake (8.3 ± 3.7 g/day), and sunlight exposure (9.7 ± 4.1 h/week) in patients with PD compared to healthy controls (p sunlight exposure were 1 (reference), 0.809 (0.454, 1.443), 0.623 (0.345, 1.124) and 0.533 (0.294, 0.966), respectively. A significant positive correlation between serum 25(OH)D and sunlight exposure was found, but serum 25(OH)D was not correlated with daily vitamin D intake. This study indicates that lower levels of serum 25(OH)D and sunlight exposure are significantly associated with an increased risk for PD. PMID:26959053

  17. Sunlight Exposure and Breast Density: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; So, Edwin; Lam, Tsz-ping; Woo, Jean; Yuen, PY; Qin, Ling; Ku, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to assess the association of sunlight exposure with breast cancer risk, measured by the breast density assessed from Tabár's mammographic pattern in Chinese women. Methods A total of 676 premenopausal women were recruited to participate in this study, in which 650 completed a validated sunlight exposure questionnaire via telephone. The mammograms were classified according to Tabár's classification for parenchyma, and patterns IV & V and I, II & III indicated respectively high and low risk mammographic patterns for breast cancer. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sun exposure-related variables were estimated using unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Among 646 participants, women with high breast cancer risk (Tabár's patterns IV &V) had less hours spent in the sun than those with low risk (I, II & III) at any age stage. A higher level of sunlight exposure was associated with a significantly lower risk having high risk Tabár's pattern. Women aged 40 to 44 years who were in the highest tertile of lifetime total hours spent in the sun had a multi-adjusted OR of 0.41 (95% CI, 0.18-0.92; p for trend=0.03) compared with those in the lowest tertile (>2.19 hr/day vs. sunlight exposure is related to a lower risk of having high risk breast density pattern in premenopausal women. Our results also suggest the most relevant period of exposure is during earlier life. PMID:23843849

  18. Sunlight technologies for photochemical deactivation of organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, A.; Fischer, E.; Tornheim, R. [The Volcani Center, Inst. of Soils and Water, Bet Dagan (Israel); Manor, Y. [Sheba Medical Center, Central Virology Lab., Ramat Gan (Israel)

    1997-12-31

    Sensitized-photochemical oxidation methods aimed at use in water treatment technologies for deactivation of biotic (microorganisms) and/or of xenobiotic (pesticides) pollutants in water were developed using global solar radiation or concentrated sunlight (up to 250 suns). The solar global radiation was used either for detoxification of industrial waste water from a pesticide factory to allow their discharge into the urban sewer, or for disinfection of domestric effluents to be used in crop irrigation. The disinfection process was eventually carried out in an experimental pilot-scale plant, capable of disinfection up to 50 m{sup 3}/h of effluent supplied by an activated sludge sewage treatment plant located in Tel-Aviv area. The treated effluents did not show any regrowth of the microorganisms during 7 days. The solar concentrated radiation experiments performed using facilities of the Sun Tower of The Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot. The concentrated sunlight was provided by different combination of several computer controlled heliostates, up to 8, that track the sun and focus the received sunlight onto the target situated on the roof of the sun-tower. The sunlight intensities measured on the target reached up to 200 kW/m{sup 2}. The experiments were performed either batch- or continuous-wise. The water-samples exposed to disinfection were the above effluent, filtered and supplemented with vaccine strain poliovirus or with different concentrations of an industrial potential pollutant (bromacil), MB 2 mg/L and two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (8.0 or 40.0 mg O{sub 2}/L). An exposure time of 2-3 seconds at 150 kW/m{sup 2} was decreased the microorganisms alive (counts) by five orders of magnitude. A comparison between the two above water treatment technologies is presented. (orig./SR)

  19. Measuring diffuse interstellar bands with cool stars. Improved line lists to model background stellar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Lallement, R.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Diffuse stellar bands (DIBs) are ubiquitous in stellar spectra. Traditionally, they have been studied through their extraction from hot (early-type) stars because of their smooth continuum. In an era in which there are several ongoing or planned massive Galactic surveys using multi-object spectrographs, cool (late-type) stars constitute an appealing set of targets. However, from the technical point of view, the extraction of DIBs in their spectra is more challenging because of the complexity of the continuum. Aims: In this contribution we provide the community with an improved set of stellar lines in the spectral regions associated with the strong DIBs at λ6196.0, λ6269.8, λ6283.8, and λ6379.3. These lines allow for the creation of better stellar synthetic spectra, reproducing the background emission and a more accurate extraction of the magnitudes associated with a given DIB (e.g., equivalent width, radial velocity). Methods: The Sun and Arcturus were used as representative examples of dwarf and giant stars, respectively. A high quality spectrum for each of them was modeled using TURBOSPECTRUM and the Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD) stellar line list. The oscillator strength log (gf) and wavelength of specific lines were modified to create synthetic spectra in which the residuals in both the Sun and Arcturus were minimized. Results: The TURBOSPECTRUM synthetic spectra, based on improved line lists, reproduce the observed spectra for the Sun and Arcturus in the mentioned spectral ranges with greater accuracy. Residuals between the synthetic and observed spectra are always ≲10%, which is much better than residuals with previously existing options. We tested the new line lists with some characteristic spectra from a variety of stars, including both giant and dwarf stars, and under different degrees of extinction. As occurred with the Sun and Arcturus, residuals in the fits used to extract the DIB information are smaller when using synthetic spectra

  20. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, A. C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we ...

  1. Photochemical Transformation of Graphene Oxide in Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a graphene derivative that is more easily manufactured in large scale and used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with properties analogous to graphene. In this study, we investigate the photochemical fate of GO under sunlight conditions. The resu...

  2. ZASPE: A Code to Measure Stellar Atmospheric Parameters and their Covariance from Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, Rafael; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator (ZASPE), a new algorithm, and its associated code, for determining precise stellar atmospheric parameters and their uncertainties from high resolution echelle spectra of FGK-type stars. ZASPE estimates stellar atmospheric parameters by comparing the observed spectrum against a grid of synthetic spectra only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. Realistic uncertainties in the parameters are computed from the data itself, by taking into account the systematic mismatches between the observed spectrum and the best-fit synthetic one. The covariances between the parameters are also estimated in the process. ZASPE can in principle use any pre-calculated grid of synthetic spectra. We tested the performance of two existing libraries (Coehelo et al. 2005, Husser et al. 2013) and we concluded that neither is suitable for computing precise atmospheric parameters. We describe a process to synthesise a new library of syn...

  3. Doppler-radar wind-speed measurements in tornadoes: A comparison of real and simulated spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluestein, H.B.; LaDue, J.G.; Stein, H.; Speheger, D. (Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)); Unruh, W.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Bluestein and Unruh have discussed the advantages of using a portable doppler radar to map the wind field in tornadoes. during the spring of 1991 a storm-intercept team from the University of Oklahoma (OU) collected data near five supercell tornadoes in Oklahoma and Kansas. Details about the 1-W, 3-cm, 5-deg half-power beamwidth, CW/FM-CW Doppler radar we used and the methods of data collection and analysis are found in Bluestein and Unruh and Bluestein et al. Using the portable radar, we approximately doubled in only one year the number of tornado spectra that had been collected over a period of almost 20 years by NSSL's fixed-site Doppler radar. In this paper we will compare observed tornado wind spectra with simulated wind spectra (Zmic and Doviak 1975) in order to learn more about tornado structure.

  4. Unfolding the measured neutron spectra in the irradiation chamber of the UZrH reactor using iterative method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the procedure of neutron fluence measurement in the whole energy range (10-4 eV~18 MeV), in the irradiation chamber of a UZrH reactor, the neutron energy spectra are unfolded using the method of minimizing directed divergence and SAND-Ⅱ, which are used broadly at home and abroad. These methods belong to the iterative methods.In this article, the procedure of the spectra unfolding using the two methods is described in detail. The neutron spectrum distribution unfolded by the two methods agree well with each other. In the end, the major differences of the two iterative methods are compared with each other, and the main factors affecting the accuracy of the spectra unfolding with the iterative method are discussed.

  5. Asteroid thermal modeling in the presence of reflected sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    This study addresses thermal modeling of asteroids with a new derivation of the Near Earth Asteroid Thermal (NEATM) model which correctly accounts for the presence of reflected sunlight in short wave IR bands. Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation applies to this case and has important implications. New insight is provided into the ???? parameter in the NEATM model and it is extended to thermal models besides NEATM. The role of surface material properties on ???? is examined using laboratory spectra of meteorites and other asteroid compositional proxies; the common assumption that emissivity ????=0.9 in asteroid thermal models may not be justified and can lead to misestimating physical parameters. In addition, indeterminacy in thermal modeling can limit its ability to uniquely determine temperature and other physical properties. A new curve-fitting approach allows thermal modeling to be done independently of visible-band observational parameters, such as the absolute magnitude ????.

  6. ZASPE: A Code to Measure Stellar Atmospheric Parameters and their Covariance from Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, Rafael; Jordán, Andrés; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    We describe the Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator (ZASPE), a new algorithm, and its associated code, for determining precise stellar atmospheric parameters and their uncertainties from high resolution echelle spectra of FGK-type stars. ZASPE estimates stellar atmospheric parameters by comparing the observed spectrum against a grid of synthetic spectra only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. Realistic uncertainties in the parameters are computed from the data itself, by taking into account the systematic mismatches between the observed spectrum and the best-fit synthetic one. The covariances between the parameters are also estimated in the process. ZASPE can in principle use any pre-calculated grid of synthetic spectra but unbiased grids are required to obtain accurate parameters. We tested the performance of two existing libraries (Coelho et al. 2005; Husser et al. 2013) and we concluded that neither is suitable for computing precise atmospheric parameters. We describe a process to synthesise a new library of synthetic spectra that was found to generate consistent results when compared with parameters obtained with different methods (interferometry, asteroseismology, equivalent widths).

  7. Fluorescence spectra of atmospheric aerosol at Adelphi, Maryland, USA: measurement and classification of single particles containing organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnick, Ronald G.; Hill, Steven C.; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard K.

    We measured laser-induced fluorescence spectra from individual supermicron-sized atmospheric particles drawn into our laboratory at Adelphi, MD, an urban site in the Washington, DC metroplex. A virtural impactor concentrator is used along with an aerodynamic-focusing-nozzle which forms, within an optical chamber, a focused aerosol jet where single aerosol particles can be interrogated on-the-fly with a pulsed 266-nm-wavelength laser. Sample rates are a few liter per minute, and are size dependent. Crossed-diode laser beams indicate when a particle is traversing the sample region and are used to trigger the UV laser to fire and the gated intensified CCD to record the fluorescence spectrum. Our breadboard fluorescence particle spectrometer measures particles in the 3-10 μm diameter size range. Typical trigger rates are a few per second. The usable spectral range is from about 295 to 605 nm. The majority of the particles have very weak fluorescence (on average 8 percent of particles have fluorescence signals above noise). The spectra were grouped using a heirarchical cluster analysis, with parameters chosen so that spectra typically cluster into 4-12 main categories. From the set of all cluster spectra we chose 8 template spectra for reanalyzing all the data. On average, 92 percent (81-94 percent) of the spectra were similar to these templates (using the same thresholds used for the cluster analysis). The major emission bands of the most commonly occurring spectra have peaks: near 460 nm (28 percent of fluorescent particles on average), a very broad hump, and may be humic acids or humic like substances; near 317 nm (on average 24 percent of fluorescent particles); near 321 and 460 nm (a double hump, 12 percent of fluorescent particles); and near 341 nm (8 percent of fluorescent particles). Some of the fluorescence in spectra peaking in the 317-341 nm range is probably from dicyclic aromatics and heterocyclics, including the amino acid tryptophan in biological

  8. Correction of measured charged-particle spectra for energy losses in the target - A comparison of three methods

    CERN Document Server

    Soederberg, J; Alm-Carlsson, G; Olsson, N

    2002-01-01

    The experimental facility, MEDLEY, at the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, has been constructed to measure neutron-induced charged-particle production cross-sections for (n, xp), (n, xd), (n, xt), (n, x sup 3 He) and (n, x alpha) reactions at neutron energies up to 100 MeV. Corrections for the energy loss of the charged particles in the target are needed in these measurements, as well as for loss of particles. Different approaches have been used in the literature to solve this problem. In this work, a stripping method is developed, which is compared with other methods developed by Rezentes et al. and Slypen et al. The results obtained using the three codes are similar and they could all be used for correction of experimental charged-particle spectra. Statistical fluctuations in the measured spectra cause problems independent of the applied technique, but the way to handle it differs in the three codes.

  9. Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the 238U(n, γ) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, γ) as well as 234,236U(n, γ). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

  10. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra ...

  11. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2 under sunlight by MoS2 nanodots modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Xu, Ying; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Quanhua; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xianying

    2016-07-01

    In this study, MoS2 nanodots modified TiO2 (P25) composite photocatalyst (MoS2/P25) was fabricated via a facile liquid ultrasonic mixing method. Compared to the pure P25, the MoS2/P25 exhibited improved photocatalytic degradation activity under simulated sunlight with rhodamine B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) as the target pollutants. RhB or MB (40 mL 10 mg/L) completely degraded within 20 min, and the kinetic constant reached 0.221 and 0.253 min-1 for RhB and MB, respectively. Based on the characterization of transient photocurrent response measurement and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, a possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed. The enhanced photocatalytic performance was attributed to the heterostructure of P25 and MoS2 nanodots, improving their charge separation and enhancing their absorption capacity to the full sunlight spectrum. We believe that this study will contribute to the development of new photocatalysts and improving the catalytic performance of traditional photocatalysts.

  12. The use of difference spectra with a filtered rolling average background in mobile gamma spectrometry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresswell, A.J. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Rankine Avenue, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride, Glasgow G75 0QF (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.cresswell@suerc.gla.ac.uk; Sanderson, D.C.W. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Rankine Avenue, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride, Glasgow G75 0QF (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-21

    The use of difference spectra, with a filtering of a rolling average background, as a variation of the more common rainbow plots to aid in the visual identification of radiation anomalies in mobile gamma spectrometry systems is presented. This method requires minimal assumptions about the radiation environment, and is not computationally intensive. Some case studies are presented to illustrate the method. It is shown that difference spectra produced in this manner can improve signal to background, estimate shielding or mass depth using scattered spectral components, and locate point sources. This approach could be a useful addition to the methods available for locating point sources and mapping dispersed activity in real time. Further possible developments of the procedure utilising more intelligent filters and spatial averaging of the background are identified.

  13. Diffuse reflectance spectra measured in vivo in human tissues during Photofrin-mediated pleural photodynamic therapy: updated results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith A.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    We present the results of a series of spectroscopic measurements made in vivo in patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT). The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trials of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and cancers with pleural effusion. Patients were given Photofrin at dose of 2 mg per kg body weight 24 hours prior to treatment. Each patient received surgical debulking of the tumor followed by intracavity PDT at 630nm to a dose of 60 J/cm2. Dose was monitored continuously using implanted isotropic fiber-based light detectors. We measured the diffuse reflectance spectra before and after PDT in various positions within the cavity, including tumor, diaphragm, pericardium, skin, and chest wall muscle in 10 patients. The measurements were acquired using a specially designed fiber optic-based probe consisting of one fluorescence excitation fiber, one white light delivery fiber, and 9 detection fibers spaced at distances from 0.36 to 7.8 mm from the source, all of which are imaged via a spectrograph onto a CCD, allowing measurement of radially-resolved diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra. The absorption spectra were analyzed using an analytical model of light propagation in diffuse media based on the P3 approximation to radiative transport, assuming a known basis set of absorbers including hemoglobin in its oxygenated and deoxygenated forms and Photofrin. We find significant variation in hemodynamics and sensitizer concentration among patients and within tissues in a single patient.

  14. Measurement of neutron flux spectra in a Tungsten Benchmark by neutron foil activation method

    OpenAIRE

    Negoita, Cezar Ciprian

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion devices such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), which is an experimental fusion reactor based on the "tokamak" concept, rely on the results of neutron physical calculations. These depend on the knowledge of the neutron and photon flux spectra which is particularly important because it permits to anticipate the possible answers of the whole structure to phenomena such as nuclear heating, tritium breeding, atomic displaceme...

  15. Automatic Estimation of Peak Regions in Gamma-Ray Spectra Measured by NaI Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Meng-Hua; LIU Liang-Gang; XU Ao-Ao; Ma Tao

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to estimate the width of peak regions for the background elimination of gamma ray spectrum. The synthetic and experimental data are used to test this method. With the estimated peak regions using the proposed method in the whole spectra, we find that the approach is simple and effective enough for the background elimination cooperating with the statistics-sensitive nonlinear iterative peak-clipping method.

  16. Measurement of the energy spectra of fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Guillermo; Golzarri, Jose I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, Mexico D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Castano, Victor M., E-mail: castano@fata.unam.m [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    Energy spectra of fission fragments were determined using a Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) supported by digital image analysis and numerical data processing using a standard personal computer. The analysis of a californium ({sup 252}Cf) spectrum with this approach shows improvement compared with the values reported previously using the standard procedure, in terms of resolution and accuracy. This new method adds full automation to the technical advantages and cost effectiveness of an NTM.

  17. A computational method to help identify and measure metal lines in high resolution QSO spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Heng Shi; David Tytler; Jin-Liang Hou; David Kirkman; Jeffery Lee; Benjamin Ou

    2011-01-01

    A computational code is developed to help identify metal absorption lines in high resolution QSO spectra,especially in the Lyα forest.The input to the code includes a list of line central wavelengths,column densities and Doppler widths.The code then searches for candidate metal absorption systems and assesses the probability that each system could be real.The framework of the strategy we employ is described in detail and we discuss how to estimate the errors in line profile fitting that are essential to identification.A series of artificial spectra is constructed to calibrate the performance of the code.Due to the effects of blending and noise on Voigt profile fitting,the completeness of the identification depends on the column density of absorbers.For intermediate and strong artificial metal absorbers,more than 90% could be confirmed by the code.The results of applying the code to the real spectra of QSOs HS0757+5218 and Q0100+1300 are also presented.

  18. Inequality spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  19. Measurement of excitation spectra in the ${}^{12}$C$(p,d)$ reaction near the $\\eta'$ emission threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y K; Fujioka, H; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Brinkmann, K -T; Friedrich, S; Geissel, H; Gellanki, J; Guo, C; Gutz, E; Haettner, E; Harakeh, M N; Hayano, R S; Higashi, Y; Hirenzaki, S; Hornung, C; Igarashi, Y; Ikeno, N; Iwasaki, M; Jido, D; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kanungo, R; Knöbel, R; Kurz, N; Metag, V; Mukha, I; Nagae, T; Nagahiro, H; Nanova, M; Nishi, T; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Rappold, C; Reiter, M P; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J L; Scheidenberger, C; Simon, H; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Sun, B; Suzuki, K; Szarka, I; Takechi, M; Tanihata, I; Terashima, S; Watanabe, Y N; Weick, H; Widmann, E; Winfield, J S; Xu, X; Yamakami, H; Zhao, J

    2016-01-01

    Excitation spectra of $^{11}$C were measured in the $^{12}$C$(p,d)$ reaction near the $\\eta'$ emission threshold. A proton beam extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI with an incident energy of 2.5 GeV impinged on a carbon target. The momenta of deuterons emitted at 0 degrees were precisely measured with the fragment separator FRS operated as a spectrometer. In contrast to theoretical predictions on the possible existence of deeply bound $\\eta'$ mesic states in carbon nuclei, no distinct structures were observed associated with the formation of bound states. The spectra were analyzed to set stringent constraints on the formation cross section and on the hitherto barely-known $\\eta'$-nucleus interaction.

  20. Measurement of Excitation Spectra in the ^{12}C(p,d) Reaction near the η^{'} Emission Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y K; Itahashi, K; Fujioka, H; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Brinkmann, K-T; Friedrich, S; Geissel, H; Gellanki, J; Guo, C; Gutz, E; Haettner, E; Harakeh, M N; Hayano, R S; Higashi, Y; Hirenzaki, S; Hornung, C; Igarashi, Y; Ikeno, N; Iwasaki, M; Jido, D; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kanungo, R; Knöbel, R; Kurz, N; Metag, V; Mukha, I; Nagae, T; Nagahiro, H; Nanova, M; Nishi, T; Ong, H J; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Rappold, C; Reiter, M P; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J L; Scheidenberger, C; Simon, H; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Sun, B; Suzuki, K; Szarka, I; Takechi, M; Tanihata, I; Terashima, S; Watanabe, Y N; Weick, H; Widmann, E; Winfield, J S; Xu, X; Yamakami, H; Zhao, J

    2016-11-11

    Excitation spectra of ^{11}C are measured in the ^{12}C(p,d) reaction near the η^{'} emission threshold. A proton beam extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI with an incident energy of 2.5 GeV impinges on a carbon target. The momenta of deuterons emitted at 0° are precisely measured with the fragment separator (FRS) operated as a spectrometer. In contrast to theoretical predictions on the possible existence of deeply bound η^{'}-mesic states in carbon nuclei, no distinct structures are observed associated with the formation of bound states. The spectra are analyzed to set stringent constraints on the formation cross section and on the hitherto barely known η^{'}-nucleus interaction.

  1. Concentrated sunlight for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight provides a novel approach to the study of the physical and electrical parameters of organic solar cells. The study of performance of organic solar cells at high solar concentrations provides insight into the physics, which cannot be studied with conventional solar simulators....... A high solar intensity study of inverted P3HT:PCBM solar cells is presented. Performance peak positions were found to be in the range of 1-5 suns, with smaller cells peaking at higher solar concentrations. Additionally, concentrated sunlight is demonstrated as a practical tool for accelerated stability...... studies of polymers for organic solar cells. Degradation was monitored by the evolution of the UV-vis absorption over time. Varying the solar intensity from 1 to 200 suns, the degradation rates were increased by more than a factor of 100 relative to degradation at 1 simulated sun. 5 different polymers...

  2. Concentrated sunlight for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight provides a novel approach to the study of the physical and electrical parameters of organic solar cells. The study of performance of organic solar cells at high solar concentrations provides insight into the physics, which cannot be studied with conventional solar simulators...... studies of polymers for organic solar cells. Degradation was monitored by the evolution of the UV-vis absorption over time. Varying the solar intensity from 1 to 200 suns, the degradation rates were increased by more than a factor of 100 relative to degradation at 1 simulated sun. 5 different polymers....... A high solar intensity study of inverted P3HT:PCBM solar cells is presented. Performance peak positions were found to be in the range of 1-5 suns, with smaller cells peaking at higher solar concentrations. Additionally, concentrated sunlight is demonstrated as a practical tool for accelerated stability...

  3. Measurements of neutron spectra from iron and boron—in—polyethylene bomareded with 14MeV nuetrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhouYu-Qing; ChenYuan; 等

    1997-01-01

    The leakage spectra of 14MeV neutrons from spheres of iron and boron-inpolyethylene with three differnet mass ratios of boron carbide to polyethylene were measured over the energy range of 20 keV to 16MeV by using proton recoil method.The integral leakages and removal cross sections at different lower cut-off energy were given.

  4. Index and Bulk Parameters for Frequency-Direction Spectra Measured at CERC Field Research Facility, September 1991 to August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Index and Bulk Parameters for Frequency- Direction Spectra Measured at CERC Field Research Facility, September 1991 to August 1992 Accion For by...Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under Civil Works Research Work Unit 32484 M US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways...that affect coastal engineering pro- jects. This effort was authorized by Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps o.’ Engi- neers (HQUSACE), under Civil Works

  5. Sunlight induced photo reactivity of drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallera, R.; Dondi, D.; Ricci, A.; Fasani, E.; Albini, A.

    2003-07-01

    The reactivity under natural light of some UVA-UVB photol able drugs belonging to the classes of fluoroquinolones, glucocortocosteroids, sunscreens and nitrophenyldihydropyridines has been investigated. The data suggest that exposition to sunlight for times ranging from some minutes to few hours at PSA is sufficient for promoting a high degradation in the drugs investigated. the chemical reactions are the same as observed under artificial UV light. (Author) 28 refs.

  6. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  7. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from silicon carbide cylinders with D–T neutrons and validation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Han, R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Nie, Y. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zqchen@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S. [College of Physics Electronic Information, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028000 (China); Shi, F.; Lin, W.; Ren, P.; Tian, G.; Sun, Q.; Gou, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ruan, X.; Ren, J. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Data, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ye, M. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for SiC are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from SiC cylinders are measured at 60° and 120° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4C calculations with ENDF-BVII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. • The SiC evaluated nuclear data from CENDL-3.1 library was checked for the first time and proved to be reliable. - Abstract: Benchmarking of evaluated nuclear data libraries was performed for 14 MeV neutrons on silicon carbide samples. The experiments were carried out by using the benchmark experimental facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from SiC (Φ13 cm × 20 cm) at 60° and 120° and SiC (Φ13 cm × 2 cm) at 60° were measured by the TOF method. The measured spectra are well reproduced by MCNP-4C calculations with the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 evaluated nuclear data libraries, except 5–8 MeV range for 20 cm thickness. The discrepancies are mostly considered as caused by the improper evaluation of the angular distribution and secondary neutron energy distribution of the elastic scattering and inelastic scattering in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  8. Turbulence Spectra for Boundary-Layer Winds in Tropical Cyclones: A Conceptual Framework and Field Measurements at Coastlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixiao; Kareem, Ahsan; Hunt, Julian; Xiao, Yiqing; Zhou, Chaoying; Song, Lili

    2015-02-01

    A conceptual model is proposed for the characteristic sub-ranges in the velocity and temperature spectra in the boundary layer of tropical cyclones (hurricanes or typhoons). The model is based on observations and computation of radial and vertical profiles of the mean flow and turbulence, and on the interpretation of eddy mechanisms determined by shear (namely roll and streak structures near the surface), convection, rotation, blocking and sheltering effects at the ground/sea surface and in internal shear layers. The significant sub-ranges, as the frequency increases, are associated with larger energy containing eddies, shear and blocking, inertial transfer between large and small scales, and intense small-scale eddies generated near the surface caused by waves, coastal roughness change, and the buoyancy force associated with the evaporation of spray droplets. These sub-ranges vary with the locations at which the spectra are measured, i.e. the level in relation to the height of the peak mean velocity and the depth of the boundary layer, and the radius in relation to the eyewall radius and the outer-vortex radius . For two tropical cyclones (Nuri and Hagupit), experimental data were analyzed. Spectra were measured where is near to and using four 1-h long datasets at coastal towers, at 10- and 60-m heights for tropical cyclone Nuri, and at 60-m height for tropical cyclone Hagupit at the south China coast. The field measurements of spectra within the boundary layer show significant sub-ranges of self-similar energy spectra (lying between the length scale 1,000 m and the smallest scales less than 40 m) that are consistent with the above conceptual model of the surface layer. However, with very high wind speeds near the eyewall, the energy of the independently generated intense surface eddy motions, associated with surface waves and water droplets in the airflow, greatly exceeds the energies of the small scales in the inertial sub-range of the boundary layer, over

  9. [Estimating total nitrogen content in wetland vegetation based on measured reflectance spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Zhao, Wen-ji; Guo, Xiao-yu; Wang, Yi-hong; Sun, Yong-hua; Miao, Qian

    2012-02-01

    More and more urban wetlands have been supplied with reclaimed water. And monitoring the growth condition of large-area wetland vegetation is playing a very important role in wetland restoration and reconstruction. Recently, remote sensing technology has become an important tool for vegetation growth monitoring. The South Wetland in the Olympic Park, a typical wetland using reused water, was selected as the research area. The leaf reflectance spectra and were acquired for the main wetland plants reed (Phragmites australis) and cattail (Typha angustifolia) with an ASD FieldSpec 3 spectrometer (350 2 500 nm). The total nitrogen (TN) content of leaf samples was determined by Kjeldahl method subsequently. The research established univariate models involving simple ratio spectral index (SR) model and normalized difference spectral index (ND) model, as well as multivariate models including stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) model and partial least squares regression (PLSR) model. Moreover, the accuracy of all the models was tested through cross-validated coefficient of determination (R2(CV)) and cross-validated root mean square error (RMSE(CV)). The results showed that (1) comparing different types of wetland plants, the accuracy of all established prediction models using Phragmites australis reflectance spectra was higher than that using Typha angustifolia reflectance spectra. (2) compared with univariate techniques, multivariate regressions improved the estimation of TN concentration in leaves. (3) among the various investigated models, the accuracy of PLSR model was the highest (R2(CV) = 0.80, RMSE(CV) = 0.24). PLSR provided the most useful explorative tool for unraveling the relationship between spectral reflectance and TN consistence of leaves. The result would not only provide a scientific basis for remote sensing retrieval of biochemical variables of wetland vegetation, but also provide a strong scientific basis for the monitoring and management of urban

  10. Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura Butler

    2009-09-01

    A few of the many applications for nanowires are high-aspect ratio conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tips, force and mass sensors, and high-frequency resonators. Reliable estimates for the elastic modulus of nanowires and the quality factor of their oscillations are of interest to help enable these applications. Furthermore, a real-time, non-destructive technique to measure the vibrational spectra of nanowires will help enable sensor applications based on nanowires and the use of nanowires as AFM cantilevers (rather than as tips for AFM cantilevers). Laser Doppler vibrometry is used to measure the vibration spectra of individual cantilevered nanowires, specifically multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silver gallium nanoneedles. Since the entire vibration spectrum is measured with high frequency resolution (100 Hz for a 10 MHz frequency scan), the resonant frequencies and quality factors of the nanowires are accurately determined. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the elastic modulus and spring constant can be calculated from the resonance frequencies of the oscillation spectrum and the dimensions of the nanowires, which are obtained from parallel SEM studies. Because the diameters of the nanowires studied are smaller than the wavelength of the vibrometer's laser, Mie scattering is used to estimate the lower diameter limit for nanowires whose vibration can be measured in this way. The techniques developed in this thesis can be used to measure the vibrational spectra of any suspended nanowire with high frequency resolution Two different nanowires were measured - MWNTs and Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles. Measurements of the thermal vibration spectra of MWNTs under ambient conditions showed that the elastic modulus, E, of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) MWNTs is 37 {+-} 26 GPa, well within the range of E previously reported for CVD-grown MWNTs. Since the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles have a greater optical scattering efficiency than

  11. Measuring temperature and ammonia hydrate ice on Charon in 2015 from Keck/OSIRIS spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Holler, Bryan J; Buie, Marc W; Grundy, William M; Lyke, James E; Young, Eliot F; Roe, Henry G

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigated the longitudinal (zonal) variability of H$_2$O and ammonia (NH$_3$) hydrate ices on the surface of Charon through analysis of the 1.65 $\\mu$m and 2.21 $\\mu$m absorption features, respectively. Near-infrared spectra presented here were obtained between 2015-07-14 and 2015-08-30 UT with the OSIRIS integral field spectrograph on Keck I. Spectra centered on six different sub-observer longitudes were obtained through the Hbb (1.473-1.803 $\\mu$m) and Kbb (1.965-2.381 $\\mu$m) filters. Gaussian functions were fit to the aforementioned bands to obtain information on band center, band depth, full width at half maximum, and band area. The shift in the band center of the temperature-dependent 1.65 $\\mu$m feature was used to calculate the H$_2$O ice temperature. The mean temperature of the ice on the observable portion of Charon's surface is 45$\\pm$14 K and we report no statistically significant variations in temperature across the surface. We hypothesize that the crystalline and amorphous pha...

  12. Energy spectra of KASCADE-Grande based on shower size measurements and different hadronic interaction models

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, D; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    KASCADE-Grande is dedicated for investigations of cosmic-ray air showers in the primary energy range from 10 PeV to 1 EeV. The multi-detector system allows us to reconstruct charged particles, electron and muon numbers for individual air showers with high accuracies. Based on the shower size ($N_{ch}$) spectra of the charged particle component, the all-particle energy spectrum of cosmic rays is reconstructed, where attenuation effects in the atmosphere are corrected by applying the constant intensity cut method. The energy calibration is performed by using CORSIKA simulations with high-energy interaction models QGSJET-II-2, QGSJET-II-4, EPOS 1.99 and SIBYLL 2.1, where FLUKA has been used as low-energy interaction model for all cases. In the different hadronic models, different abundances for shower particles are predicted. Such model differences in the observables will be compared and discussed in this contribution. Furthermore, by using data with increasing statistics, the updated energy spectra by means of ...

  13. Measurement of (23)Na(n,2n) cross section in well-defined reactor spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Milčák, Ján; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The present paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of (23)Na(n,2n)(22)Na in a well-defined reactor spectra of a special core assembled in the LR-0 reactor. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination. The resulting value averaged in spectra is 0.91±0.02µb. This cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010 and CENDL-3.1 nuclear data libraries. Generally the best C/E agreement, within 2%, was found using the ROSFOND-2010 data set, whereas the worst, as high as 40%, was found using the ENDF/B-VII.0.

  14. Application of neural networks for unfolding neutron spectra measured by means of Bonner spheres and activation foils

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, C C

    2001-01-01

    A neural network structure has been used for unfolding neutron spectra measured by means of a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer set and a foil activation set using several neutron induced reactions. The present work used the SNNS (Stuttgart Neural Network Simulator) as the interface for designing, training and validation of the Multilayer Perceptron network. The back-propagation algorithm was applied. The Bonner Sphere set chosen has been calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory, United Kingdom, and uses gold activation foils as thermal neutron detectors. The neutron energy covered by the response functions goes from 0.0001 eV to 14 MeV. The foil activation set chosen has been irradiated at the IEA-R1 research reactor and measured at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Two types of neutron spectra were numerically investigated: monoenergetic and continuous The unfolded spectra were compared to a conventional method using code SAND-II as part of the neutron dosimetry system SAIPS. Good results wer...

  15. PROBING THE NATURE OF THE HELIOSHEATH WITH THE NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRA MEASURED BY IBEX IN THE VOYAGER 1 DIRECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opher, M.; Prested, C. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Schwadron, N. A. [Department of Physics and Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Drake, J. F., E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    We are able to show by comparing modeled energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) spectra to those measured by Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) that the models along the Voyager 1 (V1) trajectory that best agree with the low energy IBEX data include extra heating due to ram and magnetic energy in the quasi-stagnation region or a kappa ion distribution (with κ = 2.0) in the outer heliosheath. The model explored is the multi-ion, multi-fluid (MI-MF) which treats the pick-up ions and the thermal ion fluids with separate Maxwellian distributions. These effects are included ad hoc in the modeled ENA since they are not present in the model. These results indicate that the low energy spectra of ENAs as measured by IBEX is sensitive to the physical nature of the heliosheath and to effects not traditionally present in current global models. Therefore, by comparing the low energy ENA spectra to models, we can potentially probe the heliosheath in locations beyond those probed by V1 and Voyager 2 (V2)

  16. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: Energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Orii, A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Wendell, R. A.; Akutsu, R.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Nantais, C. M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Park, R. G.; Himmel, A.; Li, Z.; O'Sullivan, E.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Friend, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yano, T.; Cao, S. V.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Mijakowski, P.; Frankiewicz, K.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Li, X.; Palomino, J. L.; Wilking, M. J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Fukuda, D.; Ishino, H.; Kayano, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Xu, C.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Suda, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Bronner, C.; Hartz, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Suzuki, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra, and variation over time, of the atmospheric νe+ν¯ e and νμ+ν¯μ fluxes are measured. The energy spectra are obtained using an iterative unfolding method by combining various event topologies with differing energy responses. The azimuthal spectra depending on energy and zenith angle, and their modulation by geomagnetic effects, are also studied. A predicted east-west asymmetry is observed in both the νe and νμ samples at 8.0 σ and 6.0 σ significance, respectively, and an indication that the asymmetry dipole angle changes depending on the zenith angle was seen at the 2.2 σ level. The measured energy and azimuthal spectra are consistent with the current flux models within the estimated systematic uncertainties. A study of the long-term correlation between the atmospheric neutrino flux and the solar magnetic activity cycle is performed, and a weak preference for a correlation was seen at the 1.1 σ level, using SK-I-SK-IV data spanning a 20-year period. For several particularly strong solar activity periods, corresponding to Forbush decrease events, no theoretical prediction is available but a deviation below the typical neutrino event rate is seen at the 2.4 σ level. The seasonal modulation of the neutrino flux is also examined, but the change in flux at the SK site is predicted to be negligible, and, as expected, no evidence for a seasonal correlation is seen.

  17. The Seasonality of Tuberculosis, Sunlight, Vitamin D, and Household Crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Tom; Schumacher, Samuel G.; Sandhu, Gurjinder; Tovar, Marco A.; Zevallos, Karine; Baldwin, Matthew R.; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric S.; Jongkaewwattana, Chulanee; Lewis, James J.; Gilman, Robert H.; Friedland, Jon S.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Unlike other respiratory infections, tuberculosis diagnoses increase in summer. We performed an ecological analysis of this paradoxical seasonality in a Peruvian shantytown over 4 years. Methods. Tuberculosis symptom-onset and diagnosis dates were recorded for 852 patients. Their tuberculosis-exposed cohabitants were tested for tuberculosis infection with the tuberculin skin test (n = 1389) and QuantiFERON assay (n = 576) and vitamin D concentrations (n = 195) quantified from randomly selected cohabitants. Crowding was calculated for all tuberculosis-affected households and daily sunlight records obtained. Results. Fifty-seven percent of vitamin D measurements revealed deficiency (<50 nmol/L). Risk of deficiency was increased 2.0-fold by female sex (P < .001) and 1.4-fold by winter (P < .05). During the weeks following peak crowding and trough sunlight, there was a midwinter peak in vitamin D deficiency (P < .02). Peak vitamin D deficiency was followed 6 weeks later by a late-winter peak in tuberculin skin test positivity and 12 weeks after that by an early-summer peak in QuantiFERON positivity (both P < .04). Twelve weeks after peak QuantiFERON positivity, there was a midsummer peak in tuberculosis symptom onset (P < .05) followed after 3 weeks by a late-summer peak in tuberculosis diagnoses (P < .001). Conclusions. The intervals from midwinter peak crowding and trough sunlight to sequential peaks in vitamin D deficiency, tuberculosis infection, symptom onset, and diagnosis may explain the enigmatic late-summer peak in tuberculosis. PMID:24596279

  18. Measurement and calculation of fast neutron and gamma spectra in well defined cores in LR-0 reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Matěj, Zdeněk; Cvachovec, František; Rypar, Vojtěch; Losa, Evžen; Rejchrt, Jiří; Mravec, Filip; Veškrna, Martin

    2017-02-01

    A well-defined neutron spectrum is essential for many types of experimental topics and is also important for both calibration and testing of spectrometric and dosimetric detectors. Provided it is well described, such a spectrum can also be employed as a reference neutron field that is suitable for validating selected cross sections. The present paper aims to compare calculations and measurements of such a well-defined spectra in geometrically similar cores of the LR-0 reactor with fuel containing slightly different enrichments (2%, 3.3% and 3.6%). The common feature to all cores is a centrally located dry channel which can be used for the insertion of studied materials. The calculation of neutron and gamma spectra was realized with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-3.3, ROSFOND-2010 and CENDL-3.1 nuclear data libraries. Only minor differences in neutron and gamma spectra were found in the comparison of the presented reactor cores with different fuel enrichments. One exception is the gamma spectrum in the higher energy region (above 8MeV), where more pronounced variations could be observed.

  19. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  20. HISTORY OF SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Tina; Ersoy, Lebriz; Lechanteur, Yara T E; Saksens, Nicole T M; Hoyng, Carel B; den Hollander, Anneke I; Kirchhof, Bernd; Fauser, Sascha

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate effects of current and past sunlight exposure and iris color on early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Of 3,701 individuals from the EUGENDA database, 752 (20.3%) showed early AMD, 1,179 (31.9%) late AMD, and 1,770 (47.8%) were controls. Information about current and past sunlight exposure, former occupation type, subdivided in indoor working and outdoor working, and iris color were obtained by standardized interviewer-assisted questionnaires. Associations between environmental factors adjusted for age, gender, and smoking and early and late AMD were performed by multivariate regression analysis. Current sunlight exposure showed no association with early AMD or late AMD, but past sunlight exposure (≥8 hours outside daily) was significantly associated with early AMD (odds ratio: 5.54, 95% confidence interval 1.25-24.58, P = 0.02) and late AMD (odds ratio: 2.77, 95% confidence interval 1.25-6.16, P = 0.01). Outside working was found to be associated with late AMD (odds ratio: 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.89-3.48, P = 1.58 × 10). No association was observed between iris color and early or late AMD. Sunlight exposure during working life is an important risk factor for AMD, whereas sunlight exposure after retirement seems to have less influence on the disease development. Therefore, preventive measures, for example, wearing sunglasses to minimize sunlight exposure, should start early to prevent development of AMD later in life.

  1. Characteristics of AVIRIS Band Measurements in Desert Agroecosystems in the Area of Blythe, California. 1; Studies of Cotton Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Safwat H. Shakir

    2001-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data from Blythe, California, were acquired in June 1997 to study agricultural spectra from different crops and to identify crops in other areas with similar environmental factors and similar spectral properties. The main objectives of this study are: (1) to compare the spectral and radiometric characteristics of AVIRIS data from agriculture crops with ground spectra measured by a FieldSpec ASD spectrometer; (2) to explore the use of AVIRIS spectral images for identifying agricultural crops; (3) to study the spectral expression of environmental factors on selected crops; and (4) to build a spectral library for the crops that were studied. A long-term goal is to extend the spectral library for different vegetation or crops in different stages of growth. To support our study, on July 18 and 19, 2000, we collected spectra using the FieldSpec spectrometer from selected fields with different crops in the Blythe area of California (longitude 114 deg 33.28 W and latitude 33 deg 25.42 N to longitude 1140 44.53 W and latitude 33 deg 39.77 N). These crops were cotton in different stages of growth, varieties of grass pure or mixed, Sudan grass, Bermuda grass, Teff grass, and alfalfa. Some of the fields were treated with different types of irrigation (i.e., wet to dry conditions). Additional parameters were studied such as the soil water content (WC), pH, and organic matter (OM). The results of this study showed that for crops known to be similar, there is a significant correlation between the spectra that were collected by AVIRIS in 1997 and spectra measured by the FieldSpec (registered) spectrometer in 2000. This correlation allowed development of a spectral library to be used in ENVI-IDL analysis software. This library was used successfully to identify different crops. Furthermore, using IDL algorithms of Spectral Angle Mapper classification (SAM), spectral feature fitting (SFF) and spectral binary encoding (SPE

  2. Explanation of the local galactic cosmic ray energy spectra measured by Voyager 1. I. Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Kempf, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Webber, W. R., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: ank@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: bwebber@nmsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Almost exactly 100 yr after the original discovery of cosmic rays, the V1 spacecraft has observed, for the first time, the local interstellar medium energy spectra of cosmic ray H, He, C/O nuclei at nonrelativistic kinetic energies, after leaving the heliosphere modulation region on 2012 August 25. We explain these observations by modeling the propagation of these particles in the local Galactic environment with an updated steady-state spatial diffusion model including all particle momentum losses with the local interstellar gas (Coulomb/ionization, pion production, adiabatic deceleration, and fragmentation interactions). Excellent agreement with the V1 cosmic ray H observations is obtained if the solar system resides within a spatially homogeneous layer of distributed cosmic ray sources injecting the same momentum power law ∝p {sup –s} with s = 2.24 ± 0.12. The best fit to the V1 H observations also provides an estimate of the characteristic break kinetic energy T{sub C} = 116 ± 27 MeV, representing the transition from ionization/Coulomb energy losses at low energies to pion production and adiabatic deceleration losses in a Galactic wind at high energies. As the determined value is substantially smaller than 217 MeV in the absence of adiabatic deceleration, our results prove the existence of a Galactic wind in the local Galactic environment.

  3. Measurement of the cosmic ray all-particle and light-component energy spectra with the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Mitri I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ARGO-YBJ detector, located at high altitude in the Cosmic Ray Observatory of YangBaJing in Tibet (4300 m asl, about 600 g/cm2 of atmospheric depth provides the opportunity for the study, with unprecedented resolution, of cosmic ray physics in the primary energy region between 1012 and 1016 eV. Preliminary results of the measurements of the all-particle and light-component (i.e. protons and helium energy spectra between approximately 5 TeV and 5 PeV are reported and discussed.

  4. Measuring fast electron spectra and laser absorption in relativistic laser-solid interactions using differential bremsstrahlung photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, R H H; Perez, F; Streeter, M J V; Davies, J R; Schlenvoigt, H -P; Santos, J J; Hulin, S; Lancaster, K L; Baton, S D; Rose, S J; Norreys, P A

    2013-01-01

    A photon detector suitable for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra generated in relativistically-intense laser-solid interactions is described. The Monte Carlo techniques used to back-out the fast electron spectrum and laser energy absorbed into fast electrons are detailed. A relativistically-intense laser-solid experiment using frequency doubled laser light is used to demonstrate the effective operation of the detector. The experimental data was interpreted using the 3-spatial-dimension Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Pelowitz 2008), and the fast electron temperature found to be 125 keV.

  5. Measuring fast electron spectra and laser absorption in relativistic laser-solid interactions using differential bremsstrahlung photon detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R H H; Clark, E L; Pérez, F; Streeter, M J V; Davies, J R; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Santos, J J; Hulin, S; Lancaster, K L; Baton, S D; Rose, S J; Norreys, P A

    2013-08-01

    A photon detector suitable for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra generated in relativistically intense laser-solid interactions is described. The Monte Carlo techniques used to extract the fast electron spectrum and laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons are detailed. A relativistically intense laser-solid experiment using frequency doubled laser light is used to demonstrate the effective operation of the detector. The experimental data were interpreted using the 3-spatial-dimension Monte Carlo code MCNPX [D. Pelowitz, MCNPX User's Manual Version 2.6.0, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2008], and the fast electron temperature found to be 125 keV.

  6. Measurements of the linear energy transfer spectra on the Mir orbital station and comparison with radiation transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Konradi, A.; Atwell, W.; Golightly, M. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Petrov, V. M.; Tchernykh, I. V.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Lobakov, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    A tissue equivalent proportional counter designed to measure the linear energy transfer spectra (LET) in the range 0.2-1250 keV/micrometer was flown in the Kvant module on the Mir orbital station during September 1994. The spacecraft was in a 51.65 degrees inclination, elliptical (390 x 402 km) orbit. This is nearly the lower limit of its flight altitude. The total absorbed dose rate measured was 411.3 +/- 4.41 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 2.44. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) dose rate was 133.6 microGy/day with a quality factor of 3.35. The trapped radiation belt dose rate was 277.7 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 1.94. The peak rate through the South Atlantic Anomaly was approximately 12 microGy/min and nearly constant from one pass to another. A detailed comparison of the measured LET spectra has been made with radiation transport models. The GCR results are in good agreement with model calculations; however, this is not the case for radiation belt particles and again points to the need for improving the AP8 omni-directional trapped proton models.

  7. The impact of sunlight on high-latitude equivalent currents

    CERN Document Server

    Laundal, K M; Østgaard, N; Reistad, J P; Haaland, S; Snekvik, K; Tenfjord, P; Ohtani, S; Milan, S E

    2016-01-01

    Ground magnetic field measurements can be mathematically related to an overhead ionospheric equivalent current. In this study we look in detail at how the global equivalent current, calculated using more than 30 years of SuperMAG magnetometer data, changes with sunlight conditions. The calculations are done using spherical harmonic analysis in quasi-dipole coordinates, a technique which leads to improved accuracy compared to previous studies. Sorting the data according to the location of the sunlight terminator and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), we find that the equivalent current resembles ionospheric convection patterns on the sunlit side of the terminator but not on the dark side. On the dark side, with southward IMF, the current is strongly dominated by a dawn cell and the current across the polar cap has a strong dawnward component. The contrast between the sunlit and dark side increases with increasing values of the $\\mathit{F}_{10.7}$ index, showing that increasing solar EUV fl...

  8. Indirect measure of X-rays spectra using TLDs; Medicion indirecta de espectros de rayos X utilizando TLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonzi, E. V.; Mainardi, R. T. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Av. Haya de la Torre y Av. Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, X5016LEA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-10-15

    A methodology of indirect measure of X-rays spectra, emitted by conventional tubes, was developed recently and its feasibility verified in the first place by Monte Carlo simulations. For that case is intended to measure, by means of plastic scintillators, attenuation curves of dispersed beams previously. In this work were carried out measurements of attenuation curves with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to verify the kindness of the indirect measure method. The attenuation curve was also measured using an ionization chamber brand Capintec (model 192) with the purpose of making a comparison. The results of the attenuation curve measured with both dosimeters present a good resolution inside the statistical fluctuations and the spectral reconstruction using diverse parametric functions is carried out in a quick and simple way with excellent resolutions in the functional form. For this reconstruction method are of fundamental importance the following properties of the used dosimeter: in the first place the repetition of the measures, property that could check; in second place the precision of the measured data and lastly the dosimeter response, this is, the increase of the thermoluminescent signal before an increase of the photons flow of X-rays. This parameter is the gradient of the curve thermoluminescent signal versus the dose imparted to the dosimeter. The measures were realized with a generator of X-rays brand Kevex provided of a conventional tube with tungsten anti cathode that polarizes with high tension to a maximum value of 50 kV and current of 0.5 ma. (Author)

  9. The Effect of a Finite Measurement Volume on Power Spectra from a Burst Type LDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika; K. George, William

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the effects of a finite size measurement volume on the power spectrum computed fromdata acquired with a burst-type laser Doppler anemometer. The finite measurement volume causes temporal distortions in acquisition of the data resulting in phenomena such as finite processing time and de...

  10. Preparation of K-doped TiO2 nanostructures by wet corrosion and their sunlight-driven photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eunhye; Jin, Saera; Kim, Jiyoon; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Park, Kwang-Won; Hong, Jongin

    2016-08-01

    K-doped TiO2 nanowire networks were prepared by the corrosion reaction of Ti nanoparticles in an alkaline (potassium hydroxide: KOH) solution. The prepared nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Their sunlight-driven photocatalytic activity was also investigated with differently charged dye molecules, such as methylene blue, rhodamine B and methyl orange. The adsorption of the dye molecules on the photocatalyst surface would play a critical role in their selective photodegradation under sunlight illumination.

  11. Analysis of daylight performance of solar light pipes influenced by size and shape of sunlight captures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanpeng; Jin, Rendong; Zhang, Wenming; Liu, Li; Zou, Dachao

    2009-11-01

    Experimental investigations on three different sunlight captures with diameter 150mm, 212mm, 300mm were carried out under different conditions such as sunny conditions, cloudy conditions and overcast conditions and the two different size solar light pipes with diameter 360mm and 160mm under sunny conditions. The illuminance in the middle of the sunlight capture have relationship with its size, but not linear. To improve the efficiency of the solar light pipes, the structure and the performance of the sunlight capture must be enhanced. For example, University of Science and Technology Beijing Gymnasium, Beijing 2008 Olympic events of Judo and Taekwondo, 148 solar light pipes were installed with the diameter 530mm for each light pipe. Two sunlight captures with different shape were installed and tested. From the measuring results of the illuminance on the work plane of the gymnasium, the improvement sunlight captures have better effects with the size of augmenting and the machining of the internal surface at the same time, so that the refraction increased and the efficiency of solar light pipes improved. The better effects of supplementary lighting for the gymnasium have been achieved.

  12. Persistence of benthiocarb in soil: influence of ultraviolet and sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wasim Aktar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistence of benthiocarb in soil as affected by UV and sunlight exposure was studied. Treated soil was placed in petri plate, brought to field capacity moisture and then exposed to UV and sunlight. Residues of benthiocarb in soil dissipated with half lives of 2.10, 11.85 and 43.63 days under UV, sunlight and dark condition, respectively. Soil samples kept under dark showed the slowest dissipation. Further, benthiocarb residues dissipated quickly under UV light as compared to sunlight. Exposure of thin film of benthiocarb confirmed that it is photo labile and dissipated very fast with half life of 1.16 and 1.77 days following exposure to UV and sunlight, respectively. The study revealed that UV component of sunlight is an important factor for benthiocarb dissipation.

  13. Measurements of Neutron Energy Spectra and Neutron Dose Equivalent Rates of Workplaces in TQNPC-Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Monitoring for neutron doses is one of the important activities for radiation protection. And the information about neutron energy distributions of the measured fields is necessary for the correct

  14. A unified approach to deconvolution radiation spectra measured by radiochromic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Velimir A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the evaluation of energy distribution of a radiation source on the basis of measured space distribution of deposited energy is proposed. The measured data were obtained by using radiochromic films. Mathematical modeling is defined as a Fredholm integral equation inversion problem. Negative solutions were treated as an additional condition expressed through undefined energy group boundaries, caused by virtue of the physical phenomenon of statistical uncertainty. Examples are given of the electron source and neutron radiation field.

  15. Measurements of cosmic-ray energy spectra with the 2nd CREAM flight

    CERN Document Server

    Maestro, P; Allison, P; Bagliesi, M G; Barbier, L; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Brandt, T J; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; DuVernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S W; Nutter, S; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Walpole, P; Wu, J; Yang, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2009.09.045

    2010-01-01

    During its second Antarctic flight, the CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass) balloon experiment collected data for 28 days, measuring the charge and the energy of cosmic rays (CR) with a redundant system of particle identification and an imaging thin ionization calorimeter. Preliminary direct measurements of the absolute intensities of individual CR nuclei are reported in the elemental range from carbon to iron at very high energy.

  16. Fitting the Low Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Primary Nuclei from C to Fe as Measured on Voyager 1

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2016-01-01

    The intensities of the low energy part of the spectra of primary cosmic ray nuclei including C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe measured by Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause are deficient relative to the spectra measured at energies above ~100 MeV/nuc as calculated using a standard Leaky Box Model with the path length a function of rigidity. Modifications to the normal exponential distribution of path lengths at a single rigidity as is used in a simple LBM will provide a good fit to this new Voyager 1 data at low energies. These modifications, sometimes called a truncation, lead to a deficiency of short path lengths relative to an exponential distribution. This deficiency in the intensities can be described by a truncation parameter = 0.12. This modification can be produced in several ways including a non-uniform local distribution of cosmic ray sources. A uniform source distribution in the galactic plane that is deficient in sources within 0.2-0.4 Kpc of the Sun is indicated by the data. Further studies of these low ener...

  17. Steps Towards a Fully Automated Classification and -measurement Pipeline for LAMOST Spectra I. Continuum level and wavelength estimation for galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Large Sky-Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) under construction by the National Astronomical Observatories will yield up to fourthousand multi-fiber spectra of stars and galaxies per field. The present series of papers describes the automated data-reduction pipeline currently being designed inorder to cope with the anticipated flood of spectrographic data. In this prelimi-nary paper, we present an automated method for estimating the continuum level,the positions of strong lines and the 4000 A break in galaxy spectra. In order to obtain detailed information on the continuum, we use a wavelet filter bank. Aftercontinuum fitting, our software searches for a 4000 A break and distinguishes be-tween emission-line galaxies (ELGs) and non-ELGs according to whether the break is small or large. It then searches for strong lines and measures the intensities of emission lines and the equivalent widths of absorption lines. For non-ELGs, the absorption lines arc identified automatically yielding redshift measurements.

  18. South African university student knowledge of eye protection against sunlight

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Oduntan; A. Carelson; P. Clarke-Farr; R. Hansraj

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight has been associated with several ocular conditions such as cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and conjunctival neoplasm. Knowledge of protective modalities and good behavioural practice involving eye protection is essential to prevent adverse effects of sunlight. The purpose of this study was to establish knowledge amongst randomly selected university students in South Africa, of prevention modalities against the adverse effects of sunlight. A questionnaire relat...

  19. Charged particle spectra measured during the transit to Mars with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Appel, Jan K.; Brinza, David E.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Böttcher, Stephan I.; Burmeister, Sönke; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Böhm, Eckart; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) started its 253-day cruise to Mars on November 26, 2011. During cruise the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), situated on board the Curiosity rover, conducted measurements of the energetic-particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. This environment consists mainly of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), as well as secondary particles created by interactions of these GCRs with the spacecraft. The RAD measurements can serve as a proxy for the radiation environment a human crew would encounter during a transit to Mars, for a given part of the solar cycle, assuming that a crewed vehicle would have comparable shielding. The measurements of radiological quantities made by RAD are important in themselves, and, the same data set allow for detailed analysis of GCR-induced particle spectra inside the spacecraft. This provides important inputs for the evaluation of current transport models used to model the free-space (and spacecraft) radiation environment for different spacecraft shielding and different times in the solar cycle. Changes in these conditions can lead to significantly different radiation fields and, thus, potential health risks, emphasizing the need for validated transport codes. Here, we present the first measurements of charged particle fluxes inside a spacecraft during the transit from Earth to Mars. Using data obtained during the last two month of the cruise to Mars (June 11-July 14, 2012), we have derived detailed energy spectra for low-Z particles stopping in the instrument's detectors, as well as integral fluxes for penetrating particles with higher energies. Furthermore, we analyze the temporal changes in measured proton fluxes during quiet solar periods (i.e., when no solar energetic particle events occurred) over the duration of the transit (December 9, 2011-July 14, 2012) and correlate them with changing heliospheric conditions.

  20. Charged particle spectra measured during the transit to Mars with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Appel, Jan K; Brinza, David E; Rafkin, Scot C R; Böttcher, Stephan I; Burmeister, Sönke; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Böhm, Eckart; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) started its 253-day cruise to Mars on November 26, 2011. During cruise the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), situated on board the Curiosity rover, conducted measurements of the energetic-particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. This environment consists mainly of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), as well as secondary particles created by interactions of these GCRs with the spacecraft. The RAD measurements can serve as a proxy for the radiation environment a human crew would encounter during a transit to Mars, for a given part of the solar cycle, assuming that a crewed vehicle would have comparable shielding. The measurements of radiological quantities made by RAD are important in themselves, and, the same data set allow for detailed analysis of GCR-induced particle spectra inside the spacecraft. This provides important inputs for the evaluation of current transport models used to model the free-space (and spacecraft) radiation environment for different spacecraft shielding and different times in the solar cycle. Changes in these conditions can lead to significantly different radiation fields and, thus, potential health risks, emphasizing the need for validated transport codes. Here, we present the first measurements of charged particle fluxes inside a spacecraft during the transit from Earth to Mars. Using data obtained during the last two month of the cruise to Mars (June 11-July 14, 2012), we have derived detailed energy spectra for low-Z particles stopping in the instrument's detectors, as well as integral fluxes for penetrating particles with higher energies. Furthermore, we analyze the temporal changes in measured proton fluxes during quiet solar periods (i.e., when no solar energetic particle events occurred) over the duration of the transit (December 9, 2011-July 14, 2012) and correlate them with changing heliospheric conditions.

  1. Measurements and identifications of extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged Sm and Er

    CERN Document Server

    Podpaly, Y A; Reader, J; Ralchenko, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We report spectroscopic measurements of highly charged samarium and erbium performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). These measurements are in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range, and span electron beam energies from 0.98 keV to 3.00 keV. We observed 71 lines from Kr-like Sm$^{26+}$ to Ni-like Sm$^{34+}$, connecting 83 energy levels, and 64 lines from Rb-like Er$^{32+}$ to Ni-like Er$^{40+}$, connecting 78 energy levels. Of these lines, 64 in Sm and 60 in Er are new. Line identifications are performed using collisional-radiative modeling of the EBIT plasma. All spectral lines are assigned individual uncertainties, most in the $\\sim$0.001 nm range. Energy levels are derived from the wavelength measurements.

  2. The study of ozonosphere trace gases near St.Petersburg on the basis of FTIR solar spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Yana; Timofeyev, Yury; Poberovsky, Anatoly

    2013-04-01

    The ground-based method of the direct solar IR radiance measurements by FTIR spectrometer with high spectral resolution (~0.005 cm-1) has been considered. The spectra measured at St. Petersburg State University (59.88N, 29.82E) in 2009-2012 have been analyzed. The amounts of ozone isotopes and ozone-cycle trace gases have been retrieved with PROFFIT software. The obtained data have been analyzed independently and simultaneously and compared with other remote sensing methods data as well as with models. The correlations between temporal variations of different ozonosphere trace gases have been studied. It has been shown that ground-based high-resolution FTIR-spectrometer method can be used in validation of satellite data and in refinement of models' parameters. This work has been partly supported by grant of Russian Foundation for Basic Research 12-05-00596 and 12-05-00445.

  3. Artificial intelligence applied to the automatic analysis of absorption spectra. Objective measurement of the fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Bainbridge, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    A new and fully-automated method is presented for the analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra (GVPFIT). The method has broad application but here we apply it specifically to the problem of measuring the fine structure constant at high redshift. For this we need objectivity and reproducibility. GVPFIT is also motivated by the importance of obtaining a large statistical sample of measurements of $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$. Interactive analyses are both time consuming and complex and automation makes obtaining a large sample feasible. Three numerical methods are unified into one artificial intelligence process: a genetic algorithm that emulates the Darwinian processes of reproduction, mutation and selection, non-linear least-squares with parameter constraints (VPFIT), and Bayesian model averaging. In contrast to previous methodologies, which relied on a particular solution as being the most likely model, GVPFIT plus Bayesian model averaging derives results from a large set of models, and helps overcome systema...

  4. Measurements of charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factor in p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Balek, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC obtained the sample of p+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}={}$5.02TeV with integrated luminosity of 25nb${}^{-1}$, which can be compared to the pp data obtained by interpolating pp measurements at $\\sqrt{s}={}$2.76TeV and 7TeV. Due to the excellent capabilities of the ATLAS detector, and its stable operation in heavy ion as well as proton-proton physics runs, the data allow measurements of the nuclear modification factor, ratio of heavy ion charged particle spectra divided by pp reference, in different centrality classes over a wide range of rapidity. The charged particle nuclear modification factor is found to vary significantly as a function of transverse momentum with a stronger dependence in more peripheral collisions.

  5. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  6. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  7. Determination of the complex refractivity of Au, Cu and Al in terahertz and far-infrared regions from reflection spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yuan; Wu, Zhen-sen; Gao, Yan-qing; Yang, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Qiu-jie; Zhang, Geng

    2017-01-01

    A scheme to determine the complex refractivity of gold (Au), Copper (Cu) and Aluminum (Al) from measurements of ellipsometer and spectrometer are proposed in this paper. The reflection spectra of the metals from 4 THz to 40 THz are measured with spectrometer. The determined refractivity by Kramers-Kronig (KK) algorithm coincides with the measured results from ellipsometer in far infrared region. Drude model is invited to make the wing correction on the terahertz reflection spectra, which helps to eliminate the effects of the noises from spectrometer on KK algorithm. The calculated refractive indexes from measured spectra in terahertz region are in consistent with those from corrected reflection spectra. The advantage of the scheme is to obtain terahertz dispersion properties based on limited information in infrared region.

  8. Charge exchange recombination in X-ray spectra of He-like argon measured at the tokamak TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlummer, Tobias

    2014-06-16

    Charge exchange recombination between ions and atomic hydrogen is an important atomic process in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Besides radiative cooling of the plasma edge, charge exchange causes modifications of the ionization balance and the population densities of excited ion states. The central goal of this work is to investigate the influence of charge exchange on X-ray spectra measured at the tokamak TEXTOR. A new 2D X-ray spectrometer developed for future use at the stellarator W7-X was recently installed at TEXTOR. The spectrometer is optimized for measuring the K{sub α}-spectrum of He-like argon (1s2l - 1s{sup 2}) at wavelengths close to 4 Aa. K{sub α}-spectroscopy on He-like impurity ions is an established diagnostic for electron and ion temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. Still, up to now the observed intensity ratios of the K{sub α}-lines and their associated satellites are not fully understood. They show significant deviations from the predictions made by basic corona models. In the past charge exchange with the neutral particle background and radial impurity transport have been discussed as likely explanations. Yet a detailed description of the experimental spectra still has not been achieved. To reconstruct the 2D K{sub α}-spectra measured at TEXTOR the radial argon ion distribution is modeled using an impurity transport code. The model accounts for charge exchange and transport on basis of given radial profiles of the neutral particle density n{sub 0}(r) and the diffusion coefficient D {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (r). The theoretical spectrum is then constructed based on the processes relevant for line emission. Within an iterative procedure n{sub 0}(r) and D {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (r) are varied until consistency between the theoretical and the experimental spectra is achieved. It is shown that the 2D K{sub α}-spectra allow a clear distinction of charge exchange and transport effects, ensuring unique solutions for n

  9. Measurement of the Surface and Underground Neutron Spectra with the UMD/NIST Fast Neutron Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Thomas J.

    The typical fast neutron detector falls into one of two categories, Bonner sphere spectrometers and liquid scintillator proton recoil detectors. These two detector types have traditionally been used to measure fast neutrons at the surface and in low background environments. The cosmogenic neutron spectrum and flux is an important parameter for a number of experimental efforts, including procurement of low background materials and the prediction of electronic device faults. Fast neutrons can also cause problems for underground low-background experiments, through material activation or signals that mimic rare events. Current detector technology is not sufficient to properly characterize these backgrounds. To this end, the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology designed, developed, and deployed two Fast Neutron Spectrometers (FaNS) comprised of plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. The detectors are based upon capture-gated spectroscopy, a technique that demands a delayed coincidence between a neutron scatter and the resulting neutron capture after thermalization. This technique provides both particle identification and knowledge that the detected neutron fully thermalized. This improves background rejection capabilities and energy resolution. Presented are the design, development, and deployment of FaNS-1 and FaNS-2. Both detectors were characterized using standard fields at NIST, including calibrated 252Cf neutron sources and two monoenergetic neutron generators. Measurements of the surface fast neutron spectrum and flux have been made with both detectors, which are compared with previous measurements by traditional detectors. Additionally, FaNS-1 was deployed at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Ripplemead, VA. A measurement of the fast neutron spectrum and flux at KURF is presented as well. FaNS-2 is currently installed in a shallow underground laboratory where it is measuring the muon

  10. Quantifying K, U and Th contents of marine sediments using shipboard natural gamma radiation spectra measured on DV JOIDES Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, David; Dunlea, Ann G.; Auer, Gerald; Anderson, Chloe H.; Brumsack, Hans; de Loach, Aaron; Gurnis, Michael C.; Huh, Youngsook; Ishiwa, Takeshige; Jang, Kwangchul; Kominz, Michelle A.; März, Christian; Schnetger, Bernhard; Murray, Richard W.; Pälike, Heiko; Expedition 356 shipboard scientists, IODP

    2017-04-01

    During International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions, shipboard-generated data provide the first insights into the cored sequences. The natural gamma radiation (NGR) of the recovered material, for example, is routinely measured on the ocean drilling research vessel DV JOIDES Resolution. At present, only total NGR counts are readily available as shipboard data, although full NGR spectra (counts as a function of gamma-ray energy level) are produced and archived. These spectra contain unexploited information, as one can estimate the sedimentary contents of potassium (K), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) from the characteristic gamma-ray energies of isotopes in the 40K, 232Th, and 238U radioactive decay series. Dunlea et al. [2013] quantified K, Th and U contents in sediment from the South Pacific Gyre by integrating counts over specific energy levels of the NGR spectrum. However, the algorithm used in their study is unavailable to the wider scientific community due to commercial proprietary reasons. Here, we present a new MATLAB algorithm for the quantification of NGR spectra that is transparent and accessible to future NGR users. We demonstrate the algorithm's performance by comparing its results to shore-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-emission spectrometry (ICP-ES), and quantitative wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses. Samples for these comparisons come from eleven sites (U1341, U1343, U1366-U1369, U1414, U1428-U1430, U1463) cored in two oceans during five expeditions. In short, our algorithm rapidly produces detailed high-quality information on sediment properties during IODP expeditions at no extra cost. Dunlea, A. G., R. W. Murray, R. N. Harris, M. A. Vasiliev, H. Evans, A. J. Spivack, and S. D'Hondt (2013), Assessment and use of NGR instrumentation on the JOIDES Resolution to quantify U, Th, and K concentrations in marine sediment, Scientific Drilling, 15, 57-63.

  11. [Research on error reduction of path change of liquid samples based on near infrared trans-reflective spectra measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Hong; Dong, Da-Ming; Zhou, Ping; Zheng, Wen-Gang; Ye, Song; Wang, Wen-Zhong

    2014-10-01

    Based on sucrose solution as the research object, this paper measured the trans-reflective spectrum of sucrose solution of different concentration by the technique of near infrared spectrum in three optical path (4, 5, 6 mm). Five kinds of pretreatment method (vector normalization, baseline offset correction, multiplicative scatter correction, standard normal variate transformation, a derivative) were used to eliminate the influence of the optical path difference, and to establish model of the calibration set in combination with the PLS (Partial Least Squares)method. Five kinds of pretreatment method could restrain the inter ference of light path in varying degrees. Compared with the PLS model of original spectra, the model of multiple scattering correction combined with PLS method is the optimal model. The results of quantitative analysis of original spectra: the number of principal component PC= 6, the determination coefficient R2 = 0.891 278, the determination coefficient of cross validation R2CV = 0.888 374, root mean square error of calibration RMSEC = 1.704%, root mean square error of cross validation RMSECV = 1.827%; The results of quantitative analysis of spectra after MSC pretreatment: the number of principal component PC = 3, the determination coefficient R2 = 0.987 535, the determination coefficient of cross validation R2CV = 0.983 343, root mean square er- ror of calibration RMSEC = 0.89%, root mean square error of cross validation RMSECV = 1.05%. The correlation coefficient of the prediction set is as much as 0.976 22. root mean square error of prediction is 0.01, lesser than 0.014 36. The results show that the MSC can eliminate the influence of optical path difference, improve the prediction precision and improve the stability.

  12. Measurement of charged particle spectra in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia)] [and others; Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2013-01-15

    Charged particle production in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The kinematic range of the analysis covers low photon virtualities, 5measured as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}{sup *}) and transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup *}) in the range 0<{eta}{sup *}<5 and 0

  13. Measurement of Charged Particle Spectra in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Alexa, C.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2013-04-20

    Charged particle production in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The kinematic range of the analysis covers low photon virtualities, 5 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2, and small values of Bjorken-x, 10^{-4} < x < 10^{-2}. The analysis is performed in the hadronic centre-of-mass system. The charged particle densities are measured as a function of pseudorapidity (eta^*) and transverse momentum (p_T^*) in the range 0< \\eta^* < 5 and 0< p_T^* < 10$ GeV differentially in x and Q^2. The data are compared to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators implementing various options for hadronisation and parton evolutions.

  14. Measurement of charged particle spectra in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexa, C.; Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Kraemer, M.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Brandt, G. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Orsay (France); Buniatyan, A.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Rostovtsev, A.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Ceccopieri, F.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P.Van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerpen (Belgium); Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky and grave, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Universitaet Wuppertal, Fachbereich C, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C. [Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM, Marseille (France); Dodonov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Dossanov, A. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L. [CE-Saclay, CEA, DSM/Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Physics, Kosice (Slovakia); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Grab, C. [ETH, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R. [CINVESTAV IPN, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico City (Mexico); Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Joensson, L. [University of Lund, Physics Department, Lund (Sweden); Jung, H. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerpen (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R.; Nowak, K. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (Italy); INFN Roma 3, Roma (Italy); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerpen (Belgium); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Praha (Czech Republic); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Wegener, D. [TU Dortmund, Institut fuer Physik, Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: The H1 Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    Charged particle production in deep-inelastic ep scattering is measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The kinematic range of the analysis covers low photon virtualities, 5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2}, and small values of Bjorken-x, 10{sup -4} < x < 10{sup -2}. The analysis is performed in the hadronic centre-of-mass system. The charged particle densities are measured as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}{sup *}) and transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup *}) in the range 0<{eta}{sup *} < 5 and 0

  15. Photocatalytic oxidation of ciprofloxacin under simulated sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad-Allah, Tarek A; Ali, Mohamed E M; Badawy, Mohamed I

    2011-02-15

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a famous synthetic chemotherapeutic antibiotic. It is widely found either in water or wastewater. In this study ciprofloxacin was photocatalytically degraded using commercial anatase titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) under simulated sunlight. The rate of reaction was found to be affected by pH, TiO(2) concentration and antibiotic concentration. The best reaction rate was obtained in natural ciprofloxacin pH (5.8) and 1000 mg/L TiO(2). More titania concentration was found to reduce the reaction rate because of the limitation in light transmittance. From kinetic studies, the reaction was proved to proceed through adsorption step then photooxidation and obeys pseudo-first order kinetics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid Anomaly Detection and Tracking via Compressive Time-Spectra Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-12

    includes the data, the MMD and Z -score and the combined detection metric in four separate graphs for each measurement, we have generated receiver...distributions. 4. The product of Z -score and MMD score generates our change detection score. 5. The change detection scores are also a time series... characteristic and precision recall curves. New 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION

  17. Sunlight assisted photodegradation by tin oxide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajira, P. S.; Prabhu, V. Ganeshchandra; Bushiri, M. Junaid

    2015-12-01

    Rutile phase of SnO2 quantum dots of average size of 2.5 nm were synthesized at a growth temperature of 70 °C and characterized with XRD, TEM, FTIR and Raman analysis. The effective strain within the lattice of SnO2 quantum dots was calculated by Williamson-Hall method. The broad peaks in XRD as well as Raman spectra and the presence of Raman bands at 569 and 432 cm-1 are due to lower crystallinity of nanoparticles. The optical band gap of SnO2 quantum dots was increased to 3.75 eV attributed to the quantum size effect. SnO2 quantum dots were annealed in air atmosphere and the crystallite size of the particles increased with annealing temperature. Sunlight assisted photodegration property of SnO2 quantum dots was investigated with vanillin as a model system and it shows the photodegradation efficiency of 87%. The photoluminescence and photodegradation efficiency of nanocrystallite SnO2 decreases with increase of crystallite size contributed to the reduction in population of defects and surface area.

  18. New Limits on Polarized Power Spectra at 126 and 164 MHz: Relevance to Epoch of Reionization Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, David; Parsons, Aaron; Ali, Zaki; Bradley, Richard; Carilli, Chris; DeBoer, David; Dexter, Matthew; Gugliucci, Nicole; Jacobs, Daniel; Klima, Pat; Liu, Adrian; MacMahon, David; Manley, Jason; Pober, Jonathan; Stefan, Irina; Walbrugh, William

    2015-01-01

    Polarized foreground emission is a potential contaminant of attempts to measure the fluctuation power spectrum of highly redshifted 21 cm H{\\sc i} emission from the epoch of reionization, yet observational constraints on the level of polarized emission are poor. Using the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), we present the first limits on the power spectra of all four Stokes parameters in two frequency bands, centered at 126 MHz ($z=10.3$) and 164 MHz ($z=7.66$). This data comes from from a three-month observing campaign of a 32-antenna deployment, for which unpolarized power spectrum results have been reported at $z=7.7$ (Parsons et al 2014) and $7.5 < z < 10.5$ (Jacobs et al 2014). The power spectra in this paper are processed in the same way, and show no definitive detection of polarized power. The limits are sufficiently low that we are able to show that the excess unpolarized power reported in those works is not due to leakage of Faraday-rotated polarized ...

  19. Measurement of γ and conversion electron spectra following the decay of 125Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, M.; Venkataramaniah, K.; Sood, P. C.

    1998-12-01

    Relative intensities of γ rays and conversion electron lines in the decay of 125Sb are measured precisely using an HPGe detector and a miniorange electron spectrometer. These data are used to derive the K- and L-shell internal conversion coefficients and to deduce the multipolarities of the respective transitions. A revised level scheme is presented for 125Te incorporating 37 transitions between 13 energy levels up to an excitation energy of 675 keV. The newly established levels at 538 and 653 keV complete the hextuplet corresponding to the (s1/2⊗2+) and (d3/2⊗2+) phonon-coupled configurations.

  20. Effect of sunlight irradiation on photocatalytic pyrene degradation in contaminated soils by micro-nano size TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Chien, S W; Chang, C H; Chen, S H; Wang, M C; Madhava Rao, M; Satya Veni, S

    2011-09-01

    The enhanced catalytic pyrene degradation in quartz sand and alluvial and red soils by micro-nano size TiO(2) in the presence and absence of sunlight was investigated. The results showed that the synergistic effect of sunlight irradiation and TiO(2) was more efficient on pyrene degradation in quartz sand and red and alluvial soils than the corresponding reaction system without sunlight irradiation. In the presence of sunlight irradiation, the photooxidation (without TiO(2)) of pyrene was very pronounced in alluvial and red soils and especially in quartz sand. However, in the absence of sunlight irradiation, the catalytic pyrene degradation by TiO(2) and the photooxidation (without TiO(2)) of pyrene were almost nil. This implicates that ultra-violet (UV) wavelength range of sunlight plays an important role in TiO(2)-enhanced photocatalytic pyrene degradation and in photooxidation (without TiO(2)) of pyrene. The percentages of photocatalytic pyrene degradation by TiO(2) in quartz sand, alluvial and red soils under sunlight irradiation were 78.3, 23.4, and 31.8%, respectively, at 5h reaction period with a 5% (w/w) dose of the amended catalyst. The sequence of TiO(2)-enhanced catalytic pyrene degradation in quartz sand and alluvial and red soils was quartz sand>red soil>alluvial soil, due to different texture and total organic carbon (TOC) contents of the quartz sand and other two soils. The differential Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of degraded pyrene in alluvial soil corroborate that TiO(2)-enhanced photocatalytic degradation rate of degraded pyrene was much greater than photooxidation (without TiO(2)) rate of degraded pyrene. Based on the data obtained, the importance for the application of TiO(2)-enhanced photocatalytic pyrene degradation and associated organic contaminants in contaminated soils was elucidated.

  1. The Skipheia Wind Measurement Station. Instrumentation, Wind Speed Profiles and Turbulence Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasen, S.E.

    1995-10-01

    This thesis describes the design of a measurement station for turbulent wind and presents results from an analysis of the collected data. The station is located at Skipheia near the south-west end of Froeya, an island off the coast of Mid-Norway. The station is unique for studies of turbulent winds because of the large numbers of sensors, which are located at various heights above ground up to 100 m, a sampling rate of 0.85 Hz and storage of the complete time series. The frequency of lightning and atmospheric discharges to the masts are quite high and much effort has gone into minimizing the damage caused by lightning activity. A major part of the thesis deals with data analysis and modelling. There are detailed discussions on the various types of wind sensors and their calibration, the data acquisition system and operating experiences with it, the database, data quality control, the wind speed profile and turbulence. 40 refs., 78 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Online Monitoring of Laser-Generated XUV Radiation Spectra by Surface Reflectivity Measurements with Particle Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we present a wavelength-sensitive method for the detection of extreme ultraviolet (XUV photon energies between 30 eV and 120 eV. The method is based on 45° reflectivity from either a cesium iodide-coated or an uncoated metal surface, which directs the XUV beam onto an electron or ion detector and its signal is used to monitor the XUV beam. The benefits of our approach are a spectrally sensitive diagnosis of the XUV radiation at the interaction place of time-resolved XUV experiments and the detection of infrared leak light though metal filters in high-harmonic generation (HHG experiments. Both features were tested using spectrally shaped XUV pulses from HHG in a capillary, and we have achieved excellent agreement with XUV spectrometer measurements and reflectivity calculations. Our obtained results are of interest for time-resolved XUV experiments presenting an additional diagnostic directly in the interaction region and for small footprint XUV beamline diagnostics.

  3. Restricted Modal Analysis Applied to Internal Annular Combustor Autospectra and Cross-Spectra Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2007-01-01

    A treatment of the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a combustor as determined by two pressure time history measurements is developed herein. It is applied to a Pratt and Whitney PW4098 engine combustor over a range of operating conditions. For modes other than the plane wave the assumption is made that there are distinct frequency bands in which the individual modes, including the plane wave mode, overlap such that if circumferential mode m and circumferential mode m-1 are present then circumferential mode m-2 is not. In the analysis used herein at frequencies above the first cutoff mode frequency, only pairs of circumferential modes are individually present at each frequency. Consequently, this is a restricted modal analysis. As part of the analysis one specifies mode cut-on frequencies. This creates a set of frequencies that each mode spans. One finding was the successful use of the same modal span frequencies over a range of operating conditions for this particular engine. This suggests that for this case the cut-on frequencies are in proximity at each operating condition. Consequently, the combustion noise spectrum related to the circumferential modes might not change much with operating condition.

  4. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2016-01-01

    We have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, we utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the SM particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial b...

  5. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Salewski, Mirko; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Garcıa-Munoz, Manuel; Heidbrink, Bill; Korsholm, Soren Bang; Leipold, Frank; Madsen, Jens; Moseev, Dmitry; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Rasmussen, Jesper; Stejner, Morten; Tardini, Giovanni; Weiland, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$. To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) light from the plasma center in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of $f(v_\\parallel, v_\\perp)$ at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven vi...

  6. Artificial intelligence applied to the automatic analysis of absorption spectra. Objective measurement of the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Webb, John K.

    2017-06-01

    A new and automated method is presented for the analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra. Three established numerical methods are unified into one `artificial intelligence' process: a genetic algorithm (Genetic Voigt Profile FIT, gvpfit); non-linear least-squares with parameter constraints (vpfit); and Bayesian model averaging (BMA). The method has broad application but here we apply it specifically to the problem of measuring the fine structure constant at high redshift. For this we need objectivity and reproducibility. gvpfit is also motivated by the importance of obtaining a large statistical sample of measurements of Δα/α. Interactive analyses are both time consuming and complex and automation makes obtaining a large sample feasible. In contrast to previous methodologies, we use BMA to derive results using a large set of models and show that this procedure is more robust than a human picking a single preferred model since BMA avoids the systematic uncertainties associated with model choice. Numerical simulations provide stringent tests of the whole process and we show using both real and simulated spectra that the unified automated fitting procedure out-performs a human interactive analysis. The method should be invaluable in the context of future instrumentation like ESPRESSO on the VLT and indeed future ELTs. We apply the method to the zabs = 1.8389 absorber towards the zem = 2.145 quasar J110325-264515. The derived constraint of Δα/α = 3.3 ± 2.9 × 10-6 is consistent with no variation and also consistent with the tentative spatial variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al.

  7. Artificial intelligence applied to the automatic analysis of absorption spectra. Objective measurement of the fine structure constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Webb, John K.

    2017-01-01

    A new and automated method is presented for the analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra. Three established numerical methods are unified into one "artificial intelligence" process: a genetic algorithm (GVPFIT); non-linear least-squares with parameter constraints (VPFIT); and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA). The method has broad application but here we apply it specifically to the problem of measuring the fine structure constant at high redshift. For this we need objectivity and reproducibility. GVPFIT is also motivated by the importance of obtaining a large statistical sample of measurements of Δα/α. Interactive analyses are both time consuming and complex and automation makes obtaining a large sample feasible. In contrast to previous methodologies, we use BMA to derive results using a large set of models and show that this procedure is more robust than a human picking a single preferred model since BMA avoids the systematic uncertainties associated with model choice. Numerical simulations provide stringent tests of the whole process and we show using both real and simulated spectra that the unified automated fitting procedure out-performs a human interactive analysis. The method should be invaluable in the context of future instrumentation like ESPRESSO on the VLT and indeed future ELTs. We apply the method to the zabs = 1.8389 absorber towards the zem = 2.145 quasar J110325-264515. The derived constraint of Δα/α = 3.3 ± 2.9 × 10-6 is consistent with no variation and also consistent with the tentative spatial variation reported in Webb et al. (2011) and King et al. (2012).

  8. Fine-resolution multiscale mapping of clay minerals in Australian soils measured with near infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscarra Rossel, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Clay minerals are the most reactive inorganic components of soils. They help to determine soil properties and largely govern their behaviors and functions. Clay minerals also play important roles in biogeochemical cycling and interact with the environment to affect geomorphic processes such as weathering, erosion and deposition. This paper provides new spatially explicit clay mineralogy information for Australia that will help to improve our understanding of soils and their role in the functioning of landscapes and ecosystems. I measured the abundances of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Using a model-tree algorithm, I built rule-based models for each mineral at two depths (0-20 cm, 60-80 cm) as a function of predictors that represent the soil-forming factors (climate, parent material, relief, vegetation and time), their processes and the scales at which they vary. The results show that climate, parent material and soil type exert the largest influence on the abundance and spatial distribution of the clay minerals; relief and vegetation have more local effects. I digitally mapped each mineral on a 3 arc-second grid. The maps show the relative abundances and distributions of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils. Kaolinite occurs in a range of climates but dominates in deeply weathered soils, in soils of higher landscapes and in regions with more rain. Illite is present in varied landscapes and may be representative of colder, more arid climates, but may also be present in warmer and wetter soil environments. Smectite is often an authigenic mineral, formed from the weathering of basalt, but it also occurs on sediments and calcareous substrates. It occurs predominantly in drier climates and in landscapes with low relief. These new clay mineral maps fill a significant gap in the availability of soil mineralogical information. They provide data to for example, assist with research into soil

  9. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  10. Measurement of characteristic to total spectrum ratio of tungsten X-ray spectra for the validation of the modified Tbc model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, A. H.; Costa, P. R. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Laboratory of Radiation Dosimetry and Medical Physics, Matao Street, alley R, 187, 66318 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: ahlopezg@usp.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Physics Institute, Campus Samambaia, 131 Goiania, Goias (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Primary X-ray spectra were measured in the range of 80 to 150 kV in order to validate a computer program based on a semiempirical model for X-ray spectra evaluation(tbc and mod). The ratio between the characteristic lines and total spectrum was considered for comparing the simulated results and experimental data. The raw spectra measured by the Cd Te detector were corrected by the detector efficiency, Compton effects and characteristic Cd and Te X-rays escape peaks, using a software specifically developed. The software Origin 8.5.1 was used to calculate the spectra and characteristic peaks areas. The obtained result shows that the experimental spectra have higher effective energy than the simulated spectra computed with tbc and mod software. The behavior of the ratio between the characteristic lines and total spectrum for simulated data presents discrepancy with the experimental result. Computed results are in good agreement with theoretical data published by Green, for spectra obtained with 3.04 mm of additional aluminum filtration. The difference of characteristic to total spectrum ratio between experimental and simulated data increases with the tube voltage. (Author)

  11. Measurement of 14 MeV neutron-induced prompt gamma-ray spectra from 15 elements found in cargo containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perot, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: bertrand.perot@cea.fr; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Szabo, J.-L.; Sannie, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, 54 Bijenicka c., 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Viesti, G.; Lunardon, M.; Botosso, C.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Moretto, S. [INFN and Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Zenoni, A.; Donzella, A. [INFN and Universita di Brescia, 38 Via Branze, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Moszynski, M.; Gierlik, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Klamra, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Le Tourneur, P. [EADS-SODERN, 20 Av. Descartes, 94451 Limeil-Brevannes Cedex (France)] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    Within the EURopean Illicit TRAfficking Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project, the gamma-ray spectra produced in a series of materials by 14-MeV tagged-neutron beams have been collected in the inspection portal equipped with large volume NaI(Tl) detectors, in order to build a database of signatures for various elements: C, N, O, Na, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb. The measured spectra have been compared with prediction from Monte Carlo simulations to verify the consistency of the relevant nuclear data inputs. This library of measured 14-MeV neutron-induced gamma-ray spectra is currently used in a data processing algorithm to unfold the energy spectra of the transported goods into elementary contributions, thus allowing material identification.

  12. Comparison between X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectra of an environmental aerosol sample measured by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, J.; Yamamoto, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Tohno, S. [Department of Socio-Environmental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kitajima, Y. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-01-04

    Sulfur X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of an aerosol sample collected by an Andersen sampler were measured using a synchrotron beam line. While the XPS was more surface sensitive than XAS, the detection limit of XAS was better than that of XPS. It was concluded that the XAS was more suitable for the chemical state analysis of sulfur in aerosol samples than XPS. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Far-infrared reflectivity spectra of the hydrogen-bonded ferroelectric KH[sub 2]PO[sub 4] measured by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Shik; Tezuka, Yasuhisa (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Solid State Physics); Saito, Shinji; Chiba, Yuki; Ishigame, Mareo

    1994-07-01

    Far infrared reflectivity spectra of hydrogen-bonded ferroelectric KH[sub 2]PO[sub 4] are measured by using synchrotron radiation in the photon-energy region from 5 to 250 cm[sup -1]. The strong relaxational mode is found in the infrared spectra. This result is consistent with the results which have been obtained by the hyper-Raman and Raman scattering, but inconsistent with the results which have been observed by the ordinary infrared light source. (author).

  14. Photocatalytic degradation of synthetic dye under sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Dušan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic dyes are widely used in the textile industry. Dye pollutants from the textile industry are an important source of environmental contamination. The majority of these dyes are toxic, mostly non-biodegradable and also resistant to decomposition by physico-chemical methods. Among new oxidation methods or "advanced oxidation processes", heterogeneous photocatalysis appears as an emerging destructive technology leading to the total mineralization of many organic pollutants. CI Basic Yellow 28 (BY28, commonly used as a textile dye, could be photocatalytically degraded using TiU2 as catalyst under sunlight. The effect of some parameters such as the initial catalyst concentration, initial dye concentration, initial NaCl and Na2CO3 concentrations, pH, H2O2 and type of catalyst on the degradation rate of BY28 was examined in details. The presence of NaCl and Na2CO3 led to inhibition of the photodegradation process. The highest photodegradation rate was observed at high pH, while the rate was the lowest at low pH. Increase of the initial H2O2 concentration increased the initial BY28 photodegradation efficiency. ZnO was a better catalyst than TiO2 at low dye concentrations.

  15. Different Surfactants-Assisted Hydrothermal Fabrication and Photocatalytic Properties of Bi2MoO6 for Methylene Blue Degradation under Simulated Sunlight Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bi2MoO6 single-crystallites were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP, or cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS techniques. The photocatalytic activities of the as-fabricated Bi2MoO6 samples were measured for the degradation of methylene blue (MB under the Xe light illumination. It is shown that the introduction of surfactant have a crucial influence on the size and morphology of the Bi2MoO6 product. Among the as-fabricated Bi2MoO6 samples, the ones derived hydrothermally with CTAB showed outstanding photocatalytic activities for the addressed reaction under simulated sunlight irradiation, attributed to the ultrafine nanocrystals and the higher surface areas.

  16. Identified particle spectra measured by the ALICE experiment in pp collisions at 0.9 and 7 TeV at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, Iouri [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien - IPHC, 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France); LOPEZ NORIEGA, Mercedes [Institut de Physique Nucleaire - IPN, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    We will present the transverse momentum spectra of identified particles measured with the ALICE experiment in proton-proton collisions at LHC recorded at the center-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV. The spectra of the charged particles (p{+-}, K{+-}, p and p-bar) were obtained measuring the dE/dx in the ALICE TPC and ITS complemented at higher momenta by the time-of-flight information provided by the ALICE TOF detector. The spectra of the K{sup 0}{sub S}, and hyperons were reconstructed using the decay topology of these particles. These measurements demonstrate the exceptional operation of both the LHC machine and the ALICE experiment. On the physics side, they provide insights about the mechanisms of the particle production at these energies and will serve as a baseline for the future measurements at even higher LHC energies and for heavy-ion collisions. (authors)

  17. Temperature measurements using a projection to latent structures of fluorescence spectra of potassium-aluminum borate glasses with copper-containing molecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkina, A. N.; Khodasevich, M. A.; Shirshnev, P. S.

    2017-02-01

    Luminescence spectra of a potassium-aluminum borate glass with copper-containing molecular clusters are presented in the temperature range of 295-624 K. Two methods of temperature measurement are compared with the aim of evaluating the possibility of their further application in optical temperature sensors: specifically, the classical method of measuring a temperature based on the spectral position of the fluorescence band peak and the measurement method based on projection to latent structures of fluorescence spectra in the visible range. It is shown that, concerning the accuracy of measuring a temperature, the fourdimensional space of latent structures is preferred for the case under consideration; it allows one to determine (using a training set of fluorescence spectra) a temperature with the relative error of no more than 1.2%.

  18. Determination of the Total Solar Modulation Factors in the Heliosphere For Cosmic Ray Protons and Electrons by Comparing Interstellar Spectra Deduced from Voyager Measurements and PAMELA Spectra of These Particles at the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2016-01-01

    We have determined the interstellar spectra of cosmic ray protons and electrons from a few MeV to ~10 GeV. These interstellar spectra are based on Voyager data and a normalization of specific galactic propagation model calculations of both protons and electrons to PAMELA data at the Earth at 10 GeV, where the solar modulation is small. These resulting interstellar spectra are then compared with spectra of protons and electrons measured at lower energies at the Earth by PAMELA in 2009. The total amount of modulation at lower rigidities (energies) is found to be nearly the same at the same rigidity for both protons and electrons and ranges in magnitude from a factor ~400 at 0.1 GV for electrons, to a factor ~15 at 0.44 GV (100 MeV for protons), to a factor ~3.3 at 1 GV for both components. The magnitude of this total modulation of both components are the same to within + 10% from ~0.3 to ~3 GV in rigidity. The observed total modulation for protons can be matched quite closely using a simple spherically symmetri...

  19. New Measurements of Fine-Scale CMB Polarization Power Spectra from CAPMAP at Both 40 and 90 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Bischoff, C; McMahon, J J; Nixon, G W; Samtleben, D; Smith, K M; Vanderlinde, K; Barkats, D; Farese, P; Gaier, T; Gundersen, J O; Hedman, M M; Staggs, S T; Winstein, B

    2008-01-01

    We present new measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization from the final season of the Cosmic Anisotropy Polarization MAPper (CAPMAP). The data set was obtained in winter 2004-2005 with the 7 m antenna in Crawford Hill, New Jersey, from 12 W-band (84-100 GHz) and 4 Q-band (36-45 GHz) correlation polarimeters with 3.3' and 6.5' beamsizes, respectively. After selection criteria were applied, 956 (939) hours of data survived for analysis of W-band (Q-band) data. Two independent and complementary pipelines produced results in excellent agreement with each other. A broad suite of null tests as well as extensive simulations showed that systematic errors were minimal, and a comparison of the W-band and Q-band sky maps revealed no contamination from galactic foregrounds. We report the E-mode and B-mode power spectra in 7 bands in the range 200 < l < 3000, extending the range of previous measurements to higher l. The E-mode spectrum, which is detected at 11 sigma significance, is in agree...

  20. Temperature and polarization angular power spectra of Galactic dust radiation at 353 GHz as measured by Archeops

    CERN Document Server

    Ponthieu, N; Tristram, M; Ade, P; Amblard, A; Ansari, R; Aumont, J; Aubourg, E; Beno^it, A; Bernard, J P; Blanchard, A; Bock, J J; Bouchet, F R; Bourrachot, A; Camus, P; Cardoso, J F; Couchot, F; De Bernardis, P

    2005-01-01

    We present the first measurement of temperature and polarization angular power spectra of the diffuse emission of Galactic dust at 353 GHz as seen by Archeops on 20% of the sky. The temperature angular power spectrum is compatible with that provided by the extrapolation to 353 GHz of IRAS and DIRBE maps using \\cite{fds} model number 8. For Galactic latitudes $|b| \\geq 5$ deg we report a 4 sigma detection of large scale ($3\\leq \\ell \\leq 8$) temperature-polarization cross-correlation $(\\ell+1)C_\\ell^{TE}/2\\pi = 76\\pm 21 \\mu\\rm{K_{RJ}}^2$ and set upper limits to the $E$ and $B$ modes at $11 \\mu\\rm{K_{RJ}}^2$. For Galactic latitudes $|b| \\geq 10$ deg, on the same angular scales, we report a 2 sigma detection of temperature-polarization cross-correlation $(\\ell+1)C_\\ell^{TE}/2\\pi = 24\\pm 13 \\mu\\rm{K_{RJ}}^2$. These results are then extrapolated to 100 GHz to estimate the contamination in CMB measurements by polarized diffuse Galactic dust emission. The $TE$ signal is then $1.7\\pm0.5$ and $0.5\\pm0.3 \\mu\\rm{K^2_{CM...

  1. Measurement of inclusive jet spectra in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions with the ALICE detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, Rüdiger; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes of the kinematic properties and the topology of high energy hadron collisions. Jets are collimated sprays of charged and neutral particles, which are produced in fragmentation of hard scattered partons from an early stage of the collision. In ALICE, jets have been measured in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions at several collision energies. While analyses of Pb-Pb events unveil properties of the hot and dense medium formed in heavy-ion collisions, pp and p-Pb collisions can shed light on hadronization and cold nuclear matter effects in jet production. Additionally, pp and p-Pb collisions serve as a baseline for disentangling hot and cold nuclear matter effects. A possible modification of the initial state is tested in p-Pb analyses. For the extraction of a jet signal, the exact evaluation of the background from the underlying event is an especially important ingredient. Due to the different nature of underlying events, each collision system requires a different analysis technique for removing the effect of the background on the jet sample. The focus of this publication is on the ALICE measurements of nuclear modification factors connecting p-Pb and Pb-Pb events to pp collisions. Furthermore, the radial jet structure is explored by comparing jet spectra reconstructed with different resolution parameters.

  2. Factor analysis of combined organic and inorganic aerosol mass spectra from high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Sun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The high resolution mass spectra of organic and inorganic aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS measurements were first combined into positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis to investigate the sources and evolution processes of atmospheric aerosols. The new approach is able to study the mixing of organic aerosols (OA and inorganic species, the acidity of OA factors, and the fragment ion patterns related to photochemical processing. In this study, PMF analysis of the unified AMS spectral matrices resolved 8 factors for the submicron aerosols measured at Queens College in New York City in summer 2009. The hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA and cooking OA (COA contain very minor inorganic species, indicating the different sources and mixing characteristics between primary OA and secondary species. The two factors that are primarily ammonium sulfate (SO4-OA and ammonium nitrate (NO3-OA, respectively, are overall neutralized, of which the OA in SO4-OA shows the highest oxidation state (O/C = 0.69 among OA factors. The semi-volatile oxygenated OA comprises two components, i.e., a less oxidized (LO-OOA and a more oxidized (MO-OOA. The MO-OOA represents a local photochemical product with the diurnal profile exhibiting a pronounced noon peak, consistent with those of formaldehyde (HCHO and Ox (= O3+NO2. The much higher NO+/NO2+ fragment ion ratio in MO-OOA than that from ammonium nitrate alone provides evidence for the formation of organic nitrates. The amine-related nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA contains ~25% of acidic inorganic salts, elucidating the formation of secondary OA from amines in acidic environments. The size distributions derived from 3-dimensional size-resolved mass spectra show distinct diurnal evolving behaviors for different OA factors, but overall a progressing evolution from smaller to larger particle mode as a function of oxidation states

  3. Improvements to a High Spectral Resolution, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Model of a Lightning Return Stroke and Comparisons with Measured Spectra and Inferred Plasma Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J. D.; Dreike, P.; Smith, M. W.; Clemenson, M. D.; Zollweg, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    We describe developments to a 1-D cylindrical, radiation-hydrodynamics model of a lightning return stroke that simulates lighting spectra with 1 Angstrom resolution in photon wavelength. In previous calculations we assumed standard density air in the return stroke channel and the resulting optical spectrum was that of an optically thick emitter, unlike measured spectra that are optically thin. In this work, we improve our model by initializing our simulation assuming that the leader-heated channel is pre-expanded to a density of 0.01-0.05 ambient and near pressure equilibrium with the surrounding ambient air and by implementing a time-dependent, external heat source to incorporate the effects of continuing current. By doing so, our simulated spectra, illustrated in the attached figure, show strong spectral emission characteristics at wavelengths similar to spectra measured by Orville (1968). In this poster, we describe our model and compare our simulated results with spectra measured by Orville (1968) and Smith (2015). We also use spectroscopic methods to compute physical properties of the plasma channel, e.g. temperature, from Smith's measurements and compare these with our simulated results.

  4. Measurement of LET (linear energy transfer) spectra using CR-39 at different depths of water irradiated by 171 MeV protons: A comparison with Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, G.S. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathy, S.P., E-mail: sam.tripathy@gmail.com [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Molokanov, A.G.; Aleynikov, V.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Sharma, S.D. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Radiological Physics & Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bandyopadhyay, T. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-05-11

    In this work, we have used CR-39 detectors to estimate the LET (linear energy transfer) spectrum of secondary particles due to 171 MeV proton beam at different depths of water including the Bragg peak region. The measured LET spectra were compared with those obtained from FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed dose (D{sub LET}), dose equivalent (H{sub LET}) were estimated using the LET spectra. The values of D{sub LET} and H{sub LET} per incident proton fluence were found to increase with the increase in depth of water and were maximum at Bragg peak. - Highlights: • Measurement of LET spectrometry using CR-39 detectors at different depths of water. • Comparison of measured spectra with FLUKA Monte carlo simulation. • Absorbed dose and dose equivalent was found to increase with depth of water.

  5. Sunlight, ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and skin cancer: how much sunlight do we need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holick, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin for good reason. During exposure to sunlight, the UV B photons enter the skin and photolyze 7-dehydrocholesterol to previtamin D3 which in turn is isomerized by the body's temperature to vitamin D3. Most humans have depended on sun for their vitamin D requirement. Skin pigment, sunscreen use, aging, time of day, season and latitude dramatically affect previtamin 13 synthesis. Vitamin D deficiency was thought to have been conquered, but it is now recognized that more than 50% of the world's population is at risk for vitamin D deficiency. This deficiency is in part due to the inadequate fortification of foods with vitamin D and the misconception that a healthy diet contains an adequate amount of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency causes growth retardation and rickets in children and will precipitate and exacerbate osteopenia, osteoporosis and increase risk of fracture in adults. The vitamin D deficiency has been associated pandemic with other serious consequences including increased risk of common cancers, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases and cardiovascular disease. There needs to be a renewed appreciation of the beneficial effect of moderate sunlight for providing all humans with their vitamin D requirement for health.

  6. High Redshift Intergalactic C IV Abundance Measurements from the Near-Infrared Spectra of Two z~6 QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Simcoe, R A

    2006-01-01

    New measurements of the z~6 intergalactic CIV abundance are presented, using moderate resolution IR spectra of two QSOs taken with GNIRS on Gemini South. These data were systematically searched for high redshift CIV absorption lines, using objective selection criteria. Comprehensive tests were performed to quantify sample incompleteness, as well as the rate of false positive CIV identifications. The trend of constant $\\Omega_{CIV}(z)$ observed at z~2-5 appears to continue to z~6, the highest observed redshift. The CIV sample is also consistent with the redshift-invariant form of the CIV column density distribution reported by Songaila (2001) at lower redshift, although with fairly large uncertainties due to a smaller sample size and noisier infrared data. The constant value of $\\Omega_{CIV}$ does not necessarily imply that the IGM was infused with an early metallicity ``floor,'' but the presence of early CIV does indicate that heavy-element enrichment began < 1 Gyr after the Big Bang. The lack of a decline...

  7. Simultaneous factor analysis of organic particle and gas mass spectra: AMS and PTR-MS measurements at an urban site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Slowik

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the winter component of the SPORT (Seasonal Particle Observations in the Region of Toronto field campaign, particulate non-refractory chemical composition and concentration of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs were measured by an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, respectively. Sampling was performed in downtown Toronto ~15 m from a major road. The mass spectra from the AMS and PTR-MS were combined into a unified dataset, which was analyzed using positive matrix factorization (PMF. The two instruments were given equal weight in the PMF analysis by application of a scaling factor to the uncertainties of each instrument. A residual based metric, Δesc, was used to evaluate the relative weight. The PMF analysis yielded a 5-factor solution that included factors characteristic of regional transport, local traffic emissions, charbroiling, and oxidative processing. The unified dataset provides information on particle and VOC sources and atmospheric processing that cannot be obtained from the datasets of the individual instruments, such as apportionment of oxygenated VOCs to direct emission sources vs. secondary reaction products, improved correlation of oxygenated aerosol factors with photochemical age, and increased detail regarding the composition of oxygenated organic aerosol factors. This analysis represents the first application of PMF to a unified AMS/PTR-MS dataset.

  8. Spatially Resolved Spectra from a new X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurements of Ion and Electron Temperature Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Stratton, B; Roquemore, A; Mastrovito, D; Lee, S; Bak, J; Moon, M; Nam, U; Smith, G; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Fraenkel, B

    2004-08-10

    A new type of high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is being developed to measure ion and electron temperature profiles in tokamak plasmas. The instrument is particularly valuable for diagnosing plasmas with purely Ohmic heating and rf heating, since it does not require the injection of a neutral beam - although it can also be used for the diagnosis of neutral-beam heated plasmas. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. It records spectra of helium-like argon (or krypton) from multiple sightlines through the plasma and projects a de-magnified image of a large plasma cross-section onto the detector. The spatial resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the height of the crystal, its radius of curvature, and the Bragg angle. This new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer may also be of interest for the diagnosis of ion temperature profiles in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER, where the application of the presently used charge-exchange spectroscopy will be difficult, if the neutral beams do not penetrate to the plasma center. The paper presents the results from proof-of-principle experiments performed with a prototype instrument at Alcator C-Mod.

  9. First Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of CMB Polarization Power Spectra at 43 GHz in the Multipole Range 25 <= ell <= 475

    CERN Document Server

    Bischoff, C; Buder, I; Chinone, Y; Cleary, K; Dumoulin, R N; Kusaka, A; Monsalve, R; Næss, S K; Newburgh, L B; Reeves, R; Smith, K M; Wehus, I K; Zuntz, J A; Zwart, J T L; Bronfman, L; Bustos, R; Church, S E; Dickinson, C; Eriksen, H K; Ferreira, P G; Gaier, T; Gundersen, J O; Hasegawa, M; Hazumi, M; Huffenberger, K M; Jones, M E; Kangaslahti, P; Kapner, D J; Lawrence, C R; Limon, M; May, J; McMahon, J J; Miller, A D; Nguyen, H; Nixon, G W; Pearson, T J; Piccirillo, L; Radford, S J E; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J L; Samtleben, D; Seiffert, M; Shepherd, M C; Staggs, S T; Tajima, O; Thompson, K L; Vanderlinde, K; Williamson, R; Winstein, B

    2010-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43GHz and 95GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the CMB. QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, >10,000hours of data were collected, first with the 19-element 43GHz array (3458hours) and then with the 90-element 95GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering ~1000deg^2. This paper reports initial results from the 43GHz receiver which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69uK sqrt(s). The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until th...

  10. Expected load spectra of prototype Francis turbines in low-load operation using numerical simulations and site measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, M.; Taruffi, A.; Bauer, C.

    2017-04-01

    The operators of hydropower plants are forced to extend the existing operating ranges of their hydraulic machines to remain competitive on the energy market due to the rising amount of wind and solar power. Faster response times and a higher flexibility towards part- and low-load conditions enable a better electric grid control and assure therefore an economic operation of the power plant. The occurring disadvantage is a higher dynamic excitation of affected machine components, especially Francis turbine runners, due to pressure pulsations induced by unsteady flow phenomena (e.g. draft tube vortex ropes). Therefore, fatigue analysis becomes more important even in the design phase of the hydraulic machines to evaluate the static and dynamic load in different operating conditions and to reduce maintenance costs. An approach including a one-way coupled fluid-structure interaction has been already developed using unsteady CFD simulations and transient FEM computations. This is now applied on two Francis turbines with different specific speeds and power ranges, to obtain the load spectra of both machines. The results are compared to strain gauge measurements on the according Francis turbines to validate the overall procedure.

  11. Measuring the shock-heating rate in the winds of O stars using X-ray line spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, David H; Gayley, Kenneth G; Owocki, Stanley P; Sundqvist, Jon O; Petit, Veronique; Leutenegger, Maurice A

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for using measured X-ray emission line fluxes from O stars to determine the shock-heating rate due to instabilities in their radiation-driven winds. The high densities of these winds means that their embedded shocks quickly cool by local radiative emission, while cooling by expansion should be negligible. Ignoring for simplicity any non-radiative mixing or conductive cooling, the method presented here exploits the idea that the cooling post-shock plasma systematically passes through the temperature characteristic of distinct emission lines in the X-ray spectrum. In this way, the observed flux distribution among these X-ray lines can be used to construct the cumulative probability distribution of shock strengths that a typical wind parcel encounters as it advects through the wind. We apply this new method (Gayley 2014) to Chandra grating spectra from five O stars with X-ray emission indicative of embedded wind shocks in effectively single massive stars. Correcting for wind absorption of...

  12. Sunlight-induced DNA damage in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Wallin, Hakan; Holst, Erik

    2002-01-01

    of sunlight was comparable to the interindividual variation, indicating that sunlight exposure and the individual's background were the two most important determinants for the basal level of DNA damage. Influence of other lifestyle factors such as exercise, intake of foods, infections, and age could......In this study of 301 blood samples from 21 subjects, we found markedly higher levels of DNA damage (nonpyrimidine dimer types) in the summer than in the winter detected by single-cell gel electrophoresis. The level of DNA damage was influenced by the average daily influx of sunlight ... to blood sampling. The 3 and 6 day periods before sampling influenced DNA damage the most. The importance of sunlight was further emphasized by a positive association of the DNA damage level to the amount of time the subjects had spent in the sun over a 3 day period prior to the sampling. The effect...

  13. Direct and Indirect Phototransformation of Graphene Oxide in Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct and indirect (with added H202 that serves as OH precursor) photoreactions of grapheme oxide (GO) were examined under sunlight exposure. The results indicate that GO photoreacts under both conditions, leading to significant alterations in GO's physicochemical properties. In...

  14. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  15. Galactic cosmic ray spectra during solar cycle 23 and 24. Measurement capabilities of the electron proton helium telescope on board SOHO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, Patrick; Dresing, Nina; Gieseler, Jan; Heber, Bernd; Klassen, Andreas [Christian-Albrechts Universitaet zu Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can be studied in detail by long term variations of the GCR energy spectrum (e.g. on the scales of a solar cycle). With almost 20 years of data, the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) aboard SOHO is well suited for these kind of investigations. Although the design of the instrument is optimized to measure proton and helium isotope spectra up to 50 MeV/nucleon the capability exist that allow to determine energy spectra above 1.5 GeV/nucleon. Therefore we developed a sophisticated inversion method to calculate such proton spectra. The method relies on a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument and a simplified spacecraft model that calculates the energy response function of EPHIN for electrons, protons and heavier ions. As a result we present galactic cosmic ray spectra from 1995 to 2015. For validation, the derived spectra are compared to AMS, BESS and PAMELA data. Furthermore we discuss the spectra with respect to the solar modulation.

  16. Sunlight exposure-mediated DNA damage in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masashi; Iida, Machiko; Goto, Yuji; Kondo, Takaaki; Yajima, Ichiro

    2011-08-01

    Previous experimental studies showed that single ultraviolet B (UVB) light irradiation increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a well-established biomarker of carcinogenesis and oxidative DNA damage, in epithelial cells in animals and humans. We conducted for the first time an epidemiologic study to investigate the correlations among levels of oxidative DNA damage, skin pigmentation, and sunlight exposure in human daily life. Digitalized skin pigmentation levels and creatinine-adjusted urinary 8-OHdG levels were examined in 127 healthy young adults aged 20 to 24 years and in hairless mice with normal pigmented skin (HL-mice; n = 20) and hyperpigmented skin (HL-HPS-mice; n = 20). Data obtained by a questionnaire were also analyzed for the 127 subjects. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that increased sunlight intensity, but not sunlight-exposed time or sunlight-exposed skin area, was correlated with elevation in creatinine-adjusted urinary 8-OHdG levels. In contrast, increased skin pigmentation level, but not the use of sunscreen, was correlated with reduction in urinary 8-OHdG level in humans. UVB irradiation corresponding to several minutes of sunlight exposure significantly increased urinary 8-OHdG levels in HL-mice but not in HL-HPS-mice. We showed that increase in intensity of sunlight in human daily life increased levels of DNA damage. We also showed a protective effect of skin pigmentation on sunlight exposure-mediated DNA damage. We have provided more reliable evidence of routine sunlight exposure-mediated DNA damage in humans through the combination of epidemiologic and experimental studies. ©2011 AACR.

  17. Accelerated stability testing of organic photovoltaics using concentrated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Eugene A.; Manor, Assaf; Mescheloff, Asaf;

    2012-01-01

    We suggest to use concentrated sunlight for accelerated studies of light-induced mechanisms in the degradation of organic photovoltaics (OPV) based on the polymer (P3HT)/fullerene (PCBM) bulk heterojunctions. Two particular cases of the degradation are reported.......We suggest to use concentrated sunlight for accelerated studies of light-induced mechanisms in the degradation of organic photovoltaics (OPV) based on the polymer (P3HT)/fullerene (PCBM) bulk heterojunctions. Two particular cases of the degradation are reported....

  18. Correction of diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with CdTe and CdZnTe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, M. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Kanamori, H.; Toragaito, T.; Taniguchi, A.

    1996-07-01

    We modified the formula of stripping procedure presented by E. Di. Castor et al. We added the Compton scattering and separated K{sub {alpha}} radiation of Cd and Te (23 and 27keV, respectively). Using the new stripping procedure diagnostic x-ray spectra (object 4mm-Al) of tube voltage 50kV to 100kV for CdTe and CdZnTe detectors are corrected with comparison of those spectra for the Ge detector. The corrected spectra for CdTe and CdZnTe detectors coincide with those for Ge detector at lower tube voltage than 70kV. But the corrected spectra at higher tube voltage than 70kV do not coincide with those for Ge detector. The reason is incomplete correction for full energy peak efficiencies of real CdTe and CdZnTe detectors. (J.P.N.)

  19. Sunlight exposure and multiple sclerosis in a tropical country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Ramírez, Guillermo; Ordoñez, Graciela; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Sotelo, Julio

    2014-07-01

    We analysed past and current sun exposure in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients as compared with matched controls in Mexico, a country with tropical climate. In a case-controlled study that include 83 MS patients and 166 matched controls, we inquired about sunlight exposure in two different periods: during adolescence and during the immediate past 5 years. Indicators were: exposure on quotidian and weekend outdoor activities with direct sunlight contact as expressed on frequency by mean number of days, daytime (morning, noon, afternoon), number of hours, visits to sunny places, and use of sunblocking agents. Additional elements were socioeconomic status, skin colour, and antecedent of varicella infection during childhood. MS patients showed a larger proportion of white skin. MS patients had more sunlight exposure during adolescence (80% versus 60%, P = 0·002); this tendency prevailed on current indicators (46% versus 30%, P = 0·02). However, current exposure on weekends (10% versus 22%, P = 0·02) and visits to the beach (64% versus 98%, P = 0·002) were lower in MS than in controls. Mexico gets more sunlight through the year than areas with high incidence of MS; nevertheless, its prevalence has greatly increased over the last decades, making it a relevant emerging disease. Our results indicate that in a tropical country, there is no association between sunlight exposure and the risk to develop MS, given the immunological effects of sunlight exposure either through UV radiation or vitamin D metabolism.

  20. Cross section and γ-ray spectra for U238(n,γ) measured with the DANCE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krtička, M.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of the U238(n,γ) cross section is important for developing theoretical nuclear reaction models and for applications. However, capture cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and often must be measured. Purpose: We seek to confirm previous measurements and test cross-section calculations with an emphasis on the unresolved resonance region from 1 to 500 keV. Method: Cross sections were measured from 10 eV to 500 keV using the DANCE detector array at the LANSCE spallation neutron source. The measurements used a thin target, 48 mg/cm2 of depleted uranium. Gamma cascade spectra were also measured to provide an additional constraint on calculations. The data are compared to cross-section calculations using the code CoH3 and cascade spectra calculations made using the code dicebox. Results: This new cross-section measurement confirms the previous data. The measured gamma-ray spectra suggest the need for additional low-lying dipole strength in the radiative strength function. New Hauser-Feshbach calculations including this strength accurately predict the capture cross section without renormalization. Conclusions: The present cross-section data confirm previous measurements. Including additional low-lying dipole strength in the radiative strength function may lead to more accurate cross-section calculations in nuclei where has not been measured.

  1. Measurements of cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra from the BESS-Polar long-duration balloon flights over Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Itazaki, A; Kim, K C; Kumazawa, T; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Matsumoto, K; Mitchell, J W; Myers, Z; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Picot-Clemente, N; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shikaze, Y; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Takasugi, Y; Takeuchi, K; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2015-01-01

    The BESS-Polar Collaboration measured the energy spectra of cosmic-ray protons and helium during two long-duration balloon flights over Antarctica in December 2004 and December 2007, at substantially different levels of solar modulation. Proton and helium spectra probe the origin and propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy, and are essential to calculations of the expected spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons, positrons, and electrons from interactions of primary cosmic-ray nuclei with the interstellar gas, and to calculations of atmospheric muons and neutrinos. We report absolute spectra at the top of the atmosphere for cosmic-ray protons in the kinetic energy range 0.2-160 GeV and helium nuclei 0.2-80 GeV/nucleon. The corresponding magnetic rigidity ranges are 0.6-160 GV for protons and 1.3-160 GV for helium. These spectra are compared to measurements from previous BESS flights and from AMS-01, ATIC-2, PAMELA, and AMS-02. We also report the ratio of the proton and helium fluxes from 1.3 GV to 160 GV a...

  2. Deriving depth-dependent light escape efficiency and optical Swank factor from measured pulse height spectra of scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howansky, Adrian; Peng, Boyu; Lubinsky, Anthony R; Zhao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Pulse height spectroscopy has been used by investigators to deduce the imaging properties of scintillators. Pulse height spectra (PHS) are used to compute the Swank factor, which describes the variation in scintillator light output per x-ray interaction. The spread in PHS measured below the K-edge is related to the optical component of the Swank factor, i.e., variations in light escape efficiency from different depths of x-ray interaction in the scintillator, denoted ε¯(z). Optimizing scintillators for medical imaging applications requires understanding of these optical properties, as they determine tradeoffs between parameters such as x-ray absorption, light yield, and spatial resolution. This work develops a model for PHS acquisition such that the effect of measurement uncertainty can be removed. This method allows ε¯(z) to be quantified on an absolute scale and permits more accurate estimation of the optical Swank factor of scintillators. The pulse height spectroscopy acquisition chain was modeled as a linear system of stochastic gain stages. Analytical expressions were derived for signal and noise propagation through the PHS chain, accounting for deterministic and stochastic aspects of x-ray absorption, scintillation, and light detection with a photomultiplier tube. The derived expressions were used to calculate PHS of thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators using parameters that were measured, calculated, or known from literature. PHS were measured at 25 and 32 keV of CsI samples designed with an optically reflective or absorptive backing, with or without a fiber-optic faceplate (FOP), and with thicknesses ranging from 150-1000 μm. Measured PHS were compared with calculated PHS, then light escape model parameters were varied until measured and modeled results reached agreement. Resulting estimates of ε¯(z) were used to calculate each scintillator's optical Swank factor. For scintillators of the same optical design, only minor differences in

  3. Applying coda envelope measurements to local and regional waveforms for stable estimates of magnitude, source spectra and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, R.; Mayeda, K.; Rodgers, A.; Walter, W.

    1999-07-26

    Magnitude estimation forms an integral part in any seismic monitoring endeavor. For monitoring compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, regional seismic discriminants are often functions of magnitude such as m{sub b}:M{sub 0} high-to-low spectral ratios, and nuclear yield estimation. For small-to-moderate magnitude events that cannot be studied by a large regional or global network of stations, there is a need for stable magnitudes that can be obtained from as few as one station. To date, magnitudes based on coda envelopes are by far the most stable because of the coda's averaging properties. Unlike conventional magnitudes which utilize the direct phases such as P (P{sub n}, P{sub g}) or S (S{sub n}, L{sub g}), or M{sub g}, a coda envelope magnitude is not as sensitive to the undesirable effects of source radiation pattern, 3-D path heterogeneity, and constructive/destructive interference near the recording site. The stability of the coda comes from a time-domain measurement made over a large portion of the seismogram thereby averaging over the scattered wavefield. This approach has been applied to earthquakes in the western United States where it was found that a single-station coda magnitude was approximately equivalent to an average over a 64 station network which used only the direct waves such as L{sub g} (Mayeda and Walter, JGR, 1996). In this paper we describe in detail our calibration procedure starting with a broadband recording, correlation with independent moment estimates, formation of narrowband envelopes, coda envelope fitting with synthetics, and finally the resultant moment-rate spectra. Our procedure accounts for all propagation, site, and S-to-coda transfer function effects. The resultant coda-derived moment-rate spectra are then used to estimate seismic moment (M{sub o}), narrowband magnitudes such as m{sub b} or M{sub L}, and total seismic energy. For the eastern Mediterranean region a preliminary study was completed for

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Strain Newman Photoinactivation and Cellular Response to Sunlight Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, Jill S; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2017-09-01

    Sunlight influences microbial water quality of surface waters. Previous studies have investigated photoinactivation mechanisms and cellular photostress responses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), including Escherichia coli and enterococci, but further work is needed to characterize photostress responses of bacterial pathogens. Here we investigate the photoinactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (strain Newman), a pigmented, waterborne pathogen of emerging concern. We measured photodecay using standard culture-based assays and cellular membrane integrity and investigated photostress response by measuring the relative number of mRNA transcripts of select oxidative stress, DNA repair, and metabolism genes. Photoinactivation experiments were performed in both oxic and anoxic systems to further investigate the role of oxygen-mediated and non-oxygen-mediated photoinactivation mechanisms. S. aureus lost culturability much faster in oxic systems than in anoxic systems, indicating an important role for oxygen in photodecay mechanisms. S. aureus cell membranes were damaged by sunlight exposure in anoxic systems but not in oxic systems, as measured by cell membrane permeability to propidium iodide. After sunlight exposure, S. aureus increased expression of a gene coding for methionine sulfoxide reductase after 12 h of sunlight exposure in the oxic system and after 6 h of sunlight exposure in the anoxic system, suggesting that methionine sulfoxide reductase is an important enzyme for defense against both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent photostresses. This research highlights the importance of oxygen in bacterial photoinactivation in environmentally relevant systems and the complexity of the bacterial photostress response with respect to cell structure and transcriptional regulation.IMPORTANCEStaphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium that causes gastrointestinal, respiratory, and skin infections. In severe cases, S. aureus infection can lead to life

  5. Measurement of jet spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a measurement of transverse momentum spectra of jets detected with the ALICE detector in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles using the anti-kT jet algorithm. The background from soft particle production is determined for each event and subtracte

  6. Measurement of jet spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a measurement of transverse momentum spectra of jets detected with the ALICE detector in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN=2.76 TeV. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles using the anti-kT jet algorithm. The background from soft particle production is determined for each event and

  7. Comparison of simulated and measured spectra from an X-ray tube for the energies between 20 and 35 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, M.; Emirhan, E.; Bayrak, A.; Ozben, C. S.; Yücel, E. Barlas

    2015-11-01

    Design and production of a simple and low cost X-ray imaging system that can be used for light industrial applications was targeted in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In this study, production, transmission and detection of X-rays were simulated for the proposed imaging device. OX/70-P dental tube was used and X-ray spectra simulated by Geant4 were validated by comparison with X-ray spectra measured between 20 and 35 keV. Relative detection efficiency of the detector was also determined to confirm the physics processes used in the simulations. Various time optimization tools were performed to reduce the simulation time.

  8. Comparison of simulated and measured spectra from an X-ray tube for the energies between 20 and 35 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yücel, M.; Emirhan, E.; Bayrak, A.; Ozben, C.S.; Yücel, E. Barlas, E-mail: barlase@itu.edu.tr

    2015-11-01

    Design and production of a simple and low cost X-ray imaging system that can be used for light industrial applications was targeted in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In this study, production, transmission and detection of X-rays were simulated for the proposed imaging device. OX/70-P dental tube was used and X-ray spectra simulated by Geant4 were validated by comparison with X-ray spectra measured between 20 and 35 keV. Relative detection efficiency of the detector was also determined to confirm the physics processes used in the simulations. Various time optimization tools were performed to reduce the simulation time.

  9. Interstellar Spectra of Primary Cosmic Ray Nuclei from H through Fe Measured at Voyager and a Comparison with Higher Energy Measurements, An Interpretation of the Spectra from 10 MeVnuc to Over 100 GeVnuc Using a Leaky Box Model

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing new Voyager measurements at lower energies and higher energy spacecraft measurements near the Earth, the interstellar spectra of primary cosmic ray nuclei from H to Fe have now been determined from ~10 MeV/nuc to > 100 GeV/nuc. These measurements are compared with the predictions from a Leaky Box propagation model. It is found that above ~50-100 MeV/nuc the spectra of all the nuclei, H, He, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe are well connected between 100 MeV/nuc and 10 GeV/nuc and above by simple source rigidity spectra proportional to P-2.28, with the exponent independent of rigidity and using a rigidity dependent diffusion coefficient ~P0.50 above ~1.0 GV. This leads to intensities and spectra ~P-2.78 at ~100 GeV/nuc and above, which are consistent with new AMS-2 and PAMELA measurements of H, He and C to within + 10%. Below 50-100 MeV the spectra of these primary charges fall into two groups. The spectra of primary nuclei with Z > 6 fall more rapidly at low energies than those of H and He and more rapidly t...

  10. Distortion of pulse height spectra due to absorbers in the measurement of low-energy beta-rays with a silicon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, H; Norimura, T; Katase, A

    2002-01-01

    In measurement of beta-rays from sup 1 sup 4 C with a silicon semiconductor detector, pulse height spectra are observed to change by insertion of absorbers between the source and the detector. An obvious broad peak appears in the spectra by the insertion. An increase in the absorber thickness reduces the peak height, and shifts the peak position to the higher energy side in the spectra. On the other hand, the increase in the distance between the source and the absorber also reduces the peak height, but does not move the position of the peak. The absorption curve derived from these results shows its particular shape corresponding to the respective position of the absorber. Therefore, the distortion of the pulse height spectrum for low-energy beta-rays depends not only on the thickness of the absorber but also on its position between the source and the detector. (author)

  11. Determination of the absolute configuration of perylene quinone-derived mycotoxins by measurement and calculation of electronic circular dichroism spectra and specific rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlech, Joachim; Fleck, Stefanie C; Metzler, Manfred; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-09-01

    Altertoxins I-III, alterlosins I and II, alteichin (alterperylenol), stemphyltoxins I-IV, stemphyperylenol, stemphytriol, 7-epi-8-hydroxyaltertoxin I, and 6-epi-stemphytriol are mycotoxins derived from perylene quinone, for which the absolute configuration was not known. Electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra were calculated for these compounds and compared with measured spectra of altertoxins I-III, alteichin, and stemphyltoxin III and with reported Cotton effects. Specific rotations were calculated and compared with reported specific rotations. The absolute configuration of all the toxins, except for stemphyltoxin IV, could thus be determined. The validity of the assignment was high whenever reported ECD data were available for comparison, and the validity was lower when the assignment was based only on the comparison of calculated and reported specific rotations. ECD spectra are intrinsically different for toxins with a biphenyl substructure and for toxins derived from dihydroanthracene.

  12. Measurement and Calculation of High-Energy Neutron Spectra behind Shielding at the CERF 120 GeV/c Hadron Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Nakao, N; Roesler, S; Brugger, M; Hagiwara, M; Vincke, H; Khater, H; Prinz, A A; Rokni, S H; Kosako, K

    2008-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (a mixture of mainly protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameter by 50-cm long). An NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. The measurement locations cover an angular range with respect to the beam axis between 13 and 133 degrees. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 32 MeV and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. Since the source term and experimental geometry in this experiment are well characterized and simple, and results are given in the form of energy spectra, these experimental results are very useful a...

  13. Measurement of optical constants of Si and SiO2 from reflection electron energy loss spectra using factor analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H.; Shinotsuka, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Iwai, H.; Tanuma, S.; Tougaard, S.

    2010-04-01

    The energy loss functions (ELFs) and optical constants of Si and SiO2 were obtained from quantitative analysis of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) by a new approach. In order to obtain the ELF, which is directly related to the optical constants, we measured series of angular and energy dependent REELS spectra for Si and SiO2. The λ(E )K(ΔE) spectra, which are the product of the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) and the differential inverse IMFP, were obtained from the measured REELS spectra. We used the factor analysis (FA) method to analyze series of λ(E )K(ΔE) spectra for various emission angles at fixed primary beam energy to separate the surface-loss and bulk-loss components. The extracted bulk-loss components enable to obtain the ELFs of Si and SiO2, which are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. The real part of the reciprocal of the complex dielectric function was determined by Kramers-Kronig analysis of the ELFs. Subsequently, the optical constants of Si and SiO2 were calculated. The resulting optical constants in terms of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient for Si and SiO2 are in good agreement with Palik's reference data. The results demonstrate the general applicability of FA as an efficient method to obtain the bulk ELF and to determine the optical properties from REELS measurements.

  14. An evaluation method of reflectance spectra to be obtained by Hayabusa2 Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS3) based on laboratory measurements of carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Moe; Nakamura, Tomoki; Osawa, Takahito; Iwata, Takahiro; Kitazato, Kohei; Abe, Masanao; Nakauchi, Yusuke; Arai, Takehiko; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Hiroi, Takahiro; Imae, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Akira; Kojima, Hideyasu

    2017-09-01

    We conducted ground-based performance evaluation tests of the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS3) onboard Hayabusa2 spacecraft in November 2013 and from April to May 2014 and established a method for evaluating its measured reflectance spectra. Reflectance spectra of nine powdered carbonaceous chondrite samples were measured by both NIRS3 and a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. We have established two methods for correcting the NIRS3 data by comparing them with the corresponding FT-IR data because raw data obtained by NIRS3 underwent spectral distortion caused by systematic offsets in sensitivity of individual pixels. The corrected NIRS3 spectra of carbonaceous chondrite samples are comparable with their FT-IR spectra. The depth of each band component D λ is defined for each wavelength λ (μm) to characterize the absorption bands in NIRS3 spectra. It is suggested that the relationship between the D 2.72/ D 2.79 ratio and the D 2.76/ D 2.90 ratio would be useful for estimating the degree of heating of the asteroid surface, if contributions of terrestrial adsorbed water on D 2.79 and D 2.90 are properly corrected. The degrees of heating and space weathering are also comprehensively evaluated by the relationship between D 2.90 and the D 2.76/ D 2.90 ratio. Reflectance spectra of asteroid Ryugu, the target asteroid of Hayabusa2, to be recorded by the NIRS3 instrument are expected to reveal the characteristics of the surface materials by using the evaluation technique proposed in this paper. Such information will be used for choosing the touchdown points for sampling and also for investigating the distribution of the materials similar to the returned samples on Ryugu.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Life-threatening motor vehicle crashes in bright sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Raza, Sheharyar

    2017-01-01

    Bright sunlight may create visual illusions that lead to driver error, including fallible distance judgment from aerial perspective. We tested whether the risk of a life-threatening motor vehicle crash was increased when driving in bright sunlight.This longitudinal, case-only, paired-comparison analysis evaluated patients hospitalized because of a motor vehicle crash between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. The relative risk of a crash associated with bright sunlight was estimated by evaluating the prevailing weather at the time and place of the crash compared with the weather at the same hour and location on control days a week earlier and a week later.The majority of patients (n = 6962) were injured during daylight hours and bright sunlight was the most common weather condition at the time and place of the crash. The risk of a life-threatening crash was 16% higher during bright sunlight than normal weather (95% confidence interval: 9-24, P vehicle crash. An awareness of this risk might inform driver education, trauma staffing, and safety warnings to prevent a life-threatening motor vehicle crash.

  16. Stability of Bacillus thuringiensis and NPV Microencapsulated Formulation under Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Sadat Naghavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation technology is used for the formulation of bio pesticides and is effective against the ultra-violet radiation of sunlight. The present research studied the stability of Bt and NPV formulations microencapsulated with gelatin and sodium alginate, individually or in combination. The formulations were evaluated in outdoor space and under sunlight on potted growing cabbage. The stability of each active ingredient tested in each formulation was studied at 0, 3, 7 and 10 days after spraying on cabbage infested with diamondback moth Plutella xylostella second instars larvae. Results showed that non-formulated and microencapsulated formulations not exposed to sunlight (time zero had similar mortality. However, after being exposed to sunlight for three days, the non-formulated Bt and NPV resulted in a significantly lower mortality (less than 40%; compared with the microencapsulated bio pesticides (more than 70% mortality. Fifty percent (50% mortality was reached in microencapsulated formulations after seven and ten days of exposure to sunlight, whereas there was no mortality in larvae exposed to unformulated treated plants after ten days. ANOVA analysis showed the highest larval mortality was achieved by the Bt+NPV gelatin microencapsulated formulation followed by gelatin coated Bt, sodium alginate coated NPV, sodium alginate coated Bt+NPV, gelatin coated NPV and sodium alginate coated Bt. The formulations showed no significant LT50 differences between microencapsulated versus unformulated Bt and NPV.

  17. Recommended summer sunlight exposure amounts fail to produce sufficient vitamin D status in UK adults of South Asian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Mark D; Kift, Richard; Felton, Sarah J; Berry, Jacqueline L; Durkin, Marie T; Allan, Donald; Vail, Andy; Webb, Ann R; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2011-11-01

    The cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D is dependent on UVB from sunlight, but melanin reduces the penetration of UVB and thus contributes to vitamin D insufficiency in individuals with darker skin. The national guidance provided on amounts of sunlight exposure in the United Kingdom is for the light-skinned population, and in the absence of dedicated information, darker-skinned people may attempt to follow this guidance. We determined the relative effect of a simulation of UK recommendations of summer sunlight exposure on the vitamin D status of individuals of South Asian ethnicity compared with that of whites. In a prospective cohort study, simulated summer sunlight exposures were provided under rigorous dosimetric conditions to 15 adults (aged 20-60 y) of South Asian ethnicity, and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured weekly. Dietary vitamin D intake was estimated. Outcomes were compared with those of 109 whites (aged 20-60 y) treated with the identical UV-radiation exposure protocol. At baseline (winter trough), all South Asians were vitamin D-insufficient [25(OH)D concentrations Sunlight-exposure recommendations are inappropriate for individuals of South Asian ethnicity who live at the UK latitude. More guidance is required to meet the vitamin D requirements of this sector of the population. This study was registered at www.isrctn.org as ISRCTN 07565297.

  18. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, E; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, T; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Orii, A; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Akutsu, R; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nishimura, Y; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Gustafson, J; Kachulis, C; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, S; Nantais, C M; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Goldhaber, M; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Park, R G; Himmel, A; Li, Z; OSullivan, E; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Friend, M; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Yano, T; Cao, S V; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Suzuki, T; Mijakowski, P; Frankiewicz, K; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Li, X; Palomino, J L; Wilking, M J; Yanagisawa, C; Fukuda, D; Ishino, H; Kayano, T; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Xu, C; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Suda, Y; Yokoyama, M; Bronner, C; Hartz, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Suzuki, Y; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra of the atmospheric ${\

  19. Measurement of inclusive neutron spectra from p-Be up to 24 GeV/c incident momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Engler, J; Gibbard, B; Mönnig, F; Pack, K; Runge, K; Schopper, Herwig Franz

    1973-01-01

    The authors present data on inclusive neutron spectra produced in an internal Be target of the CERN PS, for incident proton momenta between 8 and 24 GeV/c at 0 degrees , and for incident proton momentum of 19 GeV/c at 50 mrad. (30 refs).

  20. An experiment to measure the spectra of primary proton, helium and iron nuclei at the 'knee' region at a high altitude

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X W; Ding, L K; Zhang, C S; Ohnishi, M

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of measuring the energy spectra of some single elements (proton, helium and iron) in primary cosmic rays at the 'knee' energies, by setting up an air shower (AS) core detector in the AS gamma array (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China) is investigated. Taking into account the sensitivity and the acceptance needed for this measurement, the feasibility of construction and operation of the apparatus at a high altitude, and the cost, it is shown that this aim can be achieved by a simple AS core detector that mainly measures the high-energy electromagnetic components in AS cores. In this paper, such a detector is described. With a three-year exposure, proton, helium and iron spectra at the 'knee' energy region can be obtained with three event samples selected by an artificial neural network (ANN).

  1. Balloon Measurements of Cosmic Ray Muon Spectra in the Atmosphere along with those of Primary Protons and Helium Nuclei over Mid-Latitude

    CERN Document Server

    Bellotti, R; Circella, M; De Marzo, C; Golden, R L; Stochaj, S J; De Pascale, M P; Morselli, A; Picozza, P; Stephens, S A; Hof, M; Menn, W; Simon, M; Mitchell, J W; Ormes, J F; Streitmatter, R E; Finetti, N; Grimani, C; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Spillantini, P; Basini, G; Ricci, M

    1999-01-01

    We report here the measurements of the energy spectra of atmospheric muons and of the cosmic ray primary proton and helium nuclei in a single experiment. These were carried out using the MASS superconducting spectrometer in a balloon flight experiment in 1991. The relevance of these results to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly is emphasized. In particular, this approach allows uncertainties caused by the level of solar modulation, the geomagnetic cut-off of the primaries and possible experimental systematics to be decoupled in the comparison of calculated fluxes of muons to measured muon fluxes. The muon observations cover the momentum and depth ranges of 0.3-40 GeV/c and 5-886 g/cmsquared, respectively. The proton and helium primary measurements cover the rigidity range from 3 to 100 GV, in which both the solar modulation and the geomagnetic cut-off affect the energy spectra at low energies.

  2. Measurement of wavelengths and lamb shifts for inner-shell transitions in Fe XVIII-XXIV. [from solar flare X-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Safronova, U. I.

    1986-01-01

    The wavelengths of inner-shell 1s-2p transitions in the ions Fe XVIII-XXIV have been measured in solar flare spectra recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) on the Air Force P78-1 spacecraft. The measurements are compared with previous measurements and with recently calculated wavelengths. It is found that the measured wavelengths are systematically larger than the wavelengths calculated using the Z-expansion method by up to 0.65 mA. For the more highly charged ions, these differences can be attributed to the QED contributions to the transition energies that are not included in the Z-expansion calculations.

  3. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton–proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Adriani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC s=7 TeV proton–proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity η ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results, and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-rapidity ranges. However, no model perfectly explains the experimental results over the entire pseudo-rapidity range. The experimental data indicate a more abundant neutron production rate relative to the photon production than any model predictions studied here.

  4. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton--proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A-L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W.C.; Zhou, Q.D.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV proton--proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity $\\eta$ ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the difference in the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-...

  5. Childhood cancer incidence in relation to sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, J R B; Spector, L G

    2011-01-04

    There is increasing interest in the possible association between cancer incidence and vitamin D through its role as a regulator of cell growth and differentiation. Epidemiological studies in adults and one paediatric study suggest an inverse association between sunlight exposure and cancer incidence. We carried out an ecological study using childhood cancer registry data and two population-level surrogates of sunlight exposure, (1) latitude of the registry city or population centroid of the registry nation and (2) annual solar radiation. All models were adjusted for nation-level socioeconomic status using socioeconomic indicators. Latitude and radiation were significantly associated with cancer incidence, and the direction of association was consistent between the surrogates. Findings were not consistent across tumour types. Our ecological study offers some evidence to support an association between sunlight exposure and risk of childhood cancer.

  6. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight was used to study the performance response of inverted P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells after exposure to high intensity sunlight. Correlations of efficiency as a function of solar intensity were established in the range of 0.5–15 suns at three different stages: for a pristine....... The transient state is believed to be a result of the breakdown of the diode behaviour of the ZnO electron transport layer by O2 desorption, increasing the hole conductivity. These results imply that accelerated degradation of organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight is not a straightforward process...... cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of the lost performance over time: at 1 sun only 6% of the initial performance was conserved after...

  7. Carbon nanohorns-based nanofluids as direct sunlight absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, E; Barison, S; Pagura, C; Mercatelli, L; Sansoni, P; Fontani, D; Jafrancesco, D; Francini, F

    2010-03-01

    The optimization of the poor heat transfer characteristics of fluids conventionally employed in solar devices are at present one of the main topics for system efficiency and compactness. In the present work we investigated the optical and thermal properties of nanofluids consisting in aqueous suspensions of single wall carbon nanohorns. The characteristics of these nanofluids were evaluated in view of their use as sunlight absorber fluids in a solar device. The observed nanoparticle-induced differences in optical properties appeared promising, leading to a considerably higher sunlight absorption. We found that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids was higher than pure water. Both these effects, together with the possible chemical functionalization of carbon nanohorns, make this new kind of nanofluids very interesting for increasing the overall efficiency of the sunlight exploiting device.

  8. Quantification of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in the urine of Swedish adults and children following exposure to sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljendahl, Tove Sandberg; Kotova, Natalia; Segerbäck, Dan

    2012-11-01

    DNA damage following exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is important in skin cancer development. The predominant photoproduct, cyclobutane thymine dimer (T=T), is repaired and excreted in the urine, where it provides a biomarker of exposure. To quantify urinary T=T levels after recreational sunlight exposure in adults and children. Average UVR doses were measured with personal dosimeters. Urinary T=T was analysed with (32)P-postlabelling. Background levels of T=T increased significantly following exposure to sunlight. Amounts of T=T in urine of children and adults were not significantly different after adjusting for area of skin exposed and physiological differences. UVR dose and amounts of T=T correlated for both adults and children. Recreational exposure to sunlight in Sweden induces levels of DNA damage, clearly detectable in urine.

  9. Life-threatening motor vehicle crashes in bright sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A.; Raza, Sheharyar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bright sunlight may create visual illusions that lead to driver error, including fallible distance judgment from aerial perspective. We tested whether the risk of a life-threatening motor vehicle crash was increased when driving in bright sunlight. This longitudinal, case-only, paired-comparison analysis evaluated patients hospitalized because of a motor vehicle crash between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. The relative risk of a crash associated with bright sunlight was estimated by evaluating the prevailing weather at the time and place of the crash compared with the weather at the same hour and location on control days a week earlier and a week later. The majority of patients (n = 6962) were injured during daylight hours and bright sunlight was the most common weather condition at the time and place of the crash. The risk of a life-threatening crash was 16% higher during bright sunlight than normal weather (95% confidence interval: 9–24, P < 0.001). The increased risk was accentuated in the early afternoon, disappeared at night, extended to patients with different characteristics, involved crashes with diverse features, not apparent with cloudy weather, and contributed to about 5000 additional patient-days in hospital. The increased risk extended to patients with high crash severity as indicated by ambulance involvement, surgical procedures, length of hospital stay, intensive care unit admission, and patient mortality. The increased risk was not easily attributed to differences in alcohol consumption, driving distances, or anomalies of adverse weather. Bright sunlight is associated with an increased risk of a life-threatening motor vehicle crash. An awareness of this risk might inform driver education, trauma staffing, and safety warnings to prevent a life-threatening motor vehicle crash. Level of evidence: Epidemiologic Study, level III. PMID:28072708

  10. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight

    OpenAIRE

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A.; Frederik C. Krebs

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight was used to study the performance response of inverted P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells after exposure to high intensity sunlight. Correlations of efficiency as a function of solar intensity were established in the range of 0.5–15 suns at three different stages: for a pristine cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of...

  11. Measuring Diffuse Interstellar Bands with cool stars. An improved line list to model the background stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Monreal-Ibero, A

    2016-01-01

    DIBs are ubiquitous in stellar spectra. Traditionally, they have been studied through their extraction from hot stars, because of their smooth continuum. In an era where there are several going-on or planned massive Galactic surveys using multi-object spectrographs, cool stars constitute an appealing set of targets. From the technical point of view, the extraction of DIBs in their spectra is more challenging due to the complexity of the continuum. In this contribution we will provide the community with an improved set of stellar lines in the spectral regions associated to the strong DIBs at l6196, l6269, l6284, and l6379. These lines will allow for the creation of better stellar synthetic spectra, reproducing the background emission and a more accurate extraction of the magnitudes associated with a given DIB. The Sun and Arcturus were used as representative examples of dwarf and giant stars, respectively. A high quality spectrum for each of them was modeled using TURBOSPECTRUM and the VALD stellar line list. ...

  12. The X-ray Spectra of Black Hole X-ray Novae in Quiescence as Measured by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; García, M R; Murray, S S; Barret, D

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of black hole X-ray novae V404 Cyg, A0620-00, GRO J1655-40 and XTE J1550-564 in quiescence. Their quiescent spectra can be well fitted by a power-law model with slope $\\alpha \\sim 2$. While a coronal (Raymond-Smith) model is also a statistically acceptable representation of the spectra, the best fit temperatures of these models is $\\sim 5$ times higher than that seen in active stellar coronae. These four spectra of quiescent X-ray novae are all consistent with that expected for accretion via an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and inconsistent with that expected from a stellar corona. This evidence for continued accretion in quiescence further strengthens the case for the existence of event horizons in black holes. Both A0620-00 and GRO J1655-40 were fainter than in previous observations, while V404 Cyg was more luminous and varied by a factor of 2 in a few ksec. A reanalysis of the X-ray data for XTE J1550-564 shows that (like V404 Cyg and A0620-00) its luminosity exc...

  13. Cassini VIMS Spectra of the Thermal Emission from Hot Spots Along Enceladus South Pole Fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Cassini VIMS Team

    2016-10-01

    Most of the south pole fissure region has not been directly illuminated by sunlight since the sub-solar point moved into the northern hemisphere in 2009, thereby eliminating the background of reflected sunlight at VIMS wavelengths and making the fissure thermal emission readily measureable. Since then, VIMS has measured spectra of at least 11 hot spots along the fissures. Most of these measurements were acquired in ride-along mode with CIRS as the prime instrument. During at least 2 encounters, VIMS and CIRS acquired simultaneous or near-simultaneous spectra of the same fissure location. VIMS spectra include multiple hot spots along Damascus, Baghdad, Cairo, and a likely hot spot on Alexandria.All of the VIMS spectra examined to date are consistent with this scenario of a self-regulating fissure maximum T~200 K with brighter VIMS emissions corresponding to fissures up to ~20 m wide. Emission from the warm fissure interior walls dominate the VIMS spectra with <15% contributed by conductive heating of the adjacent terrain at VIMS wavelengths.CIRS spectra report slightly cooler T's due to CIRS increased sensitivity to lower T emission at longer wavelengths and averaging over contributions from both the hottest and cooler areas. Combined analysis of the CIRS and VIMS spectra spanning 3 to 500 micron wavelengths promises to reveal the distribution of [T, area] near the fissures that cannot be spatially resolved. This [T, area] distribution holds the key to understanding how heat is transferred to the surface within a few 100 m of the fissures.The VIMS-detected emission is concentrated in localized hot spots along the fissures and does not seem to be distributed continuously along them. CIRS spectra suggest a more continuous distribution of the emission along the fissure length. Jets locations also are distributed along the fissure length and it appears that the VIMS-detected hot spots in general correlate with jet locations, but not all of the jet locations have been

  14. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Ho, E-mail: jhjeon07@ibs.re.kr; Nakajima, Kazuhisa, E-mail: naka115@dia-net.ne.jp; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Choi, Il Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Cho, Byoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1–10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  15. Sunlight-induced photochemical decay of oxidants in natural waters: implications in ballast water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William J; Jones, Adam C; Whitehead, Robert F; Zika, Rod G

    2007-05-15

    The transport and discharge of ship ballast water has been recognized as a major vector for the introduction of invasive species. Chemical oxidants, long used in drinking water and wastewater treatment, are alternative treatment methods for the control of invasive species currently being tested for use on ships. One concern when a ballasted vessel arrives in port is the adverse effects of residual oxidant in the treated water. The most common oxidants include chlorine (HOCl/OCl-), bromine (HOBr/OBr-), ozone (03), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and monochloramine (NH2Cl). The present study was undertaken to evaluate the sunlight-mediated photochemical decomposition of these oxidants. Sunlight photodecomposition was measured at various pH using either distilled water or oligotrophic Gulf Stream water for specific oxidants. For selected oxidants, quantum yields at specific wavelengths were obtained. An environmental photochemical model, GCSOLAR, also provided predictions of the fate (sunlight photolysis half-lives) of HOCI/OCl-, HOBr/OBr-, ClO2, and NH2Cl for two different seasons at latitude 40 degrees and in water with two different concentrations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. These data are useful in assessing the environmental fate of ballast water treatment oxidants if they were to be discharged in port.

  16. Spore sensitivity to sunlight and freezing can restrict dispersal in wood-decay fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norros, Veera; Karhu, Elina; Nordén, Jenni; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2015-08-01

    Assessment of the costs and benefits of dispersal is central to understanding species' life-history strategies as well as explaining and predicting spatial population dynamics in the changing world. While mortality during active movement has received much attention, few have studied the costs of passive movement such as the airborne transport of fungal spores. Here, we examine the potential of extreme environmental conditions to cause dispersal mortality in wood-decay fungi. These fungi play a key role as decomposers and habitat creators in forest ecosystems and the populations of many species have declined due to habitat loss and fragmentation. We measured the effect of simulated solar radiation (including ultraviolet A and B) and freezing at -25°C on the spore germinability of 17 species. Both treatments but especially sunlight markedly reduced spore germinability in most species, and species with thin-walled spores were particularly light sensitive. Extrapolating the species' laboratory responses to natural irradiance conditions, we predict that sunlight is a relevant source of dispersal mortality at least at larger spatial scales. In addition, we found a positive effect of spore size on spore germinability, suggesting a trade-off between dispersal distance and establishment. We conclude that freezing and particularly sunlight can be important sources of dispersal mortality in wood-decay fungi which can make it difficult for some species to colonize isolated habitat patches and habitat edges.

  17. Bait Formulations of Chlorophyllin against Infected/Uninfected Lymnaea acuminata in Red and Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of snail population is an important tool in fasciolosis control programme. In order to achive this objective the method of bait formulation containing an attractant and a molluscicide is an appropriate approach to ensure the death of host snail. Chlorophyllin bait pellets were prepared by addition of attractants starch (10 mM/serine (20 mM and Chlorophyllin 2% agar solution. These baits were used against host snail Lymnaea acuminata. The behavioral response of snail against attractant (starch/serine and chlorophyllin was examined in red and sunlight. The fraction of snail that was in contact with chlorophyllin bait in zone-3 was used as measure of attraction process. Infected snails were more attracted with red light+starch (57.7%. Uninfected snails were more attracted by red light+serine (58.0%. The molluscicidal activity of chlorophyllin against infected snails in red light (96h LC50-1.88% chlorophyllin in bait and sunlight (96h LC50-2.40% chlorophyllin in bait was more pronounced than uninfected snail in red light (96h LC50-1.76% Chlorophyllin in bait and sunlight (96h LC50-3.62% chlorophyllin in bait.

  18. Colour Changes Evaluation of Freshly Cut Alder Veneers Under the Influence of Indoor Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Adela SALCA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental study concerning the colour changes occurred on the surfaces ofblack alder veneers (Alnus glutinosa, obtained from a freshly cut (not treated log, after their exposure tosunlight and darkness, for 1 and 3 months, under indoor conditions.A Chroma Meter Konika Minolta CR-410 device was used for colour measurement.The colorimetric coordinates were recorded before and after the exposure, according to ISO 7724-2.The results highlight a significant decrease of colour lightness, right after the first month of sunlight exposure.The a* and b* colour coordinates showed an increasing tendency with increasing exposure time, whichsignifies a colour darkening under sunlight radiation that penetrates the window glass. Colour differenceswere noticed right after the first month of sunlight exposure, while under darkness conditions, a relativecolour constancy was noticed, the colour changes being less pronounced, but yet perceptible by the humaneye.The study results complete the colorimetric database of veneers used in furniture industry, but theyalso contribute to the rehabilitation of black alder as a wood species with a real potential of use in furnitureindustry.

  19. Chemically derived luminescent graphene oxide nanosheets and its sunlight driven photocatalytic activity against methylene blue dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets (NSs) have been synthesized with precise control over their thickness and molecular structure. The existence of oxygen containing functional groups on GO NSs through chemical treatment confers remarkable optical properties on GO. XRD, TEM, Raman and FTIR techniques were used to confirm the phase and degree of oxidation, morphology, structural information and chemical structure of the synthesized GO NSs. UV-Vis. spectroscopy was employed to study the optical absorption properties of the synthesized GO NSs. The excitation wavelength dependent PL measurements of the synthesized GO NSs were carried out which could be useful for the design and development of GO based next generation optoelectronic devices. The most fascinating luminescent property of synthesized GO NSs is that its luminescence peak position can be easily tuned by only varying the excitation wavelength without significant changes in its size and chemical composition. In order to study the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye using GO NSs as a photocatalyst, a sunlight driven photocatalytic activity has been performed. The degradation rate of MB dye becomes fast when GO NSs are added to the dye solution. The photodegradation efficiency of GO NSs is calculated to be 60%. The present results indicate that synthesized GO NSs can be used as sunlight active photocatalyst. The optimistic response to sunlight irradiation validates the potential of GO NSs in solar energy conversion.

  20. Spectroscopic properties of Er doped and Er, Nd codoped fluoride glasses under simulated sunlight illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Shintaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Hiroyuki; Hughes, Mark A.; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the fluorescence characteristics of Er codoped Nd doped ZBLAN glasses proposed for solar pumped fiber laser (SPFL) under simulated sunlight. Er is used as a sensitizer because it absorbs a part of the ultraviolet and visible light where is no absorption of Nd. Under simulated sunlight illumination, Er singly doped fluoride glass displayed four emission bands with peaks at 550, 848, 977 and 1533 nm attributed to the 4S 3/2- 4I 15/2, 4S 3/2- 4I 13/2, 4I 11/2- 4I 15/2 and 4I 13/2- 4I 15/2 electronic transitions of Er, respectively. The quantum efficiency measurement was carried out using an integrating sphere and under the simulated sunlight excitation showed a maximum of 73% for 0.5 mol.% of ErF 3 in ZBLAN glass. In Nd, Er codoped fluoride glass, the 1.05 μm emission of Nd was observed under 380 nm excitation what supposes the energy transfer from Er to Nd in ZBLAN glasses as Nd has no absorption at the wavelength. Er, Nd codoped fluoride glasses are promising as a sensitized laser media for solar pumped fiber lasers.

  1. Attitude of future healthcare provider towards vitamin D significance in relation to sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Aysha Zia; Zia, Zubia; Gitay, Mehnaz Nuruddin; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Khan, Muhammad Saad

    2015-10-01

    Nature is the kindest of all to provide man with all the necessary components for a healthy life at easily accessible lengths. The deprivation arises with unawareness and lack of correct measures to extract the benefits. Medical education makes the youth aware of the numerous disorders and diseases, as well as their preventions and treatments. This awareness needs to be realized and implemented in the society, and it is not possible without the advisers acting on the same lines. Since doctors are the most trusted and their advice is adopted without much thought, it is extremely inevitable to analyze the attitude of medical students of various levels to understand the cause of their negligence toward their own deficiencies, the focus for this study being vitamin D (VD). A cross sectional descriptive study was done on undergraduate medical students of health profession from different universities of Pakistan to access the awareness regarding VD deficiency associated with sunlight. Informed consent was duly signed by each participant after which self-constructed questionnaire was provided to them and data are collected. SPSS 17 was used for Statistical analysis. Final students are well aware of VD significance, take food rich in VD but still suffer from fatigue and muscular pain. No treatment was taken for fatigue and muscular pain by majority of these sufferers and those who took treatment were VD supplement. The health sufferers were mostly those who avoided sunlight highlighting the role of VD in maintaining an active lifestyle as well as the significance of sunlight in maintaining VD levels. It can be concluded that in spite of awareness, the role of sunlight exposure and the proper time and duration of exposure cannot be ignored to create a healthy and active society.

  2. Sunlight decreased genotoxicity of azadirachtin on root tip cells of Allium cepa and Eucrosia bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwankua, W; Sengsai, S; Kuleung, C; Euawong, N

    2010-07-01

    Utilization of neem plant (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) extract for pest control in agriculture has raised concerns over contamination by the residues to the environment. Such residues, particularly azadirachtin (Aza), may cause deleterious effect to non-target organisms. This investigation was conducted to find out if Aza could be inactivated through exposures to sunlight. Activity of Aza was assessed as its ability to cause cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the forms of nuclei abnormality and chromosome aberration as measured by mitotic index (MI) and mitotic aberration (MA). Varying concentrations of Aza were tested on Allium cepa and Eucrosia bicolor. It was found that the MI of all root tip meristematic cells of A. cepa and E. bicolor treated with 0.00005%, 0.00010%, 0.00015%, and 0.00020% (w/v) Aza-containing neem extract for 24h, were significantly lower than the controls. Complementary to the lower levels of MI, the Aza-treated groups showed higher MA levels in all cases investigated. Furthermore, the decreasing levels of MI and the increasing levels of MA related well with the increasing concentration of Aza. Microscopic examination of root tip meristematic cells revealed that the anomaly found most often were mitotic disturbances and chromosomal bridges. Exposures of 0.00020% (w/v) Aza to sunlight for 3 days and 7 days decreased Aza ability to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, both in terms of MI and MA, to root tip meristematic cells in A. cepa and E. bicolor. Photodegradation of Aza upon exposure to direct sunlight was confirmed by HPLC. The study implicates that Aza would unlikely cause long term deleterious effects to the environment since it would be inactivated by sunlight. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of helium-like and hydrogen-like argon spectra using double-crystal X-ray spectrometers on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, B.; Chen, J.; Hu, R. J.; Wang, F. D.; Li, Y. Y.; Fu, J.; Shen, Y. C.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N.; Lee, S. G.; Ye, M. Y.; Shi, Y. J.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    A two-crystal assembly was deployed on the tangential X-ray crystal spectrometer to measure both helium-like and hydrogen-like spectra on EAST. High-quality helium-like and hydrogen-like spectra were observed simultaneously for the first time on one detector for a wide range of plasma parameters. Profiles of line-integrated core ion temperatures inferred from two spectra were consistent. Since tungsten was adopted as the upper divertor material, one tungsten line (W XLIV at 4.017 Å) on the short-wavelength side of the Lyman-α line (Lα1) was identified for typical USN discharges, which was diffracted by a He-like crystal (2d = 4.913 Å). Another possible Fe XXV line (1.85 Å) was observed to be located on the long-wavelength side of resonance line (w), which was diffracted from a H-like crystal (2d = 4.5622 Å) on the second order. Be-like argon lines were also observable that fill the detector space between the He-like and H-like spectra.

  4. Striking anomalies in the shape of Mössbauer spectra measured near “magnetic” Bragg reflection from [Fe/Cr] multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, M. A., E-mail: Mandreeva1@yandex.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Chumakov, A. I.; Smirnov, G. V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation); Babanov, Yu. A.; Devyaterikov, D. I.; Goloborodsky, B. Yu.; Ponomarev, D. A.; Romashev, L. N.; Ustinov, V. V. [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics RAS (Russian Federation); Rüffer, R. [ESRF - European Synchrotron (France)

    2016-12-15

    The present work reports the observation of a peculiar asymmetry of the Mössbauer spectra of reflectivity from a periodic [{sup 57}Fe(8Å)/Cr(10.5Å)]{sub 30} multilayer measured on both slopes of the half-order “magnetic” Bragg peak. The performed analysis and model calculations confirm the responsibility of the refraction effect for the observed features.

  5. Methods Of Measurement The Three-Dimensional Wind Waves Spectra, Based On The Processing Of Video Images Of The Sea Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Salin, Boris M

    2013-01-01

    Optical means of measurement of surface waves characteristics provide better spatial and temporal resolution than other methods, but they face definite difficulties, while converting results of the indirect measurements to absolute levels of the waves. This publication solves this problem, to some extent. In this paper we propose an optical method for measuring the 3D power spectral density of the surface waves and the space-time samples of profiles of the waves. The method involves, firstly, synchronous recording of brightness field over a patch of the rough surface and measurement of surface oscillations in one or more points, and secondly, filtering of the image spatial spectrum and the filter parameters are selected to maximize correlation of surface oscillations that are reconstructed and measured in one or two points. In addition to the measurement procedure, the paper provides experimental results on the measurement of multidimensional spectra of roughness, which are, in common, in agreement with theor...

  6. Lack of sunlight exposure influence on primary glioblastoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Hasan; Akca, Zeki; Erden, Abdulsamet; Aslan, Tuncay; Ucar, Kadir; Kaplan, Bunyamin; Buyukcelik, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of primary glioblastoma (GBM) is poor. Approximately 2/3 of primary brain tumor diagnoses are GBM, of which 95% are primary lesions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether more sunlight exposure has an effect on survival of patients with primary GBM. A total of 111 patients with primary GBM were enrolled from Kayseri in inner Anatolia which has a cold climate (n: 40) and Mersin in Mediterranean region with a warm climate and more sunlight exposure (n: 71). The patients with primary GBM were divided into two groups as Kayseri and Mersin and compared for progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The PFS values were 7.0 and 4.7 months for Kayseri and Mersin groups, respectively (p=0.10) and the respective OS values were 13.3 and 9.4 months (p=0.13). We did not found any significant difference regarding age, sex, comorbidity, smoking, surgery, resurgery, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and palliative chemotherapy between the groups. We found that more sunlight exposure had no impact on prognosis of patients with primary GBM, adding inconsistency to the literature about the relationship between sunlight and GBM.

  7. Sunlight exposure, antioxidants, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Astrid E; Bentham, Graham C; Agnew, Maureen; Young, Ian S; Augood, Cristina; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vioque, Jesus

    2008-10-01

    To examine the association of sunlight exposure and antioxidant level with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Four thousand seven hundred fifty-three participants aged 65 years or older in the European Eye Study underwent fundus photography, were interviewed for adult lifetime sunlight exposure, and gave blood for antioxidant analysis. Blue light exposure was estimated by combining meteorologic and questionnaire data. Data on sunlight exposure and antioxidants were available in 101 individuals with neovascular AMD, 2182 with early AMD, and 2117 controls. No association was found between blue light exposure and neovascular or early AMD. Significant associations were found between blue light exposure and neovascular AMD in individuals in the quartile of lowest antioxidant level-vitamin C, zeaxanthin, vitamin E, and dietary zinc-with an odds ratio of about 1.4 for 1 standard deviation unit increase in blue light exposure. Higher odds ratios for blue light were observed with combined low antioxidant levels, especially vitamin C, zeaxanthin, and vitamin E (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-8.9), which were also associated with early stages of AMD. Although it is not possible to establish causality between sunlight exposure and neovascular AMD, our results suggest that people in the general population should use ocular protection and follow dietary recommendations for the key antioxidant nutrients.

  8. [Most common skin disorders caused by excessive exposure to sunlight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitás, Éva; Mészáros, Judit

    2016-01-17

    The healing properties of sunlight has been known for millennia, however the gradual deterioration of the ozone layer and the increased use of sun tanning beds in recent decades are causing an increase in skin damaging ultraviolet exposure. In this article the most common photodermatoses and the principles of their treatments are reviewed.

  9. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-06-03

    Concentrated sunlight was used to study the performance response of inverted P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells after exposure to high intensity sunlight. Correlations of efficiency as a function of solar intensity were established in the range of 0.5-15 suns at three different stages: for a pristine cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of the lost performance over time: at 1 sun only 6% of the initial performance was conserved after the high intensity exposure, while after rest the performance had recovered to 60% of the initial value. The timescale of the recovery effect was studied by monitoring the cell performance at 1 sun after high intensity exposure. This showed that cell performance was almost completely restored after 180 min. The transient state is believed to be a result of the breakdown of the diode behaviour of the ZnO electron transport layer by O(2) desorption, increasing the hole conductivity. These results imply that accelerated degradation of organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight is not a straightforward process, and care has to be taken to allow for a sound accelerated lifetime assessment based on concentrated sunlight.

  10. Photochemical transformation of graphene oxide in sunlight (journal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a graphene derivative that is more easily manufactured in large scale and used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with properties analogous to graphene. In this study, we investigate the photochemical fate of GO under sunlight conditions. The resu...

  11. Electricity from Sunlight: The Future of Photovoltaics. Worldwatch Paper 52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Christopher

    Solar photovoltaic cells have been called the ultimate energy technology, environmentally benign and without moving parts, solar cells directly convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic energy conversion is fundamentally different from all other forms of electricity generation. Without turbines, generators or other mechanical equipment, it…

  12. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  13. Sunlight driven photocatalytic water splitting using nanostructured bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, R.; Sakar, M.; Bharathkumar, S.; Balakumar, S.

    2017-05-01

    Sunlight driven photocatalytic water splitting properties of nanosized Bi2WO6 have been demonstrated. Upon the structural confirmation using XRD and Raman studies, the band edge offset deduced from UV-DRS spectra showed that the energy band structure of Bi2WO6 is manifested due to electronic transition in the hybridized orbital of Bi6s and O2p to the W5d orbital. The observed Bi2WO6 nanoparticulates-assisted H2 generation from glycerol-water mixture may be attributed to the following two competitive phenomena: (i) the photocatalytic degradation of glycerol and (ii) photocatalytic splitting of water molecules, where glycerol acts as a sacrificial agent. This study sheds lights on the photocatalytic reformation of contaminated aqueous ecosystems as a green resource to produce hydrogen energy.

  14. Measurement of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose rates from {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction induced on thin LiF target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanackovic, Jovica, E-mail: atanacjz@gmail.com [Ontario Power Generation, Whitby, ON, Canada L1N 9E3 (Canada); Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Matysiak, Witold [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL 32206 (United States); Dubeau, Jacques; Witharana, Sampath [DETEC, Gatineau, QC, Canada J8T 4J1 (Canada); Waker, Anthony [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The measurements of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose rates were performed using the KN Van de Graaff accelerator, located at the McMaster University Accelerator Laboratory (MAL). Protons were accelerated on the thin lithium fluoride (LiF) target and produced mono-energetic neutrons which were measured using three different spectrometers: Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS), and Rotational Proton Recoil Spectrometer (ROSPEC). The purpose of this work is (1) measurement and quantification of low energy accelerator neutron fields in terms of neutron fluence and dose, (2) comparison of results obtained by three different instruments, (3) comparison of measurements with Monte Carlo simulations based on theoretical neutron yields from {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and (4) comparison of results obtained using different neutron spectral unfolding methods. The nominal thickness of the LiF target used in the experiment was 50μg/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to the linear thickness of 0.19μm and results in approximately 6 keV energy loss for the proton energies used in the experiment (2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 MeV). For each of the proton energies, neutron fluence per incident proton charge was measured and several dosimetric quantities of interest in radiation protection were derived. In addition, theoretical neutron yield calculations together with the results of Monte Carlo (MCNP) modeling of the neutron spectra are reported. Consistent neutron fluence spectra were obtained with three detectors and good agreement was observed between theoretically calculated and measured neutron fluences and derived dosimetric quantities for investigated proton energies at 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 MeV. In the case of 2.2 MeV, some plausibly explainable discrepancies were observed.

  15. Correcting for variable laser-target distances of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with ChemCam using emission lines of Martian dust spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Cousin, A.; Lanza, N. L.; Lasue, J.; Clegg, S. M.; Berger, G.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Tokar, R. L.; Bender, S.; Forni, O.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Frydenvang, J.; Delapp, D.; Gasnault, O.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A. M.; Lewin, E.; Clark, B. C.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Blaney, D.; Fabre, C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory, the ChemCam instrument acquires remote laser induced breakdown spectra at distances that vary between 1.56 m and 7 m. This variation in distance affects the intensities of the measured LIBS emission lines in non-trivial ways. To determine the behavior of a LIBS emission line with distance, it is necessary to separate the effects of many parameters such as laser energy, laser spot size, target homogeneity, and optical collection efficiency. These parameters may be controlled in a laboratory on Earth but for field applications or in space this is a challenge. In this paper, we show that carefully selected ChemCam LIBS emission lines acquired from the Martian dust can be used to build an internal proxy spectroscopic standard. This in turn, allows for a direct measurement of the effects of the distance of various LIBS emission lines and hence can be used to correct ChemCam LIBS spectra for distance variations. When tested on pre-launch LIBS calibration data acquired under Martian-like conditions and with controlled and well-calibrated targets, this approach yields much improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. This work lays the foundation for future implementation of automated routines to correct ChemCam spectra for differences caused by variable distance.

  16. Measurement of negatively charged pion spectra in inelastic p+p interactions at p{sub lab} = 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Blondel, A.; Bravar, A.; Debieux, S.; Haesler, A.; Korzenev, A.; Murphy, S.; Ravonel, M. [University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Aduszkiewicz, A.; Dominik, W.; Kielczewska, D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Matulewicz, T.; Posiadala, M.; Skrzypczak, E. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Ali, Y.; Brzychczyk, J.; Majka, Z.; Marcinek, A.; Planeta, R.; Staszel, P.; Wyszynski, O. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Anticic, T.; Kadija, K.; Susa, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Antoniou, N.; Christakoglou, P.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.; Kapoyannis, A.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Vassiliou, M. [University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Baatar, B.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Krasnoperov, A.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Tereshchenko, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bay, F.; Luise, S.Di; Rubbia, A.; Sgalaberna, D. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Blumer, J.; Dembinski, H.; Engel, R.; Mathes, H.J.; Roth, M.; Szuba, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Tsenov, R. [University of Sofia, Faculty of Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria); Busygina, O.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Ivashkin, A.; Kurepin, A.; Marin, V.; Petukhov, O.; Sadovsky, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Czopowicz, T.; Dynowski, K.; Grebieszkow, K.; Maksiak, B.; Peryt, W.; Pluta, J.; Slodkowski, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Drozhzhova, T.; Feofilov, G.A.; Igolkin, S.; Kondratiev, V.P.; Vechernin, V.V.; Vinogradov, L. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Dumarchez, J.; Robert, A.; Zambelli, L. [LPNHE, University of Paris VI and VII, Paris (France); Ereditato, A.; Hierholzer, M.; Nirkko, M.; Pistillo, C.; Redij, A. [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fodor, Z.; Fulop, A.; Kiss, T.; Laszlo, A.; Marton, K.; Palla, G.; Sipos, R.; Tolyhi, T.; Vesztergombi, G. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Gazdzicki, M. [Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce (Poland); University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Grzeszczuk, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kisiel, J.; Kowalski, S.; Larsen, D.; Pulawski, S.; Schmidt, K.; Wilczek, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Hasegawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shibata, M.; Tada, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Idczak, R.; Kovesarki, P.; Turko, L. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Jokovic, D.; Manic, D.; Puzovic, J.; Savic, M. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Kleinfelder, S. [University of California, Irvine (United States); Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M.; Renfordt, R.; Rustamov, A.; Stroebele, H. [University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Matveev, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mrowczynski, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Seyboth, P.; Stefanek, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A. [Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce (Poland); Palczewski, T.; Rondio, E.; Stepaniak, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Paul, T.; Veberic, D. [University Nova Gorica, Laboratory of Astroparticle Physics, Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Popov, B.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); LPNHE, University of Paris VI and VII, Paris (France); Rauch, W. [Fachhochschule Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Roehrich, D. [University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Collaboration: NA61/SHINE Collaboration

    2014-03-15

    We present experimental results on inclusive spectra and mean multiplicities of negatively charged pions produced in inelastic p+p interactions at incident projectile momenta of 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c (√(s) = 6.3, 7.7, 8.8, 12.3 and 17.3 GeV, respectively). The measurements were performed using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer at the CERN super proton synchrotron. Two-dimensional spectra are determined in terms of rapidity and transverse momentum. Their properties such as the width of rapidity distributions and the inverse slope parameter of transverse mass spectra are extracted and their collision energy dependences are presented. The results on inelastic p+p interactions are compared with the corresponding data on central Pb+Pb collisions measured by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. The results presented in this paper are part of the NA61/SHINE ion program devoted to the study of the properties of the onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter. They are required for interpretation of results on nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of negatively charged pion spectra in inelastic p+p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgrall, N.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Diakonos, F.; Luise, S. Di; Dominik, W.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Fulop, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Idczak, R.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Joković, D.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kiełczewska, D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kiss, T.; Kleinfelder, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kovesarki, P.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Manić, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marin, V.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mrówczyński, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paul, T.; Pistillo, C.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Płaneta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Savić, M.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Sipos, R.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tolyhi, T.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental results on inclusive spectra and mean multiplicities of negatively charged pions produced in inelastic p+p interactions at incident projectile momenta of 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/ c ( 6.3, 7.7, 8.8, 12.3 and 17.3 GeV, respectively). The measurements were performed using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer at the CERN super proton synchrotron. Two-dimensional spectra are determined in terms of rapidity and transverse momentum. Their properties such as the width of rapidity distributions and the inverse slope parameter of transverse mass spectra are extracted and their collision energy dependences are presented. The results on inelastic p+p interactions are compared with the corresponding data on central Pb+Pb collisions measured by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. The results presented in this paper are part of the NA61/SHINE ion program devoted to the study of the properties of the onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter. They are required for interpretation of results on nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  18. Measurement of negatively charged pion spectra in inelastic p+p interactions at $p_{lab}$ = 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Ali, Y; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Baatar, B; Bay, F; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Bogomilov, M; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bunyatov, S A; Busygina, O; Christakoglou, P; Czopowicz, T; Davis, N; Debieux, S; Dembinski, H; Diakonos, F; Di Luise, S; Dominik, W; Drozhzhova, T; Dumarchez, J; Dynowski, K; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Fulop, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Haesler, A; Hasegawa, T; Hierholzer, M; Idczak, R; Igolkin, S; Ivashkin, A; Jokovic, D; Kadija, K; Kapoyannis, A; Katrynska, N; Kaptur, E; Kielczewska, D; Kirejczyk, M; Kisiel, J; Kiss, T; Kleinfelder, S; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kondratiev, V P; Korzenev, A; Kovesarki, P; Kowalski, S; Krasnoperov, A; Kurepin, A; Larsen, D; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M; Majka, Z; Maksiak, B; Malakhov, A I; Manic, D; Marcinek, A; Marin, V; Marton, K; Mathes, H J; Matulewicz, T; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G.L; Mrowczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Paul, T; Pistillo, C; Peryt, W; Petukhov, O; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Pulawski, S; Puzovic, J; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Redij, A; Renfordt, R; Robert, A; Rohrich, D; Rondio, E; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rustamov, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovsky, A; Sakashita, K; Savic, M; Schmidt, K; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Sgalaberna, D; Shibata, M; Sipos, R; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strobele, H; Susa, T; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Tereshchenko, V; Tolyhi, T; Tsenov, R; Turko, L; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Veberic, D; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Vinogradov, L; Wilczek, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A; Wyszynski, O; Zambelli, L; Zipper, W

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results on inclusive spectra and mean multiplicities of negatively charged pions produced in inelastic p+p interactions at incident projectile momenta of 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158GeV/c ($\\sqrt{s}$ = 6.3, 7.7, 8.8, 12.3 and 17.3GeV, respectively). The measurements were performed using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer at the CERN super proton synchrotron. Two-dimensional spectra are determined in terms of rapidity and transverse momentum. Their properties such as the width of rapidity distributions and the inverse slope parameter of transverse mass spectra are extracted and their collision energy dependences are presented. The results on inelastic p+p interactions are compared with the corresponding data on central Pb+Pb collisions measured by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. The results presented in this paper are part of the NA61/SHINE ion program devoted to the study of the properties of the onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of strongly inter...

  19. The Cosmic Ray Helium and Carbon Nuclei Spectra Measured by Voyager 1 at Low Energies and Earth Based Measurements of these Nuclei up to 200 GeV nuc Concordance at High Energies with a Leaky Box Propagation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the Helium and Carbon interstellar spectra measured at Voyager in the local interstellar medium leads to a different interpretation than a comparison of the Hydrogen to Helium spectra. This is because the He/C ratio is observed to increase rapidly with energy below 40 MeV/nuc in contrast to an almost constant H/He ratio at these low energies. Both the He and C spectra that are observed at Voyager above 40 MeV/nuc and much higher energy spectra from the PAMELA measurements of these two components up to 100 GeV/nuc can be accurately fit to within 10% assuming galactic propagation in a leaky box type of diffusion model in the galaxy with identical source spectra P-2.28 for He and C using a diffusion coefficient P0.50 above 1 GV rigidity. These same exponents also fit the H spectrum from 40 MeV to over 100 GeV. At low energies an excess of He relative to C is observed that would amount to about 20% of the modeled galactic component at 10 MeV/nuc.

  20. An iterative method in a probabilistic approach to the spectral inverse problem: Differential emission measure from line spectra and broadband data

    CERN Document Server

    Goryaev, F F; Urnov, A M; Oparin, S N; Hochedez, J -F; Reale, F; 10.1051/0004-6361/201014280

    2010-01-01

    Inverse problems are of great importance in astrophysics for deriving information about the physical characteristics of hot optically thin plasma sources from their EUV and X-ray spectra. We describe and test an iterative method developed within the framework of a probabilistic approach to the spectral inverse problem for determining the thermal structures of the emitting plasma. We also demonstrate applications of this method to both high resolution line spectra and broadband imaging data. Our so-called Bayesian iterative method (BIM) is an iterative procedure based on Bayes' theorem and is used to reconstruct differential emission measure (DEM) distributions. To demonstrate the abilities of the BIM, we performed various numerical tests and model simulations establishing its robustness and usefulness. We then applied the BIM to observable data for several active regions (AR) previously analyzed with other DEM diagnostic techniques: both SUMER/SOHO (Landi and Feldman, 2008) and SPIRIT/CORONAS-F (Shestov et al...

  1. Measurement of jet spectra in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, Marta

    2013-01-01

    We report a measurement of transverse momentum spectra of jets detected with the ALICE detector in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN)=2.76 TeV. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles using the anti-kt jet algorithm. The background from soft particle production is determined for each event and subtracted. The remaining influence of underlying event fluctuations is quantified by embedding different probes into heavy-ion data. The reconstructed transverse momentum spectrum is corrected for background fluctuations by unfolding. We compare the inclusive jet spectra reconstructed with R=0.2 and R=0.3 for different centrality classes and compare the jet yield in Pb-Pb and pp events.

  2. Measurements of beta ray spectra inside nuclear generating stations using a silicon detector coincidence telescope: skin dose beta correction factors for TL elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Weizmann, Y. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Hirning, C.R. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby (Canada). Health Physics

    1996-10-01

    The measurement of beta ray spectra at various work locations inside nuclear generating stations operated by Ontario Hydro is described. The measurements were carried out using an advanced coincidence telescope spectrometer using silicon detectors only. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies over the range 70-2500 keV with close to 100% efficiency. Over 40 beta ray spectra were measured at various work locations in three nuclear generating stations. Photon rejection is carried out by requiring a coincidence between either two or three detectors. Monte Carlo calculations were then used to estimate beta correction factors for the LiF:Mg,Ti elements used in the Ontario Hydro thermoluminescence dosemeters. Averaging over all the measured beta correction factors for the `skin chip (100 mg. cm{sup -2}) results in a value of 2.73 {+-} 0.77 and for the extremity dosemeter (240 mg.cm{sup -2}) an average value of 4.42 {+-} 1.17 is obtained. These values are 57% and 120% greater, respectively, than the current values used by Ontario Hydro. In addition, beta correction factors for nine representative spectra were calculated for 40 mg.cm{sup -2} and 20 mg.cm{sup -2} chips, and the results demonstrate the benefits of decreased dosemeter thickness. The average value of the beta correction factor, as well as the spread in the beta correction factor, decreases dramatically from 4.80 {+-} 2.1 (240 mg.cm{sup -2}) to 1.29 {+-} 0.1 (20mg.cm{sup -2}). (Author).

  3. Measurements of neutron streaming energy spectra in shielding ducts; Medidas e calculos de espectro de energia de neutrons emergentes de um duto em uma blindagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioletto, Elcio; Abe, Alfredo Y. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). E-mail: angiolet@net.ipen.br; Coelho, Rogerio P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    This work presents the measurements of neutron streaming, for different energy ranges, in shielding ducts. The shielding is composed of plates of different materials (borate polyethylene and paraffin). The two ducts are conceived as labyrinths in order to (a three-legged duct) minimize the radiation streaming. A 37 GBq Americium-Beryllium neutron source type was used for the experimental measurements. The fast neutron energy spectra were measured using a detection system with a liquid organic scintillator, NE-213 detector, and appropriate electronic equipment. The results are in good agreement with the literature. The measurements of thermal neutrons intensity were performed with a BF{sub 3} counter. The MCNP-4B code was used to simulate the experiment. The simulation was performed with success, obtaining a small discrepancy (9.0%) between the calculated results and the measurements with the BF{sub 3} counter, at the duct third leg. From the results it was possible to observe the thermal neutron streaming through the duct, the effects of neutron flux moderation, the attenuation in the shielding and also the neutron energy spectra modifications emerging from the shielding. (author)

  4. Photovoltaics: Electricity from sunlight, FY 1985 accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    This summary of FY 1985 accomplishments contains the technical highlights of SERI's program in photovoltaic research and development and a bibliography of technical publications. Also included are several management highlights. Selected accomplishments are categorized according to research tasks identified in the DOE National PV Program's Five-Year Research Plan. The DOE task areas appearing here are Single-Junction Thin Films, High-Efficiency Multijunction Concepts, Innovative Concepts, Flat-Plate Collectors, and System Experiments. Subcontract program categories include amorphous thin films, high-efficiency concepts, polycrystalline thin films, crystalline silicon, and innovative concepts, which are further subdivided into new ideas, the University Participation Program, and photoelectrochemical cells. SERI's internal PV task areas are PV Devices and Measurements, Solid State Research, Insolation Resource Assessment, Advanced PV Systems Research, and solar electric research activities. The bibliography is a compilation of the technical publications resulting from all of SERI's research during FY 1984 and FY 1985. The entries are listed alphabetically by author.

  5. Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions of Deepwater horizon oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Phoebe Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Chen, Huan [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310-4005 (United States); Podgorski, David C. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310-4005 (United States); Future Fuels Institute, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310-4005 (United States); McKenna, Amy M. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310-4005 (United States); Tarr, Matthew A., E-mail: mtarr@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Sunlight oxygenates petroleum. - Highlights: • Oxidation seen in water-soluble oil fraction after exposure to simulated sunlight. • Oxygen addition occurred across a wide range of carbon number and DBE. • Oil compounds were susceptible to addition of multiple oxygens to each molecule. • Results provide understanding of fate of oil on water after exposure to sunlight. - Abstract: In order to assess the impact of sunlight on oil fate, Macondo well oil from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) rig was mixed with pure water and irradiated with simulated sunlight. After irradiation, the water-soluble organics (WSO) from the dark and irradiated samples were extracted and characterized by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Liquid–liquid extraction yielded two fractions from dark and irradiated water/oil mixtures: acidic WSOs (negative-ion electrospray (ESI)), and base/neutral WSOs (positive-ion ESI) coupled to FT-ICR MS to catalog molecular-level transformations that occur to Macondo-derived WSOs after solar irradiation. Such direct measure of oil phototransformation has not been previously reported. The most abundant heteroatom class detected in the irradiated WSO acid fractions correspond to molecules that contain five oxygens (O{sub 5}), while the most abundant acids in the dark samples contain two oxygen atoms per molecule (O{sub 2}). Higher-order oxygen classes (O{sub 5}–O{sub 9}) were abundant in the irradiated samples, but <1.5% relative abundance in the dark sample. The increased abundance of higher-order oxygen classes in the irradiated samples relative to the dark samples indicates that photooxidized components of the Macondo crude oil become water-soluble after irradiation. The base/neutral fraction showed decreased abundance of pyridinic nitrogen (N{sub 1}) concurrent with an increased abundance of N{sub 1}O{sub x} classes after irradiation. The predominance of higher

  6. Effect of Natural Sunlight on Bacterial Activity and Differential Sensitivity of Natural Bacterioplankton Groups in Northwestern Mediterranean Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Gasol, Josep M.; Lefort, Thomas; Hofer, Julia; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of natural sunlight on heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton in short-term experiments. We used a single-cell level approach involving flow cytometry combined with physiological probes and microautoradiography to determine sunlight effects on the activity and integrity of the cells. After 4 h of sunlight exposure, most bacterial cells maintained membrane integrity and viability as assessed by the simultaneous staining with propidium iodide and SYBR green I. In contrast, a significant inhibition of heterotrophic bacterial activity was detected, measured by 5-cyano-2,3 ditolyl tetrazolium chloride reduction and leucine incorporation. We applied microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization to test the sensitivity of the different bacterial groups naturally occurring in the Northwestern Mediterranean to sunlight. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes groups appeared to be highly resistant to solar radiation, with small changes in activity after exposure. On the contrary, Alphaproteobacteria bacteria were more sensitive to radiation as measured by the cell-specific incorporation of labeled amino acids, leucine, and ATP. Within Alphaproteobacteria, bacteria belonging to the Roseobacter group showed higher resistance than members of the SAR11 cluster. The activity of Roseobacter was stimulated by exposure to photosynthetic available radiation compared to the dark treatment. Our results suggest that UV radiation can significantly affect the in situ single-cell activity of bacterioplankton and that naturally dominating phylogenetic bacterial groups have different sensitivity to natural levels of incident solar radiation. PMID:16957198

  7. LAMOST Observations in the Kepler Field. Analysis of the Stellar Parameters Measured with LASP Based on Low-resolution Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Anbing; Fu, Jianning; De Cat, Peter; Wu, Yue; Yang, Xiaohu; Shi, Jianrong; Luo, Ali; Zhang, Haotong; Dong, Subo; Zhang, Ruyuan; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Cao, Zihuang; Du, Bing

    2016-08-01

    All 14 subfields of the Kepler field were observed at least once with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (lamost, Xinglong Observatory, China) during the 2012-2014 observation seasons. There are 88,628 reduced spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio in the g band (S/N g ) ≥ 6 after the first round (2012-2014) of observations of the lamost- Kepler project (LK-project). By adopting the upgraded version of the lamost Stellar Parameter pipeline (lasp), we have determined the atmospheric parameters ({T}{eff}, {log}g, and [Fe/H]) and heliocentric radial velocity v rad for 51,406 stars with 61,226 spectra. Compared with the atmospheric parameters derived from both high-resolution spectroscopy and asteroseismology for common stars in Huber et al., an external calibration of lasp atmospheric parameters was made, leading to the determination of the external errors for giants and dwarfs. Multiple spectroscopic observations of the same objects in the LK-project were used to estimate the internal uncertainties of the atmospheric parameters as a function of S/N g with the unbiased estimation method. The lasp atmospheric parameters were calibrated based on both the external and internal uncertainties for the giants and dwarfs. A general statistical analysis of the stellar parameters leads to the discovery of 106 candidate metal-poor stars, 9 candidate very metal-poor stars, and 18 candidate high-velocity stars. Fitting formulae were obtained segmentally for both the calibrated atmospheric parameters of the LK-project and the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) parameters with common stars. The calibrated atmospheric parameters and radial velocities of the LK-project will be useful for studying stars in the Kepler field. ) located at the Xinglong Observatory, China.

  8. Photocatalytic degradation of Orange G on nitrogen-doped TiO2 catalysts under visible light and sunlight irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianhui; Qiao, Liping; Sun, Shengpeng; Wang, Guoliang

    2008-06-30

    In this paper, the degradation of an azo dye Orange G (OG) on nitrogen-doped TiO2 photocatalysts has been investigated under visible light and sunlight irradiation. Under visible light irradiation, the doped TiO2 nanocatalysts demonstrated higher activity than the commercial Dugussa P25 TiO2, allowing more efficient utilization of solar light, while under sunlight, P25 showed higher photocatalytic activity. According to the X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis spectra analyses, it was found that both the nanosized anatase structure and the appearance of new absorption band in the visible region caused by nitrogen doping were responsible for the significant enhancement of OG degradation under visible light. In addition, the photosensitized oxidation mechanism originated from OG itself was also considered contributing to the higher visible-light-induced degradation efficiency. The effect of the initial pH of the solution and the dosage of hydrogen peroxide under different light sources was also investigated. Under visible light and sunlight, the optimal solution pH was both 2.0, while the optimal dosage of H2O2 was 5.0 and 15.0 mmol/l, respectively.

  9. Neutron reference spectra measurements with the Bonner multi-spheres spectrometer; Medidas de espectros de referencia de neutrons com o espectrometro de multiesferas de Bonner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos Junior, Roberto Mendonca de

    2004-07-01

    This paper aims to define a procedure to use the Bonner Multisphere Spectrometer with a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) detector in order to determine of neutron spectra. It was measured {sup 238}PuBe spectra and same of reference ({sup 241}AmBe, {sup 252}Cf e {sup 252}Cf+D{sub 2}O) published in ISO 8529-1 (2001) Norm. The data were processed by a computer program (BUNKI), which presents the results in neutrons energy fluency. Each input parameter of the program was studied in order to establish their influence in the adjustment result. The environment dose equivalent rate obtained placing the detector 1 m from the {sup 241}AmBe source was 122 {+-} 4 {mu}Sv/h with 7% of uncertainty and 95% of confidence level. The procedure established in this work was tested with the {sup 238}PuBe spectrum, obtaining an environment dose equivalent rate of 286 {+-} 9 {mu}Sv/h, 8% lower than the value measured experimentally used as reference. Through this procedure will be possible to measure neutron spectra in different work places where neutrons sources are used. Knowing these spectra, it will be possible to evaluate which area monitors, are more suitable, as well as, to study better the response of individual neutron monitors, as for instance, to obtain a conversion coefficient more appropriate to the albedo dosimeter used in different work places. As the measurements need a long time to be accomplished, the work optimization is fundamental to reduce the exposing time of the Bonner spectrometer operator. For this reason, an important parameter examined in this paper was the possibility of reducing the number of spheres used during the measurement without changing the final result. Considering the radiation protection standards, this parameter has a huge importance when the measurements are performed in work places where the neutron fluency and gamma rate offer risks to the operator's health, as for instance, in nuclear centrals. Studying this parameter, it was possible to conclude that

  10. Vitamin D and Sunlight Exposure in Newly-Diagnosed Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yu, Yu; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo

    2016-01-01

    ...), while the effects of sunlight exposure have not yet been fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the associations between serum vitamin D, vitamin D intake, sunlight exposure, and newly-diagnosed PD patients in a Chinese population...

  11. Correcting for variable laser-target distances of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with ChemCam using emission lines of Martian dust spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A. [Optical Science Center for Applied Research, Delaware State University, Dover, DE (United States); Cousin, A.; Lanza, N.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lasue, J. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Clegg, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berger, G. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Wiens, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maurice, S. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tokar, R.L.; Bender, S. [Planetary Science Institute, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Forni, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Breves, E.A.; Dyar, M.D. [Dept. of Astronomy, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA (United States); Frydenvang, J. [The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delapp, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gasnault, O. [Institut de Recherche en Astophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite' Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.M. [Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Alburquerque, NM (United States); Lewin, E. [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Universite Grenoble l-CNRS, Grenoble (France); and others

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory, the ChemCam instrument acquires remote laser induced breakdown spectra at distances that vary between 1.56 m and 7 m. This variation in distance affects the intensities of the measured LIBS emission lines in non-trivial ways. To determine the behavior of a LIBS emission line with distance, it is necessary to separate the effects of many parameters such as laser energy, laser spot size, target homogeneity, and optical collection efficiency. These parameters may be controlled in a laboratory on Earth but for field applications or in space this is a challenge. In this paper, we show that carefully selected ChemCam LIBS emission lines acquired from the Martian dust can be used to build an internal proxy spectroscopic standard. This in turn, allows for a direct measurement of the effects of the distance of various LIBS emission lines and hence can be used to correct ChemCam LIBS spectra for distance variations. When tested on pre-launch LIBS calibration data acquired under Martian-like conditions and with controlled and well-calibrated targets, this approach yields much improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. This work lays the foundation for future implementation of automated routines to correct ChemCam spectra for differences caused by variable distance. - Highlights: • Selected Martian dust emission lines are used to correct for variable laser-target distances. • The correction model yields improved agreement between targets observed at various distances. • The impact of the model reduces the bias between predicted and actual compositions by as much as 70%. • When implemented, the model will yield spectral corrections for various ChemCam measurements. • This work is a foundation to perform novel stand-off LIBS measurements on Earth and other planets.

  12. Measurement of degenerate two-photon absorption spectra of a series of developed two-photon initiators using a dispersive white light continuum Z-scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Aliasghar; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Tromayer, Maximilian; Gruber, Peter; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2017-08-01

    To achieve efficient micro- and nanostructuring based on two-photon polymerization (2PP), the development and evaluation of specialized two-photon initiators (2PIs) are essential. Hence, a reliable method to determine the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectra of the synthesized 2PIs used for 2PP structuring is crucial. A technique by which absolute visible-to-near-infrared 2PA spectra of degenerate nature can be determined via performing a single dispersive white-light continuum (WLC) Z-scan has been realized. Using a dispersed white light beam containing 8 fs pulses at wavelengths ranging from 650 nm to 950 nm, the nonlinear transmittance as a function of the sample position can be measured for all spectral components by performing a single scan along the laser beam propagation direction. In this work, the 2PA spectrum of three different 2PIs was determined using this technique. 2PP structuring was also accomplished using the developed 2PIs at different wavelengths. Tuning the wavelength of the laser to match the peak of the 2PA spectra of the developed 2PIs resulted in lower intensity thresholds and facilitated higher structuring speeds. As an example, using M2CMK 2PI for 2PP, the scanning speed can be increased up to 5 folds when the laser wavelength is tuned to 760 nm (i.e., 2PA maximum) instead of the conventionally used 800 nm.

  13. Using measured 30-150 kVp polychromatic tungsten x-ray spectra to determine ion chamber calibration factors, Nx (Gy C(-1)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, J R; Kopp, D T; McDavid, W D; Dove, S B; Lancaster, J L; Tucker, D M

    2000-10-01

    Two methods for determining ion chamber calibration factors (Nx) are presented for polychromatic tungsten x-ray beams whose spectra differ from beams with known Nx. Both methods take advantage of known x-ray fluence and kerma spectral distributions. In the first method, the x-ray tube potential is unchanged and spectra of differing filtration are measured. A primary standard ion chamber with known Nx for one beam is used to calculate the x-ray fluence spectrum of a second beam. Accurate air energy absorption coefficients are applied to the x-ray fluence spectra of the second beam to calculate actual air kerma and Nx. In the second method, two beams of differing tube potential and filtration with known Nx are used to bracket a beam of unknown Nx. A heuristically derived Nx interpolation scheme based on spectral characteristics of all three beams is described. Both methods are validated. Both methods improve accuracy over the current half value layer Nx estimating technique.

  14. Measurement of the transverse momentum spectra of weak vector bosons produced in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-06-19

    The transverse momentum spectra of weak vector bosons are measured in the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement uses a sample of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, collected during a special low-luminosity running that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 inverse-picobarns. The production of W bosons is studied in both electron and muon decay modes, while the production of Z bosons is studied using only the dimuon decay channel. The ratios of W- to W+ and Z to W differential cross sections are also measured. The measured differential cross sections and ratios are compared with theoretical predictions up to next-to-next leading order in QCD.

  15. Measurement of the transverse momentum spectra of weak vector bosons produced in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Awad, Adel; Elgammal, Sherif; Mohamed, Amr; Salama, Elsayed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Jain, Sandhya; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Butanov, Khakimjan; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Pak, Sang Il; Son, Dong-Chul; Yusupov, Hammid; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Markin, Oleg; Rusinov, Vladimir; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Benhabib, Lamia; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; 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    2017-01-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of weak vector bosons are measured in the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement uses a sample of proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV, collected during a special low-luminosity running that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 $\\pm$ 0.5 pb$^{-1}$. The production of W bosons is studied in both electron and muon decay modes, while the production of Z bosons is studied using only the dimuon decay channel. The ratios of $\\mathrm{ W }^{-}$ to $\\mathrm{ W }^{+}$ and Z to W differential cross sections are also measured. The measured differential cross sections and ratios are compared with theoretical predictions up to next-to-next leading order in QCD.

  16. Measurement of the transverse momentum spectra of weak vector bosons produced in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Susa, T.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall’Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; SavoyNavarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Blinov, V.; Skovpen, Y.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D’Alfonso, M.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. 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M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Kumar, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-12-16

    The transverse momentum spectra of weak vector bosons are measured in the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement uses a sample of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, collected during a special low-luminosity running that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 inverse-picobarns. The production of W bosons is studied in both electron and muon decay modes, while the production of Z bosons is studied using only the dimuon decay channel. The ratios of W- to W+ and Z to W differential cross sections are also measured. The measured differential cross sections and ratios are compared with theoretical predictions up to next-to-next leading order in QCD.

  17. A comparison and survey of the measured cloud liquid water content and an analysis of the bimodal droplet spectra observed during COPE-MED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, Jeffrey Alan

    The primary objective of the COnvective Precipitation Experiment - Microphysics and Entrainment Dependencies (COPE-MED) was part of a larger field campaign undertaken during July and August 2013 with the primary goal of improving quantitative precipitation forecasts for summertime convection over SW England, with a special emphasis on understanding microphysical processes that impact hydrometeor development. Understanding the interplay between the warm rain and ice processes is necessary to lead to better parameterizations for precipitation rates in numerical simulations so, to that end, a detailed survey of the liquid water content and total cloud droplet number concentrations measured during COPE-MED is undertaken. Additionally, a probe-by-probe comparison of the liquid water content was performed in order to ascertain their relative performance and consistency during COPE-MED and under certain conditions. These comparisons reveal generally good agreement between the in situ probes used during COPE-MED, but also reveals that there may be potential issues with certain probes under certain conditions. Secondly, observations from the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft show occurrences of bimodal cloud droplet spectra, where there exist two distinct droplet diameter populations. An analysis of several COPE-MED cases, based on observations from in situ cloud microphysical probes, is presented. Several environmental factors are examined to look for evidence of entrainment events within regions containing bimodal spectra. Correlations between the adiabaticity and concentration in each mode are examined. While some of these analyses indicate evidence of entrainment, others are less clear. The theoretical super-saturation a parcel would experience when neglecting the small mode and the updraft speed required to achieve various levels of super-saturation are also calculated. Initial results show evidence that secondary activation could potentially explain the

  18. Patterns and timing of sunlight exposure and risk of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin – a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannacone Michelle R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, comprised of basal (BCC and squamous (SCC cell carcinomas, is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR exposure is the most important environmental risk factor for NMSC. However, the precise relationship between UVR and the risk of NMSC is complex, and the relationship may differ by skin cancer type. Methods A case–control study was conducted among Florida residents to investigate measures of patterns (intermittent vs. continuous and timing (childhood vs. adulthood of sunlight exposure in BCC and SCC. Participants included 218 BCC and 169 SCC cases recruited from a university dermatology clinic and 316 controls with no history of skin or other cancers. Results A history of blistering sunburn (a measure of intermittent sunlight exposure was associated with both BCC (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.27-3.03 and SCC (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.22-3.33. Additionally, having a job in the sun for ≥3 months for 10 years or longer (a measure of continuous sunlight exposure was also associated with both BCC and SCC in our study population. With the exception of younger age at first blistering sunburn, measures of younger age at sunlight exposure tended to be associated with SCC, but not BCC risk. Conclusions Results from the current study suggest that sunlight exposure is associated with both BCC and SCC risk regardless of the pattern in which the exposure was received (i.e. intermittent vs. continuous. The data also suggest that sunlight exposure at a younger age may be more important for SCC but not BCC, however additional studies are needed to further characterize sunlight exposure-response relationships in different types of NMSC.

  19. Patterns and timing of sunlight exposure and risk of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin--a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Wang, Wei; Stockwell, Heather G; O'Rourke, Kathleen; Giuliano, Anna R; Sondak, Vernon K; Messina, Jane L; Roetzheim, Richard G; Cherpelis, Basil S; Fenske, Neil A; Rollison, Dana E

    2012-09-20

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprised of basal (BCC) and squamous (SCC) cell carcinomas, is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the most important environmental risk factor for NMSC. However, the precise relationship between UVR and the risk of NMSC is complex, and the relationship may differ by skin cancer type. A case-control study was conducted among Florida residents to investigate measures of patterns (intermittent vs. continuous) and timing (childhood vs. adulthood) of sunlight exposure in BCC and SCC. Participants included 218 BCC and 169 SCC cases recruited from a university dermatology clinic and 316 controls with no history of skin or other cancers. A history of blistering sunburn (a measure of intermittent sunlight exposure) was associated with both BCC (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.27-3.03) and SCC (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.22-3.33). Additionally, having a job in the sun for ≥ 3 months for 10 years or longer (a measure of continuous sunlight exposure) was also associated with both BCC and SCC in our study population. With the exception of younger age at first blistering sunburn, measures of younger age at sunlight exposure tended to be associated with SCC, but not BCC risk. Results from the current study suggest that sunlight exposure is associated with both BCC and SCC risk regardless of the pattern in which the exposure was received (i.e. intermittent vs. continuous). The data also suggest that sunlight exposure at a younger age may be more important for SCC but not BCC, however additional studies are needed to further characterize sunlight exposure-response relationships in different types of NMSC.

  20. Patterns and timing of sunlight exposure and risk of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin – a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprised of basal (BCC) and squamous (SCC) cell carcinomas, is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the most important environmental risk factor for NMSC. However, the precise relationship between UVR and the risk of NMSC is complex, and the relationship may differ by skin cancer type. Methods A case–control study was conducted among Florida residents to investigate measures of patterns (intermittent vs. continuous) and timing (childhood vs. adulthood) of sunlight exposure in BCC and SCC. Participants included 218 BCC and 169 SCC cases recruited from a university dermatology clinic and 316 controls with no history of skin or other cancers. Results A history of blistering sunburn (a measure of intermittent sunlight exposure) was associated with both BCC (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.27-3.03) and SCC (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.22-3.33). Additionally, having a job in the sun for ≥3 months for 10 years or longer (a measure of continuous sunlight exposure) was also associated with both BCC and SCC in our study population. With the exception of younger age at first blistering sunburn, measures of younger age at sunlight exposure tended to be associated with SCC, but not BCC risk. Conclusions Results from the current study suggest that sunlight exposure is associated with both BCC and SCC risk regardless of the pattern in which the exposure was received (i.e. intermittent vs. continuous). The data also suggest that sunlight exposure at a younger age may be more important for SCC but not BCC, however additional studies are needed to further characterize sunlight exposure-response relationships in different types of NMSC. PMID:22994655

  1. Measurements and modeling of cold 13CH4 spectra in the 3750-4700 cm-1 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. R.; Nikitin, A. V.; Sung, K.; Rey, M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Crawford, T. J.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    A new study of 13CH4 line intensities and positions was performed in the Octad region between 3750 and 4700 cm-1. Using 13C-enriched samples, spectra were recorded with both the McMath-Pierce FTS at Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona and the Bruker IFS-125HR at JPL. Sample temperatures ranged between 80 and 296 K. Line positions and intensities of ~15,000 features were retrieved at different temperatures by non-linear least squares curve-fitting procedures. Intensities were used to estimate the lower state energies for 60% of the features in order to determine quantum assignments up to J=10. A preliminary analysis was performed using the effective Hamiltonian and the effective dipole transition moment expressed in terms of irreducible tensor operators adapted to spherical top molecules. Selected assignments were made up to J=10 for all 24 sub-vibrational states of the Octad; these were modeled for 4752 experimental line positions and 3301 selected line intensities fitted with RMS standard deviations of 0.004 cm-1 and 6.9%, respectively. Integrated intensities of the eight Octad bands are compared to ab initio variational calculations. A prediction of the 13CH4 is given, but further analysis to improve the calculation will be reported in the future.

  2. Near-wall hot-wire measurements . Part II: Turbulence time scale, convective velocity and spectra in the viscous sublayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, B. C.; Chew, Y. T.; Teo, C. J.

    This work continues the studies of Khoo et al. (Exp. Fluids 29: 448-460, 2001), where experiments were performed in turbulent-channel and flat-plate boundary-layer flows using near-wall hot-wire probes. The probability density function (pdf) of the wall-shear stress and streamwise velocity fluctuations in the viscous sublayer, buffer region and beyond were compared and analyzed. The convective velocity Uc of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the very near-wall region was obtained using a two-point correlation technique. It was found that in the viscous sublayer, Uc is approximately constant at 13uτ and 15uτ, respectively, for the channel and boundary-layer flows. Spectra data for the viscous sublayer are presented for the first time, and the normalized spectral plots for different flow conditions collapse at high frequencies or wavenumbers, thus indicating the possible presence of small-scale universality at different Reynolds numbers. The integral time scale corresponding to the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the viscous sublayer is also presented.

  3. Dispersed single-phase-step Michelson interferometer for Doppler imaging using sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian

    2012-09-15

    A Michelson interferometer is dispersed with a fiber array-fed spectrograph, providing 59 Doppler sensing channels using sunlight in the 510-570 nm wavelength region. The interferometer operates at a single-phase-step mode, which is particularly advantageous in multiplexing and data processing compared to the phase-stepping mode of other interferometer spectrometer instruments. Spectral templates are prepared using a standard solar spectrum and simulated interferometer modulations, such that the correlation function with a measured 1D spectrum determines the Doppler shift. Doppler imaging of a rotating cylinder is demonstrated. The average Doppler sensitivity is ~12 m/s, with some channels reaching ~5 m/s.

  4. Exposure time to sunlight for ultra violet light therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas C

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure time to sunlight for photo or photochemotherapy is arbitrarily determined. This could lead to inadequate or over exposure. As a sequence to our initial pilot study on exposure time for PUVASOL, we have now developed a bar chart which could be used as a guide to achieve a more logical and uniform exposure time during different months. We plan to extend the study to different zones in India.

  5. Novel materials and devices for sunlight concentrating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovel, H. J.

    1980-09-01

    An economic analysis of photovoltaic conversion under concentrated sunlight has been performed which demonstrates that solar cell efficiency, concentrator efficiency, and concentrator cost are the most important parameters in a concentrating photovoltaic system; solar cell cost is only of secondary importance. Six novel structures are described, including modified conventional Si cells Ga(1-x)Al(x)As/GaAs, interdigitated cells, vertical and horizontal multijunction cells and 'multicolor' devices.

  6. Non-intrusive measurement of emission indices. A new approach to the evaluation of infrared spectra emitted by aircraft engine exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindermeir, E.; Haschberger, P.; Tank, V. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Optoelektronik

    1997-12-31

    A non-intrusive method is used to determine the emission indices of a research aircraft`s engine in-flight. The principle is based on the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer MIROR which was specifically designed and built for operation aboard aircrafts. This device measures the spectrum of the infrared radiation emitted by the hot exhaust gas under cruise conditions. From these spectra mixing ratios and emission indices can be derived. An extension to previously applied evaluation schemes is proposed: Whereas formerly the plume was assumed a homogeneous layer of gas, temperature and concentration profiles are now introduced to the evaluation procedure. (author) 5 refs.

  7. ARTSY-J: Convenient and precise measurement of 3JHNHα couplings in medium-size proteins from TROSY-HSQC spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Torchia, Dennis A.; Bax, Ad

    2016-07-01

    A new and convenient method, named ARTSY-J, is introduced that permits extraction of the 3JHNHα couplings in proteins from the relative intensities in a pair of 15N-1H TROSY-HSQC spectra. The pulse scheme includes 3JHNHα dephasing of the narrower TROSY 1HN-{15N} doublet component during a delay, integrated into the regular two-dimensional TROSY-HSQC pulse scheme, and compares the obtained intensity with a reference spectrum where 3JHNHα dephasing is suppressed. The effect of passive 1Hα spin flips downscales the apparent 3JHNHα coupling by a uniform factor that depends approximately linearly on both the duration of the 3JHNHα dephasing delay and the 1H-1H cross relaxation rate. Using such a correction factor, which accounts for the effects of both inhomogeneity of the radiofrequency field and 1Hα spin flips, agreement between prior and newly measured values for the small model protein GB3 is better than 0.3 Hz. Measurement for the HIV-1 protease homodimer (22 kDa) yields 3JHNHα values that agree to better than 0.7 Hz with predictions made on the basis of a previously parameterized Karplus equation. Although for Gly residues the two individual 3JHNHα couplings cannot be extracted from a single set of ARTSY-J spectra, the measurement provides valuable ϕ angle information.

  8. ARTSY-J: Convenient and precise measurement of (3)JHNHα couplings in medium-size proteins from TROSY-HSQC spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Julien; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Torchia, Dennis A; Bax, Ad

    2016-07-01

    A new and convenient method, named ARTSY-J, is introduced that permits extraction of the (3)JHNHα couplings in proteins from the relative intensities in a pair of (15)N-(1)H TROSY-HSQC spectra. The pulse scheme includes (3)JHNHα dephasing of the narrower TROSY (1)H(N)-{(15)N} doublet component during a delay, integrated into the regular two-dimensional TROSY-HSQC pulse scheme, and compares the obtained intensity with a reference spectrum where (3)JHNHα dephasing is suppressed. The effect of passive (1)H(α) spin flips downscales the apparent (3)JHNHα coupling by a uniform factor that depends approximately linearly on both the duration of the (3)JHNHα dephasing delay and the (1)H-(1)H cross relaxation rate. Using such a correction factor, which accounts for the effects of both inhomogeneity of the radiofrequency field and (1)H(α) spin flips, agreement between prior and newly measured values for the small model protein GB3 is better than 0.3Hz. Measurement for the HIV-1 protease homodimer (22kDa) yields (3)JHNHα values that agree to better than 0.7Hz with predictions made on the basis of a previously parameterized Karplus equation. Although for Gly residues the two individual (3)JHNHα couplings cannot be extracted from a single set of ARTSY-J spectra, the measurement provides valuable ϕ angle information.

  9. Effects of sunlight exposure on grapevine powdery mildew development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Craig N; Wilcox, Wayne F

    2012-09-01

    Natural and artificially induced shade increased grapevine powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) severity in the vineyard, with foliar disease severity 49 to 75% higher relative to leaves in full sun, depending on the level of natural shading experienced and the individual experiment. Cluster disease severities increased by 20 to 40% relative to those on check vines when ultraviolet (UV) radiation was filtered from sunlight reaching vines in artificial shading experiments. Surface temperatures of leaves in full sunlight averaged 5 to 8°C higher than those in natural shade, and in one experiment, filtering 80% of all wavelengths of solar radiation, including longer wavelengths responsible for heating irradiated tissues, increased disease more than filtering UV alone. In controlled environment experiments, UV-B radiation reduced germination of E. necator conidia and inhibited both colony establishment (hyphal formation and elongation) and maturity (latent period). Inhibitory effects of UV-B radiation were significantly greater at 30°C than at 20 or 25°C. Thus, sunlight appears to inhibit powdery mildew development through at least two mechanisms, i.e., (i) UV radiation's damaging effects on exposed conidia and thalli of the pathogen; and (ii) elevating temperatures of irradiated tissues to a level supraoptimal or inhibitory for pathogen development. Furthermore, these effects are synergistic at temperatures near the upper threshold for disease development.

  10. Measurements of neutron energy spectra from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction with Bonner sphere spectrometer, Nested Neutron Spectrometer and ROSPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanackovic, J; Matysiak, W; Witharana, S; Dubeau, J; Waker, A J

    2014-10-01

    Neutron spectrometry measurements were carried out at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory (MAL), which is equipped with a 3-MV Van de Graaff-type accelerator. Protons were accelerated onto a thick natural lithium target inducing the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. Depending on the proton energy, slightly different poly-energetic neutron fields were produced. Neutron spectra were measured at two incident proton energies: 2.15 and 2.24 MeV, which produced poly-energetic neutrons with maximum kinetic energies of 401 and 511 keV, respectively. Measurements were performed at a distance of 1.5 m from the target in the forward direction with three different instruments: Bonner sphere spectrometer, Nested Neutron Spectrometer and ROtational proton recoil SPECtrometer.

  11. Measurement of deuteron spectra and elliptic flow in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nobuhiro, Akihide; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; 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Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    The transverse momentum (p T ) spectra and elliptic flow coefficient (v 2 ) of deuterons and anti- deuterons at mid-rapidity (|y| 1.8 GeV/c within the experimental uncertainties. The measurement of the coalescence parameter B 2 is performed, showing a p T dependence in contrast with the simplest coalescence model, which fails to reproduce also the measured v 2 coefficient. In addition, the coalescence parameter B 2 and the elliptic flow coefficient in the 20–40% centrality interval are compared with the AMPT model which is able, in its version without string melting, to reproduce the measured v 2 (p T ) and the B 2 (p T ) trend.

  12. Local moments and electronic correlations in Fe-based Heusler alloys: Kα x-ray emission spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyazhin, Artem, E-mail: svyazhin@imp.uran.ru [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences – Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurmaev, Ernst; Shreder, Elena; Shamin, Sergey [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences – Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sahle, Christoph J. [ESRF – The European Synchrotron, CS40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-09-15

    Heusler alloys are a property-rich class of materials, intensively investigated today from both theoretical and real-world application points of view. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the role of electronic correlations in the Fe{sub 2}MeAl group (where Me represents all 3d elements from Ti to Ni) of Heusler alloys. For this purpose, we have investigated the local moments of iron by means of the x-ray emission spectroscopy technique. To obtain numerical values of local moments, the Kα-FWHM method has been employed for the first time. In every compound of the group, the presence of a local moment on the Fe atom was detected. As has been revealed, the values of these moments are temperature-independent, pointing to an insufficiency of a pure itinerant approach to magnetism in these alloys. We also comprehensively compare the usage of Kβ main lines and Kα spectra as tools for the probing of local moments and point out the significant advantages of the latter. - Highlights: • Local spin moments of iron in Fe{sub 2}MeAl (Me = Ti … Ni) Heusler alloys were investigated by means of x-ray emission spectroscopy. • Independence of the local moments from temperature confirms their localized nature. • A local moment value of iron in Fe{sub 2}MeAl raises with the atomic number of element Me. • The applicability of the Kα x-ray emission line for extracting local moment values of 3d elements was established.

  13. Estimation of identification limit for a small-type OSL dosimeter on the medical images by measurement of X-ray spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2016-07-01

    Our aim in this study is to derive an identification limit on a dosimeter for not disturbing a medical image when patients wear a small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter on their bodies during X-ray diagnostic imaging. For evaluation of the detection limit based on an analysis of X-ray spectra, we propose a new quantitative identification method. We performed experiments for which we used diagnostic X-ray equipment, a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom (1-20 cm), and a CdTe X-ray spectrometer assuming one pixel of the X-ray imaging detector. Then, with the following two experimental settings, corresponding X-ray spectra were measured with 40-120 kVp and 0.5-1000 mAs at a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm: (1) X-rays penetrating a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom with the OSL dosimeter attached directly on the phantom, and (2) X-rays penetrating only the soft-tissue-equivalent phantom. Next, the energy fluence and errors in the fluence were calculated from the spectra. When the energy fluence with errors concerning these two experimental conditions was estimated to be indistinctive, we defined the condition as the OSL dosimeter not being identified on the X-ray image. Based on our analysis, we determined the identification limit of the dosimeter. We then compared our results with those for the general irradiation conditions used in clinics. We found that the OSL dosimeter could not be identified under the irradiation conditions of abdominal and chest radiography, namely, one can apply the OSL dosimeter to measurement of the exposure dose in the irradiation field of X-rays without disturbing medical images.

  14. South African university student knowledge of eye protection against sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Oduntan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to sunlight has been associated with several ocular conditions such as cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and conjunctival neoplasm. Knowledge of protective modalities and good behavioural practice involving eye protection is essential to prevent adverse effects of sunlight. The purpose of this study was to establish knowledge amongst randomly selected university students in South Africa, of prevention modalities against the adverse effects of sunlight. A questionnaire relating to the knowledge of preventive modalities was completed by randomly selected students from four universities selected by convenience sampling.  Questionnaires completed by one thousand, eighthundred and thirty two (N =1832 subjects were analysed with descriptive statistics using Stata version 10.  The participants’ ages ranged from 17 to 55 years (mean = 21.03 ± 3.4 years.  They included 43.7% males and 56.3% females.  They were 68.3% Blacks, 20.0% Whites, 3.4% Indians and 7.4% Coloureds. Many (82.3% of them knew that excessive exposure to sunlight can adversely affect the eyes. Only 28.5% reported that they often wore sunglasses outdoors. Only 38.5% of the participants knew that not all spectacles or contact lenses could protect eyes from ultraviolet radiation. However, many, 87.7% and 69.5% respectively knew that sunglasses and spectacles could be specifically designed to block UVR from entering the eye. Just over half (52.7% knew that contact lenses can be specifically designed to block the UVR. Many, (68.4% agreed that wearing hats with brims could protect the eyes against harmful radiation from the sun and the majority, 95.8% agreed that there was a need for awareness campaigns about the effects of the sun on the eye and against excessive exposure. Female respondents had more knowledge of preventive modalities than the males.  Knowledge of preventive modalities among the respondents varied significantly with the type of questions and was

  15. Measurement of the extragalactic background light imprint on the spectra of the brightest blazars observed with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nguyen, N.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2013-02-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the diffuse radiation with the second highest energy density in the Universe after the cosmic microwave background. The aim of this study is the measurement of the imprint of the EBL opacity to γ-rays on the spectra of the brightest extragalactic sources detected with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). The originality of the method lies in the joint fit of the EBL optical depth and of the intrinsic spectra of the sources, assuming intrinsic smoothness. Analysis of a total of ~105γ-ray events enables the detection of an EBL signature at the 8.8σ level and constitutes the first measurement of the EBL optical depth using very-high energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-rays. The EBL flux density is constrained over almost two decades of wavelengths [0.30 μm, 17 μm] and the peak value at 1.4 μm is derived as λFλ = 15 ± 2stat ± 3sys nW m-2 sr-1. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Measurement of the extragalactic background light imprint on the spectra of the brightest blazars observed with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya,