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Sample records for sunitinib-associated pyoderma gangrenosum

  1. Infantile pyoderma gangrenosum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McAleer, Maeve A

    2008-02-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is rare in infants. There have been 12 cases of PG in infants (<12 months old) reported in the past 25 years, to our knowledge. Six of these cases have been successfully controlled with systemic steroids, and one case with topical steroids alone. We report a case of an 8-month-old infant whose PG was aggressive and unresponsive to systemic steroids. Adjuvant treatment with cyclosporine was required to achieve healing. We review the previous cases of infantile PG and the therapeutic options in this age group.

  2. Peri-ileostomy pyoderma gangrenosum: case report

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    Carlos Cerdán-Santacruz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum is one of the most severe complications that can occur following stoma placement. Despite few cases reported in the literature, it is considered an underdiagnosed entity. We present a case of peri-ileostomy pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG in a patient who underwent a pancoloproctectomy and permanent ileostomy due to ulcerative colitis (UC. Treatment was based on local cures, proper fitting of ostomy devices, topical tacrolimus and systemic corticosteroids, adalimumab and antibiotics. Satisfactory resolution was achieved in eight weeks.

  3. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

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    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  4. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  5. Biological Therapy for Pyoderma Gangrenosum

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    Naw Ally Krüger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare and severe neutrophilic dermatosis asso- ciated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and other systemic diseases such as rheu- matoid arthritis and hematological malignancies. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and exclusion of other skin disorders. There is no gold standard for the treatment of PG; traditionally intravenous corticosteroids are used, but recently the use of drugs that in- hibit tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha has changed the management of PG, showing great effectiveness.Case report: female patient, 23 years old, diagnosed with severe nonspecific ulcerative colitis (UC three years ago, undergoing treatment with oral mesalamine and azathioprine. She developed PG fourteen days after hospital discharge; hospitalization was due to worsening of intestinal disease symptoms. She was successfully treated using biological therapy after unfavorable evolution with corticosteroid therapy.Conclusion: PG, a rare extraintestinal manifestation of IBD of difficult resolution that has significant impact on patient quality of life. The use of biological therapy for PG has higher efficacy in the treatment of patients decreasing wound healing time and return to daily activities. Resumo: Introdução: pioderma gangrenoso (PG é uma rara e grave dermatose neutrofílica associada a doença inflamatória intestinal (DII e a outras doenças sistêmicas como a artrite reumatoi- de e neoplasias hematológicas. O diagnóstico é baseado em critérios clínicos e exclusão de outras desordens da pele. Ainda não há padrão ouro para o tratamento do PG, tradicional- mente usa-se corticoides endovenosos, porém recentemente o uso de fármacos inibidores do fator de necrose tumoral alfa (TNF-alfa tem mudado o manejo do PG mostrando grande efetividade.Relato do caso: paciente feminina, 23 anos, com diagnóstico de retocolite ulcerativa inespe- cífica (RCUI severa há três anos, em tratamento com

  6. Photoletter to the editor: Oral ulceration in pyoderma gangrenosum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Verma, Saroj

    2012-02-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with widespread necrotising cutaneous ulceration and oral involvement. Past history included rheumatoid arthritis, and a left nephrectomy.Examination revealed multiple violaceous undermined ulcers. Blood investigations showed an acute inflammatory response. Skin histopathology showed epidermal ulceration with acute and chronic inflammation. Direct immunofluorescence was negative. A diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum with oral involvement was made. Mycophenolate mofetil therapy resulted in complete resolution of her pyoderma gangrenosum. Her treatment was complicated by a left proteus mirabilis psoas abscess. This resolved following four weeks of antibiotics.Pyoderma gangrenosum with oral involvement is rare but has been linked with inflammatory bowel disease and hematological disorders. Oral pyoderma gangrenosum has not previously been described in rheumatoid arthritis. Primary psoas abscess is rare but can develop in immunocompromised patients. Proteus mirabilis has been reported in patients years after nephrectomy. This is a rare case of pyoderma gangrenosum with oral involvement.

  7. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum: A rare complication after appendectomy

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    G Faghihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is an uncommon inflammatory ulcerative skin disease. It is characterized by painful progressive necrosis of the wound margins. Rarely, postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG manifests as a severe disturbance of wound healing following surgical interventions. Only rare cases of this complication have been reported after appendectomy. We report a case of PPG in a 29-year-old female after appendectomy. She was successfully treated with oral prednisolone. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative delayed wound healing, because this disease is simply distinguished from a postoperative wound.

  8. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum: A rare complication after appendectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, G; Abtahi-Naeini, B; Nikyar, Z; Jamshidi, K; Bahrami, A

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon inflammatory ulcerative skin disease. It is characterized by painful progressive necrosis of the wound margins. Rarely, postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) manifests as a severe disturbance of wound healing following surgical interventions. Only rare cases of this complication have been reported after appendectomy. We report a case of PPG in a 29-year-old female after appendectomy. She was successfully treated with oral prednisolone. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative delayed wound healing, because this disease is simply distinguished from a postoperative wound. PMID:25511218

  9. Pyoderma gangrenosum: A clinician′s nightmare

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    Bindhu Bhaskaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare disease and that affecting specifically the sole of the foot, is even rarer. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female admitted with a painful ulcer on the sole of the right foot which was initially treated with empirical antibiotics and debridement. The disease was found to spread rapidly after each debridement. The culture reports were negative; rheumatology workup and Doppler study were within normal limits. A clinical suspicion of PG was made and was confirmed with tissue biopsy. She was started on oral steroids following which she dramatically improved. Thus, when a patient presents with a rapidly expanding painful ulcer in a vascular limb that is refractory to antibiotic treatment and exacerbating on debridement, it is imperative to consider the possibility of PG.

  10. Nasal septum perforation in patient with pyoderma gangrenosum

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    Maia, Camilla Bezerra da Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cocaine is obtained from the leaves of the coca (Erythroxylon coca. It can be used in many ways, but the most common is the drug inhalation. The Cocaine also causes vasoconstriction at nasal mucous membrane and its chronic use can cause necrosis and nasal septum perforation. Pyoderma gangrenosum is an uncommon idiopathic disease characterized by ulcerations, usually observed on the legs. Its diagnosis is most common an exclusion of others diseases. So far, there is no specific treatment based on evidence by randomized controlled trials. Objective: Describe the rare association between Pyoderma gangrenosum and cocaine. Case Report: E. A., 27-year-old woman with destruction of nasal septum and palate who has been using a big amount of cocaine, been necessary note the difference from which disease cause de damage. Final Comments: Also there are only three cases of Pyoderma gangrenosum complicated with nasal septum perforation in cocaine users.

  11. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with osteomyelofibrosis

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    Živanović Dubravka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum generally appear on the upper extremities; most frequently they are associated with myeloproliferative disorders, including osteomyelofibrosis. A response to systemic steroids is more pronounced than in classical form. Sometimes it may be the first sign of an underlying malignancy. Case report. We reported a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum developed during the course of a myeloid malignancy - osteomyelofibrosis. The lesions occurred after a minor trauma. Painful blistering plaques, with an elevated, bluish-gray border were located on the dorsal aspect of hands. No skin malignancy was found. The lesions resolved rapidly to systemic steroids. Conclusion. Considering the unusual clinical presentation which makes the diagnosis difficult, as well as the fact that atypical forms of pyoderma gangrenosum can be the first sign of malignancies, especially myeloproliferative ones, recognizing this entity enables timely guiding future investigations toward their prompt detection.

  12. Myeloid sarcoma developing in pre-existing pyoderma gangrenosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Møller, Hanne; Kjaerskov, Mette Wanscher

    2009-01-01

    We report here a case of pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome developing into myeloid sarcoma as a sign of transformation to acute leukaemia. The patient was treated successfully with intensive chemotherapy and achieved complete remission, and her otherwise expanding...

  13. A case of surgically treated peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; O'Brien, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is characterized by the rapid progression of painful necrotic ulcer surrounding an area of abdominal stoma. It is almost exclusively associated with inflammatory bowel disease even after bowel surgery and is associated with significant morbidity. Diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum is based on exclusion of other disorders replicating some of its clinical features and histo...

  14. Neutrophilic dermatosis resembling pyoderma gangrenosum in a dog with polyarthritis.

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    Bardagí, M; Lloret, A; Fondati, A; Ferrer, L

    2007-04-01

    This report describes a case of neutrophilic dermatosis in a dog, with a number of clinical and pathological similarities to human pyoderma gangrenosum. A seven-year-old, female German shepherd dog with a history of non-erosive idiopathic polyarthritis was presented with severe facial swelling, bilateral erosivoulcerative lesions on the muzzle and multiple, eroded, dermal-subcutaneous nodules on the cranial trunk. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed a necrotising neutrophilic dermatitis. No infectious agents could be detected using specific stains, immunohistochemistry, serology and bacterial aerobic, anaerobic or fungal cultures. A sterile neutrophilic dermatosis resembling human pyoderma gangrenosum was presumptively diagnosed, and the patient showed an excellent response to treatment with prednisone and ciclosporin.

  15. An interesting case of pyoderma gangrenosum with immature hystiocytoid neutrophils.

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    Besner Morin, Catherine; Côté, Benoit; Belisle, Annie

    2018-01-01

    We present a unique case of a 36-year-old male who developed more than 20 pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) ulcers showing on histopathology a dense inflammatory infiltrate composed of histiocytoid mononuclear immature cells with a strong positivity for myeloperoxidase and Leder stain, suggesting a myeloid lineage in the absence of a concomitant myeloproliferative disorder. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (SS) is now recognized as a histological subtype of SS. Although PG and SS belong to the spectrum of neutrophilic diseases, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a "Histiocytoid pyoderma gangrenosum" encompassing immature granulocytes in the absence of leukemia cutis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Superficial Granulomatous Pyoderma Gangrenosum of the Penis: A Case Report

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    Shyamala S. Gopi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic type of pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is an uncommon ulceronecrotic cutaneous disease of uncertain aetiology characterised by broad zones of confluent ulceration with violaceous undermined margins. Some 50% of cases are associated with systemic diseases. The superficial granulomatous variant of pyoderma gangrenosum (SGPG of the external genitalia is extremely rare Patients with this condition develop single or multiple ulcerated skin lesions often with sinus tract formation. The majority of these lesions were found on the trunk and limbs. SGPG is less likely to be associated with underlying disease processes than classic PG. We present a 58 year-old with recalcitrant penile ulceration demonstrated to be SGPG on biopsy. Although rare and poorly recognised, the histological features are sufficiently typical to allow the correct diagnosis to be established.

  17. Simultaneous Onset of Ulcerative Colitis and Disseminated Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht Neesse; Patrick Michl; Steffen Kunsch; Volker Ellenrieder; Thomas M. Gress; Martin Steinkamp

    2007-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin condition representing one of the most distinct extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PG occurs independently from intestinal disease activity in about 1–2% of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and is characterized by chronic deep skin ulcers whose exact pathogenesis is still unknown. So far, patients with ulcerative colitis have only been reported to develop PG during t...

  18. A case of ulcerative colitis presenting as pyoderma gangrenosum and lung nodule

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    Xin Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum is a phenomenon of cutaneous ulceration where etiology is not well understood. About half of the cases have an associated extracutanoeus manifestation or associated systemic diseases. Most commonly associated systemic disorders include inflammatory bowel disease, hematologic malignancies, autoimmune arthritis, and vasculitis. We are reporting a case where pyoderma gangrenosum has presenting features for ulcerative colitis.

  19. Delayed diagnosis of post-surgical pyoderma gangrenosum: A multicenter case series and review of literature

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    Rawaa Almukhtar

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pyoderma gangrenosum is a chronic neutrophilic dermatosis which can occur following trauma or surgery and can mimic infection. Surgical intervention can lead to progression of disease. Presentation of cases: This case series describes 3 cases of post-surgical pyoderma gangrenosum with delayed diagnosis from two large medical centers. Discussion: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical and histopathologic presentation, and management of post-surgical pyoderma gangrenosum are discussed with a review of the literature. Conclusion: Post-surgical pyoderma gangrenosum (PSPG can mimic ulcerative disorders including bacterial infection. The diagnosis should be suspected in post-operative wounds with negative bacterial cultures which progress despite broad-spectrum antibiotics and surgical debridement. Recognizing the clinical features of PSPG is fundamental to prevent severe destruction and deformity. Keywords: Post-surgical, Pyoderma gangrenosum, Necrotizing fasciitis, Case report

  20. [Pyoderma gangrenosum and hemopathies. Apropos of 2 cases].

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    Doutre, M S; Beylot, C; Beylot, J; Broustet, A; Reiffers, J; Busquet, M; Barberis, C; Garabiol, B

    1987-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon ulcerative disease of the skin. The cause is unknown but the condition is often associated with other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease or monoclonal gammopathy. The association between PG and haematological malignancies (acute leukaemia, Myeloproliferative disorders) is infrequent. Two cases of PG associated with haemopathy are described; one had primary thrombocythaemia and the other, acute myeloblastic leukaemia following for myeloma. The significance of this association is discussed in the light of other observations previously reported in the literature.

  1. Pyoderma gangrenosum as a initial manifestation of ulcerative proctocolitis

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    Carla Bortolin Fonseca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare inflammatory skin condition characterized by progressive and recurrent skin ulceration of destructive course. It is usually associated with rheumatoid arthritis, paraproteinemia, myeloproliferative diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases, especially non-specific ulcerative proctocolitis. In these situations, skin lesions are described as concurrent with the intestinal condition. However, reports on pyoderma gangrenosum preceding intestinal findings are less frequent. The authors describe a case of a woman with febrile condition associated with skin lesions diagnosed by biopsy as pyoderma gangrenosum. Two weeks later, she developed diarrhea, arthralgia and sepsis, being diagnosed as ulcerative proctocolitis. After the administration of the treatment for ulcerative proctocolitis, she showed improvements in sepsis care, remission of diarrhea and regression of skin lesions. This case highlights the importance of considering pyoderma gangrenosum as a manifestation associated with inflammatory bowel disease, regardless of its timing in relation to intestinal symptoms.Pioderma gangrenoso é uma forma de inflamação cutânea, caracterizada por ulceração progressiva e recorrente da pele, com curso destrutivo. Geralmente é associada à artrite reumatoide, paraproteinemia, doenças mieloproliferativas e doença inflamatória intestinal, em especial retocolite ulcerativa inespecífica. Em tais casos, as lesões cutâneas são descritas concomitantes ao quadro intestinal, porém, relatos com descrição de pioderma gangrenoso precedendo achados intestinais são menos frequentes. Os autores relatam caso de mulher com quadro febril associado a lesões cutâneas diagnosticadas por biópsia como pioderma gangrenoso. Duas semanas depois, apresentou diarreia, artralgia e sepse sendo diagnosticada retocolite ulcerativa. Com o tratamento para retocolite ulcerativa apresentou melhora do quadro séptico, remissão da diarreia e

  2. Successful treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome-induced pyoderma gangrenosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, E; Duman, A E; Cetiner, D; Buyukasik, Y; Haznedaroglu, I C; Uner, A; Demirhan, B; Kerimoglu, U; Barista, I; Calguneri, M; Ozcebe, O I

    2006-12-01

    We report successful treatment of a refractory myelodysplastic syndrome-associated pyoderma gangrenosum with the combination of thalidomide and interferon-alpha2a in a single patient. A non-healing wound developed on a 40-year-old woman's left thumb after minor trauma. Massive ulcerovegetative lesions developed after reconstruction surgery. Histopathological examination of the bone marrow and cytogenetic studies revealed an atypical myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic syndrome. The skin lesions resolved dramatically after two months of thalidomide and interferon-alpha2a combination therapy and the haematological status improved.

  3. Pyoderma gangrenosum: A commonly overlooked ulcerative condition

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    Daniel Zunsheng Tay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma ga ngrenosum (PG is a rare, inflammatory, destructive neutrophilic dermatosis, which mimics other ulcerative conditions. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study based on patients diagnosed with PG over a 3-year period (2010-2013, we evaluated demographics, anatomical sites, number of lesions, subtypes, histopathology, associated conditions, treatment regimens, healing time, and recurrence. Results: Of our five patients, there were three males and two females, age ranging between 19 and 58 years (mean age 38 years. Four had single lesions localized to the lower limbs while one had multiple lesions (more than five over bilateral hands and legs. Ulcerative subtype was observed in all the patients. One exhibited pathergy. Skin biopsies were done in four patients, revealing dense neutrophilic infiltrates in three cases and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in one. Associated systemic diseases were observed in all patients, four having inflammatory bowel disease and one having both systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. The patients were all treated with systemic corticosteroids either alone or in combination with immunosuppressants (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and wound dressing. Split-thickness skin graft was done in one patient. Complete healing was achieved in all patients, ranging from one to 3 months after diagnosis. No recurrence was reported. Conclusions: Systemic corticosteroids, either alone or in combination with steroid-sparing agents are the mainstay of treatment. Should family physicians encounter a rapidly progressing ulcer that has poor response to usual wound management, timely referral to dermatology should be made.

  4. Simultaneous Onset of Ulcerative Colitis and Disseminated Pyoderma Gangrenosum

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    Albrecht Neesse

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin condition representing one of the most distinct extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PG occurs independently from intestinal disease activity in about 1–2% of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease and is characterized by chronic deep skin ulcers whose exact pathogenesis is still unknown. So far, patients with ulcerative colitis have only been reported to develop PG during the course of IBD but not at the initial manifestation of bowel symptoms. This is the first report demonstrating the simultaneous onset of ulcerative colitis and severe multifocal PG. In addition, we provide first evidence that infliximab may have a particularly powerful effect in early disseminated PG compared to late-onset PG, advocating an early application of this drug.

  5. Biologics for the treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivarasan, K; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Sud, Sukrit; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Puri, Amarender Singh

    2016-10-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite limited published literature, biologics have caused a paradigm shift in the management of this difficult-to-treat skin condition. The clinical data and outcomes of three patients with active ulcerative colitis and concurrent PG treated with biologics (infliximab two and adalimumab one) are reviewed in this report. Biologics were added because of the sub-optimal response of the colonic symptoms and skin lesions to parenteral hydrocortisone therapy. All three patients showed a dramatic response to the addition of the biologics. In view of the rapid healing of the skin lesions, superior response rate, and the additional benefit of improvement in the underlying colonic disease following treatment, anti-tumor necrosis factor blockers should be considered as a first line therapy in the management of PG with underlying IBD.

  6. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Toru; Ito, Masaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kawase, Norio; Taki, Yoji

    2002-01-01

    A 76-year-old man complained of difficulty in urination and miction pain with abacterial pyuria after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and histopathologically widespread necrosis was observed in the prostate. Thereafter retention of urine and fever occurred and computed tomography scan revealed an abscess of the penile corpus. The abscess was drained, but the fever continued. He developed an abacterial lung abscess and abacterial necrotic ulcerating lesions on his back, his left leg and his lower abdomen. Macroscopic findings demonstrated typical features of pyoderma gangrenosum. Steroid treatment was initiated and the response to steroid therapy was dramatic. Finally urinary diversion using an ileal conduit was performed. We found few cases of pyoderma gangrenosum involving lesions other than those of the skin in the literature. This is the first report of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  7. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Toru; Ito, Masaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kawase, Norio; Taki, Yoji [Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    A 76-year-old man complained of difficulty in urination and miction pain with abacterial pyuria after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and histopathologically widespread necrosis was observed in the prostate. Thereafter retention of urine and fever occurred and computed tomography scan revealed an abscess of the penile corpus. The abscess was drained, but the fever continued. He developed an abacterial lung abscess and abacterial necrotic ulcerating lesions on his back, his left leg and his lower abdomen. Macroscopic findings demonstrated typical features of pyoderma gangrenosum. Steroid treatment was initiated and the response to steroid therapy was dramatic. Finally urinary diversion using an ileal conduit was performed. We found few cases of pyoderma gangrenosum involving lesions other than those of the skin in the literature. This is the first report of pyoderma gangrenosum involving the prostate gland after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Pyoderma gangrenosum: an exceptional complication of venous access device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Sophie; Toussoun, Gilles; Ho Quoc, Christophe; Sebban, Henry; Delay, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare disease whose precise etiology remains unknown. It causes rapidly developing skin necrosis and can occur after surgery, or after a nonspecific external stimulus. This condition is difficult to diagnose because it often mimics a fulminant infection. We present a case of very significant local presentation of PG after placement of a venous access device. Fifteen days after placement, the patient developed extensive cutaneous ulcers and necrosis in the subclavicular area, which led to the misdiagnosis of infection. The device was removed and the patient was given antibiotics. Because there was no improvement following antibiotic treatment, combined with the worrying and extensive appearance of the skin and extremely intense pain, the diagnosis of PG was made. The patient was immediately treated with high-dose corticosteroids, resulting in rapid improvement of the lesions and relief of pain. PG should be considered in cases of extensive, antibiotic-resistant ulceration and treatment with corticosteroids should be initiated. Clinical improvement is usually dramatic, with almost immediate suppression of the pain and arrest of the lesion's progression. Early treatment is the best guarantee for an effective recovery.

  9. A pregnancy-associated nonfamilial case of PAPA (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Isao; Fukatsu, Yuko; Ushijima, Junko; Nakamura, Eishin; Samajima, Koki; Kadowaki, Kanako; Takagi, Kenjiro

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the influence of pregnancy on pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) syndrome. We experienced a rare case of pregnancy complicated with PAPA syndrome. The patient had various histories of skin and joint disorders and experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage during pregnancy; however, her skin lesion was unaffected.

  10. The Association of Age With Clinical Presentation and Comorbidities of Pyoderma Gangrenosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchyan, Hovik J; Butler, Daniel C; Nelson, Caroline A; Noe, Megan H; Tsiaras, William G; Lockwood, Stephen J; James, William D; Micheletti, Robert G; Rosenbach, Misha; Mostaghimi, Arash

    2018-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is an inflammatory neutrophilic dermatosis. Current knowledge of this rare disease is limited owing to a lack of validated diagnostic criteria and large population studies. To evaluate the association of age with the clinical presentation and comorbidities of pyoderma gangrenosum. This was a multicenter retrospective cohort study performed at tertiary academic referral centers in urban settings. Adults (≥18 years) who were evaluated and diagnosed as having pyoderma gangrenosum at the Brigham and Women's and Massachusetts General Hospitals from 2000 to 2015 and the University of Pennsylvania Health System from 2006 to 2016 were included. Patient demographics, clinical features, medical comorbidities, and treatment. Of the 356 validated cases of pyoderma gangrenosum included in the study, 267 (75%) were women and 284 (84.8%) were white. The mean (SD) age at presentation was 51.6 (17.7) years. Pathergy was recorded in 100 patients (28.1%). A total of 238 patients (66.9%) had associated medical comorbidities: inflammatory bowel disease in 146 patients (41.0%); inflammatory arthritis in 73 patients (20.5%); solid organ malignant neoplasms in 23 patients (6.5%); hematologic malignant neoplasms in 21 patients (5.9%); and hematologic disorders, specifically monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera in 17 patients (4.8%). When stratified by age, pathergy was more common in patients 65 years or older (36.3% vs 24.3%; P = .02). Inflammatory bowel disease was the only medical comorbidity that was more common in patients younger than 65 years (47.7% vs 26.6%; P clinical presentation in this large cohort was similar between different age groups, disease associations varied by age. The findings of this study may allow for a more focused, age-specific evaluation of patients with pyoderma gangrenosum.

  11. A case of surgically treated peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; O'Brien, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is characterized by the rapid progression of painful necrotic ulcer surrounding an area of abdominal stoma. It is almost exclusively associated with inflammatory bowel disease even after bowel surgery and is associated with significant morbidity. Diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum is based on exclusion of other disorders replicating some of its clinical features and histopathological evidence. This is a case report of a 56-year-old lady with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with rapidly progressing abdominal ulcer 8 months after a Hartmanns procedure for perforated diverticulitis. The ulcer had formed a large cavity causing faecal filling in the dependent defect. The other causes of ulcer were excluded with negative histopathology, negative polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium ulcerans and negative acid fast bacillus (AFB) test. She was diagnosed with PPG which is routinely treated medically due to risk of setting off a second focus of pyoderma if surgically intervened. However due to increased risk of faecal peritonitis, it was decided to proceed with surgical debridement. This article will discuss the case in more detail and briefly discuss diagnosis and treatment options for PPG. PMID:27302499

  12. Successful Use of Adalimumab for Treating Pyoderma Gangrenosum with Ulcerative Colitis under Corticosteroid-tapering Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagami, Shintaro; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Nagai, Kenta; Hayashi, Ryohei; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis was admitted to our hospital for an ulcerative colitis flare-up under salazosulfapyridine therapy. The symptoms improved with high-dose corticosteroids. After prednisolone was tapered to 10 mg, the frequency of diarrhea increased. The diarrhea was accompanied by joint pain and a skin ulcer with abscess formation, which was diagnosed to be pyoderma gangrenosum. The patient was started on adalimumab. A positive response to the adalimumab therapy was observed after 2 weeks, during which time the ulcerative skin lesion healed completely, however, colonic mucosal healing was achieved at 2 months. Therefore, adalimumab appears to be an effective therapeutic option for patients with ulcerative colitis-associated pyoderma gangrenosum.

  13. Wall-eyed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (webino syndrome and myelopathy in pyoderma gangrenosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Lana

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old female with pyoderma gangrenosum developed paraparesis with a sensory level at L1. Three months later she complained of diplopia and was found to have bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia and no ocular convergence. The term Webino syndrome has been coined to design this set of neuro-opthalmologic findings. Although it was initially attributed to lesions affecting the medial longitudinal fasciculus and the medial rectus subnuclei of the oculomotor complex in the midbrain the exact location of the lesion is still disputed. In the present case both myelopathy and Webino syndrome were probably due to vascular occlusive disease resulting from central nervous system vasculitis occurring in concomitance to pyoderma gangrenosum.

  14. A rare case of adult scalp pyoderma gangrenosum with cranial osteolysis

    OpenAIRE

    L. Aljohmani; K. Abdul-Jalil; C. deBlacam; G.M. Murphy; J.B. O'Sullivan

    2018-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare and painful idiopathic skin condition that has one or more areas of chronic ulceration with well demarcated and undermined borders. Bone osteolysis (the pathological destruction of bone tissue) secondary to PG is a rare phenomenon with limited cases reported in children only. This is the first case report of scalp PG with cranial osteolysis in an 80-year-old adult, with an initial presentation mimicking skin carcinoma. This case highlights the importance...

  15. A novel de novo PSTPIP1 mutation in a boy with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathalla, Basil M; Al-Wahadneh, Adel M; Al-Mutawa, Mariam; Kambouris, Marios; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are a group of Mendelian disorders characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammatory bouts without high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T-cells and are probably due to defects in the innate immunity. We here report on a 4-year-old Arabic boy with the clinical presentation of an autoinflammatory disorder, namely Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum and Acne (PAPA) syndrome. The presentation includes abscess formation after immunization and recurrent mono-articular acute arthritis in various joints that responded favourably to systemic glucocorticosteroids, albeit without acne or pyoderma gangrenosum. The mutation analysis of the boy identified a novel de novo mutation in PSTPIP1, the gene responsible for PAPA syndrome. We recommend that the diagnosis of PAPA syndrome should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent sterile pyogenic arthritis prior to the development of pyoderma gangrenosum or acne in order to initiate a timely management of the disorder.

  16. Pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH)--a new autoinflammatory syndrome distinct from PAPA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Kovnerystyy, Oleksandr; Lohse, Peter; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    PAPA syndrome is a recently identified hereditary autoinflammatory syndrome clinically characterized by pyogenic arthritis, severe acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum. It is caused by mutations in the PSTPIP1 gene and may be closely linked to the aseptic abscesses syndrome, which has been shown to be associated with CCTG repeat amplification in the promoter region of PSTPIP1. We describe two unrelated patients with a clinical presentation quite similar to, yet distinct from, PAPA syndrome. Both patients had pyoderma gangrenosum and acute or remittent acne conglobata, but, in contrast to PAPA syndrome, lacked any episodes of pyogenic arthritis. Instead, they had suppurative hidradenitis. Mutations in PSTPIP1 exons 1 to 15 were excluded. In the promoter region, an increased repetition of the CCTG microsatellite motif was present on one allele in both patients. Alterations of the most commonly affected exons of the MEFV, NLRP3, and TNFRSF1A genes also were not detectable. One patient was treated with the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist anakinra and responded well, although without complete remission. This implies that IL-1ß may be of pathogenetic importance. Small number of patients, no gene mutation identified, and unclear efficacy of therapy are limitations. The clinical triad of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis represents a new disease entity within the spectrum of autoinflammatory syndromes, similar to PAPA and aseptic abscesses syndrome. For this disease, we propose the acronym "PASH" syndrome. PASH syndrome may respond to IL-1ß blockade. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [A Case of Pyoderma Gangrenosum of the Penis Difficult to Distinguish from Fournier Gangrene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Inoue, Takaaki; Nishida, Teruhisa; Kawabata, Takashi; Kawakita, Shigenari; Muguruma, Kouei; Murota, Takashi; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    Here, we report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum of the penis which was difficult to distinguish from Fournier gangrene. The patient was a 54-year-old male who was aware of redness and swelling of the glanspenis for 1 month prior to a consultation at our department. Although he was diagnosed with herpes and treated at a nearby hospital, his symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, the patient visited our department following the onset of pain and fever. During his initial consultation, he had a fever of 39 °C as well as redness and swelling of the glans penis with partial spontaneous purulent discharge. His blood test revealed an elevated white blood cell count (20, 000/μl) and C-reactive protein (19.1 mg/dl). Because Fournier gangrene was suspected, administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents was initiated but proved to be ineffective. An abscess (2 cm in diameter) was also noted in the umbilical region.Enterococcus faecalis was detected by the bacterial culture ; and therefore, Fournier gangrene was diagnosed. A partial penectomy was performed to control the infection. Pathological findings showed only non-specific inflammation ; however, fever persisted postoperatively and blood test results showed no improvement. Furthermore, new abscess lesions emerged on the right heel and back. Because the re-performed abscess bacterial culture test result was negative, pyoderma gangrenosum was suspected, and he was started on oral prednisolone (20 mg/day). On the following day, his fever subsided and his blood test results also showed improvement. A final diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum was ultimately made.

  18. Behçet's syndrome with pyoderma-gangrenosum-like lesions treated successfully with dapsone monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Arun; Mamta

    2004-10-01

    Behçet's syndrome (BS) is a rare multisystem disorder belonging to a group of neutrophilic dermatoses. We report a 65-year-old male patient who had suffered from recurrent painful orogenital ulcers for 50 years from the age of 15 and started developing pustular and bullous lesions evolving into non-healing ulcers similar to those seen in pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) two months prior to presenting to us. There was no evidence of systemic disease or malignancy. Routine baseline investigations were within normal limits. The patient was treated successfully with dapsone, antibiotics, and local wound care.

  19. A Case of Pyoderma Gangrenosum with Ulcerative Colitis Treated with Mesalazine

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae In; Park, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Jun Young; Cho, Baik Kee

    2010-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) manifests as recurrent deep ulceration of the skin and PG is associated with a variety of disorders. Approximately 30% of the cases of PG develop in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A 34-year-old woman presented with a one-week history of recurrent ulcers on the right cheek and back. She was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) 4 years previously and with PG 1 year previously. The clinical course of the skin lesions followed the status of her UC. The patie...

  20. Pyoderma gangrenosum associated with subcorneal pustular dermatosis and IgA myeloma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, K

    2012-01-31

    We report a 57-year-old woman with a 12-year history of ulcerative pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Five years after the onset of PG, she developed subcorneal pustular dermatosis (SPD) and biclonal IgA and IgG gammopathy. She developed PG at two bone-marrow biopsy sites, showing pathergy. Finally, she developed multiple myeloma. Although PG and SPD may occur without associated underlying malignancy, these patients should be followed up for any prospective malignancy because of the association between these disorders.

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin use in managing severe, perioperative peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum following subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy for medically refractory chronic ulcerative colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Behm, Kevin; Larson, David W.; Colibaseanu, Dorin

    2015-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is characterized by painful, necrotic ulcerations occurring in the area surrounding an abdominal stoma. PPG is typically seen in younger patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology and pathogenesis is largely unknown and risk factors are not well defined. Therapy typically involves a combination of aggressive local wound care and systemic medications. Diagnosis and management of PPG can be d...

  2. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Masquerading as Necrotizing Fasciitis: Stepping Away from Cognitive Shortcuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Hilton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with post-Cesarean wound complication was treated for necrotizing fasciitis (NF with sharp debridement and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Several operations and three weeks later, her abdominal skin, subcutaneous fat, right-sided rectus abdominus, and underlying fascia had been removed without any improvement in granulation tissue. Original pathology samples demonstrated sheets of necrosis consistent with NF, but were re-reviewed by a dermatopathologist who diagnosed the patient with pyoderma gangrenosum (PG. She was started on high-dose steroids and dapsone, and her wound quickly showed signs of improvement. Anchor bias delayed the initiation of steroids and diagnosis of PG as the surgical, medical, and consulting teams were hesitant to stray from the diagnosis of NF.

  3. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum with ulcerative colitis treated with mesalazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae In; Park, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Jun Young; Cho, Baik Kee

    2010-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) manifests as recurrent deep ulceration of the skin and PG is associated with a variety of disorders. Approximately 30% of the cases of PG develop in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A 34-year-old woman presented with a one-week history of recurrent ulcers on the right cheek and back. She was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) 4 years previously and with PG 1 year previously. The clinical course of the skin lesions followed the status of her UC. The patient's skin lesions and bowel symptoms were not improved with prednisolone. After she was started on mesalazine, we observed rapid resolution of skin lesions and bowel symptoms. Herein, we report a case of recurrent PG with UC, and we discuss the possible association between these two conditions, and the efficacy of mesalazine therapy for the treatment of PG combined with UC.

  4. Brief report: genotype, phenotype, and clinical course in five patients with PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidowich, Andrew P; Freeman, Alexandra F; Kuhns, Douglas B; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Gallin, John I; Turner, Maria L; Kastner, Daniel L; Holland, Steven M

    2012-06-01

    To describe the genotypes, phenotypes, immunophenotypes, and treatments of PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), a rare autoinflammatory disease, in 5 patients. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and through interviews with 5 patients from 4 kindreds. PSTPIP1 (CD2BP1) exon 10 and exon 11 sequencing was performed in each patient. Neutrophil granule content and cytokine levels were determined in plasma and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and controls. We identified 2 previously described PAPA syndrome-associated PSTPIP1 mutations, A230T and E250Q, and a novel change, E250K. Disease penetrance was incomplete, with variable expressivity. The cutaneous manifestations included pathergy, cystic acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and circulating neutrophil granule enzyme levels were markedly elevated in patients compared to those in controls. PBMC stimulation studies demonstrated impaired production of IL-10 and enhanced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Good resolution of pyoderma gangrenosum was achieved in 3 patients with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) blockade treatment. This analysis of 5 patients demonstrates that mutations in PSTPIP1 are incompletely penetrant and variably expressed in the PAPA syndrome. Neutrophil granule proteins are markedly elevated ex vivo and in the plasma, and elevated levels might be compatible with a diagnosis of PAPA syndrome. TNFα blockade appears to be effective in treating the cutaneous manifestations of PAPA syndrome. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Wegener’s granulomatosis and pyoderma gangrenosum – rare causes of facial ulcerations

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    Karolina Kędzierska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is caused by immune system dysfunction, and particularly improper functioning of neutrophils. At least half of all PG patients also suffer from autoimmunological diseases, one of which is Wegener granulomatosis (WG. The purpose of this article was to compare cases of patients with WG and PG in terms of their clinical course, histopathology, and applied treatment. In both, histopathological features are not fully distinct. Data from microbiological and immunological evaluation and clinical presentation are required to establish the diagnosis. We also present the case of a patient with WG and deep facial skin lesions not responding to standard treatment. Methods: Systematic review of the literature in PubMed using the search terms “Wegener granulomatosis AND Pyoderma gangrenosum” and case report. Results: The finding of 22 reports in the literature (PubMed suggests that it is a rare phenomenon. This study revealed a similar rate of comorbidity of WG and PG in both genders and an increased incidence of both diseases after the age of 50. Among skin lesions there was a dominance of ulceration, most often deep and painful, covering a large area with the presence of advanced necrosis and destruction of the surrounding tissue. The most common location proved to be the cervical-cephalic area. The most popular treatment included steroids with cyclophosphamide. Discussion: The rarity of the coexistence of these two diseases results in a lack of effective therapy. In such cases sulfone derivatives are still effective and provide an alternative to standard immunosuppression methods. Hyperbaric therapy and plasmapheresis can also play an important complementary role.

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulin use in managing severe, perioperative peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum following subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy for medically refractory chronic ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Kevin; Larson, David W.; Colibaseanu, Dorin

    2015-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is characterized by painful, necrotic ulcerations occurring in the area surrounding an abdominal stoma. PPG is typically seen in younger patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology and pathogenesis is largely unknown and risk factors are not well defined. Therapy typically involves a combination of aggressive local wound care and systemic medications. Diagnosis and management of PPG can be difficult and data on treatment are limited. We present a case of severe postoperative peristomal recalcitrant to conventional therapy successfully treated with intravenous immune globulin. PMID:25802252

  7. Topical Medical Cannabis: A New Treatment for Wound Pain-Three Cases of Pyoderma Gangrenosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Vincent; Corban, Jason

    2017-11-01

    Pain associated with integumentary wounds is highly prevalent, yet it remains an area of significant unmet need within health care. Currently, systemically administered opioids are the mainstay of treatment. However, recent publications are casting opioids in a negative light given their high side effect profile, inhibition of wound healing, and association with accidental overdose, incidents that are frequently fatal. Thus, novel analgesic strategies for wound-related pain need to be investigated. The ideal methods of pain relief for wound patients are modalities that are topical, lack systemic side effects, noninvasive, self-administered, and display rapid onset of analgesia. Extracts derived from the cannabis plant have been applied to wounds for thousands of years. The discovery of the human endocannabinoid system and its dominant presence throughout the integumentary system provides a valid and logical scientific platform to consider the use of topical cannabinoids for wounds. We are reporting a prospective case series of three patients with pyoderma gangrenosum that were treated with topical medical cannabis compounded in nongenetically modified organic sunflower oil. Clinically significant analgesia that was associated with reduced opioid utilization was noted in all three cases. Topical medical cannabis has the potential to improve pain management in patients suffering from wounds of all classes. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome: differential diagnosis of septic arthritis by regular detection of exceedingly high synovial cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, W; Lohse, P; Weihmayr, T; Widenmayer, W

    2017-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne syndrome was diagnosed in a 42-year-old patient, after an unusual persistency of high synovial cell counts had been noticed. Clinical peculiarities and problems with diagnosing septic versus non-septic arthritis are discussed.

  9. An Unusual Presentation of Pyoderma Gangrenosum Leading to Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Didan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of an atypical presentation of pyoderma gangrenosum (PG in a 26-year-old male who had a negative septic screen. The patient had a life-threatening presentation requiring an intensive care unit (ICU admission for vasopressor support. It was thought that the likely cause of circulatory collapse was an overwhelming cytokine reaction or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS secondary to extensive PG lesions rather than septic shock. The patient presented with multiple large ulcers, the largest being 4 cm in diameter on the central chest. He developed fevers and circulatory shock preceding his ICU admission. Microbiological specimens, including blood cultures and wound swabs, were negative for any growth (bacterial, fungal, and tuberculosis. No infective foci could be identified as a cause of hemodynamic instability. During admission, the patient’s condition was complicated by multi-organ dysfunction. Wound debridement extending to the deep fascia on the anterior chest, back, bilateral shoulders, and right upper thigh was deemed necessary and performed by the plastic surgery team. Histopathology showed abundant neutrophils but could not confirm an infective process. Overall, the patient made an impressive recovery with almost complete healing of all lesions following oral prednisolone alone. Based on the history and clinical and laboratory findings, a diagnosis of PG complicated by a SIRS was favored. Very few cases of neutrophilic dermatoses have been described in this way. A similar presentation has been described in a 76-year-old female with lower-leg ulcers who developed circulatory shock and required an amputation. Lesions continued to appear despite antibiotics and surgical treatment. Septic screen was negative. She was subsequently diagnosed with PG and recovered rapidly after steroid therapy.

  10. Clinical outcomes and response of patients applying topical therapy for pyoderma gangrenosum: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Ormerod, Anthony D; Craig, Fiona E; Greenlaw, Nicola; Norrie, John; Mitchell, Eleanor; Mason, James M; Johnston, Graham A; Wahie, Shyamal; Williams, Hywel C

    2016-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon dermatosis with a limited evidence base for treatment. We sought to estimate the effectiveness of topical therapies in the treatment of patients with PG. This was a prospective cohort study of UK secondary care patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG that was suitable for topical treatment (recruited between July 2009 and June 2012). Participants received topical therapy after normal clinical practice (primarily topical corticosteroids [classes I-III] and tacrolimus 0.03% or 0.1%). The primary outcome was speed of healing at 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included the following: proportion healed by 6 months; time to healing; global assessment; inflammation; pain; quality of life; treatment failure; and recurrence. Sixty-six patients (22-85 years of age) were enrolled. Clobetasol propionate 0.05% was the most commonly prescribed therapy. Overall, 28 of 66 (43.8%) ulcers healed by 6 months. The median time to healing was 145 days (95% confidence interval, 96 days to ∞). Initial ulcer size was a significant predictor of time to healing (hazard ratio, 0.94 [95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.00); P = .043). Four patients (15%) had a recurrence. Our study did not include a randomized comparator. Topical therapy is potentially an effective first-line treatment for PG that avoids the possible side effects associated with systemic therapy. It remains unclear whether more severe disease will respond adequately to topical therapy alone. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Clinical patterns and treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum in a French department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuset, D; Reguiai, Z; Perceau, G; Colomb, M; Durlach, A; Bernard, P

    2016-02-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory neutrophilic dermatosis for which accurate epidemiological data are limited and therapy remains a challenge. The primary study aim was to examine all cases of PG observed in our regional department over a 15-year period in order to describe the relevant characteristics and outcome under therapy. The medical records of all patients with PG from 1997 to 2012 in the Marne department of France were studied retrospectively. Clinical and histological characteristics, comorbidities, therapeutic modalities and outcome were analysed. Forty-two patients were included (30 women, 12 men). A classical, ulcerative form was found in 39 cases and PG was multifocal in 28 cases. The number of lesions did not differ according to age or the presence of comorbidities. The most frequent first-line treatments were doxycycline (23 cases) and oral corticosteroids (15 cases), regardless of age, number of lesions or existence of comorbidities. Complete remission of PG was obtained in 38 cases (median time to remission: 3 months), with relapse occurring in 17 patients (median time to relapse: 12 months after treatment withdrawal). After a median follow-up of 46 months, 8 patients had died (median time to death: 26 months after treatment initiation). This is the first large French series of patients presenting PG and enabling determination of the annual incidence within the Marne department at around 4.6 cases/1000,000 inhabitants. Our study illustrates the value of first-line treatment with tetracycline, which merits confirmation by further prospective, controlled studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Pyoderma gangrenosum in association with microscopic colitis, idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome, selective IgE deficiency and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyaz, N; Sasidharanpillai, S; Rahima, S; Bindu, V; Shaan, M; Raghavan, N T; Mohan, L; Janardhanan, A K

    2015-08-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a neutrophilic dermatosis of unknown aetiology. We report a 27-year-old male patient with diabetes, who presented with a nonhealing ulcer on the left leg, pruritic hyperpigmented papules distributed over the trunk and limbs, and chronic diarrhoea. He had eosinophilia, low haemoglobin and serum IgE levels, and raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Histopathology of the leg ulcer was consistent with the diagnosis of PG, while the histology of the hyperpigmented papule revealed tissue eosinophilia. Subsequent evaluation was conclusive of the diagnosis of PG, idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) and selective IgE deficiency. Dexamethasone pulse therapy achieved resolution of the ulcer and reduction in the eosinophilia. Further evaluation for the persistent diarrhoea led to a diagnosis of lymphocytic colitis (LC), which responded to budesonide. To our knowledge, the association of PG with IHES, selective IgE deficiency or LC has not been previously reported. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcer in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia: identification of Helicobacter bilis by mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Patrick R; Jain, Ashish; Uzel, Gulbu; Ranken, Raymond; Ivy, Cristina; Blyn, Lawrence B; Ecker, David J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Turner, Maria L

    2010-05-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers and cellulitis of the lower extremities associated with recurrent fevers in patients with X-linked (Bruton) agammaglobulinemia have been reported to be caused by Helicobacter bilis (formerly classified as Flexispira rappini and then Helicobacter strain flexispira taxon 8). Consistent themes in these reports are the difficulty in recovering this organism in blood and wound cultures and in maintaining isolates in vitro. We confirmed the presence of this organism in a patient's culture by using a novel application of gene amplification polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. An adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with indurated plaques and a chronic leg ulcer whose origin was strongly suspected to be an H bilis organism. Histologic analysis demonstrated positive Warthin-Starry staining of curvilinear rods, which grew in culture but failed to grow when subcultured. They could not be identified by conventional techniques. A combination of gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of this organism. This novel technology was useful in the identification of a difficult-to-grow Helicobacter organism, the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum-like leg ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Correct identification of this organism as the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia is of great importance for the early initiation of appropriate and curative antibiotic therapy.

  14. Comparison of the two most commonly used treatments for pyoderma gangrenosum: results of the STOP GAP randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Anthony D; Thomas, Kim S; Craig, Fiona E; Mitchell, Eleanor; Greenlaw, Nicola; Norrie, John; Mason, James M; Walton, Shernaz; Johnston, Graham A; Williams, Hywel C

    2015-06-12

    To determine whether ciclosporin is superior to prednisolone for the treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum, a painful, ulcerating skin disease with a poor evidence base for management. Multicentre, parallel group, observer blind, randomised controlled trial. 39 UK hospitals, recruiting from June 2009 to November 2012. 121 patients (73 women, mean age 54 years) with clinician diagnosed pyoderma gangrenosum. Clinical diagnosis was revised in nine participants after randomisation, leaving 112 participants in the analysis set (59 ciclosporin; 53 prednisolone). Oral prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day compared with ciclosporin 4 mg/kg/day, to a maximum dose of 75 and 400 mg/day, respectively. The primary outcome was speed of healing over six weeks, captured using digital images and assessed by blinded investigators. Secondary outcomes were time to healing, global treatment response, resolution of inflammation, self reported pain, quality of life, number of treatment failures, adverse reactions, and time to recurrence. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and six weeks and when the ulcer had healed (to a maximum of six months). Of the 112 participants, 108 had complete primary outcome data at baseline and six weeks (57 ciclosporin; 51 prednisolone). Groups were balanced at baseline. The mean (SD) speed of healing at six weeks was -0.21 (1.00) cm(2)/day in the ciclosporin group compared with -0.14 (0.42) cm(2)/day in the prednisolone group. The adjusted mean difference showed no between group difference (0.003 cm(2)/day, 95% confidence interval -0.20 to 0.21; P=0.97). By six months, ulcers had healed in 28/59 (47%) participants in the ciclosporin group compared with 25/53 (47%) in the prednisolone group. In those with healed ulcers, eight (30%) receiving ciclosporin and seven (28%) receiving prednisolone had a recurrence. Adverse reactions were similar for the two groups (68% ciclosporin and 66% prednisolone), but serious adverse reactions, especially infections, were more common in

  15. Novel PSTPIP1 gene mutation in a patient with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Elvira; Singla, Shikha; Davis, William E; Quinet, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that usually presents in childhood with recurrent sterile arthritis. As the child ages into puberty, cutaneous features develop and arthritis subsides. We report the case of a now 25-year-old male patient with PAPA syndrome with the E250K mutation in PSTPIP1. We also present a systematic literature review of other PAPA cases. We conducted a literature search of PubMed using the following search terms: E250K mutation, PSTPIP1, and PAPA. PAPA syndrome is caused by mutations on chromosome 15q affecting the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1) gene, also known as CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1). The reported cases of PAPA syndrome currently in the literature involve mutations in A230T and E250Q. One case of a novel E250K mutation has been reported, which presented with a different phenotype to previously described cases of PAPA syndrome. With variation present between disease presentations from case to case, it is possible that the spectrum of PAPA syndrome is wider than currently thought. Further research is needed which may uncover an as-yet undiscovered genetic abnormality linking these interrelated diseases together. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ciclosporin compared with prednisolone therapy for patients with pyoderma gangrenosum: cost-effectiveness analysis of the STOP GAP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J M; Thomas, K S; Ormerod, A D; Craig, F E; Mitchell, E; Norrie, J; Williams, H C

    2017-12-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a painful, ulcerating skin disease with poor evidence for management. Prednisolone and ciclosporin are the most commonly used treatments, although not previously compared within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). To compare the cost-effectiveness of ciclosporin and prednisolone-initiated treatment for patients with PG. Quality of life (QoL, EuroQoL five dimensions three level questionnaire, EQ-5D-3L) and resource data were collected as part of the STOP GAP trial: a multicentre, parallel-group, observer-blind RCT. Within-trial analysis used bivariate regression of costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), with multiple imputation of missing data, informing a probabilistic assessment of incremental treatment cost-effectiveness from a health service perspective. In the base case analysis, when compared with prednisolone, ciclosporin was cost-effective due to a reduction in costs [net cost: -£1160; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2991 to 672] and improvement in QoL (net QALYs: 0·055; 95% CI 0·018-0·093). However, this finding appears driven by a minority of patients with large lesions (≥ 20 cm 2 ) (net cost: -£5310; 95% CI -9729 to -891; net QALYs: 0·077; 95% CI 0·004-0·151). The incremental cost-effectiveness of ciclosporin for the majority of patients with smaller lesions was £23 374/QALY, although the estimate is imprecise: the probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay of £20 000/QALY was 43%. Consistent with the clinical findings of the STOP GAP trial, patients with small lesions should receive treatment guided by the side-effect profiles of the drugs and patient preference - neither strategy is clearly a preferred use of National Health Service resources. However, ciclosporin-initiated treatment may be more cost-effective for patients with large lesions. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Saddle-nose and bilateral cauliflower ear deformities with pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers, cavitary pulmonary lesions, digital gangrene and pulselessness in a young female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhadarshani, Sweta; Gupta, Vishal; Chahal, Anurag; Verma, Kaushal K

    2017-06-15

    We report a young female who presented with saddle-nose and bilateral cauliflower ear deformities along with pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers, digital gangrene and pulselessness. Subsequently, she was found to have bilateral conductive hearing loss, a corneal opacity, mild aortic regurgitation and radiological evidence of cavitary changes in lungs and aortoarteritis. Our patient had a constellation of symptoms which posed a diagnostic challenge. Finally, a diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis with several unusual features was made. Overlap with Takayasu's arteritis and granulomatosis with polyangitis, which has been reported rarely in the literature, cannot be excluded. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum following total knee replacement surgery: first report in dermatologic literature Pioderma gangrenoso atípico após artroplastia total do joelho: primeiro relato na literatura dermatológica

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    Shyam B. Verma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking a post surgical cutaneous and subcutaneous infection is being reported for the first time in international literature after knee replacement surgery with the operation site being the starting point of pyoderma gangrenosum. Orthopedic surgeons and general surgeons should be aware of the existence of this disease and its association with surgical trauma.Um pioderma gangrenoso atípico, similar a uma infecção cutânea e subcutânea pós-operatório, está sendo relatado pela primeira vez na literatura mundial, depois de realização de artroplastia do joelho, tendo como foco inicial o local da cirurgia. Cirurgiões ortopédicos e gerais devem estar cientes da existência dessa doença e de sua associação ao trauma cirúrgico.

  19. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Fiona F; Thomas, Kim S; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Williams, Hywel C; Norrie, John; Mason, James M; Ormerod, Anthony D

    2012-04-28

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day) to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day). A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers). Secondary outcomes include: (i) time to healing; (ii) global assessment of improvement; (iii) PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv) self-reported pain; (v) health-related quality of life; (vi) time to recurrence; (vii) treatment failures; (viii) adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix) cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG); measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG); and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by lesion size, and

  20. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  1. Pyoderma Gangranosum of the Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Heung; Oh, Seung Young

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient who developed pyoderma gangrenosum in the penis with invasion of the distal urethra. The patient was treated with prednisolone and thalidomide, followed by a reconstructive surgical repair using a scrotal island flap. We report this case with a brief review of the literature. PMID:19949683

  2. Cicatricial ectropion correction in a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum: case report Correção de ectrópio cicatricial em paciente com pioderma gangrenoso: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Procianoy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A 19 year old female with pyoderma gangrenosum was referred to the oculoplastic clinic for evaluation of severe cicatricial ectropion of the right lower eyelid. Examination evidenced important scarring of lower eyelid and malar region with secondary ectropion. A full-thickness skin graft associated with a lateral tarsal strip procedure and scar tissue release was performed. The patient's corticosteroid dose was raised for the procedure, and after surgery there was no healing problem or ulcer formation in the eyelid or in the graft donor site. As pyoderma gangrenosum is associated with a pathergy phenomenon in up to 25% of the cases, the onset of new lesions is a relevant concern when performing surgery in these patients. In this case, the surgery was safely performed under corticosteroid immunosuppression.Paciente do sexo feminino de 19 anos com pioderma gangrenoso foi encaminhada ao setor de Plástica Ocular para avaliação de ectrópio cicatricial grave da pálpebra inferior direita. O exame evidenciou cicatrização importante na pálpebra inferior e região malar com um ectrópio secundário. Foi realizado liberação do tecido cicatricial e um enxerto de pele total associado a "tarsal strip". A dose de corticóide da paciente foi aumentada para a realização do procedimento e não houve problemas de cicatrização ou formação de úlceras na pálpebra ou no sítio doador após a cirurgia. Como o pioderma gangrenoso é associado ao fenômeno de patergia em até 25% dos casos, o surgimento de novas lesões é uma preocupação relevante ao indicar cirurgia nestes pacientes. Neste caso, a cirurgia foi realizada com segurança sob imunossupressão com corticóide.

  3. Perfil clinicopatológico dos pacientes com pioderma gangrenoso do Hospital das Clínicas de Porto Alegre (RS - Brasil (2000-2006 Clinic and pathological profile of the patients with pyoderma gangrenosum at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (RS - Brazil (2000-2006

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    Mariana Tremel Barbato

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: O pioderma gangrenoso é doença neutrofílica pouco freqüente. Caracteriza-se por lesões cutâneas ulceradas, dolorosas, com bordas subminadas e violáceas. Os membros inferiores configuram o local mais acometido. Sua etiologia é incerta, mas em 50% dos casos encontra-se associação com outras doenças. A histopatologia é inespecífica, e o diagnóstico, essencialmente clínico. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o perfil clinicopatológico de pacientes com pioderma gangrenoso. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo dos pacientes diagnosticados no período de 2000 a 2006 no Serviço de Dermatologia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. RESULTADOS: Foram observados 16 pacientes cuja idade média foi 49 anos, com predomínio do sexo feminino (62,5%. O período médio entre início da doença e diagnóstico foi de 1,6 ano. A forma clínica predominante foi a ulcerativa (81,25%, e 87,5% das lesões localizavam-se nos membros inferiores. O sintoma mais freqüentemente associado foi dor local (37,5%. Doze pacientes (66% apresentaram doenças sistêmicas concomitantes. Doença de Crohn, diabetes e colagenoses foram as principais comorbidades encontradas. O tratamento mais utilizado foi a corticoterapia sistêmica, associada ou não a outros medicamentos (50%, tendo 43,75% dos pacientes apresentado recidiva do quadro. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados avaliados condizem com os encontrados na literatura. As doenças associadas mais prevalentes foram ileíte regional, diabetes melitus e afecções do tecido conectivo. O tratamento mais utilizado incluiu corticoterapia sistêmica. A maioria dos pacientes apresentou cicatrização completa , porém o número de recidivas foi elevado.BACKGROUND: Pyoderma gangrenosum is an infrequent neutrophilic dermatosis. It presents more frequently with painful cutaneous ulcers, with undermined violaceous borders. The legs are most commonly affected. Etiology is uncertain, although there is an association with other diseases in 50% of

  4. Pyoderma Gangrenosum: A Clinical Observation in an Adult Nigerian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infective ulceration of the skin of unknown aetiology and rarely reported amongst Nigerians. It is believed to be a reactive inflammatory dermatosis and partly a spectrum of neutrophilic dermatoses. PG usually starts as a painful nodule or ...

  5. Delayed diagnosis of bullous pyoderma gangrenosum with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-10

    May 10, 2016 ... Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Inönü University, Malatya, Turkey. Access this article online .... because prompt administration of glucocorticoids or other immunosuppressive ... corneal keratolysis. Am J Clin Pathol ...

  6. Oxytetracycline in Pyoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Sharma

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred patients with moderate to severe pyoderma were treated with oral oxytetracycline. The most common organism isolated were coagulase positive Staph pyogenes and Str betahemolyticus. Of 100 patients; 87 showed a successful therapeutic response. The predictive value of in vitro test for bacterial susceptibility to oxytetracycline (30 mcg disc was 88% for "sensitive" reports but 17% for "resistant" reports.Judged by clinical response the incidence of false sensitive reports was 12% (9/87 but that of false resistant reports was 83 (22/26.

  7. Pioderma gangrenoso superficial como complicación de mamoplastia Superficial granulomatous pypoderma gangrenosum as a complication in mammoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. González de Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available El Pioderma Gangrenoso (PG es una rara enfermedad de etiología desconocida, sospechándose que pudiera ser debida a trastornos de autoinmunidad. Presentamos 2 casos de PG Granulomatoso en el postoperatorio mediato (3-6 semanas en pacientes sometidas a mamoplastia (mastopexia con prótesis. Ambos casos se solucionaron mediante tratamiento con corticoesteroides.Pyoderma Gangrenosum (PG is a rare disease whose etiology is unknown, suspecting that could be due to autoimmune disorders. We present 2 cases of Granulomatous PG in mediate postoperatory (3-6 weeks in patients undergoing mammoplasty (mastopexy with prosthesis. Both cases were solved by treatment with corticosteroids.

  8. MESALAZİN VE STEROİD İLE TEDAVİ EDİLEN PYODERMA GANGRENOZUMUN EŞLİK ETTİĞİ ÜLSERATİF KOLİT VAKASI

    OpenAIRE

    Balkan, Ayhan; Balkan, Yasemin; Namıduru, Mustafa; Mete, Ayşe; Mete, A. Ö.; Konduk, Buğra; Yıldırım, Abdullah; Gülşen, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a serious skin lesion which may accompanying numerous diseases and it can cause of painful, and recurrent ulcer. The lesions may arise as single or multiple lesions secondary to systemic diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, polyarthritis, monoclonal gammopathy or spontaneously without any underlying disease. A 25-year-old male patient was admitted with complaints of fever, abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, painful and infected deep ulcers on head, ...

  9. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a neutropenic leukaemic infant: A case report. D K Das, S Shukla. Abstract. Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a cutaneous lesion, mostly caused by pseudomonas in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been ...

  10. Non-Septicemic Echthyma Gangrenosum

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    Mittal Radha Rani

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35 year male suffering from acid-peptic disease since last 15 years developed multiple, progressive necrotic gangrenous ulcers with pus discharge since one month. He also had cellulites and a big serpiginous necrotic ulcer of left ring finger resembling decubitus ulcer. Smears of pus from both types of ulcers revealed gram-negative bacilli. Culture of pus from both sites showed growth of pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blood culture was negative. Diagnosis of Echthyma gangrenosum (EG was established histopathologically as gram-negative bacilli invaded the dermal vessels. Complete cure occurred after 3 months of treatment with different antibiotics; 80% of ulcers healed with cefadroxyl therapy.

  11. Ecthyma gangrenosum in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obasi, Obasi E.; Raddadi, Ali A.; Osoba, Abimbola O.

    2007-01-01

    We report a diagnosis of ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) in 4 females of mean age 54.8 (range 43-64) years, within 10 months. Severe drug reaction treated with high dose systemic corticosteroids in patient 1, acute myelocytic leukemia treated with high dose dexamethasone and multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics in patient 2precede the onset of EG. Patients 3 and 4 had vasculitic purpura and hemodialysis. In addition, patient 3 was receiving multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics plus anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs for gastric TB, while patient 4 was on melphalan and high dose systemic corticosteroids. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from blood culture of the first 3 patients and skin culture of patient one. Blister aspirate from patient 4 yielded Candida albicans. Factors enhancing skin invasion by pathogenic organisms in our patients were breached skin integrity, therapy with high dose corticosteroids and multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics, hematologic malignancies and chemotherapy with severe neutropenia. (author)

  12. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a well- described skin lesion, mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The lesion characteristically progresses rapidly from small indurated papulovesicles to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black eschar.[1]. Although rare, the presence of EG is indicative of ...

  13. Facial Nerve Paralysis seen in Pseudomonas sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum

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    Suleyman Ozdemir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which is created by pseudomonas auriginosa. Peripheral facial paralysis and mastoiditis as a rare complication of otitis media induced by pseudomonas auriginosa.In this study, 4 months child who has ecthyma gangrenosum and facial nerve paralysis was reported. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 126-130

  14. Colostomy for Perianal Sepsis With Ecthyma Gangrenosum in Immunocompromised Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Berger, Christoph; Meuli, Martin; Grotzer, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Perianal sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum is a severe and potentially mutilating complication in immunocompromised children. Therapies include antimicrobial treatment, incision and drainage, generous tissue debridement, and skin transplantation. We describe 3 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia having sepsis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in febrile neutropenia and severe perianal infections treated relatively early with a protective colostomy. Indications for colostomy were nonhealing wounds, and ceaseless pain. All patients showed a rapid reduction of pain. Complete wound healing was seen in 2 patients, and considerable pain reduction and increased quality of life were seen in a third patient during palliative care. These results suggest that a protective colostomy should be considered early in the management of immunocompromised children with ecthyma gangrenosum.

  15. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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    Čolović Nataša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ecthyma gangrenosum is a rare disease of the skin that causes the localized necrosis of the skin and subcutaneous fat tissue, leading to the multiple ulcerations surrounded by local hyperaemia. The ulcerations are usually localized in groins, and perianal area. In the majority of cases ecthyma is caused by a Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. The disease usually appears in immunocompromized, most frequently hematological patients. Case report. We presented a 78-year-old woman who had been treated for non-Hodgkin lymphoma for the last 18 years. She had recently been given cytotoxics which led to neutropenia. The patient suddenly developed high fever, chill and diarrhea, followed by ecthyma gangrenosum cutaneous lesions in groins, axillas, right side of the neck and umbilicus. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, that were sensitive to several antibiotics were isolated. The treatment included rehydratation, antibiotics, surgical debridement and regular dressing with antiseptics. The healing of all lesions was achieved after sixteen weeks of the treatment. Conclusion. If haemorrhagic- necrotic lesions of the skin are developed in immunocompromised, usually haematologic patients, an Ecthyma gangrenosum has to be considered immediately, material for identification of a cause has to be taken, followed by immediate administration of antibiotics effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Surgical debridement and other therapeutic modalities are to be considered in some patients. .

  16. Pyoderma gangraenosum as a complication to knee arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Skov, Ole; Andersen, Klaus E

    2009-01-01

    Pyoderma gangraenosum (PG) is a rare immunologic ulcerative disease, which sometimes develop as a complication to surgery. PG is often misdiagnosed as an infected wound, but treatment is completely different. We report a case of PG as a complication to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy that resul...

  17. Efficacy of Enrofloxacin in the Treatment of Recurrent Pyoderma in Dogs

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    B. Sudhakara Reddy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dogs with a history of more than three episodes of skin infections in a period of one year were selected for a study on recurrent pyoderma. Oral enrofloxacin along with appropriate simultaneous medication for the underlying associated conditions were chosen as therapy for recurrent pyoderma in dogs. Response to therapy was excellent in all the cases. Improvement was noticed by 12 to 20 days and 20 to 26 days in recurrent superficial and deep pyoderma respectively. Relapse occurred in one dog by 45 days due to re-introduction of allergic food. Enrofloxacin proved to be an effective, safe and convenient antibiotic for the treatment of recurrent pyoderma in dogs.

  18. The Concept of Ecthyma Gangrenosum Illustrated by a Fusarium oxysporum Infection in an Immunocompetent Individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, S.

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) involves necrotic cutaneous lesions caused by bacteria, mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is usually seen in immunocompromised patients with septicemia. However, clinically similar infections have been published with fungi as etiologic agents. We present a case of an

  19. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in community-acquired primary pyoderma

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    Patil Rahul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although prevalence of MRSA strains is reported to be increasing, there are no studies of their prevalence in community-acquired primary pyodermas in western India. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of MRSA infection in community-acquired primary pyodermas. Methods: Open, prospective survey carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai. Materials and Methods: Eighty-six patients with primary pyoderma, visiting the dermatology outpatient, were studied clinically and microbiologically. Sensitivity testing was done for vancomycin, sisomycin, gentamicin, framycetin, erythromycin, methicillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, penicillin G and ciprofloxacin. Phage typing was done for MRSA positive strains. Results : The culture positivity rate was 83.7%. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in all cases except two. Barring one, all strains of Staphylococcus were sensitive to methicillin. Conclusions: Methicillin resistance is uncommon in community-acquired primary pyodermas in Mumbai. Treatment with antibacterials active against MRSA is probably unwarranted for community-acquired primary pyodermas.

  20. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus schleiferi from healthy dogs and dogs with otitis, pyoderma or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Elizabeth R; Kinyon, Joann M; Noxon, James O

    2012-12-07

    In veterinary medicine, Staphylococcus schleiferi was previously assumed to be an inhabitant of carnivore skin, however, more recently, it has been repeatedly documented in the literature as both an inhabitant and as a pathogen. In order to determine the frequency of nasal carriage, and the methicillin susceptibility pattern of S. schleiferi from healthy dogs as well as dogs with otitis and/or pyoderma, a prospective study including 24 dogs with healthy ears and skin, 27 dogs with healthy ears and pyoderma, 15 dogs with otitis without pyoderma and 20 dogs with both otitis and pyoderma was performed. Specimens were obtained and cultured and isolates were identified as S. schleiferi based on growth and biochemical characteristics. S. schleiferi was isolated from the nares of 1 healthy dog, 3 dogs with recurrent pyoderma, 2 dogs with recurrent otitis, and 1 dog with both recurrent otitis and pyoderma. One of the S. schleiferi isolates was methicillin resistant. Nasal carriage of S. schleiferi does occur in healthy dogs as well as dogs with otitis and pyoderma. Methicillin resistant and sensitive S. schleiferi can be found in the nares of dogs with diseased ears and skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The clinical spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of staphylococcal pyodermas in the community and hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireen Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The uncontrolled use of antibiotics has resulted in a relentless spread of multiresistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. There are studies conducted in medical colleges in Chandigarh, Chennai, Mumbai and Vellore comparing pyodermas in the community and hospital setting based on clinical and bacteriological parameters. Aims: This study, conducted over 1½ years from March 2009 to August 2010, aimed at analyzing the clinical spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of community and hospital-associated (HA staphylococcal pyoderma. It also assessed the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in the community and hospital cohort settings. Subjects and Methods: The study comprised of 200 cases of staphylococcal pyodermas, derived from the community (150 cases and hospital (50 cases. Patients were evaluated based on their clinical presentation; antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical significance between individual attributes between the community and HA staphylococcal pyoderma groups was analyzed using Chi-square test and mean differences using student′s t-test. Results: Factors associated with community-associated (CA pyodermas were young age (P = 0.0021, primary pyodermas, and involvement of extremities, while those with HA pyodermas were middle age, secondary pyodermas, and significantly increased body surface involvement (P = 0.041. Incidence of CA-MRSA was 11.3%, while that of HA-MRSA was 18%. Conclusions: A high level of resistance to first-line drugs such as penicillin, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole was observed, more so in the hospital strain than in the community strain. S. aureus demonstrated good susceptibility to cephalosporins. Though the two strains of MRSA differed clinically, they showed 100% sensitivity to vancomycin and linezolid.

  2. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Inui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, although the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds.

  3. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The resu...

  4. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, al-though the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds.

  5. The Concept of Ecthyma Gangrenosum Illustrated by a Fusarium oxysporum Infection in an Immunocompetent Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanping; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Xiang, Yining; Cao, Yu; van den Ende, Albert H G Gerrits; Curfs-Breuker, Ilse; Meis, Jacques F; Lu, Hongguang; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-10-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) involves necrotic cutaneous lesions caused by bacteria, mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is usually seen in immunocompromised patients with septicemia. However, clinically similar infections have been published with fungi as etiologic agents. We present a case of an EG-like lesion due to Fusarium oxysporum confirmed by clinical diagnosis, culture and molecular identification and discuss the definition of EG.

  6. Ecthyma gangrenosum like lesions in disseminated mycobacterial tuberculosis infection in a renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjyot Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG is a relatively rare skin manifestation that is most commonly described in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia. It is more frequently seen in immunocompromised individuals. We report a case of 60-year-old renal transplant recipient on triple immunosuppressants and diabetes mellitus type 2 on insulin therapy who developed EG-like lesions due to disseminated mycobacterial tuberculosis (MTB infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of EG-like lesions associated with disseminated kochs.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from clinical cases of canine pyoderma in South Africa

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    Catherine A. Blunt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of canine pyoderma has become compromised owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance with accompanying recurrence of infection. Canine skin samples submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory for microbiological culture and sensitivity between January 2007 and June 2010, from which Staphylococcus intermedius was isolated, were selected for this investigation. Antimicrobial resistance of S. intermedius was most prevalent with reference to ampicillin followed by resistance to tetracycline and then potentiated sulphonamides. In general, antimicrobial resistance was low and very few methicillin-resistant isolates were detected. Temporal trends were not noted, except for ampicillin, with isolates becoming more susceptible, and potentiated sulphonamides (co-trimoxazole, with isolates becoming more resistant. In general, both the Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion and broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration tests yielded similar results for the antimicrobial agents tested. The main difference was evident in the over-estimation of resistance by the Kirby–Bauer test for ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, penicillin and doxycycline. Knowledge of trends in bacterial resistance is important for veterinarians when presented with canine pyoderma. Analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of S. intermedius isolated from canine pyodermas will guide veterinarians’ use of the most appropriate agent and encourage prudent use of antimicrobials in companion animals.

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Multidrug Resistance and Phage Pattern of Staphylococcus aureus in Pyoderma Cases

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    Sanjay M. Wavare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma is common in India and other tropical countries. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest causative agent ofpyoderma. Aims and Objectives: To know the antibiotic susceptibility and bacteriophage pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from pyoderma infection. Materials and Methods: One hundred clinically diagnosed pyoderma cases were investigated bacteriologically. A total of 59 isolates of S. aureus were subjected to antibioticsusceptibility testing by Kirby Bauer’s disk diffusion method and phage typing by routine test dilution X 100 bacteriophages. Results: Most of the strains were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin and were susceptible to gentamicin, streptomycin and erythromycin. Multidrug resistance was also high among these strains. Regarding the phage types, Phage type 52 (15 strains, 96 (8 strains and 71(16strains were predominant among the typed strains (55.95% of S. aureus. The most common group was mixed phage group (17% followed by phage group I (13.55%. Conclusion: Knowledge of antibioticsusceptibility pattern is essential to give proper antibiotic therapy and avoid unnecessary medication with non-effective drugs, which may increase resistance. Gentamicin, streptomycin and erythromycin are the drugs of choice in that order. Association of phage typing and antibiotic sensitivity of S. aureus showed the predominance of phage group III with greater frequency of penicillin resistance.

  9. Pyoderma Gangrenosum–Like Ulcer in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Patrick R.; Jain, Ashish; Uzel, Gulbu; Ranken, Raymond; Ivy, Cristina; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Turner, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers and cellulitis of the lower extremities associated with recurrent fevers in patients with X-linked (Bruton) agammaglobulinemia have been reported to be caused by Helicobacter bilis (formerly classified as Flexispira rappini and then Helicobacter strain flexispira taxon 8). Consistent themes in these reports are the difficulty in recovering this organism in blood and wound cultures and in maintaining isolates in vitro. We confirmed the presence of this organism in a patient’s culture by using a novel application of gene amplification polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Observation An adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with indurated plaques and a chronic leg ulcer whose origin was strongly suspected to be an H bilis organism. Histologic analysis demonstrated positive Warthin-Starry staining of curvilinear rods, which grew in culture but failed to grow when sub-cultured. They could not be identified by conventional techniques. A combination of gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of this organism. Conclusions This novel technology was useful in the identification of a difficult-to-grow Helicobacter organism, the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like leg ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Correct identification of this organism as the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia is of great importance for the early initiation of appropriate and curative antibiotic therapy. PMID:20479300

  10. The Global Epidemiology of Impetigo: A Systematic Review of the Population Prevalence of Impetigo and Pyoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Asha C; Mahé, Antoine; Hay, Roderick J; Andrews, Ross M; Steer, Andrew C; Tong, Steven Y C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive, systematic review of the global childhood population prevalence of impetigo and the broader condition pyoderma. PubMed was systematically searched for impetigo or pyoderma studies published between January 1 1970 and September 30 2014. Two independent reviewers extracted data from each relevant article on the prevalence of impetigo. Sixty-six articles relating to 89 studies met our inclusion criteria. Based on population surveillance, 82 studies included data on 145,028 children assessed for pyoderma or impetigo. Median childhood prevalence was 12·3% (IQR 4·2-19·4%). Fifty-eight (65%) studies were from low or low-middle income countries, where median childhood prevalences were 8·4% (IQR 4·2-16·1%) and 14·5% (IQR 8·3-20·9%), respectively. However, the highest burden was seen in underprivileged children from marginalised communities of high-income countries; median prevalence 19·4%, (IQR 3·9-43·3%). Based on data from studies published since 2000 from low and low-middle income countries, we estimate the global population of children suffering from impetigo at any one time to be in excess of 162 million, predominantly in tropical, resource-poor contexts. Impetigo is an under-recognised disease and in conjunction with scabies, comprises a major childhood dermatological condition with potential lifelong consequences if untreated.

  11. The Global Epidemiology of Impetigo: A Systematic Review of the Population Prevalence of Impetigo and Pyoderma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha C Bowen

    Full Text Available We conducted a comprehensive, systematic review of the global childhood population prevalence of impetigo and the broader condition pyoderma.PubMed was systematically searched for impetigo or pyoderma studies published between January 1 1970 and September 30 2014. Two independent reviewers extracted data from each relevant article on the prevalence of impetigo.Sixty-six articles relating to 89 studies met our inclusion criteria. Based on population surveillance, 82 studies included data on 145,028 children assessed for pyoderma or impetigo. Median childhood prevalence was 12·3% (IQR 4·2-19·4%. Fifty-eight (65% studies were from low or low-middle income countries, where median childhood prevalences were 8·4% (IQR 4·2-16·1% and 14·5% (IQR 8·3-20·9%, respectively. However, the highest burden was seen in underprivileged children from marginalised communities of high-income countries; median prevalence 19·4%, (IQR 3·9-43·3%.Based on data from studies published since 2000 from low and low-middle income countries, we estimate the global population of children suffering from impetigo at any one time to be in excess of 162 million, predominantly in tropical, resource-poor contexts. Impetigo is an under-recognised disease and in conjunction with scabies, comprises a major childhood dermatological condition with potential lifelong consequences if untreated.

  12. Disseminated refractory pyoderma gangraenosum during an ulcerative colitis flare. Treatment with infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampeli, Vasiliki A; Lippert, Undine; Nikolakis, Georgios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos G; Krause, Ulf; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-09-30

    Pyoderma gangraenosum is an immune-mediated, inflammatory, neutrophilic dermatosis of unknown etiology, which represents one of the extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease. It is a rare disease that occurs in less than 1% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and with the same ratio in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A 36-year-old woman was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis 6 years before admission to our dermatology department with an acute disseminated pyoderma gangraenosum with mucosal involvement, during a flare of ulcerative colitis. Disease progression was interrupted by intravenous administration of the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor infliximab at 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6 (1st cycle) and every 8 weeks thereafter. Improvement of intestinal, skin and oral manifestations was evident already after the 1st cycle of treatment and has been maintained since (at least 16 months). This case report is one of very few on disseminated pyoderma gangraenosum with oral involvement complicating ulcerative colitis, where infliximab was shown to have a rapid efficacy on skin, mucosal and bowel symptoms.

  13. Pyoderma Vegetans: A Case Report in a Child Suspected to Primary Immunodeficiency and Review of the Literature

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    Mahboubeh Mansouri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma vegetans (PV is a rare inflammatory disorder characterized by vegetating pustules and plaques affecting the skin and mucosal membranes. It is believed that this entity is mostly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, chronic malnutrition, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, malignancies, and other immunocompromised states. Pyoderma vegetans occurs more commonly in young and middle-aged adults. There is no sex predilection for this entity. The lesions could heal spontaneously, but usually recur and become chronic. Our patient was an 11-year-old girl suspected to have primary combined immunodeficiency complicated by chronic recurrent vegetating pustular lesions on the face and postauricular area since one year of age. The histological features of the lesions were consistent with pyoderma vegetans. This is the first case of PV beginning from early infancy in the setting of primary immunodeficiency and in an unusual location.

  14. Antibacterial drugs in the form of sprays for the topical treatment of pyodermas and dermatoses complicated with a secondary infection

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    YE. V. Matushevskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers issues related to the application of topical antibacterial drugs for the treatment of pyodermic skin diseases. The author describes mechanisms of action and advantages of the topical form of antibiotics and GCS for the topical treatment of pyodermas. The article substantiates indications for the administration of topical GCS drugs in a combination with antibacterial drugs. The efficacy and safety of antibacterial and combination topical drugs such as Neomycin, Oxycort and Polcortolon TC in the form sprays for the treatment of pyodermas and complicated forms of chronic dermatosis.

  15. Ecthyma gangrenosum in the periorbital region in a previously healthy immunocompetent woman without bacteremia

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    Somenath Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG is a cutaneous lesion classically associated with potentially fatal Pseudomonas septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been implicated. Although EG typically occurs in immunocompromised or neutropenic patients, it may occasionally affect a previously healthy person. The cutaneous findings are characteristic with small indurated papulovesicles progressing rapidly to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black Eschar. While lesions can occur at any site, most are commonly found over the buttocks, perineum, limbs, and axillae. We describe a case of EG in periorbital region in a previously healthy woman who responded to appropriate antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas. It is very important to establish the diagnosis early so that appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy can be initiated to reduce morbidity and potential mortality.

  16. Feline superficial pyoderma: a retrospective study of 52 cases (2001-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui W; Vogelnest, Linda J

    2012-10-01

    Superficial pyoderma is traditionally considered rare in cats but may be more prevalent than previously reported. To better characterize superficial pyoderma in cats. Fifty-two cats from a dermatology referral population over a 10 year period. This study was retrospective. Cases were included if neutrophils and intracellular bacteria were reported from surface cytology of skin lesions. Medical records were reviewed for signalment, historical and clinical data, cytology results, primary skin diagnoses and treatment details. Disease prevalence was 20%, with no breed or sex predispositions. The estimated median age of onset was 2 years, affecting 54% of cats by 3 years and 23% after 9 years. Fewer cases presented during winter (15%) compared with other seasons. Skin lesions were typically multifocal, affecting the face (62%), neck (37%), limbs (33%) and ventral abdomen (29%) most commonly. Crusting (83%), alopecia (67%), ulceration/erosion (54%) and erythema (46%) were common lesion types. Pruritus was reported in 92% of cats. Underlying hypersensitivities (confirmed in 60%; suspected in 19%), and atopic dermatitis specifically (confirmed in 48%), were the most frequent primary dermatoses. Cats were treated with a variety of systemic and/or topical antimicrobials. The overall apparent response was considered good in 61% and poor in 27% of cats. Recurrence was confirmed or suspected in 42% of cats. Feline superficial pyoderma was more prevalent in this study population than previously reported. Young cats with hypersensitivities and older cats were more commonly affected, and a variety of lesion types and distributions occurred. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  17. Comparison of a chlorhexidine and a benzoyl peroxide shampoo as sole treatment in canine superficial pyoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, A; Cobb, M A; Bond, R

    2011-09-03

    The clinical and antibacterial efficacy of two shampoos used as a sole antibacterial treatment in dogs with superficial pyoderma were investigated and compared. In a randomised, partially blinded study, a 3 per cent chlorhexidine gluconate shampoo (Chlorhex 3; Leo Animal Health) was compared against a 2.5 per cent benzoyl peroxide shampoo (Paxcutol; Virbac) in 22 dogs with superficial pyoderma. Dogs were washed two to three times weekly with a 10-minute contact time over 21 days. Clinical scores and bacterial counts were assessed on days 1, 8 and 22 and compared within and between treatment groups; overall response was assessed at the end of the study. Twenty dogs completed the study; 15 (68.2 per cent) showed an overall clinical improvement and the clinical signs resolved in three chlorhexidine-treated dogs. In the chlorhexidine-treated group, scores for papules/pustules (P<0.001), investigator-assessed pruritus (P=0.003), total bacterial counts (P=0.003) and counts for coagulase-positive staphylococci (P=0.003) were reduced after three weeks. Scores and bacterial counts did not vary significantly in the benzoyl peroxide-treated group.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility and Ribosomal-RNA gene restriction patterns among Staphylococcus-intermedius from healthy dogs and from dogs sufferning from pyoderma or otitis-externa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1995-01-01

    A total of 60 Staphlococcus intermedius strains from dogs were investigated by their sensitivity to various antibiotics (50 strains) and by their rRNA gene restriction patterns (ribotyping) (60 strains). Fifteen isolates were from healthy dogs, 9 with otitis externa, and 36 with pyoderma, including......, enrofloxacin, and sulphonamides with trimethoprim. There were no significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns observed among isolates from pyoderma, otitis externa or healthy dogs. Among the 60 strains studied by ribotyping, 10 different ribotypes were identified: 6 different ribotypes...... among isolates from otitis externa, 8 among isolates from pyoderma, and 5 among isolates from healthy dogs. One ribotype (profile C) was dominant among the isolates from healthy dogs while another ribotype (profile A) was dominant among strains from dogs suffering from pyoderma. This profile...

  19. Autoinflammatory syndromes associated with hidradenitis suppurativa and/or acne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinkel, Caroline; Thomsen, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes associated with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) and/or acne are rare but potentially debilitating disorders if not diagnosed and treated correctly. They share a common pathogenesis involving a dysregulated innate immune system with abnormal interleukin (IL)-1 signaling...... leading to sterile neutrophilic inflammation. The clinical features are recurrent episodes of fever, painful arthritis, and skin lesions consistent with HS, acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) accompanied by elevated systemic inflammatory markers in blood. So far, several clinically different syndromes...... have been reported in the literature including pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and pyogenic arthritis (PAPA), pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH), pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and spondyloarthritis (PASS), pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, pyogenic arthritis, and hidradenitis...

  20. Questionnaire survey of detrimental fur animal epidemic necrotic pyoderma in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Heli; Vapalahti, Katariina; Vapalahti, Olli; Sukura, Antti; Virtala, Anna-Maija

    2017-08-03

    In 2007, a previously unrecorded disease, fur animal epidemic necrotic pyoderma (FENP), was detected in farmed mink (Neovision vision), foxes (Vulpes lagopus) and Finnraccoons (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Finland. Symptoms included severe pyoderma with increased mortality, causing both animal welfare problems and economic losses. In 2011, an epidemiologic questionnaire was mailed to all members of the Finnish Fur Breeders' Association to assess the occurrence of FENP from 2009 through the first 6 months of 2011. The aim was to describe the geographical distribution and detailed clinical signs of FENP, as well as sources of infection and potential risk factors for the disease. A total of 239 farmers (25%) returned the questionnaire. Clinical signs of FENP were observed in 40% (95% CI 34-46%) of the study farms. In addition, the survey clarified the specific clinical signs for different animal species. The presence of disease was associated with the importation of mink, especially from Denmark (OR 9.3, 95% CI 2.6-33.0). The transmission route between Finnish farms was associated with fur animal purchases. Some risk factors such as the farm type were also indicated. As such, FENP was detected more commonly on farms with more than one species of fur animal in comparison to farms with, for example, only foxes (OR 4.6, 95% CI 2.4-8.6), and the incidence was higher on farms with over 750 breeder mink compared to smaller farms (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-9.0). Contact between fur animals and birds and other wildlife increased the risk of FENP on farms. Responses also indicated that blocking the entry of wildlife to the animal premises protected against FENP. FENP was most likely introduced to Finland by imported mink and spread further within the country via domestically purchased fur animals. Some potential risk factors, such as the type and size of the farm and contact with wildlife, contributed to the spread of FENP. Escape-proof shelter buildings block the entry of wildlife

  1. Effectiveness of a combined (4% chlorhexidine digluconate shampoo and solution) protocol in MRS and non-MRS canine superficial pyoderma: a randomized, blinded, antibiotic-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borio, Stefano; Colombo, Silvia; La Rosa, Giuseppe; De Lucia, Michela; Damborg, Peter; Guardabassi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    There is a lack of studies comparing topical antiseptics to systemic antibiotics in the treatment of canine superficial pyoderma. To compare the efficacy of topical chlorhexidine with systemic amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for the treatment of canine superficial pyoderma. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in dogs with superficial pyoderma. Group T (n = 31) was treated topically with 4% chlorhexidine digluconate shampoo (twice weekly) and solution (once daily) for 4 weeks. Group S (n = 20) was treated orally with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (25 mg/kg) twice daily for 4 weeks. Bacterial culture and susceptibility testing were performed on clinical specimens collected before treatment. Severity of lesions and number of intracellular bacteria were evaluated using four-point scales to calculate a total pyoderma score for each dog. Pruritus was assessed by owners using a visual analog scale (range 0-10). Scores were analysed for statistical differences between groups T and S. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated from 48 dogs, including eight meticillin-resistant strains (MRSP). Although the number of dogs was small, no significant differences in pyoderma and pruritus scores were observed between groups throughout the study except for day 1, when group S had a significantly higher total score than group T (P = 0.03). Treatment with chlorhexidine products resulted in resolution of clinical signs in all dogs including those infected with MRSP. Topical therapy with chlorhexidine digluconate products may be as effective as systemic therapy with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. This finding supports the current recommendations to use topical antiseptics alone for the management of superficial pyoderma. © 2015 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the ESVD and ACVD.

  2. Streptococcal Immunity Is Constrained by Lack of Immunological Memory following a Single Episode of Pyoderma.

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    Manisha Pandey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunobiology underlying the slow acquisition of skin immunity to group A streptococci (GAS, is not understood, but attributed to specific virulence factors impeding innate immunity and significant antigenic diversity of the type-specific M-protein, hindering acquired immunity. We used a number of epidemiologically distinct GAS strains to model the development of acquired immunity. We show that infection leads to antibody responses to the serotype-specific determinants on the M-protein and profound protective immunity; however, memory B cells do not develop and immunity is rapidly lost. Furthermore, antibodies do not develop to a conserved M-protein epitope that is able to induce immunity following vaccination. However, if re-infected with the same strain within three weeks, enduring immunity and memory B-cells (MBCs to type-specific epitopes do develop. Such MBCs can adoptively transfer protection to naïve recipients. Thus, highly protective M-protein-specific MBCs may never develop following a single episode of pyoderma, contributing to the slow acquisition of immunity and to streptococcal endemicity in at-risk populations.

  3. Comparative evaluation of topical Sodium fusidate cream in common pyodermas with topical gentamicin ointment and systemic antibiotics

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    Roy AK

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: One hundred cases of common pyodermas consisting of four groups, namely impetigo, furunculosis and chronic folliculitis were taken. Each group containing twenty five cases were divided again into three subgroups. From each group, 15 were treated with 2 percent Sodium fusidate cream, 5 were with 0.1 percent Gentamycin sulphate cream and the rest 5 with systemic Erythromycin stearate. In the group of Impetigo, Bockhart′s Impetigo and Furunculosis, topical Sodium fusidate cream showed excellent result, better than Gentamycin topical and equal to that of systemic Erythromycin stearate.

  4. Successful treatment of fusarium solani ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient affected by leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 with granulocytes transfusions

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    Hassen Assia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG manifests as a skin lesion affecting patients suffering extreme neutropenia and is commonly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunocompromised patients. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency I (LAD I which count among primary immunodeficiency syndromes of the innate immunity, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized in its severe phenotype by a complete defect in CD18 expression on neutrophils, delayed cord separation, chronic skin ulcers mainly due to recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, leucocytosis with high numbers of circulating neutrophils and an accumulation of abnormally low number of neutrophils at sites of infection. Case Presentation We report at our knowledge the first case of a child affected by LAD-1, who experienced during her disease course a multi-bacterial and fungal EG lesion caused by fusarium solani. Despite targeted antibiotics and anti-fungi therapy, the lesion extended for as long as 18 months and only massive granulocytes pockets transfusions in association with G-CSF had the capacity to cure this lesion. Conclusion We propose that granulocytes pockets transfusions will be beneficial to heal EG especially in severely immunocompromised patients.

  5. Lincosamide resistance is less frequent in Denmark in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from first-time canine superficial pyoderma compared with skin isolates from clinical samples with unknown clinical background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Rikke; Boysen, Lene; Berg, June; Guardabassi, Luca; Damborg, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance may be overestimated in bacterial isolates from clinical samples because veterinarians often submit samples in cases of treatment failure or recurrent cases, which are more frequently associated with resistant strains. To assess to what extent the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from first-time superficial pyoderma differs from canine skin isolates from clinical samples with unknown clinical background. Two study groups were enrolled in Denmark between March 2012 and October 2013: 57 dogs with first-time superficial pyoderma and no prior antimicrobial treatment (Group A); and 289 different dogs for which skin specimens were submitted for culture during the study (Group B). One S. pseudintermedius isolate from each dog was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by broth microdilution. Resistance levels in the two groups were compared by Fisher's exact test. Clindamycin resistance was less frequent in Group A (14%) than in Group B (27%) (P = 0.02). Similar trends were observed for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (1.8 versus 4.8%), chloramphenicol (8.8 versus 14.5%), enrofloxacin (1.8 versus 3.5%), oxacillin (1.8 versus 4.8%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (3.5 versus 5.9%). Oxacillin resistance was significantly associated with resistance to six of seven non-β-lactams. The prevalence of lincosamide resistance is markedly influenced by patients' clinical and antimicrobial treatment history. To limit selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria, lincosamides are appropriate empirical choices for treatment of first-time superficial pyoderma even though resistance is not infrequent. Culture and susceptibility testing are, however, recommended for all pyoderma patients. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  6. Bacteriological Study of 100 Cases of Pyodermas with Special Reference to Staphylococci, Their Antibiotic Sensitivity and Phage Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Ramani

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred new cases of pyodenna attending King George Hospital, Vishakhapatnam were investigated bacteriologically with antibiotic sensitivity of all the strains isolated and phage typing of coagulm positive staphylocci. Among these 50 had impetigo and 15 each ahd furunculosis and fouiculitis. The remaining included various other clinical entities. Children under 10 years were observed to have high incidence of pyoderma. A total of 88 strains of staphylococci (77 coagulase positive and 11 coagulase negative strains 25 strains of beta haemolytic streptococci and 3 strains of Klebsiella were isolated. Staphylococci were found to be the commonest aetiological agents either single or in association with other organisms. Of the 76 strains of coagulase positive staphylococci 32 strains were not phage typable and among the 44 typable strains 17 (38% belonged to group III and 15 (36.5% to mixed group. Coagulase positive staphylococci showed high sensitivity to garamycin, kanamycin and erythromycin and high resistance to penicillin and streptomycin. Multiple drug resistance was also high among these strains. Coagulase negative staphylococci were found to be more sensitive with less incidence of multiple drug resistance. Most of multiple drug resistant strains belonged to group III phage types. Beta haemolytic streptococci were found to be highly sensitive to all the antibiotics tested.

  7. Efficacy of Lincomycin Against the Strains of Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated From Various Types of Pyodermas in Children : in Vitro and in Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Rama

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Lincomycin is chemically distinct from all other available antibiotics except its semi-synthetic derivative clindamycin. Though it has been in the market for over three decades, there were not many clinical studies in India. This study has been undertaken to know its efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus, commonest organism of pyodermas in children. Material was taken from the lesions of 100 fresh cases of various types of pyodermas in children and studied by Gram stain and in 50% human blood agar and nutrient agar according to standard methods. The staphylococci thus isolated were tested for linocomycin susceptibility by using the disc diffusion technique. Lincomycin was given to all these children in a daily dose of 30 mg/kg 5 - 10 days. Treatment failure was defined as persistence of lesions after 10 days of treatment. 75% strains of staphylococci were susceptible to lincomycin in vitro and 95% of the patients responded to 5-10 days treatment. Five out of 100 children did not respond to treatment even after 10 days. No case of relapse was noticed among these 95 children for a period of 2 weeks. No side effects were observed and the drug was very well tolerated. Being highly effective and least toxic linomycin deserves a place in the antimicrobial arsenal of the modern dermatologists.

  8. Deep vein thrombosis, ecythyma gangrenosum and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia occurring in a man with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Apostolova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin necrosis and limb gangrene are occasional thrombotic manifestations of anticoagulation therapy. We report a man heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, and with a history of recurrent deep venous thrombosis, who initially presented with a necrotic skin lesion of the right flank while on warfarin therapy with a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin was discontinued and he received intravenous heparin. Thereafter he developed thrombocytopenia and pedal erythema and was diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Heparin was replaced with argatroban. He ultimately underwent bilateral below-knee amputations for the thrombotic complications of the HIT. The initial necrotic lesion healed with antibiotics and wound care. Pathologic examination of multiple biopsy specimens revealed two separate lesions. One was necrotic tissue infiltrated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus having features of ecthyma gangrenosum. The second showed thrombotic changes consistent with HIT. The case illustrates the differential diagnosis of skin necrosis and limb gangrene in patients on warfarin and heparin, and also the clinical complexities that can occur in a FVL heterozygote.

  9. Blastomycosis-like pyoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven cases of blastomycosis like pyo4erma without, any systemic were treated with a combination of antibiotics and corticosteroids, with good results. The number of lesions from one to ten and were present on the extremities. All the patients were having eosinophilia with an increased ESR, Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest micro-organism isolated there was no underlying medical problem in any patient.

  10. Sunitinib-associated hypertension and neutropenia as efficacy biomarkers in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donskov, Frede; Michaelson, M Dror; Puzanov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    ), neutropenia (grade ⩾2), thrombocytopenia (grade ⩾2), hand-foot syndrome (grade >0), and asthenia/fatigue (grade >0)) were analysed in multivariate analyses of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) end points. RESULTS: On-treatment neutropenia and hypertension were associated with longer...... PFS (P=0.0276 and Pneutropenia was significantly associated...... with longer PFS and OS (P=0.013 and P=0.0122, respectively) and hypertension or hand-foot syndrome with longer OS (P=0.0036 and P=0.0218, respectively). The concordance index was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.63-0.67) for IMDC classification alone and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.70-0.74) when combined with hypertension and neutropenia...

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic shock associated with ecthyma gangrenosum in an infant with agammaglobulinemia Choque séptico por Pseudomonas aeruginosa associado a éctima gangrenosa em criança com agamaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fernando Lourenço de ALMEIDA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare and invasive infection that can be associated with agammaglobulinemia. The cornerstone of the treatment is based on prompt recognition with appropriate antibiotic coverage and intravenous immunoglobulin. The authors report a case of EG emphasizing the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this condition.Éctima Gangrenosa (EG por Pseudomonas aeruginosa é uma infecção rara e invasiva que pode ser associada com agamaglobulinemia. O tratamento fundamental é baseado no pronto reconhecimento com cobertura de antibiótico apropriada e imunoglobulina intravenosa. Os autores relatam caso de EG dando ênfase aos aspectos clínicos e terapêuticos desta condição.

  12. Biologiske behandlinger af andre dermatologiske sygdomme end psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, Robert; Skov, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is the only disease in dermatology where biologics have been studied in placebo controlled trials. However, drugs have been used for several other indications in dermatology, e.g. pyoderma gangrenosum and pemphigus. We give a brief overview of the indications for biologics in skin disea...

  13. The Correlation between Individual and Environmental Hygiene and Pioderma Incidence An Analytical Observational Study in Pyoderma Patient in Islamic Sultan Agung Hospital during the Period August to December 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Aisyah Sutisna

    2011-06-01

    Design and Methods: The study type was analytic observational with case control design. The sample consisted of 30 respondents RSI patients Sultan Agung for case group and 30 persons as control group is the neighbors of patients who have similar characteristics and are not suffering pyoderma. The data used are secondary data from medical records and primary data from questionnaires filled out by respondents, then the data were analyzed with chi-square and to determine the correlation power there was used a contingency coefficient test. Results: It was found that the good and the bad individual hygene for the case group were 3.3% and 66.7% respectively, while for the control group the good and bad individual hygene were 80.0% and 20.0% respectively. Chi-square test resulted in p=0,000 with contingency coefisien of 0.426. It was found that the good and the bad environmental hygene for the case group were 56.7% and 43.3% respectively, while for the control group the good and bad environmental hygene were 83.3% and 16.3% respectively. Chi-square test resulted in p=0,024 with contingency coefisien of 0.27. Conclusion: There was a significant correlation between the personal and environmental hygiene and poderma insicence at the RSI Sultan Agung with a moderate relationship between individual hygiene and weak relationship between environmental hygene (Sains Medika, 3(1:24-30.

  14. A programme of research to set priorities and reduce uncertainties for the prevention and treatment of skin disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, K. S.; Batchelor, J. M.; Bath-Hextall, F.; Chalmers, J. R.; Clarke, T.; Crowe, S.; Delamere, F. M.; Eleftheriadou, V.; Evans, N.; Firkins, L.; Greenlaw, N.; Lansbury, L.; Lawton, S.; Layfield, C.; Leonardi-Bee, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin diseases are very common and can have a large impact on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. This programme addressed four diseases: (1) eczema, (2) vitiligo, (3) squamous cell skin cancer (SCC) and (4) pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). OBJECTIVE: To set priorities and reduce uncertainties for the treatment and prevention of skin disease in our four chosen diseases. DESIGN: Mixed methods including eight systematic reviews, three prioritisation exercises, tw...

  15. Ulcerative colitis presenting as leukocytoclastic vasculitis of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Ozaslan, Ersan; Topal, Firdevs; Albayrak, Levent; Kayhan, Burcak; Efe, Cumali

    2008-04-21

    A number of cutaneous changes are known to occur in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema nodosum, perianal disease, erythematous eruptions, urticaria, and purpura. However, occurrence of skin manifestations prior to the development of ulcerative colitis is a rare occasion. Here, we report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis in which the intestinal symptoms became overt 8 mo after the development of skin lesions.

  16. Ulcerative colitis presenting as leukocytoclastic vasculitis of skin

    OpenAIRE

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Ozaslan, Ersan; Topal, Firdevs; Albayrak, Levent; Kayhan, Burcak; Efe, Cumali

    2008-01-01

    A number of cutaneous changes are known to occur in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema nodosum, perianal disease, erythematous eruptions, urticaria, and purpura. However, occurrence of skin manifestations prior to the development of ulcerative colitis is a rare occasion. Here, we report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis in which the intestinal symptoms became overt 8 mo after the development of skin ...

  17. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma masquerading as large pyogenic granuloma

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    Anupama Bains

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL forms 9% of the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. It usually presents as solitary reddish brown ulcerating nodule or indurated plaque. Sometimes, it mimics other dermatological diseases such as eczema, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyogenic granuloma, morphea, and squamous cell carcinoma. Our case presented with large pyogenic granuloma like lesion with regional lymphadenopathy. Since pcALCL is rare, one can misdiagnose such cases and therefore high index of suspicion is necessary.

  18. Identification of a homozygous PSTPIP1 mutation in a patient with a PAPA-like syndrome responding to canakinumab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geusau, Alexandra; Mothes-Luksch, Nadine; Nahavandi, Hesam; Pickl, Winfried F; Wise, Carol A; Pourpak, Zahra; Ponweiser, Elisabeth; Eckhart, Leopold; Sunder-Plassmann, Raute

    2013-02-01

    Pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome (OMIM 604416) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by pyogenic sterile arthritis and less frequently accompanied by pyoderma gangrenosum and acne. It is associated with dominant missense mutations in the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 gene (PSTPIP1) located on chromosome 15. The patient was diagnosed as having features of a PAPA-like syndrome in which cutaneous manifestations, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and acne fulminans, predominated. Sequencing of the PSTPIP1 gene was performed in the patient and his extended family. The patient's DNA analysis revealed a homozygous nucleotide exchange c.773G>C in the PSTPIP1 gene, leading to the substitution of glycine 258 by alanine (p.Gly258Ala), a previously reported heterozygous polymorphism. Heterozygous changes were identified in both of the patient's parents and in 7 other family members, all of whom were asymptomatic. The patient was treated with canakinumab, a human anti-interleukin 1β monoclonal antibody, which led to rapid remission of the symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the resolution of dermatological symptoms associated with a PAPA-like syndrome using canakinumab treatment. Further study of the p.Gly258Ala variant is warranted to determine whether this mutation has a role in causing an apparently recessive cutaneous syndrome resembling PAPA syndrome.

  19. New Described Dermatological Disorders

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    Müzeyyen Gönül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.”

  20. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  1. Hidradenitis suppurativa: Inside and out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Patil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic, disabling, suppurative disease characterized by deep tender subcutaneous nodules; complicated by fibrosis and extensive sinuses affecting primarily the apocrine gland bearing areas. It affects all races in early 20s with greater prevalence seen in women (3 to 5:1. The estimated disease prevalence is 1 - 4 %. The disease is speculated to be caused by follicular structural abnormalities with associated risk factors as smoking, obesity, positive family history and shaving. Certain co-morbidities can also be seen such as inflammatory bowel disease, spondyloarthropathies, epithelial tumors, pyoderma gangrenosum etc. Treatment modalities include counseling of the patient to lose weight if obese, to wear loose clothes, stop smoking and maintain good hygiene. Topical antibiotics, like 1% clindamycin, have shown to give good results along with benzoyl peroxide wash. Orally cocktail of antibiotics can be given, though biologicals remain the best treatment option. Surgical excision can be done in later stages and in recalcitrant cases.

  2. Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elisabeth J; Allantaz, Florence; Bennett, Lynda; Zhang, Dongping; Gao, Xiaochong; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L; Punaro, Marilynn; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pascual, Virginia; Wise, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the “inflammasome” involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1β) production. Overproduction of IL-1β is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical pathways that may be relevant to the distinct pyogenic inflammation of the skin and joints characteristic of this disease. This review summarizes the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on these molecular aspects of PAPA syndrome and related disorders. PMID:21532836

  3. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have increased risk of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Morten L; Kjeldsen, Jens; Knudsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    were significantly increased (P celiac disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), sarcoidosis, asthma, iridocyclitis, psoriasis, pyoderma gangrenosum, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Restricted to UC (P ...AIM: To investigate whether immune mediated diseases (IMD) are more frequent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: In this population based registry study, a total of 47325 patients with IBD were alive and registered in the Danish National Patient Registry on December 16, 2013....... Controls were randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) and matched for sex, age, and municipality. We used ICD 10 codes to identify the diagnoses of the included patients. The IBD population was divided into three subgroups: Ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and Both...

  4. [Penile Tuberculosis : A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Takahiro; Nomura, Hironori; Tsujimura, Go; Ko, Yoko; Kinjyo, Takanori; Yoshioka, Iwao; Takada, Shingo; Yahata, Yoko; Mizutani, Tetsu

    2017-04-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with a chief complaint of glans penis pain, induration, and discharge of pus. He was prescribed a course of antibiotics, but the condition persisted despite treatment. Thus, we differrentially diagnosed the patient with penile tuberculosis and pyoderma gangrenosum, and performed a biopsy of the penis. The biopsy result was thickening of the horny layer epidermis with only a foreign body granuloma composed of inflammatory cells, and did not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Thoraca-abdominal computed tomography revealed axillary lymphadenopathy with necrosis. Suspecting tuberculosis lymphadenitis, we performed T-spot and QuantiFERONtests. The result was T-spot negative and QuantiFERONpositive, so we diagnosed the patient with penile tuberculosis, and started antituberculosis medication. In about half a year after the start of treatment the symptoms subsided, and lymphadenopathy showed reduction.

  5. Diseases associated with hidranitis suppurativa: part 2 of a series on hidradenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2013-06-15

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a pathologic follicular disease, impacts patients' lives profoundly and usually occurs in isolation. The diseases with the strongest association are obesity, depression, and pain. HS is associated with many diseases including acne conglobata (AC), dissecting cellulitis, pilonidal cysts, and obesity. Pyoderma fistulans sinifica (fox den disease) appears to be the same entity as Hurley Stage 2 of 3 HS. The rate of acne vulgaris in HS patients mirrors unaffected controls. The most common, albeit still uncommon, association is with seronegative, haplotype unlinked arthritis (most importantly B27), in particular spondolyarthritis. Crohn disease and HS occur together at a rate that varies from 0.6% to 38% in retrospective cases series. Ulcerative colitis occurred with HS in 14% of patients in one series. The next most common association is with pyoderma gangrenosum, but this association is likely under-reported. Synovitis-Acne-Pustulosis Hyperostosis-Osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome, which is rare, has more than 10 reports linking it to HS. Nine case reports have linked Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) to HS and two reports related HS to Fox-Fordyce disease (FF), but because both occur in the axilla this might be a mere coincidence. HS is rarely associated with ophthalmic pathology. Specifically, more than 5 reports link it to Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome (KID); greater than10 cases link it to interstitial keratitis and 2 cases are linked to Behçet's disease. The presence of proteinuria and acute nephritis link HS to the kidney, especially since and reports have documented resolution of HS after renal transplant. Florid steatocystoma multiplex, Sjogren Syndrome, and HS have been linked and their reports likely underestimate their coincidence because all these entities involve occlusion (albeit by different mechanisms). Three reports link HS and amyloid, but both share some common genetic underpinnings and thus the coincidence of these

  6. Granulomatous rosacea: Like leukemid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škiljević Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skin findings in leukemias may be divided into specific lesions (leukemia cutis and non-specific lesions (leukemids which may be found in up to 80% of all patients with leukemias. The leukemids vary clinically and they are usually a manifestation of bone marrow or immunologic impairment, but also Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythroderma, maculopapular exanthema, prurigo-like papules, generalized pigmentation, follicular mucinosis, generalized pruritus may be found during the course of leukemia. Case report. We report a 70-year-old male with a 3-month history of erythema, papules and pustules on the face, ears and neck and over a month history of refractory anemia, anorexia, weight loss, malaise, and fever. Physical examination revealed symmetric erythematous, violaceous papules, papulo-nodules and plaques with slate scale and sparse, small pustules on the face, earlobes and neck. Histopathologic findings of involved skin showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with perifollicular accentuation and focal granulomatous inflammation in the papillary and upper reticular dermis. Extensive checkup revealed the presence of acute myeloid leukemia French- American-British (FAB classification subtype M2, with signs of three-lineage dysplasia. The patient was treated by L6 protocol which led to complete remission, both in bone marrow and skin, but after seven months he had relapse of leukemia with the fatal outcome. Conclusion. This case indicates the importance of skin eruptions in the context of hematological malignancies.

  7. Vasculitis in the autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Hagit; Ben-Chetrit, Eldad

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the prevalence and relationship between autoinflammatory diseases and vasculitis. Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are a group of syndromes characterized by episodes of unprovoked inflammation due to dysregulation of the innate immune system. Despite the common occurrence of rashes and other skin lesions in these diseases, vasculitis is reported in only a few. On the other hand, neutrophilic dermatoses are more prevalent. Large vessel vasculitis is reported in patients with Behcet's and Blau's syndromes. Small and medium size vasculitides are reported in familial Mediterranean fever mainly as Henoch-Schonlein purpura and polyarteritis nodosa, respectively. It is rarely described in hyper IgD with periodic fever syndrome, cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and pyoderma gangrenosum and acne syndrome. In most AID where bones and skin are mainly involved (CRMO, Majeed syndrome, Cherubism and DITRA) - vasculitis has not been described at all. In AID small vessel vasculitis affects mainly the skin with no involvement of internal organs. In AID, neutrophilic dermatoses are more common and prominent than vasculitis. This may reflect a minor role for interleukin-1 in the pathogenesis of vasculitis. The rarity of vasculitis in AID suggests that in most reported cases its occurrence has been probably coincidental rather than being an integral feature of the disease.

  8. [Current therapeutic indications of thalidomide and lenalidomide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordi-Ros, Josep; Cosiglio, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-22

    Thalidomide is a synthetic glutamic acid derivative first introduced in 1956 in Germany as an over the counter medications. It was thought to be one of the safest sedatives ever produced as it was effective in small doses, was not addictive, and did not have acute side-effects such as motor impairment, but was quickly removed from market after it was linked to cases of severe birth defects. The Food and Drug Administration approved use in the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum. Further, it was shown its effectiveness in unresponsive dermatological conditions such as actinic prurigo, adult Langerhans cell hystiocytosis, aphthous stomatitis, Behçet syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, cutaneous sarcoidosis, erythema multiforme, Jessner-Kanof lymphocytic infiltration of the skin, Kaposi sarcoma, lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, melanoma, prurigo nodularis, pyoderma gangrenosum and others. In May 2006, it was approved for the treating multiple myeloma. New thalidomide analogues have been developed but lack clinical experience. This paper is a review of the history, pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical applications and side effects of thalidomide and its analogues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines for treatment with infliximab for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, D W; Oldenburg, B; van Bodegraven, A A; van Hogezand, R A; de Jong, D J; Romberg-Camps, M J L; van der Woude, J; Dijkstra, G

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab is an accepted induction and maintenance treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. The effectiveness of infliximab has been demonstrated for both active luminal disease and for enterocutaneous fistulisation. In addition, infliximab can be administered for extraintestinal symptoms of Crohn's disease, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis and arthropathy. Maintenance treatment with infliximab is effective and is regarded as safe as long as the necessary safety measures are heeded. Infusion reactions occur in 3 to 17% of the patients and are associated with the formation of antibodies to infliximab. A reduction in infusion reactions is possible by the concurrent administration of steroids and the use of immunosuppressants (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate). Furthermore, immunosuppressants increase the duration of the response to infliximab. For these reasons, the concomitant use of immunosuppressants with infliximab is recommended. Infections and most specifically tuberculosis need to be ruled out before infliximab is administered. Up to now, there are no indications for a connection between an increased risk for malignancies and treatment with infliximab.

  10. Long-Term Natural History and Complications of Collagenous Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis, a possibly heterogeneous disorder. Collagenous colitis most often appears to have an entirely benign clinical course that usually responds to limited treatment. Sometimes significant extracolonic disorders, especially arthritis, spondylitis, thyroiditis and skin disorders, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, dominate the clinical course and influence the treatment strategy. However, rare fatalities have been reported and several complications, some severe, have been attributed directly to the colitis. Toxic colitis and toxic megacolon may develop. Concomitant gastric and small intestinal inflammatory disorders have been described including celiac disease and more extensive collagenous inflammatory disease. Colonic ulceration has been associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, may evolve directly from collagenous colitis. Submucosal ‘dissection’, colonic fractures, or mucosal tears and perforation, possibly from air insufflation during colonoscopy, have been reported. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressures that may occur during radiological imaging of the colon. Neoplastic disorders of the colon may also occur during the course of collagenous colitis, including colon carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumours (ie, carcinoids. Finally, lymphoproliferative disease has been reported.

  11. Cutaneous Manifestations Of Hepatitis B And C Virus Infections : A Study Of 100 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochhar Atul Mohan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis viruses, especially B and C, is a major public health problem in many countries. One hundred consecutive patients with these infections were studied for cutaneous abnormalities. Females were more commonly affected. Recurrent/chronic vascular changes (92% , urticaria (72%, leucocytoclastic vasculitis (36%, erythema nodosum (28%, Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (12%, lichen planus (8%, pyoderma gangrenosum (2 patients and dermatomyositis like syndrome (1 patient were the prominent cutaneous abnormalities noted in patients with hepatitis B. Likewise, the prominent skin abnormalities notes in hepatitis â€" C Patients were vascular changes (82.2%, chronic urticaria (60.0%, xerosis of skin (56.6%, leucocytoclastic vasculitis (40%, erythema multiforme (23.3%, Sjogren’s syndrome (13.2%, recurrent erythema nodosum (19.8% and Behcet’s syndrome in a single case. Extensive subcutaneous fat atrophy of the face in one case and diffuse hyperpigmentation in 5 cases were the two interesting features noted in out patients, which have not been reported earlier. The pertinent literature is briefly reviewed in the light of above findings.

  12. Management of parastomal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Yeo; Farshad Abir; Walter E Longo

    2006-01-01

    Management of surgically placed ostomies is an important aspect of any general surgical or colon and rectal surgery practice. Complications with surgically placed ostomies are common and their causes are multifactorial. Parastomal ulceration, although rare, is a particularly difficult management problem. We conducted a literature search using MD Consult, Science Direct,OVID, Medline, and Cochrane Databases to review the causes and management options of parastomal ulceration. Both the etiology and treatments are varied.Different physicians and ostomy specialists have used a large array of methods to manage parastomal ulcers;these including local wound care; steroid creams;systemic steroids; and, when conservative measures fail, surgery. Most patients with parastomal ulcers who do not have associated IBD or peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) often respond quickly to local wound care and conservative management. Patients with PPG,IBD,or other systemic causes of their ulceration need both systemic and local care and are more likely to need long term treatment and possibly surgical revision of the ostomy. The treatment is complicated, but improved with the help of ostomy specialists.

  13. Successful treatment of ulcerative colitis complicated by Sweet's syndrome by corticosteroid therapy and leukocytapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Osawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken; Furuta, Takahisa; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro

    2011-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis is occasionally complicated by dermatological disorders presenting as extra-intestinal manifestations, including erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangrenosum. Sweet's syndrome is considered to be a rare cutaneous disease in patients with ulcerative colitis. To date, only 17 cases of Sweet's syndrome complicating ulcerative colitis have been reported in the English literature. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old male who had been suffering from ulcerative colitis for 20 years. He was admitted to hospital with hematochezia, diarrhea and fever, and painful erythematous nodules on the face and arms. Histological examination of skin biopsies showed inflammatory cell infiltration composed mainly of neutrophils without evidence of necrotizing vasculitis, and the condition was diagnosed as Sweet's syndrome. The patient was treated with prednisolone and leukocytapheresis and the erythematous nodules on the skin, as well as the abdominal symptoms and endoscopic findings of ulcerative colitis, immediately improved. In this paper we report on this case and review the literature concerning ulcerative colitis and Sweet's syndrome.

  14. [Cutaneous involvement in chronic inflammatory bowel disease : Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, L; Rappersberger, K

    2016-12-01

    Over recent decades, both the incidence and prevalence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease have continued to rise in industrialized countries; the disease is frequently associated with extracutaneous involvement and comorbidity. The purpose of this work was to investigate the frequency and specificity of mucocutaneous manifestations in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). An extensive search in peer-reviewed journals via PubMed was performed; presented is a summary and analysis of various studies and data, including data of patients treated at our department. CD and UC are frequently associated with mucocutaneous symptoms; however, primary/specific disease-associations are exclusively seen in CD patients. These include peri-anal and -stomal fistulas and ulcerations, "metastatic" Crohn's disease as well as oral granulomatous disease. Moreover, in both CD and UC, there occur several other inflammatory skin conditions such as erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, hidradenitis suppurativa, chronic oral aphthous disease, Sweet syndrome, pyostomatitis vegetans, and bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome. Malnutrition syndromes (zinc and vitamin deficiencies) are only rarely observed. On skin and oral/genital mucous membranes various different inflammatory manifestations may be observed during the course of CD or UC. However, most data about a direct pathogenic relationship of the gastrointestinal and dermatologic disorders are quite heterogeneous or even contradictory. Nevertheless, knowledge of these conditions and their possible association with CD and UC could be crucial for early diagnosis and initiation of an appropriate therapy and thus be essential to prevent secondary tissue damage.

  15. Recent Advances In Topical Therapy In Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Thappa Devinder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available With changing times various newer topical agents are introduced in the field of dermatology. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are immunisuppressants, which are effective topically and are tried in the management of atopic dermatitis as well as other disorders including allergic contact dermatitis, atrophic lichen planus, pyoderma gangrenosum. Imiquimod, an immune response modifier, is presently in use for genital warts but has potentials as anti- tumour agent and in various other dermatological conditions when used topically. Tazarotene is a newer addition to the list of topical reginoids, which is effective in psoriasis and has better effect in combination with calcipotriene, phototherapy and topical costicosteroids. Tazarotene and adapelene are also effective in inflammatory acne. Calcipotriol, a vitamin D analogue has been introduced as a topical agent in the treatment of psoriasis. Steroid components are also developed recently which will be devoid of the side effects but having adequate anti-inflammatory effect. Topical photodynamic therapy has also a wide range of use in dermatology. Newer topical agents including cidofovir, capsaicin, topical sensitizers, topical antifungal agents for onychomycosis are also of use in clinical practice. Other promising developments include skin substitutes and growth factors for wound care.

  16. Does pityriasis rosea Koebnerise?

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    Nwabudike Lawrence Chukwudi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Koebner phenomenon or isomorphic phenomenon is described in dermatology texts as the production of lesions of the original disease, in clinically uninvolved skin, following trauma. The lesions are located at the site of trauma and evidence of a traumatic causation is the linear arrangement of some of the lesions, such as in the case of lichen planus. Other disorders known to exhibit the Koebner phenomenon include psoriasis and vitiligo. A number of other diseases are associated with the Koebner phenomenon. Pathergy is a phenomenon of pustule production following trauma, which occurs in certain disorders such as Pyoderma gangrenosum and Behçet?s disease. In some disorders such as impetigo and verruca vulgaris, inoculation may give the appearance of the Koebner phenomenon. A case of pityriasis rosea and Koebner phenomenon at the site of routine blood assay is described in this work. This author has not thus far encountered any description of the Koebner reaction in relation to pityriasis rosea in the literature, but, perhaps, with this report, other physicians will be more open to this possibility and actually uncover similar cases.

  17. Thalidomide increases human keratinocyte migration and proliferation.

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    Nasca, M R; O'Toole, E A; Palicharla, P; West, D P; Woodley, D T

    1999-11-01

    Thalidomide is reported to have therapeutic utility in the treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum, Behçet's disease, aphthous ulcers, and skin wounds. We investigated the effect of thalidomide on human keratinocyte proliferation and migration, two early and critical events in the re-epithelialization of skin wounds. Thalidomide at concentrations less than 1 microM did not affect keratinocyte viability. Using a thymidine incorporation assay, we found that thalidomide, at therapeutic concentrations, induced more than a 2. 5-fold increase in the proliferative potential of the cells. Keratinocyte migration was assessed by two independent motility assays: a colloidal gold assay and an in vitro scratch assay. At optimal concentrations, thalidomide increased keratinocyte migration on a collagen matrix more than 2-fold in the colloidal gold assay and more than 3-fold in the scratch assay over control. Although pro-migratory, thalidomide did not alter the level of metalloproteinase-9 secreted into culture medium. Thalidomide did, however, induce a 2-4-fold increase in keratinocyte-derived interleukin-8, a pro-migratory cellular autocrine factor. Human keratinocyte migration and proliferation are essential for re-epithelialization of skin wounds. Interleukin-8 increases human keratinocyte migration and proliferation and is chemotactic for keratinocytes. Therefore, thalidomide may modulate keratinocyte proliferation and motility by a chemokine-dependent pathway.

  18. Piodermite profunda por Staphylococcus intermedius em eqüino Deep pyoderma by Staphylococcus intermedius in equine

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    Fábio Cordeiro Oliveira Santos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho descreve-se um caso de piodermite, com tempo de evolução de um mês, de um eqüino de oito anos de idade, sem raça definida, com áreas alopécicas, crostas na pálpebra superior, nos membros torácicos e pélvicos, na região do prepúcio e, principalmente, na região do pescoço e escápula. O prurido era discreto. O exame histopatológico revelou dermatite piogranulomatosa perivascular e perianexial associada à hiperplasia epidérmica, além de orto e paraceratose e crostas. O epitélio folicular exibiu focos de espongiose e exocitose de neutrófilos, predominando aspectos de inflamação crônica. A cultura bacteriana identificou o Staphylococcus intermedius a partir das suas características morfo-tintoriais e bioquímicas, com resultados positivos aos testes de catalase, coagulase, glicose e produção ácida aeróbica a partir do manitol. O eqüino foi tratado diariamente com dimetilsulfóxido, gentamicina e dexametasona por via tópica. Mesmo que algumas das lesões apresentaram rápida regressão (sete dias, as localizadas na região do pescoço e escápula demoraram 13 meses para a completa cicatrização.A case of one month of evolution, of an 8-year-old equine of undefined breed, presenting alopecic areas, crusts on the upper eyelid, forelimbs, hindlimbs, preputial region and mainly, on the neck and scapula is reported. Pruritus was discrete. The histological analysis revealed pyogranulomatous dermatitis round blood vessels and adnexa, associated with epidermal hyperplasia, as well as orthokeratosis, parakeratosis and crusts. The follicular epithelium exhibited foci of spongiosis and exocytosis of neutrophils, with predominant chronic inflammation changes. Bacterial culture identified Staphylococcus intermedius, based on morphology, staining and biochemical tests positive for catalase, coagulase, glucose and aerobic acid production from mannitol. The equine was treated with dimethylsulfoxide, gentamicine and dexamethasone topically on a daily basis. Although some lesions presented rapid regression (7 days, it took 13 months for the complete repair of those lesions of the neck and scapula.

  19. Facial botryomycosis-like pyoderma in an HIV-infected patient: remission after initiation of darunavir and raltegravir

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    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Botryomycosis is an uncommon, chronic, suppurative, bacterial infection that primarily affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. It has long been associated with defects of cellular immunity. We report a 28-year-old woman who presented with a chronic, ulcerated lesion with draining sinuses in the right malar region. Predisposing factors were HIV infection with poor immunological control, alcoholism, and a previous trauma to the right cheek. Several courses of antimicrobial therapy provided only partial and temporary remission. Complete clinical remission was only achieved 5 years later when a novel antiretroviral regimen composed of darunavir and raltegravir was initiated.

  20. [When to ask for a skin biopsy in a patient with leg ulcer? Retrospective study of 143 consecutive biopsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansal, A; Khayat, K; Duchatelle, V; Tella, E; Gautier, V; Sfeir, D; Attal, R; Lazareth, I; Priollet, P

    2018-02-01

    A vascular cause is found in around 85% of leg ulcer patients, but non-vascular causes are also observed. Their diagnosis is based on a set of clinical arguments and skin biopsy with histological analysis. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of these biopsies and to find common criteria for ulcers whose skin biopsies had led to the diagnosis of a non-vascular ulcer. A retrospective study was carried out on the analysis of 143 skin biopsies of leg ulcers. The reasons for the biopsy were mainly atypical clinical signs and/or the lack of improvement in care after 6 months, as advocated by the French health authorities. The skin biopsies led to a diagnosis of non-vascular ulcer in 4.9% of cases (7/143), including skin cancer (n=5, 3.5%), cutaneous leishmaniasis (n=1, 0.7%) and Pyoderma gangrenosum (n=1, 0.7%). The univariate statistical analysis revealed that an elevated rim and abnormal excessive granulation tissue were significantly more frequently found in these ulcers. All patients with a positive skin biopsy had associated vascular involvement. This study found a 5% rate of non-vascular causes of ulcers, mainly skin cancer. Elevated rims and abnormal excessive granulation tissue were the unusual features most commonly found in these ulcers. All patients whose skin biopsy revealed a non-vascular cause had associated vascular involvement. This information confirms the need to perform a skin biopsy, even in the presence of a vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Calciphylaxis and Martorell Hypertensive Ischemic Leg Ulcer: Same Pattern - One Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    This review presents a closer look at four diseases which are probably closely related to one another pathophysiologically: (a) calciphylaxis (distal pattern); (b) calciphylaxis (proximal pattern); (c) Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer; (d) calciphylaxis with normal renal and parathyroid function (synonym: eutrophication). The four diseases have largely the same risk factors: (1) arterial hypertension, (2) diabetes mellitus (types 1 and 2), (3) secondary or tertiary hyperparathyroidism (in end-stage kidney disease) and (4) oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. They share the same clinical patterns: necrotizing livedo, skin infarctions at typical locations and acral gangrene in calciphylaxis. They also share the same histopathology: ischemic subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis and small-artery disease and 'miniaturizing' Mönckeberg medial calcinosis. The treatment concept for the acute phase of the diseases is also broadly similar. In addition to an optimized control of the cardiovascular risk factors, a proactive wound approach (necrosectomy, negative pressure wound treatment with vacuum dressings, and early skin grafts supported by systemic antibiotic therapy) leads most rapidly and effectively to a reduction of the initially severe wound pain, and finally to complete healing of the wound. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists should be stopped. In extensive cases, the use of intravenous sodium thiosulfate is recommended. All four diagnoses are little known in the medical schools of most countries. The need to improve familiarity with these four closely related disorders is therefore great. In particular, the risk of confusion with pyoderma gangrenosum is a major diagnostic problem which can lead to false and even damaging treatment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Histopathological aspects of neutrophilic dermatoses: Investigation of 38 cases and review of the literature

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    Amir-Hoshang Ehsani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND is a heterogeneous group of diseases with various etiologies and clinical presentations. NDs may clinically present as papule, vesiculopustule, plaque, and nodule of the skin, but they all share the common feature of neutrophilic predominance in the skin. Histological examination of patients with suspected ND is a key step for making the proper diagnosis. Patients and Methods: The aim of this article was to investigate histopathological aspects of different NDs. We obtained our data from medical records of patients at Razi dermatology hospital, between 2012 and 2014. Thirty-eight biopsy records coded under the term of any ND, including Sweet's syndrome (SS, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG, skin lesions of Behcet's disease, neutrophilic drug eruption, amicrobial pustulosis of the folds, pustular vasculitis of the hands, and undetermined ND were recruited in our study. The specimens were evaluated regarding inflammatory reaction pattern, epidermal/adnexal changes, and dermal changes. Results: Most common NDs in our study were PG (42.1% followed by SS (21.1%. The most common pattern of inflammatory reaction was superficial perivascular and interstitial dermal inflammation in 44.7% of the patients. Exocytosis of neutrophils into epidermis, hair follicle, and eccrine gland was seen in 71%, 18.5%, and 28.9% of the specimens, respectively. Ulceration was only seen in ten PG specimens. Dermal fibrosis and vascular proliferation were reported in all PG patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of some histopathological findings in different types of ND was significantly different. These features seem helpful in distinguishing between different NDs.

  3. Peristomal skin complications: causes, effects, and treatments

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    Doctor K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly Doctor, Dorin T Colibaseanu Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: Enterostomal formation remains a necessary part of multiple types of surgeries. Stomal difficulties can be a source of frustration for patients; however, a properly functioning stoma in a patient educated in its care can result in a highly functional individual, with a high quality of life, comparable to a person without a stoma. Correct surgical technique is vital to creating a stoma that is sufficiently everted, and in a good anatomical location. Loop ileostomies have a higher chance of complications, thus care in their formation is especially important. Systemic disease (inflammatory conditions, and autoimmune diseases especially as well as local conditions (pyoderma gangrenosum, infections, and fistulas, among others can be the causes for difficult-to-treat peristomal complications. Accurate diagnosis is essential in order to be able to address the underlying disease. Choosing the appropriate products to care for the stoma is often a process of trial and error, and is best done under the guidance of an enterostomal therapist. This is especially true for stomas in overweight individuals or stomas that have become flush with the skin with time and changing body habitus. Inattention to care can result in problems that range from simple mucocutaneous separations (separation of the bowel edge from the surrounding skin to large and difficult-to-heal ulcers. This article provides a systematic review of the most common challenges that patients with stoma are faced with, and offers solutions based on up-to-date review of the literature. Keywords: stoma care, stoma complications, stoma wound

  4. Amelogenin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and other hard-to-heal wounds: Experimental and clinical evidence  ||FREE PAPER||

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    Marco Romanelli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Marco Romanelli1, Valentina Dini1, Peter Vowden2, Magnus S Ågren31Department of Dermatology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Vascular Unit, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, United Kingdom; 3Department of Surgery K, Bispebjerg Hospitals, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Amelogenins are extracellular matrix proteins that, under physiological conditions, self-assemble into globular aggregates up to micron-sizes. Studies with periodontal fibroblasts indicate that attachment to these structures increases the endogenous secretion of multiple growth factors and cell proliferation. Pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that cutaneous wounds benefit from treatment with amelogenins. A randomized controlled trial (RCT involving patients with hard-to-heal venous leg ulcers (VLUs (ie, ulcers with a surface area ≥10 cm2 and duration of ≥6 months showed that the application of amelogenin (Xelma®, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden as an adjunct treatment to compression results in significant reduction in ulcer size, improvement in the state of ulcers, reduced pain, and a larger proportion of ulcers with low levels of exudate, compared with treatment with compression alone. Amelogenin therapy was also shown to be safe to use in that there were no significant differences in adverse events noted between patients treated with amelogenin plus compression and those treated with compression alone. Case study evaluations indicate that the benefits of amelogenin therapy demonstrated in the RCT are being repeated in “real life” situations and that amelogenin therapy may also have a role to play in the treatment of other wound types such as diabetic foot ulcers.Keywords: extracellular matrix, amelogenin, venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pyoderma gangrenosum

  5. [Nocardia brasiliensis leg ulcer and nodular lymphangitis in France].

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    Hamm, M; Friedel, J; Siré, C; Semon, J

    2005-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a very rarely reported cause of chronic phagedenic ulcerations. We report the case of an elderly woman who developed such an infection after falling on her right leg on the road in the Bresse country (an essentially agricultural and bovine-cattle breading region) and developed a chronic phagedenic ulcer secondarily complicated by nodular lymphangitis of the thigh. A 75 year-old woman fell on her right leg on the side of the main road outside her hamlet in the Bresse country and secondarily developed a chronique phagedenic ulceration. We first considered her as suffering from pyoderma gangrenosum. A complete scanning only revealed an autoimmune thyroiditis and a rapidly healing gastric ulceration, and none of the treatments, either local or systemic, helped the skin condition to heal. After 3 weeks of application of a local corticoid ointment, the patient developed fever, general malaise, an exacerbation of her wound and an infiltration of the skin round her knee, together with nodular lymphangitic dissemination. A supplementary bacterial swab disclosed massive proliferation of a slow-growing Gram-positive bacillus, which proved to be Nocardia brasiliensis, together with a methicillino-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The treatment with sulfamethoxazole-trimetoprim gave a rash after 12 hours and was changed to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, which rapidly proved to be permanently effective. The revelation of this particular slow-growing bacteria is difficult and requires bacterial swabs. Nocardia brasiliensis is relatively rare in primary skin ulcerations and we discuss the reasons why an elderly women should find this bacteria on the road outside her hamlet in the French countryside. This particular infectious condition requires general scanning, to make sure that the primary skin condition does not extend to other organs. We review the therapeutical options for patients who exhibit allergic reactions to the classically effective

  6. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

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    Ana Karina Alves de Medeiros

    Full Text Available The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs. JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP, cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE, atopic dermatitis (AD, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG and alopecia areata (AA versus healthy controls for (pJAK1, (pJAK2, (pJAK3, (pTYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively. This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs.

  7. Medical Complications of Tattoos: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Parvez S; Chang, Christopher; Selmi, Carlo; Generali, Elena; Huntley, Arthur; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-04-01

    Tattoos are defined as the introduction of exogenous pigments into the dermis in order to produce a permanent design. This process may occur unintentional or may be deliberately administered for cosmetic or medical reasons. Tattoos have been around for over 5000 years and over time have evolved to represent a common cosmetic practice worldwide. Currently, adverse reactions are relatively rare and generally unpredictable and predominantly include immune-mediated reactions and skin infections. Along with better healthcare standards and more stringent public health mandates such as the provision of disposable needles, major infectious complications related to hepatitis and human retroviral infections have decreased significantly. When they do occur, skin infections are most frequently associated with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The aim of this study is to review the types and rates of medical complications of permanent tattoos. PubMed search and search dates were open ended. Acute local inflammation is the most common complication, but infections, allergic contact dermatitis, and other inflammatory or immune responses that are not well-characterized may occur. As many patients with immune reactions to tattoos do not react on skin or patch testing, it is postulated that the antigens contained in dyes or pigments are such small molecules that they need to be haptenized in order to become immunogenic. Red ink is associated more frequently with long-term reactions, including granulomatous and pseudolymphomatous phenomena or morphea-like lesions and vasculitis. Exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and pyoderma gangrenosum may occur after tattooing. There is no well-defined association between cancer and tattoos. The treatment of tattoo-related complications may include local destructive measures (cryotherapy, electro-surgery, dermabrasion, chemical destruction, ablative laser destruction), surgical excision, and thermolysis of the

  8. Skin rash and arthritis a simplified appraisal of less common associations.

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    Cozzi, A; Doria, A; Gisondi, P; Girolomoni, G

    2014-06-01

    Skin and joint manifestations are part of the clinical spectrum of many disorders. Well-known associations include psoriatic arthritis and arthritis associated with autoimmune connective tissue diseases. This review focuses on less common associations where skin lesions can provide easily accessible and valuable diagnostic clues, and directly lead to the specific diagnosis or limit the list of possibilities. This may also affect health care resources as diagnostic tests are often low-specific, highly expensive and poorly available. This group of diseases can be divided into two subsets, based on the presence/absence of fever, and then further classified according to elementary skin lesions (macular, urticarial, maculo-papular, vesico-bullous, pustular, petechial and nodular). In most instances joint involvement occurs as peripheral migrating polyarthritis. Erythematosus macular or urticarial rashes occur in most febrile disorders such as monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes, Schnitzler's syndrome, Still's disease and rheumatic fever and afebrile diseases as urticarial vasculitis. Pustular rash may be observed in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome (both febrile) as well as in Behcet's disease and Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome (both non-febrile). Papular lesions are typical of secondary syphilis, sarcoidosis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, papular petechial of cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis and nodular lesions of polyarteritis nodosa and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis all of which are afebrile. Differential diagnosis includes infections and drug reactions which may mimic several of these conditions. To biopsy the right skin lesion at the right time it is essential to obtain relevant histological information. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center

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    Kole Alakes

    2009-01-01

    .67%, pyoderma gangrenosum in 2 patients (1.34%, erythema multiforme in 10 patients (6.67%, and nail fold infarcts in 2 patients (1.34%; however, mucosal discoid lupus, lichenoid discoid lupus, livedo reticularis, sclerodactyly, etc. were not detected. Patients having lupus-specific skin lesions e.g., malar rash were associated with systemic involvement, whereas those having lupus non-specific skin lesions were associated with disease flare. Conclusions: Skin lesions in patients with SLE are important disease manifestations and proper understanding is essential for diagnosis and efficient management.

  10. Investigating the effect of independent, blinded digital image assessment on the STOP GAP trial.

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    Patsko, Emily; Godolphin, Peter J; Thomas, Kim S; Hepburn, Trish; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Craig, Fiona E; Bath, Philip M; Montgomery, Alan A

    2017-02-02

    Blinding is the process of keeping treatment assignment hidden and is used to minimise the possibility of bias. Trials at high risk of bias have been shown to report larger treatment effects than low-risk studies. In dermatology, one popular method of blinding is to have independent outcome assessors who are unaware of treatment allocation assessing the endpoint using digital photographs. However, this can be complex, expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of blinded and unblinded outcome assessment on the results of the STOP GAP trial. The STOP GAP trial compared prednisolone to ciclosporin in treating pyoderma gangrenosum. Participants' lesions were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks to calculate the primary outcome, speed of healing. Independent blinded assessors obtained measurements from digital photographs using specialist software. In addition, unblinded treating clinicians estimated lesion area by measuring length and width. The primary outcome was determined using blinded measurements where available, otherwise unblinded measurements were used (method referred to as trial measurements). In this study, agreement between the trial and unblinded measurements was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The STOP GAP trial's primary analysis was repeated using unblinded measurements only. We introduced differential and nondifferential error in unblinded measurements and investigated the effect on the STOP GAP trial's primary analysis. Eighty-six (80%) of the 108 patients were assessed using digital images. Agreement between trial and unblinded measurements was excellent (ICC = 0.92 at baseline; 0.83 at 6 weeks). There was no evidence that the results of the trial primary analysis differed according to how the primary outcome was assessed (p value for homogeneity = 1.00). Blinded digital image assessment in the STOP GAP trial did not meaningfully alter trial conclusions compared with

  11. Síndromes autoinflamatórias hereditárias na faixa etária pediátrica Pediatric hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes

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    Adriana Almeida Jesus

    2010-10-01

    from the PubMed and SciELO was carried out using the keywords autoinflammatory syndromes and child. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes are caused by monogenic defects of innate immunity and are classified as primary immunodeficiencies. These syndromes are characterized by recurrent or persistent systemic inflammatory symptoms and must be distinguished from infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, and other primary immunodeficiencies. This review describes the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features, prognosis, and treatment of the main autoinflammatory syndromes, namely: familial Mediterranean fever; TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome; the cryopyrinopathies; mevalonate kinase deficiency; pediatric granulomatous arthritis; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne syndrome; Majeed syndrome; and deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist. The cryopyrinopathies discussed include neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (also known as chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous and articular syndrome Muckle-Wells syndrome, and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatricians must recognize the clinical features of the most prevalent autoinflammatory syndromes. Early referral to a pediatric rheumatologist may allow early diagnosis and institution of treatment, with improvement in the quality of life of these patients.

  12. Lucilia eximia (Diptera: Calliphoridae, a new alternative for maggot therapy. Case series report Lucilia eximia (Diptera: Calliphoridae, una nueva alternativa para la terapia larval

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    Silvia Emelia Herrera Higuita

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Larval therapy is used in the treatment of infected chronic wounds by allowing the removal of necrotic tissue, which induces the formation of granular tissue and the growth of healthy skin.

     

    Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance, this type of therapy may be an effective alternative in the management of infected chronic wounds. In this article we report the use of maggot therapy using the Lucilia eximia species in 42 patients with chronic skin wounds associated to different pathologies including: venous and arterial ulcers, diabetic foot, sickle cell disease, vasculopathy, elephantiasis, Berger disease, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG, traumatic wounds, erysipelas, and hospital acquired infections. Four cases are depicted photographically.

    La terapia larval es utilizada desde los años 30 del siglo pasado para la remoción del tejido necrótico en el tratamiento de úlceras crónicas infectadas logrando con ello promover la formación de tejido granuloso para el crecimiento de piel sana; especialmente a partir de la aparición de la resistencia a los antibioticos se la reconoce

  13. Ekstraintestinale manifestationer ved inflammatorisk tarmsygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2009-01-01

    dermatological manifestations, while episcleritis, iridocyclitis and uveitis are common ophthalmological complications. Conventional drugs and biologicals have proven effective in the treatment of several of the manifestations, including peripheral arthritis, pyoderma gangraenosum and episcleritis...

  14. Ekstraintestinale manifestationer ved inflammatorisk tarmsygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2009-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations are relatively common in chronic inflammatory bowel disease and affect joints, skin, eyes and bile ducts. The most frequent rheumatologic manifestations are peripheral arthritis and axial arthropathies. Erythema nodosum and pyoderma gangraenosum are common...

  15. Clinical profile of HIV infection

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    Khopkar Uday

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV seropositivity rate of 14 percent was observed amongst STD cases. Heterosexual contact with prostitutes was the main risk factor. Fever, anorexia, weight loss, lymphadenopathy and tuberculosis were useful clinical leads. Genital ulcers, especially chancroid, were common in seropositivies. Alopecia of unknown cause, atypical pyoderma, seborrhea, zoster, eruptive mollusca and sulfa-induced erythema multiforme were viewed with suspicion in high risk groups. Purpura fulminans, fulminant chancroid, vegetating pyoderma and angioedema with purpura were unique features noted in this study.

  16. Serum detection of IgG antibodies against Demodex canis by western blot in healthy dogs and dogs with juvenile generalized demodicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Ivan; Ferreira, Diana; Gallego, Laia Solano; Bardagí, Mar; Ferrer, Lluís

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of canine immunoglobulins (Ig) G against Demodex proteins in the sera of healthy dogs and of dogs with juvenile generalized demodicosis (CanJGD) with or without secondary pyoderma. Demodex mites were collected from dogs with CanJGD. Protein concentration was measured and a western blot technique was performed. Pooled sera from healthy dogs reacted mainly with antigen bands ranging from 55 to 72 kDa. Pooled sera from dogs with CanJGD without secondary pyoderma reacted either with 10 kDa antigen band or 55 to 72 kDa bands. Pooled sera from dogs with CanJGD with secondary pyoderma reacted only with a 10 kDa antigen band. The results of this study suggest that both healthy dogs and dogs with CanJGD develop a humoral response against different proteins of Demodex canis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Uso da oxigenoterapia hiperbárica em pacientes de um serviço de reumatologia pediátrica Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients of a pediatric rheumatology service

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    Juliana Figueira M. R. Rossi

    2005-04-01

    ça, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculty of Medicine, São Paulo University, between 1996 and 2002, were submitted to hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This therapy was indicated by the presence of chronic osteomyelitis and tissue ulcer (vasculitis or infection not responsive to the usual treatment. Two patients presented cutaneous polyarteritis, two presented chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, one presented diffuse cutaneous sclerodema and one presented pyoderma gangrenosum. Five patients were girls (age range from 6 to 13.2 years-old. The sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy were performed under pressures that ranged from 2.4 to 2.8 absolute atmospheres and their duration were two hours. The lowest number of sessions was 18 and the highest was 80. Five patients presented complete resolution of the injuries. The patient with cutaneous sclerodema suspended the treatment after the 18th session, because she went back to her birthplace with partial improvement of the cutaneous injuries. The main adverse event during the sessions was ear pain after the first sessions, which disappeared with reduction of the pressure inside the chamber and the duration of the session. Spandrel perforation or other adverse events were not observed. The hyperbaric oxygen therapy was efficient and well tolerated by patients with rheumatic diseases and ulcerated injuries by vasculitis, infected injuries or chronic osteomyelitis.

  18. Antibiotic treatments of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infection in a dog: a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristophoris, P; Mauri, F; Albanese, F; Carnelli, A; Vanzetti, T; Zinsstag, J

    2011-09-01

    We report the antibiotic treatments administered to a female dog with mastitis and successive pyoderma. Microbiological investigations allowed the identification of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius after 54 days of various antibiotic treatments. The isolate carried the mecA gene and was resistant to 9 of 15 tested antibiotics. Consistent antibiotic treatment of the infection was possible only after accurate microbiological diagnosis.

  19. Prostate cancer revealed by skin metastasis: A case report in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K. Tengue

    2016-11-23

    Nov 23, 2016 ... ter Joseph's nodule, basal cell carcinoma, pyoderma, morphea, and more, resulting in poor recognition [9]. The diagnosis is easier if there is a history of prostatic cancer with known disseminated dis- ease. Our patient had no complaints of urinary symptoms and the diagnosis was determined by prostate ...

  20. prevalence of head lice infestation in primary school children in port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... Excoriation and secondary pyoderma, following trauma due to scratching, may result in matting together of the hair, cervical and occipital lymphadenopathy. Severe cases may result in group A Streptococcal impetigo with the risk of developing rheumatic heart disease and glomerulonephritis (14). Head lice.

  1. Atypical presentation of post infectious glomerulonephritis as malignant hypertension and thrombotic microangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vankalakunti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection-related glomerulonephritis presents commonly as acute nephritic illness, hypertension, hypocomplementinemia following an episode of pharyngitis or pyoderma. Atypical features like thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA, produced by neuraminidase antigen targeting endothelium have been described rarely. We report a case of TMA secondary to malignant hypertension, coexisting with post infectious glomerulonephritis.

  2. A split-body, randomized, blinded study to evaluate the efficacy of a topical spray composed of essential oils and essential fatty acids from plant extracts with antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensignor, Emmanuel; Fabriès, Lionel; Bailleux, Lucie

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial pyoderma is a frequent presentation in dogs. Despite the widespread availability of effective systemic and topical antimicrobial products, good clinical practice currently recommends avoidance of long-term use to mitigate the development of bacterial resistance. To evaluate the speed of resolution of clinical signs of bacterial pyoderma in dogs treated with a systemic antimicrobial agent with or without the use of an adjunctive spray with antimicrobial properties. Twelve dogs with superficial bacterial pyoderma. In this controlled and blinded study, all dogs were treated with oral cefalexin and a topical spray (PYOClean Spray) for 4 weeks. The spray was applied to one half of each dog's body, whereas a placebo spray was applied to the other half. Twelve dogs completed the study. Mean clinical scores were significantly reduced on spray-treated sites, for test product and placebo (respectively), by 47% and 34% at Week 1, 83% and 60% at Week 2, 95% and 82% at Week 3, and 100% and 96% at Week 4. Fifty percent of treated sites were considered clinically and cytologically cured at Week 2, 83% at Week 3, and 100% at Week 4 compared to 8%, 50% and 83% for the placebo sites, respectively. These results demonstrate that use of a topical spray which contains plant-derived essential oils and fatty acids, and compounds with antimicrobial properties (Manuka oil and N-acetyl cysteine) may help to speed resolution of pyoderma and may allow for shorter antimicrobial treatment time. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  3. Cross-sectional survey on the use and impact of the Danish national antibiotic use guidelines for companion animal practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Møller Sørensen, Tina; Lilja, Zenia Littau

    2017-01-01

    of the Danish Small Animal Veterinary Association in October 2015. The survey was completed by 151 veterinarians. Respondents most frequently consulted the recommendations on skin and urinary tract infections (UTI), and users generally reported a high degree of adherence to the recommendations. Sixty-five per...... cent indicated that the guidelines had influenced their habits in one or more of the areas being investigated, i.e. perioperative use of antibiotics, use of first line antibiotics for the treatment of pyoderma or UTI, and/or use of microbiological diagnostics. Perioperative use of antibiotics for clean...... surgeries was uncommon, irrespective of whether respondents had consulted the relevant recommendations or not. On the contrary, significant differences in the prescribing habits between guideline users and non-users were observed for pyoderma and UTI, suggesting an impact of the guidelines towards more...

  4. [Complications of cosmetic skin bleaching in Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, J J; Ly, F; Lightburn, E; Mahé, A

    2007-12-01

    Use of cosmetic products to bleach or lighten the skin is common among dark-skinned women in some sub-Saharan African countries. Long-term use of some pharmacologic compounds (e.g. hydroquinone, glucocorticoids and mercury) can cause adverse effects including dermatologic disorders such as dyschromia, exogenous ochronosis, acne and hypertrichosis, prominent striae, tinea corporis, pyoderma, erysipelas, scabies, and contact dermatitis and systemic complications such as hypertension, hypercorticism or surrenal deficiency, and mercurial nephropathy.

  5. Localization of immunoglobulins and complement by the peroxidase antiperoxidase method in autoimmune and non-autoimmune canine dermatopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F M; White, S D; Carpenter, J L; Torchon, E

    1987-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded skin biopsy specimens from 44 dogs with various dermatopathies were examined for the presence of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA) and complement (C3) by the peroxidase antiperoxidase method (PAP). Final diagnoses of the skin diseases were determined by clinical findings, fungal and bacterial cultures, skin scrapings, serum endocrinologic tests, and histologic features of cutaneous biopsies. The dermatopathies included examples of pyoderma (folliculitis/furunculosis), demodecosis, sarcoptic mange, dermatophytosis, endocrine dermatopathy, and autoimmune skin disease (AISD). In the latter category, 7 cases of pemphigus foliaceus, 1 pemphigus vulgaris, 4 discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and 4 examples of indeterminate AISD were examined. Immunoglobulins, C3, or both, were localized in tissue sections from AISD (15/16), pyoderma (7/11), demodecosis (4/8) sarcoptic mange (3/3), and dermatomycosis (2/3). Endocrine dermatopathy biopsies were consistently negative for Ig and C3 (0/3). The pattern of localization was most often intercellular (31/44 positive biopsies) with basement membrane immunoreactivity in 4 cases of DLE, and 1 case of indeterminate AISD. There was no consistent correlation between histologic features of hematoxylin and eosin-stained biopsies and the presence of Ig and C3. Clinical outcome was similar in both Ig and C3 positive and negative cases of non-AISD dermatitis. The high percentage (95%) of positive results in AISD biopsies indicates the usefulness and sensitivity of the PAP method for the localization of Ig and C3. Because of the high percentage of Ig localization in pyoderma (73%), biopsy specimens with extensive inflammatory skin disease are not suitable for diagnosis of AISD. The PAP method is useful in the diagnosis of AISD in biopsy specimens with minimal inflammation. Caution is warranted in the interpretation of immunoreactivity independent of clinical and histologic information.

  6. Identification of mast cells in buffy coat preparations from dogs with inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayatte, S M; McManus, P M; Miller, W H; Scott, D W

    1995-02-01

    In 100 dogs with 4 inflammatory dermatologic diseases, buffy coat preparations from EDTA-treated blood samples were examined cytologically. Fifty-four dogs had atopy, 26 had flea-bite hypersensitivity, 17 had sarcoptic mange, and 3 had food allergy. Twenty-eight dogs had 2 or more concurrent skin diseases; most of these had secondary pyoderma. Dogs did not have mast cell tumors. Thirteen samples contained 1 or more mast cells/4 slides reviewed. This study revealed that dogs with inflammatory skin diseases can have a few to many mast cells evident on cytologic examination of buffy coat preparations.

  7. The use of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) during the first cycle of sunitinib improves the diagnostic accuracy and management of hypertension in patients with advanced renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, A; Manios, E; Karadimou, A; Michas, F; Lainakis, G; Constantinidis, C; Deliveliotis, C; Zakopoulos, N; Dimopoulos, M A

    2011-07-01

    Hypertension (HT) complicates treatment with antiangiogenic agents, including the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sunitinib. To prospectively evaluate the prevalence and management of HT in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) receiving sunitinib we used 24-h ABPM and we treated HT according to guidelines of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection and Evaluation and the Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC7). Normal 24-h ABPM at the baseline and at 2, 4 and 6 weeks of the first cycle was ensured with the successive use of hydrochlorothiazide+irbesartan, nebivolol and amlodipine. Office BP measurements were used in subsequent cycles to monitor HT. Sunitinib dose was modified only if BP was not controlled with four anti-hypertensive agents. Forty patients were included in this analysis. Twenty-one patients (53%) had baseline HT, while 12 of 14 (84%) normotensive patients required anti-HT treatment during the 1st cycle of sunitinib. HT was infrequent in subsequent cycles and increase of anti-HT medication was required in only 2 cases. Two patients permanently discontinued sunitinib due to HT. The remaining 34 (94%) required no dose modifications for HT. One cardiac event (2.8%) was observed. There was no correlation of HT with sunitinib efficacy. Sunitinib-associated HT is more frequent than previously reported. The use of 24-h ABPM for diagnosis and tailoring of HT according to JNC7 guidelines may achieve uninterrupted, full dose therapy in most patients. The substitution of such protocols for currently used Toxicity Criteria may be warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transient thrombocytosis with megathrombocytes in a case of acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotru Mrinalini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytosis is commonly seen in reactive conditions and certain neoplastic states, such as chronic myeloproliferative disorders. It is rarely seen in acute leukemia. A 12-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia (FAB M2 in remission presented with pyoderma. Her hemogram revealed anemia (Hb-6.4g/dl, leucopenia (TLC - 1.2 x 109/L and thrombocytosis (platelet count- 580 x 109/L. A peripheral blood film showed numerous abnormally large platelets with few atypical cells. The thrombocytosis subsided with the clearance of infection but atypical cells persisted. One month later, she relapsed. Cytogenetic analysis revealed variable results (trisomy 9 and deletion 3. This case has been presented because thrombocytosis is rare in AML and its appearance calls for a close follow-up.

  9. Canine eosinophilic folliculitis and furunculosis in three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, C F; Bond, R; Blunden, A S; Thomson, D G; McNeil, P E; Whitbread, T W

    1995-03-01

    The historical, clinical and histopathological features of three dogs with eosinophilic folliculitis and furunculosis are described. The disease was characterised by the rapid development of pruritic, papular, pustular and ulcerative lesions on the dorsum of the muzzle. Skin lesions were confined to the face in two cases. The third dog had more generalised pustular lesions. Skin biopsy specimens showed marked eosinophil infiltration particularly centred on pilosebaceous units. Dermal collagen necrosis was evident in two cases. Similar facial lesions have previously been described as 'nasal pyoderma'. The three dogs failed to respond to initial antibacterial therapy but showed a rapid clinical response when prednisolone was given orally at doses ranging from 1 to 2.2 mg/kg, in addition to the antibacterial therapy, suggesting that glucocorticoids are indicated for the treatment of eosinophilic folliculitis and furunculosis. The aetiology of the disease was not determined.

  10. Cross-sectional survey on the use and impact of the Danish national antibiotic use guidelines for companion animal practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Møller Sørensen, Tina; Lilja, Zenia Littau

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Danish antibiotic use guidelines for companion animal practice were published by the Danish Veterinary Association in 2012. Since then, national surveillance data indicate a 10% reduction in the total use of antibiotics for companion animals, particularly a marked reduction...... in the use of third generation cephalosporins. The aim of the study was to assess if and how the guidelines have impacted diagnostic and antibiotic prescription habits of the users, and to identify user perceived barriers to implementation. Results: An online questionnaire was sent to all 882 members...... cent indicated that the guidelines had influenced their habits in one or more of the areas being investigated, i.e. perioperative use of antibiotics, use of first line antibiotics for the treatment of pyoderma or UTI, and/or use of microbiological diagnostics. Perioperative use of antibiotics for clean...

  11. A study on the cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus are varied. We conducted a study of fifty patients having diabetes mellitus coming from the department of dermatology and medicine. The commonest cutaneous feature of diabetes were pyodermas seen in 40% patients, dermatophytosis seen in 36% patients, pruritis diabetic thick skin seen in 20 % patients, diabetic dermopathy seen in 16% patients, diabetic bulla and rubeosis seen in 8% patients each and meralgia paraesthetica and diabetic foot seen in 4% patients each. About the associations of diabetes mellitus, achrchordons were seen in 8% patients, vitiligo and perforating dermatoses were seen in 6% patients each, granuloma annulare, eruptive xanthomas, acanthosis nigricans, necrobiosis lipoidica and oral lichen planus were seen in 4 % patients each and xanthelasma was seen in 2% patients.

  12. Dermatological consequences of the Cs-137 radiological accident in Goiania, Goias State, Brazil; Repercussoes dermatologicas no acidente radioativo com o Cesio 137 em Goiania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Lia Candida Miranda de

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the occurrence of dermatosis in individuals that had been exposed to cesium{sup 137} during the radioactive accident in Goiania, in 1987 and detect pre-cancerous dermatosis or those predictive of low immunity. The groups were evaluated according to the intensity of radiation they had been exposed to and then compared to a control group of people not exposed to radiation. The population exposed to the cesium{sup 137} was comprised of 109 people, who were divided into Groups I and II, according to the CNEN norms. In group I, 54 people with {<=} 20 rads exposure and/or radio lesion were included; in group II, 55 people with > 20 rads exposure were included, along with the children of group I individuals. This was a historic cohort study, that is, a retrospective study that lasted 9 years, extending from September of 1987 to August, 1996. The presence of the oncoprotein p-53 was studied in the radio lesions of 10 patients. There is no evidence of an increase in the incidence of dermatosis in the exposed groups, excepts for pyoderma in patients with radio lesions. The most frequent dermatosis were: pyoderma, pityriasis versicolor, scabies, dermatophytosis and seborrhoeic dermatitis. The results obtained were not statistically significant for the evaluation of dermatosis predictive of low immunity or precancerous lesions. The oncoprotein p-53 in individuals with radio lesion showed a 80% positivity rate and risk factor estimated in 8 times, for the test. It has proved to be useful because it represents one more option in terms of propaedeutic evaluation and suggests that one should pay close and continuous attention in order to better control the evolution of these individuals. (author)

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from veterinary clinical cases in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluping, R P; Paul, N C; Moodley, A

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a leading aetiologic agent of pyoderma and other body tissue infections in dogs and cats. In recent years, an increased prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has been reported. Isolation of MRSP in serious infections poses a major therapeutic challenge as strains are often resistant to all forms of systemic antibiotic used to treat S. pseudintermedius -related infections. This study investigates the occurrence of MRSP from a total of 7183 clinical samples submitted to the authors' laboratories over a 15-month period. Identification was based on standard microbiological identification methods, and by S. pseudintermedius-specific nuc polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methicillin resistance was confirmed by PBP2a latex agglutination and mecA PCR. Susceptibility against non-beta-lactam antibiotics was carried out using a disc-diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. In addition, susceptibility to pradofloxacin--a new veterinary fluoroquinolone--was also investigated. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated from 391 (5%) samples and 20 were confirmed as MRSP from cases of pyoderma, otitis, wound infections, urinary tract infection and mastitis in dogs only. All 20 isolates were resistant to clindamycin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Nineteen were resistant to chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, marbofloxacin and pradofloxacin; additionally, seven isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Fifteen isolates carried SCCmec type II-III, four isolates had type V and one harboured type IV. To date, only a few scientific papers on clinical MRSP strains isolated from the UK have been published, thus the results from this study would provide additional baseline data for further investigations.

  14. Dermatological consequences of the Cs-137 radiological accident in Goiania, Goias State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Lia Candida Miranda de

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the occurrence of dermatosis in individuals that had been exposed to cesium 137 during the radioactive accident in Goiania, in 1987 and detect pre-cancerous dermatosis or those predictive of low immunity. The groups were evaluated according to the intensity of radiation they had been exposed to and then compared to a control group of people not exposed to radiation. The population exposed to the cesium 137 was comprised of 109 people, who were divided into Groups I and II, according to the CNEN norms. In group I, 54 people with ≤ 20 rads exposure and/or radio lesion were included; in group II, 55 people with > 20 rads exposure were included, along with the children of group I individuals. This was a historic cohort study, that is, a retrospective study that lasted 9 years, extending from September of 1987 to August, 1996. The presence of the oncoprotein p-53 was studied in the radio lesions of 10 patients. There is no evidence of an increase in the incidence of dermatosis in the exposed groups, excepts for pyoderma in patients with radio lesions. The most frequent dermatosis were: pyoderma, pityriasis versicolor, scabies, dermatophytosis and seborrhoeic dermatitis. The results obtained were not statistically significant for the evaluation of dermatosis predictive of low immunity or precancerous lesions. The oncoprotein p-53 in individuals with radio lesion showed a 80% positivity rate and risk factor estimated in 8 times, for the test. It has proved to be useful because it represents one more option in terms of propaedeutic evaluation and suggests that one should pay close and continuous attention in order to better control the evolution of these individuals. (author)

  15. A CONTROVERSIAL ON THE DIAGNOSIS OF CHRONIC BULLOUS TYPE MUCOCUTANEOUS DISEASE INVOLVING ORAL MUCOSA (A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Gracia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of chronic bullous type mucocutaneous disease involving oral mucosa was reported from a 56 years old man with never healing oral ulcers and wound on the perianal skin for three years. There were also red and black spots on the limb and back skin and a lesion on nail. Painful oral lesion consisted of mucous erosion, desquamative gingivitis, and sloughing area on palate and tongue. The patient is diabetic. The first perianal skin diagnosis was granulomatous candidasis with differential diagnosis pemphigus vegetates and acuminarum condiloma. However the histopathologic examination did not support these diagnosis. After several histopathologic examinations, the latest perianal skin diagnosis was lichen planus with differential diagnosis granulomatous vasculitis, bowenoid papulosis and pyodema gangrenosum. Other skin diagnosis was erythema multiforme. Oral diagnosis was mucous membrane pemphigoid with differential diagnosis lichen planus, Behçet's syndrome and erythema multiforme. Oral histopathologic examinations showed a sub-epithelial blister, which supported mucous membrane pemphigoid. A lip balm, prednisone 5 mg oral rinse and multivitamins were given but oral improvement started after blood sugar level was controlled. Conclusion: It is not yet known whether skin and oral mucous lesions are from the same disease or not.

  16. Adult-onset demodicosis in two dogs due to Demodex canis and a short-tailed demodectic mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridomichelakis, M; Koutinas, A; Papadogiannakis, E; Papazachariadou, M; Liapi, M; Trakas, D

    1999-11-01

    Infestation with a short-tailed demodectic mite and Demodex canis was diagnosed in both a six-and-a-half-year-old and a four-year-old dog. The clinical picture was compatible with generalised demodicosis complicated by staphylococcal pyoderma (case 1), or localised demodicosis (case 2). In both cases, the short-tailed demodectic mite outnumbered D canis in superficial skin scrapings. The laboratory findings (lymphopenia, eosinopenia, increased serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities, diluted urine and proteinuria) and the results of a low dose dexamethasone suppression test were suggestive of underlying hyperadrenocorticism in the first case. Hypothyroidism was considered a possibility in the second case, owing to the sustained bradycardia and the extremely low basal total thyroxine value. Systemic treatment with ivermectin and cephalexin (case 1), or topical application of an amitraz solution in mineral oil, along with sodium levothyroxine replacement therapy (case 2), resulted in a complete resolution of the skin lesions and the disappearance of both types of demodectic mite after two and one and a half months, respectively.

  17. A comparative analysis of immunorestoration and recovery with conventional and immunotherapeutic protocols in canine generalized demodicosis: a newer insight of immunotherapeutic efficacy of T11TS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, P; Mukherjee, J; Ghosh, A; Bhattacharjee, M; Mahato, S; Chakraborty, A; Mondal, M; Banerjee, C; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2004-01-01

    Demodex canis is a natural inhabiting mite of canine skin. Immunological disorder or genetic disorder induces the Demodex population to proliferate vigorously resulting in generalized demodicosis with consequent chronic immunosuppression. Signs of generalized demodicosis include alopecia, crysting, erythema, secondary pyoderma etc. Amitraz, an acaricide, is used conventionally for the treatment of generalized demodicosis. In many instances, the disease relapses due to the residual immunosuppression. The need of an immunorestorative therapy has been urged in generalized demodicosis. Two immunorestorative drugs, namely, Immuplus, a herbal drug, and T11TS, a sheep erythrocyte surface glycoprotein, has been used in two separate groups of dogs having generalized demodicosis and receiving Amitraz treatment. It was observed that though Amitraz treated group responded to the therapy showing increased E-rosettes and nonspecific cytotoxic efficacy of T-lymphocytes and decrease in phagocytic potential of macrophages, the groups treated with the immunotherapeutics like Immuplus and T11TS, responded better. However, the group treated with T11TS showed best recovery. These results emphasize the need for an immunorestorative therapy in generalized demodicosis and provide data in favor of T11TS as a better immunomodulator in comparison to Immuplus.

  18. Determination of staphylococcal exotoxins, SCCmec types, and genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Ahn, Kuk Ju; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The Staphylococcus (S.) intermedius group (SIG) has been a main research subject in recent years. S. pseudintermedius causes pyoderma and otitis in companion animals as well as foodborne diseases. To prevent SIG-associated infection and disease outbreaks, identification of both staphylococcal exotoxins and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types among SIG isolates may be helpful. In this study, it was found that a single isolate (one out of 178 SIG isolates examined) harbored the canine enterotoxin SEC gene. However, the S. intermedius exfoliative toxin gene was found in 166 SIG isolates although the S. aureus-derived exfoliative toxin genes, such as eta, etb and etd, were not detected. SCCmec typing resulted in classifying one isolate as SCCmec type IV, 41 isolates as type V (including three S. intermedius isolates), and 10 isolates as non-classifiable. Genetic relatedness of all S. pseudintermedius isolates recovered from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Strains having the same band patterns were detected in S. pseudintermedius isolates collected at 13 and 18 months, suggesting possible colonization and/or expansion of a specific S. pseudintermedius strain in a veterinary hospital. PMID:21897094

  19. Keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum: unresponsive to oral retinoid and successfully treated with wide local excision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapildev Das

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 65-year-old male presenting with a large plaque with a rolled-out interrupted margin, atrophic center, and island of normal skin over the left arm. It grew peripherally with central healing, and there was a history of recurrence after inadequate excision. Investigations ruled out other clin­ical mimickers; namely, squamous cell carcinoma, lupus vulgaris, botryomycosis, and blastomycosis-like pyoderma. Histopathological sections showed irregularly shaped craters filled with keratin and epithelial pearl but no evidence of granuloma or cellular atypia. Clinico­pathological correlation proved the lesion to be keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum (KCM, a rare variant of keratoacanthoma, which spreads centrifugally, attains a huge size, and never involutes spontaneously. Treatment of KCM has been a problem always and, in our case, systemic retinoid (acitretin for three months proved ineffective. The patient also had a history of recurrence following surgical intervention previously, necessitating wide excision to achieve complete clearance of tumor cells. Hence, after failure of retinoid therapy, the decision of excision with a 1-centimeter margin was taken and the large defect was closed by a split thickness skin graft. The graft uptake was satisfactory, and the patient is being followed-up presently and shows no signs of recurrence after six months, highlighting wide local excision as a useful treatment option.

  20. Postvaccination wounds associated predominantly with Arcanobacterium phocae in mink (Neovison vison) at three mink farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Robert J; Buter, Rianne; Sroka, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    The emerging skin disease fur animal epidemic necrotic pyoderma (FENP) has been attributed to infection with Arcanobacterium phocae (ABP). The exact pathogenesis and risk factors of FENP have yet to be elucidated. Three mink from each of three different mink farms (A-C) with postvaccination skin wounds at the vaccination site and six mink from an unaffected mink farm (D) that had used the same vaccine batch and vaccination site (hind leg). All mink from farms A-C had severe necrotizing to necropurulent dermatitis where they were vaccinated intramuscularly in the hind leg. ABP was the sole bacterium cultured from six of nine wounds. Using 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region and BOX-PCR, the ABP isolates from these wounds were indistinguishable from isolates originating from several cases of FENP. This is the first report of FENP-like lesions at the site of vaccination, in the days following the procedure, associated with ABP. At farms with FENP vaccination, procedures should be considered carefully. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Perinatal HIV-infection in Sankt Petersburg and Modern Therapy Concomitant Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Timchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included 338 HIV-infected children (B-23 and 350 children with perinatal contact HIV infection (R-75, consisting on the dispensary in the department of maternal and child the St. Petersburg City AIDS Center. In 32 persons (9.5% diagnosed with secondary infections. In the structure of viral opportunistic infections (herpesvirus, SARS amounted to 39.8%, bacterial (bronchitis, tonsillitis, pyoderma, tuberculosis — 34.8%, fungal and parasitic (candidiasis of the oral mucosa, PCP — 25.4 %. Combined therapy (causal, pathogenetic, symptomatic SARS in children with B-23 and R-75, allows you to get in early (6th d. Treatment regress the main symptoms of acute respiratory diseases. Modern therapy of congenital cytomegalovirus infection (VTSMI in children with B-23 and R-75 of the first year of life with antitsitomegalovirusnogo immunoglobulin and preparation of human recombinant interferon alfa-2b in the form of rectal suppositories — VIFERON, causes persistent normalization of clinical and laboratory parameters.

  2. Adverse drug reaction and toxicity caused by commonly used antimicrobials in canine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Arunvikram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adverse drug reaction (ADR is a serious concern for practicing veterinarians and other health professionals, and refers to an unintended, undesired and unexpected response to a drug that negatively affects the patient's health. It may be iatrogenic or genetically induced, and may result in death of the affected animal. The ADRs are often complicated and unexpected due to myriad clinical symptoms and multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction. Toxicity due to commonly used drugs is not uncommon when they are used injudiciously or for a prolonged period. Licosamides, exclusively prescribed against anaerobic pyoderma, often ends with diarrhoea and vomiting in canines. Treatment with Penicillin and β-lactam antibiotics induces onset of pemphigious vulgare, drug allergy or hypersensitivity. Chloroamphenicol and aminoglycosides causes Gray's baby syndrome and ototoxicity in puppies, respectively. Aminoglycosides are very often associated with nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neuromuscular blockage. Injudicious use of fluroquinones induces the onset of arthropathy in pups at the weight bearing joints. The most effective therapeutic measure in managing ADR is to treat the causative mediators, followed by supportive and symptomatic treatment. So, in this prospective review, we attempt to bring forth the commonly occurring adverse drug reactions, their classification, underlying mechanism, epidemiology, treatment and management as gleaned from the literature available till date and the different clinical cases observed by the authors.

  3. Silica Nanofibers with Immobilized Tetracycline for Wound Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lovětinská-Šlamborová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Local antibiotic treatment has its justification for superficial infections. The advantage of this treatment is that the antibiotic has effects on bacterial agent directly at the application site. Skin infections which are intended for the local antibiotic treatment are superficial pyoderma, some festering wounds, burns of second and third degree, infected leg ulcers, or decubitus of second and third degree. Tetracyclines are available topical antibiotics with a broad bacterial spectrum. At present, ointments containing tetracycline are also used for the treatment, which rarely can lead to skin sensitization. In this paper, a development of novel nanofibrous material with immobilized tetracycline is presented. Two different methods of immobilized tetracycline quantification onto silica nanofibers are employed. It was proven that the prevailing part of tetracycline was bound weakly by physisorption forces, while the minor part was covalently bound by NH2 groups formed by the preceding functionalization. The silica nanofibers with immobilized tetracycline are promising material for wound dressing applications due to its antibacterial activity; it was proved by tests.

  4. Diagnosis of Churg-Strauss Syndrome Presented With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dayun; Lee, Ho Jun; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin-Woo; Nam, Ki Yeun; Lee, Kyoung Hwan

    2017-06-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare systemic vasculitis that affect small and medium-sized blood vessels and is accompanied by asthma, eosinophilia, and peripheral neuropathy. This report describes a case of a 52-year-old man who had a history of sinusitis, asthma, and thymus cancer and who had complained of bilateral lower extremity paresthesia and weakness for a month. Peripheral neuropathy was detected by electrodiagnostic studies. Resection of a mediastinal mass, which was diagnosed as thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma, was performed five months before his visit. After thymectomy, peripheral blood tests revealed a gradual increase in eosinophils. Two months after surgery, he was admitted to the hospital for dyspnea, and nodules of focal consolidation were found in his chest X-ray. One month later, pyoderma occurred in the right shin, and the skin biopsy showed extravascular eosinophilic infiltration. He was diagnosed with CSS after thymectomy, and we report a very rare case of CSS presented with thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  5. The 'holi' dermatoses: annual spate of skin diseases following the spring festival in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Saha, Debabrata

    2009-07-01

    'Holi' is an annual spring festival celebrated all over India. The central ritual of Holi involves throwing of colors on one another. Playing with toxic industrial dyes often results in various dermatological complaints in a significant number of people immediately following the celebration. To describe patterns of various skin manifestations directly or indirectly related to the use of different colors in the celebration of Holi. Observational clinical study on consecutive patients presenting to a teaching hospital in Kolkata, India. Forty-two patients with a mean age of 24.2 years were studied. Itching was the commonest symptom (25, 59.5%), followed by burning sensation, pain, oozing, and scaling. Eleven patients' symptoms were attributed to activities related to preparation of colors and the removal of colors from the skin surface. Eczematous lesions were the most common pattern (24, 57.1%) followed by erosions, xerosis and scaling, erythema, urticaria, acute nail-fold inflammation, and abrasions. Thirteen (30.9%) patients reported aggravation of preexisting dermatoses (acne, eczema, and paronychia). Secondary pyoderma occurred in 3 (7.1%). Face was the commonest site affected (24, 57.1%), followed by dorsum of the hands, scalp, forearm, palms, arms, and trunk. Ocular complaints in the form of redness, watering, and grittiness occurred in 7 (16.7%) patients. Various forms of cutaneous manifestations, often associated with ocular complaints, occur commonly due to Holi colors. Public awareness and regulatory actions are needed to avoid these preventable conditions.

  6. THE ‘HOLI’ DERMATOSES: ANNUAL SPATE OF SKIN DISEASES FOLLOWING THE SPRING FESTIVAL IN INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Saha, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Background: ‘Holi’ is an annual spring festival celebrated all over India. The central ritual of Holi involves throwing of colors on one another. Playing with toxic industrial dyes often results in various dermatological complaints in a significant number of people immediately following the celebration. Aims: To describe patterns of various skin manifestations directly or indirectly related to the use of different colors in the celebration of Holi. Methods: Observational clinical study on consecutive patients presenting to a teaching hospital in Kolkata, India. Results: Forty-two patients with a mean age of 24.2 years were studied. Itching was the commonest symptom (25, 59.5%), followed by burning sensation, pain, oozing, and scaling. Eleven patients’ symptoms were attributed to activities related to preparation of colors and the removal of colors from the skin surface. Eczematous lesions were the most common pattern (24, 57.1%) followed by erosions, xerosis and scaling, erythema, urticaria, acute nail-fold inflammation, and abrasions. Thirteen (30.9%) patients reported aggravation of preexisting dermatoses (acne, eczema, and paronychia). Secondary pyoderma occurred in 3 (7.1%). Face was the commonest site affected (24, 57.1%), followed by dorsum of the hands, scalp, forearm, palms, arms, and trunk. Ocular complaints in the form of redness, watering, and grittiness occurred in 7 (16.7%) patients. Conclusion: Various forms of cutaneous manifestations, often associated with ocular complaints, occur commonly due to Holi colors. Public awareness and regulatory actions are needed to avoid these preventable conditions. PMID:20161854

  7. Cutaneous manifestations of Nocardia brasiliensis infection in Taiwan during 2002-2012-clinical studies and molecular typing of pathogen by gyrB and 16S gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Wei; Lu, Chun-Wei; Huang, Ting-Chi; Lu, Chin-Fang; Liau, Yea-Ling; Lin, Jeng-Fong; Li, Shu-Ying

    2013-09-01

    To observe the clinicopathologic and resistance profiles of the Nocardia brasiliensis causing cutaneous nocardiosis in Taiwan, 12 N. brasiliensis isolates were prospectively collected from patients with cutaneous nocardiosis in a hospital during 2002-2012. Clinicopathologic data were obtained, and isolates were identified by biochemical methods and 16S rRNA sequencing. Susceptibilities to 14 antimicrobial compounds were tested. Isolates were further genotyped by sequencing of 16S rRNA, secA1, hsp65, and gyrB genes. The nodulopustular pyoderma associated with sporotrichoid spreading was the most common skin presentations caused by N. brasiliensis. All of the isolates were susceptible to amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and resistant to kanamycin, erythromycin, and oxacillin, while susceptibilities to imipenem, vancomycin, penicillin-G, tetracycline, clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin varied among the 12 isolates. GyrB genotyping delineated the 12 isolates into 2 major groups, which was coincident with different single nucleotide substitutions at position 160 (G versus T) of 16S rRNA, different levels of imipenem minimum inhibition concentration (4-32 versus 0.25-0.75 mg/L), and prevalence of lymphadenitis (66.7 versus 16.7%). We have noted that tiny pustular lesions can be the first sign of cutaneous nocardiosis, which we believe has not been previously emphasized. No resistance to trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole was found; therefore, sulphonamide drugs remain effective for treatment of cutaneous nocardiosis in Taiwan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fox Den Disease: An Interesting Case Following Delayed Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehr, Ryan C; Kim, Nicholas; LoGiudice, John A; Ludwig, Kirk

    2015-06-01

    Pyoderma fistulans sinifica, also known as fox den disease, is a rare and poorly understood inflammatory disorder of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. This disorder is often mistaken for other inflammatory skin disorders and treated inappropriately. The authors describe the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the colorectal surgery service with a longstanding diagnosis of perirectal Crohn's disease. Despite aggressive immunosuppression and numerous surgical procedures, the patient continued to have unrelenting purulent drainage from the skin of his buttocks. Following wide excision of the affected skin and subcutaneous tissues by the colorectal surgeon, the plastic surgery team reconstructed the 30 cm x 55 cm wound using a combination of local flaps and skin grafts. The initial pathology report of the excised specimen confirmed the presence of nonspecific abscesses and inflammation. Upon special request by the plastic surgery team, the sample was resectioned with the specific intent of establishing a diagnosis of fox den disease. The additional slides met the criteria for an unequivocal diagnosis of fox den disease. Immunosuppression was discontinued and the patient healed his wounds without complication. Fox den disease is often overlooked because of the obscurity of the disease and the special histological sectioning needed to establish a diagnosis. In this case, the patient was unnecessarily treated with immunosuppressive drugs for more than 3 decades because of a misdiagnosis. With increased awareness of fox den disease, perhaps its pathophysiology can be better elucidated as more patients are appropriately diagnosed and treated.

  9. Primary seborrhoea in English springer spaniels: a retrospective study of 14 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D W; Miller, W H

    1996-04-01

    Primary seborrhoea was diagnosed in 14 English springer spaniels over a 17-year period. Seven of the dogs developed clinical signs by two years of age. The dermatosis began as a generalised non-pruritic dry scaling which gradually worsened. Some dogs remained in this dry (seborrhoea sicca) stage, but in most cases the dermatosis became greasy and inflamed (seborrhoea oleosa and seborrhoeic dermatitis). Eight of the dogs suffered from recurrent episodes of superficial or deep bacterial pyoderma. Histological findings in skin biopsy specimens included marked orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis of surface and infundibular epithelium, papillomatosis, parakeratotic capping of the papillae, and superficial perivascular dermatitis in which lymphocytes and mast cells were prominent. The dogs with seborrhoea sicca responded more satisfactorily to therapy with topical emollient-humectant agents or oral omega-3/omega-6 fatty acid supplementation. Dogs with seborrhoea oleosa and seborrhoeic dermatitis did not respond satisfactorily to topical therapy. One dog, however, responded well to etretinate and omega-3/omega-6 fatty acid administration. No dog was cured.

  10. Pattern of skin diseases among civil population and armed forces personnel at Pune

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    Sayal S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of skin disorders among 11393 civil and 8123 defence service personnel who attended out-patient department (OPD from January 1989 to December 1994 is presented. Infective dermatoses were more common in civil population (41.2% as compared to defence service personnel (36.3%. Fungal infection was common in both groups (15.1% and 17.2% whereas parasitic infestations and pyoderma were more common in civil population (12.8% and 6.1% as compared to service personnel (7.8% and 3.6%. Among non-infective dermatoses eczemas were more common in civil population (17.3% as compared to Armed Forces personnel (11.7%, whereas papulosquamous disorders, pigmentary disorders, acne and alopecia were more common in Armed Forces personnel (13.5%, 13.4% 8.7% and 6.2% as compared to civil population (10.8%, 10.1%, 6.4% and 4.1%. The incidence of other skin disorders did not differ much between the two groups.

  11. Juvenile cellulitis in dogs: 15 cases (1979-1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S D; Rosychuk, R A; Stewart, L J; Cape, L; Hughes, B J

    1989-12-01

    The records of 15 dogs diagnosed as having juvenile cellulitis (juvenile pyoderma, puppy strangles) were evaluated for clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic results. Mandibular lymphadenopathy was observed in 14 dogs, and was not associated with skin lesions in 5 dogs. Edema, pustules, papules, or crusts were noticed periorally, periocularly, on the chin or muzzle, or in the ears of those dogs with skin lesions. Eight dogs were lethargic; fever and anorexia were inconsistent findings. Four dogs had signs of pain on manipulation of their joints. Complete blood counts revealed leukocytosis with neutrophilia in 4 dogs, and normocytic, normochromic anemia in 6 dogs. Three dogs had suppurative lymphadenitis with many neutrophils. Cytology of the aspirate of pustules or abscesses in 6 dogs revealed many neutrophils without bacteria. Coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp were isolated from draining lesions in 2 dogs. Intact abscesses and lymph nodes were negative for bacterial growth in 4 dogs. Three of these dogs were being administered antibiotics at the time of bacterial culturing. Cytology of the aspirates of joints in 3 of the 4 dogs with joint pain revealed suppurative arthritis with no bacteria, and the aspirates were negative for bacterial growth on culturing, although all 3 dogs were being administered antibiotics at the time of culturing. Of 12 dogs initially treated with antibiotics, only 4 (33%) responded favorably; the other 8 dogs were then given antibiotics and corticosteroids. Three dogs were initially given antibiotics and corticosteroids. All dogs treated concurrently with antibiotics and corticosteroids responded favorably. One of these dogs had a relapse after treatment was discontinued. The concurrent arthritis in 4 of the dogs resolved with treatment of the juvenile cellulitis and did not redevelop once the medication was discontinued. Concurrent treatment with antibiotics (cephalosporins) and prednisone (2.2 mg/kg of body weight/day) was the most

  12. A clinico-etiological study of dermatoses in pediatric age group in tertiary health care center in South Gujarat region

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    Sugat A Jawade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermatologic conditions have different presentation and management in pediatric age group from that in adult; this to be studied separately for statistical and population based analysis. Objective: To study the pattern of various dermatoses in infants and children in tertiary health care center in South Gujarat region. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study; various dermatoses were studied in pediatric patients up to 14 years of age attending the Dermatology OPD of New Civil Hospital, Surat, Gujarat over a period of 12 months from June 2009 to June 2010. All patients were divided into four different study groups: 1 to 6 years and 7 to 14 years. Results: There were 596 boys and 425 girls in total 1021 study populations. Majority of the skin conditions in neonates were erythema toxicum neonatorum (12.97%, scabies (9.92%, mongolian spot (9.16%, and seborrheic dermatitis (7.63%. In > 1 month to 14 years age group of children among infectious disorder, children were found to be affected most by scabies (24.49%, impetigo (5.96%, pyoderma (5.62%, molluscum contagiosum (5.39%, tinea capitis (4.49%, leprosy (2.02%, and viral warts (1.35% while among non-infectious disorders, they were affected by atopic dermatitis (4.27%, pityriasis alba (4.16%, seborrheic dermatitis (3.60%, pityriasis rosea (3.15%, others (3.01%, phrynoderma (2.70%, lichen planus (2.58%, contact dermatitis (1.57% and ichthyosis (1.45%. Conclusion: There is a need to emphasize on training the management of common pediatric dermatoses to dermatologists, general practitioners and pediatricians for early treatment.

  13. The ′Holi′ dermatoses : Annual spate of skin diseases following the spring festival in India

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    Ghosh Sudip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : ′Holi′ is an annual spring festival celebrated all over India. The central ritual of Holi involves throwing of colors on one another. Playing with toxic industrial dyes often results in various dermatological complaints in a significant number of people immediately following the celebration. Aims : To describe patterns of various skin manifestations directly or indirectly related to the use of different colors in the celebration of Holi. Methods : Observational clinical study on consecutive patients presenting to a teaching hospital in Kolkata, India. Results : Forty-two patients with a mean age of 24.2 years were studied. Itching was the commonest symptom (25, 59.5%, followed by burning sensation, pain, oozing, and scaling. Eleven patients′ symptoms were attributed to activities related to preparation of colors and the removal of colors from the skin surface. Eczematous lesions were the most common pattern (24, 57.1% followed by erosions, xerosis and scaling, erythema, urticaria, acute nail-fold inflammation, and abrasions. Thirteen (30.9% patients reported aggravation of preexisting dermatoses (acne, eczema, and paronychia. Secondary pyoderma occurred in 3 (7.1%. Face was the commonest site affected (24, 57.1%, followed by dorsum of the hands, scalp, forearm, palms, arms, and trunk. Ocular complaints in the form of redness, watering, and grittiness occurred in 7 (16.7% patients. Conclusion : Various forms of cutaneous manifestations, often associated with ocular complaints, occur commonly due to Holi colors. Public awareness and regulatory actions are needed to avoid these preventable conditions.

  14. Estimation of the clinical and economic consequences of non-compliance with antimicrobial treatment of canine skin infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vlaenderen, Ilse; Nautrup, Barbara Poulsen; Gasper, Sabina M

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this study was to estimate the health and economic consequences of non-compliance with oral antimicrobial treatment in dogs with superficial pyoderma, wounds or abscesses in the US. A mathematical model (Markov model) which simulated treatment with long-term injectable cefovecin versus oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was developed and accounted for the effect of non-compliance on clinical outcomes and mean total treatment costs per patient. Efficacy parameters considered in the model were derived from clinical studies. Treatment failure due to oral antimicrobial treatment non-compliance was approximated from published data at 13.6%. US cost data for 2009 were derived from public sources. When non-compliance was considered as a cause of treatment failure with oral medication, the long-term injectable antibiotic was more effective than oral comparator (162 versus 158 days without clinical signs). Mean total treatment costs were lower with cefovecin (USD 376.74) versus amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (USD 382.34) in dogs of 25 kg; and cefovecin remained cost-saving up to a body weight of 31 kg. In large dogs, cefovecin was more costly; however, total therapy costs were less than 6% greater than with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Accordingly the higher drug and administration costs of the long-term injectable antibiotic were totally or substantially offset when non-compliance was considered as reason for treatment failure with oral medication. The model also allowed for the estimation of the impact of various non-compliance scenarios. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Feline atopic dermatitis: a retrospective study of 45 cases (2001-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravens, Philippa A; Xu, Bei J; Vogelnest, Linda J

    2014-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is recognized as a common cause of pruritus in cats, but it remains incompletely characterized. The aim of the study was to evaluate cases of confirmed feline AD. Fourty-five cats from a dermatology referral practice (2001-2012). A retrospective case record review was carried out using strict diagnostic criteria, including exclusion of flea-bite hypersensitivity and adverse food reaction. Disease prevalence was 12.5%, with domestic mixed (n = 24), Abyssinian (n = 6) and Devon rex (n = 3) cat breeds predisposed. Median age of onset was 2 years (62% 7 years; range 3 months to 12 years). Common presentations were severe (82%), nonseasonal (82%), waxing/waning (36%) pruritus, with alopecia/crusting/excoriations and/or erosions/ulceration (73%). Miliary dermatitis (20%) and eosinophilic granuloma complex lesions (27%) occurred. The face/head (71%), ventral abdomen (51%), neck (51%), limbs (38%), pinnae (31%), dorsum/rump (31%) and feet (16%) were frequently affected sites; lesions were restricted to the head/neck in only five cats (11%). Concurrent otitis externa (16%), superficial bacterial pyoderma (49%), Malassezia dermatitis (7%), flea-bite hypersensitivity (24%) and adverse food reaction (13%) occurred. Strong reactions on intradermal allergen testing were common (68%; 19 of 30), most frequently to pollens (61%) and/or insects (46%). Good response to ciclosporin (100%; 10 of 10), systemic glucocorticoids (55%; 22 of 40) and allergen-specific immunotherapy (57%; 13 of 23) and good/partial response to antihistamines (67%; 22 of 33) were reported. The prevalence of feline AD was higher than previously suggested, and breed predispositions were confirmed. Severe nonseasonal pruritus was most common, with a varied spectrum of lesions affecting a range of body areas. © 2014 ESVD and ACVD.

  16. НЕСПЕЦИФИЧЕСКИЙ ЯЗВЕННЫЙ КОЛИТ

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    Н. Т. Ватутин

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis is one of the most challenging problems in the modern gastroenterology. The diffuse inflammation in colon is the basis of the disease. It is clinically characterized by intestinal bleedings, loose stools with admixture of pus and blood, abdominal pains, tenesmus and constipations. However, extraintestinal manifestations can prevail at the beginning of disease. This manifestation causes difficulties in the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis at the early stages. It can take several months or even years after the first symptoms began. The article presents a case of nonspecific ulcerative colitis in 56-years old woman, who suffered from extraintestinal manifestations of disease for a long time. Within 3 months the patient complained of a low-grade fever, ulcers in the mouth, painful abscessed multiple defects of the neck skin and scalp, pain in the left ear and purulent nasal discharge, which are not pathognomonic for this disease. The patient was examined by general practitioners and specialized doctors. There were no doubts in the diagnosis of «pyoderma, abrasions, acute sinusitis». However, the prescribed treatment had no effect. Blood in the stool and its frequency of 6–8 times per day appeared only 3 month later. Based on this a sigmoidoscopy with biopsy was performed. Ulcerative colitis in the acute phase was diagnosed. Changes on the skin and mucous membranes were regarded as extraintestinal manifestations of ulcerative colitis. Pathogenetic therapy was appointed. The patient’s condition improved significantly. This case underlines the need to improve general practitioner’s and specialized doctor’s knowledge in the diagnosis of this disease. 

  17. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and therapeutics of pradofloxacin in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P

    2013-06-01

    , conjunctivitis, feline infectious anaemia and lower urinary tract infections and (ii) in dogs, for wound infections, superficial and deep pyoderma, acute urinary tract infections and adjunctive treatment of infections of gingival and periodontal tissues. At clinical dose rates pradofloxacin was well tolerated in preclinical studies and in clinical trials. Among the advantages of pradofloxacin are (i) successful treatment of infections caused by strains resistant to some other fluoroquinolones, as predicted by PK/PD data, but depending on the specific MIC of the target strain and (ii) a reduced propensity for resistance development based on MPC measurements. The preclinical and clinical data on pradofloxacin suggest that this drug should commonly be the fluoroquinolone of choice when a drug of this class is indicated. However, the PK/PD data on pradofloxacin, in comparison with other fluoroquinolones, are not a factor that leads automatically to greater clinical efficacy. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. THE ROLE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL DISORDERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS

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    E. E. Zhiltsova

    2018-01-01

    , there were high rates of IRA and NK cells (CD16+. In all patients there was an increase in immunoglobulin M and G, a high content of immunoglobulin E. The formation of secondary immunodeficiency, manifested by a decrease in phagocytic activity of leukocytes and incomplete phagocytosis, which is a factor predisposing to the development of pyoderma.Conclusion. Changes in immune status in patients with AtD are expressed by imbalance of population Of T-lymphocytes, increase of various classes of immunoglobulins and considerable oppression of practically all indicators of functional activity of neutrophils of blood.

  19. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

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    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  20. Burden and predictors of Staphylococcus aureus and S. pseudintermedius infections among dogs presented at an academic veterinary hospital in South Africa (2007–2012

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    Daniel N. Qekwana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Staphylococci are commensals of the mucosal surface and skin of humans and animals, but have been implicated in infections such as otitis externa, pyoderma, urinary tract infections and post-surgical complications. Laboratory records provide useful information to help investigate these infections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the burdens of these infections and use multinomial regression to examine the associations between various Staphylococcus infections and demographic and temporal factors among dogs admitted to an academic veterinary hospital in South Africa. Methods Records of 1,497 clinical canine samples submitted to the bacteriology laboratory at a veterinary academic hospital between 2007 and 2012 were included in this study. Proportions of staphylococcal positive samples were calculated, and a multinomial logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of staphylococcal infections. Results Twenty-seven percent of the samples tested positive for Staphylococcus spp. The species of Staphylococcus identified were S. pseudintermedius (19.0%, S. aureus (3.8%, S. epidermidis (0.7% and S. felis (0.1%. The remaining 2.87% consisted of unspeciated Staphylococcus. Distribution of the species by age of dog showed that S. pseudintermedius was the most common (25.6% in dogs aged 2–4 years while S. aureus was most frequent (6.3% in dogs aged 5–6 years. S. pseudintermedius (34.1% and S. aureus (35.1% were the most frequently isolated species from skin samples. The results of the multivariable multinomial logistic regression model identified specimen, year and age of the dog as significant predictors of the risk of infection with Staphylococcus. There was a significant temporal increase (RRR = 1.17; 95% CI [1.06–1.29] in the likelihood of a dog testing positive for S. pseudintermedius compared to testing negative. Dogs ≤ 8 years of age were significantly more likely to test positive for S

  1. Tinea on a Tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanţă, Alexandru; Irimie, Marius

    2016-08-01

    In the last twenty years, the prevalence of individuals with tattoos in the general population has increased in Europe (1) as well as in Australia (2) and the United States of America (3). A series of complications such as acute inflammatory reactions, allergic contact dermatitis (4,5), photoinduced, lichenoid, and granulomatous reactions (6, 7), pseudolymphoma (8), pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (9), skin infections (6), and skin cancers (10) may occur on tattoos. Infectious complications on tattoos include bacterial infections (pyoderma, leprosy, syphilis, cutaneous tuberculosis, mycobacteriosis) (11-14), viral infections (molluscum contagiosum, warts, herpes simplex, hepatitis B and C) (15-17), and fungal infections (sporotrichosis, dermatophytosis) (18,19). We present the case of a 29-year-old immunocompetent female patient who was consulted for the development of an erythematous-squamous placard that appeared on a tattoo about 18 days after tattooing. Dermatological examination revealed a circular, erythematous, scaly plaque, with centrifugal growth and central resolution, presenting an active, raised, erythematous, vesiculopustular edge, giving the appearance of tinea corporis. The lesion's starting point was on the tattoo in two colors located on the middle third of the left calf and subsequently evolved to beyond the surface of tattoo (Figure 1). No other skin, scalp, or nail lesions were observed. Mycological examination of the material obtained by scraping of the scales and the vesicles from the edges and the surface of the plaque revealed numerous hyphae on direct microscopy examination, and white, flat colonies with a cottony surface and radial grooves developed in Sabouraud dextrose agar culture (Figure 2). Spindle-shaped, thick-walled macroconidia and a few pyriform microconidia were observed on microscopic examinations of the colonies. Based on macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, Microsporum canis was identified. Gram stain and bacterial

  2. Dermatoses em pacientes com diabetes mellitus Skin lesions in diabetic patients

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    N T Foss

    2005-08-01

    relationship with metabolic control of diabetes. METHODS: A total of 403 diabetic patients, 31% type 1 and 69% type 2, underwent dermatological examination in an outpatient clinic of a university hospital. The endocrine-metabolic evaluation was carried out by an endocrinologist followed by the dermatological evaluation by a dermatologist. The metabolic control of 136 patients was evaluated using glycated hemoglobin. RESULTS: High number of dermophytosis (82.6% followed by different types of skin lesions such as acne and actinic degeneration (66.7%, pyoderma (5%, cutaneous tumors (3% and necrobiosis lipoidic (1% were found. Among the most common skin lesions in diabetic patients, confirmed by histopathology, there were seen necrobiosis lipoidic (2 cases, 0.4%, diabetic dermopathy (5 cases, 1.2% and foot ulcerations (3 cases, 0.7%. Glycated hemoglobin was 7.2% in both type 1 and 2 patients with adequate metabolic control and 11.9% and 12.7% in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients, respectively, with inadequate metabolic controls. A higher prevalence of dermatophytoses was seen in the both groups with inadequate metabolic control. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed a high prevalence of skin lesions in diabetic patients, especially dermatophytoses. Thus, poor metabolic control of diabetes increases patient's susceptibility to skin infections.

  3. Prevalência das dermatopatias não-tumorais em cães do município de Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul (2005-2008 Prevalence of non-tumorous canine dermatopathies in dogs from the municipality of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil (2005-2008

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    Tatiana M. Souza

    2009-02-01

    prevalence of non-tumorous canine dermatopathies affecting dogs from the municipality of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. From March 2005 to June de 2008, the authors followed-up canine dermatological cases from two sources: those referred to the Dermatology Sector of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria and those from a private practice. During this period 480 dogs with dermatological problems were examined; in 393 (81.9% it was possible to establish a definitive diagnosis and in 87 (18.1% the diagnosis was inconclusive. Four hundred and twenty four primary diagnosis and 78 secondary diagnosis were performed in the 393 dogs with conclusive diagnosis, totaling 502 diagnosis. The distribution of the diagnosis according to the categories of diagnosed dermatopathies was as follows: Allergic (190/502 [37.8%], bacterial (103/502 [20.5%], parasitic (97/502 [19.3%], environmental (28/502 [5,6%], mycotic (20/502 [4.0%], endocrine (13/502 [2.6%], keratinization disturbances (11/502 [2.2%], psychogenic (9/502 [1.8%], acquired alopecias (6/502 [1.2%], autoimmune (6/502 [1.2%], inherited (6/502 [1.2%], pigmentary disturbances (1/502 [0.2%], nutritional (1/502 [0.2%], and sundry conditions (11/502 [2.2%]. In general, the ten most frequently diagnosed non-tumorous dermatopathies in decreasing order of frequency were: Atopy, flea bite allergic dermatitis, bacterial folliculitis, demodectic mange, deep bacterial folliculitis/furunculosis, sarcoptic mange, myiasis, food allergy, traumatic pyoderma, and Malassezia dermatitis. These 10 conditions together made up approximately for three quarters of all canine skin diseases diagnosed in the current study.

  4. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF ETHANOL MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS WITH ERYTHROMYCIN AGAINST SKIN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCI WITH INDUCIBLE PHENOTYPE OF MLS-RESISTANCE

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    Yurchyshyn O.I.

    2017-10-01

    decreased in 32-64 times and Geranium pratense L. rhizomes extract antimicrobial concentration was decreased in 64-256 times. Ethanol extracts of Betula verrucosa L. buds (average FICI 0.473±0.20, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L. Spreng. leaves (average FICI 0.143±0.18 and Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb. leaves (average FICI 0.189±0.29 showed synergic action with erythromycin against 71.4-85.7% tested strains. Ethanol extracts of Sanguisorba officinalis L. roots showed non-interactive action with antibiotic against 42.8% isolates of staphylococci. Additive interaction with erythromycin for this extract was observed against 28.6% and synergic action against 28.6% strains (average FICI 0.812±0.52. Biota orientalis (L. Endl. (Platycladus orientalis (L. Franco fruits extract and Cotinus coggygria Scop. (Rhus cotinus R. leaves extract exhibited non-interactive action with antibiotic against all tested strains (average FICI 2.0±0.0. Experimental data indicate that combination of plant extracts with macrolides in therapeutic regimens against MLS-resistant staphylococci is promising, particularly for the treatment of pyoderma. The introduction of combined chemotherapy in clinical practice can actually help to solve two problems of modern medicine - slow the process of microorganisms (such as staphylococcus resistance to antibiotics acquiring and improve treatment of infections caused by resistant strains. Detection of bacteria antibiotic resistance modifiers in various plants stimulates to their intensive phytochemical study for isolation and identification of the active components. It will help to investigate the mechanisms of synergy on the molecular level. Conclusion. BAC of medicinal and aromatic plants potentiate antimicrobial activity of macrolides against skin isolates of staphylococci with inducible MLS-resistance. Alnus incana L. fruits ethanolic extract demonstrates the best direct antimicrobial activity and in combination with ERY synergistically inhibits the growth of S