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Sample records for sunflower root cell

  1. Genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceer, Huseyin; Hayirlioglu-Ayaz, Sema; Ozcan, Melahat

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the genotoxic effects of the insecticide cypermethrin on the root meristem cells of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were investigated. The roots were treated with 10- 25- 50- and 100-ppm concentrations of cypermethrin for 6, 12 and 24 h. The mitotic index and mitotic abnormalities were determined in both control and test groups. The cypermethrin showed a marked mitodepressive action on mitosis. The types of mitotic abnormalities included disturbed metaphase, c-mitosis, stickiness, laggards and chromatid bridges. A pronounced toxic effect was observed at the 50-ppm concentration. Cypermethrin may have genotoxic effects on sunflowers.

  2. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  3. Ion distribution measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis in apoplastic and symplastic pathways in root cells in sunflower plants grown in saline medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reza Ebrahimi; S C Bhatla

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about how salinity affects ions distribution in root apoplast and symplast. Using x-ray microanalysis, ions distribution and the relative contribution of apoplastic and symplastic pathways for delivery of ions to root xylem were studied in sunflower plants exposed to moderate salinity (EC=6). Cortical cells provided a considerably extended Na+ and Cl− storage facility. Their contents are greater in cytoplasm (root symplast) as compared to those in intercellular spaces (root apoplast). Hence, in this level of salinity, salt damage in sunflower is not dehydration due to extracellular accumulation of sodium and chloride ions, as suggested in the Oertli hypothesis. On the other hand, reduction in calcium content due to salinity in intercellular space is less than reduction in the cytoplasm of cortical cells. It seems that sodium inhibits the radial movement of calcium in symplastic pathway more than in the apoplastic pathway. The cell wall seems to have an important role in providing calcium for the apoplastic pathway. Redistribution of calcium from the cell wall to intercellular space is because of its tendency towards xylem through the apoplastic pathway. This might be a strategy to enhance loading of calcium to xylem elements and to reduce calcium deficiency in young leaves under salinity. This phenomenon may be able to increase salt tolerance in sunflower plants. Supplemental calcium has been found to be effective in reducing radial transport of Na+ across the root cells and their loading into the xylem, but not sodium absorption. Supplemental calcium enhanced Ca2+ uptake and influx into roots and transport to stele.

  4. Ion distribution measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis in apoplastic and symplastic pathways in root cells in sunflower plants grown in saline medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Reza; Bhatla, S C

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about how salinity affects ions distribution in root apoplast and symplast. Using x-ray microanalysis, ions distribution and the relative contribution of apoplastic and symplastic pathways for delivery of ions to root xylem were studied in sunflower plants exposed to moderate salinity (EC=6). Cortical cells provided a considerably extended Na(+) and Cl(-) storage facility. Their contents are greater in cytoplasm (root symplast) as compared to those in intercellular spaces (root apoplast). Hence, in this level of salinity, salt damage in sunflower is not dehydration due to extracellular accumulation of sodium and chloride ions, as suggested in the Oertli hypothesis. On the other hand, reduction in calcium content due to salinity in intercellular space is less than reduction in the cytoplasm of cortical cells. It seems that sodium inhibits the radial movement of calcium in symplastic pathway more than in the apoplastic pathway. The cell wall seems to have an important role in providing calcium for the apoplastic pathway. Redistribution of calcium from the cell wall to intercellular space is because of its tendency towards xylem through the apoplastic pathway. This might be a strategy to enhance loading of calcium to xylem elements and to reduce calcium deficiency in young leaves under salinity. This phenomenon may be able to increase salt tolerance in sunflower plants. Supplemental calcium has been found to be effective in reducing radial transport of Na(+) across the root cells and their loading into the xylem, but not sodium absorption. Supplemental calcium enhanced Ca(2+) uptake and influx into roots and transport to stele.

  5. Sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a species native to North America. It is a relatively new crop in the USA with commercialization starting around 1970. The high oil content sunflower seed changed the economics of producing and crushing sunflower seed for oil, making it attractive for growers. A n...

  6. Root colonization and growth promotion of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by phosphate solubilizing Enterobacter sp. Fs-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Ali, Saira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-08-01

    An Enterobacter sp. Fs-11 was isolated from sunflower rhizosphere, identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis (GeneBank accession no. GQ179978) and studied for its root colonization and growth promotion ability in sunflower. Morphologically, it was rod shaped Gram-negative, motile bacterium, producing 4.5 μg mL(-1) indole acetic acid in tryptophan-supplemented medium. It utilized 27 out of 95 substrates in BIOLOG GN2 micro plate system. It was able to convert insoluble tri-calcium phosphate to soluble phosphorus up to 43.5 μg mL(-1) with decrease in pH of the medium up to 4.5 after 10 days incubation at 28 ± 2 °C in the Pikovskaya's broth. High performance liquid chromatography of cell free supernatant showed that Fs-11 produced malic acid and gluconic acid (2.43 and 16.64 μg mL(-1), respectively) in Pikovskaya's broth. Analysis of 900 bp fragment of pyrroloquinoline quinine pqqE gene sequence showed 98 % homology with that of E. cloacae pqqE gene. Confocal laser scanning microscope revealed strong colonization of fluorescently labeled Fs-11 with sunflower roots. Sunflower inoculation with Fs-11 and its rifampicin resistant derivative in sterile sand and natural soil showed that Fs-11 colonized sunflower roots up to 30 days after transplanting in both sterile sand as well as natural soil. Moreover, Fs-11 inoculation resulted in increased plant height, fresh weight, dry weight and total phosphorus contents as compared to un-inoculated plants. The data showed that Enterobacter sp. Fs-11 is an efficient phosphate solubilizing and plant growth promoting rhizobacterium and has great potential to be used as bio-inoculant for sunflower under phosphorus deficient conditions.

  7. Nitric oxide is required for determining root architecture and lignin composition in sunflower. Supporting evidence from microarray analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti Monzón, Georgina; Pinedo, Marcela; Di Rienzo, Julio; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Pomar, Federico; Lamattina, Lorenzo; de la Canal, Laura

    2014-05-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule involved in several physiological processes in plants, including root development. Despite the importance of NO as a root growth regulator, the knowledge about the genes and metabolic pathways modulated by NO in this process is still limited. A constraint to unravel these pathways has been the use of exogenous applications of NO donors that may produce toxic effects. We have analyzed the role of NO in root architecture through the depletion of endogenous NO using the scavenger cPTIO. Sunflower seedlings growing in liquid medium supplemented with cPTIO showed unaltered primary root length while the number of lateral roots was deeply reduced; indicating that endogenous NO participates in determining root branching in sunflower. The transcriptional changes induced by NO depletion have been analyzed using a large-scale approach. A microarray analysis showed 330 genes regulated in the roots (p≤0.001) upon endogenous NO depletion. A general cPTIO-induced up-regulation of genes involved in the lignin biosynthetic pathway was observed. Even if no detectable changes in total lignin content could be detected, cell walls analyses revealed that the ratio G/S lignin increased in roots treated with cPTIO. This means that endogenous NO may control lignin composition in planta. Our results suggest that a fine tuning regulation of NO levels could be used by plants to regulate root architecture and lignin composition. The functional implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Replicon properties of chromosomal DNA fibers and the duration of DNA synthesis of sunflower root-tip meristem cells at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.; Bjerknes, C.A.; Clinton, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA fiber autoradiography was used to examine the replicon properties of root-tip meristem cells of Helianthus annuus intact seedlings grown at temperatures from 10 to 38/sup 0/C and those of root-tip cells grown in vitro at 23/sup 0/. The average replicon size was approximately 22 ..mu..m and it did not change with temperature nor when the roots were grown in culture. The average fork rate was 6 ..mu..m/h at 10/sup 0/ and it rose gradually to 12 ..mu..m/h at 38/sup 0/. The responses of replication fork movement and of the duration of S to temperature were of three types: those in which change in fork rate was primarily (more than 90%) responsible for change in the duration of S, those in which the fork rate remained constant while S increased nearly twofold, and those in which the duration of S increased even though the replication forks were moving faster. The first type of response listed was observed at temperatures from 20 to 35/sup 0/, the second type listed was observed at 10 to 15/sup 0/, and the third, was produced at 38/sup 0/.

  9. Root colonization and growth promotion of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by phosphate solubilizing Enterobacter sp. Fs-11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Ali, Saira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-01-01

    An Enterobacter sp. Fs-11 was isolated from sunflower rhizosphere, identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis (GeneBank accession no. GQ179978) and studied for its root colonization and growth promotion ability in sunflower. Morphologically, it was rod shaped Gram-negative, motile ba

  10. Root colonization and growth promotion of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by phosphate solubilizing Enterobacter sp Fs-11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Ali, Saira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-01-01

    An Enterobacter sp. Fs-11 was isolated from sunflower rhizosphere, identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis (GeneBank accession no. GQ179978) and studied for its root colonization and growth promotion ability in sunflower. Morphologically, it was rod shaped Gram-negative, motile ba

  11. Heliolactone, a non-sesquiterpene lactone germination stimulant for root parasitic weeds from sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kotomi; Furumoto, Toshio; Umeda, Shuhei; Mizutani, Masaharu; Takikawa, Hirosato; Batchvarova, Rossitza; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2014-12-01

    Root exudates of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) line 2607A induced germination of seeds of root parasitic weeds Striga hermonthica, Orobanche cumana, Orobanche minor, Orobanche crenata, and Phelipanche aegyptiaca. Bioassay-guided purification led to the isolation of a germination stimulant designated as heliolactone. FT-MS analysis indicated a molecular formula of C20H24O6. Detailed NMR spectroscopic studies established a methylfuranone group, a common structural component of strigolactones connected to a methyl ester of a C14 carboxylic acid via an enol ether bridge. The cyclohexenone ring is identical to that of 3-oxo-α-ionol and the other part of the molecule corresponds to an oxidized carlactone at C-19. It is a carlactone-type molecule and functions as a germination stimulant for seeds of root parasitic weeds. Heliolactone induced seed germination of the above mentioned root parasitic weeds, while dehydrocostus lactone and costunolide, sesquiterpene lactones isolated from sunflower root exudates, were effective only on O. cumana and O. minor. Heliolactone production in aquacultures increased when sunflower seedlings were grown hydroponically in tap water and decreased on supplementation of the culture with either phosphorus or nitrogen. Costunolide, on the other hand, was detected at a higher concentration in well-nourished medium as opposed to nutrient-deficient media, thus suggesting a contrasting contribution of heliolactone and the sesquiterpene lactone to the germination of O. cumana under different soil fertility levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Drought-Induced Increases in Abscisic Acid Levels in the Root Apex of Sunflower 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. Mason; Pharis, Richard P.; Huang, Yan Y.; Reid, David M.; Yeung, Edward C.

    1985-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) levels in 3-mm apical root segments of slowly droughted sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus L. cv Russian Giant) were analyzed as the methyl ester by selected ion monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using characteristic ions. An internal standard, hexadeuterated ABA (d6ABA) was used for quantitative analysis. Sunflower seedlings, grown in aeroponic chambers, were slowly droughted over a 7-day period. Drought stress increased ABA levels in the root tips at 24, 72, and 168 hour sample times. Control plants had 57 to 106 nanograms per gram ABA dry weight in the root tips (leaf water potential, −0.35 to −0.42 megapascals). The greatest increase in ABA, about 20-fold, was found after 72 hours of drought (leaf water potential, −1.34 to −1.47 megapascals). Levels of ABA also increased (about 7− to 54-fold) in 3-mm apical root segments which were excised and then allowed to dessicate for 1 hour at room temperature. PMID:16664535

  13. Apoplastic superoxide production and peroxidase activity by intact and excised axenically grown seedling roots of sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Inmaculada; Espinosa, Francisco; Alvarez-Tinaut, M Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Excised and cold-preincubated sunflower seedling roots were compared with intact non-preincubated roots to test the effect of the injury stress and cold preincubation on the oxidative burst measured as apoplastic superoxide (O (2) (.-) ) generation and exocellular peroxidase (ECPOX) activity. Preincubated excised or intact roots released into the medium apoplastic proteins with peroxidase activity. Intact and excised roots responded to methyl jasmonate by an immediate oxidative burst that could not be induced by salicylic acid; both phytohormones also induced a slight and slow O (2)(.-) generation and ECPOX activity on excised roots, when added to the cold preincubation medium. The results with cyanide, azide, SHAM (ECPOX inhibitors) and diphenylene iodonium (inhibitor of trans-plasma membrane NAD(P)H-oxidases (NOX)-respiratory burst oxidase homologue in plants (RBOH), the trans-plasmamembrane nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase) are consistent with the hypothesis that different systems may be the origin of O (2) (.-) in intact and excised roots; ECPOX was an important component of them in both, together with NOX-RBOH in intact roots, but in excised roots the last one was replaced by an oxidase sensitive to the same inhibitors as the alternative mitochondrial oxidase. According to our hypothesis, these results could be explained if the electron flux would be deviated to different interconnected plasma membrane-redox systems, with different terminal oxidases, activated by different effectors or stresses.

  14. Effects of Abscisic Acid and of Hydrostatic Pressure Gradient on Water Movement through Excised Sunflower Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinka, Z

    1977-05-01

    The effect of abscisic acid on the exudation rate from decapitated roots of sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus L.) was investigated in the presence and absence of an imposed hydrostatic pressure gradient. The magnitude of the abscisic acid effect was constant even when suctions up to 60 cm Hg were applied to the cut stumps.When roots were bathed in a THO-labeled nutrient solution, the course of the appearance of radioactivity in the exudate, expressed as a function of exudate volume, was not affected by abscisic acid treatment but was strongly speeded up by applying suction.The implications of those findings with regard to the water pathway through the root and the location of the abscisic acid effect are discussed.

  15. Salt stress-induced seedling growth inhibition coincides with differential distribution of serotonin and melatonin in sunflower seedling roots and cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumya; David, Anisha; Yadav, Sunita; Baluška, František; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2014-12-01

    Indoleamines regulate a variety of physiological functions during the growth, morphogenesis and stress-induced responses in plants. Present investigations report the effect of NaCl stress on endogenous serotonin and melatonin accumulation and their differential spatial distribution in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedling roots and cotyledons using HPLC and immunohistochemical techniques, respectively. Exogenous serotonin and melatonin treatments lead to variable effect on hypocotyl elongation and root growth under NaCl stress. NaCl stress for 48 h increases endogenous serotonin and melatonin content in roots and cotyledons, thus indicating their involvement in salt-induced long distance signaling from roots to cotyledons. Salt stress-induced accumulation of serotonin and melatonin exhibits differential distribution in the vascular bundles and cortex in the differentiating zones of the primary roots, suggesting their compartmentalization in the growing region of roots. Serotonin and melatonin accumulation in oil body rich cells of salt-treated seedling cotyledons correlates with longer retention of oil bodies in the cotyledons. Present investigations indicate the possible role of serotonin and melatonin in regulating root growth during salt stress in sunflower. Effect of exogenous serotonin and melatonin treatments (15 μM) on sunflower seedlings grown in the absence or presence of 120 mM NaCl substantiates their role on seedling growth. Auxin and serotonin biosynthesis are coupled to the common precursor tryptophan. Salt stress-induced root growth inhibition, thus pertains to partial impairment of auxin functions caused by increased serotonin biosynthesis. In seedling cotyledons, NaCl stress modulates the activity of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (HIOMT; EC 2.1.1.4), the enzyme responsible for melatonin biosynthesis from N-acetylserotonin.

  16. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca(2+)] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development.

  17. Oxidative stress induced in sunflower seedling roots by aqueous dry olive-mill residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Garrido

    Full Text Available The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O(2·(- generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O(2·(- generation and EC-POX's activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O(2·(- and H(2O(2 accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX's activities might be involved in the enhancement of H(2O(2 content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress.

  18. Oxidative Stress Induced in Sunflower Seedling Roots by Aqueous Dry Olive-Mill Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Inmaculada; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; Casero, Pedro Joaquin; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR) with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O2·- generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs) activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O2·- generation and EC-POX′s activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O2·- and H2O2 accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX′s activities might be involved in the enhancement of H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress. PMID:23049960

  19. Oxidative stress induced in sunflower seedling roots by aqueous dry olive-mill residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Inmaculada; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; Casero, Pedro Joaquin; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR) with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O(2)·(-) generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs) activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O(2)·(-) generation and EC-POX's activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O(2)·(-) and H(2)O(2) accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX's activities might be involved in the enhancement of H(2)O(2) content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress.

  20. Decarboxylation and transport of auxin in segments of sunflower and cabbage roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, T H; Aasheim, T

    1970-12-01

    The movement of (14)C from indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) (14)C has been examined in 5 mm root segments of dark-grown seedlings of Helianthus annuus and Brassica oleracea. Contaminants from distilled water, phosphate buffer and the razor-blade cutter increase the decarboxylation of IAA-(14)C, and cutting of root segments results in an activation of IAA-destroying enzymes at the cut surfaces. When these sources of errors were eliminated the following was shown: a) Both in sunflower and cabbage there is a slight acropetal flux of (14)C through the root segments into the agar receiver blocks. The amount of (14)C found in the receiver blocks increases with the lenght of the transport period. b) When the root segments, after the transport period, are cut in two equal parts and these assayed separately, the amounts of (14)C in the two parts indicate a greater acropetal than basipetal transport. c) The total radioactivity of the receiver blocks is in part due to IAA-(14)C and in part to (14)CO2, the latter being a result of enzymatic destruction of auxin. d) Addition of ferulic acid, an inhibitor of IAA oxidases, to the receiver blocks markedly inhibits the decarboxylation of IAA-(14)C and thus increases the amount transported. This effect is more pronounced after a 20 hr than after a 6 hr transport period.

  1. Simulating sunflower canopy temperatures to infer root-zone soil water potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Idso, S. B.

    1983-01-01

    A soil-plant-atmosphere model for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), together with clear sky weather data for several days, is used to study the relationship between canopy temperature and root-zone soil water potential. Considering the empirical dependence of stomatal resistance on insolation, air temperature and leaf water potential, a continuity equation for water flux in the soil-plant-atmosphere system is solved for the leaf water potential. The transpirational flux is calculated using Monteith's combination equation, while the canopy temperature is calculated from the energy balance equation. The simulation shows that, at high soil water potentials, canopy temperature is determined primarily by air and dew point temperatures. These results agree with an empirically derived linear regression equation relating canopy-air temperature differential to air vapor pressure deficit. The model predictions of leaf water potential are also in agreement with observations, indicating that measurements of canopy temperature together with a knowledge of air and dew point temperatures can provide a reliable estimate of the root-zone soil water potential.

  2. Plasticity in sunflower leaf and cell growth under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céccoli, G; Bustos, D; Ortega, L I; Senn, M E; Vegetti, A; Taleisnik, E

    2015-01-01

    A group of sunflower lines that exhibit a range of leaf Na(+) concentrations under high salinity was used to explore whether the responses to the osmotic and ionic components of salinity can be distinguished in leaf expansion kinetics analysis. It was expected that at the initial stages of the salt treatment, leaf expansion kinetics changes would be dominated by responses to the osmotic component of salinity, and that later on, ion inclusion would impose further kinetics changes. It was also expected that differential leaf Na(+) accumulation would be reflected in specific changes in cell division and expansion rates. Plants of four sunflower lines were gradually treated with a relatively high (130 mm NaCl) salt treatment. Leaf expansion kinetics curves were compared in leaves that were formed before, during and after the initiation of the salt treatment. Leaf areas were smaller in salt-treated plants, but the analysis of growth curves did not reveal differences that could be attributed to differential Na(+) accumulation, since similar changes in leaf expansion kinetics were observed in lines with different magnitudes of salt accumulation. Nevertheless, in a high leaf Na(+) -including line, cell divisions were affected earlier, resulting in leaves with proportionally fewer cells than in a Na(+) -excluding line. A distinct change in leaf epidermal pavement shape caused by salinity is reported for the first time. Mature pavement cells in leaves of control plants exhibited typical lobed, jigsaw-puzzle shape, whereas in treated plants, they tended to retain closer-to-circular shapes and a lower number of lobes.

  3. Partial purification and characterization of a copper-induced anionic peroxidase of sunflower roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouili, Hager; Bouazizi, Houda; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of 14-day-old sunflower seedlings with a toxic amount of copper (50 microM of CuSO(4)) during 5days caused significant increase in peroxidase activity in roots. Qualitative analysis of soluble proteins using native anionic PAGE followed by detection of peroxidase activity with guaïacol as electron donor in the presence of H(2)O(2) revealed five stimulated peroxidases, named A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5. These peroxidases had differential behavior during the period of treatment. A1, A2, A3 and A4 were stimulated in the first period of stress, but rapidly suppressed at 72h. A5 showed a progressive stimulation which was even increased at 120h. A1 was partially purified, identified using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and characterized. Effects of pH and temperature on its activity were determined with guaïacol as electron donor. Optima were obtained at pH 8 and at 40 degrees C. Analysis of substrate specificity showed that A1 was active on coniferyl alcohol but not on IAA. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by a high concentration of H(2)O(2).

  4. Rapid auxin-induced nitric oxide accumulation and subsequent tyrosine nitration of proteins during adventitious root formation in sunflower hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunita; David, Anisha; Baluška, František; Bhatla, Satish C

    2013-03-01

    Using NO specific probe (MNIP-Cu), rapid nitric oxide (NO) accumulation as a response to auxin (IAA) treatment has been observed in the protoplasts from the hypocotyls of sunflower seedlings (Helianthus annuus L.). Incubation of protoplasts in presence of NPA (auxin efflux blocker) and PTIO (NO scavenger) leads to significant reduction in NO accumulation, indicating that NO signals represent an early signaling event during auxin-induced response. A surge in NO production has also been demonstrated in whole hypocotyl explants showing adventitious root (AR) development. Evidence of tyrosine nitration of cytosolic proteins as a consequence of NO accumulation has been provided by western blot analysis and immunolocalization in the sections of AR producing hypocotyl segments. Most abundant anti-nitrotyrosine labeling is evident in proteins ranging from 25-80 kDa. Tyrosine nitration of a particular protein (25 kDa) is completely absent in presence of NPA (which suppresses AR formation). Similar lack of tyrosine nitration of this protein is also evident in other conditions which do not allow AR differentiation. Immunofluorescent localization experiments have revealed that non-inductive treatments (such as PTIO) for AR develpoment from hypocotyl segments coincide with symplastic and apoplastic localization of tyrosine nitrated proteins in the xylem elements, in contrast with negligible (and mainly apoplastic) nitration of proteins in the interfascicular cells and phloem elements. Application of NPA does not affect tyrosine nitration of proteins even in the presence of an external source of NO (SNP). Tyrosine nitrated proteins are abundant around the nuclei in the actively dividing cells of the root primordium. Thus, NO-modulated rapid response to IAA treatment through differential distribution of tyrosine nitrated proteins is evident as an inherent aspect of the AR development.

  5. Changes in Cell Membrane Permeability in Sunflower Hypocotyls Infected with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, J G

    1972-03-01

    Influx and efflux of water and urea and electrolyte leakage are less for sunflower (Helianthus annuus) hypocotyl sections above lesions caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum than for those from healthy plants. Urea uptake by sections above lesions is reduced (celery, squash, and tomato) or unchanged (bean) in other hosts after Sclerotinia infection. Efflux of urea from sunflower hypocotyls is biphasic, suggesting diffusion in series from two cellular compartments (cytoplasm and vacuole). Efflux during the fast phase was 7 to 20 times greater than that during the slow phase. No difference was noted in urea efflux from healthy and diseased tissues during the slow phase. However, efflux during the fast phase from diseased tissues was slower than from healthy tissues, suggesting that the increased resistance to diffusion of urea in host cells above lesions resides in the plasmalemma. Water movement across cell membranes of healthy and diseased sunflower hypocotyls was reduced when tissues were treated with p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  6. Sodium chloride stress induces nitric oxide accumulation in root tips and oil body surface accompanying slower oleosin degradation in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Anisha; Yadav, Sunita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2010-12-01

    Present work highlights the involvement of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in sodium chloride (NaCl)-induced biochemical regulation of seedling growth in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., cv. Morden). The growth response is dependent on NaCl concentration to which seedlings are exposed, they being tolerant to 40 mM NaCl and showing a reduction in extension growth at 120 mM NaCl. NaCl sensitivity of sunflower seedlings accompanies a fourfold increase in Na(+) /K(+) ratio in roots (as compared to that in cotyledons) and rapid transport of Na(+) to the cotyledons, thereby enhancing Na(+) /K(+) ratio in cotyledons as well. A transient increase in endogenous NO content, primarily contributed by putative NOS activity in roots of 4-day-old seedlings subjected to NaCl stress and the relative reduction in Na(+) /K(+) ratio after 4 days, indicates that NO regulates Na(+) accumulation, probably by affecting the associated transporter proteins. Root tips exhibit an early and transient enhanced expression of 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) positive NO signal in the presence of 120 mM NaCl. Oil bodies from 2-day-old seedling cotyledons exhibit enhanced localization of NO signal in response to 120 mM NaCl treatment, coinciding with a greater retention of the principal oil body membrane proteins, i.e. oleosins. Abolition of DAF positive fluorescence by the application of specific NO scavenger [2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyllimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO)] authenticates the presence of endogenous NO. These novel findings provide evidence for a possible protective role of NO during proteolytic degradation of oleosins prior to/accompanying lipolysis.

  7. Spectacular Sunflowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Molly

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author illustrates how she shares her love of sunflowers with her kindergarten and first-grade students through an interesting art lesson. Sunflowers are easy to grow, so the author started the lesson four months earlier with inexpensive seed packets. She planted many varieties, but she most likes the colors of the Mexican…

  8. Sunflower disease compendium: Sunflower botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    The number one challenge for global sunflower production is diseases. Sunflower is the fifth largest oilseed crop grown in temperate and subtropical areas in 72 countries and on every continent, except Antarctica. This has facilitated the spread of diseases globally. Disease control can be by chemic...

  9. Cell lineage patterns in the shoot meristem of the sunflower embryo in the dry seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegla, D.E.; Sussex, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    We mapped the fate of cells in the shoot meristem of the dry-seed embryo of sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. cv. Peredovic, using irradiation-induced somatic sectors. We analyzed 249 chlorophyll-deficient or glabrous (hairless) sectors generated in 236 plants. Most sectors observed in the inflorescence extended into vegetative nodes. Thus cell lineages that ultimately gave rise to reproductive structures also contributed to vegetative structures. No single sector extended the entire length of the shoot. Thus the shoot is not derived from one or a few apical initials. Rather, the position, vertical extent, and width of the sectors at different levels of the shoot suggest that the shoot is derived from three to four circumferential populations of cells in each of three cell layers of the embryo meristem. Sectors had no common boundaries even in plants with two or three independent sectors, but varied in extent and overlapped along the length of the shoot. Thus individual cells in a single circumferential population behaved independently to contribute lineages of different vertical extents to the growing shoot. The predicted number of circumferential populations of cells as well as the apparent cell number in each population was consistent with the actual number of cells in the embryo meristem observed in histological sections.

  10. Formation and separation of root border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driouich, Azeddine; Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté

    2007-01-01

    Plant roots release a large number of border cells into the rhizosphere, which are believed to play a key role in root development and health. The formation and loss of these cells from the root cap region is a developmentally regulated process that is also controlled by phytohormones and environmental factors. The separation of border cells involves the complete dissociation of individual cells from each other and from root tissue. This process requires the activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes that solubilize the cell wall connections between cells. We present and discuss the solubilization process with an emphasis on pectin-degrading enzymes as well as the recently discovered root border-like cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  11. Two TIP-like genes encoding aquaporins are expressed in sunflower guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, X; Tousch, D; Ferrare, K; Legrand, E; Dupuis, J M; Casse-Delbart, F; Lamaze, T

    1997-11-01

    SunTIP7 and SunTIP20 are closely related sunflower cDNAs showing a deduced amino acid sequence homologous to proteins of the tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) family. Their expression in Xenopus oocytes caused a marked increase in osmotic water permeability (demonstrating that they are water channels) which was sensitive to mercury. In leaves, in situ hybridization revealed that both SunTIP7 and SunTIP20 mRNA accumulated in the guard cells. The possible involvement of SunTIPs in stomatal movement was examined by comparing the time course of transcript accumulation and leaf conductance during the daily cycle and following a water limitation. SunTIP7 mRNA fluctuations fitted changes occurring in leaf conductance. The transcript levels were markedly and systematically increased during stomatal closure. It is suggested that aquaporin SunTIP7 facilitates water exit associated with a decrease in guard cell volume. In the same conditions, the transcript level of SunTIP20 remained constant indicating that SunTIP genes are differentially regulated within the same cell.

  12. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radonic, Laura M; Lewi, Dalia M; López, Nilda E; Hopp, H Esteban; Escandón, Alejandro S; Bilbao, Marisa López

    2015-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is still considered as a recalcitrant species to in vitro culture and transformation in spite of the publication of different protocols. Here we describe a routine transformation system of this crop which requires mature HA89 genotype seeds and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 strain for gene delivery, being both easily available. Selection of transformed shoots depends on root development in kanamycin-selective media, instead of shoot color, avoiding selection of escapes. The establishment of this protocol proved successful for the incorporation of both reporter and agronomic important genes and also for the evaluation of the specific expression patterns of different promoters in transgenic sunflower plants. Stable expression of the incorporated transgenes was confirmed by RT-PCR and GUS reporter gene visualization. Stable inheritance of transgenes was successfully followed until T2 generation in several independent lines.

  13. The role of fungal polysaccharidases in the hydrolysis of cell wall materials from sunflower and palm-kernel meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düsterhöft, E M; Bonte, A W; Venekamp, J C; Voragen, A G

    1993-09-01

    Main fractions from multi-component polysaccharidase preparations (Driselase, Gamanase and an experimental preparation of fungal origin), previously used for the enzymic treatment of cell wall materials from sunflower and palm-kernel meals, were sub-fractionated by different chromatographic techniques to evaluate the contribution of each of their constituent activities in cell wall degradation. Based on activity measurements, 5- to 10-fold purification was achieved for the major enzymes but residual side-activities were still detectable in most sub-fractions. Solubilization of non-starch polysaccharides from the cell wall materials by the resulting pectolytic, xylanolytic, cellulolytic and mannanolytic sub-fractions and by highly purified glucanases, arabinanases and xylanases was, when acting individually, very low (1% to 5%). With few exceptions, the solubilizing effect of the main fractions could only be slightly enhanced by supplementation with pectolytic, cellulolytic or mannanolytic sub-fractions or by highly purified enzymes. The extent of solubilization remained mostly lower than the sum of both individually obtained values. In the degradation of palm-kernel cell wall material, however, synergistic action of mannanases and glucanases was observed. The hydrolysis of pectic compounds in sunflower cell wall material was most effective when polygalacturonases, arabinanases and rhamnogalacturonan-degrading activities were applied together. The resistance of 4-O-methyl-glucuronoxylan, the major hemicellulosic polymer in the cell wall material from sunflower meal, to enzymic hydrolysis was not only caused by its location in the cell wall or interlinkage to other polymers but also by its primary structure. Neither purified endo-xylanase nor the crude parent preparation were able to achieve complete hydrolysis of this polysaccharide after extraction.

  14. Cell wall water content has a direct effect on extensibility in growing hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evered, Carol; Majevadia, Bhavita; Thompson, David Stuart

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that spacing between cellulose microfibrils within plant cell walls may be an important determinant of their mechanical properties. A consequence of this hypothesis is that the water content of cell walls may alter their extensibility and that low water potentials may directly reduce growth rates by reducing cell wall spacing. This paper describes a number of experiments in which the water potential of frozen and thawed growing hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were altered using solutions of high molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) or Dextran while their extension under constant stress was monitored using a creep extensiometer (frozen and thawed tissue was used to avoid confounding effects of turgor or active responses to the treatments). Clear reductions in extensibility were observed using both PEG and Dextran, with effects observed in hypocotyl segments treated with PEG 35 000 solutions with osmotic pressures of > or =0.21 MPa suggesting that the relatively mild stresses required to reduce water potentials of plants in vivo by 0.21 MPa may be sufficient to reduce growth rates via a direct effect on wall extensibility. It is noted, therefore, that the water binding capacity of plant cell walls may be of ecophysiological importance. Measurements of cell walls of sunflower hypocotyls using scanning electron microscopy confirmed that treatment of hypocotyls with PEG solutions reduced wall thickness, supporting the hypothesis that the spatial constraint of movement of cellulose microfibrils affects the mechanical properties of the cell wall.

  15. Variability of root characteristics in sunflower under different planting modes%向日葵不同种植模式群体根系特征差异性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡树平; 高聚林; 王志刚; 安玉麟; 于海峰; 马捷; 李君; 张玮

    2013-01-01

    Based on the single experiments of fertilizer requirement, seeding date, density and drought resistance of sunflower in 2008 and 2009, this experiment was conducted in Inner Mongolia Agricultural University Science Park in 2010 by using the integrated technology and the traditional planting mode as treatments, so as to analyze the effects of different cultivation modes on the characters of root development in sunflower. The results showed that the outputs under different planting modes were significantly different each other. Under the integrated technology, the yields of oil and edible sunflower were increased by 18.58% and 23.28% respectively, the time with the maximum rate of root dry matter accumulation was earlier, the rate of root dry matter accumulation was higher, the duration period of root dry matter accumulation was prolonged, the distribution of root system was deeper, and the root bulk, root length, root active absorbing area and their peak values were wholly increased, as compared to the traditional mode.%在2008、2009年向日葵需肥规律、播期、密度、抗旱性比较等单项试验的基础上,2010年在内蒙古农业大学科技园区对以上试验结论进行技术组装集成,并与传统农户种植模式进行比较试验,以进一步明确不同栽培模式下向日葵根系发育特性,并对根系特征差异进行分析.研究结果表明:不同种植模式产量存在显著差异,油葵、食葵集成模式下分别增产18.58%、23.28%;集成模式的根系干物质积累最大速率出现时间提前,速率增大,持续时间长,0~ 20 em土层根系分布90%左右,根系趋于下扎;集成模式的群体根体积、根长、根活跃吸收面积等均大于农户模式,且全生育期最大值大于农户模式.

  16. Cell fate and cell differentiation status in the Arabidopsis root

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.; Berg, C. van den; Weisbeek, P.

    1998-01-01

    Post-embryonic development in plants is mainly achieved by its meristems. Within the Arabidopsis root meristem, both the fate and origin of its cells can be predicted with high accuracy. Mutants defective in the determination of root cell fates show that the corresponding genes are first required

  17. Steatosis recovery after treatment with a balanced sunflower or olive oil-based diet: Involvement of perisinusoidal stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel Hernández; Esther Martínez-Lara; Ana Ca(n)uelo; Ma Luisa del Moral; Santos Blanco; Eva Siles; Ana Jiménez; Juan (A)ngel Pedrosa; Ma (A)ngeles Peinado

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the relationship between perisinusoidal stellate cell (PSC) activation and the dietary fat quantity and composition in the treatment of hepatic steatosis.METHODS: Using an experimental rat model of steatosis based on the intake of a hyperlipidic diet (14% fat as olive oil or sunflower oil, HL-O and HL-S, respectively), we analyzed the liver's capability of recovery after the treatment with a normal-lipidic diet (5% fat as olive oil or sunflower oil, NL-O and NL-S, respectively) by immunocytochemical and Western blot analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in PSCs, collagen quantification and serum aminotransferase determination.RESULTS: The fatty infiltration in the steatotic livers decreased after the treatment with both NL diets, indicating liver recovery. This decrease was accompanied with a lower collagen deposition and aminotransferase level as well as changes in the PSC population that increased the GFAP expression. The above-mentioned effects were more pronounced in animals fed on NL-O based diet. CONCLUSION: Treatment with a balanced dietenriched in olive oil contributes to the liver recovery from a stea totic process. The PSC phenotype is a marker of this hepatic-recovery model.

  18. PHIV-RootCell: a supervised image analysis tool for rice root anatomical parameter quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eLartaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed the PHIV-RootCell software to quantify anatomical traits of rice roots transverse section images. Combined with an efficient root sample processing method for image acquisition, this program permits supervised measurements of areas (those of whole root section, stele, cortex and central metaxylem vessels, number of cell layers and number of cells per cell layer. The PHIV-RootCell toolset runs under ImageJ, an independent operating system that has a license-free status. To demonstrate the usefulness of PHIV-RootCell, we conducted a genetic diversity study and an analysis of salt-stress responses of root anatomical parameters in rice (Oryza sativa L.. Using 16 cultivars, we showed that we could discriminate between some of the varieties even at the 6 day-old stage, and that tropical japonica varieties had larger root sections due to an increase in cell number. We observed, as described previously, that root sections become enlarged under salt stress. However, our results show an increase in cell number in ground tissues (endodermis and cortex but a decrease in external (peripheral tissues (sclerenchyma, exodermis and epidermis. Thus, the PHIV-RootCell program is a user-friendly tool that will be helpful for future genetic and physiological studies that investigate root anatomical trait variations.

  19. Van Gogh's Sunflowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein kindergarten students painted sunflowers. These beautiful and colorful sunflowers were inspired by the book "Camille and the Sunflowers" by Laurence Anholt, which does an amazing job of introducing young children to the art and life of Vincent van Gogh.

  20. [Cytogenetic effect of temperature on the sunflower varieties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkina, E V; Gus'kov, E P

    2002-01-01

    The influence of increased temperature on the intensity of fission and level of chromosome aberrations (ChA) in root meristeme cells of two lines of sunflower seedlings was studied. Within the first hour of seed germination, the temperature of 40 degrees C reduced proliferation activity of root meristeme cells line 3629 for almost the next 15 h of growth. Heat stress (HS) blocks the beginning of cell fission in the plastome mutant en-chlorina-5. However, subsequent by mitosis activity was seen to increase. The influence of HS on the ChA level is ambiguous: the effect depends on the duration of warm-up influence and the used sunflower lines. So, ChA level does not change inbred line 3629 even after 6 h HS. In mutant en-chlorina-5 the ChA level increases after 1 h HS and decreases after 3 and 6 h HS. The study of HS modification effect has shown that preliminary warm-up influence (40 degrees C for 1 h) reduces differences in reactions of cells 3629 of line on the action of different nitrosomethylurea (NMU) concentrations. Preliminary warm-up influence does not change sensitivity of en-chlorina-5 cells to NMU. The combined action of the increased temperature and NMU induce a powerful cytostatic effect.

  1. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  2. Extracellular proteins in pea root tip and border cell exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; VanEtten, Hans D; Tsaprailis, George; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-02-01

    Newly generated plant tissue is inherently sensitive to infection. Yet, when pea (Pisum sativum) roots are inoculated with the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca, most newly generated root tips remain uninfected even though most roots develop lesions just behind the tip in the region of elongation. The resistance mechanism is unknown but is correlated spatially with the presence of border cells on the cap periphery. Previously, an array of >100 extracellular proteins was found to be released while border cell separation proceeds. Here we report that protein secretion from pea root caps is induced in correlation with border cell separation. When this root cap secretome was proteolytically degraded during inoculation of pea roots with N. haematococca, the percentage of infected root tips increased from 4% +/- 3% to 100%. In control experiments, protease treatment of conidia or roots had no effect on growth and development of the fungus or the plant. A complex of >100 extracellular proteins was confirmed, by multidimensional protein identification technology, to comprise the root cap secretome. In addition to defense-related and signaling enzymes known to be present in the plant apoplast were ribosomal proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and others typically associated with intracellular localization but recently shown to be extracellular components of microbial biofilms. We conclude that the root cap, long known to release a high molecular weight polysaccharide mucilage and thousands of living cells into the incipient rhizosphere, also secretes a complex mixture of proteins that appear to function in protection of the root tip from infection.

  3. Lateral root organogenesis - from cell to organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benková, Eva; Bielach, Agnieszka

    2010-12-01

    Unlike locomotive organisms capable of actively approaching essential resources, sessile plants must efficiently exploit their habitat for water and nutrients. This involves root-mediated underground interactions allowing plants to adapt to soils of diverse qualities. The root system of plants is a dynamic structure that modulates primary root growth and root branching by continuous integration of environmental inputs, such as nutrition availability, soil aeration, humidity, or salinity. Root branching is an extremely flexible means to rapidly adjust the overall surface of the root system and plants have evolved efficient control mechanisms, including, firstly initiation, when and where to start lateral root formation; secondly lateral root primordia organogenesis, during which the development of primordia can be arrested for a certain time; and thirdly lateral root emergence. Our review will focus on the most recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lateral root initiation and organogenesis with the main focus on root system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Growth and cell wall changes in rice roots during spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Tanimoto, Eiichi

    2003-08-01

    We analyzed the changes in growth and cell wall properties of roots of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) grown for 68.5, 91.5, and 136 h during the Space Shuttle STS-95 mission. In space, most of rice roots elongated in a direction forming a constant mean angle of about 55 degrees with the perpendicular base line away from the caryopsis in the early phase of growth, but later the roots grew in various directions, including away from the agar medium. In space, elongation growth of roots was stimulated. On the other hand, some of elasticity moduli and viscosity coefficients were higher in roots grown in space than on the ground, suggesting that the cell wall of space-grown roots has a lower capacity to expand than the controls. The levels of both cellulose and the matrix polysaccharides per unit length of roots decreased greatly, whereas the ratio of the high molecular mass polysaccharides in the hemicellulose fraction increased in space-grown roots. The prominent thinning of the cell wall could overwhelm the disadvantageous changes in the cell wall mechanical properties, leading to the stimulation of elongation growth in rice roots in space. Thus, growth and the cell wall properties of rice roots were strongly modified under microgravity conditions during spaceflight.

  5. Tissue specific localization of root infection by fungal pathogens: role of root border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Uvini; Hawes, Martha C

    2002-11-01

    When roots of pea seedlings were inoculated uniformly with spores of Nectria haematocca or other pea pathogenic fungi, more than 90% developed lesions in the region of elongation within 3 days. More mature regions of most roots as well as the tip showed no visible signs of infection. Yet, microscopic observation revealed that 'mantles,' comprised of fungal hyphae intermeshed with populations of border cells, covered the tips of most roots. After physical detachment of the mantle, the underlying tip of most roots was found to be free of infection. Mantle-covered root tips did not respond to invasion of their border cells by activation of known defense genes unless there was invasion of the tip itself, as revealed by the presence of a lesion. Concomitant with the activation of defense genes was the induction of a cell-wall degrading enzyme whose expression is a marker for renewed production of border cells. Mantle formation did not occur in response to nonpathogens. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that border cells serve as a host-specific 'decoy' that protects root meristems by inhibiting fungal infection of the root tip.

  6. Root Border Cells and Their Role in Plant Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn; Turgeon, B Gillian; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Minh Tran, Tuan; Huskey, David A; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2016-08-01

    Root border cells separate from plant root tips and disperse into the soil environment. In most species, each root tip can produce thousands of metabolically active cells daily, with specialized patterns of gene expression. Their function has been an enduring mystery. Recent studies suggest that border cells operate in a manner similar to mammalian neutrophils: Both cell types export a complex of extracellular DNA (exDNA) and antimicrobial proteins that neutralize threats by trapping pathogens and thereby preventing invasion of host tissues. Extracellular DNases (exDNases) of pathogens promote virulence and systemic spread of the microbes. In plants, adding DNase I to root tips eliminates border cell extracellular traps and abolishes root tip resistance to infection. Mutation of genes encoding exDNase activity in plant-pathogenic bacteria (Ralstonia solanacearum) and fungi (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) results in reduced virulence. The study of exDNase activities in plant pathogens may yield new targets for disease control.

  7. The role of root border cells in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, M C; Gunawardena, U; Miyasaka, S; Zhao, X

    2000-03-01

    The survival of a plant depends upon the capacity of root tips to sense and move towards water and other nutrients in the soil. Perhaps because of the root tip's vital role in plant health, it is ensheathed by large populations of detached somatic cells - root 'border' cells - which have the ability to engineer the chemical and physical properties of the external environment. Of particular significance, is the production by border cells of specific chemicals that can dramatically alter the behavior of populations of soilborne microflora. Molecular approaches are being used to identify and manipulate the expression of plant genes that control the production and the specialized properties of border cells in transgenic plants. Such plants can be used to test the hypothesis that these unusual cells act as a phalanx of biological 'goalies', which neutralize dangers to newly generated root tissue as the root tip makes its way through soil.

  8. Protein and peroxidase modulations in sunflower seedlings (Helianthus annuus L.) treated with a toxic amount of aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouili, Hager; Bouazizi, Houda; El Ferjani, Ezzedine

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of aluminium treatment on peroxidases activities and protein content in both soluble and cell-wall-bound fractions of sunflower leaves, stems and roots. Fourteen-day-old seedlings, grown in a nutrient solution, were exposed to a toxic amount of aluminium (500 μM AlNO(3)) for 72 h. Under stress conditions, biomass production, root length and leaf expansion were significantly reduced. Also, our results showed modulations on soluble and ionically cell-wall-bound peroxidases activities. In soluble fraction, peroxidases activities were enhanced in all investigated organs. This stimulation was also observed in ionically cell-wall-bound fraction in leaves and stems. Roots showed a differential behaviour: peroxidase activity was severely reduced. Lignifying peroxidases activities assayed using coniferyl alcohol and H(2)O(2) as substrates were also modulated. Significant stimulation was shown on soluble fraction in leaves, stems and roots. In ionically cell-wall-bound fraction lignifying peroxidases were enhanced only in stems but severely inhibited in roots. Also, aluminium toxicity caused significant increase on cell wall protein content in sunflower roots.

  9. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Dupont

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventional scatter plot. Each bin with from l to d observations contains a light sunflower. Other bins contain a dark sunflower. In a light sunflower each petal represents one observation. In a dark sunflower, each petal represents k observations. (A dark sunflower with p petals represents between /2-pk k and /2+pk k observations. The user can control the sizes and colors of the sunflowers. By selecting appropriate colors and sizes for the light and dark sunflowers, plots can be obtained that give both the overall sense of the data density distribution as well as the number of data points in any given region. The use of this graphic is illustrated with data from the Framingham Heart Study. A documented Stata program, called sunflower, is available to draw these graphs. It can be downloaded from the Statistical Software Components archive at http://ideas.repec.org/c/boc/bocode/s430201.html . (Journal of Statistical Software 2003; 8 (3: 1-5. Posted at http://www.jstatsoft.org/index.php?vol=8 .

  10. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Crop-weed competition between sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and Convolvulus arvensis L. in substitutive experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazinczi, G; Takács, A; Horváth, J

    2006-01-01

    The main characteristics of a substitutive experiment is that the proportions of two species in the mixtures are varied while the overall density of the two species is maintained constant - a replacement series. In our experiments early competition between sunflower and field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) was studied in a replacement studies under glasshouse conditions. Pot experiments were set up with the following treatments: 1, sunflower 100% (6 plants pot(-1)); 2, sunflower 66.6% (4 plants pot(-1)) + C. arvensis 33.3% (2 plants pot(-1)); 3, sunflower 33.3% (2 plants pot(-1)) + C. arvensis 66.6% (4 plants pot(-1)); 4, C. arvensis 100% (6 plants pot(-1)). Sixty eight days after sowing dry weight of shoots and roots were measured and nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) content was also determined. Dry biomass production of sunflower was almost twice higher as compared to that of C. arvensis without interspecific competition. Dry weight of sunflower and C. arvensis shoots and roots for a plant continuously decreased by reducing their proportion in the mixtures. Higher biomass production of sunflower suggests, that its development is faster at the beginning of vegetation penod, therefore sunflower has better competitive ability in sunflower--C. arvensis mixtures in the early competition as compared to C. arvensis. Shoot:root ratio of plants did not change considerably in mixtures, but generally was ten times higher in sunflower plants, as compared to that of C. arvensis. Shoots generally contained macro elements at higher concentration as compared to those of roots. Total NPK content of sunflower was reduced by 53 and 82% for a pot, as its proportion decreased in the mixtures. More severe reduction in NPK content was observed in case of C. arvensis, which also proves stronger competitive ability of sunflower in the early vegetation.

  12. Silky Sunflowers & Swirly Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In this article, second-graders create a sunflower drawing using pastel techniques that produce similar effects to Vincent van Gogh's brushstrokes. They also learn how layering colors and using white to lighten colors creates depth in their flowers.

  13. Immunoelectron microscopic localization of calmodulin in corn root cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJIAXU; JIEWENLIU; DAYESUN

    1993-01-01

    Methods for the localization of plant calmodulin by immuno-gold and immuno-peroxidase electron microscopy have been developed. In both corn root-cap cells and meristematic cells, calmodulin was found to be localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria as well as in the cell wall, In the meristematic cells, calmodulin was distinctly localized on the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic face of rough endoplasmic rcticulum and polyribosomes. Characteristically, calmodulin was present in the amyloplasts of root-cap cells. The widespread distribution of calmodulin may reflect its plciotropic functions in plant cellular activities.

  14. Conservation of root regeneration potential of cell aggregates from horseradish hairy roots used as artificial seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repunte, V.; Taya, M.; Tone, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Science

    1996-10-20

    The effects of water content in agar gel used as a medium and oxygen level in the gas phase on the adventitious root regeneration of cell aggregates (CA) derived from horseradish hairy roots were investigated in cultures at 25{degree}C. The number of roots emerging from CA was highly dependent on water content of the agar gel and no root regeneration was observed at a gel water content of 66% during culture time of 20 days. CA root regeneration was suppressed when the CA were kept for 20 days in an atmosphere oxygen composition of 10%, but was restored upon transfer of the CA to normal atmosphere of 21% oxygen. On the basis of these findings, an artificial seed was proposed using the CA as a cell inclusion material encapsulated in alginate gels covered with coats. From the perspective of conserving the root regeneration potential of the CA by preventing the drying of alginate gel while keeping oxygen availability to the CA, different coating materials of ethylene vinyl acetate acrylic acid terpolymer, paraffin and polyorganosiloxane were tested. Paraffin was selected as a suitable coating material because of its efficient drying tolerance and adequate permeability to oxygen. A regeneration efficiency of 90% could be obtained from the CA, stored in alginate gel covered with a paraffin coating of 0.40 mm thickness at 25{degree}C for 60 days in air, when sucrose concentration in the gel was over 240 mol m{sup -3}. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  15. LC/MS profiling of flavonoid glycoconjugates isolated from hairy roots, suspension root cell cultures and seedling roots of Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Staszków, Anna; Swarcewicz, Barbara; Banasiak, Joanna; Muth, Dorota; Jasiński, Michał; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Hairy roots and suspension cell cultures are commonly used in deciphering different problems related to the biochemistry and physiology of plant secondary metabolites. Here, we address about the issue of possible differences in the profiles of flavonoid compounds and their glycoconjugates derived from various plant materials grown in a standard culture media. We compared profiles of flavonoids isolated from seedling roots, hairy roots, and suspension root cell cultures of a model legume plant...

  16. Diffusion of an organic cation into root cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meychik, N R; Yermakov, I P; Prokoptseva, O S

    2003-07-01

    Uptake of a cationic dye (methylene blue) by isolated root cell walls, roots of whole transpiring seedlings, and excised roots was investigated using 7-day-old seedlings of cucumber, maize, and wheat. The number of ionogenic groups per 1 g dry and wet weight of the root cell walls, their swelling capacity (K(cw)), time-dependence of methylene blue (M(cw)) ion exchange capacity, and diffusion coefficients of the cation diffusion in the polymer matrix of the cell walls (D(cw)) were determined. The M(cw) value depended on pH (or carboxyl group dissociation); it changed in accordance with the number of carboxyl groups per 1 g cell wall dry weight. This parameter decreased in the order: cucumber > wheat > maize. For description of experimental kinetic curves and calculation of cation diffusion coefficients, the equation for ion diffusion into a cylinder of infinite length was used. The chosen model adequately described cation diffusion in cell walls and roots. Diffusion coefficient values for cucumber, wheat, and maize were 3.1*10(-8), 1.3*10(-8), and 8.4*10(-8) cm(2)/sec, respectively. There was a statistically significant linear dependence between K(cw) and D(cw) values, which characterize the same property of the polymer matrix, rigidity of its polymer structure or the degree of cross-linkage or permeability. This also confirms the right choice of the model selected for calculation of methylene blue diffusion coefficients, because K(cw) and D(cw) values were obtained in independent experiments. The coefficients determined for methylene blue diffusion in transpiring seedling roots (D(ts)) and excised roots (D(er)) depended on the plant species. The rate of methylene blue diffusion into the excised roots was either 1.5-fold lower (cucumber) or 3-4-times lower (maize, wheat) than in cell walls. The values of diffusion coefficients in roots of whole seedlings were comparable which those for the cell walls. On the basis of the experimental data and results of calculations

  17. Storage of sunflower seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Castro Lima

    Full Text Available The sunflower is among the top five crops in the world for the production of edible vegetable oil. The species displays rustic behavior, with an excellent edaphic and climatic adaptability index, being able to be cultivated throughout Brazil. Seed quality is the key to increasing production and productivity in the sunflower. The objective of this work was to monitor the viability of sunflower seeds with a view to their conservation when stored in different environments and packaging. The seeds were packed in paper bags, multilayered paper, black polyethylene and PET bottles; and stored for a period of twelve months in the following environments: dry cold room (10 ºC and 55% RH, the ambient conditions of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil (30-32 ºC and 75% RH, refrigerator (4 ºC and 38-43% RH and freezer (-20 ºC. Every three months, the water content of the seeds was determined and germination, accelerated ageing, speed of emergence index, and seedling dry weight were evaluated. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a scheme of split-lots, with four replications. It can be concluded that the natural environment is not suitable for the storage of sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds remain viable for 12 months when stored in a dry cold room, refrigerator or freezer, irrespective of the type of packaging used.

  18. Auxin regulates distal stem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhaojun; Friml, Jirí

    2010-06-29

    The stem cell niche in the root meristem is critical for the development of the plant root system. The plant hormone auxin acts as a versatile trigger in many developmental processes, including the regulation of root growth, but its role in the control of the stem cell activity remains largely unclear. Here we show that local auxin levels, determined by biosynthesis and intercellular transport, mediate maintenance or differentiation of distal stem cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Genetic analysis shows that auxin acts upstream of the major regulators of the stem cell activity, the homeodomain transcription factor WOX5, and the AP-2 transcription factor PLETHORA. Auxin signaling for differentiation of distal stem cells requires the transcriptional repressor IAA17/AXR3 as well as the ARF10 and ARF16 auxin response factors. ARF10 and ARF16 activities repress the WOX5 transcription and restrict it to the quiescent center, where WOX5, in turn, is needed for the activity of PLETHORA. Our investigations reveal that long-distance auxin signals act upstream of the short-range network of transcriptional factors to mediate the differentiation of distal stem cells in roots.

  19. Isolated root caps, border cells, and mucilage from host roots stimulate hyphal branching of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Gigaspora gigantea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahashi, Gerald; Douds, David D

    2004-09-01

    Unlike previous reports that have shown that water soluble and volatile compounds from roots or root exudates play an important role in precolonization events during arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus-host root interactions (Bécard & Piché 1989, Giovannetti et al. 1993), the results shown here deal with particulate and viscous fractions isolated from host roots. Root caps and a slow sedimenting particulate fraction (SSPF) were rapidly isolated and separated from Ri T-DNA transformed carrot roots (D. carota) grown in liquid culture. In addition, border cells (BC) and mucilage were isolated from aseptically grown corn seedlings (Zea mays). Root caps, SSPF (composed mainly of small root cap fragments and some BCs), BCs, and mucilage all had an associated AM fungus hyphal branching stimulator. Root caps stored for 5 d at 4 degrees C appeared to either synthesize or slowly release the branching stimulator. Also, isolated root caps from roots grown in the absence of P contained more branch stimulating activity than those isolated from roots grown in the presence of P. Although the branching stimulation activity in particulate fractions was low compared to that of the exudate, the particulate fractions can stick to the root surface at considerable distances from the root tip. This may be significant during the infection and colonization of host roots at sites far removed from the primary location of exudation.

  20. Microgravity modifies the cell cycle in the lentil root meristem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driss-Ecole, D.; Yu, F.; Legué, V.; Perbal, G.

    In order to investigate the effects of microgravity on the cell cycle, lentil seedlings were grown in space as follows: 1 - in microgravity for 29h (Fmug), 2 - on the 1g centrifuge (F1g), 3 - in microgravity for 25h and then on the 1g centrifuge for 4h (Fmug+1g), 4 - on the 1g centrifuge for 25h and then in microgravity for 4h (F1g+mug). There were no statistical differences in mean root length after 29h in the four samples. The DNA content of nuclei in the root meristem was estimated by image analysis after sectioning and staining by the Feulgen technique. Three different regions, each of 0.2mm length (a, b, c), were distinguished basal to the root cap junction (RCJ). No difference in the distribution of nuclear DNA contents was found in region c (the furthest from the RCJ) in all four growth conditions. However, the nuclear DNA distributions were different in regions a and b in microgravity and on the 1g centrifuge (there were more cycling cells in 1g than in 1mug). When roots were grown in 1g and transferred to microgravity (F1g+mug), the proportion of cycling cells was increased. In the (Fmug+1g) sample, by contrast, the cell cycle was not modified by the transfer from 1mug to 1g. Microgravity perturbed the cell cycle by lengthening the G1 phase in the lentil root meristem.

  1. MICROELEMENTS IN SUNFLOWER CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buldykova I. A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The obtained experimental data show that the incorporation of trace elements into the system of the sunflower crop has a positive impact on the mineral nutrition of plants, the number and quality of the crop. Foliar feeding of sunflower crops with micronutrients improves nutrition of plants with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, thus creating the preconditions for the formation of highly agrocenosis. The seed yield of sunflower increased by variants with application of micronutrients 1.2-3.5 t/ha or 4.4-12.9 percent. The greatest impact of treatment with boron and copper, exceeding the background option 3.1-3.5 t/ha or 11.5-12.9% respectively. The crop is least influenced by manganese and molybdenum. The examined elements positively influenced the structure of the sunflower crop. The greatest influence on the diameter of the basket, the number of seeds, weight of seeds in the basket, the weight of 1000 seeds was provided by the zinc and copper. Trace elements contributed to the improvement of quality indicators of sunflower. For husk content, the greatest positive effect was cobalt, zinc, manganese and copper, increasing the background option 10.1, 10.4, 10.5 and 10, and 6%, respectively, on the oil content of sunflower seeds had cobalt, copper and zinc. The oil content on these options amounted 55,0, with 55.1 and 55.2%, respectively, increasing this figure by 1.5 to 1.7 %. The acid number at variants with boron, manganese and zinc was the same with the background option and amounted to 1.8. The greatest influence on iodine number provided molybdenum, zinc and copper, which accounted for 170,5, 171,2 and 171,4, exceeding the background option 10.2 and 11.1

  2. Stem cells: a view from the roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Ildiko M L; Lohmann, Jan U; Holstein, Thomas W; Zhao, Zhong

    2012-06-01

    In both plants and animals, regeneration requires the activation of stem cells. This is possibly related to the origin and requirements of multicellularity. Although long diverged from a common ancestry, plant and animal models such as Arabidopsis, Drosophila and mouse share considerable similarities in stem cell regulation. This includes stem cell niche organisation, epigenetic modification of DNA and histones, and the role of small RNA machinery in differentiation and pluripotency states. Dysregulation of any of these can lead to premature ageing, patterning and specification defects, as well as cancers. Moreover, emerging basal animal and plant systems are beginning to provide important clues concerning the diversity and evolutionary history of stem cell regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotes. This review provides a comparative framework, highlighting both the commonalities and differences among groups, which should promote the intelligent design of artificial stem cell systems, and thereby fuel the field of biomaterials science. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A crop model-based approach for sunflower yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Guilherme Dal Belo Leite

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pushed by the Brazilian biodiesel policy, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. production is becoming increasingly regarded as an option to boost farmers' income, particularly under semi-arid conditions. Biodiesel related opportunities increase the demand for decision-making information at different levels, which could be met by simulation models. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the crop model OILCROP-SUN to simulate sunflower development and growth under Brazilian conditions and to explore sunflower water- and nitrogen-limited, water-limited and potential yield and yield variability over an array of sowing dates in the northern region of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. For model calibration, an experiment was conducted in which two sunflower genotypes (H358 and E122 were cultivated in a clayey soil. Growth components (leaf area index, above ground biomass, grain yield and development stages (crop phenology were measured. A database composed of 27 sunflower experiments from five Brazilian regions was used for model evaluation. The spatial yield distribution of sunflower was mapped using ordinary kriging in ArcGIS. The model simulated sunflower grain productivity satisfactorily (Root Mean Square Error ≈ 13 %. Simulated yields were relatively high (1,750 to 4,250 kg ha-1 and the sowing window was fairly wide (Oct to Feb for northwestern locations, where sunflower could be cultivated as a second crop (double cropping at the end of the rainy season. The hybrid H358 had higher yields for all simulated sowing dates, growth conditions and selected locations.

  4. Cell wall-associated malate dehydrogenase activity from maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vesna; Vuletić, Mirjana; Marković, Ksenija; Vučinić, Zeljko

    2011-10-01

    Isolated cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) roots exhibited ionically and covalently bound NAD-specific malate dehydrogenase activity. The enzyme catalyses a rapid reduction of oxaloacetate and much slower oxidation of malate. The kinetic and regulatory properties of the cell wall enzyme solubilized with 1M NaCl were different from those published for soluble, mitochondrial or plasma membrane malate dehydrogenase with respect to their ATP, Pi, and pH dependence. Isoelectric focusing of ionically-bound proteins and specific staining for malate dehydrogenase revealed characteristic isoforms present in cell wall isolate, different from those present in plasma membranes and crude homogenate. Much greater activity of cell wall-associated malate dehydrogenase was detected in the intensively growing lateral roots compared to primary root with decreased growth rates. Presence of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) in the assay medium inhibited the activity of the wall-associated malate dehydrogenase. Exposure of maize plants to excess concentrations of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) in the hydroponic solution inhibited lateral root growth, decreased malate dehydrogenase activity and changed isoform profiles. The results presented show that cell wall malate dehydrogenase is truly a wall-bound enzyme, and not an artefact of cytoplasmic contamination, involved in the developmental processes, and detoxification of heavy metals.

  5. Establishment of a Protein Reference Map for Soybean Root Hair Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root hairs are single tubular cells formed from the differentiation of epidermal cells on roots. They are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and represent the infection site on leguminous roots by rhizobia, soil bacteria that establish a nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Root hairs develop by polar cel...

  6. Dragee product based on sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajin Biljana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sunflower kernel is rich in valuable nutritive compounds so it is suitable as a raw material for production of confectionery products. In this paper we evaluated the technological characteristics of the confectionery sunflower kernel with the aim of obtaining dragee products, and determining the final product quality and shelf life. The dragee product was obtained by panning sunflower kernel with savory powder mixture of spices in a dragee pan. The used sunflower seed has an even distribution of linear size and satisfactory dehulling characteristics. The savoury dragee product was in excellent category of sensory quality and showed stable colour and good shelf life in the period of three months.

  7. RootAnalyzer: A Cross-Section Image Analysis Tool for Automated Characterization of Root Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Joshua; Laga, Hamid; Huang, Chun Yuan; Heuer, Sigrid; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of plant root anatomical features is a key factor in effective water and nutrient uptake. Existing techniques for phenotyping root anatomical traits are often based on manual or semi-automatic segmentation and annotation of microscopic images of root cross sections. In this article, we propose a fully automated tool, hereinafter referred to as RootAnalyzer, for efficiently extracting and analyzing anatomical traits from root-cross section images. Using a range of image processing techniques such as local thresholding and nearest neighbor identification, RootAnalyzer segments the plant root from the image's background, classifies and characterizes the cortex, stele, endodermis and epidermis, and subsequently produces statistics about the morphological properties of the root cells and tissues. We use RootAnalyzer to analyze 15 images of wheat plants and one maize plant image and evaluate its performance against manually-obtained ground truth data. The comparison shows that RootAnalyzer can fully characterize most root tissue regions with over 90% accuracy.

  8. RootAnalyzer: A Cross-Section Image Analysis Tool for Automated Characterization of Root Cells and Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chopin

    Full Text Available The morphology of plant root anatomical features is a key factor in effective water and nutrient uptake. Existing techniques for phenotyping root anatomical traits are often based on manual or semi-automatic segmentation and annotation of microscopic images of root cross sections. In this article, we propose a fully automated tool, hereinafter referred to as RootAnalyzer, for efficiently extracting and analyzing anatomical traits from root-cross section images. Using a range of image processing techniques such as local thresholding and nearest neighbor identification, RootAnalyzer segments the plant root from the image's background, classifies and characterizes the cortex, stele, endodermis and epidermis, and subsequently produces statistics about the morphological properties of the root cells and tissues. We use RootAnalyzer to analyze 15 images of wheat plants and one maize plant image and evaluate its performance against manually-obtained ground truth data. The comparison shows that RootAnalyzer can fully characterize most root tissue regions with over 90% accuracy.

  9. Gustav klimt's "sunflower" impact on Schiller "sunflower" Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凯新

    2016-01-01

    gustav klimt and Schiller as a master of expressionism, same to the entire world's art has a great influence. But klimt's landscape painting had a huge impact on Schiller's landscape paintings, the most typical example is Schiller's already watched the klimt's "sunflower"exhibition, to create a picture composition and theme is very similar to the sunflower Ⅱ, thus klimt for Schiller's influence.

  10. Utilization of sunflower crop wild relatives for cultivated sunflower improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is one of the few crops native to the U.S. The current USDA-ARS-NPGS crop wild relatives sunflower collection is the largest extant collection in the world, containing 2,519 accessions comprised of 53 species; 39 perennial and 14 annual. To fully utilize gene bank co...

  11. The cytochemical localization of ascorbic acid in root tip cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JENSEN, W A; KAVALJIAN, L G

    1956-01-25

    The intracellular distribution of ascorbic acid was studied in frozen-dried root tips of Allium cepa and Vicia faba by the silver nitrate procedure. The sites of the ascorbic acid as indicated by the deposited silver appear as spherical (0.2 to 0.6 micro in diameter) cytoplasmic particles. The site appears to have small amounts of lipides and to be rich in ribonucleic acid. These particles are concluded to be submicroscopic in size and associated, in the elongating cell, with the cell surface. In the meristematic cells they appear fewer in number and are distributed throughout the cytoplasm.

  12. Regions of differential cell elongation and mitosis, and root meristem morphology in different tissues of geotropically stimulated maize root apices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen-Miller, J.; McNitt, R.E.; Wojciechowski, M.

    1978-01-01

    We examined cell length, mitosis, and root meristem ''cuticle'' in different tissues of geostimulated, red light-exposed pimary roots on corn (Zea Mays, Wisconsin hybrid 64A x 22R). The examination was done at 15-minute intervals for a period of 240 minutes. Differences in cell elongation between the upper and lower sides were most prominent between 1.5 and 2.5 mm from the root meristem; the outer cortex had the greatest elongation growth, and the upper cells showed a significant increase in length compared to the lower. A differential mitosis was also found, with the lower tissue being greater. We infer that the mitotic activity is indicative of cell division, and this division occurs strictly in the first 1.5 mm of the root meristem. The combined effect of differential cell elongation and cell division results in the localization of the geotropic curvature in the 1.5- to 2.5-mm region from the root meristem. Mitosis that occurs primarily in the cortex and stele were asynchronous; the peak of cortical division preceded that of the stele. Both peaks occurred before the peak of geotropism. A densely stained layer separates the cap from the root meristem. This layer is thinner at the apex of the root meristem. The area of the thin region increased with time and peaked at 180 minutes after geostimulation, which was coincidental with the peak of the geotropic response.

  13. Schwann cell cultures from human fetal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Feng; Hui Zhu; Jiang Hao; Xinmin Wang; Shengping Wu; Li Bai; Xiangming Li; Yun Zha

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have used many methods for in vitro Schwann cells (SCs) cul-tures and purification,such as single cell suspension and cytosine arabinoside.However,it has been difficult to obtain sufficient cellular density,and the procedures have been quite tedious.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the feasibility of culturing high-density SCs using fetal human dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Cell culture and immunohistochemistry were performed at the Cen-tral Laboratory of Kunming General Hospital of Chinese PLA between March 2001 and October 2008.MATERIALS:Culture media containing 10% fetal bovine serum,as well as 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin were purchased from Gibco,USA;mouse anti-human S-100 monoclonal antibody and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase were provided by Beijing Institute of Bi-ological Products,China.METHODS:Primarily cultured SCs were dissociated from dorsal root ganglia of human aborted fe-tuses at 4-6 months pregnancy.Following removal of the dorsal root ganglion perineurium,the gan-glia were dissected into tiny pieces and digested with 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin (volume ratio 1:1),then explanted and cultured.SC purification was performed with 5 mL 10% fetal bovine serum added to the culture media,followed by differential adhesion.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:SCs morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast light microscopy.SC purity was evaluated according to percentage of S-100 immunostained cells.RESULTS:SCs were primarily cultured for 5-6 days and then subcultured for 4-5 passages.The highly enriched SC population reached > 95% purity and presented with normal morphology.CONCLUSION:A high purity of SCs was obtained with culture methods using human fetal dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.

  14. Sunflower Array Antenna with Adjustable Density Taper

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carolina Viganó; Giovanni Toso; Gerard Caille; Cyril Mangenot; Lager, Ioan E.

    2009-01-01

    A deterministic procedure to design a nonperiodic planar array radiating a rotationally symmetric pencil beam pattern with an adjustable sidelobe level is proposed. The elements positions are derived by modifying the peculiar locations of the sunflower seeds in such a way that the corresponding spatial density fits a Taylor amplitude tapering law which guarantees the pattern requirements in terms of beamwidth and sidelobe level. Different configurations, based on a Voronoi cell spatial tessel...

  15. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  16. LC/MS profiling of flavonoid glycoconjugates isolated from hairy roots, suspension root cell cultures and seedling roots of Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszków, Anna; Swarcewicz, Barbara; Banasiak, Joanna; Muth, Dorota; Jasiński, Michał; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2011-12-01

    Hairy roots and suspension cell cultures are commonly used in deciphering different problems related to the biochemistry and physiology of plant secondary metabolites. Here, we address about the issue of possible differences in the profiles of flavonoid compounds and their glycoconjugates derived from various plant materials grown in a standard culture media. We compared profiles of flavonoids isolated from seedling roots, hairy roots, and suspension root cell cultures of a model legume plant, Medicago truncatula. The analyses were conducted with plant isolates as well as the media. The LC/MS profiles of target natural products obtained from M. truncatula seedling roots, hairy roots, and suspension root cell cultures differed substantially. The most abundant compounds in seedlings roots were mono- and diglucuronides of isoflavones and/or flavones. This type of glycosylation was not observed in hairy roots or suspension root cell cultures. The only recognized glycoconjugates in the latter samples were glucose derivatives of isoflavones. Application of a high-resolution mass spectrometer helped evaluate the elemental composition of protonated molecules, such as [M + H](+). Comparison of collision-induced dissociation MS/MS spectra registered with a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer for tissue extracts and standards allowed us to estimate the aglycone structure on the basis of the pseudo-MS(3) experiment. Structures of these natural products were described according to the registered mass spectra and literature data. The analyses conducted represent an overview of flavonoids and their conjugates in different types of plant material representing the model legume, M. truncatula. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-011-0287-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  17. Characterization of mesenchymal progenitor cells in crown and root pulp from human mesiodentes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Toriumi, T; Watanabe, N; Watanabe, E; Akita, D; Mashimo, T; Akiyama, Y; Isokawa, K; Shirakawa, T; Honda, M J

    2015-01-01

    Mesiodentes are usually found in the central position of the upper or lower jaw as supernumerary teeth. Here, we obtained 10 mesiodentes and three permanent teeth (PT) and separated the dental pulp (DP) from these into crown and root portions. We then characterized and compared the isolated crown portion-derived cells (crown cells) with root portion-derived cells (root cells) using a range of in vitro assays. Crown cells and root cells were examined for cell surface marker expression, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F), cell proliferation, cell cycle characteristics and markers, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. The proportion of CD105-positive cells (CD105(+) cells) in the crown cells vs the root cells varied among the mesiodentes, but not among the PT. When there were more CD105(+) cells in the root cells than in the crown cells, the root cells showed higher CFU-F, proliferation capacity, and osteogenic differentiation capacity. In contrast, when the crown cells contained more CD105(+) cells than the root cells, the crown cells showed the higher CFU-F, proliferation capacity, and osteogenic differentiation capacity. In addition, the sorted CD105(+) cells showed higher CFU-F and proliferation capacity than the sorted CD105(-) cells. These results indicated that proportion of CD105(+) cells is an effective means of characterizing DP-derived cells in mesiodentes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nutrient and cell wall fraction digestibility of growing WAD ewe fed Mexican sunflower leaf meal (MSLM based diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Ekeocha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available After a previous 84-d performance phase on growing WAD ewe, Studies was conducted using sixteen West African dwarf (WAD ewe-lambs weighing between 17.50 and 17.88kg on a basal diet of Panicum maximum were allotted into 4 treatment groups A, B, C and D of 4 replicates each. The MSL replaced Wheat bran (WB gravimetrically at 0, 15, 30 and 45%. Treatment A served as control. The experiment lasted for one week. Digestibility was determined using a 6-d total fecal collection. Ewes were given ad libitum access to feed and water. Parameters measured were voluntary dry matter intake (VDMI, which comprised concentrate dry matter intake (CDMI and grass dry matter intake (GDMI, Apparent Digestibility Coefficients of DM, CP, NDF, ADF, ADL, Organic matter (OM and Energy . Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANOVA .The VDMI (g/d varied from 392.30 - 695.00, CDMI (g/d varied from 181.80 - 536.80 and GDMI (g/d varied from 130.65 - 215.95 for ewe-lambs. Apparent Digestibility Coefficients of NDF, ADF, ADL, organic matter (OM and Energy were similar. Approximately 75.5 ±1.1% of the VDMI came from the supplement. Diets containing 15% MSLM was superior to others for CDMI (181.80 – 536.80 g/day, CP intake (17.72 – 32.40 g/day/kgW0.75, Digestible DMI (49.45 - 80.68 g/day/kgW0.75 and Digestible CPI (13.68 - 27.16 g/day/kgW0.75 while GDMI (130.65 – 215.95 g/day for diets containing 30% and 45% MSLM were significant (p Inclusion of up to 45% Mexican Sunflower Leaf in the diets of growing ewe to replace Wheat bran was adequate.

  19. Incorporation of sunflower oil or linseed oil in equine compound feedstuff: 1 Effects on haematology and on fatty acids profiles in the red blood cells membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patoux, S; Istasse, L

    2016-10-01

    Eight trained horses (6 mares - 2 geldings, 6 Selle Français, 2 Trotteur Français, 12 ± 5.8 years old, 538 ± 72.5 kg) were offered three diets to potentially affect haematology and the fatty acids (FA) profiles in red blood cells (RBC) membranes. The control diet was composed of 50% hay and 50% concentrate containing mainly rolled barley (48%) and whole spelt (48%). In the case of sunflower oil diet, sunflower oil (62.0% of α-linoleic acid, LA) was incorporated at a rate of 8% and substituted by an equal proportion of barley. In the linseed oil diet, first cold-pressed linseed oil (56.0% of α-linolenic acid, ALA) was utilised at a similar incorporation rate of 8%. The experimental design consisted of three 3 × 3 latin squares with one being incomplete. Each period lasted 8 weeks. On average, the total feed intake (straw excluded) was 6.2 kg/day and the oil intake 0.278 kg/day. The oils significantly increased the concentrations of RBC, haemoglobin and haematocrit. The oils had no significant impact on the haematology profiles except that platelets tended to decrease in both oil-based diets. The most abundant FA in the RBC membranes of the control diet samples were in the decreasing order LA, C18:1n9-7, C18:0, C16:0 and the arachidonic acid (ARA) respectively. The sunflower oil supplementation slightly increased the amount of LA (36.23 vs. 34.72 mg/dl, p = 0.55) and C22:4n-6 (0.21 vs. 0.09 mg/dl, p = 0.22), while the decrease was observed in case of other FA (C16:1n-7, 1.08 vs. 1.42 mg/dl, p = 0.03), C20:3n-6 (0.22 vs. 0.31 mg/dl, p = 0.02), and ARA (1.17 vs. 1.63 mg/dl, p = 0.08). Linseed oil induced similar effects in the n-6 series FA profiles. In the context of practical applications, our results show that linseed oil incorporation in the diet could improve the haematology and the n-3 FA profiles potentially leading to an increased performance. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, William D; W. Dale Plummer Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventio...

  1. Sulfur nutrient availability regulates root elongation by affecting root indole-3-acetic acid levels and the stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Wu, Yu; Gao, Lei; Ma, Jun; Li, Chuan-You; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential macronutrient for plants with numerous biological functions. However, the influence of sulfur nutrient availability on the regulation of root development remains largely unknown. Here, we report the response of Arabidopsis thaliana L. root development and growth to different levels of sulfate, demonstrating that low sulfate levels promote the primary root elongation. By using various reporter lines, we examined in vivo IAA level and distribution, cell division, and root meristem in response to different sulfate levels. Meanwhile the dynamic changes of in vivo cysteine, glutathione, and IAA levels were measured. Root cysteine, glutathione, and IAA levels are positively correlated with external sulfate levels in the physiological range, which eventually affect root system architecture. Low sulfate levels also downregulate the genes involved in auxin biosynthesis and transport, and elevate the accumulation of PLT1 and PLT2. This study suggests that sulfate level affects the primary root elongation by regulating the endogenous auxin level and root stem cell niche maintenance. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Gibberellins accumulate in the elongating endodermal cells of Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Eilon; Weinstain, Roy; Zhang, Yi; Castillejo, Cristina; Kaiserli, Eirini; Chory, Joanne; Tsien, Roger Y; Estelle, Mark

    2013-03-19

    Plant hormones are small-molecule signaling compounds that are collectively involved in all aspects of plant growth and development. Unlike animals, plants actively regulate the spatial distribution of several of their hormones. For example, auxin transport results in the formation of auxin maxima that have a key role in developmental patterning. However, the spatial distribution of the other plant hormones, including gibberellic acid (GA), is largely unknown. To address this, we generated two bioactive fluorescent GA compounds and studied their distribution in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. The labeled GAs specifically accumulated in the endodermal cells of the root elongation zone. Pharmacological studies, along with examination of mutants affected in endodermal specification, indicate that GA accumulation is an active and highly regulated process. Our results strongly suggest the presence of an active GA transport mechanism that would represent an additional level of GA regulation.

  3. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  4. Local positive feedback regulation determines cell shape in root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Seiji; Gapper, Catherine; Kaya, Hidetaka; Bell, Elizabeth; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Dolan, Liam

    2008-02-29

    The specification and maintenance of growth sites are tightly regulated during cell morphogenesis in all organisms. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE 2 reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (RHD2 NADPH) oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulate a Ca2+ influx into the cytoplasm that is required for root hair growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that Ca2+, in turn, activated the RHD2 NADPH oxidase to produce ROS at the growing point in the root hair. Together, these components could establish a means of positive feedback regulation that maintains an active growth site in expanding root hair cells. Because the location and stability of growth sites predict the ultimate form of a plant cell, our findings demonstrate how a positive feedback mechanism involving RHD2, ROS, and Ca2+ can determine cell shape.

  5. Evaluation of germination capacity and selected biometric parameters (length and dry weight of roots and coleoptile of sunflower seeds (Helianthus annuus after application of preparations containing effective microorganisms (EM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz SEKUTOWSKI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed germination and early growth microbiotest PhytotoxkitTM was used in the experiment, which consisted of 3 independent laboratory experimental series with one month intervals each and 3 replications. The aim of this study was to evaluate germination dynamics and capacity as well as selected biometric parameters after seed treatment with two preparations containing effective microorganisms: EM Farma (EMF and EM Farma Plus (EMFP. Sunflower seeds (H. annuus were chosen as the experimental material. Seeds soaked in distilled water were control objects (K in these experiment. Apart from control (K, reference material was prepared in the form of two biostimulants: Kelpak SL (KSL and gibberellic acid (GA3. The effect of the two biopreparations EM Farma (EMF and EM Farma Plus (EMFP was beneficial related to germination capacity and biometric parameters of sunflower (H. annuus.

  6. Differential Expression of Proteins and mRNAs from Border Cells and Root Tips of Pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, L. A.; Woo, H. H.; Nicoll, S. M.; Hawes, M. C.

    1995-10-01

    Many plants release large numbers of metabolically active root border cells into the rhizosphere. We have proposed that border cells, cells produced by the root cap meristem that separate from the rest of the root upon reaching the periphery of the cap, are a singularly differentiated part of the root system that modulates the environment of the plant root by producing specific substances to be released into the rhizosphere. Proteins synthesized in border cells exhibit profiles that are very distinct from those of the root tip (root cap, root meristem, and adjacent cells). In vivo-labeling experiments demonstrate that 13% of the proteins that are abundant in preparations from border cells are undetectable in root tip preparations. Twenty-five percent of the proteins synthesized by border cells in a 1-h period are rapidly excreted into the incubation medium. Quantitative variation in levels of specific marker proteins, including glutamine synthetase, heat-shock protein 70, and isoflavone reductase, also occurs between border cells and cells in the root tip. mRNA differential-display assays demonstrate that these large qualitative and quantitative differences in protein expression are correlated with similarly distinct patterns of gene expression. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a major switch in gene expression accompanies differentiation into root border cells, as expected for cells with specialized functions in plant development.

  7. Multimodal nonlinear imaging of arabidopsis thaliana root cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bumjoon; Lee, Sung-Ho; Woo, Sooah; Park, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Myeong Min; Park, Seung-Han

    2017-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has enabled the possibility to explore inside the living organisms. It utilizes ultrashort laser pulse with long wavelength (greater than 800nm). Ultrashort pulse produces high peak power to induce nonlinear optical phenomenon such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and harmonic generations in the medium while maintaining relatively low average energy pre area. In plant developmental biology, confocal microscopy is widely used in plant cell imaging after the development of biological fluorescence labels in mid-1990s. However, fluorescence labeling itself affects the sample and the sample deviates from intact condition especially when labelling the entire cell. In this work, we report the dynamic images of Arabidopsis thaliana root cells. This demonstrates the multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy is an effective tool for long-term plant cell imaging.

  8. Identification, functional characterization and developmental regulation of sesquiterpene synthases from sunflower capitate glandular trichomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ro Dae-Kyun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesquiterpene lactones are characteristic metabolites of Asteraceae (or Compositae which often display potent bioactivities and are sequestered in specialized organs such as laticifers, resin ducts, and trichomes. For characterization of sunflower sesquiterpene synthases we employed a simple method to isolate pure trichomes from anther appendages which facilitated the identification of these genes and investigation of their enzymatic functions and expression patterns during trichome development. Results Glandular trichomes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. were isolated, and their RNA was extracted to investigate the initial steps of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments led to the identification of three sesquiterpene synthases. By combination of in vitro and in vivo characterization of sesquiterpene synthase gene products in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, two enzymes were identified as germacrene A synthases, the key enzymes of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Due to the very low in vitro activity, the third enzyme was expressed in vivo in yeast as a thioredoxin-fusion protein for functional characterization. In in vivo assays, it was identified as a multiproduct enzyme with the volatile sesquiterpene hydrocarbon δ-cadinene as one of the two main products with α-muuorlene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene and α-copaene as minor products. The second main compound remained unidentified. For expression studies, glandular trichomes from the anther appendages of sunflower florets were isolated in particular developmental stages from the pre- to the post-secretory phase. All three sesquiterpene synthases were solely upregulated during the biosynthetically active stages of the trichomes. Expression in different aerial plant parts coincided with occurrence and maturity of trichomes. Young roots with root hairs showed expression of the sesquiterpene synthase genes

  9. Spatial coordination between stem cell activity and cell differentiation in the root meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubayidin, Laila; Di Mambro, Riccardo; Sozzani, Rosangela; Pacifici, Elena; Salvi, Elena; Terpstra, Inez; Bao, Dongping; van Dijken, Anja; Dello Ioio, Raffaele; Perilli, Serena; Ljung, Karin; Benfey, Philip N; Heidstra, Renze; Costantino, Paolo; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2013-08-26

    A critical issue in development is the coordination of the activity of stem cell niches with differentiation of their progeny to ensure coherent organ growth. In the plant root, these processes take place at opposite ends of the meristem and must be coordinated with each other at a distance. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, the gene SCR presides over this spatial coordination. In the organizing center of the root stem cell niche, SCR directly represses the expression of the cytokinin-response transcription factor ARR1, which promotes cell differentiation, controlling auxin production via the ASB1 gene and sustaining stem cell activity. This allows SCR to regulate, via auxin, the level of ARR1 expression in the transition zone where the stem cell progeny leaves the meristem, thus controlling the rate of differentiation. In this way, SCR simultaneously controls stem cell division and differentiation, ensuring coherent root growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative analysis for the production of fatty acid alkyl esterase using whole cell biocatalyst and purified enzyme from Rhizopus oryzae on waste cooking oil (sunflower oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Bharathiraja; Sudalaiyadum Perumal, Ayyappasamy; Jayaraman, Jayamuthunagai; Mani, Jayakumar; Ramanujam, Praveenkumar

    2012-08-01

    The petroleum fuel is nearing the line of extinction. Recent research and technology have provided promising outcomes to rely on biodiesel as the alternative and conventional source of fuel. The use of renewable source - vegetable oil constitutes the main stream of research. In this preliminary study, Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) was used as the substrate for biodiesel production. Lipase enzyme producing fungi Rhizopus oryzae 262 and commercially available pure lipase enzyme were used for comparative study in the production of Fatty Acid Alkyl Esters (FAAE). The whole cell (RO 262) and pure lipase enzyme (PE) were immobilized using calcium alginate beads. Calcium alginate was prepared by optimizing with different molar ratios of calcium chloride and different per cent sodium alginate. Entrapment immobilization was done for whole cell biocatalyst (WCB). PE was also immobilized by entrapment for the transesterification reaction. Seven different solvents - methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, iso-propanol, iso-butanol and iso-amyl alcohol were used as the acyl acceptors. The reaction parameters like temperature (30°C), molar ratio (1:3 - oil:solvent), reaction time (24 h), and amount of enzyme (10% mass ratio to oil) were also optimized for methanol alone. The same parameters were adopted for the other acyl acceptors too. Among the different acyl acceptors - methanol, whose reaction parameters were optimized showed maximum conversion of triglycerides to FAAE-94% with PE and 84% with WCB. On the whole, PE showed better catalytic converting ability with all the acyl acceptor compared to WCB. Gas chromatography analysis (GC) was done to determine the fatty acid composition of WCO (sunflower oil) and FAAE production with different acyl acceptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Developmental Characteristics and Cinnamic Acid Resistance of Root Border Cells in Cucumber and Figleaf Gourd Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Yong-xu; ZHANG Yong-ping; ZHANG Hong-xin; TIAN Yong-qiang; GAO Li-hong

    2013-01-01

    Root border cells (RBCs) originate from the root tip epidermis and surround the root apices. In this study, we evaluated the developmental characteristics and the roles of RBCs in protection of root apices of cucumber and ifgleaf gourd seedlings from CA toxicity. The formation of RBCs and the emergence of the root tip occurred almost simultaneously in root apices of cucumber and ifgleaf gourd seedlings. CA ranging from 0 to 0.25 mol L-1 inhibited root elongation and decreased root cell viability in the root tip, moreover the inhibitory effects of CA were more signiifcant in the CA-sensitive cucumber than in the CA-tolerant ifgleaf gourd. Removal of RBCs from root tips led to more severe CA induced inhibition of root elongation and decline in root cell viability. Increasing CA levels and treatment time decreased the relative viability of attached and detached RBCs. CA also induced a thicker mucilage layer surrounding attached RBCs of both species. Additionally, a signiifcantly higher relative cell viability of attached RBCs and thicker mucilage layers were observed in ifgleaf gourd. These results suggest that RBCs play an important role in protecting root tips from CA toxicity.

  12. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  13. Preventing Rancidity in sunflower Oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    used in turn to extract the polar flavonoids, while chilled acetone and petroleum ether ... sunflower oil was measured using changes in peroxide values and the UV absorbances (Conjugated diene) .... metal ions and metalloprotein catalysts.

  14. Allelopathic potential of Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L.) on the early growth of maize (Zea mays L.) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Zvonko Pacanoski; Vesna Velkoska; tefan; Tom Vere

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and glasshouse experiments were carried out to investigate the allelopathic potential of different plant parts of D. stramonium on maize and sunflower on early growth stages. The aqueous leachates of D. stramonium roots and shoot did not produc a significant effect on germination and shoot length of maize, but root length of maize was significantly reduced at the highest (1/1) D. stramonium roots leachate compared to control. From the other side, germination of sunflower was signif...

  15. Sunflower Seed and Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbipour, Alireza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mansouri, Mona

    2015-09-01

    Regardless of the overall association between diet and acne which cannot be easily ignored, there might be an association between specific nutrients and acne development or improvement. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake of sunflower seeds on acne severity and the pattern of acne lesions. In a randomized controlled trial, 50 patients aged 15 - 30 years old with acne vulgaris were enrolled through consecutive convenient sampling, in a dermatology clinic in Ardabil, Iran. They were randomly allocated into two trial arms. Those in the control group were asked to stop eating sunflower seeds if they did before. In the intervention group, they consumed 25 g sunflower-containing food daily for seven days. The primary outcome of interest was 10% increase/decrease in the baseline acne severity index (ASI), sustained to the end of the follow-up period on day 14. The mean ASI did not change significantly through the study period in the control group, but it increased in the sunflower group from 62 at the baseline to 86.8 after two weeks (P acne grading score (GAGS) did not significantly change in any of the groups and the difference in the change of GAGS was not significant between the groups (2.4 in the sunflower group versus 1.6 in the control group). Twenty two subjects (88%) in the sunflower group versus 9 (36%) in the control group had at least 10% increment in ASI throughout the follow-up period (P acne vulgaris; however, further evidence is needed to ban sunflower seed intake in patients with acne. Considering the observed potential negative effect in this trial, future randomized clinical trials may base their design on randomly assigning the exposed patients to give up use of sunflower seed intake.

  16. Root border cells and secretions as critical elements in plant host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hawes, Martha

    2013-08-01

    Border cells and border-like cells are released from the root tip as individual cells and small aggregates, or as a group of attached cells. These are viable components of the root system that play a key role in controlling root interaction with living microbes of the rhizosphere. As their separation from root tip proceeds, the cells synthesize and secrete a hydrated mucilage that contains polysaccharides, secondary metabolites, antimicrobial proteins and extracellular DNA (exDNA). This exDNA-based matrix seems to function in root defense in a way similar to that of recently characterized neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in mammalian cells. This review discusses the role of the cells and secreted compounds in the protection of root tip against microbial infections.

  17. Control of root cap maturation and cell detachment by BEARSKIN transcription factors in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Masako; Higashio, Shin-Ya; Isomoto, Atsushi; Kim, Jong-Myong; Seki, Motoaki; Miyashima, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Keiji

    2016-11-01

    The root cap supports root growth by protecting the root meristem, sensing gravity and interacting with the rhizosphere through metabolite secretion and cell dispersal. Sustained root cap functions therefore rely on balanced proliferation of proximal stem cells and regulated detachment of distal mature cells. Although the gene regulatory network that governs stem cell activity in the root cap has been extensively studied in Arabidopsis, the mechanisms by which root cap cells mature and detach from the root tip are poorly understood. We performed a detailed expression analysis of three regulators of root cap differentiation, SOMBRERO, BEARSKIN1 and BEARSKIN2, and identified their downstream genes. Our results indicate that expression of BEARSKIN1 and BEARSKIN2 is associated with cell positioning on the root surface. We identified a glycosyl hydrolase 28 (GH28) family polygalacturonase (PG) gene as a direct target of BEARSKIN1. Overexpression and loss-of-function analyses demonstrated that the protein encoded by this PG gene facilitates cell detachment. We thus revealed a molecular link between the key regulators of root cap differentiation and the cellular events underlying root cap-specific functions. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was roots, indicating that plasmodesmata may be conduits for nucleotide (ATP and ADP) exchange between cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  19. [Aluminum induces chromosome aberrations in wheat root meristem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, N V; Synzynys, B I; Koz'min, G V

    2001-12-01

    The yield and pattern of chromosome structure aberrations in wheat seedlings treated with aluminum nitrate and aluminum sulfate at various concentrations have been determined by the anaphase method. Aluminum has a genotoxic effect causing genome, chromatid, and chromosome aberrations in apical root meristem cells. The relationship between the total yield of structural mutations and the aluminum concentration follows a bell-shaped curve. The mutagenic activity of aluminum nitrate peaks at 10(-3) mg/ml, which is twice as high as the permissible concentration limit (PCL) of aluminum in potable water. The maximum of the mutagenic activity of aluminum sulfate is observed at 5 x 10(-4) mg/ml, i.e., one PCL. Tap water boiled for 2 h in an aluminum vessel has virtually no genotoxic effect on wheat cells.

  20. Growth, Cadmium and Zinc Accumulation of Ornamental Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in Contaminated Soil with Different Amendments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Xiu-Zhen; ZHOU Dong-Mei; LI Dan-Dan; JIANG Ping

    2012-01-01

    Use of ornamental plants for phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soil is a new option.A pot experiment was carried out to assess the effect of application of amendments,i.e.,swine manure,salicylic acid (SA) and potassium chloride (KCl),on the growth,uptake and translocation of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) of ornamental sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) grown on a contaminated soil.The three amendments increased sunflower height,flower diameter,and biomass.Manure significantly decreased Cd and Zn concentrations in sunflower,and thus decreased the bioaccumulation coefficient (BCF) of Cd and Zn.However,using of KCI markedly increased Cd concentrations in sunflower and the BCF of Cd.Additionally,both swine manure and KCl application increased Cd and Zn translocation from root to aboveground part.Swine manure and salicylic acid reduced the Cd/Zn ratios in flower of sunflower,while KCl significantly increased the Cd/Zn ratios.Correlation analysis demonstrated that the Cd/Zn ratio in the root of sunflower was affected by K/Na ratio in root and soil available potassium (K) concentration.Ornamental sunflower could be grown as an alternative plant in the Cd- and Zn-contaminated soil with KCl application to get the balance between environmental and economic interests.

  1. Nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd accumulation in Panax notoginseng roots by affecting root cell wall properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Qi; Wu, Wenwei; Yu, Wenqian; Zhang, Jiarong; Xu, Jin; Rengel, Zed; Chen, Limei; Cui, Xiuming; Chen, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen is a traditional medicinal herb in China. However, the high capacity of its roots to accumulate cadmium (Cd) poses a potential risk to human health. Although there is some evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating Cd toxicity, the origin of Cd-induced NO and its function in plant responses to Cd remain unknown. In this study, we examined NO synthesis and its role in Cd accumulation in P. notoginseng roots. Cd-induced NO production was significantly decreased by application of the nitrate reductase inhibitor tungstate but not the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (N(G)-methyl-l-arginine acetate), indicating that nitrate reductase is the major contributor to Cd-induced NO production in P. notoginseng roots. Under conditions of Cd stress, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) increased Cd accumulation in root cell walls but decreased Cd translocation to the shoot. In contrast, the NO scavenger cPTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and tungstate both significantly decreased NO-increased Cd retention in root cell walls. The amounts of hemicellulose 1 and pectin, together with pectin methylesterase activity, were increased with the addition of SNP but were decreased by cPTIO and tungstate. Furthermore, increases or decreases in hemicellulose 1 and pectin contents as well as pectin methylesterase activity fit well with the increased or decreased retention of Cd in the cell walls of P. notoginseng roots. The results suggest that nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd retention in P. notoginseng roots by modulating the properties of the cell wall.

  2. Functional tooth restoration by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell-based bio-root regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2013-06-15

    Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model.

  3. The evolutionary context of root epidermis cell patterning in grasses (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Marek; Melzer, Michael; Szarejko, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    In the last century, the mechanism for establishing the root epidermal pattern in grasses was proposed as a differentiating trait that can be used in taxonomic studies and as a useful tool to indicate the relationships between genera. However, knowledge about root hair differentiation in monocots is still scarce. During the last few years, this process has been studied intensively, mainly based on genetics and histological studies. A histological analysis of the root epidermis pattern composed from root hairs (trichoblasts) and non-root hair cells (atrichoblasts), as well as observations of the mechanism of the establishment of this pattern allowed 2 different methods of epidermal cell specialization in monocots to be precisely described. Additionally, a recently published paper describing root hair development in barley shed new light on the evolutionary context of the mechanism of root epidermis cell specialization, which is discussed in the presented work.

  4. The evolutionary context of root epidermis cell patterning in grasses (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Marek; Melzer, Michael; Szarejko, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    In the last century, the mechanism for establishing the root epidermal pattern in grasses was proposed as a differentiating trait that can be used in taxonomic studies and as a useful tool to indicate the relationships between genera. However, knowledge about root hair differentiation in monocots is still scarce. During the last few years, this process has been studied intensively, mainly based on genetics and histological studies. A histological analysis of the root epidermis pattern composed from root hairs (trichoblasts) and non-root hair cells (atrichoblasts), as well as observations of the mechanism of the establishment of this pattern allowed 2 different methods of epidermal cell specialization in monocots to be precisely described. Additionally, a recently published paper describing root hair development in barley shed new light on the evolutionary context of the mechanism of root epidermis cell specialization, which is discussed in the presented work. PMID:24521825

  5. THE BIOLOGICAL CYCLE OF SUNFLOWER BROOMRAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUCA Maria

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orobanchaceae is a dicot family, which consists of annual and perennial plants distributing from tropical to subarctic regions, predominately in temperate regions. Broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr. = Orobanche cernua Loefl. is a parasitic angiosperm that has been causing a great deal of damage to sunflower production in many countries, including Republic of Moldova. This parasitic angiosperm depends entirely on the host for its supply of water and nutrients. A thorough understanding of its biology, including detailed knowledge of the specific mechanisms of parasitism, is needed in order to develop novel control methods. Some main developmental steps are described for the root parasites: seed conditioning and germination, haustorium formation, penetration into host tissues, maturation of the parasite plant, and seed production. All these stages were studied in artificial and natural conditions.

  6. Compendium of sunflower disease and insect pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Compendium of Sunflower Diseases and Pests is a new addition to the popular APS Press series of plant disease compendia. This will be the most comprehensive guide to sunflower diseases and pests in the world. The introduction contains brief histories of sunflower use and production, botany of th...

  7. Root responses to soil physical conditions; growth dynamics from field to cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Bransby, M Fraser; Hans, Joachim; McKenna, Stephen J; Roberts, Tim J; Valentine, Tracy A

    2006-01-01

    Root growth in the field is often slowed by a combination of soil physical stresses, including mechanical impedance, water stress, and oxygen deficiency. The stresses operating may vary continually, depending on the location of the root in the soil profile, the prevailing soil water conditions, and the degree to which the soil has been compacted. The dynamics of root growth responses are considered in this paper, together with the cellular responses that underlie them. Certain root responses facilitate elongation in hard soil, for example, increased sloughing of border cells and exudation from the root cap decreases friction; and thickening of the root relieves stress in front of the root apex and decreases buckling. Whole root systems may also grow preferentially in loose versus dense soil, but this response depends on genotype and the spatial arrangement of loose and compact soil with respect to the main root axes. Decreased root elongation is often accompanied by a decrease in both cell flux and axial cell extension, and recent computer-based models are increasing our understanding of these processes. In the case of mechanical impedance, large changes in cell shape occur, giving rise to shorter fatter cells. There is still uncertainty about many aspects of this response, including the changes in cell walls that control axial versus radial extension, and the degree to which the epidermis, cortex, and stele control root elongation. Optical flow techniques enable tracking of root surfaces with time to yield estimates of two-dimensional velocity fields. It is demonstrated that these techniques can be applied successfully to time-lapse sequences of confocal microscope images of living roots, in order to determine velocity fields and strain rates of groups of cells. In combination with new molecular approaches this provides a promising way of investigating and modelling the mechanisms controlling growth perturbations in response to environmental stresses.

  8. Improvement of sunflower for consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijanović Dijana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing sunflower (Heliianthus annuus L for consumption is becoming more and more attractive in the whole world and in our country, as well. The consumption of this product has been considerably increased because it is being used more and more in various forms: sunflower seed in a hull, hulled kernels fried or non-fried, salted or non-salted with addition of various spices. The sunflower kernel is used for preparing over 100 different food products: special types of bread, cakes, ice-cream, chocolate. In accordance with the trade demands, the aims of sunflower seeds for consumption improvement are: high productivity, greater content of proteins, lesser content of oil, oncreased mass of 1000 seeds, lesser portion of the hull easy nibbling, as well as tolerance to dominant diseases in the growing region. In the Agricultural and Technological Research Center in Zajecar, 4 genotypes of protein sunflower (two cultivars and two hybrids have been created so far. This study shows the results achieved in increasing the content of protein, the mass of 1000 seeds, decreasing the content of oil and hull of the new 90 hybrid combination. The hybrid combinations were obtained by crossing of the CMS and restorer lines.

  9. Nitric oxide accumulation and protein tyrosine nitration as a rapid and long distance signalling response to salt stress in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Anisha; Yadav, Sunita; Baluška, František; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2015-08-18

    Sensing of salt stress by sunflower seedlings accompanies temporal and spatial modulation of intracellular nitric oxide (NO) accumulation and protein tyrosine nitration as markers of nitrosative stress. Employing a novel NO-specific probe for NO localization (a copper derivative of 4-methoxy-2-(1H-naphtho(2,3-d)imidazol-2-yl)phenol; MNIP-Cu) synthesized in author's laboratory, immunological analysis of tyrosine nitrated proteins by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and Western blot analysis, these rapid signalling events have been investigated. MNIP-Cu reveals the distribution of NO in whole seedlings. Preferential and enhanced NO localization around oil bodies (OBs) in cotyledons within 48 h of salt-stressed seedlings exhibits rapid transport of nitrosative stress signal from roots to the cotyledons. Immunological analysis reveals enhanced gradient of tyrosine nitrated proteins in salt-stressed roots from tip to the differentiating zone and from columella to the deep-seated cells. Western blot analysis shows that at least eight major cytosolic proteins exhibit enhanced tyrosine nitration in seedling roots in response to salt stress. Present observations provide strong evidence for rapid NO accumulation in salt stressed sunflower seedling roots and cotyledons and its impact on enhanced tyrosine nitration of cytosolic and OB proteins, as a mechanism to provide longevity to OBs for seedling survival under the salt stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-instrumental Analysis of Tissues of Sunflower Plants Treated with Silver(I) Ions – Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizkova, Sona; Ryant, Pavel; Krystofova, Olga; Adam, Vojtech; Galiova, Michaela; Beklova, Miroslava; Babula, Petr; Kaiser, Jozef; Novotny, Karel; Novotny, Jan; Liska, Miroslav; Malina, Radomir; Zehnalek, Josef; Hubalek, Jaromir; Havel, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate sunflower plants response on stress induced by silver(I) ions. The sunflower plants were exposed to silver(I) ions (0, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 mM) for 96 h. Primarily we aimed our attention to observation of basic physiological parameters. We found that the treated plants embodied growth depression, coloured changes and lack root hairs. Using of autofluorescence of anatomical structures, such as lignified cell walls, it was possible to determine the changes of important shoot and root structures, mainly vascular bungles and development of secondary thickening. The differences in vascular bundles organisation, parenchymatic pith development in the root centre and the reduction of phloem part of vascular bundles were well observable. Moreover with increasing silver(I) ions concentration the vitality of rhizodermal cells declined; rhizodermal cells early necrosed and were replaced by the cells of exodermis. Further we employed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of spatial distribution of silver(I) ions in tissues of the treated plants. The Ag is accumulated mainly in near-root part of the sample. Moreover basic biochemical indicators of environmental stress were investigated. The total content of proteins expressively decreased with increasing silver(I) ions dose and the time of the treatment. As we compare the results obtained by protein analysis – the total protein contents in shoot as well as root parts – we can assume on the transport of the proteins from the roots to shoots. This phenomenon can be related with the cascade of processes connecting with photosynthesis. The second biochemical parameter, which we investigated, was urease activity. If we compared the activity in treated plants with control, we found out that presence of silver(I) ions markedly enhanced the activity of urease at all applied doses of this toxic metal. Finally we studied the effect of silver(I) ions on activity of urease in in vitro

  11. Inhibition of growth and development of root border cells in wheat by Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mu-Yuan; Ahn, Sung-Ju; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2003-03-01

    The production and development of border cells vary with genotype, and they are released in wheat at an earlier stage of root development than other species studied so far. No significant difference was observed in the maximum number of border cells between Al-tolerant (Atlas 66) and Al-sensitive (Scout 66) cultivars in the absence of Al treatment. Al seriously inhibited the production and release of border cells, resulting in clumping of border cells in Scout 66, but less clustering in Atlas 66. The number of border cells released from roots treated with Al is significantly less than that from roots grown without Al treatment. Al treatment induced the death of detached border cells in vitro and they were killed by a 20-h treatment with 25 micro m Al. No significant difference in survival percentage of detached border cells was observed between Atlas 66 and Scout 66, regardless of the presence or absence of Al. The removal of border cells from root tips of both Atlas 66 and Scout 66 enhanced the Al-induced inhibition of root elongation concomitant with increased Al accumulation in the root. These results suggest that border cells adhered to the root tips play a potential role in the protection of root from Al injury in wheat.

  12. Immobilization of aluminum with mucilage secreted by root cap and root border cells is related to aluminum resistance in Glycine max L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Miaozhen; Wang, Ning; Xing, Chenghua; Wang, Fangmei; Wu, Kun; Du, Xing

    2013-12-01

    The root cap and root border cells (RBCs) of most plant species produced pectinaceous mucilage, which can bind metal cations. In order to evaluate the potential role of root mucilage on aluminum (Al) resistance, two soybean cultivars differing in Al resistance were aeroponic cultured, the effects of Al on root mucilage secretion, root growth, contents of mucilage-bound Al and root tip Al, and the capability of mucilage to bind Al were investigated. Increasing Al concentration and exposure time significantly enhanced mucilage excretion from both root caps and RBCs, decreased RBCs viability and relative root elongation except roots exposed to 400 μM Al for 48 h in Al-resistant cultivar. Removal of root mucilage from root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation. Of the total Al accumulated in root, mucilage accounted 48-72 and 12-27 %, while root tip accounted 22-52 and 73-88 % in Al-resistant and Al-sensitive cultivars, respectively. A (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the Al-adsorbed mucilage showed Al tightly bound to mucilage. Higher capacity to exclude Al in Al-resistant soybean cultivar is related to the immobilization and detoxification of Al by the mucilage secreted from root cap and RBCs.

  13. A plant U-box protein, PUB4, regulates asymmetric cell division and cell proliferation in the root meristem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinoshita, A.; Hove, ten C.A.; Tabata, R.; Yamada, M.; Shimizu, N.; Ishida, T.; Yamaguchi, K.; Shigenobu, S.; Takebayashi, Y.; Luchies, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kurata, T.; Wada, T.; Seo, M.; Hasebe, M.; Blilou, I.; Fukuda, H.; Scheres, B.; Heidstra, R.; Kamiya, Y.; Sawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    The root meristem (RM) is a fundamental structure that is responsible for postembryonic root growth. The RM contains the quiescent center (QC), stem cells and frequently dividing meristematic cells, in which the timing and the frequency of cell division are tightly regulated. In Arabidopsis thaliana

  14. NUTRIENT CONTENT IN SUNFLOWERS IRRIGATED WITH OIL EXPLORATION WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADERVAN FERNANDES SOUSA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation using produced water, which is generated during crude oil and gas recovery and treated by the exploration industry, could be an option for irrigated agriculture in semiarid regions. To determine the viability of this option, the effects of this treated water on the nutritional status of plants should be assessed. For this purpose, we examined the nutritional changes in sunflowers after they were irrigated with oil - produced water and the effects of this water on plant biomass and seed production. The sunflower cultivar BRS 321 was grown for three crop cycles in areas irrigated with filtered produced water (FPW, reverse osmosis - treated produced water (OPW, or ground water (GW. At the end of each cycle, roots, shoots, and seeds were collected to examine their nutrient concentrations. Produced water irrigation affected nutrient accumulation in the sunflower plants. OPW irrigation promoted the accumulation of Ca, Na, N, P, and Mg. FPW irrigation favored the accumulation of Na in both roots and shoots, and biomass and seed production were negatively affected. The Na in the shoots of plants irrigated with FPW increased throughout the three crop cycles. Under controlled conditions, it is possible to reuse reverse osmosis - treated produced water in agriculture. However, more long - term research is needed to understand its cumulative effects on the chemical and biological properties of the soil and crop production.

  15. Iridovirus infection of cell cultures from the Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Hunter

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We here report the development and viral infection of a Diaprepes root weevil cell culture. Embryonic tissues of the root weevil were used to establish cell cultures for use in screening viral pathogens as potential biological control agents. Tissues were seeded into a prepared solution of insect medium and kept at a temperature of 24°C. The cell culture had primarily fibroblast-like morphology with some epithelial monolayers. Root weevil cells were successfully infected in vitro with a known insect virus, Invertebrate Iridescent Virus 6. Potential uses of insect cell cultures and insect viruses are discussed.

  16. Developmental characteristics and aluminum resistance of root border cells in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, MiaoZhen; Zhang, ShuNa; Xing, ChengHua; Wang, FangMei; Ning, Wang; Lei, Zhu

    2011-05-01

    The developmental characteristics of root border cells (RBCs) and their role in protection of root apices of rice seedling from Al toxicity were evaluated in two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars differing in Al tolerance. Root elongation and RBCs viability were used as indicators for Al effects. The formation of RBCs and the emergence of the root tip occurred almost simultaneously. Treatment of the root with Al inhibited root elongation and increased Al accumulation in the root tips. Physical removal of RBCs from root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation and a higher Al accumulation in the root tips. These effects were more pronounced in the Al-sensitive rice cultivar (II You 6216) than that in the Al-tolerant rice cultivar (II You 838). The relative viability of attached and detached RBCs decreased with increasing Al concentrations. Al also induced a thicker mucilage layer surrounding attached RBCs of both cultivars, and detached RBCs did not. Maintaining the abundant live RBCs encapsulated root tip and enhancing their mucilage secretion, appear to be important in alleviating Al toxicity and in allowing exclusion of Al from the rice root apex.

  17. Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-You Li; Ai-Liang Jiang; Wei Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Salt stressed rice root tips were used to investigate the changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes at the early stages of programmed cell death (PCD). The results indicated that 500 mmol/L NaCl treatment could lead to specific features of PCD in root tips, such as DNA ladder, nuclear condense and deformation, and transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling positive reaction, which were initiated at 4 h of treatment and progressed thereafter. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytoplasm was also observed, which occurred at 2 h and was earlier than the above nuclear events. In the very early phase of PCD, an immediate burst in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion production rate was accompanied by two-phase changes of superoxide dismutases and ascorbate peroxidase. A short period of increase in the activity was followed by prolonged impairment. Thus,we conclude that salt can induce PCD in rice root tip cells, and propose that in the early phase of rice root tip cell PCD, salt stress-induced oxidative burst increased the antioxidant enzyme activity, which, In turn, scavenged the ROS and abrogated PCD. Also, when the stress is prolonged, the antioxidant system is damaged and accumulated ROS induces the PCD process, which leads to cytochrome c release and nuclear change.

  18. Impact of irrigation on larval density of stem-infesting pests of cultivated sunflower in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurence D; Aiken, Robert M; Meyer, Ron F; Gebre-Amlak, Assefa

    2007-10-01

    The guild of stem-infesting insect pests of cultivated sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., within the central Plains is a concern to producers, chiefly due to losses caused by plant lodging from the sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and Dectes texanus texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). The incidence of a root boring moth, Pelochrista womonana (Kearfott) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), also has increased. Experiments were conducted in Kansas during 2000-2001 to investigate the effect of irrigation timing and intensity on densities of C. adspersus, D. texanus, and P. womonana larvae within cultivated sunflower stalks. Supplemental soil moisture provided by irrigation during the growing season increased both seed yield and oil content, and it reduced insect densities of the sunflower stem weevil and P. womonana in the sunflower stalk. Results showed that ensuring adequate moisture during the growing season can assist in reducing stem-infesting insect densities, revealing an additional advantage of crop irrigation beyond improved sunflower productivity.

  19. The actin Cytoskeleton in Root Hairs: a cell elongation device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in root hair development. It is involved in both the delivery of growth materials to the expanding tip of root hairs and the regulation of the area of tip growth. This review starts with a discussion of the techniques that are available to visualize the

  20. The actin Cytoskeleton in Root Hairs: a cell elongation device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in root hair development. It is involved in both the delivery of growth materials to the expanding tip of root hairs and the regulation of the area of tip growth. This review starts with a discussion of the techniques that are available to visualize the

  1. Interactions between neuronal and non-neuronal cells in adult rat isolated dorsal root ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG K Y; WONG Y H; WISE H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The glial cells of the central nervous system are involved in tripartite signaling, therefore we have been investigating the relationship between sensory neurons and non-neuronal cells in isolated preparations of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Methods The mixed cell cultures of dissociated DRG cells were separated to yield enriched fractions of IB4-positive cells (small diameter, non-peptidergic cells), IB4-negative cells (small diameter, peptidergic cells, and large diameter cells), and non-neuronal cells (principally satellite glial cells, Schwarm cells and fibroblasts). Adenylyl cyclase activity was assayed by measuring production of [3H]cAMP from cells preloaded with [3H]adenine. Results PGE2 and the PGI2 mimetic eicaprost stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity which was inhibited by ONO-AE3-208 (EP4 antagonist) or CAY10441 (IP antagonist) with estimated pA2 values of 8.9 and 8.2, respectively. Surprisingly, both PGE2 and cicaprost-stimulated [3H] cAMP production was greatest in the non-neuronal cell preparation. Furthermore, when the number of non-neuronal cells was kept constant and the number of neuronal cells was increased, we observed a progressive decrease in prostanoid-stimulated activity. Conclusions Sensory neurons appear to regulate prostanoid receptor-mediated cell signaling in non-neuronal cells within the DRG.

  2. From diffuse growth to planar polarity in Arabidopsis root epidermal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eBalcerowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root's surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (= planar polarity determination. In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified.

  3. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of calcium (Ca) in caps of vertically- and horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays was monitored to determine its possible role in root graviresponsiveness. A modification of the antimonate precipitation procedure was used to localize Ca in situ. In vertically-oriented roots, the presumed graviperceptive (i.e., columella) cells were characterized by minimal and symmetric staining of the plasmalemma and mitochondria. No precipitate was present in plasmodesmata or cell walls. Within 5 min after horizontal reorientation, staining was associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell. This asymmetric staining persisted throughout the onset of gravicurvature. No staining of lateral cell walls of columella cells was observed at any stage of gravicurvature, suggesting that a lateral flow of Ca through the columella tissue of horizontally-oriented roots does not occur. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like structures in their cell walls. These results are discussed relative to proposed roles of root-cap Ca in root gravicurvature.

  4. Epidermal Patterning Genes Impose Non-cell Autonomous Cell Size Determination and have Additional Roles in Root Meristem Size Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian L?fke; Kai Dünser; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of cellular growth is of vital importance for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. Growth regulation in the epidermis has importance for organ growth rates in roots and shoots, proposing epidermal cells as an interesting model for cellular growth regulation. Here we assessed whether the root epidermis is a suitable model system to address cell size determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana L., root epidermal cells are regularly spaced in neighbouring tricho-(root hair) and atrichoblast (non-hair) cells, showing already distinct cell size regulation in the root meristem. We determined cell sizes in the root meristem and at the onset of cellular elongation, revealing that not only division rates but also cellular shape is distinct in tricho-and atrichoblasts. Intriguingly, epidermal-patterning mutants, failing to define differential vacuolization in neighbouring epidermal cell files, also display non-differential growth. Using these epidermal-patterning mutants, we show that polarized growth behaviour of epidermal tricho-and atrichoblast is interdependent, suggesting non-cell autonomous signals to integrate tissue expansion. Besides the interweaved cell-type-dependent growth mechanism, we reveal an additional role for epidermal patterning genes in root meristem size and organ growth regulation. We conclude that epidermal cells represent a suitable model system to study cell size determination and interdependent tissue growth.

  5. Root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grierson, C.; Nielsen, E.; Ketelaar, T.; Schiefelbein, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair

  6. Zinc adsorption and desorption characteristics in root cell wall involving zinc hyperaccumulation in Sedum alfredii Hance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e; Meng, Fan-hua; Lu, Ling-li

    2007-02-01

    Radiotracer techniques were employed to characterize (65)Zn adsorption and desorption in root-cell-wall of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) species of Sedum alfredii Hance. The results indicated that at the end of a 30 min short time radioisotope loading period, comparable amounts of (65)Zn were accumulated in the roots of the two ecotypes Sedum alfredii, whereas 2.1-fold more (65)Zn remains in NHE root after 45-min desorption. At the end of 60 min uptake period, no difference of (65)Zn accumulation was observed in undesorbed root-cell-wall of Sedum alfredii. However, 3.0-fold more (65)Zn accumulated in desorbed root-cell-wall of NHE. Zn(2+) binding in root-cell-wall preparations of NHE was greater than that in HE under high Zn(2+) concentration. All these results suggested that root-cell-wall of the two ecotypes Sedum alfredii had the same ability to adsorb Zn(2+), whereas the desorption characteristics were different, and with most of (65)Zn binding on root of HE being available for loading into the xylem, as a result, more (65)Zn was translocated to the shoot.

  7. Inhibiting Cadmium Transport Process in Root Cells of Plants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Yan-ling

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium(Cd is the most common element found in the heavy-metal contaminated soils in China. Roots of rice and vegetables can concentrate Cd from acid soils, and then transport Cd to above-ground parts. Cd in edible part of plants directly influences the food safety. Cellwall, plasma membrane and organells of root cells in plant can discriminate Cd from other elements. A lot of Cd can be fixed in root cells by precipitation, complexation, compartmentation, and so on, to inhibit its transport from roots to shoot and guarantee the physiological activities in above-ground parts carrying out normally. This paper summarized recent advance on inhibiting Cd transport process in subcellular fractions of root cells of plants, which is in advantage of exploring excellent germplasms and gene resources in the future.

  8. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  9. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  10. Function and regulation of transcription factors involved in root apical meristem and stem cell maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Corinna Drisch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots are essential for overall plant development, growth and performance by providing anchorage in the soil and uptake of nutrients and water. The primary root of higher plants derives from a group of pluripotent, mitotically active stem cells residing in the root apical meristem (RAM which provides the basis for growth, development and regeneration of the root. The stem cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana RAM are surrounding the quiescent center (QC, which consists of a group of rarely dividing cells. The QC maintains the stem cells in a non-cell-autonomous manner and prevents them from differentiation. The necessary dynamic but also tight regulation of the transition from stem cell fate to differentiation most likely requires complex regulatory mechanisms to integrate external and internal cues. Transcription factors play a central role in root development and are regulated by phytohormones, small signaling molecules and miRNAs. In this review we give a comprehensive overview about the function and regulation of specific transcription factors controlling stem cell fate and root apical meristem maintenance and discuss the possibility of TF complex formation, subcellular translocations and cell-to-cell movement functioning as another level of regulation.

  11. PIV as a method for quantifying root cell growth and particle displacement in confocal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Hans, Joachim; Bransby, M Fraser; Valentine, Tracy A

    2010-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) quantifies displacement of patches of pixels between successive images. We evaluated PIV as a tool for microscopists by measuring displacements of cells and of a surrounding granular medium in confocal laser scanning microscopy images of Arabidopsis thaliana roots labeled with cell-membrane targeted green fluorescent protein. Excellent accuracy (e.g., displacement standard deviation PIV-predicted and actual displacements (r(2) > 0.83). Root mean squared error for these distorted images was 0.4-1.1 pixels, increasing at higher magnification factors. Cell growth and rhizosphere deformation were tracked with good temporal (e.g., 1-min interval) and spatial resolution, with PIV patches located on recognizable cell features being tracked more successfully. Appropriate choice of GFP-label was important to decrease small-scale biological noise due to intracellular motion. PIV of roots grown in stiff 2% versus 0.7% agar showed patterns of cell expansion consistent with physically impeded roots of other species. Roots in glass ballotini underwent rapid changes in growth direction on a timescale of minutes, associated with localized arching of ballotini. By tracking cell vertices, we monitored automatically cell length, width, and area every minute for 0.5 h for cells in different stages of development. In conclusion, PIV measured displacements successfully in images of living root cells and the external granular medium, revealing much potential for use by microscopists.

  12. 混合盐胁迫对油葵保护性酶活性、细胞膜透性及其主要农艺性状的影响%Effects of mixed salt stress on protective enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability and main agronomic traits of oil-sunflower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴怀弟; 吴科生; 王红梅; 陈炳东; 陈玉梁

    2012-01-01

    Effects of NaCl and NaHCO3 on membrane permeability, SOD activity and POD activity of roots and leaves as well as specific characteristics of the tolerance of oil-sunflower were studied under various levels of salt stress. The results showed as follows: Compared with CK, membrane permeability, SOD activity and POD activity of the root and leaves appeared an increasing trend and significant level with the increase of salt concentration. At the same time the SOD activity of leaves was significantly higher than that of roots. The effects of salt concentration on phenology was signif-icant in oil-sunflower, and the growth period of oil-sunflower was delayed, while the plant height, faceplate diameters, dry weight and fresh weight of shoot and root and 100-grain weight declined significantly.%研究了不同浓度混合盐NaCl和NaHCO3对油葵苗期叶片、根系细胞膜透性,SOD、POD酶活性,油葵物候期、成熟期主要农艺性状的影响,目的在于对其耐盐性进行初步鉴定.结果表明:随着土壤混合盐浓度增大,叶片和根系的细胞膜透性,SOD、POD酶活性均呈现上升的趋势,差异显著,其中叶片SOD酶活性明显高于根系,并与盐浓度呈极显著的正相关.油葵的整个生育期明显受土壤盐浓度的影响,生育期延长,百粒重、单株产量、盘径、株高、干物质、鲜重有较大幅度下降.

  13. Modification of antioxidant systems in cell walls of maize roots by different nitrogen sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Hadži-Tašković Šukalović

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant systems of maize root cell walls grown on different nitrogen sources were evaluated. Plants were grown on a medium containing only NO3- or the mixture of NO3-+NH4+, in a 2:1 ratio. Eleven-day old plants, two days after the initiation of lateral roots, were used for the experiments. Cell walls were isolated from lateral roots and primary root segments, 2-7 cm from tip to base, representing zones of intense or decreased growth rates, respectively. Protein content and the activity of enzymes peroxidase, malate dehydrogenase and ascorbate oxidase ionically or covalently bound to the walls, as well as cell wall phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, were determined. Cell walls of plants grown on mixed N possess more developed enzymatic antioxidant systems and lower non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses than cell walls grown on NO3-. Irrespective of N treatment, the activities of all studied enzymes and protein content were higher in cell walls of lateral compared to primary roots. Phenolic content of cell walls isolated from lateral roots was higher in NO3--grown than in mixed N grown plants. No significant differences could be observed in the isozyme patterns of cell wall peroxidases isolated from plants grown on different nutrient solution. Our results indicate that different N treatments modify the antioxidant systems of root cell walls. Treatment with NO3- resulted in an increase of constitutive phenolic content, while the combination of NO3-+NH4+ elevated the redox enzyme activities in root cell walls.

  14. Possible role of root border cells in detection and avoidance of aluminum toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, S C; Hawes, M C

    2001-04-01

    Root border cells are living cells that surround root apices of most plant species and are involved in production of root exudates. We tested predictions of the hypothesis that they participate in detection and avoidance of aluminum (Al) toxicity by comparing responses of two snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivars (cv Dade and cv Romano) known to differ in Al resistance at the whole-root level. Root border cells of these cultivars were killed by excess Al in agarose gels or in simple salt solutions. Percent viability of Al-sensitive cv Romano border cells exposed in situ for 96 h to 200 microM total Al in an agarose gel was significantly less than that of cv Dade border cells; similarly, relative viability of harvested cv Romano border cells was significantly less than that of cv Dade cells after 24 h in 25 microM total Al in a simple salt solution. These results indicate that Al-resistance mechanisms that operate at the level of whole roots also operate at the cellular level in border cells. Al induced a thicker mucilage layer around detached border cells of both cultivars. Cultivar Dade border cells produced a thicker mucilage layer in response to 25 microM Al compared with that of cv Romano cells after 8 h of treatment and this phenomenon preceded that of observed cultivar differences in relative cell viability. Release of an Al-binding mucilage by border cells could play a role in protecting root tips from Al-induced cellular damage.

  15. Role of pectolytic enzymes in the programmed separation of cells from the root cap of higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawes, M.C.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a model system to study border cell separation in transgenic pea roots. In addition, the hypothesis that genes encoding pectolytic enzymes in the root cap play a role in the programmed separation of root border cells from the root tip was tested. The following objectives have been accomplished: (1) the use of transgenic hairy roots to study border cell separation has been optimized for Pisum sativum; (2) a cDNA encoding a root cap pectinmethylesterase (PME) has been cloned; (3) PME and polygalacturonase activities in cell walls of the root cap have been characterized and shown to be correlated with border cell separation. A fusion gene encoding pectate lyase has also been transformed into pea hairy root cells.

  16. Hormonal control of cell division and elongation along differentiation trajectories in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Hirotomo; Umeda, Masaaki

    2014-06-01

    The continuous development of roots is supported by a sustainable system for cell production and growth at the root tip. In the stem cell niche that consists of a quiescent centre and surrounding stem cells, an undifferentiated state and low mitotic activity are preserved by the action of auxin and abscisic acid. Stem cell daughters divide several times in the proximal meristem, where auxin and gibberellin mainly promote cell proliferation. Cells then elongate with the help of gibberellin, and become finally differentiated as a constituent of a cell file in the elongation/differentiation zone. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the transition zone is located between the proximal meristem and the elongation/differentiation zone, and plays an important role in switching from mitosis to the endoreplication that causes DNA polyploidization. Recent studies have shown that cytokinins are essentially required for this transition by antagonizing auxin signalling and promoting degradation of mitotic regulators. In each root zone, different phytohormones interact with one another and coordinately control cell proliferation, cell elongation, cell differentiation, and endoreplication. Such hormonal networks maintain the elaborate structure of the root tip under various environmental conditions. In this review, we summarize and discuss key issues related to hormonal regulation of root growth, and describe how phytohormones are associated with the control of cell cycle machinery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Transition zone cells reach G2 phase before initiating elongation in maize root apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Victoria Alarcón

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root elongation requires cell divisions in the meristematic zone and cell elongation in the elongation zone. The boundary between dividing and elongating cells is called the transition zone. In the meristem zone, initial cells are continuously dividing, but on the basal side of the meristem cells exit the meristem through the transition zone and enter in the elongation zone, where they stop division and rapidly elongate. Throughout this journey cells are accompanied by changes in cell cycle progression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that meristematic cells are in cycle, but exit when they enter the elongation zone. In addition, the percentage of cells in G2 phase (4C strongly increased from the meristem to the elongation zone. However, we did not observe remarkable changes in the percentage of cells in cell cycle phases along the entire elongation zone. These results suggest that meristematic cells in maize root apex stop the cell cycle in G2 phase after leaving the meristem.

  18. Species-dependent effects of border cell and root tip exudates on nematode behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Schmitt, M; Hawes, M C

    2000-11-01

    ABSTRACT Effects of border cell and root tip exudates on root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) behavior were examined. In whole-plant assays using pea, M. incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) accumulated rapidly around the 1- to 2-mm apical region ensheathed by border cells, but not in the region of elongation. Within 15 to 30 min, J2 which had accumulated within detached clumps of border cells lost motility and entered into a quiescent state. When border cells (and associated root tip exudates) were washed from pea roots prior to challenge with nematodes, no such accumulation and quiescence was induced. Attraction of nematodes by roots was species dependent: no attraction or accumulation occurred in snap bean. Using a quantitative assay, three categories of chemotaxis responses occurred: attraction (pea and alfalfa cv. Thor), repulsion (alfalfa cv. Moapa 69), and no response (snap bean and alfalfa cv. Lahonton). In contrast, total root tip exudates from all three plant species acted as a repellent for M. incognita in the sand assay. An in vitro assay was developed to characterize the induced quiescence response. When total root tip exudate from the tested legumes (as well as corn) was incubated with J2 populations, >80% of the nematodes lost motility. A similar response occurred in Caenorhabditis elegans. Border cell exudates did not induce or contribute to the induction of quiescence. Cocultivation of pea border cells with M. incognita resulted in changes in border cell shape similar to those observed in response to exogenous plant hormones. No such changes occurred in snap bean border cells. Understanding the cell- and host-specific extracellular recognition that occurs between roots and pathogenic nematodes in the early stages before infection occurs could lead to new avenues for disease control.

  19. Sunflower meal concentrations in Massai grass silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máikal S. Borja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetive. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the best sunflower meal concentration in Massai grass silage. Materials and methods. The treatments were composed of 0, 8, 16, and 24% sunflower meal (natural matter basis during ensiling of Massai grass, with four repetitions. Results. The regression equation showed that the inclusion of sunflower meal between 2.14% and 13.91% obtained a silage dry matter between 25 and 35%, which are the values recommended for the production of high quality silage. The addition of sunflower meal showed a linear increase in crude protein, reaching 18% DM with the highest concentration of sunflower meal. The highest feed value index was obtained with the addition of 24% sunflower meal in the silage. The estimated total digestible nutrient of silage increased linearly with sunflower meal concentration. The silage pH values had a quadratic effect, reaching the lowest value (4.1 with 15% sunflower meal addition. Conclusions. Based on the chemical composition and forage quality, a concentration of 14% sunflower meal should be used for high-quality silage with good nutritional value.

  20. Formation of silica aggregates in sorghum root endodermis is predetermined by cell wall architecture and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Milan; Martinka, Michal; Bosnic, Dragana; Caplovicová, Mária; Elbaum, Rivka; Lux, Alexander

    2017-06-22

    Deposition of silica in plant cell walls improves their mechanical properties and helps plants to withstand various stress conditions. Its mechanism is still not understood and silica-cell wall interactions are elusive. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silica deposition on the development and structure of sorghum root endodermis and to identify the cell wall components involved in silicification. Sorghum bicolor seedlings were grown hydroponically with (Si+) or without (Si-) silicon supplementation. Primary roots were used to investigate the transcription of silicon transporters by quantitative RT-PCR. Silica aggregation was induced also under in vitro conditions in detached root segments. The development and architecture of endodermal cell walls were analysed by histochemistry, microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Water retention capability was compared between silicified and non-silicified roots. Raman spectroscopy analyses of isolated silica aggregates were also carried out. Active uptake of silicic acid is provided at the root apex, where silicon transporters Lsi1 and Lsi2 are expressed. The locations of silica aggregation are established during the development of tertiary endodermal cell walls, even in the absence of silicon. Silica aggregation takes place in non-lignified spots in the endodermal cell walls, which progressively accumulate silicic acid, and its condensation initiates at arabinoxylan-ferulic acid complexes. Silicification does not support root water retention capability; however, it decreases root growth inhibition imposed by desiccation. A model is proposed in which the formation of silica aggregates in sorghum roots is predetermined by a modified cell wall architecture and takes place as governed by endodermal development. The interaction with silica is provided by arabinoxylan-ferulic acid complexes and interferes with further deposition of lignin. Due to contrasting hydrophobicity, silicification and lignification

  1. Growing Mediums in Different Environments for Sunflower and Cilantro Microgreens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, B.; Gonzalez, O.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to investigate the growth and subsequent harvest of young seedlings known as microgreens, which have expanded into a very profitable market. The goal of the experiment is to discover whether the nutrients, soil quality and climate influences the quality, flavor, and yield of the microgreens. To conduct this experiment, locations and soil types were chosen; the locations consisted of a greenhouse (an enclosed space which held consistent sunlight, warmth, and humidity) and a lath house (a somewhat shaded location that was open to the elements as well as temperature changes), while compost, Quick Root (a growing medium that is relatively devoid of nutrients), and a combination of the two is used in this experiment. This meant that a total of six different combinations could be tested. Along with that, two different seeds were selected, sunflower seeds and cilantro seeds. Each of the results are mainly influenced by the soil type, and a partial influence by the climate. Compost has an extreme lack in growth and did not produce enough plants to record in general. The Quick Root results show only a burst of growth would occur; also, the plants did not have a strong taste, but did grow slightly quicker within the greenhouse. Another advantage to the Quick Root results is that the root size nearly tripled compared to the 50/50 root size. 50/50 holds the strongest results i.e., growth consistency and holds a stronger taste. Originally, there was an attempt to grow sunflowers uncovered, but was not attempted again due to poor results. Overall the 50/50 held a stronger growth and taste, but also would easily excel in the long run compared to the Quick Root and the compost.

  2. Plasmolysis and cell wall deposition in wheat root hairs under osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgger, Michael; Lang, Ingeborg; Ovecka, Miroslav; Lichtscheidl, Irene

    2010-07-01

    We analysed cell wall formation in rapidly growing root hairs of Triticum aestivum under reduced turgor pressure by application of iso- and hypertonic mannitol solutions. Our experimental series revealed an osmotic value of wheat root hairs of 150 mOsm. In higher concentrations (200-650 mOsm), exocytosis of wall material and its deposition, as well as callose synthesis, still occurred, but the elongation of root hairs was stopped. Even after strong plasmolysis when the protoplast retreated from the cell wall, deposits of wall components were observed. Labelling with DiOC(6)(3) and FM1-43 revealed numerous Hechtian strands that spanned the plasmolytic space. Interestingly, the Hechtian strands also led towards the very tip of the root hair suggesting strong anchoring sites that are readily incorporated into the new cell wall. Long-term treatments of over 24 h in mannitol solutions (150-450 mOsm) resulted in reduced growth and concentration-dependent shortening of root hairs. However, the formation of new root hairs does occur in all concentrations used. This reflects the extraordinary potential of wheat root cells to adapt to environmental stress situations.

  3. Short-term control of maize cell and root water permeability through plasma membrane aquaporin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachez, Charles; Veselov, Dmitry; Ye, Qing; Reinhardt, Hagen; Knipfer, Thorsten; Fricke, Wieland; Chaumont, François

    2012-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that aquaporins are involved in the regulation of root water uptake, the role of specific isoforms in this process is poorly understood. The mRNA expression and protein level of specific plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were analysed in Zea mays in relation to cell and root hydraulic conductivity. Plants were analysed during the day/night period, under different growth conditions (aeroponics/hydroponics) and in response to short-term osmotic stress applied through polyethylene glycol (PEG). Higher protein levels of ZmPIP1;2, ZmPIP2;1/2;2, ZmPIP2;5 and ZmPIP2;6 during the day coincided with a higher water permeability of root cortex cells during the day compared with night period. Similarly, plants which were grown under aeroponic conditions and which developed a hypodermis ('exodermis') with Casparian bands, effectively forcing more water along a membranous uptake path across roots, showed increased levels of ZmPIP2;5 and ZmPIP1;2 in the rhizodermis and exodermis. When PEG was added to the root medium (2-8 h), expression of PIPs and cell water permeability in roots increased. These data support a role of specific PIP isoforms, in particular ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;5, in regulating root water uptake and cortex cell hydraulic conductivity in maize.

  4. EFFECT OF ARSENIC ON DRY WEIGHT AND RELATIVE CHLOROPHYLL CONTENT IN GREENINGMAIZE AND SUNFLOWER TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilvia Várallyay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is one of the most toxic elements that can be found in the environment. Excessive uptake of arsenic may cause physiological changes in plants. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different arsenic treatments on relative chlorophyll content and dry weight of shoot and root of maize and sunflower in the early phases of plant development. Seedlings were grown in climatic room in nutrient solution under strictly regulated environmental conditions. The plants were exposed to 3, 10 and 30 mg kg-1arsenic, whereas there was no arsenic treatment on the control plants. We applied arsenic in the form of arsenite (NaAsO2 and arsenate (KH2AsO4, respectively. After 14 days of arsenic treatments, changes in relative chlorophyll content and dry weight of maize shoots and roots were recorded. In the case of sunflower these physiological parameters were measured after 21 day. The applied arsenic decreased the relative chlorophyll content of maize and sunflower leaves, especially at concentration of30 mg kg-1. The increasing amount of As treatment were resulted the lower weight of the experimental plants, which was more considerable in the case of the roots. The results indicate that the sunflower plants is more sensitive to arsenic toxicity than maize plants and all data demonstrate that the As(III is more toxic to these crop plants than the As(V.

  5. The changes of oil palm roots cell wall lipids during pathogenesis of Ganoderma boninense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A.; Dayou, J.; Abdullah, S.; Chong, K. P.

    2017-07-01

    One of the first physical defences of plants against fungal infection is their cell wall. Interaction between combinations of metabolism enzymes known as the “weapons” of pathogen and the host cell wall probably determines the fate of possible invasion of the pathogen in the host. The present work aims to study the biochemical changes of cell wall lipids of oil palm roots and to determine novel information on root cell wall composition during pathogenesis of Ganoderma boninense by using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. Based on Total Ion Chromatogram analysis, 67 compounds were found more abundant in the roots infected with G. boninense compared to the healthy roots (60 compounds). Interestingly, nine new compounds were identified from the cell wall lipids of roots infected with G. boninense. These includes Cyclohexane, 1,2-dimethyl-, Methyl 2-hydroxy 16-methyl-heptadecanoate, 2-Propenoic acid, methyl ester, Methyl 9-oxohexacosanoate, 5-[(3,7,11,15-Tetramethylhexadecyl)oxy]thiophene-2carboxylic acid, Ergosta-5,7,22,24(28)-tetraen-3beta-ol, 7-Hydroxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavan, Glycine and (S)-4'-Hydroxy-4-methoxydalbergione, this may involve as response to pathogen invasion. This paper provides an original comparative lipidomic analysis of oil palm roots cell wall lipids in plant defence during pathogenesis of G. boninense.

  6. Root border cell development is a temperature-insensitive and Al-sensitive process in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Wei; Ye, Dan; Wang, Li-Ling; Hua, Jing; Zhao, Gu-Feng; Pan, Wei-Huai; Han, Ning; Zhu, Mu-Yuan

    2004-06-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that border cell (BC) survival was dependent on root tip mucigel in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Hang 981). In aeroponic culture, BC development was an induced process in barley, whereas in hydroponic culture, it was a kinetic equilibrium process during which 300-400 BCs were released into water daily. The response of root elongation to temperatures (10-35 degrees C) was very sensitive but temperature changes had no great effect on barley BC development. At 35 degrees C, the root elongation ceased whereas BC production still continued, indicating that the two processes might be regulated independently under high temperature (35 degrees C) stress. Fifty microM Al could inhibit significantly BC development by inhibiting pectin methylesterase activity in the root cap of cv. 2000-2 (Al-sensitive) and cv. Humai 16 (Al-tolerant), but 20 microM Al could not block BC development in cv. Humai 16. BCs and their mucigel of barley had a limited role in the protection of Al-induced inhibition of root elongation, but played a significant role in the prevention of Al from diffusing into the meristems of the root tip and the root cap. Together, these results suggested that BC development was a temperature-insensitive but Al-sensitive process, and that BCs and their mucigel played an important role in the protection of root tip and root cap meristems from Al toxicity.

  7. Exposure of Allium cepa root cells to zidovudine or nevirapine induces cytogenotoxic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuamah, Chika K; Ekama, Sabdat O; Audu, Rosemary A; Ezechi, Oliver C; Poirier, Miriam C; Odeigah, Peter G C

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have proved useful in the clinical management of HIV-infected persons, though there are concerns about the effects of exposure to these DNA-reactive drugs. We investigated the potential of the plant model Allium cepa root tip assay to demonstrate the cytogenotoxicity of zidovudine and nevirapine and as a replace-reduce-refine programme amenable to resource-poor research settings. Cells mitotic index were determined in squashed root cells from Allium cepa bulbs exposed to zidovudine or nevirapine for 48 hr. The concentration of zidovudine and nevirapine inhibiting 50% root growth after 96 hr exposure was 65.0 µM and 92.5 µM respectively. Root length of all antiretroviral-exposed roots after 96 hr exposure was significantly shorter than the unexposed roots while additional root growth during a subsequent 48 hr recovery period in the absence of drug was not significantly different. By ANOVA, there was a significant association between percentage of cells in mitosis and zidovudine dose (p=0.004), but not nevirapine dose (p=0.68). Chromosomal aberrations such as sticky chromosomes, chromatin bridges, multipolar mitoses and binucleated cells were observed in root cells exposed to zidovudine and nevirapine for 48 hr. The most notable chromosomal aberration was drug-related increases in sticky chromosomes. Overall, the study showed inhibition in root length growth, changes in the mitotic index, and the induction of chromosomal aberrations in Allium bulbs treated for 96 hr or 48 hr with zidovudine and nevirapine. The study reveals generalized cytogenotoxic damage induced by exposure to zidovudine and nevirapine, and further show that the two compounds differ in their effects on mitosis and the types of chromosomal aberrations induced.

  8. Exposure of Allium cepa root cells to zidovudine or nevirapine induces cytogenotoxic changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika K Onwuamah

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral drugs have proved useful in the clinical management of HIV-infected persons, though there are concerns about the effects of exposure to these DNA-reactive drugs. We investigated the potential of the plant model Allium cepa root tip assay to demonstrate the cytogenotoxicity of zidovudine and nevirapine and as a replace-reduce-refine programme amenable to resource-poor research settings. Cells mitotic index were determined in squashed root cells from Allium cepa bulbs exposed to zidovudine or nevirapine for 48 hr. The concentration of zidovudine and nevirapine inhibiting 50% root growth after 96 hr exposure was 65.0 µM and 92.5 µM respectively. Root length of all antiretroviral-exposed roots after 96 hr exposure was significantly shorter than the unexposed roots while additional root growth during a subsequent 48 hr recovery period in the absence of drug was not significantly different. By ANOVA, there was a significant association between percentage of cells in mitosis and zidovudine dose (p=0.004, but not nevirapine dose (p=0.68. Chromosomal aberrations such as sticky chromosomes, chromatin bridges, multipolar mitoses and binucleated cells were observed in root cells exposed to zidovudine and nevirapine for 48 hr. The most notable chromosomal aberration was drug-related increases in sticky chromosomes. Overall, the study showed inhibition in root length growth, changes in the mitotic index, and the induction of chromosomal aberrations in Allium bulbs treated for 96 hr or 48 hr with zidovudine and nevirapine. The study reveals generalized cytogenotoxic damage induced by exposure to zidovudine and nevirapine, and further show that the two compounds differ in their effects on mitosis and the types of chromosomal aberrations induced.

  9. Nitrate does not result in iron inactivation in the apoplast of sunflower leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Römheld, Volker

    2003-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that nitrate (NO(3)(-)) nutrition might induce iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis by inactivation of Fe in the leaf apoplast (H.U. Kosegarten, B. Hoffmann, K. Mengel [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1069-1079). To test this hypothesis, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Farnkasol) plants were grown in nutrient solutions supplied with various nitrogen (N) forms (NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+) and NH(4)NO(3)), with or without pH control by using pH buffers [2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid or 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid]. It was shown that high pH in the nutrient solution restricted uptake and shoot translocation of Fe independently of N form and, therefore, induced Fe deficiency chlorosis at low Fe supply [1 micro M ferric ethylenediaminedi(O-hydroxyphenylacetic acid)]. Root NO(3)(-) supply (up to 40 mM) did not affect the relative distribution of Fe between leaf apoplast and symplast at constant low external pH of the root medium. Although perfusion of high pH-buffered solution (7.0) into the leaf apoplast restricted (59)Fe uptake rate as compared with low apoplastic solution pH (5.0 and 6.0, respectively), loading of NO(3)(-) (6 mM) showed no effect on (59)Fe uptake by the symplast of leaf cells. However, high light intensity strongly increased (59)Fe uptake, independently of apoplastic pH or of the presence of NO(3)(-) in the apoplastic solution. Finally, there are no indications in the present study that NO(3)(-) supply to roots results in the postulated inactivation of Fe in the leaf apoplast. It is concluded that NO(3)(-) nutrition results in Fe deficiency chlorosis exclusively by inhibited Fe acquisition by roots due to high pH at the root surface.

  10. Allelopathic potential of Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. on the early growth of maize (Zea mays L. and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Pacanoski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and glasshouse experiments were carried out to investigate the allelopathic potential of different plant parts of D. stramonium on maize and sunflower on early growth stages. The aqueous leachates of D. stramonium roots and shoot did not produc a significant effect on germination and shoot length of maize, but root length of maize was significantly reduced at the highest (1/1 D. stramonium roots leachate compared to control. From the other side, germination of sunflower was significantly reduced at the highest (1/1 D. stramonium shoot leachate concentration, but lower (1/5 and 1/2 D. stramonium roots leachate concentrations significantly increased root and shoot length of sunflower compared to control. In glasshouse experiment, no one treatment with different D. stramonium plant residues significantly affected density, height and fresh weight of maize plants compared to control. Contrary, D. stramonium mixtures with 1/1 root and shoot residues significantly reduced plants density and fresh weight of sunflower plants compared to control. Lower (1/2 and 1/5 mixtures of D. stramonium roots residues and mixture with 1/5 D. stramonium shoot residues significantly increased the height of the sunflower plants.

  11. Rhodamine B induces long nucleoplasmic bridges and other nuclear anomalies in Allium cepa root tip cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dehong; Bai, Bing; Jiang, Donghua; Shi, Lin; Cheng, Shunchang; Tao, Dongbing; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-03-01

    The cytogenetic toxicity of rhodamine B on root tip cells of Allium cepa was investigated. A. cepa were cultured in water (negative control), 10 ppm methyl methanesulfonate (positive control), and three concentrations of rhodamine B (200, 100, and 50 ppm) for 7 days. Rhodamine B inhibited mitotic activity; increased nuclear anomalies, including micronuclei, nuclear buds, and bridged nuclei; and induced oxidative stress in A. cepa root tissues. Furthermore, a substantial amount of long nucleoplasmic bridges were entangled together, and some nuclei were simultaneously linked to several other nuclei and to nuclear buds with nucleoplasmic bridges in rhodamine B-treated cells. In conclusion, rhodamine B induced cytogenetic effects in A. cepa root tip cells, which suggests that the A. cepa root is an ideal model system for detecting cellular interactions.

  12. Joint effects of microwave and chromium trioxide on root tip cells of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of microwave and chromium trioxide (CrO3) on Viciafaba root tip were studied. Micronucleus assay and chromosomal aberration assay were used to determine the mitotic index, the micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration frequency of Vicia faba root tip cells induced by microwave and CrO3. The results showed that the micronucleus frequency decreased, and that the mitotic index and chromosomal aberration frequency showed linear dose responses to CrO3, in treatment of microwave for 5 s. In microwave of 25 s, the mitotic index decreased, the micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration frequency increased with increase of CrO3 concentration. We concluded that microwave and CrO3 had antagonistic effect on the mitotic index of Vicia faba root tip cells, but had synergetic effect on micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration frequency of Vicia faba root tip cells.

  13. Mutagenic effects of chromium trioxide on root tip cells of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晓薇

    2004-01-01

    In this study on the mutagenic effects of different concentrations of chromium trioxide (CrO3) on Vicia faba root tip, micronucleus assay and chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the mitotic indexes, micronucleus rate and chromosome aberration rate of Viciafaba root tip cells. The results showed that the effects of CrO3 concentration on the mitotic indexes were complicated. CrO3 increases the micronucleus rate of Vicia faba root tip cells. It was found that within certain range of CrO3 concentration the micronucleus rate increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3, but that the micronucleus rate decreased at higher level of CrO3 and that CrO3 also caused various types of chromosome aberration at a rate which increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3. We concluded that CrO3 has significant mutagenic effect on Viciafaba root tip cells.

  14. Mutagenic effects of chromium trioxide on root tip cells of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晓徽

    2004-01-01

    In this study on the mutagenic effects of different concentrations of chromium trioxide (CrO3) on Vicia faba root tip, micronucleus assay and chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the mitotic indexes, micronucleus rate and chromosome aberration rate of Vicia faba root tip cells. The results showed that the effects of CrO3 concentration on the mitotic indexes were complicated. CrO3 increases the micronucleus rate of Vicia faba root tip cells. It was found that within certain range of CrO3 concentration the micronucleus rate increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3, but that the micronucleus rate decreased at higher level of CrO3 and that CrO3 also caused various types of chromosome aberration at a rate which increased systematically with increased concentration of CrO3. We concluded that CrO3 has significant mutagenic effect on Vicia faba root tip cells.

  15. Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics reveal enhanced specialized metabolism in Medicago truncatula root border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Bonnie S; Bedair, Mohamed F; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V; Yang, Dong Sik; Allen, Stacy N; Li, Wensheng; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W

    2015-04-01

    Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics of Medicago truncatula seedling border cells and root tips revealed substantial metabolic differences between these distinct and spatially segregated root regions. Large differential increases in oxylipin-pathway lipoxygenases and auxin-responsive transcript levels in border cells corresponded to differences in phytohormone and volatile levels compared with adjacent root tips. Morphological examinations of border cells revealed the presence of significant starch deposits that serve as critical energy and carbon reserves, as documented through increased β-amylase transcript levels and associated starch hydrolysis metabolites. A substantial proportion of primary metabolism transcripts were decreased in border cells, while many flavonoid- and triterpenoid-related metabolite and transcript levels were increased dramatically. The cumulative data provide compounding evidence that primary and secondary metabolism are differentially programmed in border cells relative to root tips. Metabolic resources normally destined for growth and development are redirected toward elevated accumulation of specialized metabolites in border cells, resulting in constitutively elevated defense and signaling compounds needed to protect the delicate root cap and signal motile rhizobia required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Elevated levels of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone were further increased in border cells of roots exposed to cotton root rot (Phymatotrichopsis omnivora), and the value of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone as an antimicrobial compound was demonstrated using in vitro growth inhibition assays. The cumulative and pathway-specific data provide key insights into the metabolic programming of border cells that strongly implicate a more prominent mechanistic role for border cells in plant-microbe signaling, defense, and interactions than envisioned previously.

  16. Cell-specific production and antimicrobial activity of naphthoquinones in roots of lithospermum erythrorhizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham; Michaels; Flores

    1999-02-01

    Pigmented naphthoquinone derivatives of shikonin are produced at specific times and in specific cells of Lithospermum erythrorhizon roots. Normal pigment development is limited to root hairs and root border cells in hairy roots grown on "noninducing" medium, whereas induction of additional pigment production by abiotic (CuSO4) or biotic (fungal elicitor) factors increases the amount of total pigment, changes the ratios of derivatives produced, and initiates production of pigment de novo in epidermal cells. When the biological activity of these compounds was tested against soil-borne bacteria and fungi, a wide range of sensitivity was recorded. Acetyl-shikonin and beta-hydroxyisovaleryl-shikonin, the two most abundant derivatives in both Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed "hairy-root" cultures and greenhouse-grown plant roots, were the most biologically active of the seven compounds tested. Hyphae of the pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium aphanidermatum, and Nectria hematococca induced localized pigment production upon contact with the roots. Challenge by R. solani crude elicitor increased shikonin derivative production 30-fold. We have studied the regulation of this suite of related, differentially produced, differentially active compounds to understand their role(s) in plant defense at the cellular level in the rhizosphere.

  17. Response and tolerance of root border cells to aluminum toxicity in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Miao-Zhen; Wang, Fang-Mei; Li, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Shu-Na; Wang, Ning; Xu, Gen-Di

    2011-07-01

    Root border cells (RBCs) and their secreted mucilage are suggested to participate in the resistance against toxic metal cations, including aluminum (Al), in the rhizosphere. However, the mechanisms by which the individual cell populations respond to Al and their role in Al resistance still remain unclear. In this research, the response and tolerance of RBCs to Al toxicity were investigated in the root tips of two soybean cultivars [Zhechun No. 2 (Al-tolerant cultivar) and Huachun No. 18 (Al-sensitive cultivar)]. Al inhibited root elongation and increased pectin methylesterase (PME) activity in the root tip. Removal of RBCs from the root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation, especially in Huachun No. 18. Increasing Al levels and treatment time decreased the relative percent viability of RBCs in situ and in vitro in both soybean cultivars. Al application significantly increased mucilage layer thickness around the detached RBCs of both cultivars. Additionally, a significantly higher relative percent cell viability of attached and detached RBCs and thicker mucilage layers were observed in Zhechun No. 2. The higher viability of attached and detached RBCs, as well as the thickening of the mucilage layer in separated RBCs, suggest that RBCs play an important role in protecting root apices from Al toxicity.

  18. Root border-like cells of Arabidopsis. Microscopical characterization and role in the interaction with rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicré, Maïté; Santaella, Catherine; Blanchet, Sandrine; Gateau, Aurélien; Driouich, Azeddine

    2005-06-01

    Plant roots of many species produce thousands of cells that are released daily into the rhizosphere. These cells are commonly termed border cells because of their major role in constituting a biotic boundary layer between the root surface and the soil. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and ultrastructure of such cells in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using light and electron microscopy coupled to high-pressure freezing. The secretion of cell wall molecules including pectic polysaccharides and arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) was examined also using immunofluorescence microscopy and a set of anticarbohydrate antibodies. We show that root tips of Arabidopsis seedlings released cell layers in an organized pattern that differs from the rather randomly dispersed release observed in other plant species studied to date. Therefore, we termed such cells border-like cells (BLC). Electron microscopical results revealed that BLC are rich in mitochondria, Golgi stacks, and Golgi-derived vesicles, suggesting that these cells are actively engaged in secretion of materials to their cell walls. Immunocytochemical data demonstrated that pectins as well as AGPs are among secreted material as revealed by the high level of expression of AGP-epitopes. In particular, the JIM13-AGP epitope was found exclusively associated with BLC and peripheral cells in the root cap region. In addition, we investigated the function of BLC and root cap cell AGPs in the interaction with rhizobacteria using AGP-disrupting agents and a strain of Rhizobium sp. expressing a green fluorescent protein. Our findings demonstrate that alteration of AGPs significantly inhibits the attachment of the bacteria to the surface of BLC and root tip.

  19. A gene regulatory network for root epidermis cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Bruex

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The root epidermis of Arabidopsis provides an exceptional model for studying the molecular basis of cell fate and differentiation. To obtain a systems-level view of root epidermal cell differentiation, we used a genome-wide transcriptome approach to define and organize a large set of genes into a transcriptional regulatory network. Using cell fate mutants that produce only one of the two epidermal cell types, together with fluorescence-activated cell-sorting to preferentially analyze the root epidermis transcriptome, we identified 1,582 genes differentially expressed in the root-hair or non-hair cell types, including a set of 208 "core" root epidermal genes. The organization of the core genes into a network was accomplished by using 17 distinct root epidermis mutants and 2 hormone treatments to perturb the system and assess the effects on each gene's transcript accumulation. In addition, temporal gene expression information from a developmental time series dataset and predicted gene associations derived from a Bayesian modeling approach were used to aid the positioning of genes within the network. Further, a detailed functional analysis of likely bHLH regulatory genes within the network, including MYC1, bHLH54, bHLH66, and bHLH82, showed that three distinct subfamilies of bHLH proteins participate in root epidermis development in a stage-specific manner. The integration of genetic, genomic, and computational analyses provides a new view of the composition, architecture, and logic of the root epidermal transcriptional network, and it demonstrates the utility of a comprehensive systems approach for dissecting a complex regulatory network.

  20. Application of a Kinetic Model for Analysis of Salt Absorption of Crop Roots under the Salinized Condition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NOMIYAMA, Ryosuke; SAGO, Yuki; YASUTAKE, Daisuke; KITANO, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    .... The rate of root salt absorption of corn and sunflower plants under the salinized condition were analyzed by applying the transpiration-integrated model of root ion absorption affected by leaf transpiration...

  1. WUSCHEL induces shoot stem cell activity and developmental plasticity in the root meristem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallois, Jean-Luc; Nora, Fabiana R.; Mizukami, Yukiko; Sablowski, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Most of the plant shoot originates from a small group of stem cells, which in Arabidopsis are specified by WUSCHEL (WUS). It is unknown whether these cells have an intrinsic potential to generate shoot tissues, or whether differentiation is guided by signals from more mature tissues. Here we show that WUS expression in the root induced shoot stem cell identity and leaf development (without additional cues), floral development (together with LEAFY), or embryogenesis (in response to increased auxin). Thus, WUS establishes stem cells with intrinsic shoot identity and responsive to developmental inputs that normally do not change root identity. PMID:15004006

  2. Multi-instrumental Analysis of Tissues of Sunflower Plants Treated with Silver(I Ions – Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate sunflower plants response on stressinduced by silver(I ions. The sunflower plants were exposed to silver(I ions (0, 0.1, 0.5,and 1 mM for 96 h. Primarily we aimed our attention to observation of basic physiologicalparameters. We found that the treated plants embodied growth depression, coloured changes and lack root hairs. Using of autofluorescence of anatomical structures, such aslignified cell walls, it was possible to determine the changes of important shoot and rootstructures, mainly vascular bungles and development of secondary thickening. Thedifferences in vascular bundles organisation, parenchymatic pith development in the rootcentre and the reduction of phloem part of vascular bundles were well observable.Moreover with increasing silver(I ions concentration the vitality of rhizodermal cellsdeclined; rhizodermal cells early necrosed and were replaced by the cells of exodermis.Further we employed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of spatialdistribution of silver(I ions in tissues of the treated plants. The Ag is accumulated mainlyin near-root part of the sample. Moreover basic biochemical indicators of environmentalstress were investigated. The total content of proteins expressively decreased withincreasing silver(I ions dose and the time of the treatment. As we compare the resultsobtained by protein analysis – the total protein contents in shoot as well as root parts – wecan assume on the transport of the proteins from the roots to shoots. This phenomenon canbe related with the cascade of processes connecting with photosynthesis. The secondbiochemical parameter, which we investigated, was urease activity. If we compared theactivity in treated plants with control, we found out that presence of silver(I ions markedlyenhanced the activity of urease at all applied doses of this toxic metal. Finally we studiedthe effect of silver(I ions on activity of urease

  3. Inducible expression of Pisum sativum xyloglucan fucosyltransferase in the pea root cap meristem, and effects of antisense mRNA expression on root cap cell wall structural integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; Celoy, Rhodesia M; Nguyen, Trang; Zeng, Weiqing; Keegstra, Kenneth; Immerzeel, Peter; Pauly, Markus; Hawes, Martha C

    2008-07-01

    Mitosis and cell wall synthesis in the legume root cap meristem can be induced and synchronized by the nondestructive removal of border cells from the cap periphery. Newly synthesized cells can be examined microscopically as they differentiate progressively during cap development, and ultimately detach as a new population of border cells. This system was used to demonstrate that Pisum sativum L. fucosyl transferase (PsFut1) mRNA expression is strongly expressed in root meristematic tissues, and is induced >2-fold during a 5-h period when mitosis in the root cap meristem is increased. Expression of PsFut1 antisense mRNA in pea hairy roots under the control of the CaMV35S promoter, which exhibits meristem localized expression in pea root caps, resulted in a 50-60% reduction in meristem localized endogenous PsFut1 mRNA expression measured using whole mount in situ hybridization. Changes in gross levels of cell wall fucosylated xyloglucan were not detected, but altered surface localization patterns were detected using whole mount immunolocalization with CCRC-M1, an antibody that recognizes fucosylated xyloglucan. Emerging hairy roots expressing antisense PsFut1 mRNA appeared normal macroscopically but scanning electron microscopy of tissues with altered CCRC-M1 localization patterns revealed wrinkled, collapsed cell surfaces. As individual border cells separated from the cap periphery, cell death occurred in correlation with extrusion of cellular contents through breaks in the wall.

  4. Altered cell wall properties are responsible for ammonium-reduced aluminium accumulation in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Lan, Ping; Ma, Jian Feng; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-07-01

    The phytotoxicity of aluminium (Al) ions can be alleviated by ammonium (NH4(+)) in rice and this effect has been attributed to the decreased Al accumulation in the roots. Here, the effects of different nitrogen forms on cell wall properties were compared in two rice cultivars differing in Al tolerance. An in vitro Al-binding assay revealed that neither NH4(+) nor NO3(-) altered the Al-binding capacity of cell walls, which were extracted from plants not previously exposed to N sources. However, cell walls extracted from NH4(+)-supplied roots displayed lower Al-binding capacity than those from NO3(-)-supplied roots when grown in non-buffered solutions. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis revealed that, compared with NO3(-)-supplied roots, NH4(+)-supplied roots possessed fewer Al-binding groups (-OH and COO-) and lower contents of pectin and hemicellulose. However, when grown in pH-buffered solutions, these differences in the cell wall properties were not observed. Further analysis showed that the Al-binding capacity and properties of cell walls were also altered by pHs alone. Taken together, our results indicate that the NH4(+)-reduced Al accumulation was attributed to the altered cell wall properties triggered by pH decrease due to NH4(+) uptake rather than direct competition for the cell wall binding sites between Al(3+) and NH4(+).

  5. Emulsion properties of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Vereijken, J.M.; Merck, K.B.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Emulsions were made with sunflower protein isolate (SI), helianthinin, and sunflower albumins (SFAs). Emulsion formation and stabilization were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength and after heat treatment of the proteins. The emulsions were characterized with respect to average droplet si

  6. Variation for seed phytosterols in sunflower germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds and oils are rich sources of phytosterols, which are important compounds for human nutrition. There is limited information on variability for seed phytosterols in sunflower germplasm. The objective of the present research was to evaluate kernel phytosterol cont...

  7. Microbiological Production of Citric and Isocitric Acids from Sunflower Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana V. Kamzolova; Finogenova, Tatiana V; Igor G. Morgunov

    2008-01-01

    The growth of wild type strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 and its mutant Yarrowia lipolytica N 15 as well the biosynthesis of citric and isocitric acids on sunflower oil were studied. It was indicated that cell growth was associated with the simultaneous utilization of glycerol and free fatty acids produced during oil hydrolysis. The activities of enzymes of glycerol metabolism (glycerol kinase), fatty acid assimilation enzymes of glyoxylate cycle (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) an...

  8. Swelling of root cell walls as an indicator of their functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meychik, N R; Yermakov, I P

    2001-02-01

    The swelling capacity of cell walls isolated from different parts of lupine root was investigated. The water content in fragments of intact roots (Q) and swelling coefficient of standardized samples of cell walls (Kcw) were determined, and the dependences of Q and Kcw on the distance from the root tip (L) were plotted. It was shown that the change in Q value along the stretch of the lupine root reaches its maximum at distances of 1.5-6 cm or 7-12 cm from the root tip in 7-day-old and 14-day-old seedlings, respectively, whereas the Kcw value distribution over the root length is virtually invariable. In the radial direction, both the Q and Kcw values in cortex tissues are about twice higher than in the central cylinder. In our opinion, the changes of both Q and Kcw in the radial direction are associated with different degrees of cross-linking between polymer chains in cell wall structures of root cortex and central cylinder. The results of measurement of the Kcw value are consistent with the widely accepted mechanisms of water transport in roots in the radial direction. These data show that water transport through apoplast to the border between the cortex and central cylinder is accompanied by an increase in the resistance to water flow. Among other factors, this increase is due to a greater degree of cross-linking between cell wall polymers in the central cylinder. The results of measurement of the swelling coefficient of standardized cell wall samples in water and in 10 mM KCl at different pH values show that the swelling capacity of root cell walls varies according to the physicochemical properties of synthetic ion exchangers. Cell walls shrink (cell wall volume decreases) as ion concentration in solution increases and pH decreases. This causes an increase in the hydraulic resistance (or a decrease in the hydraulic conductivity) of apoplast. It was concluded that swelling is determined by the physicochemical properties of the cell wall, whereas the change in the

  9. Influence of mycorrhizal fungi on phytoremediating potential and yield of sunflower in Cd and Pb polluted soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewole M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of mycorrhizal fungi in uptake of heavy metals, pollution response index and yield of sunflower in degraded soils were investigated. It was a greenhouse experiment with 2 arbuscular mycorrhizae (Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices and a non-inoculation that served as control. The treatments were replicated 3 times in a completely randomized design. Each of the treatment consisted of 30 pots and each pot was filled with 5 kg by weight of dried top soil. Solutions of lead acetate and cadmium sulphate at variable levels of: 0, 250, 500, 750, 1000 mg kg-1 and 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 mg kg-1 respectively were used to pollute the soils. Increase in pollution-stressed conditions significantly (P<0.05 reduced the infection of sunflower roots, and the uptake of Pb and Cd in the dry root of sunflower was also significantly (P<0.05 reduced. Also, arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the root infection of sunflower, increased the pollution tolerance and consequently increased the yield of sunflower.

  10. Synergistic action of auxin and ethylene on root elongation inhibition is caused by a reduction of epidermal cell length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Salguero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and ethylene have been largely reported to reduce root elongation in maize primary root. However the effects of auxin are greater than those caused by ethylene. Although auxin stimulates ethylene biosynthesis through the specific increase of ACC synthase, the auxin inhibitory effect on root elongation is not mediated by the auxin-induced increase of ethylene production. Recently it has been demonstrated that root inhibition by the application of the synthetic auxin NAA (1-naphtalenacetic acid) is increased if combined with the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxilic acid) when both compounds are applied at very low concentrations.   Root elongation is basically the result of two processes: a) cell divisions in the meristem where meristematic cells continuously generate new cells and b) subsequently polarized growth by elongation along the root axis as cells leave the meristem and enter the root elongation zone. Our results indicate that exogenous auxin reduced both root elongation and epidermal cell length. In a different way, ethylene at very low concentrations only inhibited root elongation without affecting significantly epidermal cell length. However, these concentrations of ethylene increased the inhibitory effect of auxin on root elongation and cell length. Consequently the results support the hypothesis that ethylene acts synergistically with auxin in the regulation of root elongation and that inhibition by both hormones is due, at least partially, to the reduction of cell length in the epidermal layer.

  11. Regulation of root hair cell differentiation by R3 MYB transcription factors in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    CAPRICE (CPC) encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif and regulates root hair and trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Six additional CPC-like MYB proteins including TRIPTYCHON (TRY), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC2 (ETC2), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC3/CPC-LIKE MYB3 (ETC3/CPL3), TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1), and TRICHOMELESS2/CPC-LIKE MYB4 (TCL2/CPL4) also have the ability to regulate root hair and/or trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis. In this review, we describe our latest findings on how CPC-like MYB transcription factors regulate root hair cell differentiation. Recently, we identified the tomato SlTRY gene as an ortholog of the Arabidopsis TRY gene. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring SlTRY produced more root hairs, a phenotype similar to that of 35S::CPC transgenic plants. CPC is also known to be involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Anthocyanin accumulation was repressed in the SlTRY transgenic plants, suggesting that SlTRY can also influence anthocyanin biosynthesis. We concluded that tomato and Arabidopsis partially use similar transcription factors for root hair cell differentiation, and that a CPC-like R3 MYB may be a key common regulator of plant root-hair development.

  12. Root hair cell differentiation by tomato and Arabidopsis R3 MYB transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumi eTominaga-Wada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available CAPRICE (CPC encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif and regulates root hair and trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Six additional CPC-like MYB proteins including TRIPTYCHON (TRY, ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1, ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC2 (ETC2, ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC3/ CPC-LIKE MYB3 (ETC3/CPL3, TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1 and TRICHOMELESS2/CPC-LIKE MYB4 (TCL2/CPL4 also have the ability to regulate root hair and/or trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis. In this review, we describe our latest findings on how CPC-like MYB transcription factors regulate root hair cell differentiation. Recently, we identified the tomato SlTRY gene as an ortholog of the Arabidopsis TRY gene. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring SlTRY produced more root hairs, a phenotype similar to that of 35S::CPC transgenic plants. CPC is also known to be involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Anthocyanin accumulation was repressed in the SlTRY transgenic plants, suggesting that SlTRY can also influence anthocyanin biosynthesis. We concluded that tomato and Arabidopsis partially use similar transcription factors for root hair cell differentiation, and that a CPC-like R3 MYB may be a key common regulator of plant root-hair development.

  13. Application of laser microdissection to identify the mycorrhizal fungi that establish arbuscules inside root cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBerruti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Obligate symbiotic fungi that form arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF; belonging to the Glomeromycota phylum are some of the most important soil microorganisms. AMFs facilitate mineral nutrient uptake from the soil, in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon, and promote water-stress tolerance and resistance to certain diseases. AMFs colonize the root by producing inter- and intracellular hyphae. When the fungus penetrates the inner cortical cells, it produces a complex ramified structure called arbuscule, which is considered the preferential site for nutrient exchange. Direct DNA extraction from the whole root and sequencing of ribosomal gene regions are commonly carried out to investigate intraradical AMF communities. Nevertheless, this protocol cannot discriminate between the AMFs that actively produce arbuscules and those that do not. To solve this issue, the authors have characterized the AMF community of arbusculated cells through a laser microdissection (LMD approach, combined with sequencing-based taxa identification. The results were then compared with the AMF community that was found from whole root DNA extraction. The AMF communities originating from the LMD samples and the whole root samples differed remarkably. Five taxa were involved in the production of arbuscules, while two taxa were retrieved inside the root but not in the arbusculated cells. Unexpectedly, one taxon was found in the arbusculated cells, but its detection was not possible when extracting from the whole root. Thus, the LMD technique can be considered a powerful tool to obtain more precise knowledge on the symbiotically active intraradical AMF community.

  14. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells.

  15. Properties of lead deposits in cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Tatai, Yuri; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Hayatsu, Manabu; Ono, Manami; Suzuki, Suechika

    2013-01-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in detoxification of heavy metals such as lead (Pb) in plant cells. Most of the Pb taken up by plants accumulates in their roots. However, the detailed properties of Pb complexes in roots remain unclear. We have investigated the properties of Pb deposits in root cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings grown on glass beads bed containing Pb pellets, which are the source of Pb-contamination in shooting range soils. Pb deposits were tightly bound to cell walls. Cell wall fragments containing about 50,000 ppm Pb were prepared from the roots. After extracting Pb from the cell wall fragments using HCl, Pb ions were recombined with the Pb-extracted cell wall fragments in a solution containing Pb acetate. When the cell wall fragments were treated with pectinase (E.C. 3.2.1.15) and were chemically modified with 1-ethyl-3-dimethylamino-propylcarboimide, the Pb-rebinding ability of the treated cell wall fragments decreased. When acid-treated cell wall fragments were incubated in a solution containing Pb(2+) and excess amounts of a chelating agent, Pb recombined with the cell wall fragments were measured to estimate the affinity between Pb(2+) and the cell wall fragments. Our data show that Pb(2+) binds to carboxyl groups of cell walls. The source of the carboxyl groups is suggested to be pectic compounds. A stability constant of the Pb-cell wall complex was estimated to be about 10(8). The role of root cell walls in the mechanism underlying heavy metal tolerance was discussed.

  16. Stage-dependent border cell and carbon flow from roots to rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Ryan E; Dumlao, Matthew R; Samar, Danial; Silk, Wendy K

    2008-04-01

    Rising CO(2) levels in the atmosphere have drawn attention to the important role of soil in sequestering carbon. This project goal was to quantify soil carbon deposition associated with border cell release and exudation from root growth zones. Carbon was measured with a Carlo Erba C/N analyzer in soil from the rhizosphere of mature grasses and, in separate experiments, in soil collected around root growth zones. Root border cells in "rhizosphere soil" (silica sand) were counted using a compound microscope after soil sonication and extraction with surfactant. For sand-grown Bromus carinatus, Zea mays, and Cucumis sativus, young seedlings (with roots shorter than 2 cm) released thousands of border cells, while older root tips released only hundreds. For a variety of native annual and perennial grasses and invasive annual grasses (Nassella pulchra, B. carinatus, B. diandrus, B. hordeaceus, Vulpia microstachys, Aegilops triuncialis, Lolium multiflorum, Zea mays), the rhizosphere of mature root systems contained between 18 and 32 μg C g(-1) sand more than that of the unplanted controls. Spatial analysis of the rhizosphere around the cucumber growth zone confirmed C enrichment there. The root tip provided C to the rhizosphere: 4.6 μg C in front of the growing tip, with the largest deposition, 20.4 μg C, to the rhizosphere surrounding the apical 3 mm (root cap/meristem). These numbers from laboratory studies represent the maximum C that might be released during flooding in soils. Scaling up from the organ scale to the field requires a growth analysis to quantify root tip distributions in space and time.

  17. A cell-type-specific defect in border cell formation in the Acacia mangium root cap developing an extraordinary sheath of sloughed-off cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Izuki; Tange, Takeshi; Osawa, Hiroki

    2011-08-01

    Root caps release border cells, which play central roles in microbe interaction and root protection against soil stresses. However, the number and connectivity of border cells differ widely among plant species. Better understanding of key border-cell phenotype across species will help define the total function of border cells and associated genes. The spatio-temporal detachment of border cells in the leguminous tree Acacia mangium was investigated by using light and fluorescent microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, and their number and structural connectivity compared with that in soybean (Glycine max). Border-like cells with a sheet structure peeled bilaterally from the lateral root cap of A. mangium. Hydroponic root elongation partially facilitated acropetal peeling of border-like cells, which accumulate as a sheath that covers the 0- to 4-mm tip within 1 week. Although root elongation under friction caused basipetal peeling, lateral root caps were minimally trimmed as compared with hydroponic roots. In the meantime, A. mangium columella caps simultaneously released single border cells with a number similar to those in soybean. These results suggest that cell type-specific inhibitory factors induce a distinct defective phenotype in single border-cell formation in A. mangium lateral root caps.

  18. A quantitative analysis of stem cell homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Zhang, Chen; Ghosh, Dipanjana; Gong, Ximing; Xu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The Lugol's staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late 1990s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labeling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol's staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol's staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behavior that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  19. A Quantitative Analysis of Stem Cell Homeostasis in the Arabidopsis Columella Root Cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han eHong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lugol’s staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late ‘90s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labelling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU, the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol’s staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol’s staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behaviour that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  20. Developmental characteristics and response to iron toxicity of root border cells in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Cheng-hua; Zhu, Mei-hong; Cai, Miao-zhen; Liu, Peng; Xu, Gen-di; Wu, Shao-hui

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the Fe2+ effects on root tips in rice plant, experiments were carried out using border cells in vitro. The border cells were pre-planted in aeroponic culture and detached from root tips. Most border cells have a long elliptical shape. The number and the viability of border cells in situ reached the maxima of 1600 and 97.5%, respectively, at 20-25 mm root length. This mortality was more pronounced at the first 1-12 h exposure to 250 mg/L Fe2+ than at the last 12-36 h. After 36 h, the cell viability exposed to 250 mg/L Fe2+ decreased to nought, whereas it was 46.5% at 0 mg/L Fe2+. Increased Fe2+ dosage stimulated the death of detached border cells from rice cultivars. After 4 h Fe2+ treatment, the cell viabilities were > or =80% at 0 and 50 mg/L Fe2+ treatment and were border cells decreased by 10% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. After 24 h Fe2+ treatment, the viabilities of border cells at all the Fe2+ levels were border cells decreased by 20% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. The decreased viabilities of border cells indicated that Fe2+ dosage and treatment time would cause deadly effect on the border cells. The increased cell death could protect the root tips from toxic harm. Therefore, it may protect root from the damage caused by harmful iron toxicity.

  1. Developmental characteristics and response to iron toxicity of root border cells in rice seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-hua XING; Mei-hong ZHU; Miao-zhen CAI; Peng LIU; Gen-di XU; Shao-hui WU

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the Fe2+ effects on root tips in rice plant, experiments were carded out using border cells in vitro. The border cells were pre-planted in aeroponic culture and detached from root tips. Most border cells have a long elliptical shape. The number and the viability of border cells in situ reached the maxima of 1600 and 97.5%, respectively, at 20~25 mm root length. This mortality was more pronounced at the first 1~12 h exposure to 250 mg/L Fe2+ than at the last 12~36 h. After 36 h, the cell viability exposed to 250 mg/L Fe2+ decreased to nought, whereas it was 46.5% at 0 mg/L Fe2+. Increased Fe2+ dosage stimulated the death of detached border cells from rice cultivars. After 4 h Fe2+ treatment, the cell viabilities were≥80% at 0 and 50 mg/L Fe2+ treatment and were <62% at 150, 250 and 350 mg/L Fe2+ treatment; The viability of border cells decreased by 10% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. After 24 h Fe2+ treatment, the viabilities of border cells at all the Fe2+ levels were <65%; The viability of border cells decreased by 20% when the Fe2+ concentration increased by 100 mg/L. The decreased viabilities of border cells indicated that Fe2+ dosage and treatment time would cause deadly effect on the border cells. The increased cell death could protect the root tips from toxic harm. Therefore, it may protect root from the damage caused by harmful iron toxicity.

  2. Optimization of biofloc production in Azospirillum brasilense (MTCC-125) and evaluation of its adherence with the roots of certain crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Melvin; Karthikeyan, M B; Sekar, C; Deiveekasundaram, M

    2010-10-01

    The phenomenon of flocculation in Azospirillum brasilense (MTCC-125) was studied under different combinations of carbon and nitrogen sources. Fructose and Potassium nitrate at a pH of 6.4 in the cultural medium favour a higher bio-floc production. The biofloc was studied for root adhesion and its survival efficiency in the rhizoplane and rhizosphere of certain crops such as sorghum and sunflower under dryland condition. It has been demonstrated that the flocculated cultures of Azospirillum were found to have maximum adhesion to the root surface and higher survival rate in the rhizoplane and rhizosphere under different moisture stressed conditions as compared to the log phase cells of Azospirillum.

  3. Redox Changes During the Cell Cycle in the Embryonic Root Meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Simone, Ambra; Hubbard, Rachel; Viñegra de la Torre, Natanael; Velappan, Yazhini; Wilson, Michael; Considine, Michael J; Soppe, Wim J J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-05-30

    The aim of this study was to characterize redox changes in the nuclei and cytosol occurring during the mitotic cell cycle in the embryonic roots of germinating Arabidopsis seedlings, and to determine how redox cycling was modified in mutants with a decreased capacity for ascorbate synthesis. Using an in vivo reduction-oxidation (redox) reporter (roGFP2), we show that transient oxidation of the cytosol and the nuclei occurred at G1 in the synchronized dividing cells of the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, with reduction at G2 and mitosis. This redox cycle was absent from low ascorbate mutants in which nuclei were significantly more oxidized than controls. The cell cycle-dependent increase in nuclear size was impaired in the ascorbate-deficient mutants, which had fewer cells per unit area in the root proliferation zone. The transcript profile of the dry seeds and size of the imbibed seeds was strongly influenced by low ascorbate but germination, dormancy release and seed aging characteristics were unaffected. These data demonstrate the presence of a redox cycle within the plant cell cycle and that the redox state of the nuclei is an important factor in cell cycle progression. Controlled oxidation is a key feature of the early stages of the plant cell cycle. However, sustained mild oxidation restricts nuclear functions and impairs progression through the cell cycle leading to fewer cells in the root apical meristem. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  4. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita

    OpenAIRE

    Radin, D. N.; Eisenback, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg prod...

  5. Phytoglobins Improve Hypoxic Root Growth by Alleviating Apical Meristem Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Mohamed M; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxic root growth in maize (Zea mays) is influenced by the expression of phytoglobins (ZmPgbs). Relative to the wild type, suppression of ZmPgb1.1 or ZmPgb1.2 inhibits the growth of roots exposed to 4% oxygen, causing structural abnormalities in the root apical meristems. These effects were accompanied by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), possibly through the transcriptional induction of four Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs TUNEL-positive nuclei in meristematic cells indicated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) in the process. These cells also accumulated nitric oxide and stained heavily for ethylene biosynthetic transcripts. A sharp increase in the expression level of several 1-aminocyclopropane synthase (ZmAcs2, ZmAcs6, and ZmAcs7), 1-aminocyclopropane oxidase (Aco15, Aco20, Aco31, and Aco35), and ethylene-responsive (ZmErf2 and ZmEbf1) genes was observed in hypoxic ZmPgb-suppressing roots, which overproduced ethylene. Inhibiting ROS synthesis with diphenyleneiodonium or ethylene perception with 1-methylcyclopropene suppressed PCD, increased BAX inhibitor-1, an effective attenuator of the death programs in eukaryotes, and restored root growth. Hypoxic roots overexpressing ZmPgbs had the lowest level of ethylene and showed a reduction in ROS staining and TUNEL-positive nuclei in the meristematic cells. These roots retained functional meristems and exhibited the highest growth performance when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of Pgbs in protecting root apical meristems from hypoxia-induced PCD through mechanisms initiated by nitric oxide and mediated by ethylene via ROS. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Histological Changes of Small Intestinal Mucosa of Cocks Due to Sunflower Meal Single Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hamedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study was conducted to evaluate histological changes of small intestine of adult cocks due to sunflower meal single diet. Approach: Twenty adult cocks were randomly allocated into two equal groups (experimental and control; control group fed with basal diet, while Sunflower meal supplemented to basal diet of experimental group gradually with the ratio of 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 during a week and 100% during the next week. At the end of the period all animals sacrificed and 6-μm transverse sections from the middle parts of duodenum, jejunum and ileum prepared and stained with HandE and PAS. Villus length, villus width, crypt depth, villus length/crypt depth ratio and goblet cell number per unit area were measured. Chemical composition of sunflower meal and basal diet determined and metabolizable energy of sunflower meal and basal diets measured. Data analyzed by student's t test. Results: Crude fiber and crude protein of sunflower meal were 81% and 44% higher than basal diet respectively, while both AME and TME were about 40% lower in sunflower meal compared to basal diet. No difference observed between AME and AMEn or TME and TMEn in both diets. In duodenum of birds in experimental group, a significant decrease in villus length and villus length/crypt depth ratio and a significant increase in number of goblet cells observed while in jejunum there was only a significant increase in goblet cell number. In ileum of these birds number of goblet cells increased while villus length, villus width and villus length/crypt depth ratio decreased significantly compared to control group. Conclusion: Single feeding with sunflower meal can adversely affect morphological parameters of small intestinal mucosa of cocks especially in ileum, which may be due to its low energy and/or high fiber content.

  7. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures.

  8. Comparative pulping of sunflower stalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Barbash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure of holocellulose content determination in non-wood plant raw materials was developed. The strength properties of pulp obtained from sunflower stalks by neutral-sulphite, soda, alkaline sulphite-anthraquinone-ethanol and peracetic methods of delignification were studied. Methodology of comparison of plant materials delignification methods using new lignin-carbohydrate diagram was proposed. It was shown, that the alkaline sulphite-anthraquinone-ethanol method of pulping is characterized by the highest delignification degree and is the most efficient among the studied methods

  9. Control of Leaf Expansion by Nitrogen Nutrition in Sunflower Plants : ROLE OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND TURGOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, J W; Boyer, J S

    1982-04-01

    Nitrogen nutrition strongly affected the growth rate of young sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. When plants were grown from seed on either of two levels of N availability, a 33% decrease in tissue N of expanding leaves was associated with a 75% overall inhibition of leaf growth. Almost all of the growth inhibition resulted from a depression of the daytime growth rate. Measurements of pressure-induced water flux through roots showed that N deficiency decreased root hydraulic conductivity by about half. Thus, N deficiency lowered the steady-state water potential of expanding leaves during the daytime when transpiration was occurring. As a result, N-deficient leaves were unable to maintain adequate turgor for growth in the daytime. N deficiency also decreased the hydraulic conductivity for water movement into expanding leaf cells in the absence of transpiration, but growth inhibition at night was much less than in the daytime. N nutrition had no detectable effects on plastic extensibility or the threshold turgor for growth.

  10. Al-induced root cell wall chemical components differences of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-13

    Jul 13, 2011 ... Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Plant Nutrition, ... in cell wall chemical components of root tip cell between wheat lines with different Al tolerances induce ..... the highly significant interaction between cultivar × con- .... formation is a sensitive marker for genotypic aluminium sensitivity in.

  11. Cell- and Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analyses of Medicago truncatula Root Nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Moling, S.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Pereira, P.A.; Bisseling, T.; Becker, J.D.; Küster, H.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes have the unique ability to host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria as symbiosomes inside root nodule cells. To get insight into this key process, which forms the heart of the endosymbiosis, we isolated specific cells/tissues at different stages of symbiosome formation from nodules of the mod

  12. Effects of weak 16 3/2 Hz magnetic fields on growth parameters of young sunflower and wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G; Tausz, M; Köck, M; Grill, Dieter

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies on effects of magnetic fields on plants focussed on the power frequencies (50-60 Hz), but in Austria and Germany electric railways are powered by a frequency of 16 2/3) Hz. In the present study, sunflower and wheat seedlings were exposed to 16 2/3 Hz sinusoidal 20 muT (rms) vertical magnetic fields. Seeds were germinated in a germination roll and grown for 12 days under continued exposure. Seven series with sunflower and six series with wheat were done over 2 years. Sunflower seedlings exposed to experimental magnetic field showed small, but significant increases in total fresh weights, shoot fresh weights, and root fresh weights, whereas dry weights and germination rates remained unaffected. Experimentally treated wheat exhibited marginally (but significantly) higher root fresh and dry weights, total fresh weights, and higher germination rates. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina Strains Causing Pathogenicity on Sunflower and Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali N. Khan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina is the most devastating pathogen which causes charcoal rot and root rot diseases in various economically important crops. Three strains M. phaseolina 1156, M. phaseolina 1160, and M. phaseolina PCMC/F1 were tested for their virulence on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.. The strains showed high virulence on both hosts with a disease score of 2 on chickpea and sunflower. The strains also increased the hydrogen per oxide (H2O2 content by 1.4- to 1.6-fold in root as well as shoot of chickpea and sunflower. A significant increase in antioxidant enzymes was observed in fungal infected plants which indicated prevalence of oxidative stress during pathogen propagation. The M. phaseolina strains also produced hydrolytic enzymes such as lipase, amylase, and protease with solubilization zone of 5–43 mm, 5–45 mm, and 12–35 mm, respectively. The M. phaseolina strains were identified by 18S rRNA and analyzed for genetic diversity by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. The findings based on RAPD markers and 18S rRNA sequence analysis clearly indicate genetic variation among the strains collected from different hosts. The genetically diverse strains were found to be pathogenic to sunflower and chickpea.

  14. Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina Strains Causing Pathogenicity on Sunflower and Chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ali N; Shair, Faluk; Malik, Kamran; Hayat, Zafar; Khan, Muhammad Ayub; Hafeez, Fauzia Yusuf; Hassan, Muhammad Nadeem

    2017-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is the most devastating pathogen which causes charcoal rot and root rot diseases in various economically important crops. Three strains M. phaseolina 1156, M. phaseolina 1160, and M. phaseolina PCMC/F1 were tested for their virulence on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The strains showed high virulence on both hosts with a disease score of 2 on chickpea and sunflower. The strains also increased the hydrogen per oxide (H2O2) content by 1.4- to 1.6-fold in root as well as shoot of chickpea and sunflower. A significant increase in antioxidant enzymes was observed in fungal infected plants which indicated prevalence of oxidative stress during pathogen propagation. The M. phaseolina strains also produced hydrolytic enzymes such as lipase, amylase, and protease with solubilization zone of 5-43 mm, 5-45 mm, and 12-35 mm, respectively. The M. phaseolina strains were identified by 18S rRNA and analyzed for genetic diversity by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The findings based on RAPD markers and 18S rRNA sequence analysis clearly indicate genetic variation among the strains collected from different hosts. The genetically diverse strains were found to be pathogenic to sunflower and chickpea.

  15. Comparison of Selenium Toxicity in Sunflower and Maize Seedlings Grown in Hydroponic Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garousi, Farzaneh; Veres, Szilvia; Kovács, Béla

    2016-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that selenium (Se) at low concentrations is beneficial, whereas high Se concentrations can induce toxicity. Controlling Se uptake, metabolism, translocation and accumulation in plants is important to decrease potential health risks and helping to select proper biofortification methods to improve the nutritional content of plant-based foods. The uptake and distribution of Se, changes in Se content, and effects of various concentrations of Se in two forms (sodium selenite and sodium selenate) on sunflower and maize plants were measured in nutrient solution experiments. Results revealed the Se content in shoots and roots of both sunflower and maize plants significantly increased as the Se level increased. In this study, the highest exposure concentrations (30 and 90 mg/L, respectively) caused toxicity in both sunflower and maize. While both Se forms damaged and inhibited plant growth, each behaved differently, as toxicity due to selenite was observed more than in the selenate treatments. Sunflower demonstrated a high Se accumulation capacity, with higher translocation of selenate from roots to shoots compared with selenite. Since in seleniferous soils, a high change in plants' capability exists to uptake Se from these soils and also most of the cultivated crop plants have a bit tolerance to high Se levels, distinction of plants with different Se tolerance is important. This study has tried to discuss about it.

  16. Microbiological Production of Citric and Isocitric Acids from Sunflower Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Kamzolova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of wild type strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 and its mutant Yarrowia lipolytica N 15 as well the biosynthesis of citric and isocitric acids on sunflower oil were studied. It was indicated that cell growth was associated with the simultaneous utilization of glycerol and free fatty acids produced during oil hydrolysis. The activities of enzymes of glycerol metabolism (glycerol kinase, fatty acid assimilation enzymes of glyoxylate cycle (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase and citric acid cycle were comparatively assayed in Y. lipolytica grown on sunflower oil, glycerol and oleic acid. Glycerol kinase and enzymes of glyoxylate cycle were active during the whole period of cell cultivation on sunflower oil. Citric acid production and a ratio between citric and isocitric acids depended on both the strain used and the medium composition. It was revealed that wild type strain Y. lipolytica VKM Y-2373 produced almost equal amounts of citric and isocitric acids at pH=4.5 and predominantly accumulated isocitric acid at pH=6.0. The mutant Y. lipolytica N 15 produced only citric acid (150 g/L with mass yield (YCA of 1.32 g/g. Biochemical characteristics of mutant strain Y. lipolytica N 15 were discussed.

  17. Single-cell and coupled GRN models of cell patterning in the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Buylla Elena R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental work has uncovered some of the genetic components required to maintain the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche (SCN and its structure. Two main pathways are involved. One pathway depends on the genes SHORTROOT and SCARECROW and the other depends on the PLETHORA genes, which have been proposed to constitute the auxin readouts. Recent evidence suggests that a regulatory circuit, composed of WOX5 and CLE40, also contributes to the SCN maintenance. Yet, we still do not understand how the niche is dynamically maintained and patterned or if the uncovered molecular components are sufficient to recover the observed gene expression configurations that characterize the cell types within the root SCN. Mathematical and computational tools have proven useful in understanding the dynamics of cell differentiation. Hence, to further explore root SCN patterning, we integrated available experimental data into dynamic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN models and addressed if these are sufficient to attain observed gene expression configurations in the root SCN in a robust and autonomous manner. Results We found that an SCN GRN model based only on experimental data did not reproduce the configurations observed within the root SCN. We developed several alternative GRN models that recover these expected stable gene configurations. Such models incorporate a few additional components and interactions in addition to those that have been uncovered. The recovered configurations are stable to perturbations, and the models are able to recover the observed gene expression profiles of almost all the mutants described so far. However, the robustness of the postulated GRNs is not as high as that of other previously studied networks. Conclusions These models are the first published approximations for a dynamic mechanism of the A. thaliana root SCN cellular pattering. Our model is useful to formally show that the data now available are not

  18. Role of chromatin factors in Arabidopsis root stem cell maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornet, N.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311445713

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells replenish the cells present in an organism throughout its lifetime and sustain growth. They have unique characteristics: the capability to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into several cell types. Recently, it has become clear that chromatin factors support these unique

  19. Role of chromatin factors in Arabidopsis root stem cell maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornet, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells replenish the cells present in an organism throughout its lifetime and sustain growth. They have unique characteristics: the capability to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into several cell types. Recently, it has become clear that chromatin factors support these unique featu

  20. PRL1 modulates root stem cell niche activity and meristem size through WOX5 and PLTs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Wang, Shuangfeng; Li, Kexue; Szakonyi, Dóra; Koncz, Csaba; Li, Xia

    2015-02-01

    The stem cell niche in the root meristem maintains pluripotent stem cells to ensure a constant supply of cells for root growth. Despite extensive progress, the molecular mechanisms through which root stem cell fates and stem cell niche activity are determined remain largely unknown. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Pleiotropic Regulatory Locus 1 (PRL1) encodes a WD40-repeat protein subunit of the spliceosome-activating Nineteen Complex (NTC) that plays a role in multiple stress, hormone and developmental signaling pathways. Here, we show that PRL1 is involved in the control of root meristem size and root stem cell niche activity. PRL1 is strongly expressed in the root meristem and its loss of function mutation results in disorganization of the quiescent center (QC), premature stem cell differentiation, aberrant cell division, and reduced root meristem size. Our genetic studies indicate that PRL1 is required for confined expression of the homeodomain transcription factor WOX5 in the QC and acts upstream of the transcription factor PLETHORA (PLT) in modulating stem cell niche activity and root meristem size. These findings define a role for PRL1 as an important determinant of PLT signaling that modulates maintenance of the stem cell niche and root meristem size. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sulfur nutrient availability regulates root elongation by affecting root indole-3-acetic acid levels and the stem cell niche

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Zhao; Yu Wu; Lei Gao; Jun Ma; Chuan-You Li; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential macronutrient for plants with numerous biological functions. However, the influence of sulfur nutrient availability on the regulation of root development remains largely unknown. Here, we report the response of Arabidopsis thaliana L. root development and growth to different levels of sulfate, demonstrating that low sulfate levels promote the primary root elongation. By using various reporter lines, we examined in vivo IAA level and distribution, cel division, and root meristem in response to different sulfate levels. Meanwhile the dynamic changes of in vivo cysteine, glutathione, and IAA levels were measured. Root cysteine, glutathione, and IAA levels are positively correlated with external sulfate levels in the physiological range, which eventual y affect root system architecture. Low sulfate levels also downregulate the genes involved in auxin biosynthesis and transport, and elevate the accumulation of PLT1 and PLT2. This study suggests that sulfate level affects the primary root elongation by regulating the endogenous auxin level and root stem cel niche maintenance.

  2. Stem cells from wildtype and Friedreich's ataxia mice present similar neuroprotective properties in dorsal root ganglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Jones

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders share a common susceptibility to oxidative stress, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson Disease, Huntington Disease and Friedreich's ataxia. In a previous work, we proved that stem cell-conditioned medium increased the survival of cells isolated from Friedreich's ataxia patients, when submitted to oxidative stress. The aim of the present work is to confirm this same effect in dorsal root ganglia cells isolated from YG8 mice, a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia. In this disorder, the neurons of the dorsal root ganglia are the first to degenerate. Also, in this work we cultured mesenchymal stem cells isolated from YG8 mice, in order to compare them with their wildtype counterpart. To this end, dorsal root ganglia primary cultures isolated from YG8 mice were exposed to oxidative stress and cultured with conditioned medium from either wildtype or YG8 stem cells. As a result, the conditioned medium increased the survival of the dorsal root ganglia cells. This coincided with an increase in oxidative stress-related markers and frataxin expression levels. BDNF, NT3 and NT4 trophic factors were detected in the conditioned medium of both wild-type and YG8 stem cells, all which bind to the various neuronal cell types present in the dorsal root ganglia. No differences were observed in the stem cells isolated from wildtype and YG8 mice. The results presented confirm the possibility that autologous stem cell transplantation may be a viable therapeutic approach in protecting dorsal root ganglia neurons of Friedreich's ataxia patients.

  3. Developmentally regulated epitopes of cell surface arabinogalactan proteins and their relation to root tissue pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J P; Linstead, P J; Peart, J; Cooper, C; Roberts, K

    1991-11-01

    Two polymorphic forms of an extracellular arabinogalactan protein (AGP1 and AGP2), obtained from the conditioned media of two carrot suspension-cultured cell lines, have been identified in terms of binding of the anti-plasma membrane antibodies JIM4 and MAC207. AGP1 and AGP2 have been used as immunogens to generate further anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies. JIM14 identified an epitope carried by AGP2 and also by glycoproteins of low molecular weight localized to the plant cell wall. In addition, further antibodies (JIM13 and JIM15) identified carbohydrate epitopes of the AGPs that also occur on plasma membrane glycoproteins and are expressed by patterns of cells that reflect cell position at the carrot root apex. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that JIM13 recognized the surface of cells forming the epidermis and cells marking the region and axis of the future xylem. JIM15 recognized a pattern of cells directly complementary to the JIM13 pattern. The panel of anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies now available indicates groups of cells within the root meristem that may reflect an early pre-pattern of the tissues of the mature root structure and suggests extensive modulation of cell surface AGPs during cell development and the positioning of cells within the apex.

  4. Inhibition of Human Cervical Cancer Cell Growth by Ethanolic Extract of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Punarnava Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indian traditional medicine, Boerhaavia diffusa (punarnava roots have been widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, jaundice, enlargement of spleen, abdominal pain and as an anti-stress agent. Pharmacological evaluation of the crude ethanolic extract of B. diffusa roots has been shown to possess antiproliferative and immunomodulatory properties. The extract of B. diffusa was studied for anti-proliferative effects on the growth of HeLa cells and for its effect on cell cycle. Bio-assays of extracts from B. diffusa root showed that a methanol : chloroform fraction (BDF 5 had an antiproliferative effect on HeLa cells. After 48 h of exposure, this fraction at a concentration of 200 μg mL−1 significantly reduced cell proliferation with visible morphological changes in HeLa cells. Cell cycle analysis suggests that antiproliferative effect of BDF 5 could be due to inhibition of DNA synthesis in S-phase of cell cycle in HeLa cells, whereas no significant change in cell cycle was detected in control cells. The fraction BDF 5 caused cell death via apoptosis as evident from DNA fragmentation and caspase-9 activation. Thus the extract has potential to be evaluated in detail to assess the molecular mechanism-mediated anticancer activities of this plant.

  5. Direct conversion of root primordium into shoot meristem relies on timing of stem cell niche development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosspopoff, Olga; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Saffar, Julie; Lecorgne, Lena; Gey, Delphine; Caillieux, Erwann; Colot, Vincent; Roudier, François; Hilson, Pierre; Berthomé, Richard; Da Costa, Marco; Rech, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    To understand how the identity of an organ can be switched, we studied the transformation of lateral root primordia (LRP) into shoot meristems in Arabidopsis root segments. In this system, the cytokinin-induced conversion does not involve the formation of callus-like structures. Detailed analysis showed that the conversion sequence starts with a mitotic pause and is concomitant with the differential expression of regulators of root and shoot development. The conversion requires the presence of apical stem cells, and only LRP at stages VI or VII can be switched. It is engaged as soon as cell divisions resume because their position and orientation differ in the converting organ compared with the undisturbed emerging LRP. By alternating auxin and cytokinin treatments, we showed that the root and shoot organogenetic programs are remarkably plastic, as the status of the same plant stem cell niche can be reversed repeatedly within a set developmental window. Thus, the networks at play in the meristem of a root can morph in the span of a couple of cell division cycles into those of a shoot, and back, through transdifferentiation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as early signals in root hair cells responding to rhizobial nodulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in supporting polar growth in pollen tubes, fucoid cells and root hair cells. However, there is limited evidence showing ROS changes during the earliest stages of the interaction between legume roots and rhizobia. We recently reported using Phaseolus vulgaris as a model system, the occurrence of a transient increase of ROS, within seconds, at the tip of actively growing root hair cells after treatment with Nod factors (NFs).1 This transient response is NFs-specific, and clearly distinct from the ROS changes induced by a fungal elicitor, with which sustained increases in ROS signal, is observed. Since ROS levels are transiently elevated after NFs perception, we propose that this ROS response is specific of the symbiotic interaction. Furthermore, the observed ROS changes correlate spatially and temporarily with the reported transient increases in calcium levels suggesting key roles for calcium and ROS during the early NF perception.

  7. Subcellular localization of Cd in the root cells of Allium sativum by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Donghua Liu; Ingrid Kottke

    2003-06-01

    The ultrastructural investigation of the root cells of Allium sativum L. exposed to three different concentrations of Cd (100 M, 1 mM and 10 mM) for 9 days was carried out. The results showed that Cd induced several significant ultrastructural changes – high vacuolization in cytoplasm, deposition of electron-dense material in vacuoles and nucleoli and increment of disintegrated organelles. Data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed that Cd was localized in the electron-dense precipitates in the root cells treated with 10 mM Cd. High amounts of Cd were mainly accumulated in the vacuoles and nucleoli of cortical cells in differentiating and mature root tissues. The mechanisms of detoxification and tolerance of Cd are briefly explained.

  8. Application of laser microdissection to identify the mycorrhizal fungi that establish arbuscules inside root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berruti, Andrea; Borriello, Roberto; Lumini, Erica; Scariot, Valentina; Bianciotto, Valeria; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Obligate symbiotic fungi that form arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF; belonging to the Glomeromycota phylum) are some of the most important soil microorganisms. AMFs facilitate mineral nutrient uptake from the soil, in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon, and promote water-stress tolerance and resistance to certain diseases. AMFs colonize the root by producing inter- and intra-cellular hyphae. When the fungus penetrates the inner cortical cells, it produces a complex ramified structure called arbuscule, which is considered the preferential site for nutrient exchange. Direct DNA extraction from the whole root and sequencing of ribosomal gene regions are commonly carried out to investigate intraradical AMF communities. Nevertheless, this protocol cannot discriminate between the AMFs that actively produce arbuscules and those that do not. To solve this issue, the authors have characterized the AMF community of arbusculated cells (AC) through a laser microdissection (LMD) approach, combined with sequencing-based taxa identification. The results were then compared with the AMF community that was found from whole root DNA extraction. The AMF communities originating from the LMD samples and the whole root samples differed remarkably. Five taxa were involved in the production of arbuscules, while two taxa were retrieved inside the root but not in the AC. Unexpectedly, one taxon was found in the AC, but its detection was not possible when extracting from the whole root. Thus, the LMD technique can be considered a powerful tool to obtain more precise knowledge on the symbiotically active intraradical AMF community.

  9. Withania somnifera Root Extract Has Potent Cytotoxic Effect against Human Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Babli; Singh, Shruti; Thakur, Suman S

    2015-01-01

    In Ayurveda, Withania somnifera is commonly known as Ashwagandha, its roots are specifically used in medicinal and clinical applications. It possesses numerous therapeutic actions which include anti-inflammatory, sedative, hypnotic and narcotic. Extracts from this plant have been reported for its anticancer properties. In this study we evaluated for the first time, the cytotoxic effect of Withania root extract on human malignant melanoma A375 cells. The crude extract of Withania was tested for cytotoxicity against A375 cells by MTT assay. Cell morphology of treated A375 cells was visualized through phase contrast as well as fluorescence microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to check DNA fragmentation of the crude extract treated cells. Crude extract of Withania root has the potency to reduce viable cell count in dose as well as time dependent manner. Morphological change of the A375 cells was also observed in treated groups in comparison to untreated or vehicle treated control. Apoptotic body and nuclear blebbing were observed in DAPI stained treated cells under fluorescence microscope. A ladder of fragmented DNA was noticed in treated cells. Thus it might be said that the crude water extract of Withania somnifera has potent cytotoxic effect on human malignant melanoma A375 cells.

  10. Extracellular Trapping of Soil Contaminants by Root Border Cells: New Insights into Plant Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha C. Hawes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil and water pollution by metals and other toxic chemicals is difficult to measure and control, and, as such, presents an ongoing global threat to sustainable agriculture and human health. Efforts to remove contaminants by plant-mediated pathways, or “phytoremediation”, though widely studied, have failed to yield consistent, predictable removal of biological and chemical contaminants. Emerging research has revealed that one major limitation to using plants to clean up the environment is that plants are programmed to protect themselves: Like white blood cells in animals, border cells released from plant root tips carry out an extracellular trapping process to neutralize threats and prevent injury to the host. Variability in border cell trapping has been found to be correlated with variation in sensitivity of roots to aluminum, and removal of border cell results in increased Al uptake into the root tip. Studies now have implicated border cells in responses of diverse plant roots to a range of heavy metals, including arsenic, copper, cadmium, lead, mercury, iron, and zinc. A better understanding of border cell extracellular traps and their role in preventing toxin uptake may facilitate efforts to use plants as a nondestructive approach to neutralize environmental threats.

  11. Chromosomal aberrations induced by Glycidol in Allium cepa L root meristem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Panneerselvam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycidol is used as a stabilizer in the manufacture of vinyl polymers and natural oils and as an intermediate in the synthesis of glycerol, glycidyl ethers, and amines. It is also used as an alkylating agent,demulsifier, and dye-leveling agent and for sterilizing milk of magnesia. Glycidol is an alkylating agent which reacts readily with glutathione; it causes a decrease in glutathione content in rat liver, probably reflecting its binding to glutathione. It is a suspected reproductive toxicant and exposure to it has the potential to negatively affect the human reproductive system. The study investigated the cytotoxic effects of glycidol in Allium cepa L root meristem cells. Different concentrations of glycidol ranging 10, 20, 40 and 50μg/ml for 1, 2, 3 and 5h were treated with root meristem cells of Allium cepa L. Fuelgen squash technique was used to determine the aberrations in root tip cells. For each concentration 3000 well-spread cells were scored and cytological abnormalities such as break, gap, exchange, multiple breaks and chromosome fragments were observed. One way analysis of variance was used the study the significant different control and treatment exposed root tip cells.Significant difference between control and glycidol exposed cells were observed. Increasing concentrations increased the number of chromosomal aberrations.

  12. Regulation of root hair cell differentiation by R3 MYB transcription factors in tomato and Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    CAPRICE (CPC) encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif and regulates root hair and trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Six additional CPC-like MYB proteins including TRIPTYCHON (TRY), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC2 (ETC2), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC3/CPC-LIKE MYB3 (ETC3/CPL3), TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1), and TRICHOMELESS2/CPC-LIKE MYB4 (TCL2/CPL4) also have the ability to regulate root hair and/or trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis. In this r...

  13. Automatic Quantification of the Number of Intracellular Compartments in Arabidopsis thaliana Root Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, Vincent; Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-01-01

    In the era of quantitative biology, it is increasingly required to quantify confocal microscopy images. If possible, quantification should be performed in an automatic way, in order to avoid bias from the experimenter, to allow the quantification of a large number of samples, and to increase reproducibility between laboratories. In this protocol, we describe procedures for automatic counting of the number of intracellular compartments in Arabidopsis root cells, which can be used for example to study endocytosis or secretory trafficking pathways and to compare membrane organization between different genotypes or treatments. While developed for Arabidopsis roots, this method can be used on other tissues, cell types and plant species. PMID:28255574

  14. Stem cells as the root of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balic, Anamaria; Dorado, Jorge; Alonso-Gomez, Mercedes; Heeschen, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.heeschen@cnio.es

    2012-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that stem cells play a crucial role not only in the generation and maintenance of different tissues, but also in the development and progression of malignancies. For the many solid cancers, it has now been shown that they harbor a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells that bear stem cell features and therefore, these cells are termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-propagating cells. CSC are exclusively tumorigenic and essential drivers for tumor progression and metastasis. Moreover, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma does not only contain one homogeneous population of CSC rather than diverse subpopulations that may have evolved during tumor progression. One of these populations is called migrating CSC and can be characterized by CXCR4 co-expression. Only these cells are capable of evading the primary tumor and traveling to distant sites such as the liver as the preferred site of metastatic spread. Clinically even more important, however, is the observation that CSC are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy resulting in their relative enrichment during treatment and rapid relapse of disease. Many laboratories are now working on the further in-depth characterization of these cells, which may eventually allow for the identification of their Achilles heal and lead to novel treatment modalities for fighting this deadly disease.

  15. Calcium movement, graviresponsiveness and the structure of columella cells and columella tissues in roots of Allium cepa L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Allium cepa L. cv. Yellow are differentially responsive to gravity. Long (e.g. 40 mm) roots are strongly graviresponsive, while short (c.g. 4 mm) roots are minimally responsive to gravity. Although columella cells of graviresponsive roots are larger than those of nongraviresponsive roots, they partition their volumes to cellular organelles similarly. The movement of amyloplasts and nuclei in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature. Furthermore, there is no significant difference in the rates of organellar redistribution when graviresponsive and nongraviresponsive roots are oriented horizontally. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of longer roots correlates positively with (1) their caps being 9-6 times more voluminous, (2) their columella tissues being 42 times more voluminous, (3) their caps having 15 times more columella cells, and (4) their columella tissues having relative volumes 4.4 times larger than those of shorter, nongraviresponsive roots. Graviresponsive roots that are oriented horizontally are characterized by a strongly polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip from the upper to the lower side, while similarly oriented nongraviresponsive roots exhibit only a minimal polar transport of 45Ca2+. These results indicate that the differential graviresponsiveness of roots of A. cepa is probably not due to either (1) ultrastructural differences in their columella cells, (2) differences in the rates of organellar redistribution when roots are oriented horizontally. Rather, these results indicate the graviresponsiveness may require an extensive columella tissue, which, in turn, may be necessary for polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip.

  16. Brassinosteroid signaling directs formative cell divisions and protophloem differentiation in Arabidopsis root meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yeon Hee; Breda, Alice; Hardtke, Christian S

    2017-01-15

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) trigger an intracellular signaling cascade through its receptors BR INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), BRI1-LIKE 1 (BRL1) and BRL3. Recent studies suggest that BR-independent inputs related to vascular differentiation, for instance root protophloem development, modulate downstream BR signaling components. Here, we report that protophloem sieve element differentiation is indeed impaired in bri1 brl1 brl3 mutants, although this effect might not be mediated by canonical downstream BR signaling components. We also found that their small meristem size is entirely explained by reduced cell elongation, which is, however, accompanied by supernumerary formative cell divisions in the radial dimension. Thus, reduced cell expansion in conjunction with growth retardation, because of the need to accommodate supernumerary formative divisions, can account for the overall short root phenotype of BR signaling mutants. Tissue-specific re-addition of BRI1 activity partially rescued subsets of these defects through partly cell-autonomous, partly non-cell-autonomous effects. However, protophloem-specific BRI1 expression essentially rescued all major bri1 brl1 brl3 root meristem phenotypes. Our data suggest that BR perception in the protophloem is sufficient to systemically convey BR action in the root meristem context.

  17. PLASMALEMMA PATCH CLAMP EXPERIMENTS IN PLANT-ROOT CELLS - PROCEDURE FOR FAST ISOLATION OF PROTOPLASTS WITH MINIMAL EXPOSURE TO CELL-WALL DEGRADING ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOGELZANG, SA; PRINS, HBA

    1992-01-01

    A convenient and rapid isolation procedure for root cell protoplasts suitable for patch clamp experiments. was developed for root cells of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum and Plantago species, grown on hydroculture. The procedure is based on a minimal exposure of cells to cell wall degrading enzyme

  18. Tooth root regeneration using dental follicle cell sheets in combination with a dentin matrix - based scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Li, Jie; Zou, Qing; Xie, Dan; Chen, Yali; Wang, Hang; Zheng, Xiaohui; Long, Jie; Tang, Wei; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell mediated tissue engineering has been acknowledged as a prospective strategy for repairing and replacing damaged and lost tissues. However, the low survival rate of implanted stem cells proves to be a major challenge in the management of transplantation failures. While previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of tissue engineered cell sheets in improving the survival rate of implanted cells, we have recently demonstrated the use of treated dentin matrix (TDM) as a biological scaffold and dental follicle cells (DFCs) as the seeding cells for dentinogenesis and tooth root construction. This study proposes a strategy utilizing TDM with human dental follicle cell sheets (DFCSs) for root regeneration. The biological characteristics and changes of human DFCSs under the effect of TDM were studied with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. DFCSs combined with TDM were implanted subcutaneously into the dorsum of mice. Histological examination of the harvested grafts revealed a whirlpool-like alignment of the DFCs in multiple layers that were positive for COLI, integrinβ1, fibronectin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), suggestive of the formation of a rich extracellular matrix. DFCSs, under the effect of TDM, highly expressed DMP-1 and bone sialoprotein (BSP), indicating their potential for odontogenesis and osteogenesis. Importantly, in vivo, TDM could induce and support DFCSs to develop new dentin-pulp like tissues and cementum-periodontal complexes that were positive for markers such as DSP, nestin and VIII factors, COLI and cementum attachment protein (CAP), implying successful root regeneration. Therefore, DFCSs combined with TDM may prove to be a better strategy for the construction of tooth root, and is a prospective approach that could be utilized for the treatment of root or tooth defect or loss in future.

  19. Influence of hydroxyurea on cell divisions and microtubular cytoskeleton in Allium cepa root meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Q. Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In onion roots, hydroxyurea (HU causes a gradual depression of mitotic activity which ceases after 24-36 hrs. The effect is reversible; divisions begin after several hours of recovery and after 12-14 hrs about 90% cells undergo mitosis. Mitotic activity commences in the distal region of the apical meristem, and as a wave it spreads towards the apex. In the roots treated with HU for a short time, the tubulin immunofluorescence method reveals normal arrays of microtubules (MTs. After 36 hrs of HU treatment there are only cortical and endocytoplasmatic MTs. In the recovering roots, preprophase bands (PB mitotic spindles and phragmoplasts appear. Some PBs are split into two parallel rings. These abnormal PBs mostly occur in elongated cells. Apart from this, HU does not appear to have any significant influence on microtubular organization.

  20. Function of root border cells in plant health: pioneers in the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, M C; Brigham, L A; Wen, F; Woo, H H; Zhu, Y

    1998-01-01

    Plants dedicate a large amount of energy to the regulated production of living cells programmed to separate from roots into the external environment. This unusual process may be worth the cost because it enables the plant to dictate which species will share its ecological niche. For example, border cells can rapidly attract and stimulate growth in some microorganisms and repel and inhibit the growth of others. Such specificity may provide a way to control the dynamics of adjacent microbial populations in the soil to foster beneficial associations and inhibit pathogenic invasion. Plant genes controlling the delivery of border cells and the expression of their unique properties provide tools to genetically engineer plants with altered border cell quality and quantity. Such variants are being used to test the hypothesis that the function of border cells is to protect plant health by controlling the ecology of the root system.

  1. Deciphering the responses of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis and flax to pathogen-derived elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancot, Barbara; Santaella, Catherine; Jaber, Rim; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie Christine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Leprince, Jérôme; Gattin, Isabelle; Souc, Céline; Driouich, Azeddine; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté

    2013-12-01

    Plant pathogens including fungi and bacteria cause many of the most serious crop diseases. The plant innate immune response is triggered upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) such as flagellin22 and peptidoglycan. To date, very little is known of MAMP-mediated responses in roots. Root border cells are cells that originate from root caps and are released individually into the rhizosphere. Root tips of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and flax (Linum usitatissimum) release cells known as "border-like cells." Whereas root border cells of pea (Pisum sativum) are clearly involved in defense against fungal pathogens, the function of border-like cells remains to be established. In this study, we have investigated the responses of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis and flax to flagellin22 and peptidoglycan. We found that both MAMPs triggered a rapid oxidative burst in root border-like cells of both species. The production of reactive oxygen species was accompanied by modifications in the cell wall distribution of extensin epitopes. Extensins are hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins that can be cross linked by hydrogen peroxide to enhance the mechanical strength of the cell wall. In addition, both MAMPs also caused deposition of callose, a well-known marker of MAMP-elicited defense. Furthermore, flagellin22 induced the overexpression of genes involved in the plant immune response in root border-like cells of Arabidopsis. Our findings demonstrate that root border-like cells of flax and Arabidopsis are able to perceive an elicitation and activate defense responses. We also show that cell wall extensin is involved in the innate immunity response of root border-like cells.

  2. Gap junctional communication between the satellite cells of rat dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, E; Wang, H J; Asai, Y; Tamaki, D; Amano, K; Mabuchi, Y; Herbert, D C; Soji, T

    2001-06-01

    Many studies have described the ultrastructure of the dorsal root ganglia in various embryonic and adult animals, but in spite of the efforts of many investigators the functional role of the satellite cells in this tissue is not clearly understood. In this study, we discuss the function of this cell type based on the concept of cell-to-cell interaction through gap junctions. Five male 60 day-old Wistar strain rats were used. All animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital and perfused with glutaraldehyde fixative, then the dorsal root ganglia in levels L4, L5 and L6 were taken from each rat. After postosmication, the specimens were prepared for observation by transmission electron microscopy. All nerve cells were completely surrounded by satellite cell cytoplasmic expansions. The boundaries between adjacent nerve cells and satellite cells were complicated due to the presence of perikaryal projections of nerve cells. Gap junctions which showed the typical trilamellar structure of plasma membranes were found mainly between satellite cell processes belonging to the same nerve cell. On the other hand, some gap junctions were found between the satellite cell projections belonging to different nerve cells. The size of the gap junctions ranged from 300 to 400 nm. No gap junctions were associated with the plasma membrane of any nerve cell. In conclusion, only satellite cells can share free transcellular exchange of cytoplasmic molecules such as ions, amino acids, sugars and several second messengers including cAMP and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate by way of gap junctions in dorsal root ganglia.

  3. Impact of planting date on sunflower beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) infestation, damage, and parasitism in cultivated sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurence D; Knodel, Janet J

    2003-06-01

    The sunflower beetle, Zygogramma exclamationis (F.), is the major defoliating pest of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Planting date was evaluated as a potential management tool in a variety of production regions throughout North Dakota from 1997 to 1999, for its impact on sunflower beetle population density of both adults and larvae, defoliation caused by both feeding stages, seed yield, oil content, and larval parasitism in cultivated sunflower. Results from this 3-yr study revealed that sunflower beetle adult and larval populations decreased as planting date was delayed. Delayed planting also reduced defoliation from adult and larval feeding, which is consistent with the lower numbers of the beetles present in the later seeded plots. Even a planting delay of only 1 wk was sufficient to significantly reduce feeding damage to the sunflower plant. Yield reduction caused by leaf destruction of the sunflower beetle adults and larvae was clearly evident in the first year of the study. The other component of sunflower yield, oil content, did not appear to be influenced by beetle feeding. The tachinid parasitoid, Myiopharus macellus (Rheinhard), appeared to be a significant mortality factor of sunflower beetle larvae at most locations regardless of the dates of planting, and was able to attack and parasitize the beetle at various larval densities. The results of this investigation showed the potential of delayed planting date as an effective integrated pest management tactic to reduce sunflower beetle adults, larvae, and their resulting defoliation. In addition, altering planting dates was compatible with biological control of the beetle, because delaying the planting date did not reduce the effectiveness of the parasitic fly, M. macellus, which attacks the sunflower beetle larvae.

  4. Changes in vacuolation in the root apex cells of soybean seedlings in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchuk, D. O.; Kordyum, E. L.; Vorobyova, T. V.; Chapman, D. K.; Brown, C. S.

    2003-05-01

    Changes in the vacuolation in root apex cells of soybean ( Glycine max L. [Merr.]) seedlings grown in microgravity were investigated. Spaceflight and ground control seedlings were grown in the absence or presence of KMnO 4 (to remove ethylene) for 6 days. After landing, in order to study of cell ultrastructure and subcellular free calcium ion distribution, seedling root apices were fixed in 2.5% (w/v) glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer and 2% (w/v) glutaraldehyde, 2.5% (w/v) formaldehyde, 2% (w/v) potassium antimonate K[Sb(OH) 6] in 0.1 M K 2HPO 4 buffer with an osmolarity (calculated theoretically) of 0.45 and 1.26 osmol. The concentrations of ethylene in all spaceflight canisters were significantly higher than in the ground control canisters. Seedling growth was reduced in the spaceflight-exposed plants. Additionally, the spaceflight-exposed plants exhibited progressive vacuolation in the root apex cells, particularly in the columella cells, to a greater degree than the ground controls. Plasmolysis was observed in columella cells of spaceflight roots fixed in solutions with relatively high osmolarity (1.26 osmol). The appearance of plasmolysis permitted the evaluation of the water status of cells. The water potential of the spaceflight cells was higher than the surrounding fixative solution. A decrease in osmotic potential and/or an increase in turgor potential may have induced increases in cell water potential. However, the plasmolysed (i.e. nonturgid) cells implied that increases in water potential were accompanied with a decrease in osmotic potential. In such cells changes in vacuolation may have been involved to maintain turgor pressure or may have been a result of intensification of other vacuolar functions like digestion and storage

  5. Contribution of interspecific hybridization to sunflower breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Christov M.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation is directed at improving sunflower using hybrid forms resulted from interspecific hybridization. The aim is to create new B/A and R lines from interspecific hybrid forms that are resistant to diseases, the parasite broomrape, herbicides, and other stress factors and are characterized with high combining ability and to obtain on this basis highly productive oilseed sunflower hybrids with varied fatty acid composition of oil. The investigat...

  6. Seed priming with antioxidants improves sunflower seed germination and seedling growth under unfavorable germination conditions

    OpenAIRE

    DRAGANIC, Ivana; LEKIC, Slavoljub

    2014-01-01

    The results of studying the effects of sunflower seed priming with an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid (A), tocopherol (T), and glutathione (G) performed prior to accelerated ageing and a cold test are presented in this paper. Germination, the percentage of abnormal seedlings, and the lengths of both roots and shoots were monitored. The results showed that the cold test caused a drastic drop in germination, an adverse effect on the shoot length, an increase in the percentage of abnormal seed...

  7. Evaluation of Cytogenetic Effects of Isoproturon on the Root Meristem Cells of Allium sativum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.K.S.ChAUHAN; P.N.SAXENA; 等

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To validate the use of Allium sativum sativum as a reliable test model for gentoxicity,isoproturon,a substituted phenylalkylures herbicide,was evaluated on the root meristem cells by this plant system.ethod :Test concentrations were selected by determining EC50 and root tips were exposed to various concentrations for 6 or 24hr.EC50 concentration was calculated to be 70.8ppm for the root growth.In addition on root growth retardation exposure to isoproturon induced morpholoogical changes like discoloruation and stiffness of roots.Results:Exposure to various experimental concentrations of isoproturon(35-280ppm),including EC50,significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the mitotic index and induced chromosome breaks/mitotic aberrations at 6 or 24 hr.Conclusion:The frequency of aberrations was found to be decreased in a dose dependant manner at 24 or 48hr post exposure.howerver in comparison of control cells the frequency of aberrations was considerably high which indicates genotoxicity potentials of isoproturon.Further,present study also suggests that Allium satiuvum is a sensitive,efficient,and reliable test system for measuring the genotoxicity potential of environmental chemicals.

  8. Evaluation of Cytogenetic Effects of Isoproturon on the Root Meristem Cells of Allium sativum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To validate the use of Allium sativum as a reliable test model for genotoxicity, isoproturon, a substituted phenylalkylurea herbicide, was evaluated on the root meristem cells by this plant system. Method Test concentrations were selected by determining EC50 and root tips were exposed to various concentrations for 6 or 24 hr. EC50 concentration was calculated to be 70.8 ppm for the root growth. In addition to root growth retardation exposure to isoproturon induced morpholoogical changes like discolouration and stiffness of roots. Results Exposure to various experimental concentrations of isoproturon (35-280 ppm), including EC50, significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the mitotic index and induced chromosome breaks/mitotic aberrations at 6 or 24 hr. Conclusion The frequency of aberrations was found to be decreased in a dose dependant manner at 24 or 48 hr post exposure, however in comparison of control cells the frequency of aberrations was considerably high which indicates genotoxicity potentials of isoproturon. Further, present study also suggests that Allium sativum is a sensitive, efficient, and reliable test system for measuring the genotoxicity potential of environmental chemicals.

  9. SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW regulate leaf growth in Arabidopsis by stimulating S-phase progression of the cell cycle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Coppens, F.; Winter, F. de; Swarup, K.; Merks, R.M.H.; Inze, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Beemster, G.T.S.

    2010-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are required for stem cell maintenance in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root meristem, ensuring its indeterminate growth. Mutation of SHR and SCR genes results in disorganization of the quiescent center and loss of stem cell activity, resulting in the ce

  10. Identification and characterization of inward K ~+-channels in plasma membranes of Arabidopsis root cortex cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于川江; 武维华

    1999-01-01

    Patch clamping whole-cell reeording techniques were apphed to study the inward K+ channels in Arabidopsis root cortex cells. The inward K+-channels in the plasma membranes of the root cortex cell protoplasts were activated by hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The channels were highly selective tor K+ ions over Na+ ions. The channel activity was significantly inbibited by the external TEA(?) or Ba(?) The changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations did not affect the whole-cell inward K+-currents. The possible asso(?)ation betw(?)en the channel selectivity to K+ and Na(?) ions and plant salt-tolerance was also discussed.

  11. Registration of an oilseed sunflower germplasm HA-DM1 resistant to sunflower downy mildew

    Science.gov (United States)

    HA-DM1 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 674793) sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm was developed and released cooperatively by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit and the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station in 2015. HA-DM1 is a BC2F4 derived oilseed maintainer line from the cros...

  12. Allelopathic effects of barley straw on germination and seedling growth of corn, sugar beet and sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohamad taghi naseri poor yazdi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathic effects of barley straw and root on germination and growth of maize, sugar beet, and sunflower were investigated under glasshouse and laboratory experiments in Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 2006. The glasshouse experiment was designed based on randomized complete block design with three replications, treatments included: 0, 200, 400, 600 g/m² of grounded barley straw and also 0 and 50 g/m2 barley root. A laboratory experiment was carried out in order to study the effect of different concentrations of barley water extracts on germination and seedling characteristics of corn, sugar beet and sunflower. Treatments in laboratory trial included 0, 33, 50 and 100 percent of barley extracts. Results showed that leaf area of corn was significantly affected by barley straw treatments. Shoot dry matter and seed weight per plant in corn , leaf and tuber weight in sugar beet and leaf , stem weights , plant per plant in corn , leaf and tuber weight in sugar beet and leaf, stem weights, plant height, head diameter, head weight and seed weight in sunflower were significantly higher in treatment of 50g/m² barley roots. Crop seed germination decreased with increasing the amount of barley straw. The best germination response to barley extract was observed in corn. Maize radicle weight was significantly decreased with increasing concentration of barley water extract.

  13. Comparison of germination and seed vigor of sunflower in two contaminated soils of different texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Jaemaro; Lee, Jong Keun; Kim, Jae Young

    2014-05-01

    days, germination rate of sunflower was calculated, and shoot and root lengths were also measured. According to the results of germination tests, the seeds germination rates were reduced with increasing heavy metal concentrations in both loam soil and sandy loam soil. The SVI values in loam soil in more than in sandy loam soil. Keywords: phytoremediation, sunflower, soil texture, germination test ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work is supported by the Korea Ministry of the Environment as 'The GAIA (Geo-Advanced Innovative Action) Project'.

  14. Aluminum-induced cell death of barley-root border cells is correlated with peroxidase- and oxalate oxidase-mediated hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, L; Budíková, S; Huttová, J; Mistrík, I; Simonovicová, M; Siroká, B

    2005-06-01

    The function of root border cells (RBC) during aluminum (Al) stress and the involvement of oxalate oxidase, peroxidase and H(2)O(2) generation in Al toxicity were studied in barley roots. Our results suggest that RBC effectively protect the barley root tip from Al relative to the situation in roots cultivated in hydroponics where RBC are not sustained in the area surrounding the root tip. The removal of RBC from Al-treated roots increased root growth inhibition, Al and Evans blue uptake, inhibition of RBC production, the level of dead RBC, peroxidase and oxalate oxidase activity and the production of H(2)O(2). Our results suggest that even though RBC actively produce active oxygen species during Al stress, their role in the protection of root tips against Al toxicity is to chelate Al in their dead cell body.

  15. A Comparative Study on Root Canal Repair Materials: A Cytocompatibility Assessment in L929 and MG63 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytocompatibility of repair materials plays a significant role in the success of root canal repair. We conducted a comparative study on the cytocompatibility among iRoot BP Plus, iRoot FS, ProRoot MTA, and Super-EBA in L929 cells and MG63 cells. The results revealed that iRoot FS was able to completely solidify within 1 hour. iRoot BP Plus required 7-day incubation, which was much longer than expected (2 hours, to completely set. ProRoot MTA and Super-EBA exhibited a similar setting duration of 12 hours. All the materials except Super-EBA possessed negligible in vitro cytotoxicity. iRoot FS had the best cell adhesion capacity in both L929 and MG63 cells. With rapid setting, negligible cytotoxicity, and enhanced cell adhesion capacity, iRoot FS demonstrated great potential in clinical applications. Future work should focus on longer-term in vitro cytocompatibility and an in vivo assessment.

  16. A time-series phytoremediation experiment with sunflowers (Helianthus annuus on a former uranium mining site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kötschau A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available On a test field situated at a former uranium mining site near Ronneburg (Thuringia, Germany a small scale time-series field experiment with sunflowers (Helianthus annuus was carried out. This area ghas elevated contents for the heavy metals Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn including the radionuclides U and Th. Over a time period of 24 weeks the sunflowers were cultivated on homogenized soil substrate and regularly harvested. The aim was to find the ideal moment to harvest the sunflowers, being defined as having the best balance between the extraction of the contaminants and a high biomass produced. The contents of the elements were determined in soil, roots and above-ground plant parts. The contents in the above-ground plant showed no clear increasing or decreasing trend over time, so they were not the appropriate values to determine the best moment to harvest. Instead the total extracted masses (content in μg/g x biomass in g of the contaminants in the above-ground plant parts were calculated. According to this the best moment to harvest the sunflower plants was reached after 24 weeks of vegetation, because the highest extracted masses for all contaminants were calculated to this time. Additionally the biomass, which could be used e.g. for bio-fuel production, was highest at this time.

  17. Effects of cell suspension and cell·free culture filtrate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the control of root rot-root kont disease complex of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IE-6 was tested for antagonistic activity towards Meloidogyne javanica, the root-knot nematode and soilbome root-infecting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Cell-free culture filtrate of the bacterium caused significant reduction in egg hatching of M.javanica and inhibited radial growth of fungi in vitro. Cell-free culture filtrate also caused lyses in mycelium of F.solani. Under greenhouse conditions, soil drenches with the aqueous cell suspension or cell-free culture resulted in a considerable reduction in nematode population densities in soil and subsequent root-knot development due to M.javanica. In addition to nematode control, rhizobacterium application also inhibited root-infection caused by soilborne root~infecting fungi with significant enhancement of growth of tomato seedlings.

  18. Infection of Cultured Thin Cell Layer Roots of Lycopersicon esculentum by Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, D N; Eisenback, J D

    1991-10-01

    A new aseptic culture system for studying interactions between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Meloidogyne incognita is described. Epidermal thin cell layer explants from peduncles of tomato produced up to 20 adventitious roots per culture in 4-9 days on Murashige &Scoog medium plus kinetin and indole acetic acid. Rooted cultures were transferred to Gamborg's B-5 medium and inoculated with infective second-stage juveniles. Gall formation was apparent 5 days after inoculation and egg production by mature females occurred within 25 days at 25 C in the susceptible genotypes Rutgers and Red Alert. Resistant genotypes LA655, LA656, and LA1022 exhibited a characteristic hypersensitive response. This system provides large numbers of cultured root tips for studies on the molecular basis of the host-parasite relationship.

  19. Delayed olfactory ensheathing cell transplants reduce nociception after dorsal root injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ann; Lauschke, Jenny L; Gorrie, Catherine A; Cameron, Nicholas; Hayward, Ian; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Waite, Phil M E

    2011-05-01

    Injury to cervical dorsal roots mimics the deafferentation component of brachial plexus injury in humans, with intractable neuropathic pain in the deafferented limb being a common consequence. Such lesions are generally not amenable to surgical repair. The use of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) for dorsal root repair, via acute transplantation, has been successful in several studies. From a clinical point of view, delayed transplantation of OECs would provide a more realistic timeframe for repair. In this study we investigated the effect of delayed OEC transplantation on functional recovery of skilled forepaw movements and amelioration of neuropathic pain, using a C7 and C8 dorsal root injury rat model previously established in our lab. We found that OEC transplantation to the dorsal horn 1 week after root injury effectively attenuated neuropathic disturbances associated with dorsal root injury, including spontaneous pain behavior, tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The sensory controls of complex, goal-oriented skilled reaching and ladder walking, however, were not improved by delayed OEC transplantation. We did not detect any significant influence of transplanted OECs on injury-induced central reorganisation and afferent sprouting. The anti-nociceptive effect mediated by OEC transplants may therefore be explained by alternative mechanisms such as modification of inflammation and astrogliosis. The significant effect of OEC transplants in mitigating neuropathic pain may be clinically useful in intractable pain syndromes arising from deafferentation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair.

  20. Isolation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells from fetal rat dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To find a promising alternative to neurons or schwann cells (SCs) for peripheral nerve repair applications,this study sought to isolate stem cells from fetal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants.Molecular expression analysis confirmed neural stem cell characteristics of DRG-derived neurospheres in terms of expressing neural stem cell-specific genes and a set of well-defined genes related to stem cell niches and glial fate decision.Under the influence of neurotrophic factors,bFGF and NGF,the neurospheres gave rise to neurofilament-expressing neurons and S100-expressing Schwann cell-like cells by different pathways.This study suggests that a subpopulation of stem cells that reside in DRGs is the progenitor of neurons and glia,which could directly induce the differentiation toward neurons,or SCs.

  1. Sunflower seeds as eliciting agents of Compositae dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; El-Houri, Rime B; Andersen, Klaus Ejner;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sunflowers may cause dermatitis because of allergenic sesquiterpene lactones (SLs). Contact sensitization to sunflower seeds has also been reported, but the allergens are unknown. OBJECTIVES: To analyse sunflower seeds for the presence of SLs and to assess the prevalence of sunflower...... sensitization in Compositae-allergic individuals. PATIENTS/MATERIALS/METHODS: Sunflower-sensitive patients were identified by aimed patch testing. A dichloromethane extract of whole sunflower seeds was analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS......: The prevalence of sensitivity to sunflower in Compositae-allergic individuals was 56%. A solvent wash of whole sunflower seeds yielded an extract containing SLs, the principal component tentatively being identified as argophyllin A or B, other SLs being present in minute amounts. CONCLUSIONS: The concentration...

  2. Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos mediated genotoxic and cytotoxic assessment on root meristem cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibhghatulla Shaikh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are direct recipients of agro – toxics and therefore important materials for assessing environmental chemicals for genotoxicity. The meristematic mitotic cell of Allium cepa is an efficient cytogenetic material for chromosome aberration assay on environmental pollutants. Onion root tips were grown on moistened filter paper in petri dish at room temperature. Germinated root tips were then exposed to three concentrations of each pesticide for 24 h. About 1 – 2 mm length of root tip was cut, fixed in cornoy’s fixative, hydrolyzed in warm 1 N HCL, stained with acetocarmine and squashed on glass slide. About 3000 cells were scored and classified into interphase and normal or aberrant division stage. Cytotoxicity was determined by comparing the mitotic index (MI of treated cells with that of the negative control. The MI of cells treated with Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos at one or more concentration was half or less than that of control are said to be cytotoxic. Genotoxicity was measured by comparing the number of cells/1000 in aberrant division stages at each dose with the negative control using Mann – Whitney U test. Both Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos are genotoxic at higher concentrations i.e. 0.001%, 0.002% and 0.028%, 0.056% inducing chromosome fragment, chromosome lagging and bridges, stick chromosome and multipolar anaphase.

  3. Dorsal root ganglion neurons promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-xun Zhang; Xiao-rui Jiang; Lei Wang; Fang-min Chen; Lin Xu; Fei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary animal experiments have conifrmed that sensory nerve ifbers promote osteoblast differentiation, but motor nerve ifbers have no promotion effect. Whether sensory neurons pro-mote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains unclear. No results at the cellular level have been reported. In this study, dorsal root ganglion neurons (sensory neurons) from Sprague-Dawley fetal rats were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with green lfuorescent protein 3 weeks after osteo-genic differentiationin vitro, while osteoblasts derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells served as the control group. The rat dorsal root ganglion neurons promoted the prolifera-tion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblasts at 3 and 5 days of co-culture, as observed by lfuorescence microscopy. The levels of mRNAs for osteogenic differentiation-re-lated factors (including alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and bone morphogenetic protein 2) in the co-culture group were higher than those in the control group, as detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Our ifndings indicate that dorsal root ganglion neurons promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which pro-vides a theoretical basis forin vitro experiments aimed at constructing tissue-engineered bone.

  4. Ultrastructure and calcium balance in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to extremely low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    Investigations of low magnetic field (LMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planned space flights to other planets where the field intensity does not exceed 10 -5 Oe. Pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds were grown in an environment of LMF 3 days. In meristem cells of roots exposed to LMF, one could observe such ultrastructural peculiarities as a noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids. Mitochondria were the most sensitive organelle to LMF application. Their size and relative volume in cells increased, matrix was electron-transparent, and cristae reduced. Because of the significant role of calcium signalling in plant responses to different environmental factors, calcium participation in LMF effects was investigated using a pyroantimonate method to identify the localization of free calcium ions. The intensity of cytochemical reaction in root cells after LMF application was strong. The Ca 2+ pyroantimonate deposits were observed both in all organelles and in a hyaloplasm of the cells. Data obtained suggest that the observed LMF effects on ultrastructure of root cells were due to disruptions in different metabolic systems including effects on Ca 2+ homeostasis.

  5. Ultrastructure of modified root-tip cells in Ficus carica, induced by the ectoparasitic nematode Xiphinema index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, U; Lehmann, H; Jank-Ladwig, R

    1980-02-01

    The migratory ectoparasitic root nematode Xiphinema index, added to Ficus carica seedlings in sterile agar culture, fed exclusively on the tips of the roots. As a response the tips started to swell and became transformed into terminal galls as long as feeding was continued. When the cytology of swollen root-tips was examined 24 h after the first nematode attack, necrotic cells, scattered singly or in small groups within the root apex, were found in ultrathin sections. These cells, whose protoplasts showed features of a hypersensitive reaction, were most probably those fed upon by nematodes. Each necrotic cell was surrounded by several enlarged, mostly binucleate cells with dense cytoplasm. One day later the binucleate cells were multinucleate, containing 4 or even 8 nuclei. The clear-cut demarcation between necrotic and modified cells indicated that only the stimulus for the induction of modified cells but not the stimulus for cell necrosis passed into neighbouring cells. Root-tip galls that provided the appropriate food for egg production in nematodes contained greatly enlarged multinucleate cells between necrotic cells. The modified cells showed features of high metabolic activities, expressed in nuclear and nucleolar hypertrophy, invagination of the nuclear envelope, increased cytoplasmic density, abundance of mitochondria, plastids and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Wall ingrowths, typical of transfer cells, were rare and if present occurred only adjacent to necrotic cells. In older modified cells new cell plates, surrounded by phragmoplasts, were formed.

  6. Nutrient and Heavy Metal Concentration and Distribution in Corn, Sunflower, and Turnip Cultivated in a Soil under Wastewater Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Molahoseini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To study the potential uptake and accumulation of some essential elements and cadmium, a field experiment was conducted using three plants (sunflower, turnip, and forage corn in a randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications in a soil classified as Typic Haplogypsids under wastewater irrigation. The experiment site was selected in the farmfields located in Varamin region in southern Tehran, Iran (2005. The results showed that maximum concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and cadmium in sunflower were 6.05% , 1.27%, 97.27, 22.84 and 0.54 mgkg-1 respectively. The highest accumulation of nitrogen, phosphorus, zinc, and copper occurred in grain and cadmium in sunflower leaves. The maximum concentration of potassium and nitrate occurred in turnip leaves, while the maximum concentrations of iron and manganese were recorded in the root and leaves of forage corn, res pectively.

  7. 7 CFR 810.1801 - Definition of sunflower seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of sunflower seed. 810.1801 Section 810... STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN United States Standards for Sunflower Seed Terms Defined § 810.1801 Definition of sunflower seed. Grain that, before the removal of foreign material, consists of 50.0 percent...

  8. A kinetic analysis of the auxin transcriptome reveals cell wall remodeling proteins that modulate lateral root development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel R; Olex, Amy L; Lundy, Stacey R; Turkett, William H; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S; Muday, Gloria K

    2013-09-01

    To identify gene products that participate in auxin-dependent lateral root formation, a high temporal resolution, genome-wide transcript abundance analysis was performed with auxin-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Data analysis identified 1246 transcripts that were consistently regulated by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), partitioning into 60 clusters with distinct response kinetics. We identified rapidly induced clusters containing auxin-response functional annotations and clusters exhibiting delayed induction linked to cell division temporally correlated with lateral root induction. Several clusters were enriched with genes encoding proteins involved in cell wall modification, opening the possibility for understanding mechanistic details of cell structural changes that result in root formation following auxin treatment. Mutants with insertions in 72 genes annotated with a cell wall remodeling function were examined for alterations in IAA-regulated root growth and development. This reverse-genetic screen yielded eight mutants with root phenotypes. Detailed characterization of seedlings with mutations in cellulase3/glycosylhydrolase9b3 and leucine rich extensin2, genes not normally linked to auxin response, revealed defects in the early and late stages of lateral root development, respectively. The genes identified here using kinetic insight into expression changes lay the foundation for mechanistic understanding of auxin-mediated cell wall remodeling as an essential feature of lateral root development.

  9. A theoretical model for ROP localisation by auxin in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J H Payne

    Full Text Available Local activation of Rho GTPases is important for many functions including cell polarity, morphology, movement, and growth. Although a number of molecules affecting Rho-of-Plants small GTPase (ROP signalling are known, it remains unclear how ROP activity becomes spatially organised. Arabidopsis root hair cells produce patches of ROP at consistent and predictable subcellular locations, where root hair growth subsequently occurs.We present a mathematical model to show how interaction of the plant hormone auxin with ROPs could spontaneously lead to localised patches of active ROP via a Turing or Turing-like mechanism. Our results suggest that correct positioning of the ROP patch depends on the cell length, low diffusion of active ROP, a gradient in auxin concentration, and ROP levels. Our theory provides a unique explanation linking the molecular biology to the root hair phenotypes of multiple mutants and transgenic lines, including OX-ROP, CA-rop, aux1, axr3, tip1, eto1, etr1, and the triple mutant aux1 ein2 gnom(eb.We show how interactions between Rho GTPases (in this case ROPs and regulatory molecules (in this case auxin could produce characteristic subcellular patterning that subsequently affects cell shape. This has important implications for research on the morphogenesis of plants and other eukaryotes. Our results also illustrate how gradient-regulated Turing systems provide a particularly robust and flexible mechanism for pattern formation.

  10. Rice Homeodomain Protein WOX11 Recruits a Histone Acetyltransferase Complex to Establish Programs of Cell Proliferation of Crown Root Meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaoli; Jiang, Wei; Long, Fei; Cheng, Saifeng; Yang, Wenjing; Zhao, Yu; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2017-05-01

    Shoot-borne crown roots are the major root system in cereals. Previous work has shown that the Wuschel-related homeobox gene WOX11 is necessary and sufficient to promote rice (Oryza sativa) crown root emergence and elongation. Here, we show that WOX11 recruits the ADA2-GCN5 histone acetyltransferase module to activate downstream target genes in crown root meristem. Rice ADA2 and GCN5 genes are highly expressed in root meristem and are shown to be essential for cell division and growth. WOX11 and ADA2-GCN5 commonly target and regulate a set of root-specific genes involved in energy metabolism, cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone response, some of which are known to be important for root development. The results indicate that the recruitment of ADA2-GCN5 by WOX11 establishes gene expression programs of crown root meristem cell division and suggest that permissive chromatin modification involving histone acetylation is a strategy for WOX11 to stimulate root meristem development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential TOR activation and cell proliferation in Arabidopsis root and shoot apexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Cai, Wenguo; Liu, Yanlin; Li, Hui; Fu, Liwen; Liu, Zengyu; Liu, Hongtao; Xu, Tongda; Xiong, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The developmental plasticity of plants relies on the remarkable ability of the meristems to integrate nutrient and energy availability with environmental signals. Meristems in root and shoot apexes share highly similar molecular players but are spatially separated by soil. Whether and how these two meristematic tissues have differential activation requirements for local nutrient, hormone, and environmental cues (e.g., light) remain enigmatic in photosynthetic plants. Here, we report that the activation of root and shoot apexes relies on distinct glucose and light signals. Glucose energy signaling is sufficient to activate target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase in root apexes. In contrast, both the glucose and light signals are required for TOR activation in shoot apexes. Strikingly, exogenously applied auxin is able to replace light to activate TOR in shoot apexes and promote true leaf development. A relatively low concentration of auxin in the shoot and high concentration of auxin in the root might be responsible for this distinctive light requirement in root and shoot apexes, because light is required to promote auxin biosynthesis in the shoot. Furthermore, we reveal that the small GTPase Rho-related protein 2 (ROP2) transduces light-auxin signal to activate TOR by direct interaction, which, in turn, promotes transcription factors E2Fa,b for activating cell cycle genes in shoot apexes. Consistently, constitutively activated ROP2 plants stimulate TOR in the shoot apex and cause true leaf development even without light. Together, our findings establish a pivotal hub role of TOR signaling in integrating different environmental signals to regulate distinct developmental transition and growth in the shoot and root. PMID:28223530

  12. Relative susceptibility of sunflower maintainer lines and resistance sources to natural infestations of the banded sunflower moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a significant seed-feeding pest of sunflowers in North America. Though some wild Helianthus spp., interspecific crosses, and H. annuus cultivars (that precede hybrid sunflower breeding) have low susceptibility to ba...

  13. Registration of a male fertility restorer oilseed sunflower germplasm HA-R9 resistant to sunflower rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm HA-R9 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 667595) was developed by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the Agricultural Experiment Station of North Dakota State University and released in January, 2013. Sunflower rust (caused by P...

  14. Observations on continuously growing roots of the sloth and the K14-Eda transgenic mice indicate that epithelial stem cells can give rise to both the ameloblast and root epithelium cell lineage creating distinct tooth patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Mark; Thesleff, Irma

    2008-01-01

    Root development is traditionally associated with the formation of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS), whose fragments give rise to the epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM). The HERS is formed by depletion of the core of stellate reticulum cells, the putative stem cells, in the cervical loop, leaving only a double layer of the basal epithelium with limited growth capacity. The continuously growing incisor of the rodent is subdivided into a crown analog half on the labial side, with a cervical loop containing a large core of stellate reticulum, and its progeny gives rise to enamel producing. The lingual side is known as the root analog and gives rise to ERM. We show that the lingual cervical loop contains a small core of stellate reticulum cells and suggest that it acts as a functional stem cell niche. Similarly we show that continuously growing roots represented by the sloth molar and K14-Eda transgenic incisor maintain a cervical loop with a small core of stellate reticulum cells around the entire circumference of the tooth and do not form a HERS, and still give rise to ERM. We propose that HERS is not a necessary structure to initiate root formation. Moreover, we conclude that crown vs. root formation, i.e. the production of enamel vs. cementum, and the differentiation of the epithelial cells into ameloblasts vs. ERM, can be regulated independently from the regulation of stem cell maintenance. This developmental flexibility may underlie the developmental and evolutionary diversity in tooth patterning.

  15. The nucleus of differentiated root plant cells: modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lingua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclei of plant cells show marked differences in chromatin organisation, related to their DNA content, which ranges from the type with large strands of condensed chromatin (reticulate or chromonematic nuclei to one with mostly decondensed chromatin (chromocentric or diffuse nuclei. A loosening of the chromatin structure generally occurs in actively metabolising cells, such as differentiating and secretory cells, in relation to their high transcriptional activity. Endoreduplication may occur, especially in plants with a small genome, which increases the availability of nuclear templates, the synthesis of DNA, and probably regulates gene expression. Here we describe structural and quantitative changes of the chromatin and their relationship with transcription that occur in differentiated cells following an increase of their metabolism. The nuclei of root cortical cells of three plants with different 2C DNA content (Allium porrum, Pisum sativum and Lycopersicon esculentm and their modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhization, which strongly increase the metabolic activity of colonised cells, are taken as examples.

  16. Immunofluorescent localization of ubiquitin and proteasomes in nucleolar vacuoles of soybean root meristematic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stępiński, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, using the immunofluorescent method, the immunopositive signals to ubiquitin and proteasomes in nucleoli of root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings have been observed. In fact, those signals were present exclusively in nucleolar vacuoles. No signals were observed in the nucleolar territory out of the nucleolar vacuoles or in the nucleoli without vacuoles. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may act within the nucleoli of plants with high metabolic activities and may provi...

  17. System approaches to study root hairs as a single cell plant model: current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shakhawat eHossain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of plant functional genomics derives primarily from measurements of gene, protein and/or metabolite levels averaged over the whole plant or multicellular tissues. These approaches risk diluting the response of specific cells that might respond strongly to the treatment but whose signal is diluted by the larger proportion of non-responding cells. For example, if a gene is expressed at a low level, does this mean that it is indeed lowly expressed or is it highly expressed, but only in a few cells? In order to avoid these issues, we adopted the soybean root hair cell, derived from a single, differentiated root epidermal cell, as a single-cell model for functional genomics. Root hair cells are intrinsically interesting since they are major conduits for root water and nutrient uptake and are also the preferred site of infection by nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria. Although a variety of other approaches have been used to study single plant cells or single cell types, the root hair system is perhaps unique in allowing application of the full repertoire of functional genomic and biochemical approaches. In this mini review, we summarize our published work and place this within the broader context of root biology, with a significant focus on understanding the initial events in the soybean-rhizobium interaction.

  18. Lanthanum Prevents Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells by Controlling Early Induction Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, a salt stress-induced programmed cell death (PCD) model was established in rice root tip cells. Here,by using Wuyunjing 8th rice seedlings, the effects of lanthanum on salt stress-induced PCD early events were studied. The peroxidase (APX). Imidazole (20 mmol/L), the inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase), could alleviate the occurrence of PCD obviously, and such alleviation could be enhanced by the addition of La3+,indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the salt stress-induced PCD process. Taken together, lanthanum could prevent salt stress-induced PCD occurrence in the rice root tip cells by blocking the calcium influx under stress, which was followed by inhibiting calcium-dependent NADPH oxidase activity to prevent O2·-production and, enhancing the cytosolic antioxidative enzyme activities to scavenge the reactive oxygen species.

  19. Calcium-(organo)aluminum-proton competition for adsorption to tomato root cell walls: Experimental data and exchange model calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Keltjens, W.G.; Postma, J.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum interacts with negatively charged surfaces in plant roots, causing inhibition of growth and nutrient uptake in plants growing on acid soils. Pectins in the root cell wall form the major cation adsorption surface, with Ca2+ as the main adsorbing cation. Adsorption of Al3+ and Ca2+ to isolate

  20. [Oxidative damage of volatile oil from Chenopodium ambrosioides on Vicia faba root tip cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wan-Jun; Ma, Dan-Wei; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Hong

    2012-04-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides is an invasive species, which has strong allelopathic effect on surrounding plants. In this study, the methods of soil culture and filter paper culture were adopted to simulate the eluviation and volatilization of the volatile oil from C. ambrosioides, respectively, and to investigate the allelopathy of the volatile oil on the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities of Vicia faba root tip cells, with the mechanisms of the induced tip cell apoptosis analyzed. At the early stage (24 h) of soil culture and filter paper culture, the superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase activities of the tip cells decreased after an initial increase with the increasing dose of the volatile oil, and the malondialdehyde content of the tip cells increased with the increasing volatile oil dose and treated time. At the midterm (48 h) and later (72 h) stages of soil culture and filter paper culture, a typical DNA ladder strip appeared, suggesting that the volatile oil from C. ambrosioides could induce the apoptosis of the tip cells, and the apoptosis was dose- and time dependent. This study showed that the volatile oil from C. ambrosioides could act on its surrounding plants via eluviation and volatilization, making the lipid peroxidation of acceptor plants aggravated and the antioxidant enzyme activities of the plants inhibited, resulting in the oxidative damage and apoptosis of the plant root tip cells, and accordingly, the inhibition of the plant growth. Under soil culture, the root tip cells of V. faba had higher antioxidant enzyme activities and lesser DNA damage, suggesting that the volatile oil from C. ambrosioides via volatilization had stronger allelopathy on the growth of surrounding plants than via eluviation.

  1. In vitro differentiation and attachment of human embryonic stem cells on periodontal tooth root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Bülend; Elçin, A Eser; Elçin, Y Murat

    2009-11-01

    Periodontal tissue engineering based on cell replacement therapies is a promising field for improved regeneration of tooth supporting structures lost as a result of destructive periodontal diseases. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could become adequate cell source for tissue engineering because of their unlimited proliferative potential and ability to differentiate to all somatic cell types. The aim of this study was to analyze the differentiation capacity of hESCs toward periodontal compartment cells and their relationship with tooth root surfaces in vitro. Periodontal ligament fibroblastic cell (PDLF) cultures were established and characterized; hESCs (HUES-9 line) were expanded in undifferentiated state and characterized for pluripotency morphologically and immunohistochemically. Extracted tooth root slices (RS) of 300 microm thickness, prepared with both periodontal and endodontic instrumentation, were used. Three different experimental groups were established: (i) undifferentiated hESC colonies cultured on and around the RS; (ii) undifferentiated hESC colonies cultured on and around RS with PDLF coculture, and (iii) undifferentiated hESC colonies cultured on and around RS with PDLF coculture in osteoinductive medium for 3 weeks. The fibrogenic and osteogenic marker expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry; histological staining and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to determine the relationship between differentiating hESCs and mineralized tooth root structures. Results demonstrate that hESC differentiation is influenced by tooth structures, PDLFs, and osteogenic medium, resulting with increased propensity toward mesenchymal lineage commitment, and formation of soft-hard tissue relationship in close contact areas. The proposed experimental system may facilitate further understanding in development of periodontal structures and contribute to realization of hESCs as a cell source in periodontal tissue engineering applications.

  2. Potential of sunflower, castor bean, common buckwheat and vetiver as lead phytoaccumulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailson do C. Alves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies concerning the tolerance, absorption and distribution of heavy metals in plants are essential for the success of phytoremediation programs. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the potential of the sunflower, castor bean, common buckwheat and vetiver as lead phytoaccumulators. The species were grown in nutrient solution containing increasing doses of Pb (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg L-1 during a 30-day exposure period. A completely randomized split-plot design was used, with a 4 x 5 factorial and three replicates. Significant reductions of dry matter of the root, shoot and whole plant were found in the all species under study as a function of the increased Pb doses. Vetiver showed higher tolerance to Pb contamination; sunflower and castor bean had intermediate tolerance and the common buckwheat proved to be the most sensitive species. The concentration and total content of Pb in plant compartments were significantly affected by the increased Pb doses in solution, and higher accumulation of this element was observed, in general, in the roots of the studied species. Common buckwheat proved to be not much promising for Pb-phytoremediation programs; sunflower showed potential for Pb phytoextraction and castor bean and vetiver were the most appropriate for Pb phytostabilization.

  3. The organization pattern of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis is dependent on cell wall homogalacturonan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Follet-Gueye, Marie Laure; Duponchel, Ludovic; Moreau, Myriam; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine

    2009-07-01

    Border-like cells are released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root tips as organized layers of several cells that remain attached to each other rather than completely detached from each other, as is usually observed in border cells of many species. Unlike border cells, cell attachment between border-like cells is maintained after their release into the external environment. To investigate the role of cell wall polysaccharides in the attachment and organization of border-like cells, we have examined their release in several well-characterized mutants defective in the biosynthesis of xyloglucan, cellulose, or pectin. Our data show that among all mutants examined, only quasimodo mutants (qua1-1 and qua2-1), which have been characterized as producing less homogalacturonan, had an altered border-like cell phenotype as compared with the wild type. Border-like cells in both lines were released as isolated cells separated from each other, with the phenotype being much more pronounced in qua1-1 than in qua2-1. Further analysis of border-like cells in the qua1-1 mutant using immunocytochemistry and a set of anti-cell wall polysaccharide antibodies showed that the loss of the wild-type phenotype was accompanied by (1) a reduction in homogalacturonan-JIM5 epitope in the cell wall of border-like cells, confirmed by Fourier transform infrared microspectrometry, and (2) the secretion of an abundant mucilage that is enriched in xylogalacturonan and arabinogalactan-protein epitopes, in which the cells are trapped in the vicinity of the root tip.

  4. Mutations in the Diageotropica (Dgt) gene uncouple patterned cell division during lateral root initiation from proliferative cell division in the pericycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanchenko, Maria G; Coffeen, Warren C; Lomax, Terri L; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2006-05-01

    In angiosperms, root branching requires a continuous re-initiation of new root meristems. Through some unknown mechanism, in most eudicots pericycle cells positioned against the protoxylem change identity and initiate patterned division, leading to formation of lateral root primordia that further develop into lateral roots. This process is auxin-regulated. We have observed that three mutations in the Diageotropica (Dgt) gene in tomato prevent primordium formation. Detailed analysis of one of these mutants, dgt1-1, demonstrated that the mutation does not abolish the proliferative capacity of the xylem-adjacent pericycle in the differentiated root portion. Files of shortened pericycle cells found in dgt1-1 roots were unrelated to primordium formation. Auxin application stimulated this unusual proliferation, leading to formation of a multi-layered xylem-adjacent pericycle, but did not rescue the primordium formation. In contrast to wild type, auxin could not induce any cell divisions in the pericycle of the most distal dgt1-1 root-tip portion. In wild-type roots, the Dgt gene promoter was expressed strongly in lateral root primordia starting from their initiation, and on auxin treatment was induced in the primary root meristem. Auxin level and distribution were altered in dgt1-1 root tissues, as judged by direct auxin measurements, and the tissue-specific expression of an auxin-response reporter was altered in transgenic plants. Together, our data demonstrate that the Dgt gene product, a type-A cyclophilin, is essential for morphogenesis of lateral root primordia, and that the dgt mutations uncouple patterned cell division in lateral root initiation from proliferative cell division in the pericycle.

  5. Energy balance comparison of sorghum and sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, F.; Kirkham, M. B.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Stone, L. R.

    1993-03-01

    An understanding of the energy exchange processes at the surface of the earth is necessary for studies of global climate change. If the climate becomes drier, as is predicted for northern mid-latitudes, it is important to know how major agricultural crops will play a role in the budget of heat and moisture. Thus, the energy balance components of sorghum [ Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] and sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.), two drought-resistant crops grown in the areas where summertime drying is forecasted, were compared. Soil water content and evapotranspiration ( ET) rates also were determined. Net radiation was measured with net radiometers. Soil heat flux was analyzed with heat flux plates and thermocouples. The Bowen ratio method was used to determine sensible and latent heat fluxes. Sunflower had a higher evapotranspiration rate and depleted more water from the soil than sorghum. Soil heat flux into the soil during the daytime was greater for sorghum than sunflower, which was probably the result of the more erect leaves of sorghum. Nocturnal net radiation loss from the sorghum crop was greater than that from the sunflower crop, perhaps because more heat was stored in the soil under the sorghum crop. But daytime net radiation values were similar for the two crops. The data indicated that models of climate change must differentiate nighttime net radiation of agricultural crops. Sensible heat flux was not always less (or greater) for sorghum compared to sunflower. Sunflower had greater daytime values for latent heat flux, reflecting its greater depletion of water from the soil. Evapotranspiration rates determined by the energy balance method agreed relatively well with those found by the water balance method. For example, on 8 July (43 days after planting), the ET rates found by the energy-balance and water-balance methods were 4.6 vs. 5.5 mm/day for sunflower, respectively; for sorghum, these values were 4.0 vs. 3.5 mm/day, respectively. If the climate does

  6. The repetitive component of the sunflower genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Giordani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The sunflower (Helianthus annuus and species belonging to the genus Helianthus are emerging as a model species and genus for a number of studies on genome evolution. In this review, we report on the repetitive component of the H. annuus genome at the biochemical, molecular, cytological, and genomic levels. Recent work on sunflower genome composition is described, with emphasis on different types of repeat sequences, especially LTR-retrotransposons, of which we report on isolation, characterisation, cytological localisation, transcription, dynamics of proliferation, and comparative analyses within the genus Helianthus.

  7. Unique cell-type-specific patterns of DNA methylation in the root meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Taiji; Stuart, Tim; Valdes, Manuel; Breakfield, Natalie; Schmitz, Robert J; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Han, Xinwei; Lister, Ryan; Benfey, Philip N; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-04-29

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that differs between plant organs and tissues, but the extent of variation between cell types is not known. Here, we report single-base-resolution whole-genome DNA methylomes, mRNA transcriptomes and small RNA transcriptomes for six cell populations covering the major cell types of the Arabidopsis root meristem. We identify widespread cell-type-specific patterns of DNA methylation, especially in the CHH sequence context, where H is A, C or T. The genome of the columella root cap is the most highly methylated Arabidopsis cell characterized so far. It is hypermethylated within transposable elements (TEs), accompanied by increased abundance of transcripts encoding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway components and 24-nt small RNAs (smRNAs). The absence of the nucleosome remodeller DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1), required for maintenance of DNA methylation, and low abundance of histone transcripts involved in heterochromatin formation suggests that a loss of heterochromatin may occur in the columella, thus allowing access of RdDM factors to the whole genome, and producing an excess of 24-nt smRNAs in this tissue. Together, these maps provide new insights into the epigenomic diversity that exists between distinct plant somatic cell types.

  8. Interpolation of microtubules into cortical arrays during cell elongation and differentiation in roots of Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardham, A R; Gunning, B E

    1979-06-01

    Longitudinal sections of roots of Azolla pinnata R. Br. were prepared for electron microscopy so that cortical microtubules could be counted along the longitudinal walls in cell files in the endodermis, pericycle, and inner and outer cortex, and in sieve and xylem elements. With the exception of the xylem, where there are no transverse cell divisions, each file of cells commences with its initial cell and then possesses a zone of concomitant cell expansion and transverse cell division, followed, after completion of the divisions, by a zone of terminal cell differentiation. The cells augment their population of cortical microtubules as they elongate and divide, showing a net increase of up to 0.6 micron of polymerized microtubule length per min. Two main sub-processes were found: (i) When a longitudinal wall is first formed it is supplied with a higher number of microtubules per unit length of wall than it will have later, when it is being expanded. This initial quota becomes diluted as the second sub-process commences. (ii) The cells interpolate new microtubules at a rate which is characteristic of the cell, and, in the endodermis, of the face of the cell, while the cell elongates. Most cell types thus maintain a set density of cortical microtubules while they elongate and divide. Comparisons of endodermal cells in untreated controls, and roots that had been treated with colchicine, low temperature, or high pressure indicate that the initial quota of microtubules, and the later interpolations, and differentially sensitive to microtuble perturbations. Three types of behaviour, all related to changes in the cell walls, were noted as cortex, xylem and sieve element cells entered their respective phases of cell differentiation. The cortical cells expanded in all dimensions, and the interpolation of microtubules diminished or ceased. The sieve elements continued to elongate, and interpolated at a high rate, reaching unusually high densities of microtubules when the cell

  9. Evaluation of the biological activity of sunflower hull extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, F. S.; Wagdy, S. M.; Hassanein, M. M. M.; Hamed, S. F.

    2012-11-01

    This work was planned with the aim of adding value to sunflower seed hulls, a waste product of the oil industry by preparing a sunflower hull phenolic extract rich in chlorogenic acid (CGA). In order to fulfill this goal, the optimization for the extraction of a phenolic extract from the hulls was investigated. The parameters studied were: type of solvent, solvent to water ratio and hull to solvent ratio. In addition, the solvent mixtures were also studied. The resulting phenolic extracts were evaluated for their biological activities. This included phenolic content determination, evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Chlorogenic acid was determined in two chosen hull extracts using the UV spectrophotometric method and HPLC analysis. The anti carcinogenic activity of the two chosen extracts was tested on seven different cell line carcinomas. The results revealed that all the phenolic extracts of sunflower hull studied contain between 190-312.5 mg phenolics/ 100 g hulls. The highest phenolic extraction was achieved with 80% methanol (1:30, hull to solvent, w/v ratio) and methanol to ethanol to water (7:7:6 v/v/v) mixture with values of 312.5 and 306.5 mg phenolics/100 g hulls, respectively. The free radical scavenging activity and antioxidant activity of all the samples ranged from 33.6-72.6%. The highest antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging activity were achieved by the same extracts that possessed the highest phenolic content, namely methanol to ethanol to water extract and 80% methanol with values 71.8 and 72.6%, 68.2 and 70.9% respectively, compared to 77.9 and 76.9% respectively for TBHQ. All the phenolic extracts possessed antimicrobial activity but to different levels against different pathogenic bacteria. The two chosen extracts also possessed anti carcinogenic activity, which differed among varying cell line carcinomas. The HPLC analysis indicated that chlorogenic acid was the main phenolic acid in the extract. Thus it can

  10. PRELIMINARY RESULTS REGARDING THE SENSITIVITY OF TULIPA GESNERIANA L. MERISTEMATIC ROOT CELLS TO FUNGICIDE FOLPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Anca Şuţan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The genotoxicity of the pesticide Folpan was evaluated in meristematic root cells of Tulipa gesneriana cv. ‘Leen van der Mark’. The statistical analyses of the results showed that the pesticide studied has a concentration-dependent toxicity and induces chromosomal aberrations. The lowest mitotic index (2,69% was related with the highest tested concentration of Folpan (900 ppm. Various types of chromosomal and mitotic abnormalities such as binucleated cells, laggards, and disturbed ana-telophase with multiple chromosomal bridges revealed the clastogenic potential of pesticide tested.

  11. Alkali-Soluble Pectin Is the Primary Target of Aluminum Immobilization in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Mei; Fang, Jing; Shen, Ren Fang; Feng, Ying Ming; Liu, Jia You; Bian, Jian Feng; Wu, Li Shu; He, Yong Ming; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a discrepancy of Al binding in cell wall constituents determines Al mobility in root border cells (RBCs) of pea (Pisum sativum), which provides protection for RBCs and root apices under Al toxicity. Plants of pea (P. sativum L. ‘Zhongwan no. 6’) were subjected to Al treatments under mist culture. The concentration of Al in RBCs was much higher than that in the root apex. The Al content in RBCs surrounding one root apex (104 RBCs) was approximately 24.5% of the total Al in the root apex (0–2.5 mm), indicating a shielding role of RBCs for the root apex under Al toxicity. Cell wall analysis showed that Al accumulated predominantly in alkali-soluble pectin (pectin 2) of RBCs. This could be attributed to a significant increase of uronic acids under Al toxicity, higher capacity of Al adsorption in pectin 2 [5.3-fold higher than that of chelate-soluble pectin (pectin 1)], and lower ratio of Al desorption from pectin 2 (8.5%) compared with pectin 1 (68.5%). These results indicate that pectin 2 is the primary target of Al immobilization in RBCs of pea, which impairs Al access to the intracellular space of RBCs and mobility to root apices, and therefore protects root apices and RBCs from Al toxicity. PMID:27679639

  12. Alkali-Soluble Pectin Is the Primary Target of Aluminum Immobilization in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Mei; Fang, Jing; Shen, Ren Fang; Feng, Ying Ming; Liu, Jia You; Bian, Jian Feng; Wu, Li Shu; He, Yong Ming; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a discrepancy of Al binding in cell wall constituents determines Al mobility in root border cells (RBCs) of pea (Pisum sativum), which provides protection for RBCs and root apices under Al toxicity. Plants of pea (P. sativum L. 'Zhongwan no. 6') were subjected to Al treatments under mist culture. The concentration of Al in RBCs was much higher than that in the root apex. The Al content in RBCs surrounding one root apex (10(4) RBCs) was approximately 24.5% of the total Al in the root apex (0-2.5 mm), indicating a shielding role of RBCs for the root apex under Al toxicity. Cell wall analysis showed that Al accumulated predominantly in alkali-soluble pectin (pectin 2) of RBCs. This could be attributed to a significant increase of uronic acids under Al toxicity, higher capacity of Al adsorption in pectin 2 [5.3-fold higher than that of chelate-soluble pectin (pectin 1)], and lower ratio of Al desorption from pectin 2 (8.5%) compared with pectin 1 (68.5%). These results indicate that pectin 2 is the primary target of Al immobilization in RBCs of pea, which impairs Al access to the intracellular space of RBCs and mobility to root apices, and therefore protects root apices and RBCs from Al toxicity.

  13. Boron deficiency inhibits root cell elongation via an ethylene/auxin/ROS-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J.; Martín-Rejano, Esperanza M.; Herrera-Rodríguez, M. Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M. Teresa; Rexach, Jesús; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest symptoms of boron (B) deficiency is the inhibition of root elongation which can reasonably be attributed to the damaging effects of B deprivation on cell wall integrity. It is shown here that exposure of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to B deficiency for 4h led to a drastic inhibition of root cell length in the transition between the elongation and differentiation zones. To investigate the possible mediation of ethylene, auxin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of B deficiency on root cell elongation, B deficiency was applied together with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, a chemical inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis), silver ions (Ag+, an antagonist of ethylene perception), α-(phenylethyl-2‐oxo)‐indoleacetic acid (PEO-IAA, a synthetic antagonist of TIR1 receptor function), and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of ROS production). Interestingly, all these chemicals partially or fully restored cell elongation in B-deficient roots. To further explore the possible role of ethylene and auxin in the inhibition of root cell elongation under B deficiency, a genetic approach was performed by using Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ethylene (ein2‐1) or auxin (eir1-4 and aux1-22) response. Root cell elongation in these mutants was less sensitive to B-deficient treatment than that in wild-type plants. Altogether, these results demonstrated that a signalling pathway involving ethylene, auxin, and ROS participates in the reduction of root cell elongation when Arabidopsis seedlings are subjected to B deficiency. A similar signalling process has been described to reduce root elongation rapidly under various types of cell wall stress which supports the idea that this signalling pathway is triggered by the impaired cell wall integrity caused by B deficiency. PMID:25922480

  14. Tissue-specific epigenetic modifications in root apical meristem cells of Hordeum vulgare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka J Braszewska-Zalewska

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications of chromatin structure are essential for many biological processes, including growth and reproduction. Patterns of DNA and histone modifications have recently been widely studied in many plant species, although there is virtually no data on the spatial and temporal distribution of epigenetic markers during plant development. Accordingly, we have used immunostaining techniques to investigate epigenetic modifications in the root apical meristem of Hordeum vulgare. Histone H4 acetylation (H4K5ac, histone H3 dimethylation (H3K4me2, H3K9me2 and DNA methylation (5mC patterns were established for various root meristem tissues. Distinct levels of those modifications were visualised in the root cap, epidermis, cortex and vascular tissues. The lateral root cap cells seem to display the highest level of H3K9me2 and 5mC. In the epidermis, the highest level of 5mC and H3K9me2 was detected in the nuclei from the boundary of the proximal meristem and the elongation zone, while the vascular tissues were characterized by the highest level of H4K5ac. Some of the modified histones were also detectable in the cytoplasm in a highly tissue-specific manner. Immunolocalisation of epigenetic modifications of chromatin carried out in this way, on longitudinal or transverse sections, provides a unique topographic context within the organ, and will provide some answers to the significant biological question of tissue differentiation processes during root development in a monocotyledon plant species.

  15. Tissue-Specific Epigenetic Modifications in Root Apical Meristem Cells of Hordeum vulgare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braszewska-Zalewska, Agnieszka J.; Wolny, Elzbieta A.; Smialek, Lukasz; Hasterok, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications of chromatin structure are essential for many biological processes, including growth and reproduction. Patterns of DNA and histone modifications have recently been widely studied in many plant species, although there is virtually no data on the spatial and temporal distribution of epigenetic markers during plant development. Accordingly, we have used immunostaining techniques to investigate epigenetic modifications in the root apical meristem of Hordeum vulgare. Histone H4 acetylation (H4K5ac), histone H3 dimethylation (H3K4me2, H3K9me2) and DNA methylation (5mC) patterns were established for various root meristem tissues. Distinct levels of those modifications were visualised in the root cap, epidermis, cortex and vascular tissues. The lateral root cap cells seem to display the highest level of H3K9me2 and 5mC. In the epidermis, the highest level of 5mC and H3K9me2 was detected in the nuclei from the boundary of the proximal meristem and the elongation zone, while the vascular tissues were characterized by the highest level of H4K5ac. Some of the modified histones were also detectable in the cytoplasm in a highly tissue-specific manner. Immunolocalisation of epigenetic modifications of chromatin carried out in this way, on longitudinal or transverse sections, provides a unique topographic context within the organ, and will provide some answers to the significant biological question of tissue differentiation processes during root development in a monocotyledon plant species. PMID:23935955

  16. Altered susceptibility to infection by Sinorhizobium meliloti and Nectria haematococca in alfalfa roots with altered cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, H-H; Hirsch, A M; Hawes, M C

    2004-07-01

    Most infections of plant roots are initiated in the region of elongation; the mechanism for this tissue-specific localization pattern is unknown. In alfalfa expressing PsUGT1 antisense mRNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, the cell cycle in roots is completed in 48 h instead of 24 h, and border cell number is decreased by more than 99%. These plants were found to exhibit increased root-tip infection by a fungal pathogen and reduced nodule formation by a bacterial symbiont. Thus, the frequency of infection in the region of elongation by Nectria haematocca was unaffected, but infection of the root tip was increased by more than 90%; early stages of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection and nodule morphology were normal, but the frequency of nodulation was fourfold lower than in wild-type roots.

  17. Efficient induction of extrinsic cell death by dandelion root extract in human chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Ovadje

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML is a heterogeneous disease that is not only hard to diagnose and classify, but is also highly resistant to treatment. Available forms of therapy for this disease have not shown significant effects and patients rapidly develop resistance early on in therapy. These factors lead to the very poor prognosis observed with CMML patients, with median survival duration between 12 and 24 months after diagnosis. This study is therefore centered around evaluating the selective efficacy of a natural extract from dandelion roots, in inducing programmed cell death in aggressive and resistant CMML cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To confirm the induction of programmed cell death in three human CMML cell lines, nuclear condensation and externalization of the phosphatidylserine, two main characteristics of apoptosis, were detected using Hoechst staining and annexin-V binding assay. The induction of another mode of cell death, autophagy, was determined using a monodansylcadaverine (MDC stain, to detect the formation of autophagy vacuoles. The results from this study indicate that Dandelion Root Extract (DRE is able to efficiently and selectively induce apoptosis and autophagy in these cell lines in a dose and time dependent manner, with no significant toxicity on non-cancerous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. More importantly, we observed early activation of initiator caspase-8, which led to mitochondrial destabilization and the induction of autophagy, suggesting that DRE acts through the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The inability of DRE to induce apoptosis in dominant-negative FADD cells, confirms the mechanism of action of DRE in in vitro models of CMML. CONCLUSION: The results from this study indicate that natural products, in particular Dandelion Root Extract, have great potential, as non-toxic and effective alternatives to conventional modes of chemotherapy available today.

  18. The effects of six root-end filling materials and their leachable components on cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sa'eed, Oula R; Al-Hiyasat, Ahmad S; Darmani, Homa

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of six root-end filling materials (Retroplast [Retroplast Trading, Dybesøvej, Denmark], Geristore, [DEN-MAT Corporation, Santa Maria, CA], Ketac Fil [3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany], IRM [Caulk-Dentsply, Milford, DE], Super EBA [Bosworth Company, Skokie, IL], and MTA [Dentsply-Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN]) on the viability of Balb/C 3T3 fibroblasts using the [3-4, 5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide succinate (MTT) assay. Ten discs (5 mm x 2 mm) of each material were eluted in tissue culture medium for 24 hours at 37 degrees C for 3 successive days and the elutes used for cell viability testing and for determination of leached components. The results showed that Retroplast, Geristore, and Ketac Fil increased cell proliferation, whereas Super-EBA decreased cell viability. The proliferative effect of Retroplast and Geristore increased with the eluting time (24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours), whereas the effects of the other materials did not significantly change. IRM and MTA did not affect cell viability. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that there was variation in the amount of leached components from the materials. Our results indicate that the reaction of cells to root-end filling materials varies considerably between materials.

  19. Oryzalin-modified disruption of microtubular cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis thaliana root cells under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, Ia.; Shevchenko, G.; Kordyum, E.

    There are data on gravisensitivity of cells not specialized to perceive a gravity vector but the molecular processes by which gravity affects not graviperceptive cells are still unclear Spaceflight experiments show that the microtubule self-organization in vitro is gravity-dependent Confocal microscopic analysis of the microtubule spatial organization under altered gravity with combination of approach drugs that disrupt normal microtubule behavior should give us a better understanding of the possible role of microtubule cytoskeleton in gravisensing on cellular level With this aim we examined influence of horizontal clinorotation 2 rpm on the spatial organization of microtubules in the root cortical and epidermal cells by means of LSM 5 PASCAL Zeiss Germany Microtubules were visualized by using stably transformed line of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a green fluorescent protein-MAP4 fusion protein We inhibited microtubule function applying 5 956 M L oryzalin microtubule inhibitor in control and clinorotated seedlings Preliminary investigations show that cortical microtubule arrays were dense and predominantly transverse to the root long axis in the meristem and distal elongation zone in control and they got oblique direction when rapid cell elongation is finishing In the differentiation zone microtubules reorient with respect to the longitudinal growth axis of cell Under clinorotation cortical microtubules have the same configuration in the meristem central elongation zone and differentiation zone but it is observed appearances of several

  20. The effect of zeolite,bentonite and sepiolite minerals onheavy metal uptake by sunflower

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    N . Esmaeilpour Fard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mining, industrial and agricultural activities can result in considerable soil pollution by heavy metals (HMs. One of the methods to control this pollution is application of adsorbent minerals. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of adsorbent minerals (bentonite, zeolite and sepiolite on transfer of some heavy metals (i.e., Pb, Zn and Cd from soil to tissues of sunflower (Heliantus annuus L.. Treatments included: Non-polluted soil, HM-polluted soil, polluted soil + bentonite, polluted soil + zeolite, and polluted soil + sepiolite. Sunflower seeds were planted in different pots containing the above treated soils. After 70 days of growth, plants were harvested and HMs content was measured. Results revealed that the uptake of HMs from non-polluted soil was lower than that of other treatments. In the polluted soil + sepiolite treatment, the added sepiolite increased plant Cd and Zn uptake by 0.37 and 7.17 mg/kg, respectively. However, the differences in HMs uptake were not significant for other treatments. Zeolite addition decreased plant uptake of Zn and Cd by about 12 and 0.21 mg/kg, respectively, while bentonite addition reduced Pb uptake by about 3.05 mg/kg, without any significant difference for the other treatments. Zn uptake was higher by about 12.2 mg/kg in plant shoots as compared to plant roots. On the contrary, the roots took up higher amounts of Cd and Pb, as compared to the shoots. Despite high concentration of the HMs in the polluted soils, considerable tendency of sunflower for uptake, and a high adsorption capacity of the applied minerals, the HMs uptake by sunflower and surface adsorption by the minerals were very low, probably due to HMs precipitation in the soil.

  1. Cell cycle arrest in antheridial extract-treated root meristems of Allium cepa and Melandrium noctiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maszewski, J; Kaźmierczak, A; Polit, J

    1998-01-01

    Previous results have demonstrated that extracts derived from maturing male sex organs of Chara tomentosa are capable of inducing profound structural and functional effects upon M-phase cells in the primary root meristems of Melandrium noctiflorum and Allium cepa. Evident changes produced by a putative factor engaged in morphogenesis of antheridial filaments are manifested by: (1) significant shortening of chromosomes, (2) decreased mitotic indices, and (3) altered proportions estimated for the prophase and telophase transit times. The present image analysis of late G2 phase nuclei in antheridial filaments of C. tomentosa supports the concepts that progressive changes of their functional activities correspond closely to the increasing proportion of condensed chromatin. Cytophotometric measurements of Feulgen-stained cell nuclei in root meristems after a prolonged incubation in antheridial extracts revealed that cells which previously divided asynchronously became preferentially arrested in G1 (M. noctiflorum) and G2 (A. cepa). The stages at which the cells arrest are supposed to counterpart restriction checkpoints that prevent the initiation of DNA synthesis and mitosis. This assumption has been confirmed by autoradiographic studies using 3H-thymidine. In terms of the "Principal Control Points" (PCP) hypothesis, the obtained results suggest that two PCPs regulate G1-->S and G2-->M transition in a nuclear structure-dependent and a species-specific manner. Although in antheridial extract-treated roots of both M. noctiflorum and A. cepa there are only slight changes in the levels of chromatin condensation, the relative proportions of G1- and G2-arrested cells and their nuclear density profiles differ, as compared with the control and carbohydrate-starved plants.

  2. Cyclic programmed cell death stimulates hormone signaling and root development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xuan, Wei; Band, Leah R.; Kumpf, Robert P.; Rybel, De Bert

    2016-01-01

    The plant root cap, surrounding the very tip of the growing root, perceives and transmits environmental signals to the inner root tissues. In Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin released by the root cap contributes to the regular spacing of lateral organs along the primary root axis. Here, we show that

  3. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

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    Amanda L. Gindri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quantified in the roots and leaves infusions by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD, with the mobile phase of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.5: acetonitrile at 95:5 (v/v. To the genotoxicity test, onion bulbs were used. After the rootlets germination, each bulb was submitted for 24 h of the individual treatments. Were analyzed 1000 cells per bulb, in a total of 5000 cells per treatment. Results: Results showed that all concentrations of roots infusions induced chromosomes abnormalities, except for the highest, that caused a substantial inhibition in the mitosis, precluding to be observed abnormalities. In the leaves infusions, only the two higher concentrations caused the highest values of damage in the cellular cycle. The oxalic acid also caused abnormalities in the mitosis, and may be considered responsible by part of the genotoxic action of U. baccifera. Conclusions: Oxalic acid can be responsible by part of the chromosomal abnormalities caused by U. baccifera, although, there must have more metabolites that evoke the same effect promoting the genotoxic effect of this nettle.

  4. The PLETHORA Gene Regulatory Network Guides Growth and Cell Differentiation in Arabidopsis Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santuari, Luca; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino F; Luijten, Marijn; Rutjens, Bas; Terpstra, Inez; Berke, Lidija; Gorte, Maartje; Prasad, Kalika; Bao, Dongping; Timmermans-Hereijgers, Johanna L P M; Maeo, Kenichiro; Nakamura, Kenzo; Shimotohno, Akie; Pencik, Ales; Novak, Ondrej; Ljung, Karin; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; de Bruijn, Ewart; Cuppen, Edwin; Willemsen, Viola; Mähönen, Ari Pekka; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Snel, Berend; de Ridder, Dick; Scheres, Ben; Heidstra, Renze

    2016-12-01

    Organ formation in animals and plants relies on precise control of cell state transitions to turn stem cell daughters into fully differentiated cells. In plants, cells cannot rearrange due to shared cell walls. Thus, differentiation progression and the accompanying cell expansion must be tightly coordinated across tissues. PLETHORA (PLT) transcription factor gradients are unique in their ability to guide the progression of cell differentiation at different positions in the growing Arabidopsis thaliana root, which contrasts with well-described transcription factor gradients in animals specifying distinct cell fates within an essentially static context. To understand the output of the PLT gradient, we studied the gene set transcriptionally controlled by PLTs. Our work reveals how the PLT gradient can regulate cell state by region-specific induction of cell proliferation genes and repression of differentiation. Moreover, PLT targets include major patterning genes and autoregulatory feedback components, enforcing their role as master regulators of organ development. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Immortalized human dorsal root ganglion cells differentiate into neurons with nociceptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymon, H K; Thode, S; Zhou, J; Friedman, G C; Pardinas, J R; Barrere, C; Johnson, R M; Sah, D W

    1999-07-01

    A renewable source of human sensory neurons would greatly facilitate basic research and drug development. We had established previously conditionally immortalized human CNS cell lines that can differentiate into functional neurons (). We report here the development of an immortalized human dorsal root ganglion (DRG) clonal cell line, HD10.6, with a tetracycline-regulatable v-myc oncogene. In the proliferative condition, HD10.6 cells have a doubling time of 1.2 d and exhibit a neuronal precursor morphology. After differentiation of clone HD10.6 for 7 d in the presence of tetracycline, v-myc expression was suppressed, and >50% of the cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, stained positively for neuronal cytoskeletal markers, and fired action potentials in response to current injection. Furthermore, this cell line was fate-restricted to a neuronal phenotype; even in culture conditions that promote Schwann cell or smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest stem cells, HD10.6 differentiated exclusively into neurons. Moreover, differentiated HD10.6 cells expressed sensory neuron-associated transcription factors and exhibited capsaicin sensitivity. Taken together, these data indicate that we have established an immortalized human DRG cell line that can differentiate into sensory neurons with nociceptive properties. The cell line HD10.6 represents the first example of a human sensory neuronal line and will be valuable for basic research, as well as for the discovery of novel drug targets and clinical candidates.

  6. Neuropeptide FF receptor modulates potassium currents in a dorsal root ganglion cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollereau, Catherine; Roumy, Michel; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors on F-11 cells, a hybridoma derived from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and mouse neuroblastoma. Binding experiments revealed a low density (4 fmol/mg) of high affinity (0.5 nM) [(3)H]-EYF binding sites in these cells. The whole-cell planar patch-clamp technique showed that dNPA, a selective NPFF(2) agonist, increased the voltage-dependent potassium outward currents (about 30 pA/pF) by 21%; this reversible effect on sustained delayed potassium currents is blocked by tetraethylammonium. The similar effects of NPFF and opioid agonists on K(+) currents in this cell line may explain their similar antinociceptive actions at the spinal level.

  7. Sunflower Array Antenna with Adjustable Density Taper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viganó, M.C.; Toso, G.; Caille, G.; Mangenot, C.; Lager, I.E.

    2009-01-01

    A deterministic procedure to design a nonperiodic planar array radiating a rotationally symmetric pencil beam pattern with an adjustable sidelobe level is proposed. The elements positions are derived by modifying the peculiar locations of the sunflower seeds in such a way that the corresponding spat

  8. Physical properties of sunflower grains after drying

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    Paulo Carteri Coradi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the physical properties of the grains is important for the optimization of post-harvest operations. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of convective drying with different air temperatures (45, 55, 65 and 75 °C the physical properties of sunflower seeds. The drying sunflower grains was performed in convection oven with forced air. In natural conditions, samples of 5 kg of pellets were used for each repetition drying. During the drying process, the grains samples were weighed periodically until they reach 10% (wet basis, w.b., then were subjected to evaluations of physical properties. According to the results it was observed that the porosity, apparent density, thousand kernel weight to the drag coefficient, roundness, sphericity and width of sunflower seed did not change with increasing temperature drying air. It was concluded that the drying air temperatures of 45 °C and 55 retained the initial physical characteristics of sunflower seeds. The temperature of the drying air of 75 °C had greater influence on changes in volumetric shrinkage of the grains.

  9. Reimplantation combined with transplantation of transgenic neural stem cells for treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lei; LU Lai-jin; MENG Xiao-ting; CHEN Dong; ZHANG Zhi-xin; YANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore a new method to treat brachial plexus root avulsion experimentally by reimplantation combined with transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) modified by neurotrophin-3 gene (NT-3).Methods: The total RNA was extracted from neonatal rat striatum and the NT-3 cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and amplified by polymerase chain reaction.The NT-3 gene was transferred into NSCs via the pLEGFP-Cl,an expression plasmid vectors.The untransfected NSCs,the pLEGFP-Cl treated NSCs,and the pLEGFP-Cl-NT-3 treated NSCs were transplanted into corresponding spinal cord segment with brachial plexus root avulsion.The survival,differentiation,and migration of the transplanted cells were determined under confoeal laser scanning microscope or by immunohistochemistry method.The nerve regeneration was evaluated by gross observation,electrophysiologieal examination and reverse horseradish peroxidase tracing.Results: The NT-3 gene was successfully amplified and transferred into neural stem cells via the plasmid vectors.The transplanted cells survived,differentiated,and migrated and NT-3 was expressed within the spinal cord.The animals regained some muscle strength which was less than 3-degree muscular strength according to the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) evaluating system.The resuits of electrophysiological examination and reverse horseradish peroxidase tracing were superior in the pLEGFP-Cl-NT-3 group to the NSCs untransfected group orthe pLEGFP-Cl group.Conclusion: Transplantation of NSCs modified by NT-3gene combined with reimplantantion is a relatively effective way to treat brachial plexus root avuision experimentally.It still need further study to improve the results.

  10. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome. PMID:27601859

  11. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  12. The garlic allelochemical diallyl disulfide affects tomato root growth by influencing cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L., and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. seed germination, root growth, mitotic index and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs, auxin transport genes (SlPINs and expansin genes (EXPs in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM. This result suggests that tomato root growth

  13. [Possible uses of sunflower in proper human nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorić, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    The sunflower is the main oil crop in Serbia and one of the four major oil crops on the global scale. The seed of commercial sunflower crops being grown today consists most commonly of 45-53% oil and 15-18% protein. Unfortunately, sunflower seed protein has traditionally been underused in the human diet in Serbia. The amino acid composition of sunflower protein is quite favorable. In addition to oil and protein, sunflower kernels contain tocopherols, minerals, and vitamins. The sunflower is also a major honey plant, as sunflower plants produce over 40 kg of nectar and over 80 kg of pollen per area unit (hectare) under normal circumstances. Standard sunflower oil is linoleic in character, but induced mutations have been used to obtain genotypes with a high-oleic acid content of the oil (> 85%), thus enabling the development of high-oleic sunflower hybrids. Induced mutations have also been used to obtain genotypes with high levels of palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. The predominant tocopherol in standard sunflower oil is the alpha one, but sunflower genotypes have now been developed using spontaneous and induced mutations that predominantly contain beta, gamma, and delta tocopherols. Various developments in the field of genetics have made it possible to develop sunflower hybrids with different oil profiles in terms of fatty acid composition and tocopherol type and amount. The thermo-oxidative stability of the new types of sunflower oil is significantly higher than that of standard sunflower oil. Of the new types of sunflower, it is the high-oleic hybrids that have found the widest application in commercial production. It is expected that the future sunflower hybrids combining high levels of oleic and stearic acids with gamma tocopherol will become a major component of a healthy human diet. The development of new consumption sunflower hybrids with an increased protein content and altered oil quality will lead to the development of a large number of novel final

  14. cell- and tissue-specific transcriptome analyses of Medicago truncatula root nodules.

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    Erik Limpens

    Full Text Available Legumes have the unique ability to host nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria as symbiosomes inside root nodule cells. To get insight into this key process, which forms the heart of the endosymbiosis, we isolated specific cells/tissues at different stages of symbiosome formation from nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula using laser-capture microdissection. Next, we determined their associated expression profiles using Affymetrix Medicago GeneChips. Cells were collected from the nodule infection zone divided into a distal (where symbiosome formation and division occur and proximal region (where symbiosomes are mainly differentiating, as well as infected cells from the fixation zone containing mature nitrogen fixing symbiosomes. As non-infected cells/tissue we included nodule meristem cells and uninfected cells from the fixation zone. Here, we present a comprehensive gene expression map of an indeterminate Medicago nodule and selected genes that show specific enriched expression in the different cells or tissues. Validation of the obtained expression profiles, by comparison to published gene expression profiles and experimental verification, indicates that the data can be used as digital "in situ". This digital "in situ" offers a genome-wide insight into genes specifically associated with subsequent stages of symbiosome and nodule cell development, and can serve to guide future functional studies.

  15. Plant-specific Histone Deacetylases HDT½ Regulate GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 Expression to Control Arabidopsis Root Meristem Cell Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huchen; Torres-Garcia, Jesus; Latrasse, David; Benhamed, Moussa; Schilderink, Stefan; Zhou, Wenkun; Kulikova, Olga; Hirt, Heribert; Bisseling, Ton

    2017-08-30

    Root growth is modulated by environmental factors and depends on cell production in the root meristem (RM). New cells in the meristem are generated by stem cells and transit-amplifying cells, which together determine RM cell number. Transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors have been implicated in regulating the switch from stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. Here we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific histone deacetylases, HDT1 and HDT2, regulate a second switch from transit-amplifying cells to expanding cells. Knockdown of HDT½ (hdt1,2i) results in an earlier switch and causes a reduced RM cell number. Our data show that HDT½ negatively regulate the acetylation level of the C19-GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 (GA2ox2) locus and repress the expression of GA2ox2 in the RM and elongation zone. Overexpression of GA2ox2 in the RM phenocopies the hdt1,2i phenotype. Conversely, knockout of GA2ox2 partially rescues the root growth defect of hdt1,2i. These results suggest that by repressing the expression of GA2ox2, HDT½ likely fine-tune gibberellin metabolism and they are crucial for regulating the switch from cell division to expansion to determine RM cell number. We propose that HDT½ function as part of a mechanism that modulates root growth in response to environmental factors. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Plant-specific Histone Deacetylases HDT½ Regulate GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 Expression to Control Arabidopsis Root Meristem Cell Number

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huchen

    2017-08-31

    Root growth is modulated by environmental factors and depends on cell production in the root meristem (RM). New cells in the meristem are generated by stem cells and transit-amplifying cells, which together determine RM cell number. Transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors have been implicated in regulating the switch from stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. Here we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific histone deacetylases, HDT1 and HDT2, regulate a second switch from transit-amplifying cells to expanding cells. Knockdown of HDT½ (hdt1,2i) results in an earlier switch and causes a reduced RM cell number. Our data show that HDT½ negatively regulate the acetylation level of the C19-GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 (GA2ox2) locus and repress the expression of GA2ox2 in the RM and elongation zone. Overexpression of GA2ox2 in the RM phenocopies the hdt1,2i phenotype. Conversely, knockout of GA2ox2 partially rescues the root growth defect of hdt1,2i. These results suggest that by repressing the expression of GA2ox2, HDT½ likely fine-tune gibberellin metabolism and they are crucial for regulating the switch from cell division to expansion to determine RM cell number. We propose that HDT½ function as part of a mechanism that modulates root growth in response to environmental factors.

  17. A morphometric analysis of the redistribution of organelles in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine what structural changes in graviperceptive cells are associated with onset of root gravicurvature, the redistribution of organelles in columella cells of horizontally-oriented, graviresponding roots of Zea mays has been quantified. Root gravicurvature began by 15 min after reorientation, and did not involve significant changes in the (i) volume of individual columella cells or amyloplasts, (ii) relative volume of any cellular organelle, (iii) number of amyloplasts per columella cell, or (iv) surface area of cellular location of endoplasmic reticulum. Sedimentation of amyloplasts began within 1 to 2 min after reorientation, and was characterized by an intensely staining area of cytoplasm adjacent to the sedimenting amyloplasts. By 5 min after reorientation, amyloplasts were located in the lower distal corner of columella cells, and, by 15 min after reorientation, overlaid the entire length of the lower cell wall. No consistent contact between amyloplasts and any cellular structure was detected at any stage of gravicurvature. Centrally-located nuclei initially migrated upward in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots, after which they moved to the proximal ends of the cells by 15 min after reorientation. No significant pattern of redistribution of vacuoles, mitochondria, dictyosomes, or hyaloplasm was detected that correlated with the onset of gravicurvature. These results indicate that amyloplasts and nuclei are the only organelles whose movements correlate positively with the onset of gravicurvature by primary roots of this cultivar of Zea mays.

  18. Comparative study of SOS2 and a novel PMP3-1 gene expression in two sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) lines differing in salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadia, Mubshara; Jamil, Amer; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha

    2013-06-01

    Gene expression pattern of two important regulatory proteins, salt overly sensitive 2 (SOS2) and plasma membrane protein 3-1 (PMP3-1), involved in ion homeostasis, was analyzed in two salinity-contrasting sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) lines, Hysun-38 (salt tolerant) and S-278 (moderately salt tolerant). The pattern was studied at selected time intervals (24 h) under 150 mM NaCl treatment. Using reverse transcription PCR, SOS2 gene fragment was obtained from young leaf and root tissues of opposing lines while that for PMP3-1 was obtained only from young root tissues. Both tolerant and moderately tolerant lines showed a gradual increase in SOS2 expression in sunflower root tissues. Leaf tissues showed the gradually increasing pattern of SOS2 expression in tolerant plants as compared to that for moderately tolerant ones that showed a relatively lower level of expression for this gene. We found the highest level of PMP 3-1 expression in the roots of tolerant sunflower line at 6 and 12 h postsalinity treatment. The moderately tolerant line showed higher expression of PMP3-1 at 12 and 24 h after salt treatment. Overall, the expression of genes for both the regulator proteins varied significantly in the two sunflower lines differing in salinity tolerance.

  19. Differentiating the stem cell pool of human hair follicle outer root sheath into functional melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marie; Dieckmann, Christina; Rabe, Katrin; Simon, Jan-Christoph; Savkovic, Vuk

    2014-01-01

    Bench-to-Bedside concepts for regenerative therapy place significant weight on noninvasive approaches, with harvesting of the starting material as a header. This is particularly important in autologous treatments, which use one's bodily constituents for therapy. Precisely the stretch between obtaining therapeutic elements invasively and noninvasively places non-intrusive "sampling" rather than "biopsy" in the center of the road map of developing an autologous regenerative therapy. We focus on such a noninvasively available source of adult stem cells that we carry with us throughout our life, available at our fingertips-or shall we say hair roots, by a simple plucking of hair: the human hair follicle. This chapter describes an explant procedure for cultivating melanocytes differentiated from the stem cell pool of the hair follicle Outer Root Sheath (ORS). In vivo, the most abundant derivatives of the heterogeneous ORS stem cell pool are epidermal cells-melanocytes and keratinocytes which complete their differentiation-either spontaneously or upon picking up regenerative cues from damaged skin-and migrate from the ORS towards the adjacent regenerating area of the epidermis. We have taken advantage of the ORS developmental potential by optimizing explant primary culture, expansion and melanogenic differentiation of resident ORS stem cells towards end-stage melanocytes in order to obtain functional melanocytes noninvasively for the purposes of transplantation and use them for the treatment of depigmentation disorders. Our protocol specifies sampling of hair with their ORS, follicle medium-air interface primary culture, stimulation of cell outgrowth, adherent culture and differentiation of ORS stem cells and precursors towards fully functional melanocytes. Along with cultivation, we describe selection techniques for establishing and maintaining a pure melanocyte population and methods suitable for determining melanocyte identity.

  20. Root Border-Like Cells of Arabidopsis. Microscopical Characterization and Role in the Interaction with Rhizobacteria1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicré, Maïté; Santaella, Catherine; Blanchet, Sandrine; Gateau, Aurélien; Driouich, Azeddine

    2005-01-01

    Plant roots of many species produce thousands of cells that are released daily into the rhizosphere. These cells are commonly termed border cells because of their major role in constituting a biotic boundary layer between the root surface and the soil. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and ultrastructure of such cells in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using light and electron microscopy coupled to high-pressure freezing. The secretion of cell wall molecules including pectic polysaccharides and arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) was examined also using immunofluorescence microscopy and a set of anticarbohydrate antibodies. We show that root tips of Arabidopsis seedlings released cell layers in an organized pattern that differs from the rather randomly dispersed release observed in other plant species studied to date. Therefore, we termed such cells border-like cells (BLC). Electron microscopical results revealed that BLC are rich in mitochondria, Golgi stacks, and Golgi-derived vesicles, suggesting that these cells are actively engaged in secretion of materials to their cell walls. Immunocytochemical data demonstrated that pectins as well as AGPs are among secreted material as revealed by the high level of expression of AGP-epitopes. In particular, the JIM13-AGP epitope was found exclusively associated with BLC and peripheral cells in the root cap region. In addition, we investigated the function of BLC and root cap cell AGPs in the interaction with rhizobacteria using AGP-disrupting agents and a strain of Rhizobium sp. expressing a green fluorescent protein. Our findings demonstrate that alteration of AGPs significantly inhibits the attachment of the bacteria to the surface of BLC and root tip. PMID:15908608

  1. Nitric oxide and iron modulate heme oxygenase activity as a long distance signaling response to salt stress in sunflower seedling cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-02-29

    Nitric oxide is a significant component of iron signaling in plants. Heme is one of the iron sensors in plants. Free heme is highly toxic and can cause cell damage as it catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Its catabolism is carried out by heme oxygenase (HOs; EC 1.14.99.3) which uses heme both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Two significant events, which accompany adaptation to salt stress in sunflower seedlings, are accumulation of ROS and enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) in roots and cotyledons. Present investigations on the immunolocalization of heme oxygenase distribution in sunflower seedling cotyledons by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging provide new information on the differential spatial distribution of the inducible form of HO (HO-1) as a long distance in response to NaCl stress. The enzyme is abundantly distributed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals (SCs) in seedling cotyledons. Abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins has also been observed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals in cotyledons derived from salt stressed seedlings. The spatial distribution of tyrosine nitrated proteins and HO-1 expression further correlates with the abundance of mitochondria in these cells. Present findings, thus, highlight a link among distribution of HO-1 expression, abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins and mitochondria in specialized cells around the secretory canal as a long distance mechanism of salt stress tolerance in sunflower seedlings. Enhanced spatial distribution of HO-1 in response to NaCl stress in seedling cotyledons is in congruence with the observed increase in specific activity of HO-1 in NaCl stressed conditions. The enzyme activity is further enhanced by hemin (HO-1 inducer) both in the absence or presence of NaCl stress and inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin. Western blot analysis of cotyledon homogenates using anti-HO-1 polyclonal antibody shows one major band (29

  2. Sunlight decreased genotoxicity of azadirachtin on root tip cells of Allium cepa and Eucrosia bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwankua, W; Sengsai, S; Kuleung, C; Euawong, N

    2010-07-01

    Utilization of neem plant (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) extract for pest control in agriculture has raised concerns over contamination by the residues to the environment. Such residues, particularly azadirachtin (Aza), may cause deleterious effect to non-target organisms. This investigation was conducted to find out if Aza could be inactivated through exposures to sunlight. Activity of Aza was assessed as its ability to cause cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the forms of nuclei abnormality and chromosome aberration as measured by mitotic index (MI) and mitotic aberration (MA). Varying concentrations of Aza were tested on Allium cepa and Eucrosia bicolor. It was found that the MI of all root tip meristematic cells of A. cepa and E. bicolor treated with 0.00005%, 0.00010%, 0.00015%, and 0.00020% (w/v) Aza-containing neem extract for 24h, were significantly lower than the controls. Complementary to the lower levels of MI, the Aza-treated groups showed higher MA levels in all cases investigated. Furthermore, the decreasing levels of MI and the increasing levels of MA related well with the increasing concentration of Aza. Microscopic examination of root tip meristematic cells revealed that the anomaly found most often were mitotic disturbances and chromosomal bridges. Exposures of 0.00020% (w/v) Aza to sunlight for 3 days and 7 days decreased Aza ability to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, both in terms of MI and MA, to root tip meristematic cells in A. cepa and E. bicolor. Photodegradation of Aza upon exposure to direct sunlight was confirmed by HPLC. The study implicates that Aza would unlikely cause long term deleterious effects to the environment since it would be inactivated by sunlight. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell identity regulators link development and stress responses in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S; Jackson, Terry; Cui, Hongchang; Petricka, Jalean J; Busch, Wolfgang; Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Benfey, Philip N

    2011-10-18

    Stress responses in plants are tightly coordinated with developmental processes, but interaction of these pathways is poorly understood. We used genome-wide assays at high spatiotemporal resolution to understand the processes that link development and stress in the Arabidopsis root. Our meta-analysis finds little evidence for a universal stress response. However, common stress responses appear to exist with many showing cell type specificity. Common stress responses may be mediated by cell identity regulators because mutations in these genes resulted in altered responses to stress. Evidence for a direct role for cell identity regulators came from genome-wide binding profiling of the key regulator SCARECROW, which showed binding to regulatory regions of stress-responsive genes. Coexpression in response to stress was used to identify genes involved in specific developmental processes. These results reveal surprising linkages between stress and development at cellular resolution, and show the power of multiple genome-wide data sets to elucidate biological processes.

  4. Antimony (SbIII) reduces growth, declines photosynthesis, and modifies leaf tissue anatomy in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaculík, Marek; Mrázová, Anna; Lux, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The role of antimony (Sb)--a non-essential trace metalloid--in physiological processes running in crops is still poorly understood. Present paper describes the effect of Sb tartrate (SbIII) on growth, Sb uptake, photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigments, and leaf tissue organization in young sunflower plants grown in hydroponics. We found that growth of below- and aboveground part was reduced with increasing concentration of Sb in the medium. Although Sb was mostly taken up by sunflower roots and only small part (1-2%) was translocated to the shoots, decline in photosynthesis, transpiration, and decreased content of photosynthetic pigments were observed. This indicates that despite relatively low mobility of Sb in root-shoot system, Sb in shoot noticeably modifies physiological status and reduced plant growth. Additionally, leaf anatomical changes indicated that Sb reduced the size of intercellular spaces and made leaf tissue more compact.

  5. Cell Wall Amine Oxidases: New Players in Root Xylem Differentiation under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuge, Sandip A; Tisi, Alessandra; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-07-14

    Polyamines (PAs) are aliphatic polycations present in all living organisms. A growing body of evidence reveals their involvement as regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological events. They are oxidatively deaminated by amine oxidases (AOs), including copper amine oxidases (CuAOs) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs). The biologically-active hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is a shared compound in all of the AO-catalyzed reactions, and it has been reported to play important roles in PA-mediated developmental and stress-induced processes. In particular, the AO-driven H₂O₂ biosynthesis in the cell wall is well known to be involved in plant wound healing and pathogen attack responses by both triggering peroxidase-mediated wall-stiffening events and signaling modulation of defense gene expression. Extensive investigation by a variety of methodological approaches revealed high levels of expression of cell wall-localized AOs in root xylem tissues and vascular parenchyma of different plant species. Here, the recent progresses in understanding the role of cell wall-localized AOs as mediators of root xylem differentiation during development and/or under stress conditions are reviewed. A number of experimental pieces of evidence supports the involvement of apoplastic H₂O₂ derived from PA oxidation in xylem tissue maturation under stress-simulated conditions.

  6. Cell Wall Amine Oxidases: New Players in Root Xylem Differentiation under Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip A. Ghuge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines (PAs are aliphatic polycations present in all living organisms. A growing body of evidence reveals their involvement as regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological events. They are oxidatively deaminated by amine oxidases (AOs, including copper amine oxidases (CuAOs and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs. The biologically-active hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is a shared compound in all of the AO-catalyzed reactions, and it has been reported to play important roles in PA-mediated developmental and stress-induced processes. In particular, the AO-driven H2O2 biosynthesis in the cell wall is well known to be involved in plant wound healing and pathogen attack responses by both triggering peroxidase-mediated wall-stiffening events and signaling modulation of defense gene expression. Extensive investigation by a variety of methodological approaches revealed high levels of expression of cell wall-localized AOs in root xylem tissues and vascular parenchyma of different plant species. Here, the recent progresses in understanding the role of cell wall-localized AOs as mediators of root xylem differentiation during development and/or under stress conditions are reviewed. A number of experimental pieces of evidence supports the involvement of apoplastic H2O2 derived from PA oxidation in xylem tissue maturation under stress-simulated conditions.

  7. The simulation model of growth and cell divisions for the root apex with an apical cell in application to Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarska-Stachowiak, Anna; Nakielski, Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    In contrast to seed plants, the roots of most ferns have a single apical cell which is the ultimate source of all cells in the root. The apical cell has a tetrahedral shape and divides asymmetrically. The root cap derives from the distal division face, while merophytes derived from three proximal division faces contribute to the root proper. The merophytes are produced sequentially forming three sectors along a helix around the root axis. During development, they divide and differentiate in a predictable pattern. Such growth causes cell pattern of the root apex to be remarkably regular and self-perpetuating. The nature of this regularity remains unknown. This paper shows the 2D simulation model for growth of the root apex with the apical cell in application to Azolla pinnata. The field of growth rates of the organ, prescribed by the model, is of a tensor type (symplastic growth) and cells divide taking principal growth directions into account. The simulations show how the cell pattern in a longitudinal section of the apex develops in time. The virtual root apex grows realistically and its cell pattern is similar to that observed in anatomical sections. The simulations indicate that the cell pattern regularity results from cell divisions which are oriented with respect to principal growth directions. Such divisions are essential for maintenance of peri-anticlinal arrangement of cell walls and coordinated growth of merophytes during the development. The highly specific division program that takes place in merophytes prior to differentiation seems to be regulated at the cellular level.

  8. Systemic control of cell division and endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by modulating CDKs in root tip cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jigna G; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP) treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  9. Systemic Control of Cell Division and Endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by Modulating CDKs in Root Tip Cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigna G. Tank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  10. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  11. Gall-forming root-knot nematodes hijack key plant cellular functions to induce multinucleate and hypertrophied feeding cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favery, Bruno; Quentin, Michaël; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Abad, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Among plant-parasitic nematodes, the root-knot nematodes (RKNs) of the Meloidogyne spp. are the most economically important genus. RKN are root parasitic worms able to infect nearly all crop species and have a wide geographic distribution. During infection, RKNs establish and maintain an intimate relationship with the host plant. This includes the creation of a specialized nutritional structure composed of multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells, which result from the redifferentiation of vascular root cells. Giant cells constitute the sole source of nutrients for the nematode and are essential for growth and reproduction. Hyperplasia of surrounding root cells leads to the formation of the gall or root-knot, an easily recognized symptom of plant infection by RKNs. Secreted effectors produced in nematode salivary glands and injected into plant cells through a specialized feeding structure called the stylet play a critical role in the formation of giant cells. Here, we describe the complex interactions between RKNs and their host plants. We highlight progress in understanding host plant responses, focusing on how RKNs manipulate key plant processes and functions, including cell cycle, defence, hormones, cellular scaffold, metabolism and transport.

  12. Cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on root cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mamta; Khan, S Sudheer; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2011-06-15

    Increasing use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NP) in consumer products may enhance its release into the environment. Phytotoxicity study is important to understand its possible environmental impact. Allium cepa (Onion bulb) is the best model organism to study genetic toxicology of nanoparticles. Here we have reported cytogenetic and genotoxic effects of ZnO NPs on the root cells of A. cepa. The effects of ZnO NPs on the mitotic index (MI), micronuclei index (MN index), chromosomal aberration index, and lipid peroxidation were determined through the hydroponic culturing of A. cepa. A. cepa roots were treated with the dispersions of ZnO NPs at four different concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100 μg ml(-1)). With the increasing concentrations of ZnO NPs MI decreased with the increase of pycnotic cells, on the other hand MN and chromosomal aberration index increased. The frequency of micronucleated cells was higher in ZnO NPs treated cells as compared to control (deionized distilled water). The number of cells in each mitotic phase changed upon ZnO NPs treatment. The effect of ZnO NPs on lipid peroxidation as examined by measuring TBARS concentration was evident at all the concentrations compared to bulk ZnO. The TEM image showed internalization of ZnO NPs like particles. SEM image of treated A. cepa demonstrated that the internalized nanoparticles agglomerated depending on the physico-chemical environment inside the cell. Our results demonstrated that ZnO NPs can be a clastogenic/genotoxic and cytotoxic agent. In conclusion, the A. cepa cytogenetic test can be used for the genotoxicity monitoring of novel nanomaterials like ZnO NPs, which is used in many consumer products.

  13. Does the Presence of Detached Root Border Cells of Zea mays Alter the Activity of the Pathogenic Nematode Meloidogyne incognita?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, S; Bengough, A G; Griffiths, B S; Stubbs, V; Young, I M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is a major pathogen of a range of important crops. Currently, control is typically achieved by the use of nematicides. However, recent work suggests that manipulating the ability of roots to slough off border cells, which then act as a decoy to the nematode, can significantly decrease damage to the roots. We investigated the attractiveness of border cells to M. incognita and the response of the nematode to border cells in close proximity. We found very limited attraction, in that nematodes did not preferentially alter direction to move toward the border cells, but a large and significant increase in nematode speed was observed once they were in the immediate vicinity of border cells. We discuss the results in the context of physical and biological mechanisms in relation to the control of pathogenic nematodes.

  14. EFFECT OF Cu AND Mn TOXICITY ON CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND GAS EXCHANGE IN RICE AND SUNFLOWER UNDER DIFFERENT LIGHT INTENSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiboland R.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu and manganese (Mn are essential micronutrients for plants, but toxic at high concentrations. Responses of rice (Oryza sativa L. and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. to toxic concentrations of Mn and Cu (up to 100 μM were studied under three light intensities including low (LL, PPFD=100, intermediate (IL, PPFD=500 and high (HL, PPFD=800 light intensities in hydroponic medium. Rice plants showed higher susceptibility than sunflower to both heavy metals concerning dry matter of shoot and root. Growing under higher light intensity strengthened the effect of Cu toxicity while ameliorated that of Mn, the latter was attributed to the lower Mn accumulation of HL plants in both shoot and root. Chlorophyll content of leaves was influenced negatively only by Cu treatment and that at the highest concentration in the medium (100 μM. Similar with growth results, reduction of net assimilation rate (A was higher in HL than LL plants treated by excess Cu, but in contrast to growth response, reduction was more prominent in sunflower than rice. Excess Mn-induced reduction of A was similar between LL and HL plants and was greater in sunflower than rice. Reduction of A was partly attributable to stomatal limitation, but non-stomatal mechanisms were also involved in this reduction. Copper and Mn treatment did not change the optimal quantum efficiency of PSII in dark-adapted chloroplasts (Fv/Fm ratio, but Fv/F0 was influenced particularly by Cu treatment, the reduction was higher in rice than sunflower and in HL compared to LL plants. Regarding excess Cu and Mn-mediated alterations in chlorophyll concentration, Fv/F0 and Tm values, it was suggested that, Cu and Mn toxicity depress the leaf photosynthetic capacity primarily by causing a significant alteration of the composition and functional competence of the photosynthetic units rather a reduction in the number of photosynthetic units (PSUs per unit leaf area.

  15. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Wilson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans and glycoproteins present in the cell walls of these sections, and identified the expected decrease in pectin and increase in xylan from the meristematic zone (MS, through the rapid and late elongation zones (REZ, LEZ to the maturation zone and the rest of the root, including the emerging lateral roots. Other compositional changes included extensin and xyloglucan levels peaking in the REZ and increasing levels of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP epitopes from the MS to the LEZ, which remained high through the subsequent mature zones. Immuno-staining using the same antibodies identified the tissue and (subcellular localization of many epitopes. Extensins were localized in epidermal and cortex cell walls, while AGP glycans were specific to different tissues from root-hair cells to the stele. The transcriptome analysis found several gene families peaking in the REZ. These included a large family of peroxidases (which produce the reactive oxygen species needed for cell expansion, and three xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase genes (XTH17, XTH18 and XTH19. The significance of the latter may be related to a role in breaking and re-joining xyloglucan cross-bridges between cellulose microfibrils, a process which is required for wall expansion. Knockdowns of these XTHs resulted in shorter root lengths, confirming a role of the corresponding proteins in root

  16. The efficacy of dandelion root extract in inducing apoptosis in drug-resistant human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S J; Ovadje, P; Mousa, M; Hamm, C; Pandey, S

    2011-01-01

    Notoriously chemoresistant melanoma has become the most prevalent form of cancer for the 25-29 North American age demographic. Standard treatment after early detection involves surgical excision (recurrence is possible), and metastatic melanoma is refractory to immuno-, radio-, and most harmful chemotherapies. Various natural compounds have shown efficacy in killing different cancers, albeit not always specifically. In this study, we show that dandelion root extract (DRE) specifically and effectively induces apoptosis in human melanoma cells without inducing toxicity in noncancerous cells. Characteristic apoptotic morphology of nuclear condensation and phosphatidylserine flipping to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of A375 human melanoma cells was observed within 48 hours. DRE-induced apoptosis activates caspase-8 in A375 cells early on, demonstrating employment of an extrinsic apoptotic pathway to kill A375 cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generated from DRE-treated isolated mitochondria indicates that natural compounds in DRE can also directly target mitochondria. Interestingly, the relatively resistant G361 human melanoma cell line responded to DRE when combined with the metabolism interfering antitype II diabetic drug metformin. Therefore, treatment with this common, yet potent extract of natural compounds has proven novel in specifically inducing apoptosis in chemoresistant melanoma, without toxicity to healthy cells.

  17. The Efficacy of Dandelion Root Extract in Inducing Apoptosis in Drug-Resistant Human Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Chatterjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Notoriously chemoresistant melanoma has become the most prevalent form of cancer for the 25–29 North American age demographic. Standard treatment after early detection involves surgical excision (recurrence is possible, and metastatic melanoma is refractory to immuno-, radio-, and most harmful chemotherapies. Various natural compounds have shown efficacy in killing different cancers, albeit not always specifically. In this study, we show that dandelion root extract (DRE specifically and effectively induces apoptosis in human melanoma cells without inducing toxicity in noncancerous cells. Characteristic apoptotic morphology of nuclear condensation and phosphatidylserine flipping to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of A375 human melanoma cells was observed within 48 hours. DRE-induced apoptosis activates caspase-8 in A375 cells early on, demonstrating employment of an extrinsic apoptotic pathway to kill A375 cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS generated from DRE-treated isolated mitochondria indicates that natural compounds in DRE can also directly target mitochondria. Interestingly, the relatively resistant G361 human melanoma cell line responded to DRE when combined with the metabolism interfering antitype II diabetic drug metformin. Therefore, treatment with this common, yet potent extract of natural compounds has proven novel in specifically inducing apoptosis in chemoresistant melanoma, without toxicity to healthy cells.

  18. Application of Nuclear Volume Measurements to Comprehend the Cell Cycle in Root-Knot Nematode-Induced Giant Cells

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    José Dijair Antonino de Souza Junior

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes induce galls that contain giant-feeding cells harboring multiple enlarged nuclei within the roots of host plants. It is recognized that the cell cycle plays an essential role in the set-up of a peculiar nuclear organization that seemingly steers nematode feeding site induction and development. Functional studies of a large set of cell cycle genes in transgenic lines of the model host Arabidopsis thaliana have contributed to better understand the role of the cell cycle components and their implication in the establishment of functional galls. Mitotic activity mainly occurs during the initial stages of gall development and is followed by an intense endoreduplication phase imperative to produce giant-feeding cells, essential to form vigorous galls. Transgenic lines overexpressing particular cell cycle genes can provoke severe nuclei phenotype changes mainly at later stages of feeding site development. This can result in chaotic nuclear phenotypes affecting their volume. These aberrant nuclear organizations are hampering gall development and nematode maturation. Herein we report on two nuclear volume assessment methods which provide information on the complex changes occurring in nuclei during giant cell development. Although we observed that the data obtained with AMIRA tend to be more detailed than Volumest (Image J, both approaches proved to be highly versatile, allowing to access 3D morphological changes in nuclei of complex tissues and organs. The protocol presented here is based on standard confocal optical sectioning and 3-D image analysis and can be applied to study any volume and shape of cellular organelles in various complex biological specimens. Our results suggest that an increase in giant cell nuclear volume is not solely linked to increasing ploidy levels, but might result from the accumulation of mitotic defects.

  19. The acquisition of cell fate in the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, B.J.G.; Berg, C. van den; Hage, W.; Willemsen, V.; Werff, N. van der; Wolkenfelt, H.; McKhann, H.; Weisbeek, P.

    1997-01-01

    During plant embryogenesis an embryo with cotyledons, a shoot apical meristem, a hypocotyl and a root apical meristem, is formed. The primary root and shoot meristems initiate post-embryonic growth generating all plant organs. The root meristem forms the primary root, and the shoot meristem forms

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Alleviates Cadmium-Induced Cell Death through Restraining ROS Accumulation in Roots of Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a cell signal molecule produced endogenously and involved in regulation of tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress in plants. In this work, we used molecular biology, physiology, and histochemical methods to investigate the effects of H2S on cadmium- (Cd-) induced cell death in Chinese cabbage roots. Cd stress stimulated a rapid increase of endogenous H2S in roots. Additionally, root length was closely related to the cell death rate. Pretreatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H2S donor, alleviated the growth inhibition caused by Cd in roots—this effect was more pronounced at 5 μM NaHS. Cd-induced cell death in roots was significantly reduced by 5 μM NaHS treatment. Under Cd stress, activities of the antioxidant enzymes were significantly enhanced in roots. NaHS + Cd treatment made their activities increase further compared with Cd exposure alone. Enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity led to a decline in reactive oxygen species accumulation and lipid peroxidation. In contrast, these effects were reversed by hydroxylamine, a H2S inhibitor. These results suggested that H2S alleviated the cell death caused by Cd via upregulation of antioxidant enzyme activities to remove excessive reactive oxygen species and reduce cell oxidative damage. PMID:26078819

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Alleviates Cadmium-Induced Cell Death through Restraining ROS Accumulation in Roots of Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a cell signal molecule produced endogenously and involved in regulation of tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress in plants. In this work, we used molecular biology, physiology, and histochemical methods to investigate the effects of H2S on cadmium- (Cd- induced cell death in Chinese cabbage roots. Cd stress stimulated a rapid increase of endogenous H2S in roots. Additionally, root length was closely related to the cell death rate. Pretreatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a H2S donor, alleviated the growth inhibition caused by Cd in roots—this effect was more pronounced at 5 μM NaHS. Cd-induced cell death in roots was significantly reduced by 5 μM NaHS treatment. Under Cd stress, activities of the antioxidant enzymes were significantly enhanced in roots. NaHS + Cd treatment made their activities increase further compared with Cd exposure alone. Enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity led to a decline in reactive oxygen species accumulation and lipid peroxidation. In contrast, these effects were reversed by hydroxylamine, a H2S inhibitor. These results suggested that H2S alleviated the cell death caused by Cd via upregulation of antioxidant enzyme activities to remove excessive reactive oxygen species and reduce cell oxidative damage.

  2. Cytogenetic studies of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa root tip cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Rajeshwari, A; Jadon, Pradeep Singh; Chaudhuri, Gouri; Mukherjee, Anita; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2015-12-01

    The current study evaluates the cytogenetic effects of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles on the root cells of Allium cepa. The root tip cells of A. cepa were treated with the aqueous dispersions of Cr2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) at five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100μg/mL) for 4hr. The colloidal stability of the nanoparticle suspensions during the exposure period were ascertained by particle size analyses. After 4hr exposure to Cr2O3 NPs, a significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) from 35.56% (Control) to 35.26% (0.01μg/mL), 34.64% (0.1μg/mL), 32.73% (1μg/mL), 29.6% (10μg/mL) and 20.92% (100μg/mL) was noted. The optical, fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopic analyses demonstrated specific chromosomal aberrations such as-chromosome stickiness, chromosome breaks, laggard chromosome, clumped chromosome, multipolar phases, nuclear notch, and nuclear bud at different exposure concentrations. The concentration-dependent internalization/bio-uptake of Cr2O3 NPs may have contributed to the enhanced production of anti oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase to counteract the oxidative stress, which in turn resulted in observed chromosomal aberrations and cytogenetic effects. These results suggest that A. cepa root tip assay can be successfully applied for evaluating environmental risk of Cr2O3 NPs over a wide range of concentrations.

  3. Resistance among cultivated sunflower germplasm to stem-infesting pests in the central Great Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurence D; Aiken, Robert M; Miller, Jerry F; Seiler, Gerald J

    2009-06-01

    A 7-yr field study evaluated 61 oilseed sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., accessions and 31 interspecific crosses for resistance to attack by naturally occurring populations of three stem-infesting pests, the sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); a longhorned beetle, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); and a root boring moth, Pelochrista womonana (Kearfott) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), at two locations in the central Great Plains. Germplasm with potential sources of resistance to attack from all three stem-infesting species were revealed. Accessions PI 650558, PI 386230, and PI 431516 were consistent in averaging low densities of stem weevil larvae per stalk among lines tested, and PI 497939 exceeded 25 weevil larvae per stalk in only 1 yr of 5 yr of trials. Several interspecific crosses also had consistently low densities of C. adspersus larvae per stalk. Populations of both D. texanus and P. womonana were variable over years, but differences among the lines tested were evident in many trials, revealing potential for developing resistant germplasm. Four accessions (PI 386230, PI 431542, PI 650497, and PI 650558) had low larval densities of C. adspersus and P. womonana in addition to reduced percentage infestation by D. texanus. Results showed potential for developing resistant genotypes for these pests. The prospect of adding host plant resistance as an integrated pest management (IPM) tactic would provide another tool for reducing economic losses from stem-infesting insect pests of sunflower in the central Great Plains.

  4. Effect of salicylic acid treatment on cadmium toxicity and leaf lipid composition in sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradkhani S.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ameliorative effect of salicylic acid (SA on cadmium (Cd toxicity in sunflower plants was studied by investigating plant growth and fatty acid composition. Sunflower plants in two leaves stage were exposed to CdCl2 treatment (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 µM and then were treated with salicylic acid (0, 250 and 500 µM as foliage spraying. One week after the last salicylic acid treatment,plants were harvested and growth parameters were measured . Oil of leaf was extracted in a Soxhlet system and fatty acid composition were measured by gas chromatography (GC. Statistical analyses showed excess Cd reduced growth parameters (fresh weight and length of stems and roots, fresh weight and number of leavesand SA increased them compared with the control. Maximum reduction in these parameters was at 200 µmol Cd and 0µmol of SA. Cd caused a shift in fatty acids composition, resulting in a lower degree of their unsaturation and an increase in saturated fatty acids in sunflower leaves,whereas SA improved them. SA, particularly increased the percentage of linolenic acid and lowered that of palmitic acid by the same proportion. These results sugg membrane integrity due to lipids est that SA could be used as a potential growth regulator and a stabilizer ofprotection of cadmium-induced oxidative stress to improve plant resistance to Cd stress

  5. Influence of the g-force on the circumnutations of sunflower hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariassen, E.; Johnsson, A.; Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Johnson-Glebe, C.

    1987-01-01

    Circumnutations of hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Californicus) were studied under 1 g and 3 g conditions. Root mean square values of the hypocotyl deviation from the plumbline and period of the movements were determined from calculations of the autocorrelation functions of the movements. The amplitude and the period of the circumnutations increased under 3 g as compared to 1 g. A transition from 3 to 1 g or vice versa also caused changes in period and amplitude of the movements. The results are interpreted as a support for the idea that gravity influences the circumnutation parameters in this sunflower variety. A comparison is made with published results on the dwarf sunflower cv. Teddy Bear where the force influence is very small or negligible. Simulations of a model for circumnutations show movements which are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results, provided adaptation to g-levels is included in the model. Finally, the results are discussed with the recent Spacelab-experiment (SL1) as a background.

  6. Physiology and proteomics of drought stress acclimation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, S; Mikkat, S; Stegmann, H; Horn, R

    2011-07-01

    An easy and manageable in vitro screening system for drought tolerance of sunflower seedlings based on MS media supplemented with polyethylene glycol 6000 was evaluated. Morphological and physiological parameters were compared between control (-0.05 MPa) and drought-stressed (-0.6 MPa) seedlings of Helianthus annuus L. cv. Peredovick. There was a significant growth deficit in drought-stressed plants compared to control plants in terms of hypocotyl length, and shoot and root fresh mass. Shoot growth was more restricted than root growth, resulting in an increased root/shoot ratio of drought-stressed plants. Accumulation of osmolytes such as inositol (65-fold), glucose (58-fold), proline (55-fold), fructose (11-fold) and sucrose (eightfold), in leaves of drought-stressed plants could be demonstrated by gas-liquid chromatography. Soluble protein patterns of leaves were analysed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A set of 46 protein spots allowed identification of 19 marker proteins. Quantitative changes in protein expression of drought-stressed versus control plants were detected. In leaves of drought-stressed sunflower seedlings six proteins were significantly up-regulated more than twofold: a putative caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (4.5-fold), a fructokinase 3 (3.3-fold), a vegetative storage protein (2.5-fold), a glycine-rich RNA binding protein (2.2-fold), a CuZn-superoxide dismutase (2.1-fold) and an unknown low molecular weight protein (2.3-fold). These proteins represent general stress proteins induced under drought conditions or proteins contributing to basic carbon metabolism. The up-regulated proteins are interesting candidates for further physiological and molecular investigations regarding drought tolerance in sunflower.

  7. Effect on germination and early growth characteristics in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds exposed to static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisth, Ananta; Nagarajan, Shantha

    2010-01-15

    Seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) were exposed in batches to static magnetic fields of strength from 0 to 250mT in steps of 50mT for 1-4h in steps of 1h. Treatment of sunflower seeds in these magnetic fields increased the speed of germination, seedling length and seedling dry weight under laboratory germination tests. Of the various treatments, 50 and 200mT for 2h yielded the peak performance. Exposure of seeds to magnetic fields improved seed coat membrane integrity and reduced the cellular leakage and electrical conductivity. Treated seeds planted in soil resulted in statistically higher seedling dry weight, root length, root surface area and root volume in 1-month-old seedlings. In germinating seeds, enzyme activities of alpha-amylase, dehydrogenase and protease were significantly higher in treated seeds in contrast to controls. The higher enzyme activity in magnetic-field-treated sunflower seeds could be triggering the fast germination and early vigor of seedlings.

  8. He-Ne laser-induced improvement in biochemical, physiological, growth and yield characteristics in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Rashida; Jamil, Yasir; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ali, Qasim; Iqbal, Munawar; Ahmad, Muhammad Raza

    2011-01-01

    The water-soaked seeds of sunflower were exposed to low power continuous wave He-Ne laser irradiation of energies 0, 100, 300 and 500 mJ to evaluate the effect on various biochemical, physiological, growth and yield parameters of sunflower. The experiments which consisted of four replicates arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD) were carried out under the greenhouse conditions. The physiological attributes like, photosynthetic rate (A), transpiration rate (E), intrinsic CO(2) concentration (C(i) ), stomatal conductance (g(s)), chlorophyll a and b contents, relative membrane permeability and leaf water (ψ(w)), osmotic (ψ(s)) and turgor (ψ(p)) potentials, relative water contents and leaf area increased significantly as compared to control due to He-Ne treatment of seeds. The activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalases and contents of total soluble proteins, malondialdehyde, proline and leaf total phenolic also increased due to laser treatment. Significant increase in growth parameters of sunflower like shoot fresh and dry masses, root fresh and dry masses, root and shoot lengths, number of leaves per plant and stem diameter has also been observed. The contents of K, Ca and Mg in shoot and root were also increased and an overall increase of up to 28.12% was observed due to laser treatment.

  9. Complete Transcriptome of the Soybean Root Hair Cell, a Single-Cell Model, and Its Alteration in Response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marc Libault; Andrew Farmer; Laurent Brechenmacher; Jenny Drnevich; Raymond J. Langley; Damla D. Bilgin; Osman Radwan; David J. Neece; Steven J. Clough; Gregory D. May; Gary Stacey

    2010-01-01

    ...] and Bradyrhizobium japonicum) initiated by the infection of plant root hair cells by the symbiont. Fewer than 20 plant genes involved in the nodulation process have been functionally characterized...

  10. Root cause analysis of the degradation in a unitized regenerative fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Amit C.; Meenakshi, S.; Ghosh, Prakash C.

    2017-03-01

    The present study emphasizes the possible modes of failure of a unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) when operated in fuel cell as well as in electrolysis mode at different temperatures viz. 30 °C and 60 °C. The carbon based catalyst (Pt/C) and diffusion layers are used to characterize the degradation of the URFCs. The electrolysis mode of operation is found to dominate the root cause of failure with increase in temperature. Agglomeration and loss of catalyst along with delamination of electrode from membrane are observed. Membrane degradation owing to it's structural as well as chemical damage is seen to be prominent at higher temperature. Characterization techniques such as SEM, TEM and ICP-AES confirm the study showcasing the effect.

  11. Mitosis and microtubule organizational changes in rice root-tip cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUSHIXIONG(SYZEE); CHUNGUILI; CHENGZHU

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of change of the microtubule cytoskeleton of the root-tip cells of rice during mitosis was studied using immunofluorescence technic and confocal laser scanning microscopy. All the major stages of ceil division including preprophase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase were observed. The most significant finding was that in the preprophase cells microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface to the cortex were frequently seen. During development these microtubules became closely associated with the preprophase band and prophase spindie indicating that the microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface, the preprophase band and the prophazc spindle were structurally and functionally closely related to each other. Granule-like anchorage sites for the radiating microtubules at the muclear surface were often seen and the possibility that these gramle-like anchorage sites might represent the microtubule organizing centres was discussed.

  12. [On the effect of Chinese lacquer upon the cell division of root tip of Allium cepa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, H; Liang, W

    1997-01-01

    Chinese Lacquer, as a fine coating, has been studied and applied for thousands years. The allergic reaction in Chinese Lacquer on the human skin has also been known early. The reaction of Chinese Lacquer on mitosis of cell in plant meristem have not been reported yet and was carefully studied in this paper. The result showed that Chinese Lacquer induced severe abnormality of mitotic division in Allium cepa root tips. This was more obvious in the anaphase and telophase, especially in the former phase laggard chromosomes, chromosome bridges, acentric fragments and polypolar distribution could be seen frequently. A lot of polynuclear bodies were observed in the telophase. Therefore, we think that the Chinese Lacquer can be used as a plant cell mutagen, and suggest geneticists and physiologists to do more researches on the effects of Chinese Lacquer at the genetic variation, metabolism etc.

  13. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  14. Cancer Stem Cells: Targeting the Roots of Cancer, Seeds of Metastasis, and Sources of Therapy Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno-Cruz, Valery; Kibria, Golam; Liu, Xia; Doherty, Mary; Junk, Damian J.; Guan, Dongyin; Hubert, Chris; Venere, Monica; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro; Caplan, Arnold I.; Rich, Jeremy; Gerson, Stanton L.; Lathia, Justin; Liu, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    With the goal to remove the roots of cancer, eliminate metastatic seeds, and overcome therapy resistance, the 2014 inaugural International Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Conference at Cleveland, OH, convened together over 320 investigators, including 55 invited world-class speakers, 25 short oral presenters, and 100 poster presenters, to gain an in-depth understanding of CSCs and explore therapeutic opportunities targeting CSCs. The meeting enabled intriguing discussions on several topics including: genetics and epigenetics; cancer origin and evolution; microenvironment and exosomes; metabolism and inflammation; metastasis and therapy resistance; single cell and heterogeneity; plasticity and reprogramming; as well as other new concepts. Reports of clinical trials targeting CSCs emphasized the urgent need for strategically designing combinational CSC-targeting therapies against cancer. PMID:25604264

  15. Ability of root canal antiseptics used in dental practice to induce chromosome aberrations in human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Higo, Yukari; Ohno, Maki; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2008-01-08

    Root canal antiseptics are topically applied to root canals within the pulpless teeth to treat the root canal and periapical infections. Because the antiseptics that are applied to root canals can penetrate through dentin or leak out through an apical foramen into the periodontium and distribute by the systemic circulation, it is important to study the safety of these antiseptics. In the present study, we examined the ability to induce chromosome aberrations in human dental pulp cells of five root canal antiseptics, namely, carbol camphor (CC), camphorated p-monochlorophenol (CMCP), formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide, and iodoform which are most commonly used in dental practice. Statistically significant increases in the levels of chromosome aberrations were induced by CC, FC, or iodoform in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, CMCP and calcium hydroxide failed to induce chromosome aberrations in the absence or presence of exogenous metabolic activation. The percentages of cells with polyploid or endoreduplication were enhanced by FC or iodoform. Our results indicate that the root canal antiseptics that exhibited a positive response are potentially genotoxic to human cells.

  16. Organ-specific rates of cellular respiration in developing sunflower seedlings and their bearing on metabolic scaling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2012-10-01

    Fifty years ago Max Kleiber described what has become known as the "mouse-to-elephant" curve, i.e., a log-log plot of basal metabolic rate versus body mass. From these data, "Kleiber's 3/4 law" was deduced, which states that metabolic activity scales as the three fourths-power of body mass. However, for reasons unknown so far, no such "universal scaling law" has been discovered for land plants (embryophytes). Here, we report that the metabolic rates of four different organs (cotyledons, cotyledonary hook, hypocotyl, and roots) of developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings grown in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) and in white light (photomorphogenesis) differ by a factor of 2 to 5 and are largely independent of light treatment. The organ-specific respiration rate (oxygen uptake per minute per gram of fresh mass) of the apical hook, which is composed of cells with densely packaged cytoplasm, is much higher than that of the hypocotyl, an organ that contains vacuolated cells. Data for cell length, cell density, and DNA content reveal that (1) hook opening in white light is caused by a stimulation of cell elongation on the inside of the curved organ, (2) respiration, cell density and DNA content are much higher in the hook than in the stem, and (3) organ-specific respiration rates and the DNA contents of tissues are statistically correlated. We conclude that, due to the heterogeneity of the plant body caused by the vacuolization of the cells, Kleiber's law, which was deduced using mammals as a model system, cannot be applied to embryophytes. In plants, this rule may reflect scaling phenomena at the level of the metabolically active protoplasmic contents of the cells.

  17. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals. PMID:27255928

  18. Cell Production and Expansion in the Primary Root of Maize in Response to Low-Nitrogen Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Kun; CHEN Fan-jun; YUAN Li-xing; MI Guo-hua

    2014-01-01

    Maize plants respond to low-nitrogen stress by enhancing root elongation. The underlying physiological mechanism remains unknown. Seedlings of maize (Zea mays L., cv. Zhengdan 958) were grown in hydroponics with the control (4 mmol L-1) or low-nitrogen (40 µmol L-1) for 12 d, supplied as nitrate. Low nitrogen enhanced root elongation rate by 4.1-fold, accompanied by increases in cell production rate by 2.2-fold, maximal elemental elongation rate (by 2.5-fold), the length of elongation zone (by 1.5-fold), and ifnal cell length by 1.8-fold. On low nitrogen, the higher cell production rate resulted from a higher cell division rate and in fact the number of dividing cells was reduced. Consequently, the residence time of a cell in the division zone tended to be shorter under low nitrogen. In addition, low nitrogen increased root diameter, an increase that occurred speciifcally in the cortex and was accompanied by an increase in cell number. It is concluded that roots elongates in response to low-nitrogen stress by accelerating cell production and expansion.

  19. Influence of microgravity on root-cap regeneration and the structure of columella cells in Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.; Fondren, W. M.; Wang, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    We launched imbibed seeds and seedlings of Zea mays into outer space aboard the space shuttle Columbia to determine the influence of microgravity on 1) root-cap regeneration, and 2) the distribution of amyloplasts and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the putative statocytes (i.e., columella cells) of roots. Decapped roots grown on Earth completely regenerated their caps within 4.8 days after decapping, while those grown in microgravity did not regenerate caps. In Earth-grown seedlings, the ER was localized primarily along the periphery of columella cells, and amyloplasts sedimented in response to gravity to the lower sides of the cells. Seeds germinated on Earth and subsequently launched into outer space had a distribution of ER in columella cells similar to that of Earth-grown controls, but amyloplasts were distributed throughout the cells. Seeds germinated in outer space were characterized by the presence of spherical and ellipsoidal masses of ER and randomly distributed amyloplasts in their columella cells. These results indicate that 1) gravity is necessary for regeneration of the root cap, 2) columella cells can maintain their characteristic distribution of ER in microgravity only if they are exposed previously to gravity, and 3) gravity is necessary to distribute the ER in columella cells of this cultivar of Z. mays.

  20. Effect of extracts of trichosanthes root tubers on HepA-H cells and HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Ming Dou; Ji-Cheng Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cytotoxic activity of extracts of trichosanthes root tubers (EOT) on HepA-H cells and HeLa cells compared with trichosanthin (TCS), and to explore the possible mechanism of growth inhibitory effect of EOT on HeLa cells.METHODS: Tumor cells were culturedin vitro, and then microculture tetrzoalium assay (MTT) was used to investigate drugs' cytotoxic activity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to observe ultrastructural changes of cells, and electrophoresis was performed to detect changes of biochemical characteristics of intercellular DNA.RESULTS: TCS and EOT had no obvious effects on HepAH cells (P>0.05), but had remarkable effects on HeLa cells in a time and dose dependent manner (r>0.864, P<0.05or P<0.01). The inhibitory rate of EOT was much higher than that of TCS (P<0.01). Median inhibitory rates (IC50)of TCS and EOT on HeLa cells were 610.9 mg/L and 115.6 mg/L for 36 h, and 130.7 mg/L and 33.4 mg/L for 48 h respectively. Marked morphologic changes were observed including microvillus disappearance or reduction, cell membrane bledding, cell shrinkage, condensation of chromosomes and apoptotic bodies with complete membranes. Meanwhile, apoptosis of HeLa cells was confirmed by DNA ladder formation on gel electrophoresis.CONCLUSION: TCS and EOT have no obvious effects on HepA-H cells, but have significant inhibitory effects on HeLa cells, indicating that EOT is superior to TCS in anti-tumor activity.

  1. Sunflower crop in Argentina to date

    OpenAIRE

    Vasquez A.; de Romano A.

    2006-01-01

    Inside a panorama of a spectacular grain production in the last 10 years in Argentina, sunflower crop participates with an annual production of more than 3,500,000 t. During that period, many advances were made in the improvement of diseases resistance: Verticillium wilt, downy mildew and head rot. Also oil yield per hectare continued to increase. The new hybrids have new qualities, for example imidazolinones resistance, which allows farmers to keep yields, although the soils destined to sunf...

  2. Growth under elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration accelerates leaf senescence in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mata, Lourdes; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación; Agüera, Eloísa

    2012-09-15

    Some morphogenetic and metabolic processes were sensitive to a high atmospheric CO(2) concentration during sunflower primary leaf ontogeny. Young leaves of sunflower plants growing under elevated CO(2) concentration exhibited increased growth, as reflected by the high specific leaf mass referred to as dry weight in young leaves (16 days). The content of photosynthetic pigments decreased with leaf development, especially in plants grown under elevated CO(2) concentrations, suggesting that high CO(2) accelerates chlorophyll degradation, and also possibly leaf senescence. Elevated CO(2) concentration increased the oxidative stress in sunflower plants by increasing H(2)O(2) levels and decreasing activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and ascorbate peroxidase. The loss of plant defenses probably increases the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the chloroplast, decreasing the photosynthetic pigment content as a result. Elevated CO(2) concentration was found to boost photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, especially in young leaves. High CO(2) also increased the starch and soluble sugar contents (glucose and fructose) and the C/N ratio during sunflower primary leaf development. At the beginning of senescence, we observed a strong increase in the hexoses to sucrose ratio that was especially marked at high CO(2) concentration. These results indicate that elevated CO(2) concentration could promote leaf senescence in sunflower plants by affecting the soluble sugar levels, the C/N ratio and the oxidative status during leaf ontogeny. It is likely that systemic signals produced in plants grown with elevated CO(2), lead to early senescence and a higher oxidation state of the cells of these plant leaves.

  3. High-oleic sunflower, a new oil component; Die High-Oleic-Sunflower als neue Grundoelkomponente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botz, O. [Natoil AG, Technopark Luzern (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    Achieved results from NATOIL {sup registered} proved that the application of the High-Oleic-Sunflower as a component of a base oil in lubricants is in general feasible. The target goals and properties have been realised with great success. To emphasize are particularly good results in relation to piston cleanliness, oxidative stability as well as fuel economy properties. The central fear that the High-Oleic-Sunflower would not be sufficiently stable concerning oxidation has been clearly refuted in diverse motor tests. The application of the High-Oleic Sunflower and of the here of manufactured esters enables the development of lubricants with much lower viscosity characteristics in comparison to mineral-oil-based lubricants, which may result in the overall reduction of the average drag torque by up to 30%. (orig.)

  4. AtFH8 Is Involved in Root Development under Effect of Low-Dose Latrunculin B in Dividing Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Hua Xue; Chun-Qing Guo; Fei Du; Quan-Long Lu; Chuan-Mao Zhang; Hai-Yun Ren

    2011-01-01

    Formins have been paid much attention for their potent nucleating activity. However,the connection between the in vivo functions of AtFHs (Arabidopsis thaliana formin homologs) and their effects on actin organization is poorly understood. In this study,we characterized the bundling activity of AtFH8 in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis showed that AtFH8(FH1FH2) could form dimers and bundle preformed actin filaments or induce stellar structures during actin polymerization. Expression of truncated forms of AtFH8 and immunolocalization analysis showed that AtFH8 localized primarily to nuclear envelope in interphase and to the new cell wall after cytokinesis,depending primarily on its N-terminal transmembrane domain. GUS histochemical staining showed AtFH8 was predominantly expressed in Arabidopsis root meristem,vasculature,and outgrowth points of lateral roots. The primary root growth and lateral root initiation of atfh8 could be decreased by latrunculin B (LatB). Analysis of the number of dividing cells in Arabidopsis root tips showed that much fewer dividing cells in Lat B-treated atfh8 plants than wild-type plants,which indicates that AtFH8 was involved in cell division. Actin cytoskeleton in root meristem of atfh8-1 was more sensitive to LatB treatment than that of wild-type. Altogether,our results indicate that AtFH8 is an actin filament nucleator and bundler that functions in cell division and root development.

  5. Establishment of Suspension Cell Culture from Agrobacterium-transformed Hairy Root Cells of Psammosilene tunicoides, an Endangered and Rare Medicinal Plant of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zong-Shen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Psammosilene tunicoides is an important medicinal plant endemic in China. Its annual yield is severely limited due to slow growth, poor seed germination and excessive collection. To satisfy the growing market demands, it’s necessary to seek alternatives to field cultivation and wild resources of this endangered plant. Using Agrobacterium -transformed hairy roots as initial explants, here, we reported the development of a suspension cell culture system for P. tunicoides. Results showed the Agrobacterium -transformed hairy roots-derived suspension cells are fast in growth and strong in capacity for accumulation of bioactive metabolites. We established that 1/2MS was a suitable medium for culturing the hairy root-derived suspension cells and the optimal combination of phytohormones is 1.5 mg/L 2, 4-D+0.5 mg/L 6-BA+0.25 mg/L NAA+0.1 mg/L KT. Under this condition, the maximal biomass was achieved at the 20th day of culture with an average growth rate of 0.72 g/L/d; and the intracellular saponine content reached 0.92%, comparable to that of mother hairy roots. Compared with the normal P. tunicoides suspension cells, the hairy roots-derived suspension cells exhibited features of fast growth, short culture period and high concentration of saponines, suggesting that the large scale culture of hairy root-derived cells could be a feasible alternative to the wild resources of P. tunicoides.

  6. Backcrosses in interspecific hybridization in sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlagić Jovanka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available When incorporating desirable traits (resistance to causal agents of various diseases from the wild relatives into the cultivated sunflower, some undesirable ones are introduced too (branching, small head diameter, low oil content, etc. To overcome this problem, backcrosses (F1 interspecific hybrids x cultivated sunflower are used, although very often desirable traits are lost in the process. Cytological analysis (meiosis and pollen viability and molecular markers (RAPD were used to estimate what portion of the parental species genome was present in (be interspecific hybrids of the F1 and BC1F1 generations. The results showed that the percentage of irregularities at meiosis increased from F1 to BC1F1 gen. They also indicated the presence of aneuploids and sterility in the cross between the hexaploid species H.rigidus and cultivated sunflower. The genetic distance between the parents was 83%, that between H.rigidus and the F1 hybrid 54 61%, and that between H.annuus and F1 hybrid 70-76%. In the BC1F1 generation, the genetic distance from Hannuus decreased to 58-66% and that from H.rigidus increased to 69-76%.

  7. Induction of microbial genes for pathogenesis and symbiosis by chemicals from root border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Pierson, L S; Hawes, M C

    1997-12-01

    Reporter strains of soil-borne bacteria were used to test the hypothesis that chemicals released by root border cells can influence the expression of bacterial genes required for the establishment of plant-microbe associations. Promoters from genes known to be activated by plant factors included virE, required for Agrobacterium tumefaciens pathogenesis, and common nod genes from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae and Rhizobium meliloti, required for nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativum), respectively. Also included was phzB, an autoinducible gene encoding the biosynthesis of antibiotics by Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The virE and nod genes were activated to different degrees, depending on the source of border cells, whereas phzB activity remained unaffected. The homologous interaction between R. leguminosarum bv viciae and its host, pea, was examined in detail. Nod gene induction by border cells was dosage dependent and responsive to environmental signals. The highest levels of gene induction by pea (but not alfalfa) border cells occurred at low temperatures, when little or no bacterial growth was detected. Detached border cells cultured in distilled water exhibited increased nod gene induction (ini) in response to signals from R. leguminosarum bv viciae.

  8. Changes in the chemical properties and swelling coefficient of alfalfa root cell walls in the presence of toluene as a toxic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, M; Khoshgoftarmanesh, A H; Hadadzadeh, H

    2016-04-01

    The influence of toluene pollution on the chemical properties and swelling coefficient of root cell walls in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was investigated. Two sets of alfalfa seedlings were selected and one set was treated with 450 mg L(-1) toluene in the nutrient solution under hydroponic culture. Thirty days after treatment with toluene, alfalfa plants were harvested and the root cell walls were isolated. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out for the characterization of the root cell walls composition. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the swelling coefficient of the root cell walls (Kcw) were estimated at various pH values. The toluene contamination significantly reduced the mass of the cell wall material in the alfalfa roots. According to the FTIR spectra, the toluene pollution can change the alfalfa root cell wall properties by reducing the cell wall functional groups. These functional groups are probably related to the proteins and polysaccharides in the cell wall. Also, toluene pollution strongly reduced CEC and Kcw of the root cell walls. The results show that the decrease in the active sites of adsorption on the root cell walls as a response to toluene pollution can affect the water flow rate and the mineral nutrients uptake by roots.

  9. Fluorescence Imaging in the Red and Far-Red Region during Growth of Sunflower Plantlets. Diagnosis of the Early Infection by the Parasite Orobanche cumana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Bustos, Carmen M; Pérez-Bueno, María L; Barón, Matilde; Molinero-Ruiz, Leire

    2016-01-01

    Broomrape, caused by the root holoparasite Orobanche cumana, is the main biotic constraint to sunflower oil production worldwide. By the time broomrape emerges, most of the metabolic imbalance has been produced by O. cumana to sunflower plants. UV-induced multicolor fluorescence imaging (MCFI) provides information on the fluorescence emitted by chlorophyll (Chl) a of plants in the spectral bands with peaks near 680 nm (red, F680) and 740 nm (far-red, F740). In this work MCFI was extensively applied to sunflowers, either healthy or parasitized plants, for the first time. The distribution of red and far-red fluorescence was analyzed in healthy sunflower grown in pots under greenhouse conditions. Fluorescence patterns were analyzed across the leaf surface and throughout the plant by comparing the first four leaf pairs (LPs) between the second and fifth week of growth. Similar fluorescence patterns, with a delay of 3 or 4 days between them, were obtained for LPs of healthy sunflower, showing that red and far-red fluorescence varied with the developmental stage of the leaf. The use of F680 and F740 as indicators of sunflower infection by O. cumana during underground development stages of the parasite was also evaluated under similar experimental conditions. Early increases in F680 and F740 as well as decreases in F680/F740 were detected upon infection by O. cumana. Significant differences between inoculated and control plants depended on the LP that was considered at any time. Measurements of Chl contents and final total Chl content supported the results of MCFI, but they were less sensitive in differentiating healthy from inoculated plants. Sunflower infection was confirmed by the presence of broomrape nodules in the roots at the end of the experiment. The potential of MCFI in the red and far-red region for an early detection of O. cumana infection in sunflower was revealed. This technique might have a particular interest for early phenotyping in sunflower breeding

  10. [Influence of dietary therapy containing sunflower oil fortified with phospholipids on the lipid metabolism in patients with hypertension and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshigina, S; Gapparov, M M; Mal'tsev, G Iu; Kulakov, S N

    2007-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of dietary therapy containing sunflower oil with phospholipids (PL) on the lipid profile of plasma and composition of fatty acids of red blood cells in patients with hypertension and obesity. The results show that after the period of three weeks for each diet the unrefined sunflower oil supplemented with PL (30 gr oil containing 10, 8 gr PL) in diet had more influence on lowering of blood pressure (specially on diastolic BP). This diet reduced serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), apolipoprotein A 1, apoB and fibrinogen more than the refined sunflower oil diet. This oil presents useful source of polyunsaturated fatty acids and essential PL for diets aimed at prevention of heart disease.

  11. Riboflavin Arrests Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity by Ameliorating Cellular Damage in Dorsal Root Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana; Hassan, Iftekhar; Khan, Aijaz A; Alhazza, Ibrahim M

    2015-01-01

    Cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum II- (CP-) induced neurotoxicity is one of the least explored aspects of this drug. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells are considered as the primary target, and their damage plays a vital role in pathogenesis and etiology of CP-induced neurotoxicity. The present study is aimed at confirming if riboflavin (RF) has any protective role in shielding the DRG from CP-induced toxicity. After conducting the established treatment strategy on mice under photoillumination, it was observed that, despite the fact that RF alone is partially toxic, its combination with CP significantly ameliorated the drug-induced damage in DRG cells as evidenced by histological analysis. In addition, it was interesting to observe that the combination group (RF + CP) was able to induce apoptosis in the target cells up to a significant extent which is considered as the most preferred way of countering cancer cells. Therefore, RF can act as an effective adjuvant compound in CP-based chemoradiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes in the contemporary anticancer treatment regimes.

  12. Riboflavin Arrests Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity by Ameliorating Cellular Damage in Dorsal Root Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum II- (CP- induced neurotoxicity is one of the least explored aspects of this drug. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG cells are considered as the primary target, and their damage plays a vital role in pathogenesis and etiology of CP-induced neurotoxicity. The present study is aimed at confirming if riboflavin (RF has any protective role in shielding the DRG from CP-induced toxicity. After conducting the established treatment strategy on mice under photoillumination, it was observed that, despite the fact that RF alone is partially toxic, its combination with CP significantly ameliorated the drug-induced damage in DRG cells as evidenced by histological analysis. In addition, it was interesting to observe that the combination group (RF + CP was able to induce apoptosis in the target cells up to a significant extent which is considered as the most preferred way of countering cancer cells. Therefore, RF can act as an effective adjuvant compound in CP-based chemoradiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes in the contemporary anticancer treatment regimes.

  13. Response of root border cells of soybean to cultured Chenopodium ambrosioides root exudates%大豆根边缘细胞对土荆芥组培根分泌物的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安奇; 王亚男; 张红; 汪利沙; 马丹炜

    2012-01-01

    运用组织培养技术和悬空气培养法,研究了大豆根边缘细胞对土荆芥组培根分泌物的响应.结果表明:在土荆芥组培根分泌物作用下,随处理浓度的升高和处理时间的延长,边缘细胞数量和存活率持续下降.游离的根边缘细胞周围聚集了一些颗粒状物质,根边缘细胞可能螯合土荆芥根系分泌物.土荆芥根系分泌物能促进根冠果胶甲基酯酶活性上调,但是随着处理浓度增大和处理时间延长,这种促进效应降低.这些结果表明土荆芥组培根分泌物对大豆根边缘细胞具有一定的胁迫效应,根边缘细胞通过加速死亡并分泌一些活性物质螯合土荆芥根系分泌物,可在一定范围内缓解根系分泌物的毒害作用.%By using the techniques of tissue culture and aeroponic culture, response of root border cells of soybean ( Gtycine max L.) to cultured Chenopodium ambrosioides root exudates was studied. The results showed the number and activity of root border cells decreased consecutively when treated with cultured C. Ambrosioides root exudates. Some granules gathered around free root border cells would result from chelation between root border cells exudates with that of the cultured root. The cultured root exudates could stimulate the activity of pectin methylesterase of the root cap of soybean, but the effect gradually lowered down along with the increasing of treatment concentration and treatment time. The results suggested that the cultured root exudates had stress on root border cells of soybean and root border cells of soybean alleviated the allelopathic effects of the cultured root exudates on root tips though programmed cell death and chelating.

  14. Effect of 2 MHz ultrasound on DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis in Pisum sativum root meristem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.W.; Ciaravino, V.; Allen, D.; Jensen, S.

    1976-01-01

    The amounts of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis were determined in Pisum sativum root meristem cells at various times after a 1 min exposure to 1 MHz ultrasound at a power density of 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Immediate depressions in all three macromolecular syntheses occurred after sonication, followed by an apparent recovery several hours later. These events appear to correlate in time with the subsequent reduction and recovery in mitotic index in Pisum sativum root meristem cells exposed to 2 MHz ultrasound.

  15. Mechanistic study of programmed cell death of root border cells of cucumber (Cucumber sativus L.) induced by copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijuan; Song, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Chen; Yuan, Xiaofeng; Shi, Jiyan

    2015-12-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in root border cells (RBCs) induced by Copper (Cu) has been little studied. This study explored whether Cu induced PCD in RBCs of cucumber or not and investigated the possible mechanisms. The results showed that the percentage of apoptotic and necrotic RBCs increased with increasing concentration of Cu treatment. A quick burst of ROS in RBCs was detected, while mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) decreased sharply with Cu treatment. Caspase-3 like protease activity showed a tendency of increase with Cu treatment. The potential of Cu to induce PCD in RBCs of cucumber was first proved. Our results showed that ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential loss played important roles in Cu-induced caspase-3-like activation and PCD in RBCs of cucumber, which provided new insight into the signaling cascades that modulate Cu phytotoxicity mechanism.

  16. Novel roles of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in regulating pectin synthesis and demethylesterification in the cell wall of rice (Oryza sativa) root tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jie; Yang, Yongjie; Fu, Guanfu; Tao, Longxing

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been reported to increase lignin formation, enhance cell wall rigidification, restrict cell expansion and inhibit root elongation. However, our results showed that it not only inhibited rice (Oryza sativa) root elongation, but also increased root diameter. No study has reported how and why H₂O₂ increases cell expansion and root diameter. Exogenous H₂O₂ and its scavenger 4-hydroxy-Tempo were applied to confirm the roles of H₂O₂. Immunofluorescence, fluorescence probe, ruthenium red staining, histological section and spectrophotometry were used to monitor changes in the degree of pectin methylesterification, pectin content, pectin methylesterase (PME) activity and H₂O₂ content. Exogenous H₂O₂ inhibited root elongation, but increased cell expansion and root diameter significantly. H₂O₂ not only increased the region of pectin synthesis and pectin content in root tips, but also increased PME activity and pectin demethylesterification. The scavenger 4-hydroxy-Tempo reduced root H₂O₂ content and recovered H₂O₂-induced increases in cell expansion and root diameter by inhibiting pectin synthesis, PME activity and pectin demethylesterification. H₂O₂ plays a novel role in the regulation of pectin synthesis, PME activity and pectin demethylesterification. H₂O₂ increases cell expansion and root diameter by increasing pectin content and demethylesterification.

  17. Genotoxicity of tetrodotoxin from puffer fish tested in root meristem cells of Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khora, S S; Panda, K K; Panda, B B

    1997-07-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) extracted and purified from puffer fish Arothron nigropunctatus was tested for genotoxicity employing the root meristem cells of Allium cepa as the assay system. The genotoxicity endpoints investigated were mitotic index (MI), meta-anaphases with spindle aberrations, interphases with micronuclei (MNC) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in metaphase chromosomes. The results demonstrated that TTX inhibited mitosis at concentrations of > or = 30 microM as evident by the fall of MI, but failed to induce MNC at significant levels at any of the concentrations tested (10-100 microM). TTX was thus proved to be neither clastogenic nor aneugenic in the present study. It was, however, noteworthy that TTX at far lower concentrations, 0.1-5.0 microM, significantly enhanced the frequencies of SCE which indicated possible interference of the toxin in DNA replication and repair.

  18. A Partial Equilibrium Analysis of Sunflower Market in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Miran

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Sunflower oil is the most preferred vegetable oil in Turkey. 35% of total consumption of vegetable oil issunflower oil. Sunflower seed import is approximately 500-650 thousand tons while sunflower seedproduction is 800-850 thousand tons in the last years. The main objective of this study is to determine thereasons of deficiency of vegetable oil in Turkey and to suggest some solutions. For this objective, theprospective situation and the market structure of sunflower seed in Turkey has estimated. “One productpartial equilibrium analysis” has been used to estimate the future market structure of sunflower seed. Asimulation model from 2003 to 2015 has been created with partial equilibrium analysis. Turkey is a netimporter of vegetable oils. Sunflower seed import is approximately 300 thousand tons while crude oil importis approximately 180 thousand tons in 2002. According to the results of simulation model, Turkey willcontinue to be a net importer for sunflower and other oil seeds. It has been estimated that the sunflower seedimport will be approximately 1 million tons and crude oil import will be approximately 400 thousand tons atend of the simulation period (2003-2015.

  19. Morphology and networks of sunflower wax crystals in organogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant waxes are considered as promising alternatives to unhealthy solid fats such as trans fats and saturated fats in structured food products including margarines and spreads. Sunflower wax is of a great interest due to its strong gelling ability. Morphology of sunflower wax crystals formed in soyb...

  20. Crystal morphology of sunflower wax in soybean oil organogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    While sunflower wax has been recognized as an excellent organogelator for edible oil, the detailed morphology of sunflower wax crystals formed in an edible oil organogel has not been fully understood. In this study, polarized light microscopy, phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy ...

  1. Evaluating perennial sunflower for wildlife and food uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research is to use current genetics and plant breeding techniques to introgress genes for perennial habit from Helianthus tuberosus L. (2n=6x=102) into domesticated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n=2x=34). H. tuberosusis part of the secondary gene pool of sunflower and has b...

  2. Consumptive Water Use and Crop Coefficients of Irrigated Sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    In semi-arid environments, the use of irrigation is necessary for sunflower production to reach its maximum potential. The aim of this study was to quantify the consumptive water use and crop coefficients of irrigated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) without soil water limitations during two growing...

  3. Sunflower water productivity in four Great Plains soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a drought-adapted crop whose short growing season reduces irrigation requirements, makes it ideal for regions with limited irrigation water supplies. Our objectives were to a) evaluate the yield (Y) potential of sunflower under full and deficit irrigation (IR) b)...

  4. Copper-induced root growth inhibition of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. involves disturbances in cell division and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rong; Wang, Congyue; Chen, Da; Björn, Lars O; Li, Shaoshan

    2015-05-01

    Copper (Cu) is considered to be an indispensable microelement for plants. Excessive Cu, however, is toxic and disturbs several processes in the plant. The present study addressed the effects of ionic Cu (2.0 µM and 8.0 µM) on mitosis, the microtubule cytoskeleton, and DNA in root tip cells of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. to better understand Cu toxicity on plant root systems. The results indicated that Cu accumulated in roots and that root growth was inhibited dramatically in Cu treatment groups. Chromosomal aberrations (for example, C-mitosis, chromosome bridges, chromosome stickiness, and micronucleus) were observed, and the mitotic index decreased during Cu treatments at different concentrations. Microtubules were one of the target sites of Cu toxicity in root tip meristematic cells, and Cu exposure substantially impaired microtubule arrangements. The content of α-tubulin decreased following 36 h of exposure to 2.0 µM or 8.0 µM of Cu in comparison with the control group. Copper increased DNA damage and suppressed cell cycle progression. The above toxic effects became more serious with increasing Cu concentration and prolonged exposure time.

  5. Giardia duodenalis: effects of an ozonized sunflower oil product (Oleozon) on in vitro trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Frank; Hernández, Damian; Zamora, Zullyt; Díaz, Maritza; Ancheta, Odelsa; Rodriguez, Sandra; Torres, Dinorah

    2009-03-01

    The ozonized sunflower oil product (Oleozon) was investigated to explore its cytotoxic activity on Giardia duodenalis in vitro cultivated trophozites. Oleozon produced inactivation of Giardia trophozoites in a dose- and cell density-dependent manner. Thirty microliter of Oleozon with peroxide index value of 500 equivalent-mmol of activated oxygen per kilogram were used to achieve a 100% inhibition (density-dependent effect must be taken into account when prescription of this product for giardiasis treatment in humans.

  6. The role of biotechnologies in the development of sunflower cultures in the world

    OpenAIRE

    Durante Mauro; Vannozzi Gian Paolo; Pugliesi Claudio; Bernardi Rodolfo

    2002-01-01

    Sunflower improvement by conventional breeding is severely restricted by the availability of a rather limited gene pool owing to natural incompatibilities, even between related species, and by the time scale of most breeding programs. Therefore, much attention has been directed recently to the newly emerging and novel technologies of plant cell and molecular biology that provide a powerful means to supplement and complement the traditional methods of plant improvement. The concept of DNA-base...

  7. Pollutant-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species accumulation in the aerial roots of Chinese banyan (Ficus microcarpa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Cao, Ce; Sun, Zhongyu; Lin, Zhifang; Deng, Rufang

    2016-11-01

    Industrial pollutants induce the production of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2.‑, H2O2, and ·OH in plants, but they have not been well quantified or localized in tissues and cells. This study evaluated the pollutant- (HSO3‑, NH4NO3, Al3+, Zn2+, and Fe2+) induced toxic effects of ROS on the aerial roots of Chinese banyan (Ficus microcarpa). Root cell viability was greatly reduced by treatment with 20 mM NaHSO3, 20 mM NH4NO3, 0.2 mM AlCl3, 0.2 mM ZnSO4, or 0.2 mM FeSO4. Biochemical assay and histochemical localization showed that O2.‑ accumulated in roots in response to pollutants, except that the staining of O2.‑ under NaHSO3 treatment was not detective. Cytochemical localization further indicated that the generated O2.‑ was present mainly in the root cortex, and pith cells, especially in NH4NO3- and FeSO4-treated roots. The pollutants also caused greatly accumulated H2O2 and ·OH in aerial roots, which finally resulted in lipid peroxidation as indicated by increased malondialdehyde contents. We conclude that the F. microcarpa aerial roots are sensitive to pollutant-induced ROS and that the histochemical localization of O2.‑ via nitrotetrazolium blue chloride staining is not effective for detecting the effects of HSO3‑ treatment because of the treatment’s bleaching effect.

  8. Analysis of Factors Controlling Cell Cycle that Can Be Synchronized Nondestructively During Root Cap Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha Hawes

    2011-02-04

    Publications and presentations during the final funding period, including progress in defining the substrate specificity, the primary goal of the project, are listed below. Both short-term and long-term responses mediated by PsUGT1 have been characterized in transgenic or mutant pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis with altered expression of PsUGT1. Additional progress includes evaluation of the relationship between control of the cell cycle by PsUGT1 and other glycosyltransferase and glycosidase enzymes that are co-regulated in the legume root cap during the onset of mitosis and differentiation. Transcriptional profiling and multidimensional protein identification technology ('MudPIT') have been used to establish the broader molecular context for the mechanism by which PsUGT1 controls cell cycle in response to environmental signals. A collaborative study with the Norwegian Forest Research Institute (who provided $10,000.00 in supplies and travel funds for collaborator Dr. Toril Eldhuset to travel to Arizona and Dr. H. H. Woo to travel to Norway) made it possible to establish that the inducible root cap system for studying carbohydrate synthesis and solubilization is expressed in gymnosperm as well as angiosperm species. This discovery provides an important tool to amplify the potential applications of the research in defining conserved cell cycle machinery across a very broad range of plant species and habitats. The final work, published during 2009, revealed an additional surprising parallel with mammalian immune responses: The cells whose production is controlled by PsUGT1 appear to function in a manner which is analogous to that of white blood cells, by trapping and killing in an extracellular manner. This may explain why mutation within the coding region of PsUGT1 and its homolog in humans (UGT1) is lethal to plants and animals. The work has been the subject of invited reviews. A postdoctoral fellow, eight undergraduate students, four M.S. students and

  9. Involvement of the plant antioxidative response in the differential growth sensitivity to salinity of leaves vs roots during cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Nirit; Shoresh, Michal; Xu, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2010-10-15

    Sensitivity to salinity varies between plant organs and between cells of different developmental stages within a single organ. The physiological and molecular bases for the differential responses are not known. Exposure of plants to salinity is known to induce formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are involved in damage mechanisms but also in cell growth processes. The objective of this study was to elucidate developmental-stage-specific and organ-specific involvement of oxidative defense in the plant response to salinity in maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown in nutrient solution containing 1mM NaCl (control) or 80mM NaCl. The oxidative stress response and damage symptoms along the cell developmental gradient in growing and mature tissue of leaves and roots were examined. Unlike leaves, roots did not suffer oxidative damage in either growing or mature cells and demonstrated reduced antioxidant response. This may reflect different requirements of ROS for growth mechanisms of leaf and root cells. In leaves, growing tissue demonstrated higher stimulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity under salinity than mature tissue, whereas mature tissue demonstrated higher stimulation of catalase. These results indicate differential roles for these ROS-scavenging enzymes at different cell developmental stages. Because ROS are required for cell expansion, the higher increase in SOD and APX activities in the growing leaf cells that resulted in reduction of ROS content under salinity could lead to the inhibition of cell growth under salinity.

  10. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall components by 2-fluoro 2-deoxy-L-fucose induces defects in root cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Bardor, Muriel; Burel, Carole; Vauzeilles, Boris; Lerouxel, Olivier; Anderson, Charles T; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Lerouge, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    Screening of commercially available fluoro monosaccharides as putative growth inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that 2-fluoro 2-l-fucose (2F-Fuc) reduces root growth at micromolar concentrations. The inability of 2F-Fuc to affect an Atfkgp mutant that is defective in the fucose salvage pathway indicates that 2F-Fuc must be converted to its cognate GDP nucleotide sugar in order to inhibit root growth. Chemical analysis of cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins demonstrated that fucosylation of xyloglucans and of N-linked glycans is fully inhibited by 10 μm 2F-Fuc in Arabidopsis seedling roots, but genetic evidence indicates that these alterations are not responsible for the inhibition of root development by 2F-Fuc. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall polysaccharides also affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II). At low concentrations, 2F-Fuc induced a decrease in RG-II dimerization. Both RG-II dimerization and root growth were partially restored in 2F-Fuc-treated seedlings by addition of boric acid, suggesting that the growth phenotype caused by 2F-Fuc was due to a deficiency of RG-II dimerization. Closer investigation of the 2F-Fuc-induced growth phenotype demonstrated that cell division is not affected by 2F-Fuc treatments. In contrast, the inhibitor suppressed elongation of root cells and promoted the emergence of adventitious roots. This study further emphasizes the importance of RG-II in cell elongation and the utility of glycosyltransferase inhibitors as new tools for studying the functions of cell wall polysaccharides in plant development. Moreover, supplementation experiments with borate suggest that the function of boron in plants might not be restricted to RG-II cross-linking, but that it might also be a signal molecule in the cell wall integrity-sensing mechanism.

  11. SUNflower +6 : development and application of a footprint methodology for the SUNflower +6 countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, P. Oppe, S. Reurings, M. & Wegman, F.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in traffic safety is the result of many efforts, starting with political decisions, the development of safety plans and safety actions and their implementation. This report explores ways of presenting information from the SUNflower+6 countries in such a way that it shows how the interaction

  12. SUNflower +6 : development and application of a footprint methodology for the SUNflower +6 countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, P. Oppe, S. Reurings, M. & Wegman, F.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in traffic safety is the result of many efforts, starting with political decisions, the development of safety plans and safety actions and their implementation. This report explores ways of presenting information from the SUNflower+6 countries in such a way that it shows how the interaction

  13. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for color removal from textile wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G.; Xu, X. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Div. of Textiles and Clothing

    1997-03-01

    Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for two basic dyes (Methylene Blue and Basic Red 9) and two direct dyes (Congo Red and Direct Blue 71) in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of two basic dyes on sunflower stalks are very high, i.e., 205 and 317 mg/g for Methylene Blue and Basic Red 9, respectively. The two direct dyes have relatively lower adsorption on sunflower stalks. The adsorptive behaviors of sunflower stalk components are different. The pith, which is the soft and porous material in the center of stalks, has twice the adsorptive capacity of the skin. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks also affect the adsorption of dyes. The adsorption rates of two basic dyestuffs are much higher than that of the direct dyes. Within 30 min about 80% basic dyes were removed from the solutions.

  14. Industrial frying trials with high oleic sunflower oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemelä, J. R.K.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available High oleic sunflower oil has been developed for some special purposes where a good oxidation stability is needed and a healthy fatty acid profile is preferred. The oil is especially suitable for deep fat frying. These industrial frying trials with high oleic sunflower oil were part of the AIR-project CT 920687 "Utilisation of Sunflower Oils in Industrial Frying Operations". High oleic sunflower oil (HOSO was tested against the traditional oils and fats in two industrial deep fat frying applications, namely crisps and prefried frozen french fries. The frying trials took place in Raisio Groups factories in Pyhanta and Vihanti, Finland in 1993 and 1994. According to the trials, high oleic sunflower oil is very suitable for deep fat frying. Problems occurred when a hard fat was substituted for a liquid oil in the preparation of prefrozen French Fries. These problems could be partly overcome by adjustments in the processing line.

  15. SHOEBOX Modulates Root Meristem Size in Rice through Dose-Dependent Effects of Gibberellins on Cell Elongation and Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jintao; Zhao, Yu; Chu, Huangwei; Wang, Likai; Fu, Yanru; Liu, Ping; Upadhyaya, Narayana; Chen, Chunli; Mou, Tongmin; Feng, Yuqi; Kumar, Prakash; Xu, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about how the size of meristem cells is regulated and whether it participates in the control of meristem size in plants. Here, we report our findings on shoebox (shb), a mild gibberellin (GA) deficient rice mutant that has a short root meristem size. Quantitative analysis of cortical cell length and number indicates that shb has shorter, rather than fewer, cells in the root meristem until around the fifth day after sowing, from which the number of cortical cells is also reduced. These defects can be either corrected by exogenous application of bioactive GA or induced in wild-type roots by a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of paclobutrazol on GA biosynthesis, suggesting that GA deficiency is the primary cause of shb mutant phenotypes. SHB encodes an AP2/ERF transcription factor that directly activates transcription of the GA biosynthesis gene KS1. Thus, root meristem size in rice is modulated by SHB-mediated GA biosynthesis that regulates the elongation and proliferation of meristem cells in a developmental stage-specific manner.

  16. SHOEBOX Modulates Root Meristem Size in Rice through Dose-Dependent Effects of Gibberellins on Cell Elongation and Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how the size of meristem cells is regulated and whether it participates in the control of meristem size in plants. Here, we report our findings on shoebox (shb, a mild gibberellin (GA deficient rice mutant that has a short root meristem size. Quantitative analysis of cortical cell length and number indicates that shb has shorter, rather than fewer, cells in the root meristem until around the fifth day after sowing, from which the number of cortical cells is also reduced. These defects can be either corrected by exogenous application of bioactive GA or induced in wild-type roots by a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of paclobutrazol on GA biosynthesis, suggesting that GA deficiency is the primary cause of shb mutant phenotypes. SHB encodes an AP2/ERF transcription factor that directly activates transcription of the GA biosynthesis gene KS1. Thus, root meristem size in rice is modulated by SHB-mediated GA biosynthesis that regulates the elongation and proliferation of meristem cells in a developmental stage-specific manner.

  17. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  18. The effects of dan-shen root on cardiomyogenic differentiation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Li, Shi-zheng, E-mail: ychozon@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Zhang, Yun-li; Wang, Xue-zhe [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional medium and dan-shen root were used for cardiomyogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They all could induce hPDMSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induction effect of the latter was slightly higher compared to that of the former. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dan-shen root could be a good inducer for cardiomyogenic differentiation. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to search for a good inducer agent using for cardiomyogenic differentiation of stem cells. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) were isolated and incubated in enriched medium. Fourth passaged cells were treated with 10 mg/L dan-shen root for 20 days. Morphologic characteristics were analyzed by confocal and electron microscopy. Expression of {alpha}-sarcomeric actin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of cardiac troponin-I (TnI) was analyzed by immunohistofluorescence. Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and beta-myocin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC) were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). hPDMSCs treated with dan-shen root gradually formed a stick-like morphology and connected with adjoining cells. On the 20th day, most of the induced cells stained positive with {alpha}-sarcomeric actin and TnI antibody. ANF and {beta}-MHC were also detected in the induced cells. Approximately 80% of the cells were successfully transdifferentiated into cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, dan-shen root is a good inducer agent used for cardiomyogenic differentiation of hPDMSCs.

  19. Fast, transient and specific intracellular ROS changes in living root hair cells responding to Nod factors (NFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Luis; Martínez, Adán; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in root-nodule development and metabolism has been extensively studied. However, there is limited evidence showing ROS changes during the earliest stages of the interaction between legumes and rhizobia. Herein, using ratio-imaging analysis, increasing and transient ROS levels were detected at the tips of actively growing root hair cells within seconds after addition of Nod factors (NFs). This transient response (which lasted up to 3 min) was Nod-factor-specific, as chitin oligomers (pentamers) failed to induce a similar response. When chitosan, a fungal elicitor, or ATP was used instead, a sustained increasing signal was observed. As ROS levels are transiently elevated after the perception of NFs, we propose that this ROS response is characteristic of the symbiotic interaction. Furthermore, we discuss the remarkable spatial and temporal coincidences between ROS and transiently increased calcium levels observed in root hair cells immediately after the detection of NFs.

  20. Cell-type-specific H+-ATPase activity in root tissues enables K+ retention and mediates acclimation of barley (Hordeum vulgare) to salinity stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabala, Lana; Zhang, Jingyi; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    While the importance of cell type specificity in plant adaptive responses is widely accepted, only a limited number of studies have addressed this issue at the functional level. We have combined electrophysiological, imaging, and biochemical techniques to reveal the physiological mechanisms...... compared with the mature zone, mature root cells accumulated more cytosolic and vacuolar Na(+), suggesting that the higher sensitivity of apical cells to salt is not related to either enhanced Na(+) exclusion or sequestration inside the root. Rather, the above differential sensitivity between the two zones...... conferring higher sensitivity of apical root cells to salinity in barley (Hordeum vulgare). We show that salinity application to the root apex arrests root growth in a highly tissue- and treatment-specific manner. Although salinity-induced transient net Na(+) uptake was about 4-fold higher in the root apex...

  1. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress.

  2. Sensory properties during storage of crisps and French fries prepared with sunflower oil and high oleic sunflower oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, L.J. van

    1996-01-01

    A selected and trained descriptive sensory panel has assessed samples of crisps and French fries prepared on an industrial scale with either sunflower oil (SO) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO). Furthermore, crisps have been fried in these oils with or without dimethyl polysiloxane (DMPS). Referenc

  3. Sensory properties during storage of crisps and French fries prepared with sunflower oil and high oleic sunflower oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, L.J. van

    1996-01-01

    A selected and trained descriptive sensory panel has assessed samples of crisps and French fries prepared on an industrial scale with either sunflower oil (SO) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO). Furthermore, crisps have been fried in these oils with or without dimethyl polysiloxane (DMPS). Referenc

  4. Registration of two confection sunflower germplasm Lines, HA-R10 and HA-R11, Resistant to sunflower rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm lines, HA-R10 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670043) and HA-R11 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670044) were developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and released December, 20...

  5. Lead-induced nitric oxide generation plays a critical role in lead uptake by Pogonatherum crinitum root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Sun, Lian; Jin, Haihong; Chen, Qian; Chen, Zunwei; Xu, Maojun

    2012-10-01

    The effects of lead (Pb) on endogenous nitric oxide (NO) generation, the role of NO in Pb uptake and the origin of Pb-induced NO production in Pogonatherum crinitum root cells were evaluated. Pb treatment induced rapid NO generation, showing that Pb exposure triggered endogenous NO signaling of the cells. Pre-treatment of the cells with the NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline -1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) not only abolished the Pb-triggered NO burst but also reduced Pb contents of the cells. Moreover, Pb exposure enhanced nitrate reductase (NR) activity of the cells. The NR inhibitors tungstate and glutamine not only suppressed the Pb-enhanced NR activities but also reduced the Pb-triggered NO generation. Pre-treatment of the cells with tungstate and glutamine suppressed Pb accumulation and the suppression could be restored by application of exogenous NO via its donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Together, our results indicated that Pb exposure enhanced NR activity and triggered the NO burst of P. crinitum root cells. Furthermore, the data demonstrated that NR was responsible for the Pb-triggered NO burst and that NR-mediated NO generation played a critical role in Pb uptake by P. crinitum root cells. Thus, our results suggest a potential strategy for controlling Pb uptake by plants by targeting NR as a source of Pb-triggered NO production.

  6. Establishment of Hertwig’s Epithelial Root Sheath/Epithelial Rests of Malassez Cell Line from Human Periodontium

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Hyun; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jae-Won; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Jung-Wook; Lee, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Human Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath/epithelial rests of Malassez (HERS/ERM) cells are epithelial remnants of teeth residing in the periodontium. Although the functional roles of HERS/ERM cells have yet to be elucidated, they are a unique epithelial cell population in adult teeth and are reported to have stem cell characteristics. Therefore, HERS/ERM cells might play a role as an epithelial component for the repair or regeneration of dental hard tissues; however, they are very rare populati...

  7. Ion distribution and gas exchange of hydroponically grown sunflower plants as affected by salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Rivelli

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a trial carried out on sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus L., Romsun HS90 grown in the greenhouse using inert substrate and two automatic and closed hydroponic systems: one of them hosting the control (C with plants grown under optimal conditions on Hoagland nutrient solution, the other one, the salt treatment (S, with plants exposed to constant salt stress through adding 150 mM of NaCl to the nutrient solution. Salt supply caused a sharp reduction in leaf area development and dry matter production, especially in the first 4 weeks when leaves showed to be more sensitive than stem and roots. Such a reduction is attributable to the drop in net CO2 assimilation rate, transpiration and stomatal conductance and it was, on average, equal to 30, 26 and 40%, respectively, with respect to the control. The investigated genotype was not able to exclude Cl- and Na+ and considerable amounts accumulated in leaves, stem and roots. Concentration increased in leaves in the basipetal direction. Though sunflower has an efficient endogenous adaptation system by which it redistributes ions in the whole plant, with greater accumulation in older leaves, growth inhibition could be attributed to specific ion toxicity effects, and of chlorine in particular, on metabolic processes and thus on photosynthesis.

  8. Conversion of dechlorodauricumine into miharumine by a cell-free preparation from cultured roots of Menispermum dauricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Rieko; Sugimoto, Gen; Matsui, Miharu; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Takikawa, Hirosato; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2009-02-01

    Dechlorodauricumine (5) and dechloroacutumine (6) were converted to miharumine (7) and dechloroacutumidine (8), respectively, by a cell-free preparation from cultured roots of Menispermum dauricum in the presence of FAD. The structures of 7 and 8 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and chemical conversion.

  9. Early activation of lipoxygenase in lentil (Lens culinaris) root protoplasts by oxidative stress induces programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Zadelhoff, G. van; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) triggers the hypersensitive response of plants to pathogens. Here, short pulses of H2O2 are shown to cause death of lentil (Lens culinaris) root protoplasts. Dead cells showed DNA fragmentation and ladder formation, typical hallmarks of apoptosis (

  10. Micronuclei formation in Pisum sativum L. root meristem cells exposed to an electric field or. gamma. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.W.; Economou, P.; Cox, C.; Robertson, D.

    1982-01-01

    Gamma radiation (400 R, 800 R; acute exposre), but not a 430 V/m 60 Hz electric field (continuous 5 day exposure in culture medium with a conductivity of 0.08 S/m), induced micronuclei formation in root meristem cells of Pisum sativum L.

  11. Early activation of lipoxygenase in lentil (Lens culinaris) root protoplasts by oxidative stress induces programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Zadelhoff, G. van; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) triggers the hypersensitive response of plants to pathogens. Here, short pulses of H2O2 are shown to cause death of lentil (Lens culinaris) root protoplasts. Dead cells showed DNA fragmentation and ladder formation, typical hallmarks of apoptosis (

  12. [Isolation and purification of virus damaging sunflower].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakusilo, A O; Didenko, L F; Kniazieva, N A; Boĭko, A L

    1994-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for purifying intact virus's isolate particles evoking yellow spot mosaic disease in sunflower. Purification of pathogen in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 8.0 containing 0.05 M Na3SO3 and 0.2% 2-mercaptoethanol is used. After first clarification extract was exposed to two cycles of high-speed centrifugation and fractionated in linear 10-40% (wt vol-1) sucrose density gradient. Virus was recovered from appropriate fractions after dialysis against 0.01 M Na2SO3.

  13. Sunflower cataract: do not forget Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tomasz; Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Dzieżyc, Karolina; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    A 41-year-old man with liver cirrhosis of unknown aetiology for 6 years was admitted to our department to confirm the diagnosis of Wilson's disease. He consulted an ophthalmologist who suspected the presence of a sunflower cataract and Kayser-Fleischer ring. At admission, his liver function tests were modestly impaired (Child-Pugh C, 10 pts). Neurological examination was normal, but cognitive functions were mildly impaired. Based on the copper metabolism abnormalities and clinical manifestation, we diagnosed Wilson's disease (Ferenci score, 6 pts) and started treatment with d-penicillamine. Presenting the case we would like to emphasise the significance of the ophthalmological examination in Wilson's disease diagnosis.

  14. Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of pRb-like protein in root meristem cells of Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, Justyna Teresa; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej; Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) regulates cell cycle progression by controlling the G1-to-S phase transition. As evidenced in mammals, pRb has three functionally distinct binding domains and interacts with a number of proteins including the E2F family of transcription factors, proteins with a conserved LxCxE motif (D-type cyclin), and c-Abl tyrosine kinase. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb inhibits its ability to bind target proteins, thus enabling further progression of the cell cycle. As yet, the roles of pRb and pRb-binding factors have not been well characterized in plants. By using antibody which specifically recognizes phosphorylated serines (S807/811) in the c-Abl tyrosine kinase binding C-domain of human pRb, we provide evidence for the cell cycle-dependent changes in pRb-like proteins in root meristems cells of Vicia faba. An increased phosphorylation of this protein has been found correlated with the G1-to-S phase transition.

  15. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis, and expression patterns of LATERAL SUPPRESSOR-LIKE and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION-LIKE genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambrini, Marco; Salvini, Mariangela; Pugliesi, Claudio

    2016-12-29

    The wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) plants develop a highly branched form with numerous small flowering heads. The origin of a no branched sunflower, producing a single large head, has been a key event in the domestication process of this species. The interaction between hormonal factors and several genes organizes the initiation and outgrowth of axillary meristems (AMs). From sunflower, we have isolated two genes putatively involved in this process, LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (LS)-LIKE (Ha-LSL) and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION (ROX)-LIKE (Ha-ROXL), encoding for a GRAS and a bHLH transcription factor (TF), respectively. Typical amino acid residues and phylogenetic analyses suggest that Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL are the orthologs of the branching regulator LS and ROX/LAX1, involved in the growth habit of both dicot and monocot species. qRT-PCR analyses revealed a high accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts in roots, vegetative shoots, and inflorescence shoots. By contrast, in internodal stems and young leaves, a lower amount of Ha-LSL transcripts was observed. A comparison of transcription patterns between Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL revealed some analogies but also remarkable differences; in fact, the gene Ha-ROXL displayed a low expression level in all organs analyzed. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis showed that Ha-ROXL transcription was strongly restricted to a small domain within the boundary zone separating the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the leaf primordia and in restricted regions of the inflorescence meristem, beforehand the separation of floral bracts from disc flower primordia. These results suggested that Ha-ROXL may be involved to establish a cell niche for the initiation of AMs as well as flower primordia. The accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts was not restricted to the boundary zones in vegetative and inflorescence shoots, but the mRNA activity was expanded in other cellular domains of primary shoot apical meristem as well as AMs. In addition, Ha

  16. Anti-Neuroblastoma Properties of a Recombinant Sunflower Lectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Marcela; Genoula, Melanie; Silveyra, María Ximena; De Oliveira Carvalho, André; Regente, Mariana; Del Río, Marianela; Ribeiro Soares, Júlia; Moreira Gomes, Valdirene; De La Canal, Laura

    2017-01-01

    According to their sugar recognition specificity, plant lectins are proposed as bioactive proteins with potential in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Helja is a mannose-specific jacalin-like lectin from sunflower which was shown to inhibit the growth of certain fungi. Here, we report its recombinant expression in a prokaryotic system and its activity in neurobalstoma cells. Helja coding sequence was fused to the pET-32 EK/LIC, the enterokinase/Ligation-independent cloning vector and a 35 kDa protein was obtained in Escherichia coli representing Helja coupled to thioredoxin (Trx). The identity of this protein was verified using anti-Helja antibodies. This chimera, named Trx-rHelja, was enriched in the soluble bacterial extracts and was purified using Ni+2-Sepharose and d-mannose-agarose chromatography. Trx-rHelja and the enterokinase-released recombinant Helja (rHelja) both displayed toxicity on human SH-SY5Y neuroblastomas. rHelja decreased the viability of these tumor cells by 75% according to the tetrazolium reduction assay, and microscopic analyses revealed that the cell morphology was disturbed. Thus, the stellate cells of the monolayer became spheroids and were isolated. Our results indicate that rHelja is a promising tool for the development of diagnostic or therapeutic methods for neuroblastoma cells, the most common solid tumors in childhood. PMID:28075401

  17. Anti-Neuroblastoma Properties of a Recombinant Sunflower Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pinedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to their sugar recognition specificity, plant lectins are proposed as bioactive proteins with potential in cancer treatment and diagnosis. Helja is a mannose-specific jacalin-like lectin from sunflower which was shown to inhibit the growth of certain fungi. Here, we report its recombinant expression in a prokaryotic system and its activity in neurobalstoma cells. Helja coding sequence was fused to the pET-32 EK/LIC, the enterokinase/Ligation-independent cloning vector and a 35 kDa protein was obtained in Escherichia coli representing Helja coupled to thioredoxin (Trx. The identity of this protein was verified using anti-Helja antibodies. This chimera, named Trx-rHelja, was enriched in the soluble bacterial extracts and was purified using Ni+2-Sepharose and d-mannose-agarose chromatography. Trx-rHelja and the enterokinase-released recombinant Helja (rHelja both displayed toxicity on human SH-SY5Y neuroblastomas. rHelja decreased the viability of these tumor cells by 75% according to the tetrazolium reduction assay, and microscopic analyses revealed that the cell morphology was disturbed. Thus, the stellate cells of the monolayer became spheroids and were isolated. Our results indicate that rHelja is a promising tool for the development of diagnostic or therapeutic methods for neuroblastoma cells, the most common solid tumors in childhood.

  18. The combination use of platelet-rich fibrin and treated dentin matrix for tooth root regeneration by cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohui; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Gang; Guo, Shujuan; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous regeneration through cell homing provides an alternative approach for tissue regeneration, except cell transplantation, especially considering clinical translation. However, tooth root regeneration through cell homing remains a provocative approach in need of intensive study. Both platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and treated dentin matrix (TDM) are warehouses of various growth factors, which can promote cell homing. We hypothesized that endogenous stem cells are able to sense biological cues from PRF membrane and TDM, and contribute to the regeneration of tooth root, including soft and hard periodontal tissues. Therefore, the biological effects of canine PRF and TDM on periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were evaluated respectively in vitro. Beagle dogs were used as orthotopic transplantation model. It was found that PRF significantly recruited and stimulated the proliferation of PDLSCs and BMSCs in vitro. Together, PRF and TDM induced cell differentiation by upregulating the mineralization-related gene expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopotin (OPN) after 7 days coculture. In vivo, transplantation of autologous PRF and allogeneic TDM into fresh tooth extraction socket achieved successful root regeneration 3 months postsurgery, characterized by the regeneration of cementum and periodontal ligament (PDL)-like tissues with orientated fibers, indicative of functional restoration. The results suggest that tooth root connected to the alveolar bone by cementum-PDL complex can be regenerated through the implantation of PRF and TDM in a tooth socket microenvironment, probably by homing of BMSCs and PDLSCs. Furthermore, bioactive cues and inductive microenvironment are key factors for endogenous regeneration. This approach provides a tangible pathway toward clinical translation.

  19. Improved bone regeneration and root coverage using a resorbable membrane with physically assisted cell migration and DFDBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, J R; Greenwell, H; Drisko, C; Wittwer, J W; Yancey, J; Rebitski, G

    2000-08-01

    Twelve patients with 2 Miller Class I or II buccal recession defects measuring > or = 3.0 mm were treated using the principles of guided tissue regeneration and followed for 12 months. The effectiveness of a polylactide (Guidor) resorbable membrane (GA sites) was compared to a combination treatment of polylactide membrane plus polyglactin root-lining mesh (Vicryl) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) (GVB sites) designed to enhance cell migration and bone regeneration. There was 90% mean soft tissue root coverage for the GVB sites and 78% for the GA sites. The mean osseous dehiscence area coverage with hard tissue was 75% for GVB sites and 30% for GA sites.

  20. Boron Supply Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum by Interacting with Cell Wall Pectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Wen Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop growth in acidic soils. Boron (B alleviates Al toxicity in plants, which is mainly considered to be due to the formation of Rhamnogalacturonan II-B (RGII-B complexes, which helps to stabilize the cytoskeleton. It is unclear yet whether this is due to the increasing of net negative charges and/or further mechanisms. Kinetics of Al accumulation and adsorption were investigated using entire cells, cell wall and pectin of root border cells (RBCs of pea (Pisum sativum, to reveal the mechanism of B in interacting with alkali-soluble and chelator-soluble pectin for an increased Al tolerance in RBCs. The results show that B could rescue RBCs from Al-induced cell death by accumulating more Al in the cell wall, predominately in alkali-soluble pectin. Boron also promotes Al3+ adsorption and inhibits Al3+ desorption from alkali-soluble pectin. Thus, more Al3+ is immobilized within the alkali-soluble pectin fraction and less in the chelator-soluble pectin, rendering Al3+ less mobile. Boron induces an increase of RG-II (KDO,2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid content for forming more borate-RGII complexes, and the decrease of pectin methyl-esterification, thus creates more negative charges to immobilize Al3+ in cell wall pectin. The study provides evidence that abundant B supply enhances the immobilization of Al in alkali-soluble pectin, thus most likely reducing the entry of Al3+ into the symplast from the surroundings.

  1. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  2. Determination of extra and intracellular content from some lytic enzymes related with carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. root cell wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sixta Tulia Martínez Peralta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of some enzymes related to cell wall (polygalacturonase, the pectate lyase, protease and xylanase in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. roots as well as the activity levels were determined. These levels were analyzed in different cellular places: the intercellular fluid that is part of apoplast, the symplast, and the total level (apoplast and symplast in carnation roots. Two methods were tested to extract the intercellular fluid. To obtain the intracellular content (symplast and total extract (apoplast+symplast, three methods were tested, using as extracting solution  i phosphate buffer, ii phosphate buffer + PVPP,  iii before the extraction with phosphate buffer, the carnation roots were washed with acetone.  The results showed the effect of different extracting solutions in the enzymatic activities and in the protein content. A new only one step method is proposed to extract the four enzymes and make the comparative analysis of enzymatic activity.

  3. Accumulation of cell wall-bound phenolic metabolites and their upliftment in hairy root cultures of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2008-07-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis of cell wall material of tomato hairy roots yielded ferulic acid as the major phenolic compound. Other phenolics were 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin and 4-coumaric acid. The content of phenolics was much higher at the early stage of hairy root growth. The ferulic acid content decreased up to 30 days and then sharply increased to 360 microg/g at 60 days of growth. Elicitation of hairy root cultures with Fusarium mat extract (FME) increased ferulic acid content 4-fold after 24 h. As the pathogen-derived elicitors have specific receptors in plants, FME may thus be used for inducing resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici.

  4. RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED protein stimulates cell differentiation in the Arabidopsis root meristem by interacting with cytokinin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Serena; Perez-Perez, José Manuel; Di Mambro, Riccardo; Peris, Cristina Llavata; Díaz-Triviño, Sara; Del Bianco, Marta; Pierdonati, Emanuela; Moubayidin, Laila; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Costantino, Paolo; Scheres, Ben; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2013-11-01

    Maintenance of mitotic cell clusters such as meristematic cells depends on their capacity to maintain the balance between cell division and cell differentiation necessary to control organ growth. In the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem, the antagonistic interaction of two hormones, auxin and cytokinin, regulates this balance by positioning the transition zone, where mitotically active cells lose their capacity to divide and initiate their differentiation programs. In animals, a major regulator of both cell division and cell differentiation is the tumor suppressor protein RETINOBLASTOMA. Here, we show that similarly to its homolog in animal systems, the plant RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein regulates the differentiation of meristematic cells at the transition zone by allowing mRNA accumulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR19 (ARF19), a transcription factor involved in cell differentiation. We show that both RBR and the cytokinin-dependent transcription factor ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR12 are required to activate the transcription of ARF19, which is involved in promoting cell differentiation and thus root growth.

  5. RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED Protein Stimulates Cell Differentiation in the Arabidopsis Root Meristem by Interacting with Cytokinin Signaling[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Serena; Perez-Perez, José Manuel; Di Mambro, Riccardo; Peris, Cristina Llavata; Díaz-Triviño, Sara; Del Bianco, Marta; Pierdonati, Emanuela; Moubayidin, Laila; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Costantino, Paolo; Scheres, Ben; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of mitotic cell clusters such as meristematic cells depends on their capacity to maintain the balance between cell division and cell differentiation necessary to control organ growth. In the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem, the antagonistic interaction of two hormones, auxin and cytokinin, regulates this balance by positioning the transition zone, where mitotically active cells lose their capacity to divide and initiate their differentiation programs. In animals, a major regulator of both cell division and cell differentiation is the tumor suppressor protein RETINOBLASTOMA. Here, we show that similarly to its homolog in animal systems, the plant RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein regulates the differentiation of meristematic cells at the transition zone by allowing mRNA accumulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR19 (ARF19), a transcription factor involved in cell differentiation. We show that both RBR and the cytokinin-dependent transcription factor ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR12 are required to activate the transcription of ARF19, which is involved in promoting cell differentiation and thus root growth. PMID:24285791

  6. Glucose alleviates cadmium toxicity by increasing cadmium fixation in root cell wall and sequestration into vacuole in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Zhi Shi; Xiao-Fang Zhu; Jiang-Xue Wan; Gui-Xin Li; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Glucose (Glu) is involved in not only plant physiological and developmental events but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we found that the exogenous Glu improved root and shoot growth, reduced shoot cadmium (Cd) concentration, and rescued Cd-induced chlorosis in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype, Col-0) under Cd stressed conditions. Glucose increased Cd retained in the roots, thus reducing its translocation from root to shoot significantly. The most Cd retained in the roots was found in the hemicellulose 1. Glucose combined with Cd (Glu þ Cd) treatment did not affect the content of pectin and its binding capacity of Cd while it increased the content of hemicelluloses 1 and the amount of Cd retained in it significantly. Furthermore, Leadmium Green staining indicated that more Cd was compartmented into vacuoles in Glu þ Cd treatment compared with Cd treatment alone, which was in accordance with the significant upregulation of the expression of tonoplast-localized metal transporter genes, suggesting that com-partmentation of Cd into vacuoles also contributes to the Glu-alleviated Cd toxicity. Taken together, we demonstrated that Glu-alleviated Cd toxicity is mediated through increas-ing Cd fixation in the root cell wall and sequestration into the vacuoles.

  7. Hexane extract of Raphanus sativus L. roots inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human cancer cells by modulating genes related to apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevi, Syed Sultan; Mangamoori, Lakshmi Narasu; Subathra, Murugan; Edula, Jyotheeswara Reddy

    2010-09-01

    Raphanus sativus, a common cruciferous vegetable has been attributed to possess a number of pharmacological and therapeutic properties. It has been used in indigenous system of medicine for the treatment of various human ailments in India. This present study evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of different parts of R. sativus such as root, stem and leaves, extracted with solvents of varying polarity and investigated the molecular mechanism leading to growth arrest and apoptotic cell death in human cancer cell lines. Of the different parts, significant growth inhibitory effect was observed with hexane extract of R. sativus root. Analysis of hexane extract by GC-MS revealed the presence of several isothiocyanates (ITCs) such as 4-(methylthio)-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC), 4-(methylthio)-3-butyl isothiocyanate (erucin), 4-methylpentyl isothiocyanate, 4-pentenyl isothiocyanate and sulforaphene. R. sativus root extract induced cell death both in p53 proficient and p53 deficient cell lines through induction of apoptotic signaling pathway regardless of the p53 status of cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying R. sativus-induced apoptosis may involve interactions among Bcl(2) family genes, as evidenced by up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes along with activation of Caspase-3. Our findings present the first evidence that hexane extract of R. sativus root exerts potential chemopreventive efficacy and induces apoptosis in cancer cell lines through modulation of genes involved in apoptotic signaling pathway.

  8. Function of root apical meristem

    OpenAIRE

    Benešová, Šárka

    2013-01-01

    A root apical meristem is the only source of cells for all tissues in the root. The root growth relies on its function. Regulation of a cell division frequency and cell differentiation affects organization and function of the differentiated tissues and the proper meristem function. If the cell differentiation overbalances the cell proliferation, the meristem exhaustion occurs and the root growth irreversibly terminates. This thesis describes existing knowledge about regulation of the primary ...

  9. Rice ubiquitin ligase EL5 prevents root meristematic cell death under high nitrogen conditions and interacts with a cytosolic GAPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Yoko; Mochizuki, Susumu; Koiwai, Hanae; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Kishimoto, Kyutaro; Katoh, Etsuko; Minami, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Root formation in rice transformants overexpressing mutated EL5 (mEL5) was severely inhibited because of meristematic cell death. Cell death was caused by nitrogen sources, particularly nitrate forms, in the culture medium. Nitrite treatment increased the cytokinin contents in roots, but mEL5 contained more cytokinins than non-transformants. Transcriptome profiling showed overlaps between nitrite-responsive genes in non-transformants and genes with altered expression in untreated mEL5. These results indicate that impairment of EL5 function activates nitrogen signaling despite the absence of a nitrogen source. Physical interaction between the EL5 C-terminal region and a cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, OsGapC2, was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the role of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in oxidative cell death in plants is expected in future.

  10. Mechanical failure of fine root cortical cells initiates plant hydraulic decline during drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root systems perform the crucial task of absorbing water from the soil to meet the demands of a transpiring canopy. Roots are thought to operate like electrical fuses, which break when carrying an excessive load under conditions of drought stress. Yet the exact site and sequence of this dysfunction ...

  11. SCARECROW-LIKE23 and SCARECROW jointly specify endodermal cell fate but distinctly control SHORT-ROOT movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuchen; Goedhart, Joachim; Schneijderberg, Martinus; Terpstra, Inez; Shimotohno, Akie; Bouchet, Benjamin P; Akhmanova, Anna; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Heidstra, Renze; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2015-11-01

    Intercellular signaling through trafficking of regulatory proteins is a widespread phenomenon in plants and can deliver positional information for the determination of cell fate. In the Arabidopsis root meristem, the cell fate determinant SHORT-ROOT (SHR), a GRAS domain transcription factor, acts as a signaling molecule from the stele to the adjacent layer to specify endodermal cell fate. Upon exiting the stele, SHR activates another GRAS domain transcription factor, SCARCROW (SCR), which, together with several BIRD/INDETERMINATE DOMAIN proteins, restricts movement of SHR to define a single cell layer of endodermis. Here we report that endodermal cell fate also requires the joint activity of both SCR and its closest homologue SCARECROW-LIKE23 (SCL23). We show that SCL23 protein moves with zonation-dependent directionality. Within the meristem, SCL23 exhibits short-ranged movement from ground tissue to vasculature. Away from the meristem, SCL23 displays long-range rootward movement into meristematic vasculature and a bidirectional radial spread, respectively. As a known target of SHR and SCR, SCL23 also interacts with SCR and SHR and can restrict intercellular outspread of SHR without relying on nuclear retention as SCR does. Collectively, our data show that SCL23 is a mobile protein that controls movement of SHR and acts redundantly with SCR to specify endodermal fate in the root meristem.

  12. Cytotoxic and apoptogenic effects of Bryonia aspera root extract against Hela and HN-5 cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourgonabadi, Solmaz; Amiri, Mohammad Sadegh; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Bryonia aspera (Stev. ex Ledeb) is a plant that grows in northeast of Iran. In the present study, cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of B. aspera root extract was determined against HN-5(head and neck squamous cell carcinoma) and Hela (cervix adenocarcinoma) cell lines. Materials and Methods: HN-5 and Hela cell lines were cultured in DMEM medium and incubated with different concentrations of B. aspera root extract. Cell viability was quantitated by MTT assay and the optical absorbance was measured at 570 nm (620 nm as the reference) by an ELISA reader, in each experiment. Apoptotic cells were assessed using PI staining of DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). The B. aspera inhibited 50% growth (IC50) of Hela and HN-5 cell lines at 100±28 μg/ml and 12.5±4 μg/ml, respectively after 48 hr of incubation. Results: Cell viability assay showed that inhibitory effects of B. aspera were time and dose-dependent in both cell lines, which were consistent with morphological changes, observed under light microscope. Apoptosis was investigated by flow cytometry in which percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose and time-dependent manner. Conclusion: Based on our data, B. aspera has cytotoxic effects in which apoptosis played an important role. Further evaluations are needed to assess the possible anti-tumor properties of this plant. PMID:28265548

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  14. Nitric oxide implication in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in roots and signaling response of yellow lupine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Deckert, Joanna; Rucińska-Sobkowiak, Renata; Gzyl, Jarosław; Pawlak-Sprada, Sylwia; Abramowski, Dariusz; Jelonek, Tomasz; Gwóźdź, Edward A

    2012-09-01

    The sequence of events leading to the programmed cell death (PCD) induced by heavy metals in plants is still the object of extensive investigation. In this study we showed that roots of 3-day old yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) seedlings exposed to cadmium (Cd, 89μM CdCl(2)) resulted in PCD starting from 24h of stress duration, which was evidenced by TUNEL-positive reaction. Cd-induced PCD was preceded by a relatively early burst of nitric oxide (NO) localized mainly in the root tips. Above changes were accompanied by the NADPH-oxidase-dependent superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)) production. However, the concomitant high level of both NO and O(2)(·-) at the 24th h of Cd exposure did not provoke an enhanced peroxynitrite formation. The treatment with the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor and NO-scavenger significantly reduced O(2)(·-) and NO production, respectively, as well as diminished the pool of cells undergoing PCD. The obtained data indicate that boosted NO and O(2)(·-) production is required for Cd-induced PCD in lupine roots. Moreover, we found that in roots of 14-day old lupine plants the NO-dependent Cd-induced PCD was correlated with the enhanced level of the post-stress signals in leaves, including distal NO cross-talk with hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eLallemand

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based recombinant protein production systems have gained an extensive interest over the past few years, because of their reduced cost and relative safety. Although the first products are now reaching the market, progress are still needed to improve plant hosts and strategies for biopharming. Targeting recombinant proteins toward the extracellular space offers several advantages in terms of protein folding and purification, but degradation events are observed, due to endogenous peptidases. This paper focuses on the analysis of extracellular proteolytic activities in two production systems: cell cultures and root-secretion (rhizosecretion, in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Proteolytic activities of extracellular proteomes (secretomes were evaluated in vitro against two substrate proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA and human serum immunoglobulins G (hIgGs. Both targets were found to be degraded by the secretomes, BSA being more prone to proteolysis than hIgGs. The analysis of the proteolysis pH-dependence showed that target degradation was mainly dependent upon the production system: rhizosecretomes contained more peptidase activity than extracellular medium of cell suspensions, whereas variations due to plant species were smaller. Using class-specific peptidase inhibitors, serine and metallopeptidases were found to be responsible for degradation of both substrates. An in-depth in silico analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data from Arabidopsis was then performed and led to the identification of a limited number of serine and metallo-peptidases that are consistently expressed in both production systems. These peptidases should be prime candidates for further improvement of plant hosts by targeted silencing.

  16. Proton and copper adsorption to maize and soybean root cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, D L; Jarrell, W M

    1989-03-01

    A surface complexation model which has been used to describe inner-sphere complexation on metal oxide surfaces was applied to the adsorption of Cu by isolated cell walls of 4-day and 28-day-old maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 x Mo17) and 21-day-old soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Dare) roots. Concentration dependence of the titration data prevented the determination of unique pK and capacitance values for the 4-day maize cell walls, though mean values obtained for the intrinsic pK of the titratable carboxyl groups were 3.0 (4-day maize), 3.6 (28-day maize), and 3.0 (21-day soybean) as determined by potentiometric titration with either NaOH or HCl in 20 millimolar NaCl. The constant capacitance model was applied to Cu sorption data from rapid batch equilibrium experiments in an ionic medium of 20 millimolar NaClO(4). Speciation calculations indicated that the formation of a bidentate surface complex was sufficient to describe the experimental data for all three types of plant material, with only one value for the pK and capacitance density. The intrinsic constants of Cu complexation by a neutral site are: log K = -0.3 +/- 0.1, -0.2 +/- 0.3, and 0.9 +/- 0.1 for 4-day and 28-day maize, and 21-day soybean, respectively. The integral capacitance density parameter, which describes the relationship between surface charge density and electrical potential, is several times larger than for crystalline mineral surfaces. This result indicates that the surface electrical potential remains low even when the surface charge density is high. Such behavior is characteristic of gels and porous oxides.

  17. Biochemical and molecular characterization of high population density bacteria isolated from sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Pinheiro de Goes, Kelly Campos; de Castro Fisher, Maria Luisa; Cattelan, Alexandre José; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Portela de Carvalho, Claudio Guilherme; Martinez de Oliveira, Andre Luiz

    2012-04-01

    Natural and beneficial associations between plants and bacteria have demonstrated potential commercial application for several agricultural crops. The sunflower has acquired increasing importance in Brazilian agribusiness owing to its agronomic characteristics such as the tolerance to edaphoclimatic variations, resistance to pests and diseases, and adaptation to the implements commonly used for maize and soybean, as well as the versatility of the products and by-products obtained from its cultivation. A study of the cultivable bacteria associated with two sunflower cultivars, using classical microbiological methods, successfully obtained isolates from different plant tissues (roots, stems, florets, and rhizosphere). Out of 57 plantgrowth- promoting isolates obtained, 45 were identified at the genus level and phylogenetically positioned based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing: 42 Bacillus (B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. pumilus, B. megaterium, and Bacillus sp.) and 3 Methylobacterium komagatae. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis showed a broad diversity among the Bacillus isolates, which clustered into 2 groups with 75% similarity and 13 subgroups with 85% similarity, suggesting that the genetic distance correlated with the source of isolation. The isolates were also analyzed for certain growth-promoting activities. Auxin synthesis was widely distributed among the isolates, with values ranging from 93.34 to 1653.37 microM auxin per microng of protein. The phosphate solubilization index ranged from 1.25 to 3.89, and siderophore index varied from 1.15 to 5.25. From a total of 57 isolates, 3 showed an ability to biologically fix atmospheric nitrogen, and 7 showed antagonism against the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The results of biochemical characterization allowed identification of potential candidates for the development of biofertilizers targeted to the sunflower crop.

  18. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William George Tycho; Lange, Lene

    2016-01-01

    the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire...... viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction...

  19. Ethiopian soya bean and sunflower value chains : Opportunities and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, J.H.M.; Dufera Gurmesa, N.; Lute, J.C.M.; Loo, van E.N.

    2011-01-01

    This report analyses the business opportunities of soya beans and sunflowers. The opportunities are addressed to firms in all levels of the value chain ranging from consumers to farmers in the Ethiopian agriculture.

  20. Final Critical Habitat for the Pecos Sunflower (Helianthus paradoxus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To provide the user with a general idea of areas where final critical habitat for Pecos Sunflower (Helianthus paradoxus) occur. The geographic extent includes...

  1. Sunflower Beauty Contest : tsvetõ zimoi / Marina Poltavtseva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Poltavtseva, Marina

    2001-01-01

    Lillekleitide võistlusest Sunflower Beauty Contest Tallinna klubis Decolte. Konkursi idee on florist Tatjana Tridvornovalt. Esimese koha sai Viimsi lilleäri lilleseadjate Meri-Liis Kõivu ja Triinu Põlderi lillekleit "Talvepruut"

  2. Sunflower cake in the diet of Quarter Horses in activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Falaschini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased availability of sunflower cake, a by-product of oilseed extraction for biodiesel production, prompted us to test the scope of its utilization in the diet of Quarter Horses employed in equestrian shows. We substituted 600 and 1200 g of feed with 300 and 600 g of sunflower cake, respectively, so as to obtain isoproteic and isoenergetic diets. Digestibility evaluation by the AIA method evidenced generally improved nutrient utilization with the lower cake diet (300 g sunflower. The higher cake diet was associated with a reduction in organic matter, protein and ether extract digestibility coefficients. In particular, the trend of the protein coefficients (88.5 - 91.5 - 87.7 for control, 300 and 600 g sunflower cake, respectively was confirmed by higher plasma urea levels.

  3. Sunflower Beauty Contest : tsvetõ zimoi / Marina Poltavtseva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Poltavtseva, Marina

    2001-01-01

    Lillekleitide võistlusest Sunflower Beauty Contest Tallinna klubis Decolte. Konkursi idee on florist Tatjana Tridvornovalt. Esimese koha sai Viimsi lilleäri lilleseadjate Meri-Liis Kõivu ja Triinu Põlderi lillekleit "Talvepruut"

  4. Significance of cytogenetic research in sunflower and rapeseed breeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atlagić Jovanka; Terzić Sreten; Marjanović-Jeromela Ana; Marinković Radovan

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic research of sunflower and rapeseed has a century long tradition. Chromosome number and morphology were studied at first in species from the Helianthus and Brassica genera, and than their cytotaxonomy and phylogenesis...

  5. Identification and characterization of contrasting sunflower genotypes to early leaf senescence process combining molecular and physiological studies (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gialdi, A I; Moschen, S; Villán, C S; López Fernández, M P; Maldonado, S; Paniego, N; Heinz, R A; Fernandez, P

    2016-09-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex mechanism ruled by multiple genetic and environmental variables that affect crop yields. It is the last stage in leaf development, is characterized by an active decline in photosynthetic rate, nutrients recycling and cell death. The aim of this work was to identify contrasting sunflower inbred lines differing in leaf senescence and to deepen the study of this process in sunflower. Ten sunflower genotypes, previously selected by physiological analysis from 150 inbred genotypes, were evaluated under field conditions through physiological, cytological and molecular analysis. The physiological measurement allowed the identification of two contrasting senescence inbred lines, R453 and B481-6, with an increase in yield in the senescence delayed genotype. These findings were confirmed by cytological and molecular analysis using TUNEL, genomic DNA gel electrophoresis, flow sorting and gene expression analysis by qPCR. These results allowed the selection of the two most promising contrasting genotypes, which enables future studies and the identification of new biomarkers associated to early senescence in sunflower. In addition, they allowed the tuning of cytological techniques for a non-model species and its integration with molecular variables.

  6. Mutation breeding in sunflower for resistance to alternaria leaf spot

    OpenAIRE

    de Marcelo Oliveira F.; Tulmann Augusto Neto; Regina Leite M.V.B.C.; Vania Castiglioni B.R.; Arias C.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic variability for resistance to Alternarla leaf spot disease (Alternaria helianthi) can be induced by radiation or chemical mutagens. The objectives of this study were to create genetic variability in cultivated sunflower and to select lines resistant to Alternaria leaf spot. In the first experiment, sunflower seeds of the genotype HA BR 104 were irradiated with 150 and 165 Gy of gamma rays. Seeds were sown in the field at the Embrapa Soybean experimental station, in Londrina, PR, Brazi...

  7. Oryzanol as natural antioxidant for improving sunflower oil stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, L; Srinivas, P; Prasanth Kumar, P K; Gopala Krishna, A G

    2015-06-01

    Sunflower oil is being made shelf stable by the incorporation of synthetic antioxidants such as tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ), while natural antioxidants like oryzanol and tocopherols can also be used. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the antioxidant effect of natural oryzanol (Oz) concentrate (15.5 % oryzanol) and purified Oz (80 % oryzanol) on oxidative and thermal stability of sunflower oil. Sunflower oil was incorporated with Oz concentrate to provide 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.50, 0.84, 1.0, 1.60, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.20 % oryzanol in the oil, stored for 5 weeks at 37 °C and oxidative stability was evaluated. It was found that the oryzanol concentrate showed good antioxidant effect with increase in concentration of oryzanol. In another set of experiments, sunflower oil containing purified Oz at 1 % level individually and in combination with 0.1 % α- tocopherol (α-T) was heated at 120 °C for 24 h to evaluate thermal stability. Sunflower oil containing 1 % Oz (80 % purity) showed 98.40 % and sunflower oil containing 1 % Oz and 0.1 % α-T showed 108.75 % antioxidant effect compared to TBHQ taken as 100 %. The study indicated that sunflower oil containing 1 % Oz (80 % purity) and 0.1 % α-T combination provides a synergistic effect in inhibiting primary and secondary products and showed highest thermal stability. SFO containing 1 % Oz added as concentrate also showed good antioxidant effect during storage. Hence, instead of using synthetic antioxidants like TBHQ, we can add natural oryzanol (purified or as concentrate) to sunflower oil to increase its oxidative and thermal stability.

  8. SUNFLOWER HUSKS AS A SOURCE OF FUNCTIONAL FEED ADDITIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Khusid S. B.; Gneush A. N.; Nesterenko E. E.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the results of the complex feed additive based on sunflower husk, enriched with beer wort with the addition of pumpkin pulp. We have studied the chemical composition of sunflower husk, which is the secondary resource of the processing plant raw material, selected methods of enrichment of this raw material with the help of fungi Trichoderma harzianum. Cellulolytic enzyme preparations on the basis of fungi of the genus Trichoderma for use in agriculture and animal feed pro...

  9. Nutritional and energy values of sunflower cake for broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Berwanger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the nutritional and energy values of sunflower cake for broilers through two experiments. The first study evaluated the energy values by the method of total excreta collection, using 100 broiler chicks 21–31 days old, divided into five treatments of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% inclusion sunflower cake will reference a diet. The second experiment evaluated the influence of the period and the quantity supplied of sunflower cake on digestibility of amino acids by a forcedfeeding technique. Eighteen cockerels were used, divided into three treatments, which consisted of supplying 15 g of sunflower cake, 30 g of sunflower cake (15 g at intervals of 12 hours and 30 g of sunflower cake (15 g at intervals of 24 hours, and an additional six roosters were fasted for correction of metabolic and endogenous losses. The samples were sent for amino acid analysis by HPLC in the Evonik Laboratory (Germany, and chemical and energy analysis to Unioeste Laboratory. The values of apparent metabolizable energy (AME, metabolization coefficient (AMC, apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn, metabolization coefficient corrected for nitrogen balance (AMCn for sunflower cake were 2211.68 kcal.kg-1, 2150.54 kcal.kg-1, 45.47% and 44.73%, respectively. The amount of food provided in the feeding method changed the assessment of true digestibility of amino acids (TDCA, and when only 15 g was used, the values of true digestibility coefficients were underestimated. The lysine, histidine and threonine amino acids were at lower TDCA, and arginine and methionine showed the highest TDCA for sunflower cake.

  10. Genetic variance of sunflower yield components - Heliantus annuus L.

    OpenAIRE

    Hladni Nada; Škorić Dragan; Kraljević-Balalić Marija

    2003-01-01

    The main goals of sunflower breeding in Yugoslavia and abroad are increased seed yield and oil content per unit area and increased resistance to diseases, insects and stress conditions via an optimization of plant architecture. In order to determine the mode of inheritance, gene effects and correlations of total leaf number per plant, total leaf area and plant height, six genetically divergent inbred lines of sunflower were subjected to half diallel crosses. Significant differences in mean va...

  11. Association Mapping and the Genomic Consequences of Selection in Sunflower

    OpenAIRE

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; Savithri Nambeesan; Bowers, John E; Laura F Marek; Daniel Ebert; Loren H. Rieseberg; Knapp, Steven J.; Burke, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of large-scale population genomic analyses and trait-based mapping approaches has the potential to provide novel insights into the evolutionary history and genome organization of crop plants. Here, we describe the detailed genotypic and phenotypic analysis of a sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) association mapping population that captures nearly 90% of the allelic diversity present within the cultivated sunflower germplasm collection. We used these data to characterize overall ...

  12. Contribution of interspecific and intergeneric hybridization to sunflower breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Christov M.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation was directed to sunflower improvement using hybrid forms resulted from wide hybridization. The aim was to create new B/A and R lines from interspecific and intergeneric hybrids resistant to diseases, parasite broomrape, herbicides, other stress factors and with high combining ability in highly productive oil-type sunflower hybrids with varied fatty acid contents. The confectionary hybrids should have a high kernel protein content and amin...

  13. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of the Early Domestication of Sunflower

    OpenAIRE

    David M Wills; Burke, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic analyses of the domestication syndrome have revealed that domestication-related traits typically have a very similar genetic architecture across most crops, being conditioned by a small number of quantitative trait loci (QTL), each with a relatively large effect on the phenotype. To date, the domestication of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) stands as the only counterexample to this pattern. In previous work involving a cross between wild sunflower (also H. annuus) and a highly improv...

  14. Proteomic analysis reveals growth inhibition of soybean roots by manganese toxicity is associated with alteration of cell wall structure and lignification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijian; Yan, Wei; Sun, Lili; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2016-06-30

    Plant roots, the hidden half of plants, play a vital role in manganese (Mn) toxicity tolerance. However, molecular mechanisms underlying root adaptation to Mn toxicity remain largely unknown. In this study, soybean (Glycine max) was used to investigate alterations of root morphology and protein profiles in response to Mn toxicity. Results showed that soybean root growth was significantly inhibited by Mn toxicity. Subsequent proteomic analysis revealed that 31 proteins were successfully identified via MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis including 21 unique up-regulated and 6 unique down-regulated proteins, which are mainly related to cell wall metabolism, protein metabolism and signal transduction. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that corresponding gene transcription patterns were correlated with accumulation of 14 of 21 up-regulated proteins, but only 1 of 6 down-regulated proteins, suggesting that most excess Mn up-regulated proteins are controlled at the transcriptional levels, while down-regulated proteins are controlled at the post-transcriptional levels. Furthermore, changes in abundances of GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran-3, expansin-like B1-like protein, dirigent protein and peroxidase 5-like protein strongly suggested that alteration of root cell wall structure and lignification might be associated with inhibited root growth. Taken together, this study was helpful to further understandings of adaptive strategies of legume roots to Mn toxicity. This study highlighted the effects of Mn toxicity on soybean root growth and its proteome profiles. Excess Mn treatments inhibited root growth. Comparative proteomic analysis was performed to analyze the changes in protein profiles of soybean roots in response to Mn toxicity. A total of 31 root proteins with differential abundances were identified and predominantly associated with signal transduction and cell wall metabolism. Among them, the abundances of the GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran-3 and Ran-binding protein 1 were

  15. Pollutant-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species accumulation in the aerial roots of Chinese banyan (Ficus microcarpa)

    OpenAIRE

    Nan Liu; Ce Cao; Zhongyu Sun; Zhifang Lin; Rufang Deng

    2016-01-01

    Industrial pollutants induce the production of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2 .−, H2O2, and ·OH in plants, but they have not been well quantified or localized in tissues and cells. This study evaluated the pollutant- (HSO3 −, NH4NO3, Al3+, Zn2+, and Fe2+) induced toxic effects of ROS on the aerial roots of Chinese banyan (Ficus microcarpa). Root cell viability was greatly reduced by treatment with 20 mM NaHSO3, 20 mM NH4NO3, 0.2 mM AlCl3, 0.2 mM ZnSO4, or 0.2 mM FeSO4. Biochem...

  16. Development of sunflower hybrids tolerant to tribenuron methyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocić Siniša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of tribenuron-methyl resistant wild Helianthus annuus L. population (ANN-KAN created an opportunity for expansion of sunflower herbicide resistance breeding program. The aim of this study was development of sunflower hybrids resistant to tribenuron-methyl. Creation of tribenuron-methyl resistant hybrids would enable the use of a wider palette of herbicides for sunflower, more efficient chemical control of Cirsium arvense and more economically profitable post-emergence control of some annual broad-leaves weeds in sunflower. Original populations SURES-1 and SURES-2 are homozygous for resistance to tribenuron-methyl. F1 generations produced from the crossings are completely resistant to tribenuron-methyl, pointing out to dominant way of inheritance of this trait. Studies on the exact number of genes controlling the resistance are in progress. Tribenuron-methyl resistance was transferred from original populations into a number of female and male inbred lines of cultivated sunflower. These inbred lines could enable creation of a number of hybrids resistant to tribenuron-methyl. Hybrids SUMO-1-PR, SUMO-2- OR and SUMO-3 are resistant to doubled application dose of tribenuron-methyl. Agronomical characteristics of these hybrids are on the level with the leading conventional sunflower hybrids.

  17. Technical Efficiency of Sunflower Production in Trakya Region by DEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Unakitan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine how efficiently the resources are used in sunflowerproduction in Turkey. The data used in efficiency measurements covers the provinces Tekirdag, Kırklareliand Edirne in Trakya region which is the most important area of sunflower seed production. The productionarea of sunflower is about 307 thousand hectares, 57% of total sunflower sown area in Turkey and theamount of production is 498 thousand metric tons, 62% of the total sunflower production. 197 farmers wereinterviewed face to face to obtain the data. Efficiency measurements are made by means of the DataEnvelopment Analysis (DEA with respect to constant return to scale for each province. The Efficiencyscores is decomposed into pure technical efficiency and scale efficiency for getting more information fromthe measurements. Total sunflower production (kg is used as the output and land (decar; labour (hour,tractor use (hour, nitrogen fertilizer use (kg, seed use (kg and pesticide (kg are considered as the maininputs. Average technical efficiency score covering all the provinces is estimated as 0.672. Although none ofthe provinces produces sunflower efficiently, Tekirdag province is relatively more successful in input use.Tekirdag province has the highest pure technical efficiency and scale efficiency score. Considering all theregions, the reason for inefficiency is not optimal production but not producing a certain output withminimum input. Yield is a factor that increases efficiency.

  18. Torrefaction of residues and by-products from sunflower chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Riva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The high heterogeneity of some residual biomasses makes rather difficult their energy use and standardisation is a key aspect for these fuel products. Torrefaction is an interesting process used to improve the quality of ligno-cellulosic biomasses and to achieve standardisation. In the present study torrefaction has been employed on residues and by-products deriving from sunflower production chain, in particular sunflower stalks and oil press cake. The thermal behaviour of materials has been studied at first by thermo-gravimetric analysis in order to identify torrefaction temperatures range. Different residence time and torrefaction temperatures have been employed in a bench top torrefaction reactor afterwards. Analyses of raw and torrefied materials have been carried out to assess the influence of the process. As a consequence of torrefaction, the carbon and ash contents increase while the volatilisation range is reduced making the material more stable and standardised. Mass yield, energy yield and energy densification reach values of about 60 %, 80 % and 1.33 for sunflower stalks and 64 %, 85 % and 1.33 for sunflower oil press cake respectively. As highlighted by results, torrefaction is more interesting for sunflower stalks than oil cake and husks because of the different starting characteristics. Untreated oil cake and husks already show a good high heating value and the eventual torrefaction should be mild. On the contrary for sunflower stalks the process is more useful and could be more severe.

  19. Genotoxic evaluation of infusions of Urera baccifera leaves and roots in Allium cepa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda L. Gindri; Ana Paula D. Coelho; Solange B. Tedesco; Athayde, Margareth L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The aqueous extracts of Urera baccifera Wedd. leaves and roots are used to inflammatory and infectious diseases in Brazilian folk medicine. Oxalic acid, a substance co-related with toxicity and stinging, was already quantified in this plant. Aims: To evaluate the action of leaves and roots infusions (1, 30, 75 g/L) and the oxalic acid standard on mitosis as indicative of presumably antimitotic and genotoxic actions, using the Allium cepa test. Methods: Oxalic acid was quanti...

  20. Genetic impact on protein content and hullability of sunflower seeds, and on the quality of sunflower meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauguet Sylvie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunflower seed quality, in particular the characteristics of hullability and protein content, has a significant impact on the protein content of the resulting meal. Seeds dehulled before crushing produce a meal with a protein content of approximately 36%; without dehulling, the protein content is typically in the range of 27–29%. This study seeks to assess the effect of sunflower variety on hullability and protein content. Genetic effects were studied by means of seed samples obtained from a network of variety evaluation trials undertaken across the production area in France for sunflowers. For both characteristics, significant differences between cultivars were observed; as a consequence, the potential protein content of their dehulled meals also ranged widely (34–44%. Genetic selection, which provides substantial improvements in both oil content and fatty acid composition, should therefore be expected to enhance the quality of sunflower meal.

  1. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Michael H; Holman, Tara J; Sørensen, Iben;

    2015-01-01

    and glycoproteins present in the cell walls of these sections, and identified the expected decrease in pectin and increase in xylan from the meristematic zone (MS), through the rapid and late elongation zones (REZ, LEZ) to the maturation zone and the rest of the root, including the emerging lateral roots. Other...

  2. Phytotoxic effects of nickel on yield and concentration of macro- and micro-nutrients in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) achenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Sajid Aqeel; Ashraf, Muhammad; Hussain, Mumtaz

    2011-01-30

    The phytotoxic effects of varying levels of nickel (0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg L(-1)) on growth, yield and accumulation of macro- and micro-nutrients in leaves and achenes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were appraised in this study. A marked reduction in root and shoot fresh biomass was recorded at higher Ni levels. Nickel stress also caused a substantial decrease in all macro- and micro-nutrients in leaves and achenes. The lower level of Ni (10 mg L(-1)) had a non-significant effect on various yield attributes, but higher Ni levels considerably decreased these parameters. Higher Ni levels decreased the concentrations of Ca, Mn and Fe in achenes. In contrast, achene N, K, Zn, Mn and Cu decreased consistently with increasing level of Ni, even at lower level (10 mg L(-1)). Sunflower hybrid Hysun-33 had better yield and higher most of the nutrients in achenes as compared with SF-187. The maximum reduction in all parameters was observed at the maximum level of nickel (40 mg L(-1)) where almost all parameters were reduced more than 50% of those of control plants. In conclusion, the pattern of uptake and accumulation of different nutrients in sunflower plants were nutrient- and cultivar-specific under Ni-stress.

  3. Interactions between rye (Secale cereale) root border cells (RBCs) and pathogenic and nonpathogenic rhizosphere strains of Fusarium culmorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszuk-Sciseł, Jolanta; Kurek, Ewa; Rodzik, Beata; Winiarczyk, Krystyna

    2009-10-01

    Interactions of rye (Secale cereale) root border cells (RBCs), generated during plant growth and surrounding the root cap, with nonpathogenic rhizosphere Fusarium culmorum isolates: DEMFc2 (PGPF) and DEMFc5 (DRMO), and a pathogenic strain DEMFc37 were studied in test tube experiments. The effect of water-suspended RBCs released from the rye root cap on the rate of macroconidia germination and hyphae (mycelial) growth of F. culmorum strains was also examined. It was found that root caps of 3-d-old rye seedlings (with the root length of 20mm) were surrounded with a layer of RBCs generated in a number specific for this plant species of 1980+/-30. Introduction of the macroconidia of the tested F. culmorum strains into the root zone of 3-d-old seedlings resulted, after 3d of incubation, in the formation of mantle-like structures only in the rhizosphere of plants inoculated with the pathogenic DEMFc37 strain. The macroconidia were suspended in (1) water, (2) a water mixture with root caps deprived of RBCs, (3) Martin medium, (4) malt extract broth, and (5) a water mixture with rye RBCs, and their percentage germination was determined during 96-h incubation at 20 degrees C. Germination of the macroconidia of all the tested F. culmorum strains suspended in the rich growth media (Martin and malt extract broth) and in the mixture with RBCs was significantly speeded up. While only an average of 16.6 % of macroconidia suspended in water germinated after 96-h incubation, more than 90 % of those suspended in the growth media or in the mixture with RBCs germinated after 24h of incubation. In all the treatments, the highest rate of macroconidia germination was found in suspensions of the pathogenic strain and the lowest in macroconidial suspensions of the PGPF strain. The stimulatory effect of RBCs was not specific to the pathogenic strain. Nevertheless, microscopic observation revealed that it was only in the suspension containing a mixture of rye RBCs and macroconidia of the

  4. Final Report: Regulation and Function of Two Cell Wall protein Genes in Me Dicago Roots and Root Nodules, August 1, 1995 - January 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, James B.

    2000-05-08

    During the period of DOE funding we synthesized several PRP peptides, generated rabbit antisera against two PRP repeats found in early nodulin PRPs, and developed confocal microscopy methods for root immunohistochemistry. Using the antibodies, we completed extensive descriptive studies of PRP deposition in medic and alfalfa roots showing that PRPs deposition is developmentally regulated in roots and spatially restricted within the walls of specific root tissues. Domain-specific antibodies were isolated from polyclonal sera using peptide affinity chromatography and were then used to demonstrate that nodule-specific epitopes are shared by several nodule-specific proteins. The following provides a more detailed summary of this work.

  5. Antioxidant and DNA Repair Stimulating Effect of Extracts from Transformed and Normal Roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides against Induced Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in CHO Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skała, Ewa; Sitarek, Przemysław; Różalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Szemraj, Janusz; Wysokińska, Halina; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Rhaponticum carthamoides has a long tradition of use in Siberian folk medicine. The roots and rhizomes of this species are used in various dietary supplements or nutraceutical preparations to increase energy level or eliminate physical weakness. This is the first report to reveal the protective and DNA repair stimulating abilities of R. carthamoides root extracts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to an oxidative agent. Both transformed root extract (TR extract) and extract of soil-grown plant roots (NR extract) may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, but CHO cells stimulated with extract from the transformed roots demonstrated significantly stronger properties than cells treated with the soil-grown plant root extract. These differences in biological activity may be attributed to the differences in the content of phenolic compounds in these root extracts. Preincubation of the CHO cells with TR and NR extracts showed an increase in gene expression and protein levels of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2). R. carthamoides may possess antioxidant properties that protect CHO cells against oxidative stress. PMID:27034736

  6. Antioxidant and DNA Repair Stimulating Effect of Extracts from Transformed and Normal Roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides against Induced Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in CHO Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Skała

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhaponticum carthamoides has a long tradition of use in Siberian folk medicine. The roots and rhizomes of this species are used in various dietary supplements or nutraceutical preparations to increase energy level or eliminate physical weakness. This is the first report to reveal the protective and DNA repair stimulating abilities of R. carthamoides root extracts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells exposed to an oxidative agent. Both transformed root extract (TR extract and extract of soil-grown plant roots (NR extract may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, but CHO cells stimulated with extract from the transformed roots demonstrated significantly stronger properties than cells treated with the soil-grown plant root extract. These differences in biological activity may be attributed to the differences in the content of phenolic compounds in these root extracts. Preincubation of the CHO cells with TR and NR extracts showed an increase in gene expression and protein levels of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD2. R. carthamoides may possess antioxidant properties that protect CHO cells against oxidative stress.

  7. Therapy-resistant foreign body giant cell granuloma at the periapex of a root-filled human tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, P.N.; Sjoegren, U.K.; Krey, G.; Sundqvist, G. (Dental Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-12-01

    Although the primary etiological factor of periapical lesions is microbial, there are other independent factors that can adversely affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. In this communication, we present morphological evidence in support of the role of a foreign body reaction of periapical tissue to root-filling materials. The specimen consisted of a surgical biopsy of an asymptomatic periapical lesion which persisted after a decade of postendodontic follow-up. The biopsy was processed for correlated light and electron microscopy and was analyzed by various microtechniques. The unique feature of the lesion was the presence of vast numbers of large multinucleated cells and their cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Morphologically, these multinucleated cells resembled foreign body giant cells. They contained characteristic birefringent cytoplasmic inclusions which on electron-probe x-ray microanalysis consistently revealed the presence of magnesium and silicon. The magnesium and silicon are presumably the remnants of a root-filling excess which protruded into the periapex and had been resorbed during the follow-up period. These observations strongly suggest that in the absence of microbial factors, root-filling materials which contain irritating substances can evoke a foreign body reaction at the periapex, leading to the development of asymptomatic periapical lesions that may remain refractory to endodontic therapy for long periods of time.

  8. Spent metal working fluids produced alterations on photosynthetic parameters and cell-ultrastructure of leaves and roots of maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Fernandez-Pascual, Mercedes; García-Seco, Daniel; Gutierrez-Mañero, Francisco Javier; Lucas, Jose Antonio

    2013-09-15

    In this work we assess the capacity of maize (Zea mays) plants to phytoremediate spent metal working fluids (MWFs) and its effects on photosynthesis and ultrastructure of mesophyll and root cells. A corn-esparto fibre system patented by us has been used to phytoremediate MWFs in hydroponic culture. Furthermore, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has been used to improve the process. The results show that this system is capable of significantly reducing the chemical oxygen demand, under local legislation limits. However, plant systems are really damaged, mainly its photosynthetic system, as shown by the photosynthetical parameters. Nevertheless, strain inoculated improves these parameters, especially Hill reaction. The ultrastructure of photosynthetic apparatus was also affected. Chloroplast number decreased and becomes degraded in the mesophyll of MWFs treated plants. In some cases even plasmolysis of chloroplast membrane was detected. Early senescence symptoms were detected in root ultrastructural study. Severe cellular damage was observed in the parenchymal root cells of plants grown with MWFs, while vascular bundles cell remained unchanged. It seems that the inoculation minimises the damage originated by the MWFs pollutants, appearing as less degenerative organelles and higher chloroplast number than in non-inoculated ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. AtHKT1;1 mediates nernstian sodium channel transport properties in Arabidopsis root stelar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowu Xue

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis AtHKT1;1 protein was identified as a sodium (Na⁺ transporter by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, direct comparative in vivo electrophysiological analyses of a plant HKT transporter in wild-type and hkt loss-of-function mutants has not yet been reported and it has been recently argued that heterologous expression systems may alter properties of plant transporters, including HKT transporters. In this report, we analyze several key functions of AtHKT1;1-mediated ion currents in their native root stelar cells, including Na⁺ and K⁺ conductances, AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents, and shifts in reversal potentials in the presence of defined intracellular and extracellular salt concentrations. Enhancer trap Arabidopsis plants with GFP-labeled root stelar cells were used to investigate AtHKT1;1-dependent ion transport properties using patch clamp electrophysiology in wild-type and athkt1;1 mutant plants. AtHKT1;1-dependent currents were carried by sodium ions and these currents were not observed in athkt1;1 mutant stelar cells. However, K⁺ currents in wild-type and athkt1;1 root stelar cell protoplasts were indistinguishable correlating with the Na⁺ over K⁺ selectivity of AtHKT1;1-mediated transport. Moreover, AtHKT1;1-mediated currents did not show a strong voltage dependence in vivo. Unexpectedly, removal of extracellular Na⁺ caused a reduction in AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents in Columbia root stelar cells and Xenopus oocytes, indicating a role for external Na⁺ in regulation of AtHKT1;1 activity. Shifting the NaCl gradient in root stelar cells showed a Nernstian shift in the reversal potential providing biophysical evidence for the model that AtHKT1;1 mediates passive Na⁺ channel transport properties.

  10. RESPONSE OF TWO SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L. GENOTYPES TO VA-MYCORRHIZAL INOCULATION AND PHOSPHORUS LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. CHANDRASHEKARA, V.C. PATIL

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of two sunflower genotypes (Morden and MSFH-8 with and without VA-mycorrhizal fungi at three P levels (38, 56 and 75 kg P2O5 ha-1 in vertisol of Dharwad was studied to determine the effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on plant growth, yield and P uptake. The results showed that the VAM inoculation increased sunflower yield (14%, total biomass (16%, oil content (3.1% and P uptake (30.5% over uninoculated control. The percent root colonization and chlamydo-spore count decreased with increasing P levels. The total biomass production, seed yield and P uptake of mycorrhizal plants at 38 kg P2O5 ha-1 more than the non-mycorrhizal plants at 75 kg P2O5 ha-1. The biomass and seed yield of mycorrhizal plants at same P level were more than the non-mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal plants of Morden at 38 kg P2O5 ha-1 and MSFH-8 at 56 kg P2O5 ha-1 produced higher seed yield, oil content and total biomass than non-mycorrhizal plants supplied with 75 kg P2O5 ha-1. The results indicated that, VA-mycorrhizal inoculation helps in saving 25 and 50 percent of recommended dose of phosphatic fertilizer (75 kg P2O5 ha-1 in MSFH-8 (single cross hybrid and Morden (open pollinated variety, respectively.

  11. Impact of Inorganic Arsenicals on Vegetative Growth of Two Pakistani Origins Sunflower Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif Imran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenicals impact on vegetative growth of two sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cultivars (FH-385 as Hybrid 1 and FH-405 as Hybrid 2 was monitored. Various levels of two different sodium salts of arsenic, namely, sodium arsenate (Na2HAsO4·7H2O as source of As5+ and sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 as source of As3+, were used to evaluate the effect of arsenic on plant water relation parameters. Significant stress effects were found when arsenic was higher in concentrations (>60 mg/kg soil of both salts as compared to control plants. Genotype FH-405 showed higher levels for shoot and root length, water contents, number of leaves, and leaf area, which indicates well adaptation of this cultivar in arsenic contaminated environment. T5 (100 mg/kg of both salts showed notable stressful impacts as compared to low arsenic concentrations (20, 40 mg/kg and especially control plants in case of all morphophysiological parameters of sunflower cultivars.

  12. Involvement of ethylene and gibberellin signalings in chromosaponin I-induced cell division and cell elongation in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A; Tsurumi, S; Amakawa, T; Soga, K; Hoson, T; Goto, N; Kamisaka, S

    2000-01-01

    Chromosaponin I (CSI), a triterpenoid saponin isolated from pea, stimulates the growth of roots in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings on wetted filter paper in the light for 14 d. The growth rates of roots in Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) wild-types were 0.92 and 0.26 mm d(-1), respectively, and they were accelerated to 3.46 (Col) and 2.20 (Ler) mm d(-1) by treating with 300 microM CSI. The length of mature epidermal cells was increased by 1.8-fold (Col) and 2.81-fold (Ler) compared with control and the number of epidermal cells was increased by a factor of 1.65 (Col) and 2.12 (Ler). Treatment with 2-aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, also increased cell length but not cell number. The effects of CSI on root growth were not detected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-1. CSI did not inhibit ethylene production but stimulated the growth of roots in ctr1-1, the constitutive triple response mutant for ethylene, indicating that CSI inhibits ethylene signaling, especially downstream of CTR1. In the GA-insensitive mutant gai and the mutant spy-3, in which the basal level of GA signaling is activated, CSI did not increase cell number, although both CSI and AVG stimulated cell elongation in these mutants. These results suggest that the inhibition of ethylene signaling is the cause of CSI-induced cell elongation. A possible involvement of both GA and ethylene signalings is discussed for the CSI-induced cell division.

  13. Effects of NaCl and Ca2+on Membrane Potential of Epidermal Cells of Maize Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Jia-min; WANG Xiao-li; ZHAI Fu-qin; YAN Feng; FENG Ke

    2008-01-01

    The effects of salt-stress on plants involve not only the water stress caused by low osmotic pressure,but also the toxicity of excess Na+.A large amount of Na+ entering cells would reduce K+ uptake,which leads to an imbalance of K:Na ratio in cells.One of the reasons for the reduced K+-uptake iS the closure of K+-channel which is controlled by membrane potential.Calcium is usually applied to improve the growth of plants on saline soils and shows positive influence in the integrality of cell membrane.This study applied glass microelectrode technique to monitoring the NaCl-induced changes of membrane potential of root epidermal cells of maize(Zea mays L.,Denghai 11)seedlings at NaCl concentrations of 0,8,20,50,100,200 mmol L-1,respectively.The effect of Ca2+ on the changes of membrane potential caused by NaCl Was also studied.The results showed that:NaCl caused cell membrane depolarization.The depolarization became greater and faster with increasing of NaCl concentration.Moreover,the extent of depolarization was positively correlated with NaCl concentration.The addition of calcium postponed the depolarization,and decreased the degree of depolarization caused by NaCl.High NaCl concentration leads to depolarization of maize root cell membrane,which can partly be counteracted by calcium.

  14. Subcellular localization of cadmium in the root cells of Allium cepa by electron energy loss spectroscopy and cytochemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Donghua Liu; Ingrid Kottke

    2004-09-01

    The ultrastructural investigation of the root cells of Allium cepa L. exposed to 1 mM and 10 mM cadmium (Cd) for 48 and 72 h was carried out. The results indicated that Cd induced several obvious ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolation, condensed cytoplasm with increased density of the matrix, reduction of mitochondrial cristae, severe plasmolysis and highly condensed nuclear chromatin. Electron dense granules appeared between the cell wall and plasmalemma. In vacuoles, electron dense granules encircled by the membrane were aggregated and formed into larger precipitates, which increase in number and volume as a consequence of excessive Cd exposure. Data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) confirmed that these granules contained Cd and showed that significantly higher level of Cd in vacuoles existed in the vacuolar precipitates of meristematic or cortical parenchyma cells of the differentiating and mature roots treated with 1 mM and 10 mM Cd. High levels of Cd were also observed in the crowded electron dense granules of nucleoli. However, no Cd was found in cell walls or in cells of the vascular cylinder. A positive Gomori-Swift reaction showed that small metallic silver grains were abundantly localized in the vesicles, which were distributed in the cytoplasm along the cell wall.

  15. Effects of boron foliar applications on vegetative and reproductive growth of sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, A; Blamey, F P C; Edwards, D G

    2003-10-01

    Foliar application may be used to supply boron (B) to a crop when B demands are higher than can be supplied via the soil. While B foliar sprays have been used to correct B deficiency in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in the field, no studies have determined the amount of B taken up by sunflower plant parts via foliar application. A study was conducted in which sunflower plants were grown at constant B concentration in nutrient solution with adequate B (46 micro m) or with limited B supply (0.24, 0.40 and 1.72 micro m) using Amberlite IRA-743 resin to control B supply. At the late vegetative stage of growth (25 and 35 d after transplanting), two foliar sprays were applied of soluble sodium tetraborate (20.8 % B) each at 0, 28, 65, 120 and 1200 mm (each spray equivalent to 0, 0.03, 0.07, 0.13 and 1.3 kg B ha-1 in 100 L water ha-1). The highest rate of B foliar fertilization resulted in leaf burn but had no other evident detrimental effect on plant growth. Under B-deficient conditions, B foliar application increased the vegetative and reproductive dry mass of plants. Foliar application of 28-1200 mm B increased the total dry mass of the most B-deficient plants by more than three-fold and that of plants grown initially with 1.72 micro m B in solution by 37-49 %. In this latter treatment, the dry mass of the capitulum was similar to that achieved under control conditions, but in no instance was total plant dry mass similar to that of the control. All B foliar spray rates increased the B concentration in various parts of the plant tops, including those that developed after the sprays were applied, but the B concentration in the roots was not increased by B foliar application. The B concentration in the capitulum of the plants sprayed at the highest rate was between 37 and 93 % of that in the control plants. This study showed that B foliar application was of benefit to B-deficient sunflower plants, increasing the B status of plant tops, including that of the capitulum

  16. The mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria induces chitinase activity in roots and in suspension-cultured cells of its host Picea abies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, M; Hager, A

    1989-08-01

    A cell-wall fraction of the mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria increased the chitinase activity in suspension-cultured cells of spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) which is a frequent host of Amanita muscaria in nature. Chitinase activity was also increased in roots of spruce trees upon incubation with the fungal elicitor. Non-induced levels of chitinase activity in spruce were higher in suspension cells than in roots whereas the elicitorinduced increase of chitinase activity was higher in roots. Treatment of cells with hormones (auxins and cytokinin) resulted in a severalfold depression of enzyme activity. However, the chitinase activity of hormone-treated as well as hormone-free cells showed an elicitor-induced increase. Suspension cells of spruce secreted a large amount of enzyme into the medium. It is postulated that chitinases released from the host cells in an ectomycorrhizal system partly degrade the fungal cell walls, thus possibly facilitating the exchange of metabolites between the symbionts.

  17. Functional divergence of GhCFE5 homoeologs revealed in cotton fiber and Arabidopsis root cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Fenni; Li, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Li, Nina; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-04-01

    In GhCFE5 homoeologs, GhCFE5D interacted with more actin homologs and stronger interaction activity than GhCFE5A. GhCFE5D - but not GhCFE5A -overexpression severely disrupted actin cytoskeleton organization and significantly suppressed cell elongation. Homoeologous genes are common in polyploid plants; however, their functional divergence is poorly elucidated. Allotetraploid Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, AADD) is the most widely cultivated cotton; accounting for more than 90 % of the world's cotton production. Here, we characterized GhCFE5A and GhCFE5D homoeologs from G. hirsutum acc TM-1. GhCFE5 homoeologs are expressed preferentially in fiber cells; and a significantly greater accumulation of GhCFE5A mRNA than GhCFE5D mRNA was found in all tested tissues. Overexpression of GhCFE5D but not GhCFE5A seriously inhibits the Arabidopsis hypocotyl and root cell elongation. Yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis showed that compared with GhCFE5A, GhCFE5D interacts with more actin homologs and has a stronger interaction activity both from Arabidopsis and Upland cotton. Interestingly, subcellular localization showed that GhCFE5 resides on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network and is colocalized with actin cables. The interaction activities between GhCFE5 homoeologs and actin differ in their effects on F-actin structure in transgenic Arabidopsis root cells. The F-actin changed direction from vertical to lateral, and the actin cytoskeleton organization was severely disrupted in GhCFE5D-overexpressing root cells. These data support the functional divergence of GhCFE5 homoeologs in the actin cytoskeleton structure and cell elongation, implying an important role for GhCFE5 in the evolution and selection of cotton fiber.

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity of extracts and fractions of Calotropis procera (Ait. roots against human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagat Madhulika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the antiproliferative activity of three extracts (alcoholic, hydro-aqueous and aqueous and their fractions from the root part of Calotropis procera using human oral (KB and central nervous system (SNB-78 cancer cell lines as a model system. KB and SNB-78 cells were cultured in the presence of extracts and fractions at various concentrations (10, 30 and100 µg/ml for 48 h, and the percentage of cell viability was evaluated by the sulforhodamine-B (SRB assay. Our result indicates that out of the three extracts of C. procera (root, alcoholic extract had shown greater potential for growth inhibition followed by hydro-aqueous extract at three different concentration of 10 µg/ml, 30 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml in a dose-dependent manner, whereas aqueous extract was found to be least active against both oral and CNS human cancer lines. On evaluation of the fractions prepared from alcoholic and hydro-aqueous extracts, it was observed that chloroform fraction from alcoholic extract was antiproliferative for oral (KB cancer cell line and n-butanol fraction from alcoholic extract was antiproliferative for CNS cancer cell line than remaining fractions at three different concentration of 10 µg/ml, 30 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, our result indicates that the root part of C. procera possess in vitro cytotoxicity against oral and CNS human cancer cell lines. Further investigations are required to obtain the clinically important lead molecules for the drug development.

  19. Physiological and gene expression responses of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants differ according to irrigation placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Ana; Capote, Nieves; Romero, Fernando; Dodd, Ian C; Colmenero-Flores, José M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on plant physiology and gene expression in roots and leaves, three treatments were implemented in sunflower plants growing with roots split between two compartments: a control (C) treatment supplying 100% of plant evapotranspiration, and two treatments receiving 50% of plant evapotranspiration, either evenly distributed to both compartments (deficit irrigation - DI) or unevenly distributed to ensure distinct wet and dry compartments (partial rootzone drying - PRD). Plants receiving the same amount of water responded differently under the two irrigation systems. After 3 days, evapotranspiration was similar in C and DI, but 20% less in PRD, concomitant with decreased leaf water potential (Ψleaf) and increased leaf xylem ABA concentration. Six water-stress responsive genes were highly induced in roots growing in the drying soil compartment of PRD plants, and their expression was best correlated with local soil water content. On the other hand, foliar gene expression differed significantly from that of the root and correlated better with xylem ABA concentration and Ψleaf. While the PRD irrigation strategy triggered stronger physiological and molecular responses, suggesting a more intense and systemic stress reaction due to local dehydration of the dry compartment of PRD plants, the DI strategy resulted in similar water savings without strongly inducing these responses. Correlating physiological and molecular responses in PRD/DI plants may provide insights into the severity and location of water deficits and may enable a better understanding of long-distance signalling mechanisms.

  20. Gene expression of δ1- and δ3- cyclins in root meristem cells of Pisum sativum L. under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga A.

    2005-08-01

    The data on the influence of altered gravity on plant cell proliferation are ambiguity [1, 3], although a delay of the cell cycle duration in comparison with the control was observed in the most cases. Evidently, the principal regulatory processes in a cell cycle occur in the G1-phase. Cyclins are important regulators in different phases of a cell cycle and have a high homology in plant and mammalian cells. δ-cyclins are specific for plants and control the presynthetic phase events and beginning of S-phase. Therefore, we firstly performed the study the influence of slow horizontal clinorotation on δ3- and δ1-cyclins genes expression in early events of pea root development.

  1. Sunflower Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution with Lead (II Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Opatrilova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the influence of lead (II ions on sunflower growth and biochemistry was investigated from various points of view. Sunflower plants were treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 and/or 500 µM Pb-EDTA for eight days. We observed alterations in growth in all experimental groups compared with non-treated control plants. Further we determined total content of proteins by a Bradford protein assay. By the eighth day of the experiment, total protein contents in all treated plants were much lower compared to control. Particularly noticeable was the loss of approx. 8 µg/mL or 15 µg/mL in shoots or roots of plants treated with 100 mM Pb-EDTA. We also focused our attention on the activity of alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST and urease. Activity of the enzymes increased with increasing length of the treatment and applied concentration of lead (II ions. This increase corresponds well with a higher metabolic activity of treated plants. Contents of cysteine, reduced glutathione (GSH, oxidized glutathione (GSSG and phytochelatin 2 (PC2 were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Cysteine content declined in roots of plants with the increasing time of treatment of plants with Pb-EDTA and the concentration of toxic substance. Moreover, we observed ten times higher content of cysteine in roots in comparison with shoots. The observed reduction of cysteine content probably relates with its utilization for biosynthesis of GSH and phytochelatins, because the content of GSH and PC2 was similar in roots and shoots and increased with increased treatment time and concentration of Pb-EDTA. Moreover, we observed oxidative stress caused by Pb-EDTA in roots where the GSSG/GSH ratio was about 0.66. In shoots, the oxidative stress was less distinctive, with a GSSG/GSH ratio 0.14. We also estimated the rate of phytochelatin biosynthesis from the slope of linear equations plotted with data measured in the

  2. Sunflower Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution with Lead (II) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Shestivska, Violetta; Galiova, Michaela; Novotny, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef; Zehnalek, Josef; Babula, Petr; Opatrilova, Radka; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the influence of lead (II) ions on sunflower growth and biochemistry was investigated from various points of view. Sunflower plants were treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 and/or 500 μM Pb-EDTA for eight days. We observed alterations in growth in all experimental groups compared with non-treated control plants. Further we determined total content of proteins by a Bradford protein assay. By the eighth day of the experiment, total protein contents in all treated plants were much lower compared to control. Particularly noticeable was the loss of approx. 8 μg/mL or 15 μg/mL in shoots or roots of plants treated with 100 mM Pb-EDTA. We also focused our attention on the activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and urease. Activity of the enzymes increased with increasing length of the treatment and applied concentration of lead (II) ions. This increase corresponds well with a higher metabolic activity of treated plants. Contents of cysteine, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and phytochelatin 2 (PC2) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Cysteine content declined in roots of plants with the increasing time of treatment of plants with Pb-EDTA and the concentration of toxic substance. Moreover, we observed ten times higher content of cysteine in roots in comparison with shoots. The observed reduction of cysteine content probably relates with its utilization for biosynthesis of GSH and phytochelatins, because the content of GSH and PC2 was similar in roots and shoots and increased with increased treatment time and concentration of Pb-EDTA. Moreover, we observed oxidative stress caused by Pb-EDTA in roots where the GSSG/GSH ratio was about 0.66. In shoots, the oxidative stress was less distinctive, with a GSSG/GSH ratio 0.14. We also estimated the rate of phytochelatin biosynthesis from the slope of linear equations plotted with data measured in the particular

  3. Sunflower Plants as Bioindicators of Environmental Pollution with Lead (II) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Shestivska, Violetta; Galiova, Michaela; Novotny, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef; Zehnalek, Josef; Babula, Petr; Opatrilova, Radka; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the influence of lead (II) ions on sunflower growth and biochemistry was investigated from various points of view. Sunflower plants were treated with 0, 10, 50, 100 and/or 500 μM Pb-EDTA for eight days. We observed alterations in growth in all experimental groups compared with non-treated control plants. Further we determined total content of proteins by a Bradford protein assay. By the eighth day of the experiment, total protein contents in all treated plants were much lower compared to control. Particularly noticeable was the loss of approx. 8 μg/mL or 15 μg/mL in shoots or roots of plants treated with 100 mM Pb-EDTA. We also focused our attention on the activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and urease. Activity of the enzymes increased with increasing length of the treatment and applied concentration of lead (II) ions. This increase corresponds well with a higher metabolic activity of treated plants. Contents of cysteine, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and phytochelatin 2 (PC2) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Cysteine content declined in roots of plants with the increasing time of treatment of plants with Pb-EDTA and the concentration of toxic substance. Moreover, we observed ten times higher content of cysteine in roots in comparison with shoots. The observed reduction of cysteine content probably relates with its utilization for biosynthesis of GSH and phytochelatins, because the content of GSH and PC2 was similar in roots and shoots and increased with increased treatment time and concentration of Pb-EDTA. Moreover, we observed oxidative stress caused by Pb-EDTA in roots where the GSSG/GSH ratio was about 0.66. In shoots, the oxidative stress was less distinctive, with a GSSG/GSH ratio 0.14. We also estimated the rate of phytochelatin biosynthesis from the slope of linear equations plotted with data measured in the particular

  4. Diversity and function of the microbial community on anodes of sediment microbial fuel cells fueled by root exudates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabezas da Rosa, Angela

    2010-11-26

    Anode microbial communities are essential for current production in microbial fuel cells. Anode reducing bacteria are capable of using the anode as final electron acceptor in their respiratory chain. The electrons delivered to the anode travel through a circuit to the cathode where they reduce oxygen to water generating an electric current. A novel type of sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) harvest energy from photosynthetically derived compounds released through the roots. Nothing is known about anode microbial communities of this type of microbial fuel cell. This work consists of three parts. The first part focuses on the study of bacterial and archaeal community compositions on anodes of SMFCs fueled by rice root exudates. By using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), a profiling technique, and cloning / sequencing of 16S rRNA, we determined that the support type used for the plant (vermiculite, potting soil or rice field soil) is an important factor determining the composition of the microbial community. Finally, by comparing microbial communities of current producing anodes and non-current producing controls we determined that Desulfobulbus- and Geobacter-related populations were probably most important for current production in potting soil and rice field soil SMFCs, respectively. However, {delta}-proteobacterial Anaeromyxobacter spp., unclassified {delta}-proteobacteria and Anaerolineae were also part of the anode biofilm in rice field soil SMFCs and these populations might also play a role in current production. Moreover, distinct clusters of Geobacter and Anaeromyxobacter populations were stimulated by rice root exudates. Regarding Archaea, uncultured Euryarchaea were abundant on anodes of potting soil SMFCs indicating a potential role in current production. In both, rice field soil and potting soil SMFCs, a decrease of Methanosaeta, an acetotrophic methanogen, was detected on current producing anodes. In the second part we focused

  5. Effects of lead on the morphology and structure of the nucleolus in the root tip meristematic cells of Allium cepa L

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiang, Ze; Zhang, Huaning; Qin, Rong; Zou, Jinhua; Wang, Junran; Shi, Qiuyue; Jiang, Wusheng; Liu, Donghua

    2014-01-01

    To study the toxic mechanisms of lead (Pb) in plants, the effects of Pb on the morphology and structure of the nucleolus in root tip meristematic cells of Allium cepa var. agrogarum L. were investigated...

  6. Antioxidant Properties of Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae) Roots Extract and Protective Effects on Astroglial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Agata; Bonfanti, Roberta; Raciti, Giuseppina; Amodeo, Andrea; Mastrojeni, Silvana; Ragusa, Salvatore; Iauk, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae) is a bushy-spiny shrub common on Mount Etna (Sicily). We demonstrated that the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl contains prevalently berberine and berbamine, possesses antimicrobial properties, and was able to counteract the upregulation evoked by glutamate of tissue transglutaminase in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. Until now, there are no reports regarding antioxidant properties of B. aetnensis C. Presl collected in Sicily. Air-dried, powdered roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl were extracted, identified, and quantified by HPLC. We assessed in cellular free system its effect on superoxide anion, radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants against free radicals like the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, and the inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity. In primary rat astroglial cell cultures, exposed to glutamate, we evaluated the effect of the extract on glutathione levels and on intracellular production of reactive oxygen species generated by glutamate. The alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis C. Presl inhibited superoxide anion, restored to control values, the decrease of GSH levels, and the production of reactive oxygen species. Potent antioxidant activities of the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl may be one of the mechanisms by which the extract is effective against health disorders associated to oxidative stress. PMID:25177720

  7. Antioxidant Properties of Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae Roots Extract and Protective Effects on Astroglial Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Campisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aetnensis C. Presl (Berberidaceae is a bushy-spiny shrub common on Mount Etna (Sicily. We demonstrated that the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl contains prevalently berberine and berbamine, possesses antimicrobial properties, and was able to counteract the upregulation evoked by glutamate of tissue transglutaminase in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. Until now, there are no reports regarding antioxidant properties of B. aetnensis C. Presl collected in Sicily. Air-dried, powdered roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl were extracted, identified, and quantified by HPLC. We assessed in cellular free system its effect on superoxide anion, radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants against free radicals like the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, and the inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity. In primary rat astroglial cell cultures, exposed to glutamate, we evaluated the effect of the extract on glutathione levels and on intracellular production of reactive oxygen species generated by glutamate. The alkaloid extract of B. aetnensis C. Presl inhibited superoxide anion, restored to control values, the decrease of GSH levels, and the production of reactive oxygen species. Potent antioxidant activities of the alkaloid extract of roots of B. aetnensis C. Presl may be one of the mechanisms by which the extract is effective against health disorders associated to oxidative stress.

  8. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan.

  9. AtGRIP protein locates to the secretory vesicles of trans Golgi-network in Arabidopsis root cap cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; ZHANG Wei; ZHAO Lei; LI Yan

    2008-01-01

    GRIP domain proteins, locating to the trans-Golgi network, are thought to play an essential role in Golgi apparatus trafficking in yeast and animal cells. In the present study, AtGRIP cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR from RNA isolated from Arabidopsis seedling. The GST fusion protein of AtGRIP was affinity-purified and its rabbit polyclonal antibody was obtained. Immuno-blotting with the purified anti-AtGRIP polyclonal antibody demonstrated that the molecular mass of AtGRIP protein is about 92 kD, and its expression is not tissue-specific in Arabidopsis. Immunoflourescent labeling and confocal microscopy revealed that the AtGRIP protein was co-localized with Golgi stacks in Arabidop-sis root cells. Immuno-gold labeling and electron microscopy observation showed that AtGRIP protein was mainly located to the membrane of the secretory vesicles of trans-Golgi network in Arabidopsis root cap cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the localization of GRIP domain proteins be-tween plants and animal cells are conserved. These results also suggest that the AtGRIP may be in-volved in regulating the formation or sorting of Golgi-associated vesicles in plant cells.

  10. Disease Tolerance in Helianthus petiolaris: A Genetic Resource for Sunflower Breeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutierrez, Agustina; Cantamutto, Miguel; Poverene, Monica

    2012-01-01

    .... Controlled crosses of this species with sunflower demonstrated that H. petiolaris constitutes a valuable genetic variability source for sunflower breeding to improve tolerance to rust (Puccinia helianthi), white rust (Albugo tragopogonis...

  11. PIN2 turnover in Arabidopsis root epidermal cells explored by the photoconvertible protein Dendra2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jásik, Ján; Boggetti, Barbara; Baluška, František; Volkmann, Dieter; Gensch, Thomas; Rutten, Twan; Altmann, Thomas; Schmelzer, Elmon

    2013-01-01

    The steady state level of integral membrane proteins is dependent on a strictly controlled delivery and removal. Here we show that Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein, is a suitable tool to study protein turnover in plants. We characterized the fluorescence properties of Dendra2 expressed either as a free protein or as a tag in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and optimized photoconversion settings to study protein turnover. Dendra2 was fused to the PIN2 protein, an auxin transporter in the root tip, and by time-lapse imaging and assessment of red and green signal intensities in the membrane after photoconversion we quantified directly and simultaneously the rate of PIN2 delivery of the newly synthesized protein into the plasma membrane as well as the disappearance of the protein from the plasma membrane due to degradation. Additionally we have verified several factors which are expected to affect PIN2 protein turnover and therefore potentially regulate root growth.

  12. The Organization Pattern of Root Border-Like Cells of Arabidopsis Is Dependent on Cell Wall Homogalacturonan12[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Follet-Gueye, Marie Laure; Duponchel, Ludovic; Moreau, Myriam; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine

    2009-01-01

    Border-like cells are released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root tips as organized layers of several cells that remain attached to each other rather than completely detached from each other, as is usually observed in border cells of many species. Unlike border cells, cell attachment between border-like cells is maintained after their release into the external environment. To investigate the role of cell wall polysaccharides in the attachment and organization of border-like cells, we have examined their release in several well-characterized mutants defective in the biosynthesis of xyloglucan, cellulose, or pectin. Our data show that among all mutants examined, only quasimodo mutants (qua1-1 and qua2-1), which have been characterized as producing less homogalacturonan, had an altered border-like cell phenotype as compared with the wild type. Border-like cells in both lines were released as isolated cells separated from each other, with the phenotype being much more pronounced in qua1-1 than in qua2-1. Further analysis of border-like cells in the qua1-1 mutant using immunocytochemistry and a set of anti-cell wall polysaccharide antibodies showed that the loss of the wild-type phenotype was accompanied by (1) a reduction in homogalacturonan-JIM5 epitope in the cell wall of border-like cells, confirmed by Fourier transform infrared microspectrometry, and (2) the secretion of an abundant mucilage that is enriched in xylogalacturonan and arabinogalactan-protein epitopes, in which the cells are trapped in the vicinity of the root tip. PMID:19448034

  13. Effect of coumarin and xanthotoxin on mitochondrial structure, oxygen uptake, and succinate dehydrogenase activity in onion root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupidlowska, E; Dobrzynska, K; Parys, E; Zobel, A M

    1994-10-01

    At concentrations in which they occur on the plant surface and retard mitosis, coumarin and xanthotoxin lowered uptake of oxygen (by 60 and 30%, respectively) by meristematic cells ofAllium cepa root tips. They caused changes in the structure of the mitochondrial matrix to become dense, and protrusions of mitochondrial membranes were visible parallelling their hypertrophy, indicating alteration in the structure and physiology of these organelles. Coumarin and, to a lesser extent, xanthotoxin increased succinate dehydrogenase production in mitochondria and also in the cytoplasm, indicating changes in membrane permeability. Changes in oxygen uptake and mitochondrial structure, in addition to the retardation of mitosis, may be the reason these compounds act as allelochemicals after they have been removed from the plant surface and reach the root meristem.

  14. Adaptive expression of host cell w