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Sample records for sun-like stars kic

  1. Asteroseismology from multi-month Kepler photometry: the evolved Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 and KIC 10920273

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.L. Campante; R. Handberg; S. Mathur; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; W.J. Chaplin; B. Mosser; O. Benomar; A. Bonanno; E. Corsaro; S.T. Fletcher; P. Gaulme; S. Hekker; C. Karoff; D. Salabert; G.A. Verner; T.R. White; G. Houdek; I.M. Brandao; O.L. Creevey; G. Dogan; M. Bazot; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; M.S. Cunha; Y. Elsworth; D. Huber; H. Kjeldsen; M. Lundkvist; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; D. Stello; B.D. Clarke; F.R. Girouard; J.R. Hall; R.A. Garcia; C. Regulo

    2011-01-01

    Context. The evolved main-sequence Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 (F-type) and KIC 10920273 (G-type) were observed with the NASA Kepler satellite for approximately ten months with a duty cycle in excess of 90%. Such continuous and long observations are unprecedented for solar-type stars other than the

  2. A Precise Asteroseismic Age and Radius for the Evolved Sun-like Star KIC 11026764

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.; Monteiro, Mario J.P.F.G.; Thompson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously. We determine both the radius and the age of KIC 11026764 with a precision near 1%, and an accuracy near 2% for the radius and 15% for the age. Continued observations of this star promise to reveal additional oscillation...

  3. Are the majority of Sun-like stars single?

    CERN Document Server

    Whitworth, A P

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that, in the field, $\\sim\\!\\!56\\%$ of Sun-like stars ($0.8\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\lesssim M_\\star\\lesssim 1.2\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$) are single. We argue here that this suggestion may be incorrect, since it appears to be based on the multiplicity frequency of systems with Sun-like primaries, and therefore takes no account of Sun-like stars that are secondary (or higher-order) components in multiple systems. When these components are included in the reckoning, it seems likely that only $\\sim\\!46\\%$ of Sun-like stars are single. This estimate is based on a model in which the system mass function has the form proposed by Chabrier, with a power-law Salpeter extension to high masses; there is a flat distribution of mass ratios; and the probability that a system of mass $M$ is a binary is $\\,0.50 + 0.46\\log_{_{10}}\\!\\left(M/{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\right)\\,$ for $\\,0.08\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\leq M\\leq 12.5\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$, $\\,0\\,$ for $\\,M12.5\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$. The constants in this last relation ar...

  4. Challenges for asteroseismic analysis of Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Appourchaux, T; Elsworth, Y; New, R; Toutain, T

    2008-01-01

    Asteroseismology of Sun-like stars is undergoing rapid expansion with, for example, new data from the CoRoT mission and continuation of ground-based campaigns. There is also the exciting upcoming prospect of NASA's Kepler mission, which will allow the asteroseismic study of several hundred Sun-like targets, in some cases for periods lasting up to a few years. The seismic mode parameters are the input data needed for making inference on stars and their internal structures. In this paper we discuss the ease with which it will be possible to extract estimates of individual mode parameters, dependent on the mass, age, and visual brightness of the star. Our results are generally applicable; however, we look at mode detectability in the context of the upcoming Kepler observations. To inform our discussions we make predictions of various seismic parameters. To do this we use simple empirical scaling relations and detailed pulsation computations of the stochastic excitation and damping characteristics of the Sun-like...

  5. Superflares on the slowly rotating solar-type stars KIC10524994 and KIC07133671?

    CERN Document Server

    Kitze, M; Hambaryan, V; Ginski, C

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the G-type stellar population with Kepler (as done by Maehara et al.) shows that less than 1 per cent of those stars show superflares. Due to the large pixel scale of Kepler ($\\sim4 arcsec \\: px^{-1}$), it is still not clear whether the detected superflares really occur on the G-type stars. Knowing the origin of such large brightenings is important to study their frequency statistics, which are uncertain due to the low number of sun-like stars ($T_{eff} = 5600-6000 \\:K$ and $P_{rot} > 10 \\:d$) which are currently considered to exhibit superflares. We present a complete Kepler data analysis of the sun-like stars KIC10524994 and KIC07133671 (the only two stars within this subsample of solar twins with flare energies larger than $10^{35}$ erg; Maehara et al.), regarding superflare properties and a study about their origin. We could detect four new superflares within the epoch Maehara et al. investigated and found 14 superflares in the remaining light curve for KIC10524994. Astrometric Kepler ...

  6. High-energy irradiances of Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Ribas, Ignasi

    2015-07-01

    Research on exoplanetary atmospheres has developed an increasing interest. Astrobiology has put its eyes on the effects that stellar irradiance may have on the atmosphere of planets, and on the early development of life. The high energy (XUV and UV) part of the spectrum is of special interest for this purpose. Part of this spectral range, the EUV is of no access to current telescopes, hampering the studies that intend to model planetary atmospheres. A program was developed to to circumvent this problem, and to provide with spectral energy distributions of stars hosting exoplanets (X-exoplanets) in the XUV range. We present here a work in which we develop further this program to create a semiempirical grid of models of emission of Sun-like stars, based on real data and coronal models, covering the XUV and UV ranges. These models will represent a great improvement with respect to currently used models of the solar irradiance at different ages, and intend to be the reference for the years to come. These models will be of special interest to reproduce the conditions of the Earth and solar system planets during different stages of the evolution, and can be safely exported to exoplanets orbiting Sun-like stars.

  7. Superflares on Sun-Like Stars: Bane of Habitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T.

    2014-04-01

    A key aspect of planetary habitability is the existence of rare, but catastrophic events. One Earthly example is the attribution of several geological mass extinctions to asteroid collisions. Indeed, the Late Heavy Bombardment, during which the 600 Myr old Earth was pummeled persistently by impactors over a period of perhaps a hundred Myr, likely significantly delayed the permanent foothold of life on our planet. Another, less well known, example is the proposed existence of "superflares" on Sun-like stars. Although the quantity of energy in a superflare is negligible compared with the time-integrated X-ray dose from the quiescent multi-MK corona, the quality of the radiation (i.e., composition dominated by gamma rays) released from the transient, but extreme, outburst is what could be of concern to the survival of primitive lifeforms struggling for existence on a semi-habitable world. However, existing reports of superflares mainly involve interpretations of historical materials, such as long-term astronomical plate collections; there are very few concrete examples of such events observed by modern techniques at the most relevant wavelengths, namely ultraviolet or X-rays. The lack of good examples is mostly because these rare events are, well, rare. However, a recent HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph program to record the ultraviolet spectrum of young (~50 Myr) solar analog EK Draconis, fortuitously captured a giant, hour-long FUV transient, in hot lines like the C IV 155 nm doublet (T~100,000 K), and very toasty Fe XXI 124 nm coronal forbidden line (~10 MK). If translated into the equivalent GOES 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray fluence, the event would correspond to an X25000-class flare (most extreme observed on the Sun might reach as high as a mere X50). The EK Dra giant flare, as viewed with the excellent wavelength resolution, broad coverage, and high sensitivity of COS, provides the opportunity to deduce properties of such events to help inform possible impacts on planetary

  8. The Colorful Demise of a Sun-like Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the colorful 'last hurrah' of a star like our Sun. The star is ending its life by casting off its outer layers of gas, which formed a cocoon around the star's remaining core. Ultraviolet light from the dying star makes the material glow. The burned-out star, called a white dwarf, is the white dot in the center. Our Sun will eventually burn out and shroud itself with stellar debris, but not for another 5 billion years. Our Milky Way Galaxy is littered with these stellar relics, called planetary nebulae. The objects have nothing to do with planets. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century astronomers named them planetary nebulae because through small telescopes they resembled the disks of the distant planets Uranus and Neptune. The planetary nebula in this image is called NGC 2440. The white dwarf at the center of NGC 2440 is one of the hottest known, with a surface temperature of nearly 400,000 degrees Fahrenheit (200,000 degrees Celsius). The nebula's chaotic structure suggests that the star shed its mass episodically. During each outburst, the star expelled material in a different direction. This can be seen in the two bow tie-shaped lobes. The nebula also is rich in clouds of dust, some of which form long, dark streaks pointing away from the star. NGC 2440 lies about 4,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Puppis. The image was taken Feb. 6, 2007 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The colors correspond to material expelled by the star. Blue corresponds to helium; blue-green to oxygen; and red to nitrogen and hydrogen.

  9. Detection of Planetary Transits Across a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonneau, D; Latham, D W; Mayor, M; Charbonneau, David; Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Mayor, Michel

    1999-01-01

    We report high precision, high cadence photometric measurements of the star HD 209458, which is known from radial velocity measurements to have a planetary mass companion in a close orbit. We detect two separate transit events at times that are consistent with the radial velocity measurements. In both cases, the detailed shape of the transit curve due to both the limb darkening of the star and the finite size of the planet is clearly evident. Assuming stellar parameters of 1.1 R_Sun and 1.1 M_Sun, we find that the data are best interpreted as a gas giant with a radius of 1.27 +/- 0.02 R_Jup in an orbit with an inclination of 87.1 +/- 0.2 degrees. We present values for the planetary surface gravity, escape velocity, and average density, and discuss the numerous observations that are warranted now that a planet is known to transit the disk of its parent star.

  10. Seismic constraints on rotation of Sun-like star and mass of exoplanet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizon, Laurent; Ballot, Jérome; Michel, Eric; Stahn, Thorsten; Vauclair, Gérard; Bruntt, Hans; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Benomar, Othman; Vauclair, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Auvergne, Michel; Baglin, Annie; Barban, Caroline; Baudin, Fréderic; Bazot, Michaël; Campante, Tiago; Catala, Claude; Chaplin, William; Creevey, Orlagh; Deheuvels, Sébastien; Dolez, Noël; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael; Gaulme, Patrick; Mathis, Stéphane; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoît; Régulo, Clara; Roxburgh, Ian; Salabert, David; Samadi, Réza; Sato, Kumiko; Verner, Graham; Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2013-08-13

    Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85(-0.42)(+0.52)M(Jupiter), which implies that it is a planet, not a brown dwarf.

  11. Seismic constraints on rotation of Sun-like star and mass of exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; Michel, Eric; Stahn, Thorsten; Vauclair, Gérard; Bruntt, Hans; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Benomar, Othman; Vauclair, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Auvergne, Michel; Baglin, Annie; Barban, Caroline; Baudin, Fréderic; Bazot, Michaël; Campante, Tiago; Catala, Claude; Chaplin, William; Creevey, Orlagh; Deheuvels, Sébastien; Dolez, Noël; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael; Gaulme, Patrick; Mathis, Stéphane; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoît; Régulo, Clara; Roxburgh, Ian; Salabert, David; Samadi, Réza; Sato, Kumiko; Verner, Graham; Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2013-01-01

    Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85 (+0.52,-0.42) M...

  12. Gravitational Waves from Stellar Black Hole Binaries and the Impact on Nearby Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the impact of resonant gravitational waves on quadrupole acoustic modes of Sun-like stars located nearby stellar black hole binary systems (such as GW150914 and GW151226). We find that the stimulation of the low-overtone modes by gravitational radiation can lead to sizeable photometric amplitude variations, much larger than the predictions for amplitudes driven by turbulent convection, which in turn are consistent with the photometric amplitudes observed in most Sun-like stars. For accurate stellar evolution models, using up-to-date stellar physics, we predict photometric amplitude variations of 1-103 ppm for a solar mass star located at a distance between 1 au and 10 au from the black hole binary and belonging to the same multi-star system. The observation of such a phenomenon will be within the reach of the Plato mission because the telescope will observe several portions of the Milky Way, many of which are regions of high stellar density with a substantial mixed population of Sun-like stars and black hole binaries.

  13. KIC 2856960: the impossible triple star

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, T R; Carter, P J

    2014-01-01

    KIC 2856960 is a star in the Kepler field which was observed by Kepler for 4 years. It shows the primary and secondary eclipses of a close binary of 0.258d as well as complex dipping events that last for about 1.5d at a time and recur on a 204d period. The dips are thought to result when the close binary passes across the face of a third star. In this paper we present an attempt to model the dips. Despite the apparent simplicity of the system and strenuous efforts to find a solution, we find that we cannot match the dips with a triple star while satisfying Kepler's laws. The problem is that to match the dips the separation of the close binary has to be larger than possible relative to the outer orbit given the orbital periods. Quadruple star models can get round this problem but require the addition of a so-far undetected intermediate period of order 5 -- 20d that has be a near-perfect integer divisor of the outer 204d period. Although we have no good explanation for KIC 2856960, using the full set of Kepler ...

  14. Planet signatures in the chemical composition of Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    There are two possible mechanisms to imprint planet signatures in the chemical composition of Sun-like stars: i) dust condensation at the early stages of planet formation, causing a depletion of refractory elements in the gas accreted by the star in the late stages of its formation; ii) planet engulfment, enriching the host star in lithium and refractory elements. We discuss both planet signatures, the influence of galactic chemical evolution, and the importance of binaries composed of stellar twins as laboratories to verify abundance anomalies imprinted by planets.

  15. Two sun-like superflare stars rotating as slow as the Sun*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Daisaku; Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-04-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two "superflare stars," KIC 9766237 and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have recently been discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 d on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have rotation periods of 21.8 d and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairly high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not detect any hint of binarity in our spectra, although more data are needed to firmly rule out the presence of an unseen low-mass companion. These results claim that the spectroscopic properties of these superflare stars are very close to those of the Sun, and support the hypothesis that the Sun might cause a superflare.

  16. New Suns in the Cosmos II: Differential rotation in $Kepler$ Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chagas, M L Das; Costa, A D; Lopes, C E Ferreira; Sobrinho, R Silva; Paz-Chinchón, F; Leão, I C; Valio, A; de Freitas, D B; Martins, B L Canto; Lanza, A F; De Medeiros, J R

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with $T_{\\rm eff}$, $\\log g$ and rotation periods $P_{rot}$ similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation. An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the $Kepler$ space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of differential rotation; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period $P$, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the differential rotation.

  17. New Suns in the Cosmos II: differential rotation in Kepler Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Chagas, M. L.; Bravo, J. P.; Costa, A. D.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Silva Sobrinho, R.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Leão, I. C.; Valio, A.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Lanza, A. F.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with Teff, log g and rotation periods Prot similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation (DR). An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the Kepler space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of DR; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period P, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the DR.

  18. Two Sun-like Superflare Stars Rotating as Slow as the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nogami, Daisaku; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two `superflare stars', KIC 9766237, and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have been recently discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 days on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have a rotation period of 21.8 d, and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairy high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not det...

  19. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  20. Rotation period distribution of CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, I. C.; Pasquini, L.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Neves, V.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; de Oliveira, L. L. A.; Freire da Silva, D.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Baglin, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. For this purpose, we identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases specifically for a comparison with the solar Prot. Methods: Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs, which were combined with public data of physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the location of the Sun in the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram. Publicly available theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation, which strongly depends on A. Results: The synthetic samples explain the observed Prot distributions of Sun-like stars as having two main populations: one of young objects (group I, with ages younger than ~1 Gyr) and another of main-sequence and evolved stars (group II, with ages older than ~1 Gyr). The proportions of groups I and II in relation to the total number of stars range within 64-84% and 16-36%, respectively. Hence, young objects abound in the distributions, producing the effect of observing a high number of short periods around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Differences in the Prot distributions between the CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like samples may be associated with different Galactic populations. Overall, the synthetic distribution around the solar period agrees with observations, which suggests that the solar rotation is normal with respect to Sun-like

  1. Catastrophic rotational braking among Sun-like stars. A model of the Sun's rotation evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoin, P.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Observations of young open clusters show a bimodal distribution of stellar rotation. In those clusters, Sun-like stars group into two main populations of fast and slow rotators. Beyond an age of approximately 600 Myr, the two populations converge towards a single sequence of slow rotators. Aims: The present study addresses the origin of this bimodal distribution and the cause of its observed evolution. Methods: New prescriptions of mass-loss rate and Alfven radius dependences on Rossby number suggested by observations are implemented in a phenomenological model of angular-momentum loss and redistribution. The obtained model is used to calculate the time evolution of a rotation-period distribution of solar-mass stars similar to that observed in the 5 Myr-old NGC 2362 open cluster. The simulated distributions at subsequent ages are compared with those of h Per, the Pleiades, M 50, M 35, and M 37. Results: The model is able to reproduce the appearance and disappearance of a bimodal rotation-period distribution in open clusters providing that a brief episode of large-angular-momentum loss is included in the early evolution of Sun-like stars. Conclusions: I argue that a transitory episode of large-angular-momentum loss occurs on Sun-like stars with Rossby numbers between 0.13 and 0.3. This phenomenon of enhanced magnetic braking by stellar wind would be mainly driven by a rapid increase of mass loss at a critical rotation rate. This scenario accounts for the bimodal distribution of stellar rotation in open clusters with ages between 20-30 Myr and approximately 600 Myr. The mass-loss rate increase could account for a significant fraction of the X-ray luminosity decay of Sun-like stars in the 0.13-0.3 Rossby number range where a transition from the saturated to the non-saturated regime of X-ray emission is observed. Observed correlations between Li abundance and rotation sequences in the Pleiades and M 34 clusters support this scenario.

  2. Solar like oscillations in the stars KIC 5390438 and KIC 5701829 observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Fox-Machado, L

    2012-01-01

    The preliminary results of an analysis of the KIC 5390438 and KIC 5629080 light curves are presented. The variations of these stars were detected by Baran et al. (2011a) in a search for pulsating M dwarfs in the Kepler public database. In particular, the objects have been observed by the Kepler spacecraft during theQ2 and Q3 runs in a short-candence mode (integration time of $\\sim$ 1 min). A Fourier analysis of the time series data has been performed by using the PERIOD04 package. The resulting power spectrum of each star shows a clear excess of power in the frequency range 100 and 350 $\\mu$Hz with a sequence of spaced peaks typical of solar-like oscillations. A rough estimation of the large and small separations has been obtained. Spectroscopic observations secured at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro M\\'artir allowed us to derive a spectral classification olar like oscillations in the stars KIC 5390438 and KIC 5701829 observed by Kepler Thus, KIC 5390438 and KIC 5701829 have been identified...

  3. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size (1-2 Earth-radii) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (within a factor of four). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that $11\\pm4%$ of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to $\\sim200$ d. Extrapolating, one finds $5.7^{+1.7}_{-2.2}%$ of Sun-like s...

  4. Magnetic fields on young, moderately rotating Sun-like stars II. EK Draconis (HD 129333)

    CERN Document Server

    Waite, Ian; Carter, Brad; Petit, Pascal; Jeffers, Sandra; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline; Donati, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic fields, activity and dynamos of young solar-type stars can be empirically studied using time-series of spectropolarimetric observations and tomographic imaging techniques such as Doppler imaging and Zeeman Doppler imaging. In this paper we use these techniques to study the young Sun-like star EK Draconis (Sp-Type: G1.5V, HD 129333) using ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and NARVAL at the T\\`elescope Bernard Lyot. This multi-epoch study runs from late 2006 until early 2012. We measure high levels of chromospheric activity indicating an active, and varying, chromosphere. Surface brightness features were constructed for all available epochs. The 2006/7 and 2008 data show large spot features appearing at intermediate-latitudes. However, the 2012 data indicate a distinctive polar spot. We observe a strong, almost unipolar, azimuthal field during all epochs that is similar to that observed on other Sun-like stars. Using magnetic features, we determined an average equatorial rotational vel...

  5. Interactions between brown-dwarf binaries and Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, M; Whitworth, A P

    2012-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs, but there is as yet no consensus as to which -- if any -- are operative in nature. Any theory of brown dwarf formation must explain the observed statistics of brown dwarfs. These statistics are limited by selection effects, but they are becoming increasingly discriminating. In particular, it appears (a) that brown dwarfs that are secondaries to Sun-like stars tend to be on wide orbits, $a\\ga 100\\,{\\rm AU}$ (the Brown Dwarf Desert), and (b) that these brown dwarfs have a significantly higher chance of being in a close ($a\\la 10\\,{\\rm AU}$) binary system with another brown dwarf than do brown dwarfs in the field. This then raises the issue of whether these brown dwarfs have formed {\\it in situ}, i.e. by fragmentation of a circumstellar disc; or have formed elsewhere and subsequently been captured. We present numerical simulations of the purely gravitational interaction between a close brown-dwarf binary and a Sun-like star. These simulatio...

  6. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-04-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using optical spectra taken by the California Planet Search. I found a large range in the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen in this sample, including a handful of carbon-rich stars. I also developed a new technique called SpecMatch for extracting fundamental stellar parameters from optical spectra. SpecMatch is particularly applicable to the relatively faint planet-hosting stars discovered by Kepler.

  7. HAT-P-55b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Juncher, D; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Bieryla, A; Kovács, T; Boisse, I; Latham, D W; Kovács, G; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; Penev, K; de Val-Borro, M; Falco, E; Torres, G; Noyes, R W; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new transiting extrasolar planet, HAT-P-55b. The planet orbits a V = 13.207 +/- 0.039 sun-like star with a mass of 1.013 +/- 0.037 solar masses, a radius of 1.011 +/- 0.036 solar radii and a metallicity of -0.03 +/- 0.08. The planet itself is a typical hot Jupiter with a period of 3.5852467 +/- 0.0000064 days, a mass of 0.582 +/- 0.056 Jupiter masses and a radius of 1.182 +/- 0.055 Jupiter radii. This discovery adds to the increasing sample of transiting planets with measured bulk densities, which is needed to put constraints on models of planetary structure and formation theories.

  8. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using ...

  9. Toroidal vs. poloidal magnetic fields in Sun-like stars: a rotation threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, P; Solanki, SK; Donati, J-F; Aurière, M; Lignières, F; Morin, J; Paletou, F; Ramírez, J; Catala, C; Fares, R

    2008-01-01

    From a set of stellar spectropolarimetric observations, we report the detection of surface magnetic fields in a sample of four solar-type stars, namely HD 73350, HD 76151, HD 146233 and HD 190771. Assuming that the observed variability of polarimetric signal is controlled by stellar rotation, we establish the rotation periods of our targets, with values ranging from 8.8 d (for HD 190771) to 22.7 d (for HD 146233). Apart from rotation, fundamental parameters of the selected objects are very close to the Sun's, making this sample a practical basis to investigate the specific impact of rotation on magnetic properties of Sun-like stars. We reconstruct the large-scale magnetic geometry of the targets as a low-order (l<10) spherical harmonics expansion of the surface magnetic field. From the set of magnetic maps, we draw two main conclusions. (a) The magnetic energy of the large-scale field increases with rotation rate. The increase of chromospheric emission with the mean magnetic field is flatter than observed ...

  10. Activity and Magnetic Field Structure of the Sun-Like Planet Hosting Star HD 1237

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Grunhut, J; Fares, R; Donati, J -F; Alecian, E; Kochukhov, O; Oksala, M; Morin, J; Redfield, S; Cohen, O; Drake, J J; Jardine, M; Matt, S; Petit, P; Walter, F M

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the magnetic activity characteristics of the planet hosting Sun-like star, HD 1237, using HARPS spectro-polarimetric time-series data. We find evidence of rotational modulation of the magnetic longitudinal field measurements consistent with our ZDI analysis, with a period of 7 days. We investigate the effect of customising the LSD mask to the line depths of the observed spectrum and find that it has a minimal effect on shape of the extracted Stokes V profile but does result in a small increase in the S/N ($\\sim$ 7%). We find that using a Milne-Eddington solution to describe the local line profile provides a better fit to the LSD profiles in this slowly rotating star, which also impacts the recovered ZDI field distribution. We also introduce a fit-stopping criterion based on the information content (entropy) of the ZDI maps solution set. The recovered magnetic field maps show a strong (+90 G) ring-like azimuthal field distribution and a complex radial field dominating at mid latitudes ($\\sim$45 degr...

  11. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  12. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity -- comparison with the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Shimanovskaya, E V

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycles, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of the chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with the low level of the chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by the minimum level of its coronal radiation and the minimum level of its variations of the photospheric flux.

  13. Brightness Variations of Sun-like Stars: The Mystery Deepens - Astronomers facing Socratic "ignorance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    An extensive study made with ESO's Very Large Telescope deepens a long-standing mystery in the study of stars similar to the Sun. Unusual year-long variations in the brightness of about one third of all Sun-like stars during the latter stages of their lives still remain unexplained. Over the past few decades, astronomers have offered many possible explanations, but the new, painstaking observations contradict them all and only deepen the mystery. The search for a suitable interpretation is on. "Astronomers are left in the dark, and for once, we do not enjoy it," says Christine Nicholls from Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australia, lead author of a paper reporting the study. "We have obtained the most comprehensive set of observations to date for this class of Sun-like stars, and they clearly show that all the possible explanations for their unusual behaviour just fail." The mystery investigated by the team dates back to the 1930s and affects about a third of Sun-like stars in our Milky Way and other galaxies. All stars with masses similar to our Sun become, towards the end of their lives, red, cool and extremely large, just before retiring as white dwarfs. Also known as red giants, these elderly stars exhibit very strong periodic variations in their luminosity over timescales up to a couple of years. "Such variations are thought to be caused by what we call 'stellar pulsations'," says Nicholls. "Roughly speaking, the giant star swells and shrinks, becoming brighter and dimmer in a regular pattern. However, one third of these stars show an unexplained additional periodic variation, on even longer timescales - up to five years." In order to find out the origin of this secondary feature, the astronomers monitored 58 stars in our galactic neighbour, the Large Magellanic Cloud, over two and a half years. They acquired spectra using the high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope and combined them with images from other telescopes [1

  14. On the rotation period distribution of CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Leao, I C; Lopes, C E Ferreira; Neves, V; Valcarce, A A R; de Oliveira, L L A; da Silva, D Freire; de Freitas, D B; Martins, B L Canto; Janot-Pacheco, E; Baglin, A; De Medeiros, J R

    2015-01-01

    We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. We identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases particularly for a comparison with the solar Prot. Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs, which were combined with public data of physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the Sun's HR-diagram location. Theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation,...

  15. Harvard Observing Project monitoring of Boyajian's Star (KIC 8462852)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Clea F.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Bieryla, Allyson; Carmichael, Theron; Garrison, Lehman H.; Huang, Jane; Lewis, John; Mayo, Andrew; Alam, Munazza; Gomez, Sebastian; Kamdar, Harshil; Yuan, Sihan; Cordova, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2013, the Kepler spacecraft observed ~200,000 stars, repeatedly measuring their brightness to look for regular dimmings that could indicate the presence of a transiting planet (Borucki et al. 2010). This endeavor led to the discovery of thousands of planets. However, the data pertaining to one star, KIC 8462852, nicknamed “Tabby's Star” or “Boyajian's Star" indicated sporadic dimmings thought to be resulting from massive, evolving, and erratic shapes passing in front of the star (Boyajian et al. 2016, Wright and Sigurdsson 2016). Additional observations have indicated that KIC 8462852 has faded by approximately 20% over the past century (Wright and Sigurdsson 2016). Kepler is now observing other areas of space, and consequently, ground-based efforts have emerged in order to continue tracking the brightness of KIC 8462852. The Harvard Observing Project (HOP) is an observational astronomy initiative that engages undergraduate students and provides graduate students with the opportunity to lead sessions of data collection. During the fall 2016 semester, HOP will be observing KIC 8462852 in BVRI filters using Harvard's 16-inch DFM Clay telescope. We will present a light curve of the star spanning the course of three months.

  16. Richest Planetary System Discovered - Up to seven planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Astronomers using ESO's world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also have tantalising evidence that two other planets may be present, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found. This would make the system similar to our Solar System in terms of the number of planets (seven as compared to the Solar System's eight planets). Furthermore, the team also found evidence that the distances of the planets from their star follow a regular pattern, as also seen in our Solar System. "We have found what is most likely the system with the most planets yet discovered," says Christophe Lovis, lead author of the paper reporting the result. "This remarkable discovery also highlights the fact that we are now entering a new era in exoplanet research: the study of complex planetary systems and not just of individual planets. Studies of planetary motions in the new system reveal complex gravitational interactions between the planets and give us insights into the long-term evolution of the system." The team of astronomers used the HARPS spectrograph, attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile, for a six-year-long study of the Sun-like star HD 10180, located 127 light-years away in the southern constellation of Hydrus (the Male Water Snake). HARPS is an instrument with unrivalled measurement stability and great precision and is the world's most successful exoplanet hunter. Thanks to the 190 individual HARPS measurements, the astronomers detected the tiny back and forth motions of the star caused by the complex gravitational attractions from five or more planets. The five strongest signals correspond to planets with Neptune-like masses - between 13 and 25 Earth masses [1] - which orbit the star with periods ranging from about 6 to 600 days. These planets are located between 0.06 and 1.4 times the Earth-Sun distance from their central star. "We also have

  17. Dust discs around intermediate mass and Sun-like stars in the 16 Myr old NGC 1960 open cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of Spitzer IRAC (3.6--8um) and MIPS (24um) imaging of members of the 16(+10/-5)Myr old open cluster NGC 1960 (M36). Models of terrestrial planet formation indicate that rocky planets are likely to achieve their final masses at around 10-30Myr, and thus this cluster is at an interesting epoch for planet formation. We find 21 B-F5 type stars and 14 F6-K9 type stars which have 24um excess emission, and thus determine that >30% of B-F5 type stars and >23% of F6-K9 type stars in this cluster have 24um excess emission. These excess frequencies are similar to those observed in other clusters of similar age. Three early type stars have excesses at near-infrared wavelengths. Analysis of their SEDs confirms that these are true debris discs and not remnant primordial or transitional discs. None of the 61 sun-like stars have confirmed near-infrared excess, and we can place a limit on the frequency of 8um excess emission around sun-like stars of <7%. All of the detected excesses are consistent wi...

  18. A super-Earth-sized planet orbiting in or near the habitable zone around Sun-like star

    CERN Document Server

    Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B; Rowe, Jason F; Huber, Daniel; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Quintana, Elisa V; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D; Bryson, Stephen T; Borucki, William J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Ciardi, David; Clarke, Bruce D; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Fischer, Debra A; Li, Jie; Haas, Michael R; Hunter, Roger; Lissauer, Jack J; Mullally, Fergal; Sabale, Anima; Seader, Shawn E; Smith, Jeffrey C; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, AKM Kamal; Thompson, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a super-earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the three-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.1%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24+/-0.4 Rearth and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-size object with a radius of 1.7+/-0.3 Rearth and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 +/- 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth ...

  19. A unified normal mode approach to dynamic tides and its application to rotating Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, P B; Chernov, S V

    2013-01-01

    We determine the response of a uniformly rotating star to tidal perturbations due to a companion. General periodic orbits and parabolic flybys are considered. We evaluate energy and angular momentum exchange rates as a sum of contributions from normal modes allowing for dissipative processes. We consider the case when the response is dominated by the contribution of an identifiable regular spectrum of low frequency modes, such as gravity modes and evaluate it in the limit of very weak dissipation. Our formalism may be applied both to Sun-like stars with radiative cores and convective envelopes and to more massive stars with convective cores and radiative envelopes. We provide general expressions for transfer of energy and angular momentum valid for an orbit with any eccentricity. Detailed calculations are made for Sun-like stars in the slow rotation regime where centrifugal distortion is neglected in the equilibrium and the traditional approximation is made for the normal modes. We use both a WKBJ procedure a...

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS ATTRIBUTED TO GRANULATION AND FACULAE ON SUN-LIKE STARS FROM THE KEPLER MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karoff, C. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Campante, T. L. [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400, Toulouse (France); Kallinger, T. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K. U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Gruberbauer, M. [Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, B3H 3C3 Halifax (Canada); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Caldwell, D. A.; Christiansen, J. L. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kinemuchi, K., E-mail: karoff@phys.au.dk [Bay Area Environmental Research Inst./NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Sun-like stars show intensity fluctuations on a number of timescales due to various physical phenomena on their surfaces. These phenomena can convincingly be studied in the frequency spectra of these stars-while the strongest signatures usually originate from spots, granulation, and p-mode oscillations, it has also been suggested that the frequency spectrum of the Sun contains a signature of faculae. We have analyzed three stars observed for 13 months in short cadence (58.84 s sampling) by the Kepler mission. The frequency spectra of all three stars, as for the Sun, contain signatures that we can attribute to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations. The temporal variability of the signatures attributed to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations was analyzed and the analysis indicates a periodic variability in the granulation and faculae signatures-comparable to what is seen in the Sun.

  1. Kepler-9: A System of Multiple Planets Transiting a Sun-Like Star, Confirmed by Timing Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Welsh, William F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Cochran, William D.; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  2. Kepler-9: a system of multiple planets transiting a Sun-like star, confirmed by timing variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie M; Jenkins, Jon M; Rowe, Jason F; Cochran, William D; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A; MacQueen, Phillip J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Orosz, Jerome A

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  3. PULSATION PERIOD VARIATIONS IN THE RRc LYRAE STAR KIC 5520878

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippke, Michael [Institute for Data Analysis, Luiter Str. 21b, D-47506 Neukirchen-Vluyn (Germany); Learned, John G. [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Manoa 327 Watanabe Hall, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Zee, A. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Edmondson, William H. [School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lindner, John F. [Physics Department, The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Kia, Behnam; Ditto, William L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Stevens, Ian R., E-mail: hippke@ifda.eu, E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu, E-mail: zee@kitp.ucsb.edu, E-mail: w.h.edmondson@bham.ac.uk, E-mail: jlindner@wooster.edu, E-mail: wditto@hawaii.edu, E-mail: behnam@hawaii.edu, E-mail: irs@star.sr.bham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Learned et al. proposed that a sufficiently advanced extra-terrestrial civilization may tickle Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars with a neutrino beam at the right time, thus causing them to trigger early and jogging the otherwise very regular phase of their expansion and contraction. This would turn these stars into beacons to transmit information throughout the galaxy and beyond. The idea is to search for signs of phase modulation (in the regime of short pulse duration) and patterns, which could be indicative of intentional, omnidirectional signaling. We have performed such a search among variable stars using photometric data from the Kepler space telescope. In the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878, we have found two such regimes of long and short pulse durations. The sequence of period lengths, expressed as time series data, is strongly autocorrelated, with correlation coefficients of prime numbers being significantly higher (p = 99.8%). Our analysis of this candidate star shows that the prime number oddity originates from two simultaneous pulsation periods and is likely of natural origin. Simple physical models elucidate the frequency content and asymmetries of the KIC 5520878 light curve. Despite this SETI null result, we encourage testing of other archival and future time-series photometry for signs of modulated stars. This can be done as a by-product to the standard analysis, and can even be partly automated.

  4. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1--4x Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1-4x the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R_e planets with orbital periods under 100 days, and 11% have 1-2 R_e planets that receive 1-4x the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 AU, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R_e show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R_e, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: rho = 2.32 + 3.19 R/R_e [g/cc]. ...

  5. High-Dispersion Spectroscopy of the Superflare Star KIC 6934317

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notsu, Shota; Honda, Satoshi; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi; Shibayama, Takuya; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-10-01

    We conducted high-resolution spectroscopic observation with Subaru/HDS for a G-type star (KIC 6934317). We selected this star from the data of the Kepler spacecraft. It produces many superflares, and the total energy of the largest recorded superflare on this star was ˜ 103-times larger (˜ 2.2 × 1035 erg) than that of the most energetic flare on the Sun (˜ 1032 erg). The core depth and the emission flux of the Ca II infrared triplet lines and the Hα line show high chromospheric activity in this star, in spite of its low lithium abundance and small amplitude of the rotational modulation. Using empirical relations between the emission flux of chromospheric lines and the X-ray flux, this star is considered to show much higher coronal activity than that of the Sun. It probably has large starspots that can store a large amount of magnetic energy, sufficient to give rise to superflares. We also estimated the stellar parameters, such as the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, projected rotational velocity (v sin i), and radial velocity. KIC 6934317 is then confirmed to be an early G-type main-sequence star. The value of v sin i is estimated to be ˜ 1.91 km s-1. In contrast, the rotational velocity is calculated to be ˜ 20 km s-1 by using the period of the brightness variation as the rotation period. This difference can be explained by its small inclination angle (nearly pole-on). The small inclination angle is also supported by the contrast between the large superflare amplitude and the small stellar brightness variation amplitude. The lithium abundance and isochrones implies that the age of this star is more than about a few Gyr, though a problem why this star with such an age has such strong activity remains unsolved.

  6. Amplitude Modulation in the δ Sct star KIC 7106205

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Dominic. M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The δ Sct star KIC 7106205 showed amplitude modulation in a single p mode, whilst all other p and g modes remained stable in amplitude and phase over 1470 d of the Kepler dataset. The data were divided into 30 time bins of equal length and a series of consecutive Fourier transforms was calculated. A fixed frequency, calculated from a least-squares fit of all data, allowed amplitude and phase for every mode in each time bin to be tracked. The missing p mode energy was not transferred to any other visible modes.

  7. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1–4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1–4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1–2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1–2 R⊕ planets that receive 1–4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth–Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1–4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ=2.32+3.19R/R⊕ [g cm−3]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5–4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ‘‘mini-Neptunes.’’ The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life’s biochemical origins. PMID:24912169

  8. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1-4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Weiss, Lauren M; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-09-02

    Small planets, 1-4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1-2 R⊕ planets that receive 1-4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth-Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ = 2:32 + 3:19 R=R ⊕ [g cm(-3)]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5-4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ''mini-Neptunes.'' The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life's biochemical origins.

  9. Grand Challenges in the Physics of the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The study of stellar structure and evolution is one of the main building blocks of astrophysics, and the Sun has an importance both as the star that is most amenable to detailed study and as the star that has by far the biggest impact on the Earth and near-Earth environment through its radiative and particulate outputs. Over the past decades, studies of stars and of the Sun have become somewhat separate. But in recent years, the rapid advances in asteroseismology, as well as the quest to better understand solar and stellar dynamos, have emphasized once again the synergy between studies of the stars and the Sun. In this article I have selected two "grand challenges" both for their crucial importance and because I thnk that these two problems are tractable to significant progress in the next decade. They are (i) understanding how solar and stellar dynamos generate magnetic field, and (ii) improving the predictability of geo-effective space weather.

  10. The variability of Sun-like stars: reproducing observed photometric trends

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Schmutz, W K; Ball, W T; Knaack, R; Rozanov, E V; Unruh, Y C

    2014-01-01

    The Sun and stars with low magnetic activity levels, become photometrically brighter when their activity increases. Magnetically more active stars display the opposite behaviour and get fainter when their activity increases. We reproduce the observed photometric trends in stellar variations with a model that treats stars as hypothetical Suns with coverage by magnetic features different from that of the Sun. The presented model attributes the variability of stellar spectra to the imbalance between the contributions from different components of the solar atmosphere, such as dark starspots and bright faculae. A stellar spectrum is calculated from spectra of the individual components, by weighting them with corresponding disc area coverages. The latter are obtained by extrapolating the solar dependences of spot and facular disc area coverages on chromospheric activity to stars with different levels of mean chromospheric activity. We have found that the contribution by starspots to the variability increases faster...

  11. Asteroseismic determination of fundamental parameters of Sun-like stars using multilayered neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Hanasoge, Shravan; Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Antia, H. M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2016-10-01

    The advent of space-based observatories such as Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits (CoRoT) and Kepler has enabled the testing of our understanding of stellar evolution on thousands of stars. Evolutionary models typically require five input parameters, the mass, initial helium abundance, initial metallicity, mixing length (assumed to be constant over time), and the age to which the star must be evolved. Some of these parameters are also very useful in characterizing the associated planets and in studying Galactic archaeology. How to obtain these parameters from observations rapidly and accurately, specifically in the context of surveys of thousands of stars, is an outstanding question, one that has eluded straightforward resolution. For a given star, we typically measure the effective temperature and surface metallicity spectroscopically and low-degree oscillation frequencies through space observatories. Here we demonstrate that statistical learning, using artificial neural networks, is successful in determining the evolutionary parameters based on spectroscopic and seismic measurements. Our trained networks show robustness over a broad range of parameter space, and critically, are entirely computationally inexpensive and fully automated. We analyse the observations of a few stars using this method and the results compare well to inferences obtained using other techniques. This method is both computationally cheap and inferentially accurate, paving the way for analysing the vast quantities of stellar observations from past, current, and future missions.

  12. Kepler-63b: A Giant Planet in a Polar Orbit around a Young Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Albrecht, Simon; Campante, Tiago L; Chaplin, William J; Davies, Guy R; Lund, Mikkel L; Carter, Joshua A; Dawson, Rebekah I; Buchhave, Lars A; Everett, Mark E; Fischer, Debra A; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Horch, Elliott P; Howell, Steve B; Latham, David W

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, $m_{\\rm Kp} = 11.6$, $T_{\\rm eff} = 5576$ K, $M_\\star = 0.98\\, M_\\odot$). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is $6.1 \\pm 0.2 R_{\\earth}$, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit we can place a rough upper bound of $120 M_{\\earth}$ (3$\\sigma$). The host star has a high obliquity ($\\psi$ = $104^{\\circ}$), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-cross...

  13. THE DIFFERENT EVOLUTION OF GAS AND DUST IN DISKS AROUND SUN-LIKE AND COOL STARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Luhman, K.; Henning, Th.; Bouwman, J.; Meyer, M. R.; Lahuis, F.; Natta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Planet formation is profoundly impacted by the properties of protoplanetary disks and their central star. However, how disk properties vary with stellar parameters remains poorly known. Here, we present the first comprehensive, comparative Spitzer/IRS study of the dust and gas properties of disks ar

  14. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of the Superflare Star KIC6934317

    CERN Document Server

    Notsu, Shota; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi; Shibayama, Takuya; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    We conducted the high-resolution spectroscopic observation with Subaru/HDS for a G-type star (KIC6934317). We selected this star from the data of the Kepler spacecraft. This star produces a lot of superflares, and the total energy of the largest superflare on this star is ~10^3 times larger (~2.2*10^35 erg) than that of the most energetic flare on the Sun (~10^32 erg). The core depth and emission flux of Ca II infrared triplet lines and Ha line show high chromospheric activity in this star, in spite of its low lithium abundance and the small amplitude of the rotational modulation. Using the empirical relations between emission flux of chromospheric lines and X-ray flux, this star is considered to show much higher coronal activity than that of the Sun. It probably has large starspots which can store a large amount of magnetic energy enough to give rise to superflares. We also estimated the stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, projected rotational velocity (v sin_i), ...

  15. Metallicity of Sun-like G-stars that have Exoplanets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shashanka R. Gurumath; K. M. Hiremath; V. Ramasubramanian

    2017-06-01

    By considering the physical and orbital characteristics of G type stars and their exoplanets, we examine the association between stellar mass and its metallicity that follows a power law. Similar relationship is also obtained in case of single and multiplanetary stellar systems suggesting that, Sun′s present mass is about 1% higher than the estimated value for its metallicity. Further, for all the stellar systems with exoplanets, association between the planetary mass and the stellar metallicity is investigated, that suggests planetary mass is independent of stellar metallicity. Interestingly, in case of multiplanetary systems, planetary mass is linearly dependent on the stellar absolute metallicity, that suggests, metal rich stars produce massive (≥1 Jupiter mass) planets compared to metal poor stars. This study also suggests that there is a solar system planetary missing mass of ∼0.8 Jupiter mass. It is argued that probably 80% of missing mass is accreted onto the Sun and about 20% of missing mass might have been blown off to the outer solar system (beyond the present Kuiper belt) during early history of solar system formation. We find that, in case of single planetary systems, planetary mass is independent of stellar metallicity with an implication of their non-origin in the host star’s protoplanetary disk and probably are captured from the space. Final investigation of dependency of the orbital distances of planets on the host stars metallicity reveals that inward migration of planets is dominant in case of single planetary systems supporting the result that most of the planets in single planetary systems are captured from the space.

  16. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettenbacher, R M; Monnier, J D; Korhonen, H; Aarnio, A N; Baron, F; Che, X; Harmon, R O; Kővári, Zs; Kraus, S; Schaefer, G H; Torres, G; Zhao, M; ten Brummelaar, T A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L

    2016-05-12

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

  17. Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems: Cold Outer Disks Associated with Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J S; Backman, D E; Hillenbrand, L A; Meyer, M R; Rodmann, J; Moro-Martin, A; Carpenter, J M; Silverstone, M D; Bouwman, J; Mamajek, E E; Wolf, S; Malhotra, R; Pascucci, I; Najita, J; Padgett, D L; Henning, T; Brooke, T Y; Cohen, M; Strom, S E; Stobie, E B; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Misselt, K; Morrison, J E; Muzerolle, J; Su, K Y L; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Hines, Dean C.; Backman, Dana E.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Meyer, Michael R.; Rodmann, Jens; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Carpenter, John M.; Silverstone, Murray D.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Mamajek, Eric E.; Wolf, Sebastian; Malhotra, Renu; Pascucci, Ilaria; Najita, Joan; Padgett, Deborah L.; Henning, Thomas; Brooke, Timothy Y.; Cohen, Martin; Strom, Stephen E.; Stobie, Elizabeth B.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Misselt, Karl; Morrison, Jane E.; Muzerolle, James; Su, Kate Y. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the discovery of debris systems around three solar mass stars based upon observations performed with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of a Legacy Science Program, ``the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems'' (FEPS). We also confirm the presence of debris around two other stars. All the stars exhibit infrared emission in excess of the expected photospheres in the 70 micron band, but are consistent with photospheric emission at <= 33 micron. This restricts the maximum temperature of debris in equilibrium with the stellar radiation to T < 70 K. We find that these sources are relatively old in the FEPS sample, in the age range 0.7 - 3 Gyr. Based on models of the spectral energy distributions, we suggest that these debris systems represent materials generated by collisions of planetesimal belts. We speculate on the nature of these systems through comparisons to our own Kuiper Belt, and on the likely planet(s) responsible for stirring the system and ultimately releasing dust through coll...

  18. TENTATIVE EVIDENCE FOR RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS GENERATED BY THE JET OF THE YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR DG Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, Rachael E.; Ray, Tom P.; Taylor, Andrew M. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Scaife, Anna M. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Green, David A.; Buckle, Jane V., E-mail: rainsworth@cp.dias.ie [Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron emission has recently been detected in the jet of a massive protostar, providing further evidence that certain jet formation characteristics for young stars are similar to those found for highly relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. We present data at 325 and 610 MHz taken with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope of the young, low-mass star DG Tau, an analog of the Sun soon after its birth. This is the first investigation of a low-mass young stellar object at such low frequencies. We detect emission with a synchrotron spectral index in the proximity of the DG Tau jet and interpret this emission as a prominent bow shock associated with this outflow. This result provides tentative evidence for the acceleration of particles to relativistic energies due to the shock impact of this otherwise very low-power jet against the ambient medium. We calculate the equipartition magnetic field strength B {sub min} ≈ 0.11 mG and particle energy E {sub min} ≈ 4 × 10{sup 40} erg, which are the minimum requirements to account for the synchrotron emission of the DG Tau bow shock. These results suggest the possibility of low energy cosmic rays being generated by young Sun-like stars.

  19. The Triply Eclipsing Hierarchical Triple Star KIC002856960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Chung-Uk; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Park, Byeong-Gon; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius

    2013-02-01

    In a recent study, Armstrong et al. presented an eclipsing binary star of about 6.2 hr period with transit-like tertiary signals occurring every 204.2 days in the Kepler public data of KIC002856960 and proposed three possible hierarchical structures: (AB)b, (AB)C, and A(BC). We analyzed the Kepler light curve by including a third light source and one starspot on each binary component. The results represent that the close eclipsing pair is in a low-mass eccentric-orbit, detached configuration. Based on 123 eclipse timings calculated from the Wilson-Devinney binary model, a period study of the close binary reveals that the orbital period has experienced a sinusoidal variation with a period and a semi-amplitude of 205 ± 2 days and 0.0021 ± 0.0002 days, respectively. The period variation would be produced by the light-travel-time effect due to a gravitationally bound third body with a minimum mass of M 3sin i 3 = 0.76 M ⊙ in an eccentric orbit of e 3 = 0.61. This is consistent with the presence of third light found in our light curve solution and the tertiary signal of 204.2 day period most likely arises from the K-type star crossed by the close eclipsing binary. Then, KIC002856960 is a triply eclipsing hierarchical system, A(BC), consisting of a close binary with two M-type dwarfs and a more massive K-type component. The presence of the third star may have played an important role in the formation and evolution of the close pair, which may ultimately evolve into a contact system by angular momentum loss.

  20. Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878

    CERN Document Server

    Hippke, Michael; Zee, A; Edmondson, William H; Steven, Ian R; Lindner, John F; Kia, Benham; Ditto, William L

    2014-01-01

    Learned et. al. proposed that a sufficiently advanced extra-terrestrial civilization may tickle Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars with a neutrino beam at the right time, thus causing them to trigger early and jogging the otherwise very regular phase of their expansion and contraction. This would turn these stars into beacons to transmit information throughout the galaxy and beyond. The idea is to search for signs of phase modulation (in the regime of short pulse duration) and patterns, which could be indicative of intentional, omnidirectional signaling. We have performed such a search among variable stars using photometric data from the Kepler space telescope. In the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878, we have found two such regimes of long and short pulse durations. The sequence of period lengths, expressed as time series data, is strongly auto correlated, with correlation coefficients of prime numbers being significantly higher ($p=99.8$\\%). Our analysis of this candidate star shows that the prime number oddity o...

  1. Long-term magnetic field monitoring of the Sun-like star Ksi Boo A

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenthaler, A; Saar, S; Solanki, S K; Auriere, M; Dintrans, B; Fares, R; Gastine, T; Lanoux, J; Lignieres, F; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; Paletou, F; Velez, J C Ramirez; Theado, S; Van Grootel, V

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We aim at investigating the long-term temporal evolution of the magnetic field of the solar-type star Ksi Boo A, both from direct magnetic field measurements and from the simultaneous estimate of indirect activity indicators. Methods. We use 7 time-series of high-resolution, circularly-polarized spectra obtained with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter between 2007 and 2011, for a total of 76 spectra. Using about 6,100 photospheric spectral lines covering the visible domain, we employ a cross-correlation procedure to compute, from each spectrum, a mean polarized line profile. We model the large-scale photospheric magnetic field of the star by means of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging and follow the year-to-year evolution of the reconstructed magnetic topology. Simultaneously, we monitor the width of several magnetically-sensitive spectral lines, the radial velocity and line asymmetry of intensity line profiles and the chromospheric emission in the cores of the Ca II H and Halpha lines. Results. During the highest obser...

  2. The influence of the magnetic topology on the wind braking of sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réville, V.; Brun, A. S.; Matt, S. P.; Strugarek, A.; Pinto, R.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar winds are thought to be the main process responsible for the spin down of main-sequence stars. The extraction of angular momentum by a magnetized wind has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations for the resulting torque. However, previous studies generally consider simple dipole or split monopole stellar magnetic topologies. Here we consider in addition to a dipolar stellar magnetic field, both quadrupolar and octupolar configurations, while also varying the rotation rate and the magnetic field strength. 60 simulations made with a 2.5D, cylindrical and axisymmetric set-up and computed with the PLUTO code were used to find torque formulations for each topology. We further succeed to give a unique law that fits the data for every topology by formulating the torque in terms of the amount of open magnetic flux in the wind. We also show that our formulation can be applied to even more realistic magnetic topologies, with examples of the Sun in its minimum and maximum phase as observed at the Wilcox Solar Observatory, and of a young K-star (TYC-0486-4943-1) whose topology has been obtained by Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI).

  3. Searching for IR excesses in Sun-like stars observed by WISE

    CERN Document Server

    de Miera, Fernando Cruz-Saenz; Bertone, Emanuele; Vega, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search of infrared excess candidates in a comprehensive (29\\,000 stars) magnitude limited sample of dwarf stars, spanning the spectral range F2-K0, and brighter than V$=$15 mag. We searched the sample within the {\\em WISE} all sky survey database for objects within 1 arcsecond of the coordinates provided by SIMBAD database and found over 9\\,000 sources detected in all {\\em WISE} bands. This latter sample excludes objects that are flagged as extended sources and those images which are affected by various optical artifacts. For each detected object, we compared the observed W4/W2 (22$\\mu$m/4.6$\\mu$m) flux ratio with the expected photospheric value and identified 197 excess candidates at 3$\\sigma$. For the vast majority of candidates, the results of this analysis represent the first reported evidence of an IR excess. Through the comparison with a simple black-body emission model, we derive estimates of the dust temperature, as well as of the dust fractional luminosities. For more than...

  4. The influence of the magnetic topology on the braking of sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Réville, Victor; Matt, Sean; Strugarek, Antoine; Pinto, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Stellar winds are thought to be the main process responsible for the spin down of main-sequence stars. The extraction of angular momentum by a magnetized wind has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations for the resulting torque. However, previous studies generally consider simple dipole or split monopole stellar magnetic topologies. Here we consider in addition to a dipolar stellar magnetic field, both quadrupolar and octupolar configurations, while also varying the rotation rate and the magnetic field strength. 60 simulations made with a 2.5D, cylindrical and axisymmetric set-up and computed with the PLUTO code were used to find torque formulations for each topology. We further succeed to give a unique law that fits the data for every topology by formulating the torque in terms of the amount of open magnetic flux in the wind. We also show that our formulation can be applied to even more realistic magnetic topologies, with examples of the Sun in its minimum and maximum phase as observed at t...

  5. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-Like Star GJ 504

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kudo, T.; Janson, M; Kandori, R.; Brandt, T. D.; Thalmann, C.; Spiegel, D.; Biller, B.; Carson, J.; Hori, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Burrows, A.; Henning, T.; Turner, E. L.; McElwain, M. W.; Moro-Martin, A.; Suenaga, T.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Kwon, J.; Lucas, P.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Grady, C. A.; Serabyn, E.

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages ( 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial model uncertainties exist at these young ages due to the unknown initial conditions at formation, which can lead to an order of magnitude of uncertainty in the modeled planet mass. Here, we report the direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504, detected as part of the SEEDS survey. The system is older than all other known directly-imaged planets; as a result, its estimated mass remains in the planetary regime independent of uncertainties related to choices of initial conditions in the exoplanet modeling. Using the most common exoplanet cooling model, and given the system age of 160(+350/-60) Myr, GJ 504 b has an estimated mass of 4(+4.5/-1.0) Jupiter masses, among the lowest of directly imaged planets. Its projected separation of 43.5 AU exceeds the typical outer boundary of approx.. 30 AU predicted for the core accretion mechanism. GJ 504 b is also significantly cooler (510(+30/-20) K)) and has a bluer color (J - H = -0.23 mag) than previously imaged exoplanets, suggesting a largely cloud-free atmosphere accessible to spectroscopic characterization. Thus, it has the potential of providing novel insights into the origins of giant planets, as well as their atmospheric properties.

  6. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-like Star GJ 504

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzuhara, M; Kudo, T; Janson, M; Kandori, R; Brandt, T D; Thalmann, C; Spiegel, D; Biller, B; Carson, J; Hori, Y; Suzuki, R; Burrows, A; Henning, T; Turner, E L; McElwain, M W; Moro-Martin, A; Suenaga, T; Takahashi, Y H; Kwon, J; Lucas, P; Abe, L; Brandner, W; Egner, S; Feldt, M; Fujiwara, H; Goto, M; Grady, C A; Guyon, O; Hashimoto, J; Hayano, Y; Hayashi, M; Hayashi, S S; Hodapp, K W; Ishii, M; Iye, M; Knapp, G R; Matsuo, T; Mayama, S; Miyama, S; Morino, J -I; Nishikawa, J; Nishimura, T; Kotani, T; Kusakabe, N; Pyo, T -S; Serabyn, E; Suto, H; Takami, M; Takato, N; Terada, H; Tomono, D; Watanabe, M; Wisniewski, J P; Yamada, T; Takami, H; Usuda, T

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages ( 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial model uncertainties exist at these young ages due to the unknown initial conditions at formation, which can lead to an order of magnitude of uncertainty in the modeled planet mass. Here, we report the direct imaging discovery of a Jovian exoplanet around the Sun-like star GJ 504, detected as part of the SEEDS survey. The system is older than all other known directly-imaged planets; as a result, its estimated mass remains in the planetary regime independent of uncertainties related to choices of initial conditions in the exoplanet modeling. Using the most common exoplanet cooling model, and given the system age of 160 [+350, -60] Myr, GJ 504 b has an estimated mass of 4 [+4.5, -1.0] Jupiter masses, among the lowest of directly imaged planets. Its projected separation of 43.5 AU exceeds the typical outer boundary ...

  7. Spectral variability of photospheric radiation due to faculae. I. The Sun and Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte M.; Beeck, Benjamin; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Solanki, Sami K.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Yeo, Kok Leng

    2017-09-01

    Context. Stellar spectral variability on timescales of a day and longer, arising from magnetic surface features such as dark spots and bright faculae, is an important noise source when characterising extra-solar planets. Current 1D models of faculae do not capture the geometric properties and fail to reproduce observed solar facular contrasts. Magnetoconvection simulations provide facular contrasts accounting for geometry. Aims: We calculate facular contrast spectra from magnetoconvection models of the solar photosphere with a view to improve (a) future parameter determinations for planets with early G type host stars and (b) reconstructions of solar spectral variability. Methods: Regions of a solar twin (G2, log g = 4.44) atmosphere with a range of initial average vertical magnetic fields (100 to 500 G) were simulated using a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code, MURaM, and synthetic intensity spectra were calculated from the ultraviolet (149.5 nm) to the far infrared (160 000 nm) with the ATLAS9 radiative transfer code. Nine viewing angles were investigated to account for facular positions across most of the stellar disc. Results: Contrasts of the radiation from simulation boxes with different levels of magnetic flux relative to an atmosphere with no magnetic field are a complicated function of position, wavelength and magnetic field strength that is not reproduced by 1D facular models. Generally, contrasts increase towards the limb, but at UV wavelengths a saturation and decrease are observed close to the limb. Contrasts also increase strongly from the visible to the UV; there is a rich spectral dependence, with marked peaks in molecular bands and strong spectral lines. At disc centre, a complex relationship with magnetic field was found and areas of strong magnetic field can appear either dark or bright, depending on wavelength. Spectra calculated for a wide variety of magnetic fluxes will also serve to improve total and spectral solar irradiance

  8. Kepler-22b: a 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D.G.; Batalha, N.; Bryson, S.T.; Rowe, J.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.; Caldwell, D.A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cochran, W.D.; DeVore, E.; Gautier, T.N.; Geary, J.C.; Gilliland, R.; Gould, A.; Howell, S.B.; Jenkins, J.M.; Latham, D.W.; Lissauer, J.J.; Marcy, G.W.; Sasselov, D.; Boss, A.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D.; Kaltenegger, L.; Doyle, L.; Dupree, A.K.; Ford, E.B.; Fortney, J.; Holman, M.J.; Steffen, J.H.; Mullally, F.; Still, M.; Tarter, J.; Ballard, S.; Buchhave, L.A.; Carter, J.; Christiansen, J.L.; Demory, B.O.; Désert, J.M.; Dressing, C.; Endl, M.; Fabrycky, D.; Fischer, D.; Haas, M.R.; Henze, C.; Horch, E.; Howard, A.W.; Isaacson, H.; Kjeldsen, H.; Johnson, J.A.; Klaus, T.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Barclay, T.; Li, J.; Meibom, S.; Prsa, A.; Quinn, S.N.; Quintana, E.V.; Robertson, P.; Sherry, W.; Shporer, A.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S.E.; Twicken, J.D.; Van Cleve, J.; Welsh, W.F.; Basu, S.; Chaplin, W.; Miglio, A.; Kawaler, S.D.; Arentoft, T.; Stello, D.; Metcalfe, T.S.; Verner, G.A.; Karoff, C.; Lundkvist, M.; Lund, M.N.; Handberg, R.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Bedding, T.R.; Rapin, W.

    2012-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an

  9. Short duration high amplitude flares detected on the M dwarf star KIC 5474065

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsay, Gavin; Hakala, Pasi; Garcia-Alvarez, David; Brooks, Adam; Barclay, Thomas; Still, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Using data obtained during the RATS-Kepler project we identified one short duration flare in a 1 hour sequence of ground based photometry of the dwarf star KIC 5474065. Observations made using GTC show it is a star with a M4 V spectral type. Kepler observations made using 1 min sampling show that KIC 5474065 exhibits large amplitude (deltaF/F>0.4) optical flares which have a duration as short as 10 mins. We compare the energy distribution of flares from KIC 5474065 with that of KIC 9726699, which has also been observed using 1 min sampling, and ground based observations of other M dwarf stars in the literature. We discuss the possible implications of these short duration, relatively low energy flares would have on the atmosphere of exo-planets orbiting in the habitable zone of these flare stars.

  10. How Dry is the Brown Dwarf Desert?: Quantifying the Relative Number of Planets, Brown Dwarfs and Stellar Companions around Nearby Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Grether, D; Grether, Daniel; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2004-01-01

    Sun-like stars have stellar, brown dwarf and planetary companions. To help constrain their formation and migration scenarios, we analyse the close companions (orbital period 2 M_Solar respectively. However, we find no evidence that companion mass scales with host mass in general. Approximately 16% of Sun-like stars have close (P < 5 years) companions more massive than Jupiter: 11% are stellar, 1% are brown dwarf and 4% are giant planets. The companion mass function in the brown dwarf and stellar mass range, has a different shape than the initial mass function of individual stars and free-floating brown dwarfs. This suggests either a different spectrum of gravitational fragmentation in the formation environment or post-formation migratory processes disinclined to leave brown dwarfs in close orbits.

  11. The Triply Eclipsing Hierarchical Triple Star KIC002856960

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae Woo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Park, Byeong-Gon; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    In a recent study, Armstrong et al. presented an eclipsing binary star of about 6.2 h period with transit-like tertiary signals occurring every 204.2 d in the {\\it Kepler} public data of KIC002856960 and proposed three possible hierarchical structures: (AB)b, (AB)C, and A(BC). We analyzed the {\\it Kepler} light curve by including a third light source and one starspot on each binary component. The results represent that the close eclipsing pair is in a low-mass eccentric-orbit, detached configuration. Based on 123 eclipse timings calculated from the Wilson-Devinney binary model, a period study of the close binary reveals that the orbital period has experienced a sinusoidal variation with a period and a semi-amplitude of 205$\\pm$2 d and 0.0021$\\pm$0.0002 d, respectively. The period variation would be produced by the light-travel-time effect due to a gravitationally-bound third body with a minimum mass of $M_3 \\sin i_3$=0.76 M$_\\odot$ in an eccentric orbit of $e_3$=0.61. This is consistent with the presence of t...

  12. Optical SETI Observations of the Anomalous Star KIC 8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Schuetz, Marlin; Shostak, Seth; Richards, Jon

    2015-01-01

    To explore the hypothesis that KIC 8462852's aperiodic dimming is caused by artificial megastructures in orbit (Wright et al. 2015), rather than a natural cause such as cometary fragments in a highly elliptical orbit (Marengo et al. 2015), we searched for electromagnetic signals from KIC 8462852 indicative of extraterrestrial intelligence. The primary observations were in the visible optical regime using the Boquete Optical SETI Observatory in Panama. In addition, as a preparatory exercise for the possible future detection of a candidate signal (Heidmann 1991), three of six observing runs simultaneously searched radio frequencies at the Allen Telescope Array in California. No periodic optical signals greater than 67 photons/m2 within a time frame of 25 ns were seen. This limit corresponds to isotropic optical pulses of 8E22 joules. If, however, any inhabitants of KIC 8462852 were targeting our solar system (Shostak & Villard 2004), the required energy would be reduced greatly. The limits on narrowband rad...

  13. Regularities in frequency spacings of δ Scuti stars: the Kepler star KIC 9700322

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breger, M.; Balona, L.; Lenz, P.;

    2011-01-01

    In the faint star KIC 9700322 observed by the Kepler satellite, 76 frequencies with amplitudes from 14 to 29 000 ppm were detected. The two dominant frequencies at 9.79 and 12.57 d-1 (113.3 and 145.5 μHz), interpreted to be radial modes, are accompanied by a large number of combination frequencies....... A small additional modulation with a 0.16 d-1 frequency is also seen; this is interpreted to be the rotation frequency of the star. The corresponding prediction of slow rotation is confirmed by a spectrum from which v sin i= 19 ± 1 km s-1 is obtained. The analysis of the spectrum shows that the star...... the measured rotation rate. A remarkable result is the absence of additional independent frequencies down to an amplitude limit near 14 ppm, suggesting that the star is stable against most forms of non-radial pulsation. A low-frequency peak at 2.7763 d-1 in KIC 9700322 is the frequency difference between...

  14. Analysis of the variability in the sdB star KIC 10670103: DFA approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebende, Gilney F.; Fernandez, Basilio F.; Pereira, Marildo G.

    2017-01-01

    The brightness variation of the stars is an object of study in astronomy and astrophysics for representing the rich inherent source of physical information. Launched in 2009, the Kepler spacecraft with the primary mission of identifying equivalent to the Earth by the Sun transits also gave birth to thousands of light curves of targets of scientific interest. KIC 10670103, the richest pulsating sub-dwarf B (sdB) star, is one of the many stars identified by the mission. With 3.72 yr of Kepler spacecraft observations, we analysed in this paper the light curve of this sdB star, by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method. The behaviour of this pulsating star reveals self-affinity at specific time-scales, with changes in DFA exponent, αDFA. This fact suggests some light variability in KIC 10670103, as for example, from a non-periodic to a periodic case, among others. Therefore, we propose to connect the pulsation pattern of the KIC 10670103 star, which presents trends and non-stationarity, with the αDFA exponent. In this sense, we obtain five values of αDFA related to the light variability properties of KIC 10670103. A pictorial figure will describe the relationship between these variables.

  15. Optical SETI Observations of the Anomalous Star KIC 8462852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Marlin; Vakoch, Douglas A.; Shostak, Seth; Richards, Jon

    2016-07-01

    To explore the hypothesis that KIC 8462852's aperiodic dimming is caused by artificial megastructures in orbit, rather than a natural cause such as cometary fragments in a highly elliptical orbit, we searched for electromagnetic signals from KIC 8462852 indicative of extraterrestrial intelligence. The primary observations were in the visible optical regime using the Boquete Optical SETI Observatory in Panama. In addition, as a recommended preparatory exercise for the possible future detection of a candidate signal, three of six observing runs simultaneously searched radio frequencies at the Allen Telescope Array in California. No periodic optical signals greater than 67 photons m-2 within a time frame of 25 ns were seen. If, for example, any inhabitants of KIC 8462852 were targeting our solar system with 5 MJ laser pulses, locally illuminating an approximately 3 au diameter disk, the signal could have been detected at the Boquete Observatory. The limits on narrowband radio signals were 180-300 Jy Hz at 1 and 8 GHz, respectively. While the power requirement for a detectable, isotropic narrowband radio transmission from KIC 8462852 is quite high, even modest targeting on the part of the putative extraterrestrials can lower this power substantially.

  16. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borucki, W.J.; Koch, D.G.; Batalha, N.

    2012-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an astero......A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined...... with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 ± 0.060 M sun and 0.979 ± 0.020 R sun. The depth of 492 ± 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 ± 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including...... masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other...

  17. Rotation and oblique pulsation in Kepler observations of the roAp star KIC 10483436

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Cunha, M. S.; Gruberbauer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Photometry of KIC 10483436 was obtained continuously with 1-min exposures over a 27-d period from the Kepler satellite. The light curve shows rotational variations from surface spots with a period of 4.303 ± 0.002 d, an amplitude of about 6 mmag and eight pulsation frequencies typical of roAp stars...

  18. KIC 3749404

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hambleton, K.; Kurtz, D. W.; Prsa, A.;

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat stars are eccentric (e > 0.2) ellipsoidal variables whose light curves resemble a cardiogram. We present the observations and corresponding model of KIC 3749404, a highly eccentric (e = 0.66), short period (P = 20.3 d) heartbeat star with tidally induced pulsations. A binary star model...

  19. Spectroscopic and asteroseismic analysis of the remarkable main-sequence A star KIC 11145123

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Kurtz, Donald W.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    2017-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis was carried out to clarify the properties of KIC 11145123 - the first main-sequence star with a directly measured core-to-surface rotation profile - based on spectra observed with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) of the Subaru telescope. The atmospheric parameters (T...... slow rotation. In particular, we show that there is no evidence of any secondary companion star, and we put stringent limits on the possible mass of any such purported companion through the phase modulation technique....

  20. Conditions for water ice lines and Mars-mass exomoons around accreting super-Jovian planets at 1 - 20 AU from Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Exomoon detections might be feasible with NASA's Kepler or ESA's upcoming PLATO mission or the ground-based E-ELT. To use observational resources most efficiently we need to know where the largest, most easily detected moons can form. We explore the possibility of large exomoons by following the movement of water (H2O) ice lines in the accretion disks around young super-Jovian planets. We want to know how different heating sources in those disks affect the H2O ice lines. We simulate 2D rotationally symmetric accretion disks in hydrostatic equilibrium around super-Jovian exoplanets. The energy terms in our semi-analytical model -- (1) viscous heating, (2) planetary illumination, (3) accretional heating, and (4) stellar illumination -- are fed by precomputed planet evolution tracks. We consider planets accreting 1 to 12 Jupiter masses at distances between 1 and 20 AU to a Sun-like star. Accretion disks around Jupiter-mass planets closer than ~4.5 AU to Sun-like stars do not feature H2O ice lines, but the most m...

  1. To Pulsate or to Eclipse? Status of KIC 9832227 Variable Star

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The variable star known as NSVS 5597754 was identified as a short period RRc field star from ground-based photometry. This star happens to fall in the Kepler field of view and has been observed for 3 years with the Kepler spacecraft. Renamed KIC 9832227, this star was reidentified as an eclipsing binary with a periodicity of 0.457970 days. The NSVS ground based photometry yielded a period solution of 0.229 days. The Kepler photometry, which sampled the light cycle every 30 minutes, shows a pe...

  2. Evidence of Resonant Mode Coupling in the Hot B Subdwarf Star KIC 10139564

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kepler spacecraft provides new opportinuties to observe long term frequency and amplitude modulations of oscillation modes in pulsating stars. We analyzed more than three years of uninterrupted data obtained with this instrument on the hot B subdwarf (sdB star KIC 10139564 and found clear signatures of nonlinear resonant mode coupling affecting several multiplets. The observed periodic frequency and amplitude modulations may allow for new asteroseismic diagnostics, providing in particular ways to measure linear growth rates of pulsation modes in hot subdwarf stars for the first time.

  3. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke [University of Vienna, Institute for Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Haghighipour, Nader, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  4. The Solar Twin Planet Search: IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Leonardo A dos; Nascimento, José-Dias do; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess if these procedures are acceptable. We analyze the rotational velocities -- limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle -- of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins in order to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess if the Sun is a typical rotator. We use high-resolution ($R = 115000$) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO's 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 82 solar twins are estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities are inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Our s...

  5. Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS): Primordial Warm Dust Evolution From 3-30 Myr around Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Silverstone, M D; Mamajek, E E; Hines, D C; Hillenbrand, L A; Najita, J; Pascucci, I; Bouwman, J; Kim, J S; Carpenter, J M; Stauffer, J R; Backman, D E; Moro-Martin, A; Henning, T; Wolf, S; Brooke, T Y; Padgett, D L

    2006-01-01

    We present data obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (Spitzer) for a sample of 74 young (t < 30 Myr old) Sun-like (0.7 < M(star)/M(Sun) < 1.5) stars. These are a sub-set of the observations that comprise the Spitzer Legacy science program entitled the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS). Using IRAC we study the fraction of young stars that exhibit 3.6-8.0 micron infrared emission in excess of that expected from the stellar photosphere, as a function of age from 3-30 Myr. The most straightforward interpretation of such excess emission is the presence of hot (300-1000K) dust in the inner regions (< 3 AU) of a circumstellar disk. Five out of the 74 young stars show a strong infrared excess, four of which have estimated ages of 3-10 Myr. While we detect excesses from 5 optically thick disks, and photospheric emission from the remainder of our sample, we do not detect any excess emission from optically thin disks at these wavelengths. We comp...

  6. Direct Imaging of a Cold Jovian Exoplanet in Orbit around the Sun-like Star GJ 504

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzuhara, M.; et al., [Unknown; Thalmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Several exoplanets have recently been imaged at wide separations of >10 AU from their parent stars. These span a limited range of ages (<50 Myr) and atmospheric properties, with temperatures of 800-1800 K and very red colors (J - H > 0.5 mag), implying thick cloud covers. Furthermore, substantial mo

  7. Photometric and astrometric vagaries of the enigma star KIC 8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Valeri V

    2016-01-01

    We apply a PCA-based pre-whitening method to the entire collection of main Kepler mission long-cadence data for KIC 8462852 spanning four years. This technique removes the correlated variations of instrumental origin in both the detected light curves and astrometry, resolving intrinsic changes in flux and image position of less than 100 ppm and 1 mas, respectively. Beside the major dips in the light curve during mission quarters 8 and 16, when the flux dropped by up to 20%, we confirm multiple smaller dips across the time span of observation with amplitudes ranging from 0.1% to 7%. A variation of flux with a period of 0.88 d and a half-amplitude of approximately 90 ppm is confirmed in the PCA-cleaned data. We find that the phase of the wave is steady over the entire 15-month interval. We confidently detect a weak variability-induced motion (VIM) effect in the cleaned astrometric trajectories, when the moment-based centroids shift synchronously with the flux dips by up to 0.0008 pixels on the detector. The inc...

  8. $\\gamma$ Doradus Pulsations in the Eclipsing Binary Star KIC 6048106

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae Woo

    2016-01-01

    We present the ${\\it Kepler}$ photometry of KIC 6048106 exhibiting O'Connell effect and multiperiodic pulsations. Including a starspot on either of the components, light-curve synthesis indicates that this system is a semi-detached Algol with a mass ratio of 0.211, an orbital inclination of 73.9 deg, and a large temperature difference of 2,534 K. To examine in detail both spot variations and pulsations, we separately analyzed the {\\it Kepler} time-series data at the interval of an orbital period by an iterative way. The results reveal that the variable asymmetries of the light maxima can be interpreted as the changes of a magnetic cool spot on the secondary component with time. Multiple frequency analyses were performed in the outside-eclipse light residuals after removal of the binarity effects from the observed {\\it Kepler} data. We detected 30 frequencies with signal to noise amplitude ratios larger than 4.0, of which six ($f_2$--$f_6$ and $f_{10}$) can be identified as high-order (17 $\\le n \\le$ 25) low-d...

  9. Evolution of the cycles of magnetic activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars in time

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Artamonov, B P

    2016-01-01

    We applied the method of continuous wavelet-transform to the time-frequency analysis to the sets of observations of relative sunspot numbers, sunspot areas and to 6 Mount Wilson HK-project stars with well-defined magnetic cycles. Wavelet analysis of these data reveals the following pattern: at the same time there are several activity cycles whose periods vary widely from the quasi-biennial up to the centennial period for the Sun and vary significant during observations time of the HK-project stars. These relatively low-frequency periodic variations of the solar and stellar activity gradually change the values of periods of different cycles in time. This phenomenon can be observed in every cycles of activity

  10. The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey: HD32963 -- A New Jupiter Analog Orbiting a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan, Dominick; Laughlin, Gregory; Vogt, Steven S; Butler, R Paul; Burt, Jennifer; Wang, Songhu; Holden, Brad; Hanson, Russell; Arriagada, Pamela; Keiser, Sandy; Teske, Johanna; Diaz, Matias

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of 109 new, high-precision Keck/HIRES radial velocity (RV) observations for the solar-type star HD 32963. Our dataset reveals a candidate planetary signal with a period of 6.49 $\\pm$ 0.07 years and a corresponding minimum mass of 0.7 $\\pm$ 0.03 Jupiter masses. Given Jupiter's crucial role in shaping the evolution of the early Solar System, we emphasize the importance of long-term radial velocity surveys. Finally, using our complete set of Keck radial velocities and correcting for the relative detectability of synthetic planetary candidates orbiting each of the 1,122 stars in our sample, we estimate the frequency of Jupiter analogs across our survey at approximately 3%.

  11. Kepler-20: A Sun-like Star with Three Sub-Neptune Exoplanets and Two Earth-size Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, Thomas N; Rowe, Jason F; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Rogers, Leslie A; Désert, Jean-Michel; Buchhave, Lars A; Latham, David W; Quinn, Samuel N; Ciardi, David R; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ford, Eric B; Gilliland, Ronald L; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Bryson, Stephen T; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra A; Howel, Steve B; Horch, Elliott P; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William J; Christiansen, Jessie L; Geary, John C; Henze, Christopher E; Holman, Matthew J; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Jenkins, Jon M; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G; Lissauer, Jack J; Sanderfer, Dwight T; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Seager, Sara; Silverio, Kathryn; Smith, Jeffrey C; Still, Martin; Stumpe, Martin C; Tenenbaum, Peter; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of the Kepler-20 planetary system, which we initially identified through the detection of five distinct periodic transit signals in the Kepler light curve of the host star 2MASSJ19104752+4220194. We find a stellar effective temperature Teff=5455+-100K, a metallicity of [Fe/H]=0.01+-0.04, and a surface gravity of log(g)=4.4+-0.1. Combined with an estimate of the stellar density from the transit light curves we deduce a stellar mass of Mstar=0.912+-0.034 Msun and a stellar radius of Rstar=0.944^{+0.060}_{-0.095} Rsun. For three of the transit signals, our results strongly disfavor the possibility that these result from astrophysical false positives. We conclude that the planetary scenario is more likely than that of an astrophysical false positive by a factor of 2e5 (Kepler-20b), 1e5 (Kepler-20c), and 1.1e3 (Kepler-20d), sufficient to validate these objects as planetary companions. For Kepler-20c and Kepler-20d, the blend scenario is independently disfavored by the achromaticity of the ...

  12. MagAO Imaging of Long-period Objects (MILO). II. A Puzzling White Dwarf around the Sun-like Star HD 11112

    CERN Document Server

    Rodigas, Timothy J; Simon, Amelie; Arriagada, Pamela; Faherty, Jackie; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Mamajek, Eric E; Weinberger, Alycia; Butler, R Paul; Males, Jared R; Morzinski, Katie; Close, Laird M; Hinz, Philip M; Bailey, Jeremy; Carter, Brad; Jenkins, James S; Jones, Hugh; O'Toole, Simon; Tinney, C G; Wittenmyer, Rob; Debes, John

    2016-01-01

    HD 11112 is an old, Sun-like star that has a long-term radial velocity (RV) trend indicative of a massive companion on a wide orbit. Here we present direct images of the source responsible for the trend using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system. We detect the object (HD 11112B) at a separation of 2\\fasec 2 (100 AU) at multiple wavelengths spanning 0.6-4 \\microns ~and show that it is most likely a gravitationally-bound cool white dwarf. Modeling its spectral energy distribution (SED) suggests that its mass is 0.9-1.1 \\msun, which corresponds to very high-eccentricity, near edge-on orbits from Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the RV and imaging data together. The total age of the white dwarf is $>2\\sigma$ discrepant with that of the primary star under most assumptions. The problem can be resolved if the white dwarf progenitor was initially a double white dwarf binary that then merged into the observed high-mass white dwarf. HD 11112B is a unique and intriguing benchmark object that can be used to calibrate ...

  13. The stability of tightly-packed, evenly-spaced systems of Earth-mass planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertas, Alysa; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Tamayo, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Many of the multi-planet systems discovered to date have been notable for their compactness, with neighbouring planets closer together than any in the Solar System. Interestingly, planet-hosting stars have a wide range of ages, suggesting that such compact systems can survive for extended periods of time. We have used numerical simulations to investigate how quickly systems go unstable in relation to the spacing between planets, focusing on hypothetical systems of Earth-mass planets on evenly-spaced orbits (in mutual Hill radii). In general, the further apart the planets are initially, the longer it takes for a pair of planets to undergo a close encounter. We recover the results of previous studies, showing a linear trend in the initial planet spacing between 3 and 8 mutual Hill radii and the logarithm of the stability time. Investigating thousands of simulations with spacings up to 13 mutual Hill radii reveals distinct modulations superimposed on this relationship in the vicinity of first and second-order mean motion resonances of adjacent and next-adjacent planets. We discuss the impact of this structure and the implications on the stability of compact multi-planet systems. Applying the outcomes of our simulations, we show that isolated systems of up to five Earth-mass planets can fit in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star without close encounters for at least 109 orbits.

  14. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 Earth-radius Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Borucki, William J; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Douglas A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William D; DeVore, Edna; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B; Jenkins, Jon M; Latham, David W; Lissauer, Jack J; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Rowe, Jason; Sasselov, Dimitar; Boss, Alan; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Doyle, Laurance; Dupree, Andrea K; Ford, Eric B; Fortney, Jonathan; Holman, Matthew J; Steffen, Jason A; Mullally, Fergal; Still, Martin; Tarter, Jill; Ballard, Sarah; Buchhave, Lars A; Carter, Josh; Christiansen, Jessie L; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Désert, Jean-Michel; Dressing, Courtney; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel; Fischer, Debra; Haas, Michael R; Henze, Christopher; Horch, Elliott; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Kjeldsen, Hans; Johnson, John Asher; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Barclay, Thomas; Li, Jie; Meibom, Søren; Prsa, Andrej; Quinn, Samuel N; Quintana, Elisa V; Robertson, Paul; Sherry, William; Shporer, Avi; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E; Twicken, Joseph D; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F; Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, Bill; Miglio, Andrea; Kawaler, Steve; Arentoft, Torben; Stello, Dennis; Metcalfe, Travis S; Verner, Graham; Karoff, Christoffer; Lundkvist, Mia; Lund, Mikkel; Handberg, Rasmus; Elsworth, Yvonne; Hekker, Saskia; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R

    2011-01-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 +/- 0.060 MSun and 0.979 +/- 0.020 RSun. The depth of 492 +/- 10ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 +/- 0.13 REarth for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities obtained with HIRES on Keck 1 over a one year span. Although t...

  15. MagAO Imaging of Long-period Objects (MILO). I. A Benchmark M Dwarf Companion Exciting a Massive Planet around the Sun-like Star HD 7449

    CERN Document Server

    Rodigas, Timothy J; Faherty, Jackie; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Kaib, Nathan; Butler, R Paul; Shectman, Stephen; Weinberger, Alycia; Males, Jared R; Morzinski, Katie M; Close, Laird M; Hinz, Philip M; Crane, Jeffrey D; Thompson, Ian; Teske, Johanna; Diaz, Matias; Minniti, Dante; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Adams, Fred C; Boss, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    We present high-contrast Magellan adaptive optics (MagAO) images of HD 7449, a Sun-like star with one planet and a long-term radial velocity (RV) trend. We unambiguously detect the source of the long-term trend from 0.6-2.15 \\microns ~at a separation of \\about 0\\fasec 54. We use the object's colors and spectral energy distribution to show that it is most likely an M4-M5 dwarf (mass \\about 0.1-0.2 \\msun) at the same distance as the primary and is therefore likely bound. We also present new RVs measured with the Magellan/MIKE and PFS spectrometers and compile these with archival data from CORALIE and HARPS. We use a new Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure to constrain both the mass ($> 0.17$ \\msun ~at 99$\\%$ confidence) and semimajor axis (\\about 18 AU) of the M dwarf companion (HD 7449B). We also refine the parameters of the known massive planet (HD 7449Ab), finding that its minimum mass is $7.8^{+3.7}_{-1.35}$ \\mj, its semimajor axis is $2.33^{+0.01}_{-0.02}$ AU, and its eccentricity is $0.8^{+0.08}_{-0.06}$. ...

  16. Kepler-22b: A 2.4 EARTH-RADIUS PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE OF A SUN-LIKE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Batalha, Natalie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA, 95192 (United States); Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Cochran, William D. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gautier, Thomas N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA, 91109 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gould, Alan [Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W., E-mail: William.J.Borucki@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-02-01

    A search of the time-series photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft reveals a transiting planet candidate orbiting the 11th magnitude G5 dwarf KIC 10593626 with a period of 290 days. The characteristics of the host star are well constrained by high-resolution spectroscopy combined with an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry, leading to an estimated mass and radius of 0.970 {+-} 0.060 M{sub Sun} and 0.979 {+-} 0.020 R{sub Sun }. The depth of 492 {+-} 10 ppm for the three observed transits yields a radius of 2.38 {+-} 0.13 Re for the planet. The system passes a battery of tests for false positives, including reconnaissance spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and centroid motion. A full BLENDER analysis provides further validation of the planet interpretation by showing that contamination of the target by an eclipsing system would rarely mimic the observed shape of the transits. The final validation of the planet is provided by 16 radial velocities (RVs) obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on Keck I over a one-year span. Although the velocities do not lead to a reliable orbit and mass determination, they are able to constrain the mass to a 3{sigma} upper limit of 124 M{sub Circled-Plus }, safely in the regime of planetary masses, thus earning the designation Kepler-22b. The radiative equilibrium temperature is 262 K for a planet in Kepler-22b's orbit. Although there is no evidence that Kepler-22b is a rocky planet, it is the first confirmed planet with a measured radius to orbit in the habitable zone of any star other than the Sun.

  17. KIC 3749404: A heartbeat Star with Rapid Apsidal Advance Indicative of a Tertiary Component

    CERN Document Server

    Hambleton, Kelly M; Prsa, Andrej; Quinn, Sam N; Fuller, James; Murphy, Simon J; Thompson, Susan E; Latham, David W; Shporer, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat stars are eccentric (e > 0.2) ellipsoidal variables whose light curves resemble a cardiogram. We present the observations and corresponding model of KIC 3749404, a highly eccentric (e = 0.66), short period (P = 20.3 d) heartbeat star with tidally induced pulsations. A binary star model was created using PHOEBE, which we modified to include tidally induced pulsations and Doppler boosting. The morphology of the photometric periastron variation (heartbeat) depends strongly on the eccentricity, inclination and argument of periastron. We show that the inclusion of tidally induced pulsations in the model significantly changes the parameter values, specifically the inclination and those parameters dependent on it. Furthermore, we determine the rate of apsidal advance by modelling the periastron variation at the beginning and end of the 4-yr Kepler data set and dividing by the elapsed time. We compare the model with the theoretical expectations for classical and general relativistic apsidal motion and find ...

  18. Asteroseismic fingerprints of rotation and mixing in the slowly pulsating B8 V star KIC 7760680

    CERN Document Server

    Pápics, P I; Aerts, C; Van Reeth, T; De Smedt, K; Hillen, M; Oestensen, R; Moravveji, E

    2015-01-01

    We present the first detection of a rotationally affected series consisting of 36 consecutive high-order sectoral dipole gravity modes in a slowly pulsating B (SPB) star. The results are based on the analysis of four years of virtually uninterrupted photometric data assembled with the Kepler Mission, and high-resolution spectra acquired using the HERMES spectrograph at the 1.2 meter Mercator Telescope. The spectroscopic measurements place KIC7760680 inside the SPB instability strip, near the cool edge. The photometric analysis reveals the longest unambiguous series of gravity modes of the same degree l with consecutive radial order n, that carries clear signatures of chemical mixing and rotation. With such exceptional observational constraints, this star should be considered as the Rosetta Stone of SPBs for future modelling, and bring us a step closer to the much needed seismic calibration of stellar structure models of massive stars.

  19. Asteroseismic measurement of slow, nearly uniform surface-to-core rotation in the main-sequence F star KIC 9244992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kurtz, Donald W.; Takata, Masao;

    2015-01-01

    We have found a rotationally split series of core g-mode triplets and surface p-mode multiplets in a main-sequence F star, KIC 9244992. Comparison with models shows that the star has a mass of about 1.45 M-circle dot, and is at an advanced stage of main-sequence evolution in which the central......, obtained from p-mode splittings, is 66 d, slightly slower than the rotation of 64 d in the core, measured by g-mode splittings. KIC 9244992 is similar to KIC 11145123 in that both are near the end of main-sequence stage with very slow and nearly uniform rotation. This indicates the angular momentum...

  20. Identifying modes in KIC 5807616, a Pulsating sdB Star from Kepler Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzesinski J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KIC 5807616 is a pulsating B-type hot subdwarf, reported to harbor planets. Its Kepler spacecraft Q 2 and Q 5 -Q 8 light curves as well as spectroscopic data were already analyzed and parameters characterizing the star were derived. Since then, Kepler had collected 2 years of additional data (Q 9 -Q 16 and half of Q 17. One might think new data could improve previously derived parameters, but it doesn’t seem to be that easy. It appears that the Fourier transform amplitude spectra of the KIC 5807616 data do not show ”clear” multiplets. Therefore, in this work we performed the mode identification based mainly on the period spacing of g-modes, while the analysis of multiplet splitting relied on two p-modes with stable multiplet components. We also derived the rotational period of the star and analyzed the low frequency region of the FT, where signatures of two planets were found in the past, but we had difficulties confirming their existence.

  1. Solar-like oscillations from the depths of the red-giant star KIC 4351319 observed with Kepler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    di Mauro, M. P.; Cardini, D.; Catanzaro, G.; Ventura, R.; Barban, C.; Bedding, T.R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; de Ridder, J.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Kallinger, T.; Miglio, A.; Montalban, J.; Mosser, B.; Stello, D.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kjeldsen, H.; Mullally, F.; Still, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of the asteroseismic analysis of the red-giant star KIC 4351319 (TYC 3124-914-1), observed for 30 d in short-cadence mode with the Kepler satellite. The analysis has allowed us to determine the large and small frequency separations, Hz and Hz, respectively, and the frequency o

  2. KIC 10080943

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keen, M. A.; Bedding, T. R.; Murphy, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We use 4 yr of Kepler photometry to study the non-eclipsing spectroscopic binary KIC 10080943. We find both components to be gamma Doradus/delta Scuti hybrids, which pulsate in both p and g modes. We present an analysis of the g modes, which is complicated by the fact that the two sets of l = 1...... the doublets but not the triplets. The rotational splittings of the multiplets imply core rotation periods of about 11 and 7 d in the two stars. One of the stars also shows evidence of l = 2 modes....

  3. Signatures of nonlinear mode interactions in the pulsating hot B subdwarf star KIC 10139564

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, W.; Charpinet, S.; Vauclair, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The unprecedented photometric quality and time coverage offered by the Kepler spacecraft has opened up new opportunities to search for signatures of nonlinear effects that affect oscillation modes in pulsating stars. Aims: The data accumulated on the pulsating hot B subdwarf KIC 10139564 are used to explore in detail the stability of its oscillation modes, focusing in particular on evidences of nonlinear behaviors. Methods: We analyzed 38 months of contiguous short-cadence data, concentrating on mode multiplets induced by the star rotation and on frequencies forming linear combinations that show intriguing behaviors during the course of the observations. Results: We find clear signatures that point toward nonlinear effects predicted by resonant mode coupling mechanisms. These couplings can induce various mode behaviors for the components of multiplets and for frequencies related by linear relationships. We find that a triplet at 5760 μHz, a quintuplet at 5287 μHz and a (ℓ > 2) multiplet at 5412 μHz, all induced by rotation, show clear frequency and amplitude modulations which are typical of the so-called intermediate regime of a resonance between the components. One triplet at 316 μHz and a doublet at 394 μHz show modulated amplitude and constant frequency which can be associated with a narrow transitory regime of the resonance. Another triplet at 519 μHz appears to be in a frequency-locked regime where both frequency and amplitude are constant. Additionally, three linear combinations of frequencies near 6076 μHz also show amplitude and frequency modulations, which are likely related to a three-mode direct resonance of the type ν0 ~ ν1 + ν2. Conclusions: The identified frequency and amplitude modulations are the first clear-cut signatures of nonlinear resonant couplings occurring in pulsating hot B subdwarf stars. However, the observed behaviors suggest that the resonances occurring in these stars usually follow more complicated patterns than

  4. KIC 4768731: a bright long-period roAp star in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Smalley, B; Murphy, S J; Lehmann, H; Kurtz, D W; Holdsworth, D L; Cunha, M S; Balona, L A; Briquet, M; Bruntt, H; de Cat, P; Lampens, P; Thygesen, A O; Uytterhoeven, K

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of 61.45 d^-1 (711.2 mu Hz) oscillations, with amplitudes of 62.6-mu mag, in KIC 4768731 (HD 225914) using Kepler photometry. This relatively bright (V=9.17) chemically peculiar star with spectral type A5 Vp SrCr(Eu) has previously been found to exhibit rotational modulation with a period of 5.21 d. Fourier analysis reveals a simple dipole pulsator with an amplitude that has remained stable over a 4-yr time span, but with a frequency that is variable. Analysis of high-resolution spectra yields stellar parameters of T_eff = 8100 +/- 200 K, log g = 4.0 +/- 0.2, [Fe/H] = +0.31 +/- 0.24 and v sin i = 14.8 +/- 1.6 km/s. Line profile variations caused by rotation are also evident. Lines of Sr, Cr, Eu, Mg and Si are strongest when the star is brightest, while Y and Ba vary in anti-phase with the other elements. The abundances of rare earth elements are only modestly enhanced compared to other roAp stars of similar T_eff and log g. Radial velocities in the literature suggest a significant...

  5. KIC 7582608: a new Kepler roAp star with frequency variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holdsworth D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the fifth roAp star reported in the Kepler field, KIC 7582608, discovered with the SuperWASP project. The object shows a high frequency pulsation at 181.7324d−1 (P = 7.9 min with an amplitude of 1.45 mmag, and low frequency rotational modulation corresponding to a period of 20.4339 d. Spectral analysis confirms the Ap nature of the target, with characteristic lines of rare earth elements present. From our spectral observations we derive a lower limit on the mean magnetic field modulus of 〈B〉 =3.05 ± 0.23 kG. Long Cadence Kepler observations show a frequency quintuplet split by the rotational period of the star, typical for an oblique pulsator. We suggest the star is a quadrupole pulsator with a geometry such that i ~ 66° and β ~ 33°. We detect frequency variations of the pulsation in both the WASP and Kepler data sets on many time scales. Linear, non-adiabatic stability modelling allows us to constrain a region on the HR diagram where the pulsations are unstable, an area consistent with observations.

  6. Internal rotation of the red-giant star KIC 4448777 by means of asteroseismic inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mauro, M P; Cardini, D; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Dziembowski, W A; Paterno', L; Beck, P G; Bloemen, S; Davies, G R; De Smedt, K; Elsworth, Y; Garcia, R A; Hekker, S; Mosser, B; Tkachenko, A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of the stellar interior of the early red-giant star KIC 4448777 by asteroseismic inversion of 14 splittings of the dipole mixed modes obtained from {\\it Kepler} observations. In order to overcome the complexity of the oscillation pattern typical of red-giant stars, we present a procedure which involves a combination of different methods to extract the rotational splittings from the power spectrum. We find not only that the core rotates faster than the surface, confirming previous inversion results generated for other red giants (Deheuvels et al. 2012,2014), but we also estimate the variation of the angular velocity within the helium core with a spatial resolution of $\\Delta r=0.001R$ and verify the hypothesis of a sharp discontinuity in the inner stellar rotation (Deheuvels et al. 2014). The results show that the entire core rotates rigidly with an angular velocity of about $\\langle\\Omega_c/2\\pi\\rangle=748\\pm18$~nHz and provide evidence for an angular velocity decrease thro...

  7. KIC 1571511B: A Benchmark Low-Mass Star In An Eclipsing Binary System In The Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ofir, Aviv; Buchhave, Lars; Lacy, Claud H S; Hatzes, Artie P; Fridlund, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    KIC 1571511 is a 14d eclipsing binary (EB) in the Kepler dataset. The secondary of this EB is a very low mass star with a mass of 0.14136 +/- 0.00036 M_sun and a radius of 0.17831 +0.00051/-0.00062 R_sun (statistical errors only). The overall system parameters make KIC 1571511B an ideal "benchmark object": among the smallest, lightest and best-described stars known, smaller even than some known exoplanet. Currently available photometry encompasses only a small part of the total: future Kepler data releases promise to constrain many of the properties of KIC 1571511B to unprecedented level. However, as in many spectroscopic single-lined systems, the current error budget is dominated by the modeling errors of the primary and not by the above statistical errors. We conclude that detecting the RV signal of the secondary component is crucial to achieving the full potential of this possible benchmark object for the study of low mass stars.

  8. A pulsation zoo in the hot subdwarf B star KIC 10139564 observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, A S; Stello, D; Ostensen, R H; Telting, J H; Pakstiene, E; O'Toole, S J; Silvotti, R; Degroote, P; Bloemen, S; Hu, H; Van Grootel, V; Clarke, B D; Van Cleve, J; Thompson, S E; Kawaler, S D

    2012-01-01

    We present our analyses of 15 months of Kepler data on KIC 10139564. We detected 57 periodicities with a variety of properties not previously observed all together in one pulsating subdwarf B star. Ten of the periodicities were found in the low-frequency region, and we associate them with nonradial g-modes. The other periodicities were found in the high-frequency region, which are likely p-modes. We discovered that most of the periodicities are components of multiplets with a common spacing. Assuming that multiplets are caused by rotation, we derive a rotation period of 25.6(1.8) days. The multiplets also allow us to identify the pulsations to an unprecedented extent for this class of pulsator. We also detect l<=2 multiplets, which are sensitive to the pulsation inclination and can constrain limb darkening via geometric cancellation factors. While most periodicities are stable, we detected several regions that show complex patterns. Detailed analyses showed these regions are complicated by several factors....

  9. The first evidence for multiple pulsation axes: a new roAp star in the Kepler field, KIC 10195926

    CERN Document Server

    Kurtz, D W; Saio, H; Bigot, L; Balona, L A; Elkin, V G; Shibahashi, H; Brandao, I M; Uytterhoeven, K; Frandsen, S; Frimann, S; Hatzes, A; Lueftinger, T; Gruberbauer, M; Kjeldsen, H; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kawaler, S D

    2011-01-01

    We have discovered a new rapidly oscillating Ap star among the Kepler Mission target stars, KIC 10195926. This star shows two pulsation modes with periods that are amongst the longest known for roAp stars at 17.1 min and 18.1 min, indicating that the star is near the terminal age main sequence. The principal pulsation mode is an oblique dipole mode that shows a rotationally split frequency septuplet that provides information on the geometry of the mode. The secondary mode also appears to be a dipole mode with a rotationally split triplet, but we are able to show within the improved oblique pulsator model that these two modes cannot have the same axis of pulsation. This is the first time for any pulsating star that evidence has been found for separate pulsation axes for different modes. The two modes are separated in frequency by 55 microHz, which we model as the large separation. The star is an alpha^2 CVn spotted magnetic variable that shows a complex rotational light variation with a period of Prot = 5.6845...

  10. Solar-like oscillations from the depths of the red-giant star KIC 4351319 observed with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Mauro, M. P.; Cardini, D.; Catanzaro, G.; Ventura, R.; Barban, C.; Bedding, T. R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; De Ridder, J.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Kallinger, T.; Miglio, A.; Montalban, J.; Mosser, B.; Stello, D.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kjeldsen, H.; Mullally, F.; Still, M.

    2011-08-01

    We present the results of the asteroseismic analysis of the red-giant star KIC 4351319 (TYC 3124-914-1), observed for 30 d in short-cadence mode with the Kepler satellite. The analysis has allowed us to determine the large and small frequency separations, ?Hz and ?Hz, respectively, and the frequency of maximum oscillation power, ?Hz. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the observations allowed us to identify 25 independent pulsation modes whose frequencies range approximately from 300 to ?Hz. The observed oscillation frequencies together with the accurate determination of the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, gravity and metallicity), provided by additional ground-based spectroscopic observations, enabled us to theoretically interpret the observed oscillation spectrum. KIC 4351319 appears to oscillate with a well-defined solar-type p-mode pattern due to radial acoustic modes and non-radial nearly pure p modes. In addition, several non-radial mixed modes have been identified. Theoretical models well reproduce the observed oscillation frequencies and indicate that this star, located at the base of the ascending red-giant branch, is in the hydrogen-shell-burning phase, with a mass of ˜1.3 M⊙, a radius of ? and an age of ˜5.6 Gyr. The main parameters of this star have been determined with an unprecedented level of precision for a red-giant star, with uncertainties of 2 per cent for mass, 7 per cent for age, 1 per cent for radius and 4 per cent for luminosity.

  11. Seismic investigation of the γ Dor star KIC 6462033: The first results of Kepler and ground-based follow up observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, C.; Ulaş, B.; Damasso, M.; Carbognani, A.; Cenadelli, D.; Stateva, I.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Dimitrov, D.

    2014-02-01

    Preliminary results on the analysis of the Kepler light curve and photometric ground-based time series of γ Dor star KIC 6462033 (TYC 3144-646-1, V = 10.83, P = 0.69686 d) are presented in order to determine pulsation frequencies.

  12. First Kepler results on compact pulsators - II. KIC 010139564, a new pulsating subdwarf B (V361 Hya) star with an additional low-frequency mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaler, Stephen; Reed, M.D.; Quint, A.C.;

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of non-radial pulsations in a hot subdwarf B star based on 30.5 d of nearly continuous time series photometry using the Kepler spacecraft. KIC 010139564 is found to be a short-period pulsator of the V361 Hya (EC 14026) class with more than 10 independent pulsation modes...

  13. Kepler observations of the pulsating subdwarf B star KIC 2697388: the detection of converging frequency multiplets in the full data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, J. W.; Reed, M. D.; Baran, A. S.; Østensen, R. H.; Telting, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    The Kepler spacecraft observed ˜150 000 stars over the course of its four-year mission, of which 18 were discovered to be pulsating subdwarf B stars, including KIC 2697388. We analyse three years of Kepler spacecraft short-cadence data as well as 21 low-resolution spectra of the pulsating subdwarf B star KIC 2697388. Our spectra have a radial-velocity scatter of 9.5 km s-1, and while insufficient to completely rule out binarity, we rule out short-period, low-inclination orbits for KIC 2697388. From the short-cadence Kepler data, we detect 253 periodicities, most with periods from 1 to 2.5 h, which we associate with gravity-mode pulsations. Twenty-three periods were also detected in the short-period pressure-mode region. We applied standard seismic tools for mode identification, including asymptotic overtone period spacings and rotationally induced frequency multiplets. We classify 89 per cent of the periodicities with mode identifications; most of low degree (ℓ ≤ 2), but 42 are identified as ℓ ≥ 3. Frequency multiplets provide a rotation period for the star of ˜42 d. A unique feature is seen in KIC 2697388's data; in all ℓ ≥ 2 multiplets, the splittings decrease over the course of the observations. If the trend continues, ℓ ≥ 2 multiplets would become singlets within a decade.

  14. Solar-like oscillations from the depths of the red-giant star KIC 4351319 observed with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mauro, M P; Catanzaro, G; Ventura, R; Barban, C; Bedding, T R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; De Ridder, J; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Kallinger, T; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Mosser, B; Stello, D; Uytterhoeven, K; Kinemuchi, K; Kjeldsen, H; Mullally, F; Still, M

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of the asteroseismic analysis of the red-giant star KIC 4351319 (TYC 3124-914-1), observed for 30 days in short-cadence mode with the Kepler satellite. The analysis has allowed us to determine the large and small frequency separations, and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the observations allowed us to identify 25 independent pulsation modes whose frequencies range approximately from 300 to 500 muHz. The observed oscillation frequencies together with the accurate determination of the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, gravity and metallicity), provided by additional ground-based spectroscopic observations, enabled us to theoretically interpret the observed oscillation spectrum. KIC 4351319 appears to oscillate with a well defined solar-type p-modes pattern due to radial acoustic modes and non-radial nearly pure p modes. In addition, several non-radial mixed modes have been identified. Theoretical models well reproduce the observed...

  15. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. V. Follow-up of ELODIE candidates: Jupiter-analogs around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisse, I.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Bonfils, X.; Bouchy, F.; Santos, N. C.; Arnold, L.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Díaz, R. F.; Delfosse, X.; Eggenberger, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Hébrard, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Moutou, C.; Naef, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Sivan, J.-P.; Udry, S.

    2012-09-01

    We present radial-velocity measurements obtained in one of a number of programs underway to search for extrasolar planets with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 1.93-m telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory. Targets were selected from catalogs observed with ELODIE, which had been mounted previously at the telescope, in order to detect long-period planets with an extended database close to 15 years. Two new Jupiter-analog candidates are reported to orbit the bright stars HD 150706 and HD 222155 in 16.1 yr and 10.9 yr at 6.7-1.4+4.0 AU and 5.1-0.7+0.6 AU, and to have minimum masses of 2.71-0.66+1.14 MJup and 1.90-0.53+0.67 MJup, respectively. Using the measurements from ELODIE and SOPHIE, we refine the parameters of the long-period planets HD 154345b and HD 89307b, and publish the first reliable orbit for HD 24040b. This last companion has a minimum mass of 4.01 ± 0.49 MJup orbiting its star in 10.0 yr at 4.92 ± 0.38 AU. Moreover, the data provide evidence of a third bound object in the HD 24040 system. With a surrounding dust debris disk, HD 150706 is an active G0 dwarf for which we partially corrected the effect of the stellar spot on the SOPHIE radial-velocities. In contrast, HD 222155 is an inactive G2V star. In the SOPHIE measurements, an instrumental effect could be characterized and partly corrected. On the basis of the previous findings of Lovis and collaborators and since no significant correlation between the radial-velocity variations and the activity index are found in the SOPHIE data, these variations are not expected to be only due to stellar magnetic cycles. Finally, we discuss the main properties of this new population of long-period Jupiter-mass planets, which for the moment consists of fewer than 20 candidates. These stars are preferential targets either for direct-imaging or astrometry follow-up surveys to constrain the system parameters and for higher-precision radial-velocity searches for lower mass planets, aiming to find a solar system twin

  16. Sub-Inertial Gravity Modes in the B8V Star KIC 7760680 Reveal Moderate Core Overshooting and Low Vertical Diffusive Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Moravveji, Ehsan; Aerts, Conny; Mathis, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    KIC 7760680 is so far the richest slowly pulsating B star, by exhibiting 36 consecutive dipole ($\\ell=1$) gravity (g-) modes. The monotonically decreasing period spacing of the series, in addition to the local dips in the pattern confirm that KIC 7760680 is a moderate rotator, with clear mode trapping in chemically inhomogeneous layers. We employ the traditional approximation of rotation to incorporate rotational effects on g-mode frequencies. Our detailed forward asteroseismic modelling of this g-mode series reveals that KIC 7760680 is a moderately rotating B star with mass $\\sim3.25$ M$_\\odot$. By simultaneously matching the slope of the period spacing, and the number of modes in the observed frequency range, we deduce that the equatorial rotation frequency of KIC 7760680 is 0.4805 day$^{-1}$, which is 26\\% of its Roche break up frequency. The relative deviation of the model frequencies and those observed is less than one percent. We succeed to tightly constrain the exponentially-decaying convective core ov...

  17. A Helicity-Based Method to Infer the CME Magnetic Field Magnitude in Sun and Geospace: Generalization and Extension to Sun-Like and M-Dwarf Stars and Implications for Exoplanet Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Georgoulis, M. K.

    2017-07-01

    Patsourakos et al. ( Astrophys. J. 817, 14, 2016) and Patsourakos and Georgoulis ( Astron. Astrophys. 595, A121, 2016) introduced a method to infer the axial magnetic field in flux-rope coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar corona and farther away in the interplanetary medium. The method, based on the conservation principle of magnetic helicity, uses the relative magnetic helicity of the solar source region as input estimates, along with the radius and length of the corresponding CME flux rope. The method was initially applied to cylindrical force-free flux ropes, with encouraging results. We hereby extend our framework along two distinct lines. First, we generalize our formalism to several possible flux-rope configurations (linear and nonlinear force-free, non-force-free, spheromak, and torus) to investigate the dependence of the resulting CME axial magnetic field on input parameters and the employed flux-rope configuration. Second, we generalize our framework to both Sun-like and active M-dwarf stars hosting superflares. In a qualitative sense, we find that Earth may not experience severe atmosphere-eroding magnetospheric compression even for eruptive solar superflares with energies {≈} 104 times higher than those of the largest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-class flares currently observed. In addition, the two recently discovered exoplanets with the highest Earth-similarity index, Kepler 438b and Proxima b, seem to lie in the prohibitive zone of atmospheric erosion due to interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), except when they possess planetary magnetic fields that are much higher than that of Earth.

  18. KIC 8410637: a 408-day period eclipsing binary containing a pulsating giant star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Frandsen; H. Lehmann; S. Hekker; J. Southworth; J. Debosscher; P. Beck; M. Hartmann; A. Pigulski; G. Kopacki; Z. Kołaczkowski; M. Stȩślicki; A.O. Thygesen; K. Brogaard; Y. Elsworth

    2013-01-01

    Context. Detached eclipsing binaries (dEBs) are ideal targets for accurately measuring the masses and radii of their component stars. If at least one of the stars has evolved off the main sequence (MS), the masses and radii give a strict constraint on the age of the stars. Several dEBs containing a

  19. Seismic investigation of the {\\gamma} Dor star KIC 6462033: The first results of Kepler and ground-based follow up observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ulusoy, C; Damasso, M; Carbognani, A; Cenadelli, D; Stateva, I; Iliev, I Kh; Dimitrov, D

    2013-01-01

    We present the first preliminary results on the analysis of ground-based time series of the {\\gamma} Dor star KIC 6462033 (TYC 3144-646-1, V = 10.83, P = 0.69686 d) as well as Kepler photometry in order to study pulsational behaviour in this star.{\\gamma} Dor variables, which exhibit g-mode pulsations, are promising asteroseismic targets to understand their rich complexity of pulsational characteristics in detail. In order to achieve this goal, intensive and numerous multicolour and high resolution spectroscopic observations are also required, to complete space-based data aimed at the determination of their physical parameters.

  20. Tight asteroseismic constraints on core overshooting and diffusive mixing in the slowly rotating pulsating B8.3V star KIC 10526294

    CERN Document Server

    Moravveji, Ehsan; Papics, Peter I; Triana, Santiago Andres; Vandoren, Bram

    2015-01-01

    KIC 10526294 is a very slowly rotating and slowly pulsating late B-type star. Its 19 consecutive dipole gravity modes constitute a series with almost constant period spacing. This unique collection of identified modes probes the near-core environment of this star and holds the potential to reveal the size and structure of the overshooting zone on top of the convective core, as well as the mixing properties of the star. We pursue forward seismic modelling based on adiabatic eigenfrequencies of equilibrium models for eight extensive evolutionary grids tuned to KIC 10526294, by varying the initial mass, metallicity, chemical mixture, and the extent of the overshooting layer on top of the convective core. We examine models for both OP and OPAL opacities and test the occurrence of extra diffusive mixing. We find a tight mass, metallicity relation within the ranges $M$ ~ 3.13 to 3.25 Msun and $Z$ ~ 0.014 to 0.028. We deduce that an exponentially decaying diffusive core overshooting prescription describes the seismi...

  1. Solar-like oscillations in KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888 from 8 months of Kepler data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathur, S.; Handberg, R.; Campante, T.L.; Garcia, R.A.; Appourchaux, T.; Bedding, T.R.; Mosser, B.; Chaplin, W.J.; Ballot, J.; Benomar, O.; Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Gaulme, P.; Hekker, S.; Regulo, C.; Salabert, D.; Verner, G.; White, T.R.; Brandao, I.M.; Creevey, O.L.; Dogan, G.; Elsworth, Y.; Huber, D.; Hale, S.J.; Houdek, G.; Karoff, C.; Metcalfe, T.S.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M.J.P.F.G.; Thompson, M.J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gilliland, R.L.; Kawaler, S.D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Quintana, E.V.; Sanderfer, D.T.; Seader, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the photometric short-cadence data obtained with the Kepler mission during the first 8 months of observations of two solar-type stars of spectral types G and F: KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888, respectively, the latter having a lower signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) compared with the former. We

  2. Signatures of nonlinear mode interactions in the pulsating hot B subdwarf star KIC 10139564

    CERN Document Server

    Zong, Weikai; Vauclair, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    We analyse 38-month of contiguous short-cadence data, concentrating on mode multiplets induced by the star rotation and on frequencies forming linear combinations that show intriguing behaviors during the course of the observations. We find clear signatures that point toward nonlinear effects predicted by resonant mode coupling mechanisms. These couplings can induce various mode behaviors for the components of multiplets and for frequencies related by linear relationships. We find that a triplet at 5760\\,$\\mu$Hz, a quintuplet at 5287\\,$\\mu$Hz and a ($\\ell>2$) multiplet at 5412\\,$\\mu$Hz, all induced by rotation, show clear frequency and amplitude modulations which are typical of the so-called intermediate regime of a resonance between the components. One triplet at 316\\,$\\mu$Hz and a doublet at 394\\,$\\mu$Hz show modulated amplitude and constant frequency which can be associated with a narrow transitory regime of the resonance. Another triplet at 519\\,$\\mu$Hz appears to be in a frequency lock regime where both ...

  3. Kepler photometry of KIC10661783

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, J.; Pavlovski, K.; Smalley, B.

    2011-01-01

    We present Kepler satellite photometry of KIC 10661783, a short-period binary star system which shows total eclipses and multiperiodic δ Scuti pulsations. A frequency analysis of the eclipse-subtracted light curve reveals at least 68 frequencies, of which 55 or more can be attributed to pulsation...... detected. From a plot of the residuals versus orbital phase, we assign the pulsations to the primary star in the system. The pulsations were removed from the short-cadence data and the light curve was modelled using the Wilson–Devinney code. We are unable to get a perfect fit due to the residual effects...... of pulsations and also to the treatment of reflection and reprocessing in the light-curve model. A model where the secondary star fills its Roche lobe is favoured, which means that KIC 10661783 can be classified as an oEA system. Further photometric and spectroscopic observations will allow the masses and radii...

  4. KIC 8462852 Faded Throughout the Kepler Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Montet, Benjamin T

    2016-01-01

    KIC 8462852 is a superficially ordinary main sequence F star for which Kepler detected an unusual series of brief dimming events. We obtain accurate relative photometry of KIC 8462852 from the Kepler full frame images, finding that the brightness of KIC 8462852 monotonically decreased over the four years it was observed by Kepler. Over the first ~1000 days, KIC 8462852 faded approximately linearly at a rate of 0.341 +/- 0.041 percent per year, for a total decline of 0.9%. KIC 8462852 then dimmed much more rapidly in the next ~200 days, with its flux dropping by more than 2%. For the final ~200 days of Kepler photometry the magnitude remained approximately constant, although the data are also consistent with the decline rate measured for the first 2.7 yr. Of a sample of 193 nearby comparison stars and 355 stars with similar stellar parameters, 0.6% change brightness at a rate as fast as 0.341 +/- 0.041 percent per year, and none exhibit either the rapid decline by >2% or the cumulative fading by 3% of KIC 8462...

  5. Could Ultracool Dwarfs Have Sun-Like Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Solar-like stars exhibit magnetic cycles; our Sun, for instance, displays an 11-year period in its activity, manifesting as cyclic changes in radiation levels, the number of sunspots and flares, and ejection of solar material. Over the span of two activity cycles, the Suns magnetic field flips polarity and then returns to its original state.An artists illustration comparing the Sun to TRAPPIST-1, an ultracool dwarf star known to host several planets. [ESO]But what about the magnetic behavior of objects near the cooler end of the stellar main sequence do they exhibit similar activity cycles?Effects of a Convecting InteriorDwarf stars have made headlines in recent years due to their potential to harbor exoplanets. Because these cooler stars have lower flux levels compared to the Sun, their habitable zones lie much closer to the stars. The magnetic behavior of these stars is therefore important to understand: could ultracool dwarfs exhibit solar-like activity cycles that would affect planets with close orbits?The differences in internal structure between different mass stars. Ultracool dwarfs have fully convective interiors. [www.sun.org]Theres a major difference between ultracool dwarfs (stars of spectral type higher than M7 and brown dwarfs) and Sun-like stars: their internal structures. Sun-like stars have a convective envelope that surrounds a radiative core. The interiors of cool, low-mass objects, on the other hand, are fully convective.Based on theoretical studies of how magnetism is generated in stars, its thought that the fully convective interiors of ultracool dwarfs cant support large-scale magnetic field formation. This should prevent these stars from exhibiting activity cycles like the Sun. But recent radio observations of dwarf stars have led scientist Matthew Route (ITaP Research Computing, Purdue University) to question these models.A Reversing Field?During observations of the brown dwarf star J1047+21 in 20102011, radio flares were detected with

  6. KIC 8462852 Faded throughout the Kepler Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-10-01

    KIC 8462852 is a superficially ordinary main sequence F star for which Kepler detected an unusual series of brief dimming events. We obtain accurate relative photometry of KIC 8462852 from the Kepler full-frame images, finding that the brightness of KIC 8462852 monotonically decreased over the four years it was observed by Kepler. Over the first ˜1000 days KIC 8462852 faded approximately linearly at a rate of 0.341 ± 0.041% yr-1, for a total decline of 0.9%. KIC 8462852 then dimmed much more rapidly in the next ˜200 days, with its flux dropping by more than 2%. For the final ˜200 days of Kepler photometry the magnitude remained approximately constant, although the data are also consistent with the decline rate measured for the first 2.7 years. Of a sample of 193 nearby comparison stars and 355 stars with similar stellar parameters, none exhibit the rapid decline by >2% or the cumulative fading by 3% of KIC 8462852. Moreover, of these comparison stars, only one changes brightness as quickly as the 0.341% yr-1 measured for KIC 8462852 during the first three years of the Kepler mission. We examine whether the rapid decline could be caused by a cloud of transiting circumstellar material, finding that while such a cloud could evade detection in submillimeter observations, the transit ingress and duration cannot be explained by a simple cloud model. Moreover, this model cannot account for the observed longer-term dimming. No known or proposed stellar phenomena can fully explain all aspects of the observed light curve.

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN {delta} SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fossati, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Balona, L. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Kurtz, D. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Bohlender, D. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Lenz, P. [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Mueller, I.; Lueftinger, Th. [Institut fuer Astronphysik der Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 ({delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day{sup -1} (6.3 {mu}Hz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day{sup -1} (32-35 {mu}Hz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the {delta} Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator ({upsilon} sin i = 300 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}) with an effective temperature of 7600 {+-} 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 {+-} 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  8. PLANETARY CONSTRUCTION ZONES IN OCCULTATION: DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRASOLAR RING SYSTEM TRANSITING A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR AND FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR DETECTING ECLIPSES BY CIRCUMSECONDARY AND CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Quillen, Alice C.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Moolekamp, Fred; Scott, Erin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Kenworthy, Matthew A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Cameron, Andrew Collier; Parley, Neil R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    The large relative sizes of circumstellar and circumplanetary disks imply that they might be seen in eclipse in stellar light curves. We estimate that a survey of {approx}10{sup 4} young ({approx}10 million year old) post-accretion pre-main-sequence stars monitored for {approx}10 years should yield at least a few deep eclipses from circumplanetary disks and disks surrounding low-mass companion stars. We present photometric and spectroscopic data for a pre-main-sequence K5 star (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6 = ASAS J140748-3945.7), a newly discovered {approx}0.9 M{sub Sun} member of the {approx}16 Myr old Upper Centaurus-Lupus subgroup of Sco-Cen at a kinematic distance of 128 {+-} 13 pc. This star exhibited a remarkably long, deep, and complex eclipse event centered on 2007 April 29 (as discovered in Super Wide Angle Search for Planets (SuperWASP) photometry, and with portions of the dimming confirmed by All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) data). At least five multi-day dimming events of >0.5 mag are identified, with a >3.3 mag deep eclipse bracketed by two pairs of {approx}1 mag eclipses symmetrically occurring {+-}12 days and {+-}26 days before and after. Hence, significant dimming of the star was taking place on and off over at least a {approx}54 day period in 2007, and a strong >1 mag dimming event occurring over a {approx}12 day span. We place a firm lower limit on the period of 850 days (i.e., the orbital radius of the eclipser must be >1.7 AU and orbital velocity must be <22 km s{sup -1}). The shape of the light curve is similar to the lopsided eclipses of the Be star EE Cep. We suspect that this new star is being eclipsed by a low-mass object orbited by a dense inner disk, further girded by at least three dusty rings of optical depths near unity. Between these rings are at least two annuli of near-zero optical depth (i.e., gaps), possibly cleared out by planets or moons, depending on the nature of the secondary. For possible periods in the range 2.33-200 yr, the

  9. Solar-like Oscillations in KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888 from 8 Months of Kepler Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, S.; Handberg, Rasmus; Campante, Tiago. L.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the photometric short-cadence data obtained with the Kepler mission during the first 8 months of observations of two solar-type stars of spectral types G and F: KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888, respectively, the latter having a lower signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) compared with the former. We...... laws. We emphasize the importance of continued observations for the stars with low S/N for an improved characterization of the oscillation modes. Our results offer a preview of what will be possible for many stars with the long data sets obtained during the remainder of the mission....

  10. The first evidence for multiple pulsation axes: a new rapidly oscillating Ap star in the Kepler field, KIC 10195926

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtz, Donald W.; Cunha, Margarida S.; Saio, H.;

    2011-01-01

    model that these two modes cannot have the same axis of pulsation. This is the first time for any pulsating star that evidence has been found for separate pulsation axes for different modes. The two modes are separated in frequency by 55 μHz, which we model as the large separation. The star is an α2 CVn...... to these values that reproduces the rotational variations of the two obliquely pulsating modes with different pulsation axes. The star shows overabundances of the rare earth elements, but these are not as extreme as most other roAp stars. The spectrum is variable with rotation, indicating surface abundance...

  11. Solar-like oscillations from the depths of the red-giant star KIC4351319 observed with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Mauro, M.P.; Cardini, D.; Catanzaro, G.

    2011-01-01

    , is in the hydrogen-shell-burning phase, with a mass of ∼1.3 M⊙, a radius of inline image and an age of ∼5.6 Gyr. The main parameters of this star have been determined with an unprecedented level of precision for a red-giant star, with uncertainties of 2 per cent for mass, 7 per cent for age, 1 per cent for radius...

  12. CHARACTERIZING TWO SOLAR-TYPE KEPLER SUBGIANTS WITH ASTEROSEISMOLOGY: KIC 10920273 AND KIC 11395018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, G.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Deheuvels, S.; Pinsonneault, M. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Di Mauro, M. P. [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Eggenberger, P. [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Maillettes 51, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Creevey, O. L. [Universite de Nice, Laboratoire Cassiopee, CNRS UMR 6202, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Sousa, S. G.; Brandao, I. M.; Campante, T. L. [Centro de Astrofisica and DFA-Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Frasca, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Karoff, C.; Handberg, R.; Thygesen, A. O.; Bruntt, H. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Biazzo, K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Niemczura, E. [Instytut Astronomiczny, Uniwersytet Wroclawski, ul. Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wroclaw (Poland); Bedding, T. R., E-mail: gulnur@ucar.edu [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); and others

    2013-01-20

    Determining fundamental properties of stars through stellar modeling has improved substantially due to recent advances in asteroseismology. Thanks to the unprecedented data quality obtained by space missions, particularly CoRoT and Kepler, invaluable information is extracted from the high-precision stellar oscillation frequencies, which provide very strong constraints on possible stellar models for a given set of classical observations. In this work, we have characterized two relatively faint stars, KIC 10920273 and KIC 11395018, using oscillation data from Kepler photometry and atmospheric constraints from ground-based spectroscopy. Both stars have very similar atmospheric properties; however, using the individual frequencies extracted from the Kepler data, we have determined quite distinct global properties, with increased precision compared to that of earlier results. We found that both stars have left the main sequence and characterized them as follows: KIC 10920273 is a one-solar-mass star (M = 1.00 {+-} 0.04 M {sub Sun }), but much older than our Sun (t = 7.12 {+-} 0.47 Gyr), while KIC 11395018 is significantly more massive than the Sun (M = 1.27 {+-} 0.04 M {sub Sun }) with an age close to that of the Sun (t = 4.57 {+-} 0.23 Gyr). We confirm that the high lithium abundance reported for these stars should not be considered to represent young ages, as we precisely determined them to be evolved subgiants. We discuss the use of surface lithium abundance, rotation, and activity relations as potential age diagnostics.

  13. KIC 8462852 optical dipping event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2017-05-01

    T. Boyajian (Louisiana State University) et al. reported in ATel #10405 that an optical dip is underway in KIC 8462852 (Boyajian's Star, Tabby's Star) beginning on 2017 May 18 UT. Tentative signs of small dips had been seen beginning April 24, and enhanced monitoring had begun at once at Fairborn Observatory (Tennessee State University). Photometry and spectroscopy from there on May 18 and 19 UT showed a dip underway. Cousins V photometry showed a drop of 0.02 magnitude, the largest dip (and the first clear one) seen in more than a year of monitoring. AAVSO observer Bruce Gary (GBL, Hereford, AZ) carried out V photometry which showed a fading from 11.906 V ± 0.004 to 11.9244 V ± 0.0033 between UT 2017 May 14 and May 19, a drop of 1.7%. Swift/UVOT observations obtained May 18 15:19 did not show a statistically significant drop in v, but Gary's photometry is given more weight. r'-band observations from Las Cumbres Observatory obtained 2017 May 17 to May 19 showed a 2% dip. Spectra by I. Steele (Liverpool JMU) et al. taken on 2017 May 20 with the 2.0 meter Liverpool Telescope, La Palma, showed no differences in the source compared to a reference spectrum taken 2016 July 4 when the system was not undergoing a dip (ATel #10406).Dips typically last for a few days, and larger dips can last over a week. It is not clear that this dip is over. Precision time-series V photometry is urgently requested from AAVSO observers, although all photometry is welcome. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). See full Alert Notice for more details. KIC 8462852 was the subject of AAVSO Alert Notices 532 and 542. See also Boyajian et al. 2016, also available as a preprint (http://arxiv.org/abs/1509.03622). General information about KIC 8462852 may be found at http://www.wherestheflux.com/.

  14. The transiting dust clumps in the evolved disc of the Sun-like UXor RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. We show that the distribution of light curve gradients is non-uniform for deep events, which we interpret as possible evidence for an asteroidal fragment-like clump structure. However, the clumps are very likely seen above a high optical depth midplane, so the disc's bulk clumpiness is not revealed. While circumstantial evidence suggests an asteroid belt is more plausible than a gas-rich transition disc, the evolutionary status remains uncertain. We suggest that the rarity of Sun-like stars showing disc-related variability may arise because (i) any accretion streams are transparent and/or (ii) turbulence above the inner rim is normally shadowed by a flared outer disc.

  15. The transiting dust clumps in the evolved disc of the Sun-like UXor RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. We show that the distribution of light curve gradients is non-uniform for deep events, which we interpret as possible evidence for an asteroidal fragment-like clump structure. However, the clumps are very likely seen above a high optical depth midplane, so the disc’s bulk clumpiness is not revealed. While circumstantial evidence suggests an asteroid belt is more plausible than a gas-rich transition disc, the evolutionary status remains uncertain. We suggest that the rarity of Sun-like stars showing disc-related variability may arise because (i) any accretion streams are transparent and/or (ii) turbulence above the inner rim is normally shadowed by a flared outer disc. PMID:28280566

  16. Detailed Chromospheric Activity Nature of KIC 9641031

    CERN Document Server

    Yoldaş, Ezgi

    2016-01-01

    This study depends on KIC 9641031 eclipsing binary system with a chromospherically active component. There are three type variations, such as geometrical variations due to eclipses, sinusoidal variations due to the rotational modulations and also flares, in the light curves obtained with the data taken from the Kepler Mission Database. Taking into account results obtained from KIC 9641031's observations in the Kepler Mission Database, we present and discuss the details of chromospheric activity. The sinusoidal light variations due to rotational modulation and the flare events were modelled separately. 92 different data subsets separated using the analytic models described in the literature were modelled separately to obtain the cool spot configuration. It is seen that just one component of the system is chromospherically active star. On this component, there are two active regions separated by about 180 deg longitudinally between the latitudes of +50 deg and +100 deg, whose locations and forms are rapidly cha...

  17. Fine detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometric data of KIC 6950556 and HD 37633

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulášek, Zdeněk; Paunzen, Ernst; Zejda, Miloslav; Semenko, Evgenij; Bernhard, Klaus; Hümmerich, Stefan; Zhang, Jia; Hubrig, Swetlana; Kuschnig, Rainer; Janík, Jan; Jagelka, Miroslav

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple phenomenological method for detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometry, which is illustrated by means of photometric data processing of two periodically variable chemically peculiar stars, KIC 6950556 and HD 37633. In principle, this method may be applied to any type of periodically variable objects and satellite or ground based photometries. As a by product, we have identified KIC 6950556 as a magnetic chemically peculiar star with an ACV type variability.

  18. Fine detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometric data of KIC 6950556 and HD 37633

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulasek, Zdenek; Zejda, Miloslav; Semenko, Evgenij; Bernhard, Klaus; Hummerich, Stefan; Zhang, Jia; Hubrig, Swetlana; Kuschnig, Rainer; Janik, Jan; Jagelka, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple phenomenological method for detrending of raw Kepler and MOST photometry, which is illustrated by means of photometric data processing of two periodically variable chemically peculiar stars, KIC 6950556 and HD 37633. In principle, this method may be applied to any type of periodically variable objects and satellite or ground based photometries. As a by product, we have identified KIC 6950556 as a magnetic chemically peculiar star with an ACV type variability.

  19. The Age of the KIC 7177553 System

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, James

    2016-01-01

    KIC 7177553 is a quadruple system containing two binaries of orbital periods 16.5 and 18 d. All components have comparable masses and are slowly rotating, non-evolved stars of spectral type near G2V. The longer period binary is eclipsing with component masses and radii, M1 = 1.043 +/- 0.014 M_sun, R1 = 0.940 +/- 0.005 R_sun, and M2 = 0.986 +/- 0.015 M_sun, R2 = 0.941 +/- 0.005 R_sun. The essentially equal radii measurements are inconsistent with the two stars being on the main sequence at the same age using standard stellar evolution models. Instead a consistent scenario is found if the stars are in their pre-main sequence phase of evolution and have age 33 - 36 Myr. Such a young age has important implications for the detectability of the massive planet indicated by eclipse time variations.

  20. SUN-LIKE MAGNETIC CYCLES IN THE RAPIDLY ROTATING YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 30495

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Ricky [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Metcalfe, Travis S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut St. Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Hall, Jeffrey C. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Henry, Gregory W., E-mail: egeland@ucar.edu [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  1. Solar-like oscillations in KIC11395018 and KIC11234888 from 8 months of Kepler data

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, S; Campante, T L; Garcia, R A; Appourchaux, T; Bedding, T R; Mosser, B; Chaplin, W J; Ballot, J; Benomar, O; Bonanno, A; Corsaro, E; Gaulme, P; Hekker, S; Regulo, C; Salabert, D; Verner, G; White, T R; Brandao, I M; Creevey, O L; Dogan, G; Elsworth, Y; Huber, D; Hale, S J; Houdek, G; Karoff, C; Metcalfe, T S; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Thompson, M J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Quintana, E V; Sanderfer, D T; Seader, S E

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the photometric short-cadence data obtained with the Kepler Mission during the first eight months of observations of two solar-type stars of spectral types G and F: KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888 respectively, the latter having a lower signal-to-noise ratio compared to the former. We estimate global parameters of the acoustic (p) modes such as the average large and small frequency separations, the frequency of the maximum of the p-mode envelope and the average linewidth of the acoustic modes. We were able to identify and to measure 22 p-mode frequencies for the first star and 16 for the second one even though the signal-to-noise ratios of these stars are rather low. We also derive some information about the stellar rotation periods from the analyses of the low-frequency parts of the power spectral densities. A model-independent estimation of the mean density, mass and radius are obtained using the scaling laws. We emphasize the importance of continued observations for the stars with low signal-to-no...

  2. Magnetic Evolution and the Disappearance of Sun-Like Activity Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.; van Saders, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    After decades of effort, the solar activity cycle is exceptionally well characterized, but it remains poorly understood. Pioneering work at the Mount Wilson Observatory demonstrated that other Sun-like stars also show regular activity cycles, and suggested two possible relationships between the rotation rate and the length of the cycle. Neither of these relationships correctly describes the properties of the Sun, a peculiarity that demands explanation. Recent discoveries have started to shed light on this issue, suggesting that the Sun's rotation rate and magnetic field are currently in a transitional phase that occurs in all middle-aged stars. Motivated by these developments, we identify the manifestation of this magnetic transition in the best available data on stellar cycles. We propose a reinterpretation of previously published observations to suggest that the solar cycle may be growing longer on stellar evolutionary timescales, and that the cycle might disappear sometime in the next 0.8 - 2.4 Gyr. Future tests of this hypothesis will come from ground-based activity monitoring of Kepler targets that span the magnetic transition, and from asteroseismology with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission to determine precise masses and ages for bright stars with known cycles.

  3. Pulsating red giant stars in eccentric binary systems discovered from Kepler space-based photometry. A sample study and the analysis of KIC 5006817

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. Beck; K. Hambleton; J. Vos; T. Kallinger; S. Bloemen; A. Tkachenko; R.A. García; R.H. Østensen; C. Aerts; D.W. Kurtz; J. De Ridder; S. Hekker; K. Pavlovski; S. Mathur; K. De Smedt; A. Derekas; E. Corsaro; B. Mosser; H. Van Winckel; D. Huber; P. Degroote; G.R. Davies; A. Prša; J. Debosscher; Y. Elsworth; P. Nemeth; L. Siess; V.S. Schmid; P.I. Pápics; B.L. de Vries; A.J. van Marle; P. Marcos-Arenal; A. Lobel

    2014-01-01

    Context. The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red giant stars and binary stars. Seismology allows us to constrain the properties of red giants. In addition to eclipsing binaries, eccentric non-eclipsing binaries that exhibit

  4. Modeling KIC10684673 and KIC12216817 as Single Pulsating Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The raw light curves of both KIC 10684673 and KIC 12216817 show variability. Both are listed in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (hereafter KEBC), however both are flagged as uncertain in nature. In the present study we show their light curves can be modeled by considering each target as a single, multi-modal delta Scuti pulsator. While this does not exclude the possibility of eclipsing systems, we argue, while spectroscopy on the systems is still lacking, the delta Scuti model is a simpler explanation and therefore more probable.

  5. Verification of the Kepler Input Catalog from Asteroseismology of Solar-type Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verner, G.A.; Chaplin, W.J.; Basu, S.;

    2011-01-01

    -based multi-color photometry. For the stars in our sample, we find general agreement but we detect an average overestimation bias of 0.23 dex in the KIC determination of log (g) for stars with log (g)KIC > 4.0 dex, and a resultant underestimation bias of up to 50% in the KIC radii estimates for stars with R...... KIC sun. Part of the difference may arise from selection bias in the asteroseismic sample; nevertheless, this result implies there may be fewer stars characterized in the KIC with R ~ 1 R sun than is suggested by the physical properties in the KIC. Furthermore, if the radius estimates are taken...

  6. The Age of the KIC 7177553 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Mullan, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    KIC 7177553 is a quadruple system containing two binaries of orbital periods 16.5 and 18 days. All components have comparable masses and are slowly rotating with spectral types of ∼G2V. The longer period binary is eclipsing with component masses and radii M 1 = 1.043 ± 0.014 M ⊙, R 1 = 0.940 ± 0.005 R ⊙ and M 2 = 0.986 ± 0.015 M ⊙, R 2 = 0.941 ± 0.005 R ⊙. The essentially equal radii measurements are inconsistent with the two stars being on the man sequence at the same age using standard nonmagnetic stellar evolution models. Instead a consistent scenario is found if the stars are in their pre-main-sequence phase of evolution and have an age of 32–36 Myr. We have also computed evolutionary models of magnetic stars, but we find that our nonmagnetic models fit the empirical radii and effective temperatures better than the magnetic models.

  7. KIC 8462852: The Infrared Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Massimo; Hulsebus, Alan; Willis, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the warm Spitzer/IRAC data of KIC 8462852. We found no evidence of infrared excess at 3.6 μm and a small excess of 0.43 ± 0.18 mJy at 4.5 μm below the 3σ threshold necessary to claim a detection. The lack of strong infrared excess 2 years after the events responsible for the unusual light curve observed by Kepler further disfavors the scenarios involving a catastrophic collision in a KIC 8462852 asteroid belt, a giant impact disrupting a planet in the system or a population of dust-enshrouded planetesimals. The scenario invoking the fragmentation of a family of comets on a highly elliptical orbit is instead consistent with the lack of strong infrared excess found by our analysis.

  8. KIC 8462852 - The Infrared Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Marengo, Massimo; Willis, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the warm Spitzer/IRAC data of KIC 8462852. We found no evidence of infrared excess at 3.6 micron and a small excess of 0.43 +/- 0.18 mJy at 4.5 micron, below the 3 sigma threshold necessary to claim a detection. The lack of strong infrared excess 2 years after the events responsible for the unusual light curve observed by Kepler, further disfavors the scenarios involving a catastrophic collision in a KIC 8462852 asteroid belt, a giant impact disrupting a planet in the system or a population of a dust-enshrouded planetesimals. The scenario invoking the fragmentation of a family of comets on a highly elliptical orbit is instead consistent with the lack of strong infrared excess found by our analysis.

  9. Asteroseismic modelling of the two F-type hybrid pulsators KIC10080943A and KIC10080943B

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, V S

    2016-01-01

    Pulsating binary stars are ideal targets for testing the theory of stellar structure and evolution. Fundamental parameters can be derived from binary modelling to high precision and provide crucial constraints for seismic modelling. High-order gravity modes are sensitive to the conditions near the convective core and therefore allow for a determination of parameters describing interior physics, especially the convective-core overshooting parameter. KIC 10080943 is a binary system, which contains two gravity- and pressure-mode hybrid pulsators. A detailed observational study has provided fundamental and seismic parameters for both components. We aim to find a model, which is able to predict the observed g-mode period spacings and stellar parameters of both components of KIC 10080943. By calculating model grids with the stellar evolution code MESA and the seismic code GYRE, we can compare theoretical properties to the observed mean period spacing and position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The masses of ou...

  10. Secular dimming of KIC 8462852 following its consumption of a planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Shen, Ken J.; Stone, Nicholas

    2017-07-01

    The Kepler-field star KIC 8462852, an otherwise apparently ordinary F3 main-sequence star, showed several highly unusual dimming events of variable depth and duration. Adding to the mystery was the discovery that KIC 8462852 faded by 14 per cent from 1890 to 1989, as well as by another 3 per cent over the 4 yr Kepler mission. Following an initial suggestion by Wright & Sigurdsson, we propose that the secular dimming behaviour is the result of the inspiral of a planetary body or bodies into KIC 8462852, which took place ˜10-104 yr ago (depending on the planet mass). Gravitational energy released as the body inspirals into the outer layers of the star caused a temporary and unobserved brightening, from which the stellar flux is now returning to the quiescent state. The transient dimming events could then be due to obscuration by planetary debris from an earlier partial disruption of the same inspiralling bodies, or due to evaporation and outgassing from a tidally detached moon system. Alternatively, the dimming events could arise from a large number of comet- or planetesimal-mass bodies placed on to high-eccentricity orbits by the same mechanism (e.g. Lidov-Kozai oscillations due to the outer M-dwarf companion) responsible for driving the more massive planets into KIC 8462852. The required high occurrence rate of KIC 8462852-like systems that have undergone recent major planet inspiral event(s) is the greatest challenge to the model, placing large lower limits on the mass of planetary systems surrounding F stars and/or requiring an unlikely probability to catch KIC 8462852 in its current state.

  11. Deep asteroseismic sounding of the compact hot B subdwarf pulsator KIC02697388 from Kepler time series photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charpinet, S.; Van Grootel, Valerie; Fontaine, G.;

    2011-01-01

    of the sdBVs star KIC02697388 monitored with Kepler, using the rich pulsation spectrum uncovered during the ~27-day-long exploratory run Q2.3. Methods: We analyse new high-S/N spectroscopy of KIC02697388 using appropriate NLTE model atmospheres to provide accurate atmospheric parameters for this star. We...... also reanalyse the Kepler light curve using standard prewhitening techniques. On this basis, we apply a forward modelling technique using our latest generation of sdB models. The simultaneous match of the independent periods observed in KIC02697388 with those of models leads objectively...... to the identification of the pulsation modes and, more importantly, to the determination of some of the parameters of the star. Results: The light curve analysis reveals 43 independent frequencies that can be associated with oscillation modes. All the modulations observed in this star correspond to g-mode pulsations...

  12. A Search for Brief Optical Flashes Associated with the SETI Target KIC 8462852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D. J.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Lin, T. T. Y.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Brien, S.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Ratliff, G.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2016-02-01

    The F-type star KIC 8462852 has recently been identified as an exceptional target for search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) observations. We describe an analysis methodology for optical SETI, which we have used to analyze nine hours of serendipitous archival observations of KIC 8462852 made with the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory between 2009 and 2015. No evidence of pulsed optical beacons, above a pulse intensity at the Earth of approximately 1 {photon} {{{m}}}-2, is found. We also discuss the potential use of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays in searching for extremely short duration optical transients in general.

  13. A Search for Brief Optical Flashes Associated with the SETI Target KIC 8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Archer, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Fegan, D J; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Huetten, M; Hakansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Lin, T T Y; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; O'Brien, S; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Petrashyk, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Ratliff, G; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2016-01-01

    The F-type star KIC 8462852 has recently been identified as an exceptional target for SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) observations. We describe an analysis methodology for optical SETI, which we have used to analyse nine hours of serendipitous archival observations of KIC 8462852 made with the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory between 2009 and 2015. No evidence of pulsed optical beacons, above a pulse intensity at the Earth of approximately 1 photon per m^2, is found. We also discuss the potential use of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays in searching for extremely short duration optical transients in general.

  14. Stellar activity as observed by the KEPLER space telescope: The K Dwarf KIC 8429280

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2011-09-01

    The activity of the K dwarf KIC 8429280 (TYC 3146-35-1) has been studied. Unique high-precision photometric observations of this object obtained with the KEPLER space telescope suggest a pronounced amplitude modulation of the brightness of the star, and have made possible the analysis of surface-temperature inhomogeneities. The evolution of active regions on the surface of KIC 8429280 has been traced during 105 rotation periods. Evidence has been found for the existence of two active longitudes on the surface of KIC 8429280, separated by approximately 180°. The motion of the active longitudes on the surface of KIC 8429280 is complex and unstable. At some times, the active regions moved together in longitude with the rotation of the star, while they moved in opposite directions at other time. The less active region sometimes disappeared completely, and only one active region was observed on the stellar surface. The area of the spotted surface S is 4% of the visible stellar surface for the adopted inclination of the rotation axis of the star to the line of sight, i = 60°. The periodicity for variations in S is no less than 90 d. The timescale for the change in the amplitude of the brightness variations is 30 d. Three epochs of alternation of the active longitudes are close in time to three of four firmly established minima in the amplitudes of the brightness variations. The results of the light-curve analysis for KIC 8429280 are compared to results obtained for the young active solar-type star Corot-Exo-2, which has a similar light curve with a pronounced modulation.

  15. KIC11911480: the second ZZ Ceti in the $Kepler$ field

    CERN Document Server

    Greiss, S; Hermes, J J; Steeghs, D; Koester, D; Ramsay, G; Barclay, T; Townsley, D M

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of the second pulsating hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarf in the $Kepler$ field, KIC11911480. It was selected from the $Kepler$-INT Survey (KIS) on the basis of its colours and its variable nature was confirmed using ground-based time-series photometry. An atmosphere model fit to an intermediate-resolution spectrum of KIC11911480 places this DA white dwarf close to the blue edge of the empirical boundaries of the ZZ Ceti instability strip: $T_\\mathrm{eff} = 12\\,160 \\pm 250$ K and $\\log{g} = 7.94 \\pm 0.10 $. Assuming a mass-radius relation and cooling models for DA white dwarfs, the atmospheric parameters yield: M$_{\\rm WD}$ = 0.57 $\\pm$ 0.06 M$_\\odot$. We also obtained two quarters (Q12 and Q16) of nearly uninterrupted short-cadence $Kepler$ data on this star. We detect a total of six independent pulsation modes with a $\\geq$ 3$\\sigma$ confidence in its amplitude power spectrum. These pulsations have periods ranging between 172.9 s and 324.5 s, typical of the hotter ZZ Ceti stars. Our pre...

  16. Constraints on the circumstellar dust around KIC 8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, M A; Kemper, F; Geach, J E; Dunham, M M; Morata, O; Ertel, S; Ho, P T P; Dempsey, J; Coulson, I; Petitpas, G; Kristensen, L E

    2015-01-01

    We present millimetre (SMA) and sub-millimetre (SCUBA-2) continuum observations of the peculiar star KIC 8462852 which displayed several deep and aperiodic dips in brightness during the Kepler mission. Our observations are approximately confusion-limited at 850 $\\mu$m and are the deepest millimetre and sub-millimetre photometry of the star that has yet been carried out. No significant emission is detected towards KIC 8462852. We determine upper limits for dust between a few 10$^{-6}$ M$_{\\oplus}$ and 10$^{-3}$ M$_{\\oplus}$ for regions identified as the most likely to host occluding dust clumps and a total overall dust budget of $<$7.7 M$_{\\oplus}$ within a radius of 200 AU. Such low limits for the inner system make the catastrophic planetary disruption hypothesis unlikely. Integrating over the Kepler lightcurve we determine that at least 10$^{-9}$ M$_{\\oplus}$ of dust is required to cause the observed Q16 dip. This is consistent with the currently most favoured cometary breakup hypothesis, but nevertheless...

  17. Planet Hunters X. KIC 8462852 - Where's the Flux?

    CERN Document Server

    Boyajian, T S; Rappaport, S A; Fabrycky, D; Fischer, D A; Gandolfi, D; Kennedy, G M; Liu, M C; Moor, A; Olah, K; Vida, K; Wyatt, M C; Best, W M J; Ciesla, F; Csak, B; Dupuy, T J; Handler, G; Heng, K; Korhonen, H; Kovacs, J; Kozakis, T; Kriskovics, L; Schmitt, J R; Szabo, Gy; Szabo, R; Wang, J; Goodman, S; Hoekstra, A; Jek, K J

    2015-01-01

    Over the duration of the Kepler mission, KIC 8462852 was observed to undergo irregularly shaped, aperiodic dips in flux down to below the 20% level. The dipping activity can last for between 5 and 80 days. We characterize the object with high-resolution spectroscopy, spectral energy distribution fitting, and Fourier analyses of the Kepler light curve. We determine thatKIC 8462852 is a main-sequence F3 V/IV star, with a rotation period ~0.88 d, that exhibits no significant IR excess. In this paper, we describe various scenarios to explain the mysterious events in the Kepler light curve, most of which have problems explaining the data in hand. By considering the observational constraints on dust clumps orbiting a normal main-sequence star, we conclude that the scenario most consistent with the data is the passage of a family of exocomet fragments, all of which are associated with a single previous breakup event. We discuss the necessity of future observations to help interpret the system.

  18. An evaporating planet explanation for the photometric variation of the extreme helium subdwarf KIC10449976

    CERN Document Server

    Bear, Ealeal

    2013-01-01

    We propose that the unstable periodic variation of the extreme helium hot subdwarf star KIC10449976 is caused by the stochastic evaporation process of a planet orbiting the star with a period of 3.9 days. KIC10449976 shows evidence for photometric periodic modulation of P=3.9days. The period is not stable, neither in time nor in amplitude. In our model the UV radiation from KIC10449976, whose effective temperature is T_eff = 40000 K, heats the planet and causes its envelope to swell and lose mass where dust might be formed. The estimated mass outflow rate is 10^{-9} M_J yr^{-1}. Stochastic variations in the outflow rate and in dust formation rate lead to the variation in the amount of reflected light, hence to the unstable periodic behavior. Self-shielding of the dust and the behavior on the day-night boundary might lead to the stochastic outflow rate. We predict the presence of a sub-stellar companion to KIC10449976 with a mass of M_J < m_p < 20 M_J at an orbital separation of a_p=8.3AU.

  19. KIC 7177553: a quadruple system of two close binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, H; Rappaport, S A; Ngo, H; Mawet, D; Csizmadia, Sz; Forgacs-Dajka, E

    2016-01-01

    KIC 7177553 was observed by the Kepler satellite to be an eclipsing eccentric binary star system with an 18-day orbital period. Recently, an eclipse timing study of the Kepler binaries has revealed eclipse timing variations in this object with an amplitude of about 100 sec, and an outer period of 529 days. The implied mass of the third body is that of a superJupiter, but below the mass of a brown dwarf. We therefore embarked on a radial velocity study of this binary to determine its system configuration and to check the hypothesis that it hosts a giant planet. From the radial velocity measurements, it became immediately obvious that the same Kepler target contains another eccentric binary, this one with a 16.5-day orbital period. Direct imaging using adaptive optics reveals that the two binaries are separated by 0.4 arcsec (about 167 AU), and have nearly the same magnitude (to within 2%). The close angular proximity of the two binaries, and very similar Gamma velocities, strongly suggest that KIC 7177553 is o...

  20. Fundamental Parameters of Kepler Eclipsing Binaries. I. KIC 5738698

    CERN Document Server

    Matson, Rachel A; Guo, Zhao; Orosz, Jerome A

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve as a valuable source of stellar masses and radii that inform stellar evolutionary models and provide insight into additional astrophysical processes. The exquisite light curves generated by space-based missions such as Kepler offer the most stringent tests to date. We use the Kepler light curve of the 4.8-day eclipsing binary KIC 5739896 with ground based optical spectra to derive fundamental parameters for the system. We reconstruct the component spectra to determine the individual atmospheric parameters, and model the Kepler photometry with the binary synthesis code ELC to obtain accurate masses and radii. The two components of KIC 5738698 are F-type stars with M1 = 1.39+/-0.04M, M2 = 1.34+/-0.06M, and R1 = 1.84+/-0.03R, R2 = 1.72+/-0.03R. We also report a small eccentricity (e < 0.0017) and unusual albedo values that are required to match the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve. Comparisons with evolutionary models indicate an approximate age of 2.3 Gyr for the system.

  1. KIC 8462852 did likely not fade during the last 100 years

    CERN Document Server

    Hippke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A recent analysis found a "completely unprecedented" dimming of $0.165\\pm0.013$ magnitudes per century in the F3 main sequence star KIC8462852. This star is interesting, as it shows episodes of day-long dips with up to 20% dimming of unknown origin. We re-analyze the same Harvard archival Johnson B photometry and find comparable dimmings, and structural breaks, for 18 of 28 checked F-dwards (64%) in the Kepler field of view. We conclude that the Harvard plates photometry suffers from imperfect long-term (1890--1989) calibration. The most likely explanation for the century-long dimming of KIC8462852 is thus a data artefact, and it is probably not of astrophysical origin.

  2. Avalanche Statistics Identify Intrinsic Stellar Processes near Criticality in KIC 8462852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mohammed A.; Weaver, Richard L.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-12-01

    The star KIC8462852 (Tabby's star) has shown anomalous drops in light flux. We perform a statistical analysis of the more numerous smaller dimming events by using methods found useful for avalanches in ferromagnetism and plastic flow. Scaling exponents for avalanche statistics and temporal profiles of the flux during the dimming events are close to mean field predictions. Scaling collapses suggest that this star may be near a nonequilibrium critical point. The large events are interpreted as avalanches marked by modified dynamics, limited by the system size, and not within the scaling regime.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Coupling factors of 5166 KIC (Mosser+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, B.; Pincon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Takata, M.; Vrard, M.

    2017-08-01

    Seismic global parameters of the stars listed in the paper. Each star is identified with its KIC number (Kepler Input Catalog). Coupling factors of mixed modes were measured for thousands of red giants. They show specific variation with mass and evolutionary stage. Weak coupling is observed for the most evolved stars on the red giant branch only; large coupling factors are measured at the transition between subgiants and red giants as well as in the red clump. Period spacings and evolutionary stages are from Vrard et (2016, Cat. J/A+A/588/A87). (1 data file).

  4. Candidates of eclipsing multiples based on extraneous eclipses on binary light curves: KIC 7622486, KIC 7668648, KIC 7670485 and KIC 8938628

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jia; He, Jian-Duo

    2016-01-01

    Four candidates of eclipsing multiples, based on new extraneous eclipses found on Kepler binary light curves, are presented and studied. KIC 7622486 is a double eclipsing binary candidate with orbital period of 2.2799960 days and 40.246503 days. The two binary systems do not eclipse each other in the line of sight, but there is mutual gravitational influence between them which leads to the small but definite eccentricity 0.0035(0.0022) on the short 2.2799960 days period orbit. KIC 7668648 is hierarchical quadruple system candidate, with two sets of solid 203(+-5) days period extraneous eclipses and another independent set of extraneous eclipses. A clear and credible extraneous eclipse is found on the binary light curve of KIC 7670485 which made it a triple system candidates. Two sets of extraneous eclipse of about 390 days and 220 days period are found on KIC 8938628 binary curves, which not only confirms the previous conclusion of $388.5(+-0.3) triple system, but also proposed a new additional objects that m...

  5. KIC 7177553: A QUADRUPLE SYSTEM OF TWO CLOSE BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, H. [Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Borkovits, T. [Baja Astronomical Observatory of Szeged University, H-6500 Baja, Szegedi út, Kt. 766 (Hungary); Rappaport, S. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Ngo, H. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mawet, D. [California Institute of Technology, Astronomy Dept. MC 249-17, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Csizmadia, Sz. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institut für Planeten-forschung, Rutherfordstraße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Forgács-Dajka, E., E-mail: lehm@tls-tautenburg.de, E-mail: borko@electra.bajaobs.hu, E-mail: sar@mit.edu, E-mail: hngo@caltech.edu, E-mail: dmawet@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: szilard.csizmadia@dlr.de, E-mail: e.forgacs-dajka@astro.elte.hu [Astronomical Department, Eötvös University, H-1118 Budapest, Pázmány Péter stny. 1/A (Hungary)

    2016-03-01

    KIC 7177553 was observed by the Kepler satellite to be an eclipsing eccentric binary star system with an 18-day orbital period. Recently, an eclipse timing study of the Kepler binaries has revealed eclipse timing variations (ETVs) in this object with an amplitude of ∼100 s and an outer period of 529 days. The implied mass of the third body is that of a super-Jupiter, but below the mass of a brown dwarf. We therefore embarked on a radial velocity (RV) study of this binary to determine its system configuration and to check the hypothesis that it hosts a giant planet. From the RV measurements, it became immediately obvious that the same Kepler target contains another eccentric binary, this one with a 16.5-day orbital period. Direct imaging using adaptive optics reveals that the two binaries are separated by 0.″4 (∼167 AU) and have nearly the same magnitude (to within 2%). The close angular proximity of the two binaries and very similar γ velocities strongly suggest that KIC 7177553 is one of the rare SB4 systems consisting of two eccentric binaries where at least one system is eclipsing. Both systems consist of slowly rotating, nonevolved, solar-like stars of comparable masses. From the orbital separation and the small difference in γ velocity, we infer that the period of the outer orbit most likely lies in the range of 1000–3000 yr. New images taken over the next few years, as well as the high-precision astrometry of the Gaia satellite mission, will allow us to set much narrower constraints on the system geometry. Finally, we note that the observed ETVs in the Kepler data cannot be produced by the second binary. Further spectroscopic observations on a longer timescale will be required to prove the existence of the massive planet.

  6. Asteroseismic modelling of the two F-type hybrid pulsators KIC 10080943A and KIC 10080943B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, V. S.; Aerts, C.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Pulsating binary stars are ideal targets for testing the theory of stellar structure and evolution. Fundamental parameters can be derived to high precision from binary modelling and provide crucial constraints for seismic modelling. High-order gravity modes are sensitive to the conditions near the convective core and therefore allow for a determination of parameters describing interior physics, especially the convective-core overshooting parameter. KIC 10080943 is a binary system that contains two gravity- and pressure-mode hybrid pulsators. A detailed observational study has provided fundamental and seismic parameters for both components. Aims: We aim to find a model that is able to predict the observed g-mode period spacings and stellar parameters of both components of KIC 10080943. Methods: By calculating model grids with the stellar evolution code MESA and the seismic code GYRE, we can compare theoretical properties to the observed mean period spacing and position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Results: The masses of our best models are somewhat below the values estimated from binarity, which is a consequence of the low observed mean g-mode period spacing. We find that the amount of core overshooting and diffusive mixing can be well constrained by the equal-age requirement for the two stars, however, we find no significant difference for different shapes of core overshooting. The measured rotation rates are within the limit of validity for the first-order perturbation approximation. We can find a good fit by using the traditional approximation for the pulsations, when taking slightly younger models with a higher asymptotic period spacing. This is because the zonal modes experience a slight shift due to the Coriolis force, which the first-order perturbation approximation ignores.

  7. KIC 8462852 Faded at an Average Rate of 0.165+-0.013 Magnitudes Per Century From 1890 To 1989

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Bradley E

    2016-01-01

    The star KIC 8462852 is a completely-ordinary F3 main sequence star, except that the light curve from the Kepler spacecraft shows episodes of unique and inexplicable day-long dips with up to 20% dimming. Here, I provide a light curve of 1232 Johnson B-band magnitudes from 1890 to 1989 taken from archival photographic plates at Harvard. KIC 8462852 displays a highly significant and highly confident secular dimming at an average rate of 0.165+-0.013 magnitudes per century. From the early 1890s to the late 1980s, KIC 8462852 has faded by 0.193+-0.030 mag. This century-long dimming is completely unprecedented for any F-type main sequence star. So the Harvard light curve provides the first confirmation (past the several dips seen in the Kepler light curve alone) that KIC 8462852 has anything unusual going on. The century-long dimming and the day-long dips are both just extreme ends of a spectrum of timescales for unique dimming events, so by Ockham's Razor, all this is produced by one physical mechanism. This one ...

  8. The Relation between the Transit Depths of KIC 12557548b & the Stellar Rotation Period

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Bryce; Levine, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    Kawahara and collaborators analyzed the transits of the candidate disintegrating Mercury-mass planet KIC 12557548b and suggested that the transit depths were correlated with the phase of the stellar rotation. We analyze the transit depths of KIC 12557548b and confirm that there is indeed a robust, statistically significant signal in the transit depths at the rotation period of the spotted host star. This signal is more prominent in the first-half of the Kepler data, and is not due to leakage of the rotating spot signal into our measurement of the transit depths, or due to unocculted starspots. We investigate the suggestion that this signal could be due to an active region on the star, emitting enhanced ultraviolet or X-ray radiation leading to an increased mass loss rate of the planet; we confirm that such a scenario could cause both modulation of the transit depths of KIC 12557548b, and small enough transit-timing variations that they might not be detected in the Kepler data. Our preferred explanation for th...

  9. KIC 9821622: An interesting lithium-rich giant in the Kepler field

    CERN Document Server

    Jofré, E; García, L; Gómez, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new exceptional young lithium-rich giant, KIC 9821622, in the \\textit{Kepler} field exhibiting unusually large enhancement of $\\alpha$, Fe-peak and \\textit{r}-process elements. From high-resolution spectra obtained with GRACES at Gemini North, we derived fundamental parameters and detailed chemical abundances of 23 elements from both equivalent widths and synthesis analysis. Combining atmospheric stellar parameters with available asteroseismic data we obtained the stellar mass, radius and age. The data analysis reveals that KIC 9821622 is a Li-rich (A(Li)$_{NLTE}$ = 1.80 $\\pm$ 0.2) intermediate-mass giant star ($M$ = 1.64 $M_{\\odot}$) located at the RGB near the luminosity bump. We find unexpected elevated abundances of Fe-peak and \\textit{r}-process elements. Also, as previously reported, we find that this is a young star (2.37 Gyr) with unusual high abundances of $\\alpha$-elements ([$\\alpha$/Fe] = 0.31). The evolutionary status of KIC 9821622 suggests that its Li-rich nature is ...

  10. KIC 9246715: The Double Red Giant Eclipsing Binary With Odd Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Rawls, Meredith L; McKeever, Jean; Jackiewicz, Jason; Orosz, Jerome A; Corsaro, Enrico; Beck, Paul; Mosser, Benoît; Latham, David W; Latham, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    We combine Kepler photometry with ground-based spectra to present a comprehensive dynamical model of the double red giant eclipsing binary KIC 9246715. While the two stars are very similar in mass (M1 = 2.171 [+0.006 / -0.008], M2 = 2.149 [+0.006 / -0.008] Msun) and radius (R1 = 8.37 [+0.03 / -0.07], R2 = 8.30 [+0.04 / -0.03] Rsun), an asteroseismic analysis finds one main set of solar-like oscillations with unusually low-amplitude, wide modes. A second set of oscillations from the other star may exist, but this marginal detection is extremely faint. Because the two stars are nearly twins, KIC 9246715 is a difficult target for a precise test of the asteroseismic scaling relations, which yield M = 2.17 +/- 0.14 Msun and R = 8.26 +/- 0.18 Rsun. Both stars are consistent with the inferred asteroseismic properties, but we suspect the main oscillator is Star 2 because it is less active than Star 1. We find evidence for stellar activity and modest tidal forces acting over the 171-day eccentric orbit, which are like...

  11. KIC 10449976: discovery of an extreme-helium subdwarf in the Kepler field

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffery, C S; Naslim, N; Carrera, R; Greiss, S; Barclay, T; Karjalainen, R; Brooks, A; Hakala, P

    2012-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy of the blue star KIC 10449976 shows that it is an extremely helium-rich subdwarf with effective temperature T=40000+/-300 K and surface gravity log g=5.3+/-0.1. Radial-velocity measurements over a five-day timescale show an upper variability limit of ~50+/-20 km/s. Kepler photometry of KIC 10449976 in both long and short cadence modes shows evidence for a periodic modulation on a timescale of ~3.9 days. We have examined the possibility that this modulation is not astrophysical but conclude it is most likely real. We discuss whether the modulation could be caused by a low-mass companion, by stellar pulsations, or by spots. The identification of any one of these as cause has important consequences for understanding the origin of helium-rich subdwarfs.

  12. Extrasolar Comets in our Solar System Captured During Close Encounters with Nearby Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, M. C. L.; Acevedo, R. D.

    2014-09-01

    It is a fact that many nearby Sun like stars have their own cometary clouds. Close encounters with passing nearby stars may induce to the capture and exchange of cometary nuclei between the Sun and the coming star.

  13. Asteroseismology revealing trapped modes in KIC 10553698A

    CERN Document Server

    Østensen, R H; Reed, M D; Baran, A S; Nemeth, P; Kiaeerad, F

    2014-01-01

    The subdwarf-B pulsator, KIC 10553698A, is one of 16 such objects observed with one-minute sampling for most of the duration of the Kepler Mission. Like most of these stars, it displays a rich g-mode pulsation spectrum with several clear multiplets that maintain regular frequency splitting. We identify these pulsation modes as components of rotationally split multiplets in a star rotating with a period of about 41 d. From 162 clearly significant periodicities, we are able to identify 156 as likely components of l=1 or l=2 multiplets. For the first time we are able to detect l=1 modes that interpose in the asymptotic period sequences and that provide a clear indication of mode trapping in a stratified envelope, as predicted by theoretical models. A clear signal is also present in the Kepler photometry at 3.387 d. Spectroscopic observations reveal a radial-velocity amplitude of 64.8 km/s. We find that the radial-velocity variations and the photometric signal have phase and amplitude that are perfectly consisten...

  14. Tidally Induced Pulsations in Kepler Eclipsing Binary KIC 3230227

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhao; Fuller, Jim

    2016-01-01

    KIC 3230227 is a short period ($P\\approx 7.0$ days) eclipsing binary with a very eccentric orbit ($e=0.6$). From combined analysis of radial velocities and {\\it Kepler} light curves, this system is found to be composed of two A-type stars, with masses of $M_1=1.84\\pm 0.18M_{\\odot}$, $M_2=1.73\\pm 0.17M_{\\odot}$ and radii of $R_1=2.01\\pm 0.09R_{\\odot}$, $R_2=1.68\\pm 0.08 R_{\\odot}$ for the primary and secondary, respectively. In addition to an eclipse, the binary light curve shows a brightening and dimming near periastron, making this a somewhat rare eclipsing heartbeat star system. After removing the binary light curve model, more than ten pulsational frequencies are present in the Fourier spectrum of the residuals, and most of them are integer multiples of the orbital frequency. These pulsations are tidally driven, and both the amplitudes and phases are in agreement with predictions from linear tidal theory for $l=2, m=-2$ prograde modes.

  15. Mysterious eclipses in the light curve of KIC8462852: a possible explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neslušan, L.; Budaj, J.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Apart from thousands of "regular" exoplanet candidates, Kepler satellite has discovered a small number of stars exhibiting peculiar eclipse-like events. They are most probably caused by disintegrating bodies transiting in front of the star. However, the nature of the bodies and obscuration events, such as those observed in KIC 8462852, remain mysterious. A swarm of comets or artificial alien mega-structures have been proposed as an explanation for the latter object. Aims: We explore the possibility that such eclipses are caused by the dust clouds associated with massive parent bodies orbiting the host star. Methods: We assumed a massive object and a simple model of the dust cloud surrounding the object. Then, we used the numerical integration to simulate the evolution of the cloud, its parent body, and resulting light-curves as they orbit and transit the star. Results: We found that it is possible to reproduce the basic features in the light-curve of KIC 8462852 with only four objects enshrouded in dust clouds. The fact that they are all on similar orbits and that such models require only a handful of free parameters provides additional support for this hypothesis. Conclusions: This model provides an alternative to the comet scenario. With such physical models at hand, at present, there is no need to invoke alien mega-structures for an explanation of these light-curves.

  16. KIC 1718290: A Helium-rich V1093-Her-like Pulsator on the Blue Horizontal Branch

    CERN Document Server

    Østensen, Roy H; Telting, John H; Vos, Joris; Aerts, Conny; Jeffery, C Simon; Green, Elizabeth M; Reed, Mike D; Heber, Ulirich

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first g-mode pulsator found to reside on the classical blue horizontal branch. One year of Kepler observations of KIC 1718290 reveals a rich spectrum of low-amplitude modes with periods between one and twelve hours, most of which follow a regular spacing of 276.3 s. This mode structure strongly resembles that of the V1093Her pulsators, with only a slight shift towards longer periods. Our spectroscopy, however, reveals KIC 1718290 to be quite distinct from the sdB stars that show V1093Her pulsations, which all have surface gravities higher than log g = 5.1 and helium abundances depleted by at least an order of magnitude relative to the solar composition. We find that KIC1718290 has T_eff = 22 100K, log g = 4.72, and a super-solar helium abundance (log N(He)/N(H) = -0.45). This places it well above the extreme horizontal branch, and rather on the very blue end of the classical horizontal branch, where shell hydrogen burning is present. We conclude that KIC 1718290 must have suffered extreme mas...

  17. KIC 4552982: outbursts and pulsations in the longest-ever pseudo-continuous light curve of a ZZ Ceti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KIC 4552982 was the first ZZ Ceti (hydrogen-atmosphere pulsating white dwarf identified to lie in the Kepler field, resulting in the longest pseudo-continuous light curve ever obtained for this type of variable star. In addition to the pulsations, this light curve exhibits stochastic episodes of brightness enhancement unlike any previously studied white dwarf phenomenon. We briefly highlight the basic outburst and pulsation properties in these proceedings.

  18. Study of KIC 8561221 observed by Kepler: an early red giant showing depressed dipolar modes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, R A; Benomar, O; Aguirre, V Silva; Ballot, J; Davies, G R; Dogan, G; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Houdek, G; Lignieres, F; Mathur, S; Takata, M; Ceillier, T; Chaplin, W J; Mathis, S; Mosser, B; Ouazzani, R M; Pinsonneault, M H; Reese, D R; Regulo, C; Salabert, D; Thompson, M J; van Saders, J L; Neiner, C; De Ridder, J

    2013-01-01

    The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to better understand the structure and dynamics of red giants using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars shows dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with higher frequency of maximum power. In this work we want to characterize KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to the reduction of the dipole amplitudes such as a fast rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the...

  19. KIC7668647: a 14 day beaming sdB+WD binary with a pulsating subdwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Telting, J H; Nemeth, P; Ostensen, R H; Kupfer, T; Macfarlane, S; Heber, U; Aerts, C; Geier, S

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered subdwarf B (sdB) pulsator KIC7668647 is one of the 18 pulsating sdB stars detected in the Kepler field. It features a rich g-mode frequency spectrum, with a few low-amplitude p-modes at short periods. We use new ground-based low-resolution spectroscopy, and the near-continuous 2.88 year Kepler lightcurve, to reveal that KIC7668647 consists of a subdwarf B star with an unseen white-dwarf companion with an orbital period of 14.2d. An orbit with a radial-velocity amplitude of 39km/s is consistently determined from the spectra, from the orbital Doppler beaming seen by Kepler at 163ppm, and from measuring the orbital light-travel delay of 27 by timing of the many pulsations seen in the Kepler lightcurve. The white dwarf has a minimum mass of 0.40 M_sun. We use our high signal-to-noise average spectra to study the atmospheric parameters of the sdB star, and find that nitrogen and iron have abundances close to solar values, while helium, carbon, oxygen and silicon are underabundant relative t...

  20. IRTF/SPEX OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNUSUAL KEPLER LIGHT CURVE SYSTEM KIC 8462852

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Sitko, M. L. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011 (United States); Marengo, M., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, 12 Physics Hall, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument’s high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8–4.2 μm spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley and Greene’s emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the ∼1.4 Gyr old F2V system η Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  1. KIC011764567: An evolved object showing substantial flare-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Kitze, M; Hambaryan, V; Torres, G; Neuhäuser, R

    2016-01-01

    We intensively studied the flare activity on the stellar object KIC011764567. The star was thought to be solar type, with a temperature of $T_{eff} = (5640 \\pm 200)\\,$K, $\\log(g) = (4.3 \\pm 0.3)\\,$dex and a rotational period of Prot 22 d (Brown et al. 2011). High resolution spectra turn the target to an evolved object with Teff = (5300 \\pm 150) K, a metalicity of $[m/H] = (-0.5 \\pm 0.2)$, a surface gravity of $log(g) = (3.3 \\pm 0.4)\\,$dex, and a projected rotational velocity of $v sin i = (22 \\pm 1)\\,kms^{-1}$. Within an observing time span of 4 years we detected 150 flares in Kepler data in an energy range of $10^{36} - 10^{37}$ erg. From a dynamical Lomb-Scargle periodogram we have evidence for differential rotation as well as for stellar spot evolution and migration. Analysing the occurrence times of the flares we found hints for a periodic flare frequency cycle of $430 - 460 $d, the significance increases with an increasing threshold of the flares equivalent duration. One explanation is a very short activ...

  2. Sun-Like Magnetic Cycles in the Rapidly-Rotating Young Solar Analog HD 30495

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Ricky; Hall, Jeffrey C; Henry, Gregory W

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial ($\\sim$2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, an $\\sim$1 Gyr-old G1.5V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at $\\sim$1.7 years and a long cycle of $...

  3. STARSPOTS-TRANSIT DEPTH RELATION OF THE EVAPORATING PLANET CANDIDATE KIC 12557548b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, Hajime; Kurosaki, Kenji; Ito, Yuichi; Ikoma, Masahiro [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirano, Teruyuki, E-mail: kawahara@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-10-10

    Violent variation of transit depths and an ingress-egress asymmetry of the transit light curve discovered in KIC 12557548 have been interpreted as evidence of a catastrophic evaporation of atmosphere with dust ( M-dot {sub p}∼>1 M{sub ⊕} Gyr{sup –1}) from a close-in small planet. To explore what drives the anomalous atmospheric escape, we perform time-series analysis of the transit depth variation of Kepler archival data for ∼3.5 yr. We find a ∼30% periodic variation of the transit depth with P {sub 1} = 22.83 ± 0.21 days, which is within the error of the rotation period of the host star estimated using the light curve modulation, P {sub rot} = 22.91 ± 0.24 days. We interpret the results as evidence that the atmospheric escape of KIC 12557548b correlates with stellar activity. We consider possible scenarios that account for both the mass loss rate and the correlation with stellar activity. X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV)-driven evaporation is possible if one accepts a relatively high XUV flux and a high efficiency for converting the input energy to the kinetic energy of the atmosphere. Star-planet magnetic interaction is another possible scenario, though huge uncertainty remains for the mass loss rate.

  4. Properties of an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star: Earth observed by the EPOXI mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Timothy A; Deming, L Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Meadows, Victoria S; Robinson, Tyler D; Seager, Sara; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission observed the disc-integrated Earth and Moon to test techniques for reconnoitering extrasolar terrestrial planets, using the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to observe Earth at the beginning and end of Northern Hemisphere spring, 2008, from a range of ∼1/6 to 1/3 AU. These observations furnish high-precision and high-cadence empirical photometry and spectroscopy of Earth, suitable as "ground truth" for numerically simulating realistic observational scenarios for an Earth-like exoplanet with finite signal-to-noise ratio. Earth was observed at near-equatorial sub-spacecraft latitude on 18-19 March, 28-29 May, and 4-5 June (UT), in the range of 372-4540 nm wavelength with low visible resolving power (λ/Δλ=5-13) and moderate IR resolving power (λ/Δλ=215-730). Spectrophotometry in seven filters yields light curves at ∼372-948 nm filter-averaged wavelength, modulated by Earth's rotation with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤20%. The spatially resolved Sun glint is a minor contributor to disc-integrated reflectance. Spectroscopy at 1100-4540 nm reveals gaseous water and carbon dioxide, with minor features of molecular oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide. One-day changes in global cloud cover resulted in differences between the light curve beginning and end of ≤5%. The light curve of a lunar transit of Earth on 29 May is color-dependent due to the Moon's red spectrum partially occulting Earth's relatively blue spectrum. The "vegetation red edge" spectral contrast observed between two long-wavelength visible/near-IR bands is ambiguous, not clearly distinguishing between the verdant Earth diluted by cloud cover versus the desolate mineral regolith of the Moon. Spectrophotometry in at least one other comparison band at short wavelength is required to distinguish between Earth-like and Moon-like surfaces in reconnaissance observations. However, measurements at 850 nm alone, the high-reflectance side of the red edge, could be sufficient to establish periodicity in the light curve and deduce Earth's diurnal period and the existence of fixed surface units.

  5. Magnetic variability in the young solar analog KIC 10644253: Observations from the Kepler satellite and the HERMES spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Salabert, D; Garcia, R A; Beck, P G; Ballot, J; Creevey, O L; Hernandez, F Perez; Nascimento, J D do; Corsaro, E; Egeland, R; Mathur, S; Metcalfe, T S; Bigot, L; Cellier, T; Palle, P L

    2016-01-01

    The continuous photometric observations collected by the Kepler satellite over 4 years provide a whelm of data with an unequalled quantity and quality for the study of stellar evolution of more than 200000 stars. Moreover, the length of the dataset provide a unique source of information to detect magnetic activity and associated temporal variability in the acoustic oscillations. In this regards, the Kepler mission was awaited with great expectation. The search for the signature of magnetic activity variability in solar-like pulsations still remained unfruitful more than 2 years after the end of the nominal mission. Here, however, we report the discovery of temporal variability in the low-degree acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years with significant temporal variations along the duration of the Kepler observations. The variations are in agreement with the derived photometric activity. The frequency shifts extracted for KIC 10644253 are show...

  6. KIC 10080943: An eccentric binary system containing two pressure and gravity mode hybrid pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, V S; Aerts, C; Degroote, P; Bloemen, S; Murphy, S J; Van Reeth, T; Papics, P I; Bedding, T R; Keen, M A; Prsa, A; Menu, J; Debosscher, J; Hrudkova, M; De Smedt, K; Lombaert, R; Nemeth, P

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Doradus and delta Scuti pulsators cover the transition region between low mass and massive main-sequence stars, and are as such critical for testing stellar models. When they reside in binary systems, we can combine two independent methods to derive critical information, such as precise fundamental parameters to aid asteroseismic modelling. In the Kepler light curve of KIC10080943, clear signatures of gravity and pressure mode pulsations have been found. Ground-based spectroscopy revealed this target to be a double-lined binary system. We present the analysis of four years of Kepler photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy to derive observational constraints, which will serve to evaluate theoretical predictions of the stellar structure and evolution for intermediate-mass stars. We used the method of spectral disentangling to determine atmospheric parameters for both components and derive the orbital elements. With phoebe we modelled the ellipsoidal variation and reflection signal of the binary in the...

  7. THE VARYING LIGHT CURVE AND TIMINGS OF THE ULTRASHORT-PERIOD CONTACT BINARY KIC 9532219

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Park, Jang-Ho, E-mail: jwlee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: kshong@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: koojr@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: pooh107162@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-20

    KIC 9532219 is a W UMa-type eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 0.1981549 days that is below the short-period limit (∼0.22 days) of the period distribution for contact binaries. The Kepler light curve of the system exhibits striking changes in both eclipse depths and light maxima. Applying third-body and spot effects, the light-curve synthesis indicates that the eclipsing pair is currently in a marginal contact stage with a mass ratio of q = 1.20, an orbital inclination of i = 66.°0, a temperature difference of T{sub 1}–T{sub 2} = 172 K, and a third light of l{sub 3} = 75.9%. To understand the light variations with time, we divided up the light curve into 312 segments and analyzed them separately. The results reveal that variation of eclipse depth is primarily caused by changing amounts of contamination due to the nearby star KIC 9532228 between the Kepler Quarters and that the variable O’Connell effect originates from the starspot activity on the less massive primary component. Based on our light-curve timings, a period study of KIC 9532219 indicates that the orbital period has varied as a combination of a downward parabola and a light-travel-time (LTT) effect due to a third body, which has a period of 1196 days and a minimum mass of 0.0892 M{sub ⊙} in an orbit of eccentricity 0.150. The parabolic variation could be a small part of a second LTT orbit due to a fourth component in a wider orbit, instead of either mass transfer or angular momentum loss.

  8. The Varying Light Curve and Timings of the Ultra-short Period Contact Binary KIC 9532219

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae Woo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    KIC 9532219 is a W UMa-type eclipsing binary with an orbital period of 0.1981549 d that is below the short-period limit ($\\sim$0.22 d) of the period distribution for contact binaries. The {\\it Kepler} light curve of the system exhibits striking light changes in both eclipse depths and light maxima. Applying third-body and spot effects, the light-curve synthesis indicates that the eclipsing pair is currently in a marginal contact stage with a mass ratio of $q$=1.20, an orbital inclination of $i$=66.0 deg, a temperature difference of $\\Delta$ ($T_{1}$--$T_{2}$)=172 K, and a third light of $l_3$=75.9 \\%. To understand the light variations with time, we divided up the light curve into 312 segments and separately analyzed them. The results reveal that variation of eclipse depth is primarily caused by changing amounts of contamination due to the nearby star KIC9532228 between the {\\it Kepler} Quarters and that the variable O'Connell effect originates from the starspot activity on the less massive primary component....

  9. Dusty tails of evaporating exoplanets. II. Physical modelling of the KIC 12557548b light curve

    CERN Document Server

    van Lieshout, R; Dominik, C; Brogi, M; de Graaff, T; Hekker, S; Kama, M; Keller, C U; Ridden-Harper, A; van Werkhoven, T I M

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating rocky exoplanets, such as KIC 12557548b, eject large amounts of dust grains, which can trail the planet in a comet-like tail. When such objects occult their host star, the resulting transit signal contains information about the dust in the tail. We aim to use the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve of KIC 12557548b to constrain the size and composition of the dust grains that make up the tail, as well as the mass loss rate of the planet. Using a self-consistent numerical model of the dust dynamics and sublimation, we calculate the shape of the tail by following dust grains from their ejection from the planet to their destruction due to sublimation. From this dust cloud shape, we generate synthetic light curves (incorporating the effects of extinction and angle-dependent scattering), which are then compared with the phase-folded Kepler light curve. We explore the free-parameter space thoroughly using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Our physics-based model is capable of reproducing the obser...

  10. AsteroFLAG - from the Sun to the stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaplin, W J; Elsworth, Y [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Appourchaux, T; Baudin, F [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), Batiment 121, F-91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Arentoft, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kjeldsen, H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ballot, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, 85741, Garching (Germany); Bazot, M [Centro de AstrofIsica Universidade do Porto, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Bedding, T R [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Creevey, O L [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Duez, V; Garcia, R A [DAPNIA/CEA, CE Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Fletcher, S T [Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Gough, D O; Houdek, G [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Jimenez, A; Jimenez-Reyes, S J [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Lazrek, M [LPHEA, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Leibacher, J W, E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk (and others)

    2008-10-15

    We stand on the threshold of a critical expansion of asteroseismology of Sun-like stars, the study of stellar interiors by observation and analysis of their global acoustic modes of oscillation. The Sun-like oscillations give a very rich spectrum allowing the internal structure and dynamics to be probed down into the stellar cores to very high precision. Asteroseismic observations of many stars will allow multiple-point tests of crucial aspects of stellar evolution and dynamo theory. The aims of the asteroFLAG collaboration are to help the community to refine existing, and to develop new, methods for analysis of the asteroseismic data on the Sun-like oscillators.

  11. Planet Hunters IX. KIC 8462852 - where's the flux?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyajian, T. S.; LaCourse, D. M.; Rappaport, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the duration of the Kepler mission, KIC 8462852 was observed to undergo irregularly shaped, aperiodic dips in flux of up to ˜20 per cent. The dipping activity can last for between 5 and 80 d. We characterize the object with high-resolution spectroscopy, spectral energy distribution fitting, ...

  12. Evidence for the disintegration of KIC 12557548 b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Brogi; C.U. Keller; M. de Juan Ovelar; M.A. Kenworthy; R.J. de Kok; M. Min; I.A.G. Snellen

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Kepler object KIC 12557548 b is peculiar. It exhibits transit-like features every 15.7 h that vary in depth between 0.2% and 1.2%. Rappaport et al. (2012, ApJ, 752, 1) explain the observations in terms of a disintegrating, rocky planet that has a trailing cloud of dust created and const

  13. KIC 3858884: a hybrid {\\delta} Sct pulsator in a highly eccentric eclipsing binary

    CERN Document Server

    Maceroni, C; da Silva, R; Montalbán, J; Lee, C -U; Ak, H; Deshpande, R; Yakut, K; Debosscher, J; Guo, Z; Kim, S -L; Lee, J W; Southworth, J

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of eclipsing binaries containing non-radial pulsators allows: i) to combine two different and independent sources of information on the internal structure and evolutionary status of the components, and ii) to study the effects of tidal forces on pulsations. KIC 3858884 is a bright Kepler target whose light curve shows deep eclipses, complex pulsation patterns with pulsation frequencies typical of {\\delta} Sct, and a highly eccentric orbit. We present the result of the analysis of Kepler photometry and of high resolution phaseresolved spectroscopy. Spectroscopy yielded both the radial velocity curves and, after spectral disentangling, the primary component effective temperature and metallicity, and line-of-sight projected rotational velocities. The Kepler light curve was analyzed with an iterative procedure devised to disentangle eclipses from pulsations which takes into account the visibility of the pulsating star during eclipses. The search for the best set of binary parameters was performed com...

  14. KIC 9821622: An interesting lithium-rich giant in the Kepler field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré, E.; Petrucci, R.; García, L.; Gómez, M.

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new exceptional young lithium-rich giant, KIC 9821622, in the Kepler field that exhibits an unusually large enhancement of α, Fe-peak, and r-process elements. From high-resolution spectra obtained with GRACES at Gemini North, we derived fundamental parameters and detailed chemical abundances of 23 elements from equivalent widths and synthesis analysis. By combining atmospheric stellar parameters with available asteroseismic data, we obtained the stellar mass, radius, and age. The data analysis reveals that KIC 9821622 is a Li-rich (A(Li)NLTE = 1.80 ± 0.2) intermediate-mass giant star (M = 1.64 M⊙) located at the red giant branch near the luminosity bump. We find unexpectedly elevated abundances of Fe-peak and r-process elements. In addition, as previously reported, we find that this is a young star (2.37 Gyr) with unusually high abundances of α-elements ([α/Fe] = 0.31). The evolutionary status of KIC 9821622 suggests that its Li-rich nature is the result of internal fresh Li that is synthesized through the Cameron-Fowler mechanism near the luminosity bump. However, its peculiar enhancement of α, Fe-peak, and r-process elements opens the possibility of external contamination by material enriched by a supernova explosion. Although it is less likely, planet accretion cannot be ruled out. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. KIC 11401845: An Eclipsing Binary with Multiperiodic Pulsations and Light-travel Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2017-02-01

    We report the {\\text{}}{Kepler} photometry of KIC 11401845 displaying multiperiodic pulsations, superimposed on binary effects. Light-curve synthesis shows that the binary star is a short-period detached system with a very low mass ratio of q = 0.070 and filling factors of F1 = 45% and F2 = 99%. Multiple-frequency analyses were applied to the light residuals after subtracting the synthetic eclipsing curve from the observed data. We detected 23 frequencies with signal-to-noise ratios larger than 4.0, of which the orbital harmonics (f4, f6, f9, f15) in the low-frequency domain may originate from tidally excited modes. For the high frequencies of 13.7–23.8 day‑1, the period ratios and pulsation constants are in the ranges of {P}{pul}/{P}{orb}=0.020{--}0.034 and Q = 0.018–0.031 days, respectively. These values and the position on the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram demonstrate that the primary component is a δ Sct pulsating star. We examined the eclipse timing variation of KIC 11401845 from the pulsation-subtracted data and found a delay of 56 ± 17 s in the arrival times of the secondary eclipses relative to the primary eclipses. A possible explanation of the time shift may be some combination of a light-travel-time delay of about 34 s and a very small eccentricity of e\\cos ω < 0.0002. This result represents the first measurement of the Rømer delay in noncompact binaries.

  16. A physically inspired model of Dip d792 and d1519 of the Kepler light curve seen at KIC8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The star KIC 8462852 shows a very unusual and hard to comprehend light curve. The dip d7922 absorbs 16% of the starlight. The light curve is unusually smooth but the very steep edges make it hard to find a simple natural explanation by covering due to comets or other well-known planetary objects. We describe a mathematical approximation to the light curve, which is motivated by a physically meaningful event of a large stellar beam which generates an orbiting cloud. The data might fit to the science fiction idea of star lifting, a mining technology that could extract star matter. We extend the model to d1519 and d1568 using multiple beams and get an encouraging result that fits essential parts of the dips but misses other parts of the measured flux. We recommend further exploration of this concept with refined models.

  17. The effects of near-core convective shells on the gravity modes of the subdwarf B pulsator KIC 10553698A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, H.; Moravveji, E.; Aerts, C.; Safari, H.; Vučković, M.

    2017-02-01

    KIC 10553698A is a hot pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) star observed by the Kepler satellite. It exhibits dipole (l = 1) and quadrupole (l = 2) gravity modes with a clear period spacing structure. The seismic properties of the KIC 10553698A provide a test of stellar evolution models, and offer a unique opportunity to determine mixing processes. We consider mixing due to convective overshooting beyond the boundary of the helium burning core. Very small overshooting (f = 10-6) results in a progressive increase in the size of convective core. However, moderate (f = 10-2) and small (f = 10-5) overshooting both lead to the occurrence of inert outer convective shells in the near-core region. We illustrate that the chemical stratifications induced by convective shells are able to change the g-mode period spacing pattern of an sdB star appreciably. The mean period spacing and trapping of the gravity modes in the model with moderate and small core overshooting are fully consistent with the period-spacing trends observed in KIC 10553698A. Atomic diffusion driven by gravitational settling as well as thermal and chemical gradients is applied to reach a better match with the observed period spacings. Models that include small or very small overshooting with atomic diffusion have a decreased lifetime of the extreme horizontal branch phase and produce chemical stratification induced by convective shells during helium burning phase. In addition of being consistent with asteroseismology, their calculated values of the R2 parameter are more compatible with the observed R2 values.

  18. ON THE METALLICITIES OF KEPLER STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Subo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Zhu, Zhaohuan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); De Cat, P. [Royal observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Fu, J. N.; Yang, X. H. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, 19 Avenue Xinjiekouwai, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Haotong [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Jin, Ge; Zhang, Yong [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-07-01

    We use 12,000 stars from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectroscopic survey data to show that the metallicities of Kepler field stars as given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) systematically underestimate both the true metallicity and the dynamic range of the Kepler sample. Specifically, to the first order approximation, we find [Fe/H]{sub KIC} = –0.20 + 0.43[Fe/H]{sub LAMOST}, with a scatter of ∼0.25 dex, due almost entirely to errors in KIC. This relation is most secure for –0.3 < [Fe/H]{sub LAMOST} < +0.4 where we have >200 comparison stars per 0.1 dex bin and good consistency is shown between metallicities determined by LAMOST and high-resolution spectra. It remains approximately valid in a slightly broader range. When the relation is inverted, the error in true metallicity as derived from KIC is (0.25 dex)/0.43-0.6 dex. We thereby quantitatively confirm the cautionary note by Brown et al. that KIC estimates of [Fe/H] should not be used by {sup a}nyone with a particular interest in stellar metallicities{sup .} Fortunately, many more LAMOST spectroscopic metallicities will be available in the near future.

  19. The HERMES solar atlas and the spectroscopic analysis of the seismic solar analogue KIC 3241581

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Van Reeth, T.; Tkachenko, A.; Raskin, G.; van Winckel, H.; do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Salabert, D.; Corsaro, E.; García, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar-analogue stars provide an excellent resource to study the Sun's evolution, i.e. the changes with time in stellar structure, activity, or rotation for solar-like stars. The unparalleled photometric data from the NASA space telescope Kepler allows us to study and characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology. Aims: We aim to spectroscopically investigate the fundamental parameter and chromospheric activity of solar analogues and twins, based on observations obtained with the HERMES spectrograph and combine them with asteroseismology. Therefore, we need to build a solar atlas for the spectrograph, to provide accurate calibrations of the spectroscopically determined abundances of solar- and late-type stars observed with this instrument and thus perform differential spectroscopic comparisons. Methods: We acquire high-resolution and high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectroscopy to construct three solar reference spectra by observing the reflected light of the asteroids Vesta and Victoria and the jovian moon Europa (100 ≲ S/N ≲ 450) with the HERMES spectrograph. We then observe the Kepler solar analogue KIC 3241581 (S/N ~ 170). For this star, the fundamental spectral parameters are extracted using a differential analysis. Sufficient S/N in the near ultraviolet allows us to investigate the chromospheric magnetic activity in both objects. Results: We constructed three solar spectrum atlases from 385 to 900 nm, obtained with the HERMES spectrograph from observations of two bright asteroids and a jovian moon. A comparison between our solar spectra atlas to the Kurucz and HARPS solar spectrum shows an excellent agreement. KIC 3241581 was found to be a long-periodic binary system. The fundamental parameter for the stellar primary component are Teff = 5689 ± 11 K, log g = 4.385 ± 0.005, [Fe/H] = + 0.22 ± 0.01, being in agreement with the published global seismic values, which confirms its status as solar analogue. The chromospheric activity level is

  20. The effects of near-core convective shells on the gravity modes of the subdwarf B pulsator KIC 10553698A

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Hamed; Aerts, Conny; Safari, Hossein; Vučković, Maja

    2016-01-01

    KIC 10553698A is a hot pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) star observed by the Kepler satellite. It exhibits dipole (l = 1) and quadrupole (l = 2) gravity modes with a clear period spacing structure. The seismic properties of the KIC 10553698A provide a test of stellar evolution models, and offer a unique opportunity to determine mixing processes. We consider mixing due to convective overshooting beyond the boundary of the helium burning core. Very small overshooting ( f = 10^{-6} ) results in a progressive increase in the size of convective core. However, moderate ( f = 10^{-2} ) and small ( f = 10^{-5} ) overshooting both lead to the occurrence of inert outer convective shells in the near-core region. We illustrate that the chemical stratifications induced by convective shells are able to change the g-mode period spacing pattern of a sdB star appreciably. The mean period spacing and trapping of the gravity modes in the model with moderate and small core overshooting are fully consistent with the period spacing tren...

  1. Kepler Eclipsing Binaries with $\\delta$ Scuti/$\\gamma$ Doradus Pulsating Components 1: KIC 9851944

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhao; Matson, Rachel A; Hernández, Antonio García

    2016-01-01

    KIC 9851944 is a short period ($P=2.16$ days) eclipsing binary in the {\\it Kepler} field of view. By combining the analysis of {\\it Kepler} photometry and phase resolved spectra from Kitt Peak National Observatory and Lowell Observatory, we determine the atmospheric and physical parameters of both stars. The two components have very different radii ($2.27R_{\\odot}$, $3.19R_{\\odot}$) but close masses ($1.76 M_{\\odot}$, $1.79M_{\\odot}$) and effective temperatures ($7026$K, $6902$K), indicating different evolutionary stages. The hotter primary is still on the main sequence (MS), while the cooler and larger secondary star has evolved to post-MS, burning hydrogen in a shell. A comparison with coeval evolutionary models shows that it requires solar metallicity and a higher mass ratio to fit the radii and temperatures of both stars simultaneously. Both components show $\\delta$ Scuti type pulsations which we interpret as p-modes and p and g mixed modes. After a close examination of the evolution of $\\delta$ Scuti pul...

  2. IRTF/SPEX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Lightcurve System KIC8462852

    CERN Document Server

    Lisse, C M; Marengo, M

    2015-01-01

    We have utilized the NASA IRTF 3m SpeX instrument's high resolution spectral mode (Rayner et al. 2003) to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler lightcurve system KIC8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8 to 4.2 um spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analysis of the Rayner et al. 2009 catalogue, and the 25 system collection of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey (NIRDS; Lisse et al. 2016), we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene's (2014) emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring mater...

  3. Kepler Eclipsing Binaries with Delta Scuti/Gamma Doradus Pulsating Components I: KIC 9851944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhao; Gies, Douglas R.; Matson, Rachel A.; García Hernández, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    KIC 9851944 is a short-period (P = 2.16 days) eclipsing binary in the Kepler field of view. By combining the analysis of Kepler photometry and phase-resolved spectra from Kitt Peak National Observatory and Lowell Observatory, we determine the atmospheric and physical parameters of both stars. The two components have very different radii (2.27 R ⊙, 3.19 R ⊙) but close masses (1.76 M ⊙, 1.79 M ⊙) and effective temperatures (7026, 6902 K), indicating different evolutionary stages. The hotter primary is still on the main sequence (MS), while the cooler and larger secondary star has evolved to the post-MS, burning hydrogen in a shell. A comparison with coeval evolutionary models shows that it requires solar metallicity and a higher mass ratio to fit the radii and temperatures of both stars simultaneously. Both components show δ Scuti-type pulsations, which we interpret as p-modes and p and g mixed modes. After a close examination of the evolution of δ Scuti pulsational frequencies, we make a comparison of the observed frequencies with those calculated from MESA/GYRE.

  4. Dusty tails of evaporating exoplanets. II. Physical modelling of the KIC 12557548b light curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, R.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; Brogi, M.; de Graaff, T.; Hekker, S.; Kama, M.; Keller, C. U.; Ridden-Harper, A.; van Werkhoven, T. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Evaporating rocky exoplanets, such as KIC 12557548b, eject large amounts of dust, which can trail the planet in a comet-like tail. When such objects occult their host star, the resulting transit signal contains information about the dust in the tail. Aims: We aim to use the detailed shape of the Kepler light curve of KIC 12557548b to constrain the size and composition of the dust grains that make up the tail, as well as the mass loss rate of the planet. Methods: Using a self-consistent numerical model of the dust dynamics and sublimation, we calculated the shape of the tail by following dust grains from their ejection from the planet to their destruction due to sublimation. From this dust cloud shape, we generated synthetic light curves (incorporating the effects of extinction and angle-dependent scattering), which were then compared with the phase-folded Kepler light curve. We explored the free-parameter space thoroughly using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Results: Our physics-based model is capable of reproducing the observed light curve in detail. Good fits are found for initial grain sizes between 0.2 and 5.6 μm and dust mass loss rates of 0.6 to 15.6 M⊕ Gyr-1 (2σ ranges). We find that only certain combinations of material parameters yield the correct tail length. These constraints are consistent with dust made of corundum (Al2O3), but do not agree with a range of carbonaceous, silicate, or iron compositions. Conclusions: Using a detailed, physically motivated model, it is possible to constrain the composition of the dust in the tails of evaporating rocky exoplanets. This provides a unique opportunity to probe to interior composition of the smallest known exoplanets.

  5. KIC 10080943: An eccentric binary system containing two pressure- and gravity-mode hybrid pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, V. S.; Tkachenko, A.; Aerts, C.; Degroote, P.; Bloemen, S.; Murphy, S. J.; Van Reeth, T.; Pápics, P. I.; Bedding, T. R.; Keen, M. A.; Prša, A.; Menu, J.; Debosscher, J.; Hrudková, M.; De Smedt, K.; Lombaert, R.; Németh, P.

    2015-12-01

    Context. γ Doradus and δ Scuti pulsators cover the transition region between low mass and massive main-sequence stars, and as such, are critical for testing stellar models. When they reside in binary systems, we can combine two independent methods to derive critical information, such as precise fundamental parameters to aid asteroseismic modelling. In the Kepler light curve of KIC 10080943, clear signatures of gravity- and pressure-mode pulsations have been found. Ground-based spectroscopy revealed this target to be a double-lined binary system. Aims: We present the analysis of four years of Kepler photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy to derive observational constraints with which to evaluate theoretical predictions of the stellar structure and evolution for intermediate-mass stars. Methods: We used the method of spectral disentangling to determine atmospheric parameters for both components and derive the orbital elements. With phoebe, we modelled the ellipsoidal variation and reflection signal of the binary in the light curve and used classical Fourier techniques to analyse the pulsation modes. Results: We show that the eccentric binary system KIC 10080943 contains two hybrid pulsators with masses M1 = 2.0 ± 0.1 M⊙ and M2 = 1.9 ± 0.1 M⊙, with radii R1 = 2.9 ± 0.1 R⊙ and R2 = 2.1 ± 0.2 R⊙. We detect rotational splitting in the g and p modes for both stars and use them to determine a first rough estimate of the core-to-surface rotation rates for the two components, which will be improved by future detailed seismic modelling. Based on the data gathered with NASA's Discovery mission, Kepler, and with the HERMES spectrograph, installed at the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias and supported by the Fund for Scientific Research of Flanders (FWO), Belgium, the Research Council of KU Leuven, Belgium, the

  6. 12000 rotation periods of Kepler stars (Nielsen+, 2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. B.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.;

    2013-01-01

    shows the scatter of periods for each star, over 6 or more (out of 8 analyzed) Kepler quarters. The g-r color index, E(B-V), radius, surface gravity, and effective temperature are from the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Column 9 (TF) indicates whether or not the msMAP data for a given star satisfies...

  7. Kepler detection of a new extreme planetary system orbiting the subdwarf-B pulsator KIC10001893

    CERN Document Server

    Silvotti, R; Green, E; Fontaine, G; Telting, J H; Ostensen, R H; Van Grootel, V; Baran, A S; Schuh, S; Machado, L Fox

    2014-01-01

    KIC10001893 is one out of 19 subdwarf-B (sdB) pulsators observed by the Kepler spacecraft in its primary mission. In addition to tens of pulsation frequencies in the g-mode domain, its Fourier spectrum shows three weak peaks at very low frequencies, which is too low to be explained in terms of g modes. The most convincing explanation is that we are seeing the orbital modulation of three Earth-size planets (or planetary remnants) in very tight orbits, which are illuminated by the strong stellar radiation. The orbital periods are P1=5.273, P2=7.807, and P3=19.48 hours, and the period ratios P2/P1=1.481 and P3/P2=2.495 are very close to the 3:2 and 5:2 resonances, respectively. One of the main pulsation modes of the star at 210.68 {\\mu}Hz corresponds to the third harmonic of the orbital frequency of the inner planet, suggesting that we see, for the first time in an sdB star, g-mode pulsations tidally excited by a planetary companion. The extreme planetary system that emerges from the Kepler data is very similar ...

  8. Sonneberg plate photometry in two colors for KIC 8462852: No dimming between 1934 and 1995

    CERN Document Server

    Hippke, Michael; Matthei, Frank; Angerhausen, Daniel; Tuvikene, Taavi; Stassun, Keivan G; Roshchina, Elena; Vasileva, Tatyana; Izmailov, Igor; Lund, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    The F3 main sequence star KIC 8462852 has raised interest because of its mysterious day-long brightness dips, and an unusual ~3% brightness decrease during the 4 years of the Kepler mission. Recently, a 0.164mag (~14%) dimming between 1890 and 1990 was claimed, based on the analysis of photographic plates, although this has been refuted. To resolve this controversy, we have gathered an independent set of historic data from Sonneberg Observatory, Germany. From these historic plates, we could extract 862 magnitudes in blue light, and 401 magnitudes in red light. The data cover the years 1934 to 1995 and are very evenly sampled between 1956 and 1995. In both colors, we find the star to be of constant brightness within 0.033mag/century (~3%). The previously claimed dimming is inconsistent with these data at the $\\sim5\\sigma$-level, however the recently reported modest dimming of ~3% in the Kepler data is not inconsistent with these data. We have also searched for periodicities and yearly trends in the data and fi...

  9. KIC 9406652: An Unusual Cataclysmic Variable in the Kepler Field of View

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, Douglas R; Howell, Steve B; Still, Martin D; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Hoekstra, Abe J; Jek, Kian J; LaCourse, Daryll; Winarski, Troy

    2013-01-01

    KIC 9406652 is a remarkable variable star in the Kepler field of view that shows both very rapid oscillations and long term outbursts in its light curve. We present an analysis of the light curve over quarters 1 to 15 and new spectroscopy that indicates that the object is a cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 6.108 hours. However, an even stronger signal appears in the light curve periodogram for a shorter period of 5.753 hours, and we argue that this corresponds to the modulation of flux from the hot spot region in a tilted, precessing disk surrounding the white dwarf star. We present a preliminary orbital solution from radial velocity measurements of features from the accretion disk and the photosphere of the companion. We use a Doppler tomography algorithm to reconstruct the disk and companion spectra, and we also consider how these components contribute to the object's spectral energy distribution from ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths. This target offers us a remarkable opportunity to invest...

  10. Serendipitous discovery of a dwarf Nova in the Kepler field near the G dwarf KIC 5438845

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Alexander; Ayres, Thomas R. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); Neff, James E.; Wells, Mark A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 66 George Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Kowalski, Adam [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Berdyugina, Svetlana [Kiepenheuer Institut für Sonnenphysik, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, D-79104 (Germany); Harper, Graham M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Korhonen, Heidi [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Piskunov, Nikolai [Department of Astronomy and Space Physics, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751-20 (Sweden); Saar, Steven [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Walkowicz, Lucianne, E-mail: Alexander.Brown@colorado.edu [Astrophysical Sciences Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Kepler satellite provides a unique window into stellar temporal variability by observing a wide variety of stars with multi-year, near-continuous, high precision, optical photometric time series. While most Kepler targets are faint stars with poorly known physical properties, many unexpected discoveries should result from a long photometric survey of such a large area of sky. During our Kepler Guest Observer programs that monitored late-type stars for starspot and flaring variability, we discovered a previously unknown dwarf nova that lies within a few arcseconds of the mid-G dwarf star KIC 5438845. This dwarf nova underwent nine outbursts over a 4 year time span. The two largest outbursts lasted ∼17–18 days and show strong modulations with a 110.8 minute period and a declining amplitude during the outburst decay phase. These properties are characteristic of an SU UMa-type cataclysmic variable. By analogy with other dwarf nova light curves, we associate the 110.8 minute (1.847 hr) period with the superhump period, close to but slightly longer than the orbital period of the binary. No precursor outbursts are seen before the super-outbursts and the overall super-outburst morphology corresponds to Osaki and Meyer “Case B” outbursts, which are initiated when the outer edge of the disk reaches the tidal truncation radius. “Case B” outbursts are rare within the Kepler light curves of dwarf novae. The dwarf nova is undergoing relatively slow mass transfer, as evidenced by the long intervals between outbursts, but the mass transfer rate appears to be steady, because the smaller “normal” outbursts show a strong correlation between the integrated outburst energy and the elapsed time since the previous outburst. At super-outburst maximum the system was at V ∼ 18, but in quiescence it is fainter than V ∼ 22, which will make any detailed quiescent follow-up of this system difficult.

  11. Absolute stellar parameters of KIC 09246715 -- a double-giant eclipsing system with a solar-like oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Hełminiak, Krzysztof G; Kambe, Eiji; Konacki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We present our results of a combined analysis of radial velocity and light curves of a double-lined spectroscopic and eclipsing binary KIC 09246715, observed photometrically by the $Kepler$ satellite, and spectroscopically with the OAO-1.88m telescope with the HIgh-Dispertion Echelle Spectrograph (HIDES). The target was claimed to be composed of two red giants, one of which is showing solar-like oscillations. We have found that the mass and radius of the primary are $M_1=2.169\\pm0.024$ M$_\\odot$ and $R_1=8.47\\pm0.13$ R$_\\odot$, and of the secondary: $M_2=2.143\\pm0.025$ M$_\\odot$ and $R_2=8.18\\pm0.09$ R$_\\odot$, which confirms the double-giant status. Our secondary is the star to which the oscillations were attributed. Results of its previous asteroseismic analysis are in agreement with ours, only significantly less precise, but the subsequent light-curve-based study failed to derive correct mass and radius of our primary. KIC 09246715 is one of the rare cases where asteroseismic parameters of a solar-like osc...

  12. KICS: A Model of Motivational Leadership in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This pure research gave birth to a Model of Motivational Leadership – KICS: which embraces knowledge, intelligence, collaboration and synergy. It is a synergistic  proposition based on the theory of emotional intelligence as the index of competencies needed for effective leadership. It opened with a general discussion on traditional models of leadership, then the roles of knowledge, intelligence, collaboration and synergy as they relate to motivational leadership. Issues of emotional intelligence clusters and synthesis of the model’s elements were discussed, emphasizing how KICS-based motivational leadership skills can be developed and sustained. Motivational leadership entails exciting people’s imaginations and inspiring them to move in a desired direction. It takes more than simple power to motivate and lead in organizations. Realizing that unity and cohesiveness are built from personal bonds, the best leaders ensure to deepen their rapport with employees and colleagues which enhances organizational performance. This pure research argues that the synergy of related emotional intelligence competencies can lead to motivational leadership behaviour. Knowledge is critical to leadership because there are different types of leadership and different situations require different kinds of knowledge, and the person possessing the knowledge demanded by a certain situation in most cases, tends to become the best leader. A knowledgeable person is one who is trained to consider his actions to undertake them deliberately, in a disciplined manner. Added to this ability is the intelligence to endure in a chosen course in the face of distraction, confusion and difficulty, all combined in producing a motivational leader. Knowledge tends to be procedural in nature and to operate outside of focal awareness. It also reflects the structure of the situation more closely than it does in the structure of formal disciplinary knowledge. The survey research design

  13. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: II. Stellar modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metcalfe , T.S.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    Observations from the Kepler satellite were recently published for three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that the star has evolved...... significantly. We have derived initial estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from the oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler, combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present preliminary results from detailed modeling of this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses...

  14. KIC11560447: An Active Eclipsing Binary From the Kepler Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozavci, Ibrahim; Hussain, Gaitee; Yılmaz, Mesut; O'Neal, Douglas; osman Selam, Selim; Şenavcı, Hakan Volkan

    2016-07-01

    We performed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the detached eclipsing binary KIC11560447, in order to investigate the spot activity of the system. In this context, we reconstructed the surface maps with the help of the code DoTS, using time series spectra obtained at the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory. We also analysed high precision Kepler light curves of the system simultaneously with the code DoTS to reveal the spot migration and activity behaviour.

  15. The Kepler Eclipsing System KIC 5621294 and its Substellar Companion

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    We present the physical properties of KIC 5621294 showing light and timing variations from the ${\\it Kepler}$ photometry. Its light curve displays partial eclipses and O'Connell effect with Max II fainter than Max I, which was fitted quite well by applying third-body and spot effects to the system. The results indicate that the eclipsing pair is a classical Algol-type system with parameters of $q$=0.22, $i$=76$^\\circ$.8, and $\\Delta$($T_{1}$--$T_{2}$)=4,235 K, in which the detached primary component fills about 77\\% of its limiting lobe. Striking discrepancies exist between the primary and secondary eclipse times obtained with the method of Kwee \\& van Woerden. These are mainly caused by surface inhomogeneities due to spot activity detected in our light-curve synthesis. The 1,253 light-curve timings from the Wilson-Devinney code were used for a period study. It was found that the orbital period of KIC 5621294 has varied due to a periodic variation overlaid on a downward parabola. The sinusoidal variation ...

  16. The Chromospherically Active Low-Mass Close Binary KIC 9761199

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoldaş, E.; Dal, H. A.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results obtained from the analyses of KIC 9761199's light variation acquired by the Kepler Mission. The temperature of the secondary component was found to be 3891±1 K, and the mass ratio was found to be 0.69±0.01 with an orbital inclination of 77°.4± 0°.1. Stellar spots separated by about 180° longitudinally were found around the latitudes of +47° and +30°. In addition, the OPEA model was derived for 94 detected flares. The plateau value was found to be 1.951±0.069 s, while the half-life value was found to be 1014 s. The flare frequency N1 was 0.01351 h-1, while the flare frequency N2 was 0.00006. Maximum flare rise time was 1118.098 s, while maximum flare total time was 6767.72 s. The chromospheric activity level of KIC 9761199 is at the expected level according to a B-V of 1m.303.

  17. Analysis and interpretation of 15 quarters of Kepler data of the disintegrating planet KIC 12557548 b

    CERN Document Server

    van Werkhoven, T I M; Snellen, I A G; Keller, C U

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler object KIC 12557548 shows irregular eclipsing behaviour with a constant 15.685 hr period, but strongly varying transit depth. In this paper we fit individual eclipses, in addition to fitting binned light curves, to learn more about the process underlying the eclipse depth variation. Additionally, we put forward observational constraints that any model of this planet-star system will have to match. We find two quiescent spells of ~30 orbital periods each where the transit depth is 0.5% deep transits are followed by apparently no transit at all. Apart from these isolated events we find neither significant correlation between consecutive transit depths nor a correlation between transit depth and stellar intensity. We find a three-sigma upper limit for the secondary eclipse of 4.9*10^-5, consistent with a planet candidate with a radius of less than 4600 km. Using the short cadence data we find that a 1-D exponential dust tail model is insufficient to explain the data. We improved our model to a 2-D, tw...

  18. Possible Disintegrating Short-Period Super-Mercury Orbiting KIC 12557548

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaport, S; Chiang, E; Mellah, I El; Jenkins, J; Kalomeni, B; Kotson, M; Nelson, L; Rousseau-Nepton, L; Tran, K

    2012-01-01

    We report here on the discovery of stellar occultations, observed with Kepler, that recur periodically at 15.685 hour intervals, but which vary in depth from a maximum of 1.2% to a minimum that can be less than 0.2%. The star that is apparently being occulted is KIC 12557548, a V = 16 magnitude K dwarf with T_eff = 4400 K. The out-of-occultation behavior shows no evidence for ellipsoidal light variations, indicating that the mass of the orbiting object is less than ~3 M_J. Because the eclipse depths are highly variable, they cannot be due solely to transits of a single planet with a fixed size. We discuss but dismiss a scenario involving a binary giant planet whose mutual orbit plane precesses, bringing one of the planets into and out of a grazing transit. This scenario seems ruled out by the dynamical instability that would result from such a configuration. The much more likely explanation involves macroscopic particles - e.g., dust, possibly in the form of micron-sized pyroxene grains - escaping the atmosph...

  19. POSSIBLE DISINTEGRATING SHORT-PERIOD SUPER-MERCURY ORBITING KIC 12557548

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappaport, S.; El Mellah, I.; Kotson, M.; Tran, K. [37-602B, M.I.T. Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Levine, A.; Kalomeni, B. [37-575, M.I.T. Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chiang, E. [Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Jenkins, J. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kite, E. S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, UC Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States); Nelson, L. [Department of Physics, Bishop' s University, 2600 College St., Sherbrooke, Quebec, QC J1M 1Z7 (Canada); Rousseau-Nepton, L., E-mail: sar@mit.edu, E-mail: aml@space.mit.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: ielmelah@ens-cachan.fr, E-mail: Jon.M.Jenkins@nasa.gov, E-mail: belinda.kalomeni@ege.edu.tr, E-mail: ekite@caltech.edu, E-mail: lnelson@ubishops.ca, E-mail: laurie.r-nepton.1@ulaval.ca [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2012-06-10

    We report on the discovery of stellar occultations, observed with Kepler, which recur periodically at 15.685 hr intervals, but which vary in depth from a maximum of 1.3% to a minimum that can be less than 0.2%. The star that is apparently being occulted is KIC 12557548, a V = 16 mag K dwarf with T{sub eff,s} {approx_equal} 4400 K. The out-of-occultation behavior shows no evidence for ellipsoidal light variations, indicating that the mass of the orbiting object is less than {approx}3 M{sub J} (for an orbital period of 15.7 hr). Because the eclipse depths are highly variable, they cannot be due solely to transits of a single planet with a fixed size. We discuss but dismiss a scenario involving a binary giant planet whose mutual orbit plane precesses, bringing one of the planets into and out of a grazing transit. This scenario seems ruled out by the dynamical instability that would result from such a configuration. We also briefly consider an eclipsing binary, possibly containing an accretion disk, that either orbits KIC 12557548 in a hierarchical triple configuration or is nearby on the sky, but we find such a scenario inadequate to reproduce the observations. The much more likely explanation-but one which still requires more quantitative development-involves macroscopic particles escaping the atmosphere of a slowly disintegrating planet not much larger than Mercury in size. The particles could take the form of micron-sized pyroxene or aluminum oxide dust grains. The planetary surface is hot enough to sublimate and create a high-Z atmosphere; this atmosphere may be loaded with dust via cloud condensation or explosive volcanism. Atmospheric gas escapes the planet via a Parker-type thermal wind, dragging dust grains with it. We infer a mass-loss rate from the observations of order 1 M{sub Circled-Plus} Gyr{sup -1}, with a dust-to-gas ratio possibly of order unity. For our fiducial 0.1 M{sub Circled-Plus} planet (twice the mass of Mercury), the evaporation timescale may

  20. Fundamental properties of five Kepler stars using global asteroseismic quantities and ground-based observations

    CERN Document Server

    Creevey, O L; Frasca, A; Thygesen, A O; Basu, S; Bhattacharya, J; Biazzo, K; Brandão, I M; Bruntt, H; Mazumdar, A; Niemczura, E; Shrotriya, T; Sousa, S G; Stello, D; Subramaniam, A; Campante, T L; Handberg, R; Mathur, S; Bedding, T R; García, R A; Régulo, C; Salabert, D; Molenda-Żakowicz, J; Quirion, P -O; White, T R; Bonanno, A; Chaplin, W J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Christiansen, J L; Elsworth, Y; Fanelli, M N; Karoff, C; Kinemuchi, K; Kjeldsen, H; Gai, N; Monteiro, M J P F G; Suárez, J C

    2011-01-01

    We present an asteroseismic study of the solar-like stars KIC 11395018, KIC 10273246, KIC 10920273, KIC 10339342, and KIC 11234888 using short-cadence time series of more than eight months from the Kepler satellite. For four of these stars, we derive atmospheric parameters from spectra acquired with the Nordic Optical Telescope. The global seismic quantities (average large frequency separation and frequency of maximum power), combined with the atmospheric parameters, yield the mean density and surface gravity with precisions of 2% and ~0.03 dex, respectively. We also determine the radius, mass, and age with precisions of 2-5%, 7-11%, and ~35%, respectively, using grid-based analyses. We determine asteroseismic distances to these stars with a precision better than 10%, and constrain the stellar inclination for three of the stars. An Li abundance analysis yields an independent estimate of the age, but this is inconsistent with the asteroseismically determined age for one of the stars. We compare the results fro...

  1. The Kepler Eclipsing System KIC 5621294 and Its Substellar Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius

    2015-03-01

    We present the physical properties of KIC 5621294, showing light and timing variations from the Kepler photometry. Its light curve displays partial eclipses and the O’Connell effect, with Max II fainter than Max I, which was fitted quite well by applying third-body and spot effects to the system. The results indicate that the eclipsing pair is a classical Algol-type system with parameters of q = 0.22, i = 76.°8, and Δ(T1-T2) = 4235 K, in which the detached primary component fills about 77% of its limiting lobe. Striking discrepancies exist between the primary and secondary eclipse times obtained with the method of Kwee & van Woerden. These are mainly caused by surface inhomogeneities due to spot activity detected in our light curve synthesis. The 1253 light curve timings from the Wilson-Devinney code were used for a period study. It was found that the orbital period of KIC 5621294 has varied due to periodic variation overlaid on a downward parabola. The sinusoidal variation with a period of 961 days and a semi-amplitude of 22.5 s most likely arises from a light-time effect due to a third component with a mass of {{M}3}sin {{i}3} = 46.9 MJup, which is in good agreement with that calculated from the light curve itself. If its orbital inclination is larger than about 40°, the mass of the circumbinary object would possibly match a brown dwarf. The parabolic variation could not be fully explained by either a mass transfer between the binary components or angular momentum via magnetic braking. It is possible that the parabola may be the only observed part of a period modulation caused by the presence of another companion in a wider orbit.

  2. The Kepler eclipsing system KIC 5621294 and its substellar companion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Hinse, Tobias Cornelius, E-mail: jwlee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: kshong@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: tchinse@gmail.com [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    We present the physical properties of KIC 5621294, showing light and timing variations from the Kepler photometry. Its light curve displays partial eclipses and the O’Connell effect, with Max II fainter than Max I, which was fitted quite well by applying third-body and spot effects to the system. The results indicate that the eclipsing pair is a classical Algol-type system with parameters of q = 0.22, i = 76.°8, and Δ(T{sub 1}−T{sub 2}) = 4235 K, in which the detached primary component fills about 77% of its limiting lobe. Striking discrepancies exist between the primary and secondary eclipse times obtained with the method of Kwee and van Woerden. These are mainly caused by surface inhomogeneities due to spot activity detected in our light curve synthesis. The 1253 light curve timings from the Wilson–Devinney code were used for a period study. It was found that the orbital period of KIC 5621294 has varied due to periodic variation overlaid on a downward parabola. The sinusoidal variation with a period of 961 days and a semi-amplitude of 22.5 s most likely arises from a light-time effect due to a third component with a mass of M{sub 3}sini{sub 3} = 46.9 M{sub Jup}, which is in good agreement with that calculated from the light curve itself. If its orbital inclination is larger than about 40°, the mass of the circumbinary object would possibly match a brown dwarf. The parabolic variation could not be fully explained by either a mass transfer between the binary components or angular momentum via magnetic braking. It is possible that the parabola may be the only observed part of a period modulation caused by the presence of another companion in a wider orbit.

  3. Asteroseismology of KIC\\,11754974: a high-amplitude SX\\,Phe pulsator in a 343-day binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, S J; Kurtz, D W; Suarez, J C; Handler, G; Balona, L A; Smalley, B; Uytterhoeven, K; Szabo, R; Thygesen, A O; Elkin, V; Breger, M; Grigahcene, A; Guzik, J A; Nemec, J M; Southworth, J

    2013-01-01

    The candidate SX Phe star KIC 11754974 shows a remarkably high number of combination frequencies in the Fourier amplitude spectrum: 123 of the 166 frequencies in our multi-frequency fit are linear combinations of independent modes. Predictable patterns in frequency spacings are seen in the Fourier transform of the light curve. We present an analysis of 180 d of short-cadence Kepler photometry and of new spectroscopic data for this evolved, late A-type star. We infer from the 1150-d, long-cadence light curve, and in two different ways, that our target is the primary of a 343-d, non-eclipsing binary system. According to both methods, the mass function is similar, f(M)=0.0207 +/- 0.0003 Msun. The observed pulsations are modelled extensively, using separate, state-of-the-art, time-dependent convection (TDC) and rotating models. The models match the observed temperature and low metallicity, finding a mass of 1.50-1.56 Msun. The models suggest the whole star is metal-poor, and that the low metallicity is not just a...

  4. The Stability of F-star Brightness on Century Timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Michael B; Stassun, Keivan G; Hippke, Michael; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The century-long photometric record of the DASCH project provides a unique window into the variability of stars normally considered to be photometrically inactive. In this paper, we look for long-term trends in the brightness of F stars, with particular attention to KIC 8462852,an F3 main sequence star that has been identified as significant short-term variability according to Kepler observations. Although a simple search for variability suggests long-term dimming of a number of F stars, we find that such trends are artifacts of the 'Menzel Gap' in the DASCH data. That includes the behavior of KIC 8462852, which we believe is consistent with constant flux over the full duration of observations. We do, however, present a selection of F stars thatdo have significant photometric trends, even after systematics are taken into account.

  5. Metal Abundances, Radial Velocities and other Physical Characteristics for the RR Lyrae Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Nemec, James M; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Sesar, Branimir; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude delta Scuti star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which 16 exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 +/- 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 +/- 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al.(2011) the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be meta...

  6. Selection, Prioritization, and Characteristics of Kepler Target Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    observations of ∼1500 secondary photometric standards within the Kepler field. These in turn are tied to >300 stars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey ( SDSS ...to provide a full census of point sources in the field down to SDSS g = 20 corresponding to the completeness of the USNO-B catalog (Monet et al. 2003...R∗ archived in the KIC) to that of the Sun. The completeness of the KIC with regard to point sources down to SDSS g = 20 allows us to simulate the sky

  7. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  8. Chromospherically Active Low-Mass Close Binary: KIC 9761199

    CERN Document Server

    Yoldas, Ezgi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present the results obtained from KIC 9761199's the photometrical data acquired by the Kepler Mission. The light curve of the system, the sinusoidal variation out-of-eclipses and instant-short term flare events in the entire light curves were analyzed. The temperature of the secondary component was found to be 3891+-1 K, while the mass ratio of the components (q) was found to be 0.69+-0.01, and the orbital inclination (i) was computed as 77.4+-0.1 degrees. The sinusoidal variation is caused by the stellar spots of two active regions separated by about 180 degrees longitudinally located around the latitudes of +47 and +30 degrees. In addition, 94 flares were detected and their parameters were computed. The OPEA model was derived for these flares and its parameters were computed. The Plateau value as saturation level for the active component was found to be 1.951+-0.069 s, while the half-life value was found to be 1014 s. The flare frequency N1 was found to be 0.01351 per hour, while the flare...

  9. Understanding angular momentum transport in red giants: the case of KIC 7341231

    CERN Document Server

    Ceillier, T; García, R A; Mathis, S

    2013-01-01

    Context. Thanks to recent asteroseismic observations, it has been possible to infer the radial differential rotation profile of subgiants and red giants. Aims. We want to reproduce through modeling the observed rotation profile of the early red giant KIC 7341231 and constrain the physical mechanisms responsible for angular momentum transport in stellar interiors. Methods. We compute models of KIC 7341231 including a treatment of shellular rotation and we compare the rotation profiles obtained with the one derived by Deheuvels et al. (2012). We then modify some modeling parameters in order to quantify their effect on the obtained rotation profile. Moreover, we mimic a powerful angular momentum transport during the Main Sequence and study its effect on the evolution of the rotation profile during the subgiant and red giant phases. Results. We show that meridional circulation and shear mixing alone produce a rotation profile for KIC 7341231 too steep compared to the observed one. An additional mechanism is then ...

  10. Constraints to dark-matter properties from asteroseismic analysis of KIC 2009504

    CERN Document Server

    Brandão, Isa M

    2015-01-01

    Asteroseismology can be used to constrain some properties of dark-matter (DM) particles (Casanellas & Lopes, 2013). In this work, we performed an asteroseismic modelling of the main-sequence solar-like pulsator KIC 2009505 (also known as Dushera) in order to test the existence of DM particles with the characteristics that explain the recent results found in some of the DM direct detection experiments. We found that the presence of a convective core in KIC 2009504 is incompatible with the existence of some particular models of DM particles.

  11. ASTEROSEISMOLOGY OF EVOLVED STARS WITH KEPLER: A NEW WAY TO CONSTRAIN STELLAR INTERIORS USING MODE INERTIAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benomar, O.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Belkacem, K. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, Université Paris Diderot, 5 place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Di Mauro, M. P. [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ventura, R. [INAF-Astrophyscial Observatory of Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Mosser, B.; Goupil, M. J.; Samadi, R. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    The asteroseismology of evolved solar-like stars is experiencing growing interest due to the wealth of observational data from space-borne instruments such as the CoRoT and Kepler spacecraft. In particular, the recent detection of mixed modes, which probe both the innermost and uppermost layers of stars, paves the way for inferring the internal structure of stars along their evolution through the subgiant and red giant phases. Mixed modes can also place stringent constraints on the physics of such stars and on their global properties (mass, age, etc.). Here, using two Kepler stars (KIC 4351319 and KIC 6442183), we demonstrate that measurements of mixed mode characteristics allow us to estimate the mode inertias, providing a new and additional diagnostics on the mode trapping and subsequently on the internal structure of evolved stars. We however stress that the accuracy may be sensitive to non-adiabatic effects.

  12. Spectroscopic survey of Kepler stars. I. HERMES/Mercator observations of A- and F-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Niemczura, E; Smalley, B; Uytterhoeven, K; Pigulski, A; Lehmann, H; Bowman, D M; Catanzaro, G; van Aarle, E; Bloemen, S; Briquet, M; De Cat, P; Drobek, D; Eyer, L; Gameiro, J F S; Gorlova, N; Kaminski, K; Lampens, P; Marcos-Arenal, P; Papics, P I; Vandenbussche, B; Van Winckel, H; Steslicki, M; Fagas, M

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler space mission provided near-continuous and high-precision photometry of about 207,000 stars, which can be used for asteroseismology. However, for successful seismic modelling it is equally important to have accurate stellar physical parameters. Therefore, supplementary ground-based data are needed. We report the results of the analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data of A- and F-type stars from the Kepler field, which were obtained with the HERMES spectrograph on the Mercator telescope. We determined spectral types, atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances for a sample of 117 stars. Hydrogen Balmer, Fe I, and Fe II lines were used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and microturbulent velocities. We determined chemical abundances and projected rotational velocities using a spectrum synthesis technique. The atmospheric parameters obtained were compared with those from the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC), confirming that the KIC effective temperatures are underestimated for ...

  13. KIC 8262223: A Post-Mass Transfer Eclipsing Binary Consisting of a Delta Scuti Pulsator and a Helium White Dwarf Precursor

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhao; Matson, Rachel A; Hernández, Antonio García; Han, Zhanwen; Chen, Xuefei

    2016-01-01

    KIC~8262223 is an eclipsing binary with a short orbital period ($P=1.61$ d). The {\\it Kepler} light curves are of Algol-type and display deep and partial eclipses, ellipsoidal variations, and pulsations of Delta Scuti type. We analyzed the {\\it Kepler} photometric data, complemented by phase-resolved spectra from the R-C Spectrograph on the 4-meter Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and determined the fundamental parameters of this system. The low mass and oversized secondary ($M_2=0.20M_{\\odot}$, $R_2=1.31R_{\\odot}$) is the remnant of the donor star that transferred most of its mass to the gainer, and now the primary star. The current primary star is thus not a normal $\\delta$ Scuti star but the result of mass accretion from a lower mass progenitor. We discuss the possible evolutionary history and demonstrate with the MESA evolution code that the system can be understood as the result of non-conservative binary evolution similar to that for the formation of EL CVn type binaries. The pulsation...

  14. Star Shows It Has The Right Stuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make the best case yet that a star can be engulfed by its companion star and survive. This discovery will help astronomers better understand how closely coupled stars, and perhaps even stars and planets, evolve when one of the stars expands enormously in its red giant phase. The binary star system known as V471 Tauri comprises a white dwarf star (the primary) in a close orbit -- one thirtieth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun -- with a normal Sun-like star (the secondary). Chandra's data showed that the hot upper atmosphere of the secondary star has a deficit of carbon atoms relative to nitrogen atoms. "This deficit of carbon atoms is the first clear observational evidence that the normal star was engulfed by its companion in the past," according to Jeremy Drake of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, MA, who coauthored an article on V471 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters with Marek Sarna of the N. Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland. The white dwarf star was once a star several times as massive as the Sun. Nuclear fusion reactions in the core of such a star convert carbon into nitrogen over a period of about a billion years. When the fuel in the core of the star is exhausted, the core collapses, triggering more energetic nuclear reactions that cause the star to expand and transform into a red giant before eventually collapsing to become a white dwarf. The carbon-poor material in the core of the red giant is mixed with outer part of the star, so its atmosphere shows a deficit of carbon, as compared with Sun-like stars. The X-ray spectra of a red giant star (top panel) and a Sun-like star (bottom panel) show the large difference in the peaks due to carbon atoms in the two stars. Theoretical calculations indicate that a red giant in a binary system can completely envelop its companion star and dramatically affect its evolution. During this common envelope

  15. Verification of the Kepler Input Catalog from asteroseismology of solar-type stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Verner; W.J. Chaplin; S. Basu; T.M. Brown; S. Hekker; D. Huber; C. Karoff; S. Mathur; T.S. Metcalfe; B. Mosser; P.O. Quirion; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; H. Bruntt; T.L. Campante; Y. Elsworth; R.A. Garcia; R. Handberg; C. Regulo; I.W. Roxburgh; D. Stello; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; R.L. Gilliland; S.D. Kawaler; H. Kjeldsen; C. Allen; B.D. Clarke; F.R. Girouard

    2011-01-01

    We calculate precise stellar radii and surface gravities from the asteroseismic analysis of over 500 solar-type pulsating stars observed by the Kepler space telescope. These physical stellar properties are compared with those given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), determined from ground-based mult

  16. Detailed Study of the Internal Structure of a Red-giant Star Observed with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Mauro, M. P.; Ventura, R.; Cardini, D.;

    2012-01-01

    We study the internal structure and evolutionary state of KIC 4351319, a red-giant star observed with the Kepler satellite. The use of 25 individual oscillation frequencies, together with the accurate atmospheric data provided by ground-based spectroscopic observations, allowed us to estimate the...

  17. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Camosun College, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 5J2 (Canada); Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States); Ripepi, Vincenzo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Derekas, Aliz [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Moskalik, Pawel [Copernicus Astronomical Centre, ul.Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Chadid, Merieme [Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Universite de Nice, Sophia-Antipolis, UMR 6525, Parc Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Bruntt, Hans, E-mail: nemec@camosun.ca, E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca, E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it, E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu, E-mail: pam@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr, E-mail: bruntt@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  18. KIC 8262223: A Post-mass Transfer Eclipsing Binary Consisting of a Delta Scuti Pulsator and a Helium White Dwarf Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhao; Gies, Douglas R.; Matson, Rachel A.; García Hernández, Antonio; Han, Zhanwen; Chen, Xuefei

    2017-03-01

    KIC 8262223 is an eclipsing binary with a short orbital period (P = 1.61 day). The Kepler light curves are of Algol-type and display deep and partial eclipses, ellipsoidal variations, and pulsations of δ Scuti type. We analyzed the Kepler photometric data, complemented by phase-resolved spectra from the R-C Spectrograph on the 4 meter Mayall telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory and determined the fundamental parameters of this system. The low-mass and oversized secondary ({M}2=0.20{M}ȯ , {R}2=1.31{R}ȯ ) is the remnant of the donor star that transferred most of its mass to the gainer, and now the primary star. The current primary star is thus not a normal δ Scuti star but the result of mass accretion from a lower mass progenitor. We discuss the possible evolutionary history and demonstrate with the MESA evolution code that this system and several other systems discussed in prior literature can be understood as the result of non-conservative binary evolution for the formation of EL CVn-type binaries. The pulsations of the primary star can be explained as radial and non-radial pressure modes. The equilibrium models from single star evolutionary tracks can match the observed mass and radius ({M}1=1.94{M}ȯ , {R}1=1.67{R}ȯ ) but the predicted unstable modes associated with these models differ somewhat from those observed. We discuss the need for better theoretical understanding of such post-mass transfer δ Scuti pulsators.

  19. Comparison of fracture toughness (KIC) and strain energy release rate (G) of selected nuclear graphites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan

    2016-08-01

    The fracture behaviors of six nuclear graphite grades for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which differed in coke particle size and forming method, were characterized based on the ASTM standard graphite fracture toughness test method (ASTM D 7779-11) at room temperature. The G appeared to show good correlation with the fracture surface roughness and the G-Δa curves appeared to describe the fracture process well from crack initiation to failure. Comparison of the local (KIC) and gross (GIC, G-Δa) fracture parameters showed that the resistance to crack initiation and propagation was higher in the extruded or vibration molded medium particle size grades (PCEA, NBG-17, NBG-18: EVM group) than in the iso-molded fine particle size grades (IG-110, IG-430, NBG-25: IMF group). The ASTM may need to provide a guideline for G-Δa curve analysis. The KIC appeared to increase with specimen thickness (size).

  20. KIC Krones通过质量和环境管理体系认证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    近期,克朗斯子公司KIC Krones顺利通过TUV SUD Management Service认证公司的认证。TUV SUD审核后确认,德国新特劳普林的KIC Krones阍际合作有限责任公司引进的质量和环境管理体系,能满足ISO9001:2008和ISO14001:2004标准的各项要求。此认证有效期为三年,其间TUV SUD每年执行一次监督审核。

  1. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2013-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  2. Amplitude Variability in gamma Dor and delta Scuti stars observed by the Kepler Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Joyce A; Bradley, Paul A; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Kepler spacecraft data revealed a large number of multimode nonradially pulsating gamma Dor and delta Sct variable star candidates. The high precision long time-series photometry makes it possible to study amplitude variations of the frequencies. We summarize recent literature on amplitude and frequency variations in pulsating variables. We are searching for amplitude variability in several dozen faint gamma Doradus or delta Scuti variable-star candidates observed as part of the Kepler Guest Observer program. We apply several methods, including a Matlab-script wavelet analysis developed by J. Jackiewicz, and the wavelet technique of the VSTAR software (http://www.aavso.org/vstar-overview). Here we show results for two stars, KIC 2167444 and KIC 2301163. We discuss the magnitude and timescale of the amplitude variations, and the presence or absence of correlations between amplitude variations for different frequencies of a given star. Amplitude variations may be detectable using Kepler data even for s...

  3. Multiwavelength Observations of the Candidate Disintegrating sub-Mercury KIC 12557548b

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Bryce; DeVore, John; Gilliland, Ronald L; Crepp, Justin R; Howard, Andrew W; Star, Kimberly M; Chiang, Eugene; Levine, Alan M; Jenkins, Jon M; Albert, Loic; Bonomo, Aldo S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Isaacson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    We present multiwavelength photometry, high angular resolution imaging, and radial velocities, of the unique and confounding disintegrating low-mass planet candidate KIC 12557548b. Our high angular resolution imaging, which includes spacebased HST/WFC3 observations in the optical, and groundbased Keck/NIRC2 observations in K'-band, allow us to rule-out background and foreground candidates at angular separations greater than 0.2 arcsec that are bright enough to be responsible for the transits we associate with KIC 12557548. Our radial velocity limit from Keck/HIRES allows us to rule-out bound, low-mass stellar companions to KIC 12557548 on orbits less than 10 years, as well as placing an upper-limit on the mass of the candidate planet of 1.2 Jupiter masses; therefore, the combination of our radial velocities, high angular-resolution imaging, and photometry are able to rule-out most false positive interpretations of the transits. Our precise multiwavelength photometry includes two simultaneous detections of the...

  4. Multiwavelength observations of the candidate disintegrating sub-Mercury KIC 12557548B , ,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croll, Bryce; Rappaport, Saul; Levine, Alan M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); DeVore, John [Visidyne, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA 93105 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L.; Star, Kimberly M. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chiang, Eugene [Departments of Astronomy and of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California at Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Jenkins, Jon M. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Albert, Loic [Département de physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Bonomo, Aldo S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Isaacson, Howard, E-mail: croll@space.mit.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We present multiwavelength photometry, high angular resolution imaging, and radial velocities of the unique and confounding disintegrating low-mass planet candidate KIC 12557548b. Our high angular resolution imaging, which includes space-based Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations in the optical (∼0.53 μm and ∼0.77 μm), and ground-based Keck/NIRC2 observations in K' band (∼2.12 μm), allow us to rule out background and foreground candidates at angular separations greater than 0.''2 that are bright enough to be responsible for the transits we associate with KIC 12557548. Our radial velocity limit from Keck/HIRES allows us to rule out bound, low-mass stellar companions (∼0.2 M {sub ☉}) to KIC 12557548 on orbits less than 10 yr, as well as placing an upper limit on the mass of the candidate planet of 1.2 Jupiter masses; therefore, the combination of our radial velocities, high angular resolution imaging, and photometry are able to rule out most false positive interpretations of the transits. Our precise multiwavelength photometry includes two simultaneous detections of the transit of KIC 12557548b using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Wide-field InfraRed Camera (CFHT/WIRCam) at 2.15 μm and the Kepler space telescope at 0.6 μm, as well as simultaneous null-detections of the transit by Kepler and HST/WFC3 at 1.4 μm. Our simultaneous HST/WFC3 and Kepler null-detections provide no evidence for radically different transit depths at these wavelengths. Our simultaneous CFHT/WIRCam detections in the near-infrared and with Kepler in the optical reveal very similar transit depths (the average ratio of the transit depths at ∼2.15 μm compared with ∼0.6 μm is: 1.02 ± 0.20). This suggests that if the transits we observe are due to scattering from single-size particles streaming from the planet in a comet-like tail, then the particles must be ∼0.5 μm in radius or larger, which would favor that KIC 12557548b is a sub

  5. Magnetised winds in single and binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Stellar winds are fundamentally important for the stellar magnetic activity evolution and for the immediate environment surrounding their host stars. Ionised winds travel at hundreds of km/s, impacting planets and clearing out large regions around the stars called astropheres. Winds influence planets in many ways: for example, by compressing the magnetosphere and picking up atmospheric particles, they can cause significant erosion of a planetary atmosphere. By removing angular momentum, winds cause the rotation rates of stars to decrease as they age. This causes the star's magnetic dynamo to decay, leading to a significant decay in the star's levels of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet emission. Despite their importance, little is currently known about the winds of other Sun-like stars. Their small mass fluxes have meant that no direct detections have so far been possible. What is currently known has either been learned indirectly or through analogies with the solar wind. In this talk, I will review what is known about the properties and evolution of the winds of other Sun-like stars. I will also review wind dynamics in binary star systems, where the winds from both stars impact each other, leading to shocks and compression regions.

  6. KOI-3278: A Self-Lensing Binary Star System

    CERN Document Server

    Kruse, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    Over 40% of Sun-like stars are bound in binary or multistar systems. Stellar remnants in edge-on binary systems can gravitationally magnify their companions, as predicted 40 years ago. By using data from the Kepler spacecraft, we report the detection of such a "self-lensing" system, in which a 5-hour pulse of 0.1% amplitude occurs every orbital period. The white dwarf stellar remnant and its Sun-like companion orbit one another every 88.18 days, a long period for a white dwarf-eclipsing binary. By modeling the pulse as gravitational magnification (microlensing) along with Kepler's laws and stellar models, we constrain the mass of the white dwarf to be ~63% of the mass of our Sun. Further study of this system, and any others discovered like it, will help to constrain the physics of white dwarfs and binary star evolution.

  7. Reduced Activity and Large Particles from the Disintegrating Planet Candidate KIC 12557548b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, E.; Herter, T.; Zhao, M.; Teske, J. K.; Chen, H.

    2016-08-01

    The intriguing exoplanet candidate KIC 12557548b is believed to have a comet-like tail of dusty debris trailing a small rocky planet. The tail of debris scatters up to 1.3% of the stellar light in the Kepler observatory’s bandpass (0.42-0.9 μm). Observing the tail’s transit depth at multiple wavelengths can reveal the composition and particle size of the debris, constraining the makeup and lifetime of the sub-Mercury planet. Early dust particle size predictions from the scattering of the comet-like tail pointed toward a dust size of ˜0.1 μm for silicate compositions. These small particles would produce a much deeper optical transit depth than near-infrared transit depth. We measure a transmission spectrum for KIC 12557548b using the SpeX spectrograph (covering 0.8-2.4 μm) simultaneously with the MORIS imager taking r‧ (0.63 μm) photometry on the Infrared Telescope Facility for eight nights and one night in H band (1.63 μm) using the Wide-field IR Camera at the Palomar 200 inch telescope. The infrared spectra are plagued by systematic errors, but we argue that sufficient precision is obtained when using differential spectroscopic calibration when combining multiple nights. The average differential transmission spectrum is flat, supporting findings that KIC 12557548b’s debris is likely composed of larger particles ≳0.5 μm for pyroxene and olivine and ≳0.2 μm for iron and corundum. The r‧ photometric transit depths are all below the average Kepler value, suggesting that the observations occurred during a weak period or that the mechanisms producing optical broadband transit depths are suppressed.

  8. The architecture of the hierarchical triple star KOI 928 from eclipse timing variations seen in Kepler photometry

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, J.H.; Quinn, S.N.; Borucki, W. J.; Brugamyer, E.; Bryson, S. T.; Buchhave, L. A.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Holman, M. J.; Jenkins, J.; Koch, D.; Latham, D. W.; MacQueen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a hierarchical triple star system (KIC 9140402) where a low mass eclipsing binary orbits a more massive third star. The orbital period of the binary (4.98829 Days) is determined by the eclipse times seen in photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft. The periodically changing tidal field, due to the eccentric orbit of the binary about the tertiary, causes a change in the orbital period of the binary. The resulting eclipse timing variations provide insight into the dynamics and archit...

  9. Direct evidence for an evolving dust cloud from the exoplanet KIC 12557548 b

    CERN Document Server

    Bochinski, Jakub J; Marsh, Tom R; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart P

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous multi-color optical photometry using ULTRACAM of the transiting exoplanet KIC 12557548 b (also known as KIC 1255 b). This reveals, for the first time, the color dependence of the transit depth. Our g and z transits are similar in shape to the average Kepler short-cadence profile, and constitute the highest-quality extant coverage of individual transits. Our Night 1 transit depths are 0.85 +/- 0.04% in z; 1.00 +/- 0.03% in g; and 1.1 +/- 0.3% in u. We employ a residual-permutation method to assess the impact of correlated noise on the depth difference between the z and g bands and calculate the significance of the color dependence at 3.2{\\sigma}. The Night 1 depths are consistent with dust extinction as observed in the ISM, but require grain sizes comparable to the largest found in the ISM: 0.25-1{\\mu}m. This provides direct evidence in favor of this object being a disrupting low-mass rocky planet, feeding a transiting dust cloud. On the remaining four nights of observations the object ...

  10. Reduced Activity And Large Particles From the Disintegrating Planet Candidate KIC 12557548b

    CERN Document Server

    Schlawin, Everett; Zhao, Ming; Teske, Johanna K; Chen, Howard

    2016-01-01

    The intriguing exoplanet candidate KIC 12557548b is believed to have a comet-like tail of dusty debris trailing a small rocky planet. The tail of debris scatters up to 1.3% of the stellar light in the Kepler observatory's bandpass (0.42 um to 0.9 um). Observing the tail's transit depth at multiple wavelengths can reveal the composition and particle size of the debris, constraining the makeup and lifetime of the sub-Mercury planet. Early dust particle size predictions from the scattering of the comet-like tail pointed towards a dust size of ~0.1 um for silicate compositions. These small particles would produce a much deeper optical transit depth than near-infrared transit depth. We measure a transmission spectrum for KIC 12557548b using the SpeX spectrograph (covering 0.8 um to 2.4 um) simultaneously with the MORIS imager taking r' (0.63 um) photometry on the Infrared Telescope Facility for eight nights and one night in H band (1.63 um) using the Wide-Field IR Camera at the Palomar 200-inch telescope. The infr...

  11. Multiwavelength Observations of the Candidate Disintegrating Sub-Mercury KIC 12557548b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Bryce; Rappaport, Saul; DeVore, John; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Crepp, Justin R.; Howard, Andrew W.; Star, Kimberly M.; Chiang, Eugene; Levine, Alan M.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Albert, Loic; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Isaacson, Howard

    2014-05-01

    We present multiwavelength photometry, high angular resolution imaging, and radial velocities of the unique and confounding disintegrating low-mass planet candidate KIC 12557548b. Our high angular resolution imaging, which includes space-based Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) observations in the optical (~0.53 μm and ~0.77 μm), and ground-based Keck/NIRC2 observations in K' band (~2.12 μm), allow us to rule out background and foreground candidates at angular separations greater than 0.''2 that are bright enough to be responsible for the transits we associate with KIC 12557548. Our radial velocity limit from Keck/HIRES allows us to rule out bound, low-mass stellar companions (~0.2 M ⊙) to KIC 12557548 on orbits less than 10 yr, as well as placing an upper limit on the mass of the candidate planet of 1.2 Jupiter masses; therefore, the combination of our radial velocities, high angular resolution imaging, and photometry are able to rule out most false positive interpretations of the transits. Our precise multiwavelength photometry includes two simultaneous detections of the transit of KIC 12557548b using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Wide-field InfraRed Camera (CFHT/WIRCam) at 2.15 μm and the Kepler space telescope at 0.6 μm, as well as simultaneous null-detections of the transit by Kepler and HST/WFC3 at 1.4 μm. Our simultaneous HST/WFC3 and Kepler null-detections provide no evidence for radically different transit depths at these wavelengths. Our simultaneous CFHT/WIRCam detections in the near-infrared and with Kepler in the optical reveal very similar transit depths (the average ratio of the transit depths at ~2.15 μm compared with ~0.6 μm is: 1.02 ± 0.20). This suggests that if the transits we observe are due to scattering from single-size particles streaming from the planet in a comet-like tail, then the particles must be ~0.5 μm in radius or larger, which would favor that KIC 12557548b is a sub-Mercury rather than super

  12. Angular Momentum Transport via Internal Gravity Waves in Evolving Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many sub-giant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into sub-giants, however, low frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the sub-giant branch when stars have surface temperatures of roughly 5500 K. However, gravity waves can s...

  13. Kepler observations of rapidly oscillating Ap, δ Scuti and γ Doradus pulsations in Ap stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, Luis A.; Cunha, Margarida S.; Kurtz, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of the A5p star KIC 8677585 obtained during the Kepler 10-d commissioning run with 1-min time resolution show that it is a rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star with several frequencies with periods near 10 min. In addition, a low frequency at 3.142 d−1 is also clearly present....... Multiperiodic γ Doradus (γ Dor) and δ Scuti (δ Sct) pulsations, never before seen in any Ap star, are present in Kepler observations of at least three other Ap stars. Since γ Dor pulsations are seen in Ap stars, it is likely that the low frequency in KIC 8677585 is also a γ Dor pulsation. The simultaneous...... presence of both γ Dor and roAp pulsations and the unexpected detection of δ Sct and γ Dor pulsations in Ap stars present new opportunities and challenges for the interpretation of these stars. Since it is easy to confuse Am and Ap stars at classification dispersions, the nature of these Ap stars...

  14. Transits Probabilities Around Hypervelocity and Runaway Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fragione, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    In the blooming field of exoplanetary science, NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of exoplanets. Kepler's very precise and long-duration photometry is ideal for detecting planetary transits around Sun-like stars. The forthcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is expected to continue Kepler's legacy. In this paper, we explore the possibility of detecting planetary transits around hypervelocity and runaway stars, which should host a very compact system as consequence of their turbulent origin. We find that the probability of a multi-planetary transit is $10^{-3}\\lesssim P\\lesssim 10^{-1}$. We therefore need to observe $\\sim 10-1000$ high-velocity stars to spot a transit. We predict that the European Gaia satellite, along with TESS, could spot such transits.

  15. Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti star V2367 Cyg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balona, L. A.; Lenz, P.; Antoci, V.

    2012-01-01

    We analyse Kepler observations of the high-amplitude δ Scuti (HADS) star V2367 Cyg (KIC 9408694). The variations are dominated by a mode with frequency f1= 5.6611 d−1. Two other independent modes with f2= 7.1490 d−1 and f3= 7.7756 d−1 have amplitudes an order of magnitude smaller than f1. Nearly ...

  16. KIC 2831097 - A 2-year orbital-period RR Lyrae binary candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Sódor, Á; Liška, J; Bognár, Zs

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new Kepler first-overtone RR Lyrae pulsator, KIC 2831097. The pulsation shows large, 0.1 d amplitude, systematic phase variations that can be interpreted as light travel-time effect caused by orbital motion in a binary system, superimposed on a linear pulsation-period decrease. The assumed eccentric (e=0.47) orbit with the period of approximately 2 yr is the shortest among the non-eclipsing RR Lyrae binary candidates. The binary model gives a lowest estimate for the mass of the companion of 8.4 M_Sun, that places it among black hole candidates. Beside the first-overtone pulsation, numerous additional non-radial pulsation frequencies were also identified. We detected an ~47-d Blazhko-like irregular light-curve modulation.

  17. Witnessing the Emergence of a Carbon Star

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman-Ramirez, L; Wesson, R; Zijlstra, A A; Muller, A; Jones, D; Boffin, H M J; Sloan, G C; Redman, M P; Smette, A; Karakas, A I; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2015-01-01

    During the late stages of their evolution, Sun-like stars bring the products of nuclear burning to the surface. Most of the carbon in the Universe is believed to originate from stars with masses up to a few solar masses. Although there is a chemical dichotomy between oxygen-rich and carbon-rich evolved stars, the dredge-up itself has never been directly observed. In the last three decades, however, a few stars have been shown to display both carbon- and oxygen-rich material in their circumstellar envelopes. Two models have been proposed to explain this dual chemistry: one postulates that a recent dredge-up of carbon produced by nucleosynthesis inside the star during the Asymptotic Giant Branch changed the surface chemistry of the star. The other model postulates that oxygen-rich material exists in stable keplerian rotation around the central star. The two models make contradictory, testable, predictions on the location of the oxygen-rich material, either located further from the star than the carbon-rich gas,...

  18. Asteroseismology of hybrid δ Scuti-γ Doradus pulsating stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Arias, J. P.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Hybrid δ Scuti-γ Doradus pulsating stars show acoustic (p) oscillation modes typical of δ Scuti variable stars, and gravity (g) pulsation modes characteristic of γ Doradus variable stars simultaneously excited. Observations from space missions such as MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler have revealed a large number of hybrid δ Scuti-γ Doradus pulsators, thus paving the way for an exciting new channel of asteroseismic studies. Aims: We perform detailed asteroseismological modelling of five hybrid δ Scuti-γ Doradus stars. Methods: A grid-based modeling approach was employed to sound the internal structure of the target stars using stellar models ranging from the zero-age main sequence to the terminal-age main sequence, varying parameters such as stellar mass, effective temperature, metallicity and core overshooting. Their adiabatic radial (ℓ = 0) and non-radial (ℓ = 1,2,3) p and g mode periods were computed. Two model-fitting procedures were used to search for asteroseismological models that best reproduce the observed pulsation spectra of each target star. Results: We derive the fundamental parameters and the evolutionary status of five hybrid δ Scuti-γ Doradus variable stars recently observed by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions: CoRoT 105733033, CoRoT 100866999, KIC 11145123, KIC 9244992, and HD 49434. The asteroseismological model for each star results from different criteria of model selection, in which we take full advantage of the richness of periods that characterises the pulsation spectra for this kind of star.

  19. Asteroseismology of Red Giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrant, N J; Elsworth, Y P; Spreckley, S A; Stevens, I R

    2008-01-01

    Sun-like oscillations, that is p-modes excited stochastically by convective noise, have now been observed in a number of Red Giant stars. Compared to those seen in the Sun, these modes are of large amplitude and long period, making the oscillations attractive prospects for observation. However, the low Q-factor of these modes, and issues relating to the rising background at low frequencies, present some interesting challenges for identifying modes and determining the related asteroseismic parameters. We report on the analysis procedure adopted for peak-bagging by our group at Birmingham, and the techniques used to robustly ensure these are not a product of noise. I also show results from a number of giants extracted from multi-year observations with the SMEI instrument.

  20. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. I. Temperature, Surface Gravity, Metallicity, and $v \\sin i$

    CERN Document Server

    Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We conducted high dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru/HDS, and measured the stellar parameters of them. These 50 targets were selected from the solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler photometric data. As a result of these spectroscopic observations, we found that more than half (34 stars) of our 50 targets have no evidence of binary system. We then estimated effective temperature ($T_{\\rm{eff}}$), surface gravity ($\\log g$), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and projected rotational velocity ($v\\sin i$) of these 34 superflare stars on the basis of our spectroscopic data. The accuracy of our estimations is higher than that of Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) values, and the differences between our values and KIC values ($(\\Delta T_{\\rm{eff}})_{\\rm{rms}} \\sim 219$K, $(\\Delta \\log g)_{\\rm{rms}} \\sim 0.37$ dex, and $(\\Delta\\rm{[Fe/H]})_{\\rm{rms}} \\sim 0.46$ dex) are comparable to the large uncertainties and systematic differences of KIC values ...

  1. Solar-like oscillating stars as standard clocks and rulers for Galactic studies

    CERN Document Server

    Miglio, Andrea; Rodrigues, Thaise S; Stello, Dennis; Chaplin, William J

    2014-01-01

    The CoRoT and Kepler space missions have detected oscillations in hundreds of Sun-like stars and thousands of field red-giant stars. This has opened the door to a new era of stellar population studies in the Milky Way. We report on the current status and future prospects of harvesting space-based photometric data for ensemble asteroseismology, and highlight some of the challenges that need to be faced to use these stars as accurate clocks and rulers for Galactic studies.

  2. KIC 11285625: a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a gamma Dor pulsator discovered from Kepler space photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Debosscher, J; Tkachenko, A; Pavlovski, K; Maceroni, C; Kurtz, D; Beck, P G; Bloemen, S; Degroote, P; Lombaert, R; Southworth, J

    2013-01-01

    We present the first binary modelling results for the pulsating eclipsing binary KIC 11285625, discovered by the Kepler mission. An automated method to disentangle the pulsation spectrum and the orbital variability in high quality light curves, was developed and applied. The goal was to obtain accurate orbital and component properties, in combination with essential information derived from spectroscopy. A binary model for KIC 11285625 was obtained, using a combined analysis of high-quality space-based Kepler light curves and ground-based high-resolution HERMES echelle spectra. The binary model was used to separate the pulsation characteristics from the orbital variability in the Kepler light curve in an iterative way. We used an automated procedure to perform this task, based on the JKTEBOP binary modelling code, and adapted codes for frequency analysis and prewhitening of periodic signals. Using a disentangling technique applied to the composite HERMES spectra, we obtained a higher signal-to-noise mean compo...

  3. The same frequency of planets inside and outside open clusters of stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, Søren; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Latham, David W; Rowe, Jason F; Ciardi, David R; Bryson, Steven T; Rogers, Leslie A; Henze, Christopher E; Janes, Kenneth; Barnes, Sydney A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A; Howell, Steve B; Horch, Elliott P; Jenkins, Jon M; Schuler, Simon C; Crepp, Justin

    2013-07-04

    Most stars and their planets form in open clusters. Over 95 per cent of such clusters have stellar densities too low (less than a hundred stars per cubic parsec) to withstand internal and external dynamical stresses and fall apart within a few hundred million years. Older open clusters have survived by virtue of being richer and denser in stars (1,000 to 10,000 per cubic parsec) when they formed. Such clusters represent a stellar environment very different from the birthplace of the Sun and other planet-hosting field stars. So far more than 800 planets have been found around Sun-like stars in the field. The field planets are usually the size of Neptune or smaller. In contrast, only four planets have been found orbiting stars in open clusters, all with masses similar to or greater than that of Jupiter. Here we report observations of the transits of two Sun-like stars by planets smaller than Neptune in the billion-year-old open cluster NGC6811. This demonstrates that small planets can form and survive in a dense cluster environment, and implies that the frequency and properties of planets in open clusters are consistent with those of planets around field stars in the Galaxy.

  4. Influence of heat treatment and KIc/HRc ratio on the dynamic wear properties of coated high speed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sedlaček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the impact of various heat treatments on the KIc/HRc ratio and subsequently on the wear properties of coated high-speed steel under dynamic impact loading. The results showed that hardness and improvement in the fracture toughness have significant influence on the adhesion and impact wear properties of the coated high-speed steel.

  5. The Tidal Disruption of Giant Stars and Their Contribution to the Flaring Supermassive Black Hole Population

    CERN Document Server

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Sun-like stars are thought to be regularly disrupted by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) within galactic nuclei. Yet, as stars evolve off the main sequence their vulnerability to tidal disruption increases drastically as they develop a bifurcated structure consisting of a dense core and a tenuous envelope. Here we present the first hydrodynamic simulations of the tidal disruption of giant stars and show that the core has a substantial influence on the star's ability to survive the encounter. Stars with more massive cores retain large fractions of their envelope mass, even in deep encounters. Accretion flares resulting from the disruption of giant stars should last for tens to hundreds of years. Their characteristic signature in transient searches would not be the $t^{-5/3}$ decay typically associated with tidal disruption events, but a correlated rise over many orders of magnitude in brightness on months to years timescales. We calculate the relative disruption rates of stars of varying evolutionary stages in...

  6. An Independent Asteroseismic Analysis of the Fundamental Parameters and Internal Structure of the Solar-like Oscillator KIC 6225718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Li, Yan

    2017-09-01

    Asteroseismology is a useful tool that is usually used to probe stellar interiors and to determine stellar fundamental parameters, such as stellar mass, radius, and surface gravity. In order to probe stellar interiors, making comparisons between observations and models is usually used with the {χ }2-minimization method. The work of Wu & Li reported that the best parameter determined by the {χ }2-matching process is the acoustic radius for pure p-mode oscillations. In the present work, based on the theoretical calculations of Wu & Li, we will independently analyze the seismic observations of KIC 6225718 to determine its fundamental parameters and to investigate its interior properties. First, in order to test the method, we use it in the Sun to determine its fundamental parameters and to investigate interiors. Second, we independently determine the fundamental parameters of KIC 6225718 without any other non-seismic constraint. Therefore, those determined fundamental parameters are independent of those determined by other methods. They can be regarded as independent references in other analyses. Finally, we analyze the stellar internal structure and find that KIC 6225718 has a convective core with the size of 0.078–0.092 {R}ȯ . Its overshooting parameter {f}{ov} in the core is around 0.010. In addition, its center hydrogen {X}{{c}} is about 0.264–0.355.

  7. Lessons for Asteroseismology from White Dwarf Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Travis S. Metcalfe

    2005-06-01

    The interpretation of pulsation data for sun-like stars is currently facing challenges quite similar to those faced by white dwarf modelers ten years ago. The observational requirements for uninterrupted long-term monitoring are beginning to be satisfied by successful multi-site campaigns and dedicated satellite missions. But exploration of the most important physical parameters in theoretical models has been fairly limited, making it difficult to establish a detailed best-fit model for a particular set of oscillation frequencies. I review the past development and the current state of white dwarf asteroseismology, with an emphasis on what this can tell us about the road to success for asteroseismology of other types of stars.

  8. The same frequency of planets inside and outside open clusters of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Meibom, Søren; Fressin, Francois; Latham, David W; Rowe, Jason F; Ciardi, David R; Bryson, Steven T; Rogers, Leslie A; Henze, Christopher E; Janes, Kenneth; Barnes, Sydney A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A; Howell, Steve B; Horch, Elliott P; Jenkins, Jon M; Schuler, Simon C; Crepp, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Most stars and their planets form in open clusters. Over 95 per cent of such clusters have stellar densities too low (less than a hundred stars per cubic parsec) to withstand internal and external dynamical stresses and fall apart within a few hundred million years. Older open clusters have survived by virtue of being richer and denser in stars (1,000 to 10,000 per cubic parsec) when they formed. Such clusters represent a stellar environment very different from the birthplace of the Sun and other planet-hosting field stars. So far more than 800 planets have been found around Sun-like stars in the field. The field planets are usually the size of Neptune or smaller. In contrast, only four planets have been found orbiting stars in open clusters, all with masses similar to or greater than that of Jupiter. Here we report observations of the transits of two Sun-like stars by planets smaller than Neptune in the billion-year-old open cluster NGC6811. This demonstrates that small planets can form and survive in a dens...

  9. The properties of brown dwarfs and low-mass hydrogen-burning stars formed by disc fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that a high proportion of brown dwarfs are formed by gravitational fragmentation of massive extended discs around Sun-like stars. Such discs should arise frequently, but should be observed infrequently, precisely because they fragment rapidly. By performing an ensemble of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we show that such discs fragment within a few thousand years, and produce mainlybrown dwarf (BDs) stars, but also planetary mass (PM) stars and very low-mass hydrogen-burning (HB) stars. Most of the the PM stars and BDs are ejected by mutual interactions. We analyse the statistical properties of these stars, and compare them with observations. After a few hundred thousand years the Sun-like primary is typically left with a close low-mass HB companion, and two much wider companions: a low-mass HB star and a BD star, or a BD-BD binary. There is a BD desert extending out to at least ~100 AU; this is because BDs tend to be formed further out than low-mass HB stars, and then they tend to be scattered...

  10. The case of the Kepler DBAV star J1929+4447

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontaine G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A first pulsating white dwarf has been discovered recently in the Kepler field of view [1]. This star, catalogued as GALEX J192904.6+444708 or KIC 8626021, is a He-atmosphere white dwarf of the V777 Her (DBV type. It appears to be the hottest of its class and, as such, has the potential to be a key object in our understanding of the DB gap problem. We present here a seismological analysis of this star and a look at his previous history.

  11. Nearby stars as gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, Ilídio

    2015-01-01

    Sun-like stellar oscillations are excited by turbulent convection and have been discovered in some 500 main sequence and sub-giant stars and in more than 12,000 red giant stars. When such stars are near gravitational wave sources, low-order quadrupole acoustic modes are also excited above the experimental threshold of detectability, and they can be observed, in principle, in the acoustic spectra of these stars. Such stars form a set of natural detectors to search for gravitational waves over a large spectral frequency range, from $10^{-7}$ Hz to $10^{-2}$ Hz. In particular, these stars can probe the $10^{-6}$ Hz -- $10^{-4}$ Hz spectral window which cannot be probed by current conventional gravitational wave detectors, such as SKA and eLISA. The PLATO stellar seismic mission will achieve photospheric velocity amplitude accuracy of $~ {\\rm cm/s}$. For a gravitational wave search, we will need to achieve accuracies of the order of $10^{-2}{\\rm cm/s}$, i.e., at least one generation beyond PLATO. However, we have...

  12. Estimate the radius of the convective core of main-sequence stars from observed oscillation frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the size of the convective core of main-sequence stars is usually dependent on the construction of models of stars. Here we introduce a method to estimate the radius of the convective core of main-sequence stars with masses between about 1.1 and 1.5 $M_{\\odot}$ from observed frequencies of low-degree p-modes. A formula is proposed to achieve the estimation. The values of the radius of the convective core of four known stars are successfully estimated by the formula. The radius of the convective core of KIC 9812850 estimated by the formula is $\\mathbf{0.140\\pm0.028}$ $R_{\\odot}$. In order to confirm this prediction, a grid of evolutionary models were computed. The value of the convective-core radius of the best-fit model of KIC 9812850 is $0.149$ $R_{\\odot}$, which is in good agreement with that estimated by the formula from observed frequencies. The formula aids in understanding the interior structure of stars directly from observed frequencies. The understanding is not dependent on the c...

  13. Fracture toughness (K(IC) of a hot-pressed core ceramic based on fractographic analysis of fractured ceramic FPDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Suck; Park, Ju-Mi; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no significant difference between the fracture toughness (K(IC)) of an experimental hot-pressed core ceramic measured by fractographic analysis of failed ceramic prostheses and the values determined by other standard methods. Four groups were subjected to one of four test methods: group 1 = indentation strength technique (standard numerical calculation); group 2 = indentation strength technique (fractographic analysis); group 3 = flexure test of precracked specimens (fractographic analysis); and group 4 = fractographic analysis of failed three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPD). For groups 1 to 3, 20 ceramic bar specimens were subjected to three-point flexure at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. For group 4, 10 failed FPDs were collected from a previous study. Stress values at failure were calculated from either a flexure stress equation (groups 1 to 3) or from finite element analyses (group 4). K(IC) values were calculated from an equation and fractographic measurement data. Mean fracture toughness ranged from 3.1 MPa x m1/2 (SD 0.2) (group 1) to 3.4 MPa x m1/2 (SD 0.2) (group 4). The mean K(IC) value for group 1 was significantly different from that of group 4; however, no significant differences were found between groups 1, 2, and 3, or between groups 2, 3, and 4. Fracture toughness for an experimental hot-pressed core ceramic measured by fractographic analysis in combination with finite element analysis was comparable with the values determined with other standard fractographic methods.

  14. 核电厂KIC供配电方案分析%Analysis of Solution on KIC Power Distribution for Nuclear Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张刚; 毛婷; 于正龙; 程波; 周毅超

    2014-01-01

    核电厂计算机信息与控制系统(K IC )的供配电对K IC的可用性及可靠性具有决定性的影响。本文在对两个核电厂K IC的功能结构简要描述的基础上,通过对K IC的供配电方案的对比分析,分别阐述了单一母线失电状况下K IC的状态,并指出了两个核电厂工程实践中K IC供配电存在的问题,提出了改进意见,为后续核电厂大修改进及新建CPR1000和三代项目KIC供配电设计提供了参考。%The power distribution for KIC has a decisive influence on the availability and reliability of KIC .The KIC power distributions were compared and analyzed based on the description of the structure and function of KIC system for two nuclear power plants .The situation of KIC with the single bus power loss was described .Some prob‐lems of both the projects were pointed out and some improvement suggestions were put forward ,which would be the reference for subsequent improvement of plant overhaul , KIC power distributions of the other CPR1000 projects and three generation projects .

  15. Effect of heat treatment on fracture toughness K(IC) and microstructure of a fluorcanasite-based glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Suck; Zhang, Nai-Zheng; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increase in fracture toughness of a fluorcanasite-based glass-ceramic is a linear function of crystal volume fraction. A total of 60 specimen bars (20 x 5 x 2 mm(3)) were cut from parent glass blocks, polished, annealed, randomly divided into six groups, nucleated at 680 degrees C/4 hr, and crystallized at the following temperatures and times: (1) 850 degrees C/0.5 hr, (2) 850 degrees C/1 hr, (3) 850 degrees C/3 hr, (4) 750 degrees C/6 hr, (5) 800 degrees C/6 hr, or (6) 850 degrees C/6 hr. Indentation flaws were produced by a microhardness indenter at the center of one surface, and the prepared specimens were subjected to three-point flexure loading with the severely flawed surface under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Flexural strength and fracture toughness (K(IC)) were calculated based on the indentation-strength technique. Crystal volume fraction (V(c)) was determined by quantitative stereology of scanning electron images of each group of ceramic specimens. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparison test (alpha= 0.05). The mean K(IC) and V(c) values ranged from 2.7 to 3.9 MPa m(1/2) and 37% to 71% within the crystallization temperature range of 750 to 850 degrees C. Five statistical subsets of groups 1, 2/4, 3, 5, and 6 were determined as a function of crystallization temperature and holding time (Duncan's multiple comparison analysis; alpha= 0.05). The lowest and highest K(IC) and V(c) values were associated with Groups 1 (850 degrees C/0.5 hr) and 6 (850 degrees C/6 hr), respectively. Fracture toughness increased linearly as a function of crystal volume fraction (correlation coefficient R(2)= 0.67). The fracture toughness increased by 45% when the crystal volume fraction increased by 92%. Mean K(IC) values increased as a linear function of crystal volume fraction in a fluorcanasite-based glass-ceramic within the crystallization temperature range of

  16. Transit probabilities around hypervelocity and runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragione, G.; Ginsburg, I.

    2017-04-01

    In the blooming field of exoplanetary science, NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of exoplanets. Kepler's very precise and long-duration photometry is ideal for detecting planetary transits around Sun-like stars. The forthcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is expected to continue Kepler's legacy. Along with transits, the Doppler technique remains an invaluable tool for discovering planets. The next generation of spectrographs, such as G-CLEF, promise precision radial velocity measurements. In this paper, we explore the possibility of detecting planets around hypervelocity and runaway stars, which should host a very compact system as consequence of their turbulent origin. We find that the probability of a multiplanetary transit is 10-3 ≲ P ≲ 10-1. We therefore need to observe ∼10-1000 high-velocity stars to spot a transit. However, even if transits are rare around runaway and hypervelocity stars, the chances of detecting such planets using radial velocity surveys is high. We predict that the European Gaia satellite, along with TESS and the new-generation spectrographs G-CLEF and ESPRESSO, will spot planetary systems orbiting high-velocity stars.

  17. The Proportion of Stars with Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, M. M.

    2016-04-01

    Estimates of the proportion of Sun-like stars with accompanying planets vary widely; the best present estimate is that it is about 0.34. The capture theory of planet formation involves an interaction between a condensed star and either a diffuse protostar or a high-density region in a dense embedded cluster. The protostar, or dense region, is tidally stretched into a filament that is gravitationally unstable and breaks up into a string of protoplanetary blobs, which subsequently collapse to form planets, some of which are captured by the star. A computational model, in which the passage of collapsing protostars, with initial radii 1000, 1500 and 2000 au, through a dense embedded cluster are followed, is used to estimate the proportion of protostars that would be disrupted to give planets, in environments with star number-densities in the range 5000-25,000 pc-3. It is concluded from the results that the capture theory might explain the presently-estimated proportion of stars with exoplanet companions, although other possible ways of producing exoplanets are not excluded.

  18. Evidence for dynamo bistability among very low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, J; Donati, J -F; Dormy, E; Forveille, T; Jardine, M; Petit, P; Schrinner, M

    2012-01-01

    Dynamo action in fully convective stars is a debated issue that also questions our understanding of magnetic field generation in partly convective Sun-like stars. During the past few years, spectropolari- metric observations have demonstrated that fully convective objects are able to trigger strong large-scale and long-lived magnetic fields. We present here the first spectropolarimetric study of a sample of active late M dwarfs (M5-M8) carried out with ESPaDOnS@CFHT. It reveals the co-existence of two distinct types of magnetism among stars having similar masses and rotation rates. A possible explanation for this unexpected discovery is the existence of two dynamo branches in this parameter regime, we discuss here the possible identification with the weak vs strong field bistability predicted for the geodynamo.

  19. Nearby Stars as Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Sun-like stellar oscillations are excited by turbulent convection and have been discovered in some 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars and in more than 12,000 red giant stars. When such stars are near gravitational wave sources, low-order quadrupole acoustic modes are also excited above the experimental threshold of detectability, and they can be observed, in principle, in the acoustic spectra of these stars. Such stars form a set of natural detectors to search for gravitational waves over a large spectral frequency range, from {10}-7 to {10}-2 Hz. In particular, these stars can probe the {10}-6-{10}-4 Hz spectral window which cannot be probed by current conventional gravitational wave detectors, such as the Square Kilometre Array and Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The Planetary Transits and Oscillations of State (PLATO) stellar seismic mission will achieve photospheric velocity amplitude accuracy of {cm} {{{s}}}-1. For a gravitational wave search, we will need to achieve accuracies of the order of {10}-2 {cm} {{{s}}}-1, i.e., at least one generation beyond PLATO. However, we have found that multi-body stellar systems have the ideal setup for this type of gravitational wave search. This is the case for triple stellar systems formed by a compact binary and an oscillating star. Continuous monitoring of the oscillation spectra of these stars to a distance of up to a kpc could lead to the discovery of gravitational waves originating in our galaxy or even elsewhere in the universe. Moreover, unlike experimental detectors, this observational network of stars will allow us to study the progression of gravitational waves throughout space.

  20. Using K2 to Investigate Planetary Systems Orbiting Low-Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressing, Courtney D.; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Charbonneau, David; Schlieder, Joshua E.; K2 CHAI Consortium

    2016-10-01

    The NASA K2 mission is using the repurposed Kepler spacecraft to search for transiting planets in multiple fields along the ecliptic plane. Unlike the original Kepler mission, which stared at a single region of the sky for four years, K2 observes each field for a much shorter timespan of roughly 80 days. While planets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars would be unlikely to transit even once during an 80-day interval, planets in the habitable zones of faint low-mass stars have much shorter orbital periods and may even transit multiple times during a single K2 campaign. Accordingly, M and K dwarfs are frequently nominated as K2 Guest Observer targets and K2 has already observed significantly more low-mass stars than the original Kepler mission. While the K2 data are therefore an enticing resource for studying the properties and frequency of planetary systems orbiting low-mass stars, many K2 target stars are not well-characterized and some candidate low-mass stars are actually giants or reddened Sun-like stars. We are improving the characterization of K2 planetary systems orbiting low-mass stars by using SpeX on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and TripleSpec on the 200-inch Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory to acquire near-infrared spectra of K2 target stars. We then employ empirically-based relations to determine the temperatures, radii, luminosities, and metallicities of K2 planet candidate host stars. Refining the stellar parameters allows us to identify astrophysical false positives and better constrain the radii and insolation flux environments of bona fide transiting planets. I will present our resulting catalog of stellar properties and discuss the prospects for using K2 data to investigate whether planet occurrence rates for mid-M dwarfs are similar to those for early-M and late-K dwarfs.

  1. The HERMES Solar Atlas and the spectroscopic analysis of the seismic solar analogue KIC3241581

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; Van Reeth, T; Tkachenko, A; Raskin, G; van Winckel, H; Nascimento, J -D do; Salabert, D; Corsaro, E; Garcia, R A

    2015-01-01

    Solar-analog stars provide an excellent opportunity to study the Sun's evolution, i.e. the changes with time in stellar structure, activity, or rotation for solar-like stars. The unparalleled photometric data from the NASA space telescope Kepler allows us to study and characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology. We aim to spectroscopically investigate the fundamental parameter and chromospheric activity of solar analogues and twins, based on observations obtained with the HERMES spectrograph and combine them with asteroseismology. Therefore, we need to build a solar atlas for the spectrograph, to provide accurate calibrations of the spectroscopically determined abundances of solar and late type stars observed with this instrument and thus perform differential spectral comparisons. We acquire high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectroscopy to construct three solar reference spectra by observing the reflected light of Vesta and Victoria asteroids and Europa (100

  2. Putting urban soils in the spotlight: A learning experience through the Climate-KIC's initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maymó, Ana; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Rubio, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    The European Commission encourages integrating ecosystem-based approaches in the portfolio of adaptation strategies also in the urban areas. However, the renewed interest in the environmental benefits from green infrastructures coexists with the marginality with which they are treated in practice and, especially, where soil is concerned. Despite its critical functions, soils in cities have often been neglected. In fact, urban soil issues rarely get society attention or even from our policy makers. But, how to make urban soils visible?. From academia we need to extend our communication and networking abilities to engage citizens with projects related to urban soils. Through the Climate-KIC's professional placement programme, Pioneers into Practice, we were able to connect with stakeholders with widely different interests, and engage a broad range of opinions and comments on local circumstances and needs in a semi-quantitative form. Methodology included an actor analysis, an actor network map and a set of semi-structured actor interviews. This involved a local stakeholder network establishment. This stakeholder network reaches out beyond the usual suspects we would expect to partner and it is represented by the following groups: local administration, local governmental services (e.g., forestry and agriculture extension), relevant non-governmental organizations (e.g., dedicated to environment or development) at local level, planners, developers, and individuals (e.g., long-term local residents). The approach is focused on the non-technical barriers to success, whether they are social, institutional, financial, behavioral or regulatory, and how to overcome them. In this context, of a raising environmental awareness, the principal response from interviews demonstrated strong support for a strategic approach to soil management at the urban core and the countryside fringe. Herein, the contribution of urban soils to the provision of ecosystem services, in the framework of

  3. Grid search in stellar parameters: a software for spectrum analysis of single stars and binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The currently operating space missions, as well as those that will be launched in the near future, will deliver high-quality data for millions of stellar objects. Since the majority of stellar astrophysical applications still (at least partly) rely on spectroscopic data, an efficient tool for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy is needed. Aims: We aim at developing an efficient software package for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy of single stars and those in binary systems. The major requirements are that the code should have a high performance, represent the state-of-the-art analysis tool, and provide accurate determinations of atmospheric parameters and chemical compositions for different types of stars. Methods: We use the method of atmosphere models and spectrum synthesis, which is one of the most commonly used approaches for the analysis of stellar spectra. Our Grid Search in Stellar Parameters (gssp) code makes use of the Message Passing Interface (OpenMPI) implementation, which makes it possible to run in parallel mode. The method is first tested on the simulated data and is then applied to the spectra of real stellar objects. Results: The majority of test runs on the simulated data were successful in that we were able to recover the initially assumed sets of atmospheric parameters. We experimentally find the limits in signal-to-noise ratios of the input spectra, below which the final set of parameters is significantly affected by the noise. Application of the gssp package to the spectra of three Kepler stars, KIC 11285625, KIC 6352430, and KIC 4931738, was also largely successful. We found an overall agreement of the final sets of the fundamental parameters with the original studies. For KIC 6352430, we found that dependence of the light dilution factor on wavelength cannot be ignored, as it has a significant impact on the determination of the atmospheric parameters of this binary system. Conclusions: The

  4. The High Rate of the Boyajian's Star Anomaly as a Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Boyajian's Star (KIC 8462852) undergoes mysterious, irregular eclipses that aren't yet explained. It also appears to have dimmed over a time of several years, possibly decades. I show that Kepler's detection of a phenomenon with a duration of t_anom is only expected if it occurs at a mean rate of >~ 30 Gyr^(-1) (t_anom / 100 yr)^(-1) for each Kepler target and K2 star. If true, the phenomenon occurs hundreds of times during the lifespan of its host stars. Obscuration by the interstellar medium remains a plausible explanation, since it doesn't actually affect the host star. An intervening cloud is consistent with the lack of an observed submillimeter excess but would be abnormally dilute.

  5. A Statistical Analysis of the Accuracy of the Digitized Magnitudes of Photometric Plates on the Timescale of Decades with an Application to the Century-long Light Curve of KIC 8462852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippke, Michael; Angerhausen, Daniel; Lund, Michael B.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the accuracy of the digitized magnitudes of photometric plates on the timescale of decades. In our examination of archival Johnson B photometry from the Harvard DASCH archive, we find a median rms scatter of light curves of the order of 0.15 mag over the range B ˜ 9-17 for all calibrations. Slight underlying systematics (trends or flux discontinuities) are on a level of ≲0.2 mag per century (1889-1990) for the majority of constant stars. These historic data can be unambiguously used for processes that happen on scales of magnitudes, and need to be carefully examined in cases approaching the noise floor. The characterization of these limits in photometric stability may guide future studies in their use of plate archives. We explain these limitations for the example case of KIC 8462852, which has been claimed to dim by 0.16 mag per century, and show that this trend cannot be considered as significant.

  6. A Statistical Analysis of the Accuracy of the Digitized Magnitudes of Photometric Plates on the Timescale of Decades with an Application to the Century-Long Light Curve of KIC 8462852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippke, Michael; Angerhausen, Daniel; Lund, Michael B.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the accuracy of the digitized magnitudes of photometric plates on the timescale of decades. In our examination of archival Johnson B photometry from the Harvard DASCH archive, we find a median rt mean square scatter of light curves of the order of 0.15 magnitude over the range B approximately equal to 9-17 for all calibrations. Slight underlying systematics (trends or flux discontinuities) are on a level of less than or equal to 0.2 magnitudes per century (1889–1990) for the majority of constant stars. These historic data can be unambiguously used for processes that happen on scales of magnitudes, and need to be carefully examined in cases approaching the noise floor. The characterization of these limits in photometric stability may guide future studies in their use of plate archives. We explain these limitations for the example case of KIC 8462852, which has been claimed to dim by 0.16 magnitudes per century, and show that this trend cannot be considered as significant.

  7. 欧盟KICs对我国协同创新的启示%Experiences from EU KICs to Promote Chinese Collaborative Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张换兆; 刘冠男

    2015-01-01

    EIT of EU took KICs as a main model to promote the integration and effective transformation of knowledge trian‐gle .Since 2010 ,the first laughed three KICS gained primary achievement in the initial goal .There are mainly three fea‐tures of KICs ,w hich includes focusing on strategic frontier technology ,taking enterprise as main leader and targeting in innovation capacity building and economic growth .At the last part of the paper ,we recommend that China should set up a comprehensive initiative based on cooperation among university ,enterprise and institute to push integration in science and education ,hence the collaboration with European EIT through KICs and strengthen tackling studies in European KICs .%欧盟 EIT 以KICs模式促进“知识三角”的融合与有效转化,自2010年首批启动3个KICs以来,取得了初步成效。欧盟 K IC s具有专注战略前沿技术、以企业为主导、以培养创新能力和促进经济增长为核心3个特点。我国应设立综合性产学研合作专项推动科教协同,以KICs为载体加强与欧盟EIT 的交流合作,并加强对欧盟K IC s的跟踪研究。

  8. First Kepler results on compact pulsators - III. Subdwarf B stars with V1093 Her and hybrid (DW Lyn) type pulsations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reed, M.D.; Kawaler, Stephen D.; Østensen, Roy H.

    2010-01-01

    1093 Her (PG 1716) class or a hybrid star with both short and long periods. The apparently non-binary long-period and hybrid pulsators are described here. The V1093 Her periods range from 1 to 4.5 h and are associated with g-mode pulsations. Three stars also exhibit short periods indicative of p......We present the discovery of non-radial pulsations in five hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars based on 27 d of nearly continuous time series photometry using the Kepler spacecraft. We find that every sdB star cooler than ≈27 500 K that Kepler has observed (seven so far) is a long-period pulsator of the V......-modes with periods of 2-5 min and in addition, these stars exhibit periodicities between both classes from 15 to 45 min. We detect the coolest and longest-period V1093 Her-type pulsator to date, KIC010670103 (Teff≈ 20 900 K, Pmax≈ 4.5 h) as well as a suspected hybrid pulsator, KIC002697388, which is extremely cool...

  9. KIC 11285625: A double-lined spectroscopic binary with a γ Doradus pulsator discovered from Kepler space photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debosscher, J.; Aerts, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Pavlovski, K.; Maceroni, C.; Kurtz, D.; Beck, P. G.; Bloemen, S.; Degroote, P.; Lombaert, R.; Southworth, J.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We present the first binary modelling results for the pulsating, eclipsing binary KIC 11285625 that was discovered by the Kepler mission. An automated method to disentangle the pulsation spectrum and the orbital variability in high quality light curves was developed and applied. The goal was to obtain accurate orbital and component properties in combination with essential information derived from spectroscopy. Methods: A binary model for KIC 11285625 was obtained, using a combined analysis of high-quality space-based Kepler light curves and ground-based high-resolution HERMES echelle spectra. The binary model was used to separate the pulsation characteristics from the orbital variability in the Kepler light curve in an iterative way. We used an automated procedure based on the JKTEBOP binary modelling code to perform this task, and adapted codes for frequency analysis and prewhitening of periodic signals. Using a disentangling technique applied to the composite HERMES spectra, we obtained a higher signal-to-noise mean spectrum for both the primary and the secondary components. A model grid search method for fitting synthetic spectra was used for fundamental parameter determination for both components. Results: Accurate orbital and component properties of KIC 11285625 were derived, and we have obtained the pulsation spectrum of the γ Dor pulsator in the system. Detailed analysis of the pulsation spectrum revealed amplitude modulation on a timescale of a hundred days, and strong indications of frequency splittings at both the orbital frequency and the rotational frequency derived from spectroscopy. Partly based on observations made with the Mercator Telescope, which is operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based on observations obtained with the HERMES spectrograph, which is supported by the Fund for Scientific Research of Flanders (FWO

  10. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    CERN Document Server

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-01-01

    M-dwarf stars -- hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun -- are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the plane...

  11. Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hambleton Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of high precision photometry from satellites such as Kepler and CoRoT, a whole new layer of interesting and astounding astronomical objects has been revealed: heartbeat stars are an example of such objects. Heartbeat stars are eccentric ellipsoidal variables that undergo strong tidal interactions when the stars are almost in contact at the time of closest approach. These interactions deform of the stars and cause a notable light curve variation in the form of a tidal pulse. A subset of these objects (~20% show prominent tidally induced pulsations: pulsations forced by the binary orbit. We now have a fully functional code that models binary star features (using PHOEBE and stellar pulsations simultaneously, enabling a complete and accurate heartbeat star model to be determined. In this paper we show the results of our new code, which uses emcee, a variant of mcmc, to generate a full set of stellar parameters. We further highlight the interesting features of KIC 8164262, including its tidally induced pulsations and resonantly locked pulsations.

  12. 12000 rotation periods of Kepler stars (Nielsen+, 2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. B.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.

    2013-01-01

    Rotation periods of 12253 stars in the Kepler field. The periods are determined by the brightness variations, from star spots or active regions, in the light curves of the white light photometry obtained by the Kepler spacecraft. The median absolute deviation from the median (MAD) of the periods...... shows the scatter of periods for each star, over 6 or more (out of 8 analyzed) Kepler quarters. The g-r color index, E(B-V), radius, surface gravity, and effective temperature are from the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Column 9 (TF) indicates whether or not the msMAP data for a given star satisfies...... the selection criteria described in section 2. Of these, there are 86 stars with periods from the msMAP data that differ from the period derived from the PDCMAP data by more than one frequency resolution element (1/90d-1). For these stars the msMAP periods are therefore given in column 10 as a none-zero value...

  13. First prototypes of hybrid potassium-ion capacitor (KIC): An innovative, cost-effective energy storage technology for transportation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Comte, Annaïg; Reynier, Yvan; Vincens, Christophe; Leys, Côme; Azaïs, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid supercapacitors, combining capacitive carbon-based positive electrode with a Li-ion battery-type negative electrode have been developed in the pursuit of increasing the energy density of conventional supercapacitor without impacting the power density. However, lithium-ion capacitors yet hardly meet the specifications of automotive sector. Herein we report for the first time the development of new hybrid potassium-ion capacitor (KIC) technology. Compared to lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) all strategic materials (lithium and copper) have been replaced. Excellent electrochemical performance have been achieved at a pouch cell scale, with cyclability superior to 55 000 cycles at high charge/discharge regime. For the same cell scale, the energy density is doubled compared to conventional supercapacitor up to high power regime (>1.5 kW kg-1). Finally, the technology was successfully scaled up to 18650 format leading to very promising prospects for transportation applications.

  14. The Sun as a star: empirical estimates of stellar coronal mass ejection rates and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    Our nearest star provides exquisite, up-close views of the physical processes driving energetic phenomena we observe on stars and cannot yet spatially resolve. Stars provide a statistical ensemble of solar analogs spanning a range of ages representing snapshots along our Sun's full life cycle. In this talk, I will share a project bringing the astronomer's large scale statistical approach to bear on solar data. Combining a decades' worth of solar flare and CME data, we characterize for the first time a relationship between flare and CME properties in order to extend analogy to readily observable stellar flares. We aim to better understand the properties and evolution of magnetic activity on Sun-like stars and exoweather on planets about distant Suns.

  15. Asteroseismology of Solar-type stars with Kepler III. Ground-based Data

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Sousa, Sergio; Frasca, Antonio; Biazzo, Katia; Huber, Daniel; Ireland, Mike; Bedding, Tim; Stello, Dennis; Uytterhoeven, Katrien; Dreizler, Stefan; De Cat, Peter; Briquet, Maryline; Catanzaro, Giovanni; Karoff, Chistoffer; Frandsen, Soeren; Spezzi, Loredana; Catala, Claude

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium Working Group 1 (KASC WG-1). The main goal of this coordinated research is the determination of the fundamental stellar atmospheric parameters, which are used for the computing of their asteroseismic models, as well as for the verification of the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC).

  16. SUPERFLARES ON SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED WITH KEPLER. I. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERFLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Maehara, Hiroyuki; Honda, Satoshi; Ishii, Takako T.; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: shibayama@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    By extending our previous study by Maehara et al., we searched for superflares on G-type dwarfs (solar-type stars) using Kepler data for a longer period (500 days) than that (120 days) in our previous study. As a result, we found 1547 superflares on 279 G-type dwarfs, which is much more than the previous 365 superflares on 148 stars. Using these new data, we studied the statistical properties of the occurrence rate of superflares, and confirmed the previous results, i.e., the occurrence rate (dN/dE) of superflares versus flare energy (E) shows a power-law distribution with dN/dE∝E {sup –α}, where α ∼ 2. It is interesting that this distribution is roughly similar to that for solar flares. In the case of the Sun-like stars (with surface temperature 5600-6000 K and slowly rotating with a period longer than 10 days), the occurrence rate of superflares with an energy of 10{sup 34}-10{sup 35} erg is once in 800-5000 yr. We also studied long-term (500 days) stellar brightness variation of these superflare stars and found that in some G-type dwarfs the occurrence rate of superflares was extremely high, ∼57 superflares in 500 days (i.e., once in 10 days). In the case of Sun-like stars, the most active stars show a frequency of one superflare (with 10{sup 34} erg) in 100 days. There is evidence that these superflare stars have extremely large starspots with a size about 10 times larger than that of the largest sunspot. We argue that the physical origin of the extremely high occurrence rate of superflares in these stars may be attributed to the existence of extremely large starspots.

  17. Kepler Transit Depths Contaminated By a Phantom Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Croll, Bryce; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.

    2017-02-01

    We present ground-based observations from the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) of three transits of Kepler-445c—a supposed super-Earth exoplanet with properties resembling GJ 1214b—and demonstrate that the transit depth is ∼50% shallower than the depth previously inferred from Kepler spacecraft data. The resulting decrease in planetary radius significantly alters the interpretation of the exoplanet’s bulk composition. Despite the faintness of the M4 dwarf host star, our ground-based photometry clearly recovers each transit and achieves repeatable 1σ precision of ∼0.2% (2 millimags). The transit parameters estimated from the DCT data are discrepant with those inferred from the Kepler data to at least 17σ confidence. This inconsistency is due to a subtle miscalculation of the stellar crowding metric during the Kepler pre-search data conditioning (PDC). The crowding metric, or CROWDSAP, is contaminated by a non-existent phantom star originating in the USNO-B1 catalog and inherited by the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Phantom stars in the KIC are likely rare, but they have the potential to affect statistical studies of Kepler targets that use the PDC transit depths for a large number of exoplanets where an individual follow-up observation of each is not possible. The miscalculation of Kepler-445c’s transit depth emphasizes the importance of stellar crowding in the Kepler data, and provides a cautionary tale for the analysis of data from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which will have even larger pixels than Kepler.

  18. Another Possibility for Boyajian's Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    The unusual light curve of the star KIC 8462852, also known as Tabbys star or Boyajians star, has puzzled us since its discovery last year. A new study now explores whether the stars missing flux is due to internal blockage rather than something outside of the star.Mysterious DipsMost explanations for the flux dips of Boyajians star rely on external factors, like this illustrated swarm of comets. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Boyajians star shows unusual episodes of dimming in its light curve by as much as 20%, each lasting a few to tens of days and separated by periods of typically hundreds of days. In addition, archival observations show that it has gradually faded by roughly 15% over the span of the last hundred years. What could be causing both the sporadic flux dips and the long-term fading of this odd star?Explanations thus far have varied from mundane to extreme. Alien megastructures, pieces of smashed planets or comets orbiting the star, and intervening interstellar medium have all been proposed as possible explanations but these require some object external to the star. A new study by researcher Peter Foukal proposes an alternative: what if the source of the flux obstruction is the star itself?Analogy to the SunDecades ago, researchers discovered that our own stars total flux isnt as constant as we thought. When magnetic dark spots on the Suns surface block the heat transport, the Suns luminosity dips slightly. The diverted heat is redistributed in the Suns interior, becoming stored as a very small global heating and expansion of the convective envelope. When the blocking starspot is removed, the Sun appears slightly brighter than it did originally. Its luminosity then gradually relaxes, decaying back to its original value.Model of a stars flux after a 1,000-km starspot is inserted at time t = 0 and removed at time t = ts at a depth of 10,000 km in the convective zone. The stars luminosity dips, then becomes brighter than originally, and then gradually decays. [Foukal

  19. Does the Eclipsing Binary KIC 10935310 Contain a Massively Inflated M Dwarf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Jonathan; Han, Eunkyu; Ding, Jeffrey; O'Neill, Kathleen; Lawrence, Yousef; Klink, Douglas; Muirhead, Philip Steven; Shan, Yutong

    2017-01-01

    Stellar evolution models are known to under-predict the radii of low-mass stars by between 5% and 10%, and there are a number of theoretical explanations for this discrepancy including metallicity and age variations, and magnetic suppression of convection. An eclipsing binary system in the Kepler field has been reported to have stars with masses of 0.68 and 0.34 solar and radii of 0.61 and 0.90 solar, respectively. We investigate this system with a new code under development that uses a Gaussian process technique to account for the out of eclipse light variations. We combine new NIR light curve data with the Kepler data and literature RVs to assess the feasibility that this system contains a hugely inflated M dwarf, or if another explanation of the data is preferred.

  20. KIC 9533489: a genuine gamma Doradus-delta Scuti Kepler hybrid pulsator with transit events

    CERN Document Server

    Bognár, Zs; Frémat, Y; Southworth, J; Sódor, Á; De Cat, P; Isaacson, H T; Marcy, G W; Ciardi, D R; Gilliland, R L; Martín-Fernández, P

    2015-01-01

    Context: Several hundred candidate hybrid pulsators of type A-F have been identified from space-based observations. Their large number allows both statistical analyses and detailed investigations of individual stars. This offers the opportunity to study the full interior of the genuine hybrids, in which both low-radial-order p- and high-order g-modes are self-excited at the same time. However, a few other physical processes can also be responsible for the observed hybrid nature, related to binarity or to surface inhomogeneities. The finding that most delta Scuti stars also show long-period light variations represents a real challenge for theory. Methods: Fourier analysis of all the available Kepler light curves. Investigation of the frequency and period spacings. Determination of the stellar physical parameters from spectroscopic observations. Modelling of the transit events. Results: The Fourier analysis of the Kepler light curves revealed 55 significant frequencies clustered into two groups, which are separ...

  1. The Blazhko effect and additional excited modes in RR Lyrae stars

    CERN Document Server

    Benkő, J M

    2015-01-01

    Recent photometric space missions, such as CoRoT and Kepler revealed that many RR Lyrae stars pulsate -- beyond their main radial pulsation mode -- in low amplitude modes. Space data seem to indicate a clear trend, namely overtone (RRc) stars and modulated fundamental (RRab) RR Lyrae stars ubiquitously show additional modes, while non-Blazhko RRab stars never do. Two Kepler stars (V350 Lyr and KIC 7021124), however, apparently seemed to break this rule: they were classified as non-Blazhko RRab stars showing additional modes. We processed Kepler pixel photometric data of these stars. We detected small amplitude, but significant Blazhko effect for both stars by using the resulted light curves and O$-$C diagrams. This finding strengthens the apparent connection between the Blazhko effect and the excitation of additional modes. In addition, it yields a potential tool for detecting Blazhko stars through the additional frequency patterns even if we have only short but accurate time series observations. V350 Lyr sho...

  2. Star Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gieles, M.

    1993-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of stars and star clusters. These complexes share similar properties with giant molecular clouds, from which they are formed. Many (70%) of the young clusters will not survive the fist 10 Myr, due to t...

  3. Stars and Star Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  4. Stars and Star Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  5. KIC 24/7Wave使波峰焊工艺实现了艺术与科技的完美融合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    KIC推出了新型KIC24/7Wave,它利用波峰焊机器的内置传感器,依据合格工艺窗口,自动测量每一个经过波峰焊的PCB的温度曲线。焊炉中还安装了热电偶装置,以持续测量炉腔内的温度。

  6. Stabilization of CO2 Atmospheres on Exoplanets around M Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Peter; Robinson, Tyler D; Li, Cheng; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the chemical stability of CO2-dominated atmospheres of M dwarf terrestrial exoplanets using a 1-dimensional photochemical model. On planets orbiting Sun-like stars, the photolysis of CO2 by Far-UV (FUV) radiation is balanced by the reaction between CO and OH, the rate of which depends on H2O abundance. By comparison, planets orbiting M dwarf stars experience higher FUV radiation compared to planets orbiting Sun-like stars, and they are also likely to have low H2O abundance due to M dwarfs having a prolonged, high-luminosity pre-main sequence (Luger & Barnes 2015). We show that, for H2O-depleted planets around M dwarfs, a CO2-dominated atmosphere is stable to conversion to CO and O2 by relying on a catalytic cycle involving H2O2 photolysis. However, this cycle breaks down for planets with atmospheric hydrogen mixing ratios below ~1 ppm, resulting in ~40% of the atmospheric CO2 being converted to CO and O2 on a time scale of 1 Myr. The increased abundance of O2 also results in high O3 concent...

  7. Regarding the Potential Impact of Double Star Observations on Conceptions of the Universe of Stars in the Early 17TH Century

    CERN Document Server

    Graney, Christopher M

    2008-01-01

    Galileo Galilei believed that stars were distant suns whose sizes measured via his telescope were a direct indication of distance -- fainter stars (appearing smaller in the telescope) being farther away than brighter ones. Galileo argued in his Dialogue that telescopic observation of a chance alignment of a faint (distant) and bright (closer) star would reveal annual parallax, if such double stars were found. This would provide support both for Galileo's ideas concerning the nature of stars and for the motion of the Earth. However, Galileo actually made observations of such double stars, well before publication of the Dialogue. We show that the results of these observations, and the likely results of observations of any double star that was a viable subject for Galileo's telescope, would undermine Galileo's ideas, not support them. We argue that such observations would lead either to the more correct idea that stars were sun-like bodies of varying sizes which could be physically grouped, or to the less correc...

  8. An Exoplanet Spinning Up Its Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    , for transiting planets with orbital periods shorter than 2 days and masses greater than 0.1 Jupiter masses. HATS-18b is denoted by the red star. [Penev et al. 2016]Tidal InteractionsWhat happens when a massive planet orbits this close to its star? Tidal interactions between the star and the planet cause tidal dissipation in the star, resulting in decay of the planets orbit. But there may be an additional effect of this interaction in the case of HATS-18b, the authors claim: the planet may be transferring some of its angular momentum to the star.As stars age, they should gradually spin slower as they lose angular momentum viastellar winds. But Penev and collaborators note that this exoplanets host star, HATS-18, spins roughly three times as fast asits inferred age suggests it should. The authors conclude that the angular momentum lost by the planet as its orbit shrinks is deposited in the star, causing the star to spin up.HATS-18 is an excellent laboratory for studying how very short-period planets interact with their stars in fact, Penev and collaborators have already used their observations of the system to constrain models of tidal dissipation from Sun-like stars. Additional observations of HATS-18 and other short-period systems should allow us to further test models of how planetary systems form and evolve.CitationK. Penev et al 2016 AJ 152 127. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/5/127

  9. Three ways to solve the orbit of KIC 11 558 725

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telting, J.H.; Østensen, R.H.; Baran, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    curve to reveal the orbital Doppler-beaming effect, giving rise to light variations at the 238 ppm level, which is consistent with the observed spectroscopic orbital radial-velocity amplitude of the subdwarf. We use the strongest 70 pulsation frequencies in the Kepler light curve of the subdwarf...... as clocks to derive a third consistent measurement of the orbital radial-velocity amplitude, from the orbital light-travel delay. The orbital radius asdBsini = 11.5 R⊙ gives rise to a light-travel time delay of 53.6 s, which causes aliasing and lowers the amplitudes of the shortest pulsation frequencies...... to constrain the internal structure of this star, and of sdB stars ingeneral. We have obtained ground-based spectroscopic radial-velocity measurements of KIC 11 558 725 based on low-resolution spectra in the Balmer-line region, spanning the 2010 and 2011 observing seasons. From these data we have discovered...

  10. A Review and Preview of Magnetic Star-Planet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2017-05-01

    Planets interact with their host stars through gravity, radiation and magnetic fields, and for those giant planets that orbit their stars within 20 stellar radii (=0.1 AU for a sun-like star), star-planet interactions (SPI) are observable with a wide variety of photometric, spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric studies. At such close distances, the planet orbits within the sub-alfvénic radius of the star in which the transfer of energy and angular momentum between the two bodies is particularly efficient. The nature of magnetic SPI is modeled to be strongly affected by both the stellar and planetary magnetic fields, possibly influencing the magnetic activity of both, as well as affecting the irradiation and even the migration of the planet. As we refine our observational techniques for hot Jupiter systems, we can begin to extend them to other tightly orbiting stellar systems, such as smaller planets close to M dwarfs where the region near tens of stellar radii begins to coincide with the classical habitable zone. Future studies of SPI with space-based telescopes and the next generation of ground-based telescopes will be informative pursuits for the study of the internal dynamics and atmospheric evolution of exoplanets.

  11. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  12. Planet Hunters: A Transiting Circumbinary Planet in a Quadruple Star System

    CERN Document Server

    Schwamb, Megan E; Carter, Joshua A; Welsh, William F; Fischer, Debra A; Torres, Guillermo; Howard, Andrew W; Crepp, Justin R; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris J; Kaib, Nathan A; Terrell, Dirk; Gagliano, Robert; Jek, Kian J; Parrish, Michael; Smith, Arfon M; Lynn, Stuart; Simpson, Robert J; Giguere, Matthew J; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery and confirmation of a transiting circumbinary planet (PH1) around KIC 4862625, an eclipsing binary in the Kepler field. The planet was discovered by volunteers searching the first six Quarters of publicly available Kepler data as part of the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Transits of the planet across the larger and brighter of the eclipsing stars are detectable by visual inspection every ~137 days, with seven transits identified in Quarters 1-11. The physical and orbital parameters of both the host stars and planet were obtained via a photometric-dynamical model, simultaneously fitting both the measured radial velocities and the Kepler light curve of KIC 4862625.The 6.18 $\\pm$ 0.17 Earth radii planet orbits outside the 20-day orbit of an eclipsing binary consisting of an F dwarf (1.734 +/- 0.044 Solar radii, 1.528 +/- 0.087 Solar masses) and M dwarf (0.378 +/0 0.023 Solar radii, 0.408 +/- 0.024 solar masses). For the planet, we find an upper mass limit of 169 Earth masses(0.5...

  13. Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  14. Kepler Data on KIC 7341653: A Nearby M Dwarf with Monster Flares and a Phase-coherent Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Goldin, Alexey

    2017-08-01

    KIC 7341653 is one of several late-type M dwarfs observed by the main mission of Kepler with peculiar infrared colors placing them in the domain of suspected young stellar objects (YSO). It is likely associated with a powerful X-ray emitter with X-ray flares. Kepler light curves reveal two distinct types of activity: frequent flares lasting from less than 30 minutes to a few hours, and a periodic variability with a period of 0.5463441(7) days. The largest detected flare increased the flux in the Kepler passband by a factor of 2.8 and released an estimated 4 × 1034 erg of energy in the Kepler band. Segmented periodogram analysis reveals that the amplitude of the periodic variation was subject to secular changes, dropping from peak values around 20 ppt to below 5 ppt toward the end of the mission, while the phase varied periodically with an amplitude of 0.15 rad and period 362(3) days. Two possible interpretations of the phase periodicity are discussed: a migrating long-lived photospheric spot, and a Doppler frequency shift generated by a solar-mass faint companion, such as a white dwarf.

  15. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  16. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere.

  17. A compact system of small planets around a former red-giant star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpinet, S; Fontaine, G; Brassard, P; Green, E M; Van Grootel, V; Randall, S K; Silvotti, R; Baran, A S; Ostensen, R H; Kawaler, S D; Telting, J H

    2011-12-21

    Planets that orbit their parent star at less than about one astronomical unit (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance) are expected to be engulfed when the star becomes a red giant. Previous observations have revealed the existence of post-red-giant host stars with giant planets orbiting as close as 0.116 AU or with brown dwarf companions in tight orbits, showing that these bodies can survive engulfment. What has remained unclear is whether planets can be dragged deeper into the red-giant envelope without being disrupted and whether the evolution of the parent star itself could be affected. Here we report the presence of two nearly Earth-sized bodies orbiting the post-red-giant, hot B subdwarf star KIC 05807616 at distances of 0.0060 and 0.0076 AU, with orbital periods of 5.7625 and 8.2293 hours, respectively. These bodies probably survived deep immersion in the former red-giant envelope. They may be the dense cores of evaporated giant planets that were transported closer to the star during the engulfment and triggered the mass loss necessary for the formation of the hot B subdwarf, which might also explain how some stars of this type did not form in binary systems.

  18. The architecture of the hierarchical triple star KOI 928 from eclipse timing variations seen in Kepler photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, J H; Borucki, W J; Brugamyer, E; Bryson, S T; Buchhave, L A; Cochran, W D; Endl, M; Fabrycky, D C; Ford, E B; Holman, M J; Jenkins, J; Koch, D; Latham, D W; MacQueen, P; Mullally, F; Prsa, A; Ragozzine, D; Rowe, J F; Sanderfer, D T; Seader, S E; Short, D; Shporer, A; Thompson, S E; Torres, G; Twicken, J D; Welsh, W F; Windmiller, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a hierarchical triple star system (KIC 9140402) where a low mass eclipsing binary orbits a more massive third star. The orbital period of the binary (4.98829 Days) is determined by the eclipse times seen in photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft. The periodically changing tidal field, due to the eccentric orbit of the binary about the tertiary, causes a change in the orbital period of the binary. The resulting eclipse timing variations provide insight into the dynamics and architecture of this system and allow the inference of the total mass of the binary ($0.424 \\pm 0.017 \\text{M}_\\odot$) and the orbital parameters of the binary about the central star.

  19. A survey for pulsations in A-type stars using SuperWASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2015-12-01

    "It is sound judgement to hope that in the not too distant future we shall be competent to understand so simple a thing as a star." - Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, The Internal Constitution of Stars, 1926 A survey of A-type stars is conducted with the SuperWASP archive in the search for pulsationally variable stars. Over 1.5 million stars are selected based on their (J-H) colour. Periodograms are calculated for light curves which have been extracted from the archive and cleaned of spurious points. Peaks which have amplitudes greater than 0.5 millimagnitude are identified in the periodograms. In total, 202 656 stars are identified to show variability in the range 5-300 c/d. Spectroscopic follow-up was obtained for 38 stars which showed high-frequency pulsations between 60 and 235 c/d, and a further object with variability at 636 c/d. In this sample, 13 were identified to be normal A-type δ Sct stars, 14 to be pulsating metallic-lined Am stars, 11 to be rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars, and one to be a subdwarf B variable star. The spectra were used not only to classify the stars, but to determine an effective temperature through Balmer line fitting. Hybrid stars have been identified in this study, which show pulsations in both the high- and low-overtone domains; an observation not predicted by theory. These stars are prime targets to perform follow-up observations, as a confirmed detection of this phenomenon will have significant impact on the theory of pulsations in A-type stars. The detected number of roAp stars has expanded the known number of this pulsator class by 22 per cent. Within these results both the hottest and coolest roAp star have been identified. Further to this, one object, KIC 7582608, was observed by the Kepler telescope for 4 yr, enabling a detailed frequency analysis. This analysis has identified significant frequency variations in this star, leading to the hypothesis that this is the first close binary star of its type. The observational

  20. The Habitability of Planets Orbiting M-dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, Aomawa L; Johnson, John A

    2016-01-01

    The prospects for the habitability of M-dwarf planets have long been debated, due to key differences between the unique stellar and planetary environments around these low-mass stars, as compared to hotter, more luminous Sun-like stars. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made by both space- and ground-based observatories to measure the likelihood of small planets to orbit in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars. We now know that most M dwarfs are hosts to closely-packed planetary systems characterized by a paucity of Jupiter-mass planets and the presence of multiple rocky planets, with roughly a third of these rocky M-dwarf planets orbiting within the habitable zone, where they have the potential to support liquid water on their surfaces. Theoretical studies have also quantified the effect on climate and habitability of the interaction between the spectral energy distribution of M-dwarf stars and the atmospheres and surfaces of their planets. These and other recent results fill in knowledge g...

  1. Clinical Manifestations of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV Lytic Activation: Multicentric Castleman Disease (KSHV-MCD and the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome (KICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark N. Polizzotto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV, it was appreciated that this virus was associated with most cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD arising in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. It has subsequently been recognized that KSHV-MCD is a distinct entity from other forms of MCD. Like MCD that is unrelated to KSHV, the clinical presentation of KSHV-MCD is dominated by systemic inflammatory symptoms including fevers, cachexia and laboratory abnormalities including cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Pathologically KSHV-MCD is characterized by polyclonal, IgM-lambda restricted plasmacytoid cells in the intrafollicular areas of affected lymph nodes. A portion of these cells are infected with KSHV and a sizable subset of these cells express KSHV lytic genes including a viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6. Patients with KSHV-MCD generally have elevated KSHV viral loads in their peripheral blood. Production of vIL-6 and induction of human (h IL-6 both contribute to symptoms, perhaps in combination with overproduction of IL-10 and other cytokines. Until recently, the prognosis of patients with KSHV-MCD was poor. Recent therapeutic advances targeting KSHV-infected B cells with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and utilizing KSHV enzymes to target KSHV-infected cells have substantially improved patient outcomes. Recently another KSHV-associated condition, the KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS has been described. Its clinical manifestations resemble those of KSHV-MCD but lymphadenopathy is not prominent and the pathologic nodal changes of KSHV-MCD are absent. Patients with KICS exhibit elevated KSHV viral loads and elevation of vIL-6, hIL-6 and IL-10 comparable to those seen in KSHV-MCD; the cellular origin of these is a matter of investigation. KICS may contribute to the inflammatory symptoms seen in some patients with severe Kaposi

  2. Star Wreck

    OpenAIRE

    Kusenko, Alexander; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail E.; Tinyakov, P. G.; Tkachev, Igor I.

    1998-01-01

    Electroweak models with low-energy supersymmetry breaking predict the existence of stable non-topological solitons, Q-balls, that can be produced in the early universe. The relic Q-balls can accumulate inside a neutron star and gradually absorb the baryons into the scalar condensate. This causes a slow reduction in the mass of the star. When the mass reaches a critical value, the neutron star becomes unstable and explodes. The cataclysmic destruction of the distant neutron stars may be the or...

  3. Star polygons

    OpenAIRE

    Riosa, Blažka

    2014-01-01

    In mathematics we often encounter polygons, such us triangle, square, hexagon, etc., but we hardly encounter star polygons. Despite the fact that we do not meet them so often in mathematics, in nature they can be traced almost on every step. In this paper the emphasis is on the geometric meaning of regular star polygons. Star polygon is a generalization of the concept of regular polygons. In star polygons also non-adjacent sides intersect. Up to similarity they are determined by Schläfli symb...

  4. AN ANALYTIC METHOD TO DETERMINE HABITABLE ZONES FOR S-TYPE PLANETARY ORBITS IN BINARY STAR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Gyergyovits, Markus; Funk, Barbara [Institute for Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Georgakarakos, Nikolaos, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at, E-mail: elke.pilat-lohinger@univie.ac.at [128 V. Olgas str., Thessaloniki 546 45 (Greece)

    2012-06-10

    With more and more extrasolar planets discovered in and around binary star systems, questions concerning the determination of the classical habitable zone have arisen. Do the radiative and gravitational perturbations of the second star influence the extent of the habitable zone significantly, or is it sufficient to consider the host star only? In this article, we investigate the implications of stellar companions with different spectral types on the insolation a terrestrial planet receives orbiting a Sun-like primary. We present time-independent analytical estimates and compare them to insolation statistics gained via high precision numerical orbit calculations. Results suggest a strong dependence of permanent habitability on the binary's eccentricity, as well as a possible extension of habitable zones toward the secondary in close binary systems.

  5. An Analytic Method to determine Habitable Zones for S-Type Planetary Orbits in Binary Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eggl, Siegfried; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Gyergyovits, Markus; Funk, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    With more and more extrasolar planets discovered in and around binary star systems, questions concerning the determination of the classical Habitable Zone arise. Do the radiative and gravitational perturbations of the second star influence the extent of the Habitable Zone significantly, or is it sufficient to consider the host-star only? In this article we investigate the implications of stellar companions with different spectral types on the insolation a terrestrial planet receives orbiting a Sun-like primary. We present time independent analytical estimates and compare these to insolation statistics gained via high precision numerical orbit calculations. Results suggest a strong dependence of permanent habitability on the binary's eccentricity, as well as a possible extension of Habitable Zones towards the secondary in close binary systems.

  6. STAR Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, W W, E-mail: jacobsw@indiana.ed [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility and Department of Physics, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington IN 47408 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    The main STAR calorimeters comprise a full Barrel EMC and single Endcap EMC plus a Forward Meson Spectrometer. Together they give a nearly complete coverage over the range -1 < pseudorapidity < 4 and provide EM readout and triggering that help drive STAR physics capabilities. Their description, status, performance and operations (and a few physics anecdotes) are briefly presented and discussed.

  7. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  8. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta;

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  9. Update On the Puzzling Boyajian's Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Photometric time series for a neighboring star thats 25 NNW of Boyajians Star. No significant long-term dimming is seen which constrains the size of potential material obscuring Boyajians Star. [Wright et al. 2016/Benjamin Montet]Whats causing the mysterious light-curve dips of the so-called alien megastructure star, Boyajians Star? A recent study analyzes a variety of possible explanations to determine which ones are the most plausible.An Unusual Light CurveEarlier this year, astronomer Tabetha Boyajian reported on the unusual light curve of the star KIC 8462852. This star, now nicknamed Tabbys Star or Boyajians Star, showsunusual dips on day-long timescales that are too large to be explained by planet transits or similar phenomena.In addition to these short dips in luminosity, recent observations have also indicated that the star has faded by roughly 20% over the past hundred years. What could be causing both the short-term dips in the stars light and the long-term dimming over a century?Could the dimming be caused by an alien megastructure built by an extraterrestrial civilization? The authors find that a spherical structure is very unlikely. [Danielle Futselaar/SETI International]Alien Megastructures? Or Another Explanation?Boyajians Star was vaulted into the media spotlight when astronomer Jason Wright (Pennsylvania State University and University of California, Berkeley) proposed that its unusual light curve could potentially be explained by a surrounding megastructure built by an extraterrestrial civilization.Now Wright is back with co-author Steinn Sigurdsson (Pennsylvania State University). In a new study, Wright and Sigurdsson analyze an extensive list of explanations for the puzzling apparent behavior of Boyajians Star, based on our latest knowledge about this strange object.The Realm of PossibilitiesHere are just a few possible causes of Boyajians Stars dimming, as well as the authors assessment of their plausibility. For the full list, see the authors

  10. WASP-135b: a highly irradiated, inflated hot Jupiter orbiting a G5V star

    CERN Document Server

    Spake, Jessica J; Doyle, Amanda P; Hébrard, Guillaume; McCormac, James; Armstrong, David J; Pollacco, Don; Chew, Yilen Gómez Maqueo; Anderson, David R; Barros, Susana C C; Bouchy, François; Boumis, Panayotis; Bruno, Giovanni; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Courcol, Bastien; Davies, Guy R; Faedi, Francesca; Hellier, Coel; Kirk, James; Lam, Kristine W F; Liakos, Alexios; Louden, Tom; Maxted, Pierre F L; Osborn, Hugh P; Palle, Enric; Arranz, Jorge Prieto; Udry, Stéphane; Walker, Simon R; West, Richard G; Wheatley, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new transiting planet from the WASP survey. WASP-135b is a hot Jupiter with a radius of 1.30 pm 0.09 Rjup, a mass of 1.90 pm 0.08 Mjup and an orbital period of 1.401 days. Its host is a Sun-like star, with a G5 spectral type and a mass and radius of 0.98 pm 0.06 Msun and 0.96 pm 0.05 Rsun respectively. The proximity of the planet to its host means that WASP-135b receives high levels of insolation, which may be the cause of its inflated radius. Additionally, we find weak evidence of a transfer of angular momentum from the planet to its star.

  11. First Kepler results on compact pulsators - VII. Pulsating subdwarf B stars detected in the second half of the survey phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, A. S.; Kawaler, S. D.; Reed, M. D.; Quint, A. C.; O'Toole, S. J.; Østensen, R. H.; Telting, J. H.; Silvotti, R.; Charpinet, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Still, M.; Hall, J. R.; Uddin, K.

    2011-07-01

    We present five new pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) stars discovered by the Kepler spacecraft during the asteroseismology survey phase. We perform time series analysis on the nearly continuous month-long Kepler data sets of these five objects; these data sets provide nearly alias-free time series photometry at unprecedented precision. Following an iterative pre-whitening process, we derive the pulsational frequency spectra of these stars, separating out artefacts of known instrumental origin. We find that these new pulsating sdB stars are multiperiodic long-period pulsators of the V1093 Her type, with the number of periodicities ranging from eight (KIC 8302197) to 53 (KIC 11558725). The frequencies and amplitudes are typical of g-mode pulsators of this type. We do not find any evidence for binarity in the five stars from their observed pulsation frequencies. As these are g-mode pulsators, we briefly looked for period spacings for mode identification and found average spacings of about 260 and 145 s. This may indicate l= 1 and 2 patterns. Some modes may show evidence of rotational splitting. These discoveries complete the list of compact pulsators found in the survey phase. Of the 13 compact pulsators, only one star was identified as a short-period (p-mode) V361 Hya pulsator, while all other new pulsators turned out to be V1093 Her class objects. Among the latter objects, two of them seemed to be pure V1093 Her while the others show additional low-amplitude peaks in the p-mode frequency range, suggesting their hybrid nature. Authenticity of these peaks will be tested with longer runs currently under analysis.

  12. Tidal dissipation in rotating low-mass stars and implications for the orbital evolution of close-in massive planets. II. Effect of stellar metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmont, E.; Gallet, F.; Mathis, S.; Charbonnel, C.; Amard, L.; Alibert, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Observations of hot-Jupiter exoplanets suggest that their orbital period distribution depends on the metallicity of the host stars. We investigate here whether the impact of the stellar metallicity on the evolution of the tidal dissipation inside the convective envelope of rotating stars and its resulting effect on the planetary migration might be a possible explanation for this observed statistical trend. We use a frequency-averaged tidal dissipation formalism coupled to an orbital evolution code and to rotating stellar evolution models in order to estimate the effect of a change of stellar metallicity on the evolution of close-in planets. We consider here two different stellar masses: 0.4 M⊙ and 1.0 M⊙ evolving from the early pre-main sequence phase up to the red-giant branch. We show that the metallicity of a star has a strong effect on the stellar parameters, which in turn strongly influence the tidal dissipation in the convective region. While on the pre-main sequence, the dissipation of a metal-poor Sun-like star is higher than the dissipation of a metal-rich Sun-like star; on the main sequence it is the opposite. However, for the 0.4 M⊙ star, the dependence of the dissipation with metallicity is much less visible. Using an orbital evolution model, we show that changing the metallicity leads to different orbital evolutions (e.g., planets migrate farther out from an initially fast-rotating metal-rich star). Using this model, we qualitatively reproduced the observational trends of the population of hot Jupiters with the metallicity of their host stars. However, more steps are needed to improve our model to try to quantitatively fit our results to the observations. Specifically, we need to improve the treatment of the rotation evolution in the orbital evolution model, and ultimately we need to consistently couple the orbital model to the stellar evolution model.

  13. Rising Star

    OpenAIRE

    Worley, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    Rising Star is a novel about appearances. Thailand Allen is a girl who thinks she understands what she sees. But when what she sees are cracks in her perfect world, maturation and new sight are not far off. Before growth can occur, Thailand must undergo a painful process of learning that carries with it embarrassment, sorrow, anger and confusion. Thailand lives with her mother in a small Texas town called Rising Star. Rising Star is like every other small town with its community gather...

  14. Instability of mass transfer in a planet-star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shi; Spruit, H. C.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the angular momentum exchange mechanism governing the evolution of mass-transferring binary stars does not apply to Roche lobe filling planets, because most of the angular momentum of the mass-transferring stream is absorbed by the host star. Apart from a correction for the difference in specific angular momentum of the stream and the centre of mass of the planet, the orbit does not expand much on Roche lobe overflow. We explore the conditions for dynamically unstable Roche lobe overflow as a function of planetary mass and mass and radius (age) of host star and equation of state of planet. For a Sun-like host, gas giant planets in a range of mass and entropy can undergo dynamical mass transfer. Examples of the evolution of the mass transfer process are given. Dynamic mass transfer of rocky planets depends somewhat sensitively on equation of state used. Silicate planets in the range 1 mass transfer before settling to slow overflow when their mass drops to less than 1 M⊕.

  15. Instability of mass transfer in a planet-star system

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Shi

    2016-01-01

    We show that the angular momentum exchange mechanism governing the evolution of mass transferring binary stars does not apply to Roche-lobe filling planets, because most of the angular momentum of the mass transferring stream is absorbed by the host star. Apart from a correction for the difference in specific angular momentum of the stream and the centre of mass of the planet, the orbit does not expand much on Roche-lobe overflow. We explore the conditions for dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow as a function of planet mass and mass and radius (age) of host star and equation of state of planet. For a Sun-like host, gas giant planets in a range of mass and entropy can undergo dynamical mass transfer. Examples of the evolution of the mass transfer process are given. Dynamic mass transfer of rocky planets depend somewhat sensitively on equation of state used. Silicate planets in the range $1 M_{\\oplus}

  16. Interpreting the extended emission around three nearby debris disc host stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Jonathan P; Ertel, S; Augereau, J -C; Kennedy, G M; Booth, M; Wolf, S; Montesinos, B; Eiroa, C; Matthews, B

    2014-01-01

    Cool debris discs are a relic of the planetesimal formation process around their host star, analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. As such, they can be used as a proxy to probe the origin and formation of planetary systems like our own. The Herschel Open Time Key Programmes "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) and "Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre" (DEBRIS) observed many nearby, sun-like stars at far-infrared wavelengths seeking to detect and characterize the emission from their circumstellar dust. Excess emission attributable to the presence of dust was identified from around $\\sim$ 20% of stars. Herschel's high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 7" FWHM at 100 $\\mu$m) provided the capacity for resolving debris belts around nearby stars with radial extents comparable to the solar system (50 to 100 au). As part of the DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, we obtained observations of three debris disc stars, HIP 22263 (HD 30495), HIP 62207 (HD 110897), and HIP 72848 (HD 1315...

  17. A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-Myr-old solar-mass T Tauri star

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, JF; Malo, L; Baruteau, C; Yu, L; Hebrard, E; Hussain, G; Alencar, S; Menard, F; Bouvier, J; Petit, P; Takami, M; Doyon, R; Cameron, A Collier

    2016-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are giant Jupiter-like exoplanets that orbit 100x closer to their host stars than Jupiter does to the Sun. These planets presumably form in the outer part of the primordial disc from which both the central star and surrounding planets are born, then migrate inwards and yet avoid falling into their host star. It is however unclear whether this occurs early in the lives of hot Jupiters, when still embedded within protoplanetary discs, or later, once multiple planets are formed and interact. Although numerous hot Jupiters were detected around mature Sun-like stars, their existence has not yet been firmly demonstrated for young stars, whose magnetic activity is so intense that it overshadows the radial velocity signal that close-in giant planets can induce. Here we show that hot Jupiters around young stars can be revealed from extended sets of high-resolution spectra. Once filtered-out from the activity, radial velocities of V830 Tau derived from new data collected in late 2015 exhibit a sine wave of...

  18. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in Sun-like stars. As the X-ray activity - rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dyna...

  19. Planet Hunters: A Transiting Circumbinary Planet in a Quadruple Star System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Carter, Joshua A.; Welsh, William F.; Fischer, Debra A.; Torres, Guillermo; Howard, Andrew W.; Crepp, Justin R.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Kaib, Nathan A.; Terrell, Dirk; Gagliano, Robert; Jek, Kian J.; Parrish, Michael; Smith, Arfon M.; Lynn, Stuart; Simpson, Robert J.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    We report the discovery and confirmation of a transiting circumbinary planet (PH1b) around KIC 4862625, an eclipsing binary in the Kepler field. The planet was discovered by volunteers searching the first six Quarters of publicly available Kepler data as part of the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Transits of the planet across the larger and brighter of the eclipsing stars are detectable by visual inspection every ~137 days, with seven transits identified in Quarters 1-11. The physical and orbital parameters of both the host stars and planet were obtained via a photometric-dynamical model, simultaneously fitting both the measured radial velocities and the Kepler light curve of KIC 4862625. The 6.18 ± 0.17 R ⊕ planet orbits outside the 20 day orbit of an eclipsing binary consisting of an F dwarf (1.734 ± 0.044 R ⊙, 1.528 ± 0.087 M ⊙) and M dwarf (0.378 ± 0.023 R ⊙, 0.408 ± 0.024 M ⊙). For the planet, we find an upper mass limit of 169 M ⊕ (0.531 Jupiter masses) at the 99.7% confidence level. With a radius and mass less than that of Jupiter, PH1b is well within the planetary regime. Outside the planet's orbit, at ~1000 AU, a previously unknown visual binary has been identified that is likely bound to the planetary system, making this the first known case of a quadruple star system with a transiting planet.

  20. Rock Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国平

    2000-01-01

    Around the world young people are spending unbelievable sums of money to listen to rock music. Forbes Magazine reports that at least fifty rock stars have incomes between two million and six million dollars per year.

  1. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  2. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  3. STAR POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Ch. von Ferber; Yu.Holovatch

    2002-01-01

    It is our great pleasure to present a collection of papers devoted to theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies in the field of star polymers. Since its introduction in the early 80-ies, this field has attracted increasing interest and has become an important part of contemporary polymer physics. While research papers in this field appear regularly in different physical and chemical journals, the present collection is an attempt to join together the studies of star polymers showing the...

  4. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  5. Evidence of chaotic modes in the analysis of four δ Scuti stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló Forteza, S.; Roca Cortés, T.; García Hernández, A.; García, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Since CoRoT observations unveiled the very low amplitude modes that form a flat plateau in the power spectrum structure of δ Scuti stars, the nature of this phenomenon, including the possibility of spurious signals due to the light curve analysis, has been a matter of long-standing scientific debate. Aims: We contribute to this debate by finding the structural parameters of a sample of four δ Scuti stars, CID 546, CID 3619, CID 8669, and KIC 5892969, and looking for a possible relation between these stars' structural parameters and their power spectrum structure. Methods: For the purposes of characterization, we developed a method of studying and analysing the power spectrum with high precision and have applied it to both CoRoT and Kepler light curves. Results: We obtain the best estimates to date of these stars' structural parameters. Moreover, we observe that the power spectrum structure depends on the inclination, oblateness, and convective efficiency of each star. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the power spectrum structure is real and is possibly formed by 2-period island modes and chaotic modes.

  6. Atmospheric Parameters of 169 F, G, K and M-type Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Frasca, A; Uytterhoeven, K; Briquet, M; Van Winckel, H; Drobek, D; Niemczura, E; Lampens, P; Lykke, J; Bloemen, S; Gameiro, J F; Jean, C; Volpi, D; Gorlova, N; Mortier, A; Tsantaki, M; Raskin, G

    2013-01-01

    The asteroseismic and planetary studies, like all research related to stars, need precise and accurate stellar atmospheric parameters as input. We aim at deriving the effective temperature (Teff), the surface gravity (log g), the metallicity ([Fe/H]), the projected rotational velocity (v sin i) and the MK type for 169 F, G, K, and M-type Kepler targets which were observed spectroscopically from the ground with five different instruments. We use two different spectroscopic methods to analyse 189 high-resolution, high-signal-to-noise spectra acquired for the 169 stars. For 67 stars, the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters are derived for the ?first time. KIC 9693187 and 11179629 are discovered to be double-lined spectroscopic binary systems. The results obtained for those stars for which independent determinations of the atmospheric parameters are available in the literature are used for a comparative analysis. As a result, we show that for solar-type stars the accuracy of present determinations of atmospheric...

  7. Asteroseismic measurement of surface-to-core rotation in a main-sequence star*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtz Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have discovered rotationally split core g-mode triplets and surface p-mode triplets and quintuplets in a terminal age main-sequence A star, KIC 11145123, that shows both δ Sct p-mode pulsations and γ Dor g-mode pulsations. This gives the first robust determination of the rotation of the deep core and surface of a main-sequence star, essentially model-independently. We find its rotation to be nearly uniform with a period near 100 d, but we show with high confidence that the surface rotates slightly faster than the core. A strong angular momentum transfer mechanism must be operating to produce the nearly rigid rotation, and a mechanism other than viscosity must be operating to produce a more rapidly rotating surface than core. Our asteroseismic result, along with previous asteroseismic constraints on internal rotation in some B stars, and measurements of internal rotation in some subgiant, giant and white dwarf stars, has made angular momentum transport in stars throughout their lifetimes an observational science.

  8. Constraining stellar physics from red-giant stars in binaries - stellar rotation, mixing processes and stellar activity

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; Pavlovski, K; Palacios, A; Tkachenko, A; García, R A; Mathis, S; Corsaro, E; Johnston, C; Mosser, B; Ceillier, T; Nascimento, J -D do; Raskin, G

    2016-01-01

    The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has led to an improved understanding of stellar structure and evolution - in particular for solar-like oscillators in this context. Binary stars are fascinating objects. Because they were formed together, binary systems provide a set of two stars with very well constrained parameters. Those can be used to study properties and physical processes, such as the stellar rotation, dynamics and rotational mixing of elements and allows us to learn from the differences we find between the two components. In this work, we discussed a detailed study of the binary system KIC9163796, discovered through Kepler photometry. The ground-based follow-up spectroscopy showed that this system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, with a mass ratio close to unity. However, the fundamental parameters of the components of this system as well as their lithium abundances differ substantially. Kepler photometry of this system allows to perform a detailed seism...

  9. 高强度沉淀硬化不锈钢与KIC和KISCC%High strength precipitation-hardening stainless steel with KIC and KISCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志; 赵振业; 刘天琦

    2003-01-01

    分析了航空用沉淀硬化不锈钢的化学成分与力学性能之间特别是断裂韧度(KIC)和应力腐蚀门坎值(KISCC)的关系,指出沉淀硬化不锈钢的KIC和KISCC数值接近,而以二次硬化为主的不锈钢的KIC和KISCC差别较大,表现出与高合金超高强度钢相同的特征.文章指出,因二次硬化引起基体中Cr,Mo含量的减少与KIC和KISCC差别直接相关;由上述分析,引出超高强度不锈钢设计原则的初步构想.

  10. An extrasolar giant planet in a close triple-star system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konacki, Maciej

    2005-07-14

    Hot Jupiters are gas-giant planets orbiting with periods of 3-9 days around Sun-like stars. They are believed to form in a disk of gas and condensed matter at or beyond approximately 2.7 astronomical units (au-the Sun-Earth distance) from their parent star. At such distances, there exists a sufficient amount of solid material to produce a core capable of capturing enough gas to form a giant planet. Subsequently, they migrate inward to their present close orbits. Here I report the detection of an unusual hot Jupiter orbiting the primary star of a triple stellar system, HD 188753. The planet has an orbital period of 3.35 days and a minimum mass of 1.14 times that of Jupiter. The primary star's mass is 1.06 times that of the Sun, 1.06 M(\\circ). The secondary star, itself a binary stellar system, orbits the primary at an average distance of 12.3 au with an eccentricity of 0.50. The mass of the secondary pair is 1.63 M(\\circ). Such a close and massive secondary would have truncated a disk around the primary to a radius of only approximately 1.3 AU (ref. 4) and might have heated it up to temperatures high enough to prohibit giant-planet formation, leaving the origin of this planet unclear.

  11. Rossby waves and polar spots in rapidly rotating stars: Implications for stellar wind evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Zaqarashvili, T V; Ballester, J L; Carbonell, M; Khodachenko, M L; Lammer, H; Leitzinger, M; Odert, P

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly rotating stars show short-period oscillations in magnetic activity and polar appearance of starspots. The aim of this paper is to study large-scale shallow water waves in the tachoclines of rapidly rotating stars and their connection to the periodicity and the formation of starspots at high latitudes. Shallow-water magnetohydrodynamic equations were used to study the dynamics of large-scale waves at the rapidly rotating stellar tachoclines in the presence of toroidal magnetic field. Dispersion relations and latitudinal distribution of wave modes were derived. We found that low-frequency magnetic Rossby waves tend to be located at poles, but high-frequency magnetic Poincare waves are concentrated near the equator in rapidly rotating stars. These results have important implications for the evolution of the stellar wind in young Sun-like stars. Unstable magnetic Rossby waves may lead to the local enhancement of magnetic flux at high latitudes of tachoclines in rapidly rotating stars. The enhanced magneti...

  12. Morning Star

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Morning Star comprises a group of paintings and drawings whose imagery derives from photographs of 1960s American hippie communes. The paintings are made using oil paint on linen. Their dimensions vary between 180 x 120, and 228 x 217 centimetres. The drawings are in pencil on watercolour paper and are all 56 x 76 centimetres. The work has been exhibited in conventional form, hanging on gallery walls. For Morning Star I made pencil drawings and oil paintings derived from images in Dick Fa...

  13. Fourier analysis of non-Blazhko ab-type RR Lyrae stars observed with the Kepler space telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Nemec, J M; Benko, J M; Moskalik, P; Kolenberg, K; Szabo, R; Kurtz, D W; Bryson, S; Guggenberger, E; Chadid, M; Jeon, Y -B; Kunder, A; Layden, A C; Kinemuchi, K; Kiss, L L; Poretti, E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kjeldsen, H; Caldwell, D; Ripepi, V; Derekas, A; Nuspl, J; Mullally, F; Thompson, S E; Borucki, W J

    2011-01-01

    Nineteen of the ~40 RR Lyr stars in the Kepler field have been identified as candidate non-Blazhko (or unmodulated) stars. In this paper we present the results of Fourier decomposition of the time-series photometry of these stars acquired during the first 417 days of operation (Q0-Q5) of the Kepler telescope. Fourier parameters based on ~18400 long-cadence observations per star (and ~150000 short-cadence observations for FN Lyr and for AW Dra) are derived. None of the stars shows the recently discovered `period-doubling' effect seen in Blazhko variables; however, KIC 7021124 has been found to pulsate simultaneously in the fundamental and second overtone modes with a period ratio P2/P0 ~ 0.59305 and is similar to the double-mode star V350 Lyr. Period change rates are derived from O-C diagrams spanning, in some cases, over 100 years; these are compared with high-precision periods derived from the Kepler data alone. Extant Fourier correlations by Kovacs, Jurcsik et al. (with minor transformations from the V to t...

  14. Pulsating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Catelan, M?rcio

    2014-01-01

    The most recent and comprehensive book on pulsating stars which ties the observations to our present understanding of stellar pulsation and evolution theory.  Written by experienced researchers and authors in the field, this book includes the latest observational results and is valuable reading for astronomers, graduate students, nuclear physicists and high energy physicists.

  15. Stars Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean Leyder

    1996-01-01

    An imaginary voyage in time where we were witness of the birth of the universe itself, the time of the Big-Bang 15 billion years ago. Particules from the very first moments of time : protons, neutrons and electrons, and also much more energetic one. These particules are preparing to interact collider and generating others which will be the birth to the stars ........

  16. STAR Highlights

    OpenAIRE

    Masui, Hiroshi; collaboration, for the STAR

    2011-01-01

    We report selected results from STAR collaboration at RHIC, focusing on jet-hadron and jet-like correlations, quarkonium suppression and collectivity, di-electron spectrum in both p+p and Au+Au, and higher moments of net-protons as well as azimuthal anisotropy from RHIC Beam Energy Scan program.

  17. Sonneberg Plate Photometry for Boyajian’s Star in Two Passbands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippke, Michael; Kroll, Peter; Matthai, Frank; Angerhausen, Daniel; Tuvikene, Taavi; Stassun, Keivan G.; Roshchina, Elena; Vasileva, Tatyana; Izmailov, Igor; Samus, Nikolay N.; Pastukhova, Elena N.; Bryukhanov, Ivan; Lund, Michael B.

    2017-03-01

    The F3 main-sequence star KIC 8462852 (Boyajian’s Star) showed deep (up to 20%) day-long brightness dips of unknown cause during the four years of the Kepler mission. A 0.164 mag (16%) dimming between 1890 and 1990 was claimed, based on the analysis of photographic plates from the Harvard Observatory. We have gathered an independent set of historic plates from Sonneberg Observatory, Germany, covering the years of 1934-1995. With 861 mag in B, and 397 mag in V, we find the star to be of constant brightness within 0.03 mag per century (3%). Consistent outcomes are found using by-eye estimates of the best 119 plates. Results are supported by data from Sternberg Observatory, Moscow, which show the star as constant between 1895 and 1995. The previously claimed century-long dimming is inconsistent with our results at the 5σ -level, however, the recently reported modest dimming of 3% in the Kepler data is not inconsistent with our data. We find no periodicities or shorter trends within our limits of 5% per five year bin, but note a possible dimming event on 1978 October 24.

  18. Precise mass and radius measurements for the components of the bright solar-type eclipsing binary star V1094 Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Maxted, P F L; Torres, G; Lacy, C H S; Southworth, J; Smalley, B; Pavlovski, K; Marschall, L A; Clausen, J V

    2015-01-01

    V1094 Tau is bright eclipsing binary star with an orbital period close to 9 days containing two stars similar to the Sun. Our aim is to test models of Sun-like stars using precise and accurate mass and radius measurements for both stars in V1094 Tau. We present new spectroscopy of V1094 Tau which we use to estimate the effective temperatures of both stars and to refine their spectroscopic orbits. We also present new, high-quality photometry covering both eclipses of V1094 Tau in the Stroemgren uvby system and in the Johnson V-band. The masses, radii and effective temperatures of the stars in V1094 Tau are found to be M$_A$ = 1.0964 $\\pm$ 0.0040 M$_{\\odot}$, R$_A$ = 1.4129 $\\pm$ 0.0058 R$_{\\odot}$, T$_{\\rm eff,A}$ = 5850 $\\pm$ 100 K, and M$_B$ = 1.0120 $\\pm$ 0.0028 M$_{\\odot}$, R$_B$ = 1.0913 $\\pm$ 0.0066 R$_{\\odot}$, T$_{\\rm eff,B}$ = 5700 $\\pm$ 100 K. An analysis of the times of mid-eclipse and the radial velocity data reveals apsidal motion with a period of 14500 $\\pm$ 3700 years. The observed masses, radii...

  19. Magnetic and Gravitational Disk-Star Interactions: An Interdependence of PMS Stellar Rotation Rates and Spin-Orbit Misalignments

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    The presence of giant gaseous planets that reside in close proximity to their host stars may be a consequence of large-scale radial migration through the proto-planetary nebulae. Within the context of this picture, significant orbital obliquities characteristic of a substantial fraction of such planets can be attributed to external torques that perturb the disks out of alignment with the spin axes of their host stars. Therefore, the acquisition of orbital obliquity exhibits sensitive dependence on the physics of disk-star interactions. Here, we analyze the primordial excitation of spin-orbit misalignment of Sun-like stars, in light of disk-star angular momentum transfer. We begin by calculating the stellar pre-main sequence rotational evolution, accounting for spin-up due to gravitational contraction and accretion as well as spin-down due to magnetic star-disk coupling. We devote particular attention to angular momentum transfer by accretion, and show that while generally subdominant to gravitational contract...

  20. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  1. Planck stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A star that collapses gravitationally can reach a further stage of its life, where quantum-gravitational pressure counteracts weight. The duration of this stage is very short in the star proper time, yielding a bounce, but extremely long seen from the outside, because of the huge gravitational time dilation. Since the onset of quantum-gravitational effects is governed by energy density --not by size-- the star can be much larger than planckian in this phase. The object emerging at the end of the Hawking evaporation of a black hole can can then be larger than planckian by a factor $(m/m_{\\scriptscriptstyle P})^n$, where $m$ is the mass fallen into the hole, $m_{\\scriptscriptstyle P}$ is the Planck mass, and $n$ is positive. The existence of these objects alleviates the black-hole information paradox. More interestingly, these objects could have astrophysical and cosmological interest: they produce a detectable signal, of quantum gravitational origin, around the $10^{-14} cm$ wavelength.

  2. Signatures of internal rotation discovered in the Kepler data of five slowly pulsating B stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pápics, P. I.; Tkachenko, A.; Van Reeth, T.; Aerts, C.; Moravveji, E.; Van de Sande, M.; De Smedt, K.; Bloemen, S.; Southworth, J.; Debosscher, J.; Niemczura, E.; Gameiro, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Massive stars are important building blocks of the Universe, and their stellar structure and evolution models are fundamental cornerstones of various fields in modern astrophysics. The precision of these models is strongly limited by our lack of understanding of various internal mixing processes that significantly influence the lifetime of these objects, such as core overshoot, chemical mixing, or the internal differential rotation. Aims: Our goal is to calibrate models by extending the sample of available seismic studies of slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars, providing input for theoretical modelling efforts that will deliver precise constraints on the parameters describing the internal mixing processes in these objects. Methods: We used spectral synthesis and disentangling techniques to derive fundamental parameters and to determine precise orbital parameters from high-resolution spectra. We employed custom masks to construct light curves from the virtually uninterrupted four year long Kepler pixel data and used standard time-series analysis tools to construct a set of significant frequencies for each target. These sets were first filtered from combination frequencies, and then screened for period spacing patterns. Results: We detect gravity mode period series of modes, of the same degree ℓ with consecutive radial order n, in four new and one revisited SPB star. These series (covering typically 10 to 40 radial orders) are clearly influenced by moderate to fast rotation and carry signatures of chemical mixing processes. Furthermore, they are predominantly prograde dipole series. Our spectroscopic analysis, in addition to placing each object inside the SPB instability strip and identifying KIC 4930889 as an SB2 binary, reveals that KIC 11971405 is a fast rotator that shows very weak Be signatures. Together with the observed photometric outbursts this illustrates that this Be star is a fast rotating SPB star. We hypothesise that the outbursts might be

  3. Seismic evidence for a rapidly rotating core in a lower-giant-branch star observed with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Deheuvels, S; Chaplin, W J; Basu, S; Antia, H M; Appourchaux, T; Benomar, O; Davies, G R; Elsworth, Y; Gizon, L; Goupil, M J; Reese, D R; Regulo, C; Schou, J; Stahn, T; Casagrande, L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Fischer, D; Hekker, S; Kjeldsen, H; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Pinsonneault, M; Valenti, J; Christiansen, J L; Kinemuchi, K; Mullally, F

    2012-01-01

    Rotation is expected to have an important influence on the structure and the evolution of stars. However, the mechanisms of angular momentum transport in stars remain theoretically uncertain and very complex to take into account in stellar models. To achieve a better understanding of these processes, we desperately need observational constraints on the internal rotation of stars, which until very recently were restricted to the Sun. In this paper, we report the detection of mixed modes - i.e. modes that behave both as g modes in the core and as p modes in the envelope - in the spectrum of the early red giant KIC7341231, which was observed during one year with the Kepler spacecraft. By performing an analysis of the oscillation spectrum of the star, we show that its non-radial modes are clearly split by stellar rotation and we are able to determine precisely the rotational splittings of 18 modes. We then find a stellar model that reproduces very well the observed atmospheric and seismic properties of the star. ...

  4. HATS-18 b: An Extreme Short--Period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star

    CERN Document Server

    Penev, Dr Kaloyan M; Bakos, Dr Gaspar A; Ciceri, Ms Simona; Brahm, Dr Rafael; Bayliss, Dr Daniel; Bento, Joao; Jord'an, Andr'es; Csubry, Mr Zoltan; Bhatti, W; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Espinoza, Mr Néstor; Zhou, Dr George; Mancini, Dr Luigi; Rabus, Dr Markus; Suc, Vincent; Henning, Thomas; Schmidt, Prof Brian P; Noyes, Dr Robert W; L'az'ar, J; Papp, Istvan; S'ari, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18 b: a 1.980 +/- 0.077 Mj, 1.337 +0.102 -0.049 Rj planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037 +/- 0.047 Msun, and radius 1.020 +0.057 -0.031 Rsun) with V=14.067 +/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range 6.5 <= lg(Q*/k_2) <= 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star--planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories.

  5. Stars Form Surprisingly Close to Milky Way's Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    million low mass, sun-like stars in and around the ring, whereas in the disk model, the number of low mass stars could be much less. Nayakshin and his coauthor, Rashid Sunyaev of the Max Plank Institute for Physics in Garching, Germany, used Chandra observations to compare the X-ray glow from the region around Sgr A* to the X-ray emission from thousands of young stars in the Orion Nebula star cluster. They found that the Sgr A* star cluster contains only about 10,000 low mass stars, thereby ruling out the migration model. "We can now say that the stars around Sgr A* were not deposited there by some passing star cluster, rather they were born there," said Sunyaev . "There have been theories that this was possible, but this is the first real evidence. Many scientists are going to be very surprised by these results." Because the Galactic Center is shrouded in dust and gas, it has not been possible to look for the low-mass stars in optical observations. In contrast, X-ray data have allowed astronomers to penetrate the veil of gas and dust and look for these low mass stars. Scenario Dismissed by Chandra Results Scenario Dismissed by Chandra Results "In one of the most inhospitable places in our Galaxy, stars have prevailed," said Nayakshin. "It appears that star formation is much more tenacious than we previously believed." The results suggest that the "rules" of star formation change when stars form in the disk of a giant black hole. Because this environment is very different from typical star formation regions, there is a change in the proportion of stars that form. For example, there is a much higher percentage of massive stars in the disks around black holes. And, when these massive stars explode as supernovae, they will "fertilize" the region with heavy elements such as oxygen. This may explain the large amounts of such elements observed in the disks of young supermassive black holes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for

  6. Measure of the stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henbest, N.

    1984-12-13

    The paper concerns the Hertzsprung-Russel (H-R) diagram, which is graph relating the brightness to the surface temperature of the stars. The diagram provides a deep insight into the fundamental properties of the stars. Evolution of the stars; the death of a star; distances; and dating star clusters, are all briefly discussed with reference to the H-R diagram.

  7. When stars collide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, E.; Pols, O.R.

    2007-01-01

    When two stars collide and merge they form a new star that can stand out against the background population in a star cluster as a blue straggler. In so called collision runaways many stars can merge and may form a very massive star that eventually forms an intermediate mass blackhole. We have perfor

  8. A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-million-year-old solar-mass T Tauri star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, J F; Moutou, C; Malo, L; Baruteau, C; Yu, L; Hébrard, E; Hussain, G; Alencar, S; Ménard, F; Bouvier, J; Petit, P; Takami, M; Doyon, R; Collier Cameron, A

    2016-06-30

    Hot Jupiters are giant Jupiter-like exoplanets that orbit their host stars 100 times more closely than Jupiter orbits the Sun. These planets presumably form in the outer part of the primordial disk from which both the central star and surrounding planets are born, then migrate inwards and yet avoid falling into their host star. It is, however, unclear whether this occurs early in the lives of hot Jupiters, when they are still embedded within protoplanetary disks, or later, once multiple planets are formed and interact. Although numerous hot Jupiters have been detected around mature Sun-like stars, their existence has not yet been firmly demonstrated for young stars, whose magnetic activity is so intense that it overshadows the radial velocity signal that close-in giant planets can induce. Here we report that the radial velocities of the young star V830 Tau exhibit a sine wave of period 4.93 days and semi-amplitude 75 metres per second, detected with a false-alarm probability of less than 0.03 per cent, after filtering out the magnetic activity plaguing the spectra. We find that this signal is unrelated to the 2.741-day rotation period of V830 Tau and we attribute it to the presence of a planet of mass 0.77 times that of Jupiter, orbiting at a distance of 0.057 astronomical units from the host star. Our result demonstrates that hot Jupiters can migrate inwards in less than two million years, probably as a result of planet–disk interactions.

  9. On the survival of brown dwarfs and planets engulfed by their giant host star

    CERN Document Server

    Passy, Jean-Claude; De Marco, Orsola

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of two Earth-mass planets in close orbits around an evolved star has raised questions as to whether substellar companions can survive encounters with their host stars. We consider whether these companions could have been stripped of significant amounts of mass during the phase when they orbited through the dense inner envelopes of the giant. We apply the criterion derived by Murray et al. for disruption of gravitationally bound objects by ram pressure, to determine whether mass loss may have played a role in the histories of these and other recently discovered low-mass companions to evolved stars. We find that the brown dwarf and Jovian mass objects circling WD 0137-349, SDSS J08205+0008, and HIP 13044 are most unlikely to have lost significant mass during the common envelope phase. However, the Earth-mass planets found around KIC 05807616 could well be the remnant of one or two Jovian mass planets that lost extensive mass during the common envelope phase.

  10. The discovery of a planetary candidate around the evolved low-mass Kepler giant star HD 175370

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrudková, M.; Hatzes, A.; Karjalainen, R.; Lehmann, H.; Hekker, S.; Hartmann, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Prins, S.; Van Winckel, H.; De Nutte, R.; Dumortier, L.; Frémat, Y.; Hensberge, H.; Jorissen, A.; Lampens, P.; Laverick, M.; Lombaert, R.; Pápics, P. I.; Raskin, G.; Sódor, Á.; Thoul, A.; Van Eck, S.; Waelkens, C.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a planetary companion candidate with a minimum mass M sin i = 4.6 ± 1.0 MJupiter orbiting the K2 III giant star HD 175370 (KIC 007940959). This star was a target in our programme to search for planets around a sample of 95 giant stars observed with Kepler. This detection was made possible using precise stellar radial velocity measurements of HD 175370 taken over five years and four months using the coudé echelle spectrograph of the 2-m Alfred Jensch Telescope and the fibre-fed echelle spectrograph High Efficiency and Resolution Mercator Echelle Spectrograph of the 1.2-m Mercator Telescope. Our radial velocity measurements reveal a periodic (349.5 ± 4.5 d) variation with a semi-amplitude K = 133 ± 25 m s- 1, superimposed on a long-term trend. A low-mass stellar companion with an orbital period of ˜88 yr in a highly eccentric orbit and a planet in a Keplerian orbit with an eccentricity e = 0.22 are the most plausible explanation of the radial velocity variations. However, we cannot exclude the existence of stellar envelope pulsations as a cause for the low-amplitude radial velocity variations and only future continued monitoring of this system may answer this uncertainty. From Kepler photometry, we find that HD 175370 is most likely a low-mass red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch star.

  11. Determining the Age of the Kepler Open Cluster NGC 6819 With a New Triple System and Other Eclipsing Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Brewer, Lauren N; Mathieu, Robert D; Milliman, Katelyn; Geller, Aaron M; Jeffries, Mark W; Orosz, Jerome A; Brogaard, Karsten; Platais, Imants; Bruntt, Hans; Grundahl, Frank; Stello, Dennis; Frandsen, Soeren

    2016-01-01

    As part of our study of the old (~2.5 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819 in the Kepler field, we present photometric (Kepler and ground-based BVRcIc) and spectroscopic observations of the detached eclipsing binary WOCS 24009 (Auner 665; KIC 5023948) with a short orbital period of 3.6 days. WOCS 24009 is a triple-lined system, and we verify that the brightest star is physically orbiting the eclipsing binary using radial velocities and eclipse timing variations. The eclipsing binary components have masses M_B =1.090+/-0.010 Msun and M_C =1.075+/-0.013 Msun, and radii R_B =1.095+/-0.007 Rsun and R_C =1.057+/-0.008 Rsun. The bright non-eclipsing star resides at the cluster turnoff, and ultimately its mass will directly constrain the turnoff mass: our preliminary determination is M_A =1.251+/-0.057 Msun. A careful examination of the light curves indicates that the fainter star in the eclipsing binary undergoes a very brief period of total eclipse, which enables us to precisely decompose the light of the three stars and pl...

  12. Can strange stars mimic dark energy stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, Debabrata; Guha, B K; Ray, Saibal

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of strange stars mixed with dark energy to be one of candidates for dark energy stars is the main issue of the present study. Our investigation shows that quark matter is acting as dark energy after certain yet unknown critical condition inside the quark stars. Our proposed model reveals that strange stars mixed with dark energy feature not only a physically acceptable stable model but also mimic characteristics of dark energy stars. The plausible connections are shown through the mass-radius relation as well as the entropy and temperature. We particulary note that two-fluid distribution is the major reason for anisotropic nature of the spherical stellar system.

  13. Interpreting the extended emission around three nearby debris disc host stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. P.; Kirchschlager, F.; Ertel, S.; Augereau, J.-C.; Kennedy, G. M.; Booth, M.; Wolf, S.; Montesinos, B.; Eiroa, C.; Matthews, B.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Cool debris discs are a relic of the planetesimal formation process around their host star, analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. As such, they can be used as a proxy to probe the origin and formation of planetary systems like our own. Aims: The Herschel open time key programmes "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) and "Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre" (DEBRIS) observed many nearby, sun-like stars at far-infrared wavelengths seeking to detect and characterize the emission from their circumstellar dust. Excess emission attributable to the presence of dust was identified from around ~20% of stars. Herschel's high angular resolution (~7'' FWHM at 100 μm) provided the capacity for resolving debris belts around nearby stars with radial extents comparable to the solar system (50-100 au). Methods: As part of the DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, we obtained observations of three debris disc stars, HIP 22263 (HD 30495), HIP 62207 (HD 110897), and HIP 72848 (HD 131511), at far-infrared wavelengths with the Herschel PACS instrument. Combining these new images and photometry with ancilliary data from the literature, we undertook simultaneous multi-wavelength modelling of the discs' radial profiles and spectral energy distributions using three different methodologies: single annulus, modified black body, and a radiative transfer code. Results: We present the first far-infrared spatially resolved images of these discs and new single-component debris disc models. We characterize the capacity of the models to reproduce the disc parameters based on marginally resolved emission through analysis of two sets of simulated systems (based on the HIP 22263 and HIP 62207 data) with the noise levels typical of the Herschel images. We find that the input parameter values are recovered well at noise levels attained in the observations presented here.

  14. Interaction of free-floating planets with a star-planet pair

    CERN Document Server

    Varvoglis, Harry; Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of free-floating planets and their theoretical interpretation as celestial bodies, either condensed independently or ejected from parent stars in tight clusters, introduced an intriguing possibility. Namely the existence of exoplanets not condensed from the protoplanetary disk of their parent star. In this novel scenario a free-floating planet interacts with an already existing planetary system, created in a tight cluster, and is captured as a new planet. In the present work we study this interaction process by integrating trajectories of planet-sized bodies, which encounter a binary system consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet revolving around a Sun-like star. To simplify the problem we assume coplanar orbits for the bound and the free-floating planet and an initially parabolic orbit for the free-floating planet. By calculating the uncertainty exponent, a quantity that measures the dependence of the final state of the system on small changes of the initial conditions, we show that the int...

  15. Starspot activity and rotation of the planet-hosting star Kepler-17

    CERN Document Server

    Bonomo, Aldo S

    2012-01-01

    Context. Kepler-17 is a G2V sun-like star accompanied by a transiting planet with a mass of ~2.5 Jupiter masses and an orbital period of 1.486 d, recently discovered by the Kepler space telescope. This star is highly interesting as a young solar analogue. Aims. We used about 500 days of high-precision, high-duty-cycle optical photometry collected by Kepler to study the rotation of the star and the evolution of its photospheric active regions. Methods. We applied a maximum-entropy light curve inversion technique to model the flux rotational modulation induced by active regions that consist of dark spots and bright solar-like faculae with a fixed area ratio. Their configuration was varied after a fixed time interval to take their evolution into account. Active regions were used as tracers to study stellar differential rotation, and planetary occultations were used to constrain the latitude of some spots. Results. Our modelling approach reproduces the light variations of Kepler-17 with a standard deviation of th...

  16. Gravitational waves from dark matter collapse in a star

    CERN Document Server

    Kurita, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collapse of clusters of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the core of a Sun-like star and the possible formation of mini-black holes and the emission of gravity waves. When the number of WIMPs is small, thermal pressure balances the WIMP cluster's self gravity. If the number of WIMPs is larger than a critical number, thermal pressure cannot balance gravity and the cluster contracts. If WIMPs are collisionless and bosonic, the cluster collapses directly to form a mini-black hole. For fermionic WIMPs, the cluster contracts until it is sustained by Fermi pressure, forming a small compact object. If the fermionic WIMP mass is smaller than $4\\times 10^2$ GeV, the radius of the compact object is larger than its Schwarzschild radius and Fermi pressure temporally sustains its self gravity, halting the formation of a black hole. If the fermionic WIMP mass is larger than $4\\times 10^2$ GeV, the radius is smaller than its Schwarzschild radius and the compact object becomes a mini-black h...

  17. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  18. The Cambridge Double Star Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEvoy, Bruce; Tirion, Wil

    2015-12-01

    Preface; What are double stars?; The binary orbit; Double star dynamics; Stellar mass and the binary life cycle; The double star population; Detecting double stars; Double star catalogs; Telescope optics; Preparing to observe; Helpful accessories; Viewing challenges; Next steps; Appendices: target list; Useful formulas; Double star orbits; Double star catalogs; The Greek alphabet.

  19. Investigation of Energy Release from X-ray Flares on Young Stellar Objects with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David M.

    2017-08-01

    Young stellar objects (YSOs), which tend to flare more frequently and at higher temperatures than what is typically observed on Sun-like stars, are excellent targets for studying the nature of energy release and transport in large flaring events. Multiple star-forming regions have been observed in the past by soft x-ray missions such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, but the energy ranges of these missions fall off prior to the hard x-ray regime, where it would be possible to search for a crossover from thermal to nonthermal emission. To investigate this hard x-ray emission, three 50ks observations of the star-forming region rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the current spectral and timing analyses of the brightest of the these events, exploring the way energy is released as well as the effects of these large flares on the surrounding environment. We compare these results to what is typically observed for solar flares.

  20. MINERVA-Red: A telescope dedicated to the discovery of planets orbiting the nearest low-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliski, David; Blake, Cullen; Johnson, John A.; Plavchan, Peter; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Eastman, Jason D.; Barnes, Stuart; Baker, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Results from Kepler and ground-based exoplanet surveys suggest that M-dwarfs host numerous small sized planets. Additionally, the discovery of the Earth-sized exoplanets orbiting Proxima Centauri and Trappist 1 demonstrate that these stars can host terrestrial planets in their habitable zones. Since low-mass stars are intrinsically faint at optical wavelengths, obtaining 1 m/s Doppler resolution to detect their planetary companions remains a challenge for instruments designed for sun-like stars. We describe a novel, high-cadence approach aimed at detecting and characterizing planets orbiting the closest low-mass stars to the Sun. MINERVA-Red is an echelle spectrograph optimized for the 'deep red', between 800 nm and 900 nm, where M-dwarfs are brightest. The spectrograph will be temperature controlled at 20C +/- 10mk and in a vacuum chamber which maintains a pressure below 0.01 mbar while using a Fabry-Perot etalon and U/Ne lamp for wavelength calibration. The spectrometer will operate with a robotic, 0.7-meter telescope at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. We expect first light in 2017.

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. III. The structure of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations

    CERN Document Server

    Beeck, Benjamin; Cameron, Robert H; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    The convective envelopes of cool main-sequence stars harbour magnetic fields with a complex global and local structure. These fields affect the near-surface convection and the outer stellar atmospheres in many ways and are responsible for the observable magnetic activity of stars. Our aim is to understand the local structure in unipolar regions with moderate average magnetic flux density. These correspond to plage regions covering a substantial fraction of the surface of the Sun (and likely also the surface of other Sun-like stars) during periods of high magnetic activity. We analyse the results of 18 local-box magnetohydrodynamics simulations covering the upper layers of the convection zones and the photospheres of cool main-sequence stars of spectral types F to early M. The average vertical field in these simulations ranges from 20 to 500G. We find a substantial variation of the properties of the surface magnetoconvection between main-sequence stars of different spectral types. As a consequence of a reduced...

  2. The discovery of a planetary candidate around the evolved low-mass Kepler giant star HD 175370

    CERN Document Server

    Hrudková, M; Karjalainen, R; Lehmann, H; Hekker, S; Hartmann, M; Tkachenko, A; Prins, S; van Winckel, H; de Nutte, R; Dumortier, L; Frémat, Y; Hensberge, H; Jorissen, A; Lampens, P; Laverick, M; Lombaert, R; Pápics, P I; Raskin, G; Sódor, Á; Thoul, A; van Eck, S; Waelkens, C

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a planetary companion candidate with a minimum mass Msini = 4.6 M_J orbiting the K2 III giant star HD 175370 (KIC 007940959). This star was a target in our program to search for planets around a sample of 95 giant stars observed with Kepler. This detection was made possible using precise stellar radial velocity measurements of HD 175370 taken over five years and four months using the coude echelle spectrograph of the 2-m Alfred Jensch Telescope and the fibre-fed echelle spectrograph HERMES of the 1.2-m Mercator Telescope. Our radial velocity measurements reveal a periodic (349.5 days) variation with a semi-amplitude K = 133 m/s, superimposed on a long-term trend. A low-mass stellar companion with an orbital period of ~88 years in a highly eccentric orbit and a planet in a Keplerian orbit with an eccentricity e = 0.22 are the most plausible explanation of the radial velocity variations. However, we cannot exclude the existence of stellar envelope pulsations as a cause for the low-...

  3. ENERGY STAR Certified Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Boilers that are effective as of October 1,...

  4. ENERGY STAR Certified Furnaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Furnaces that are effective as of February 1,...

  5. ENERGY STAR Certified Computers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 6.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Computers that are effective as of June 2, 2014....

  6. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  7. Star operations and Pullbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Marco; Park, Mi Hee

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the star operations on a pullback of integral domains. In particular, we characterize the star operations of a domain arising from a pullback of ``a general type'' by introducing new techniques for ``projecting'' and ``lifting'' star operations under surjective homomorphisms of integral domains. We study the transfer in a pullback (or with respect to a surjective homomorphism) of some relevant classes or distinguished properties of star operations such as $v-, t-, w-, b...

  8. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  9. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  10. Magnetism in massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrichs, H.F.

    2012-01-01

    Stars with mass more than 8 solar masses end their lives as neutron stars, which we mostly observe as highly magnetized objects. Where does this magnetic field come from? Such a field could be formed during the collapse, or is a (modified) remnant of a fossil field since the birth of the star, or ot

  11. Managing the star performer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas.

  12. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  13. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  14. To rescue a star

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Massless neutrinos are exchanged in a neutron star, leading to long range interactions. Many body forces of this type follow and we resum them. Their net contribution to the total energy is negligible as compared to the star mass. The stability of the star is not in danger, contrary to recent assertions.

  15. A Statistical Reconstruction of the Planet Population Around Kepler Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Silburt, Ari; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-01-01

    Using the most recent Kepler catalog, we reconstruct the occurrence rate of small (Neptune-sized or below) planets as a function of orbital period and planet radius, taking careful account of various detection biases. We analyze a sample of $76,000$ Sun-like stars and their associated planet candidates with periods between $20$ and $200$ days, and sizes between $1$ and $4 R_\\oplus$. Such planets have likely experienced little photoevaporation, and may reflect the "primordial" planet population. Assuming that the size distribution of planets are independent of their orbital periods (and vice versa), we conclude that Kepler planets are preferentially peaked at $2-2.8 R_\\oplus$, with their numbers decreasing gradually toward smaller sizes. These planets are found roughly uniformly in logarithmic period. The average number of planets per star, in the stated period and size ranges, is $0.46 \\pm 0.03$. This number rises by $\\sim 0.2$ if one includes planets inward of $20$ days. Upon extrapolation we obtain an occur...

  16. The Age and Distance of the Kepler Open Cluster NGC 6811 from an Eclipsing Binary, Turnoff Star Pulsation, and Giant Asteroseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Sandquist, Eric L; Shetrone, Matthew D; Brogaard, Karsten; Meibom, Soren; Leitner, Marika; Stello, Dennis; Bruntt, Hans; Antoci, Victoria; Orosz, Jerome A; Grundahl, Frank; Frandsen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of an eccentric, partially eclipsing long-period ($P=19.23$ d) binary system KIC 9777062 that contains main sequence stars near the turnoff of the intermediate age open cluster NGC 6811. The primary is a metal-lined Am star with a possible convective blueshift to its radial velocities, and one star (probably the secondary) is likely to be a $\\gamma$ Dor pulsator. The component masses are $1.603\\pm0.006$(stat.)$\\pm0.016$(sys.) and $1.419\\pm0.003\\pm0.008 M_\\odot$, and the radii are $1.744\\pm0.004\\pm0.002$ and $1.544\\pm0.002\\pm0.002 R_\\odot$. The isochrone ages of the stars are mildly inconsistent: the age from the mass-radius combination for the primary ($1.05\\pm0.05\\pm0.09$ Gyr, where the last quote was systematic uncertainty from models and metallicity) is smaller than that from the secondary ($1.21\\pm0.05\\pm0.15$ Gyr) and is consistent with the inference from the color-magnitude diagram ($1.00\\pm0.05$ Gyr). We have improved the measurements of the asteroseismic parameters $\\Delta \

  17. Determinación de la tenacidad a la fractura de muestras de Acero 45 fundido, empleando las correlaciones entre el KIC y la energía de impacto medida en el ensayo de Charpy. // Determination of the fracture tenacity of cast Steel grade 45 samples, using th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ramos Morales

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se determinan los valores de tenacidad a la fractura (KIC de muestras de Acero 45 fundido,empleando las correlaciones entre la tenacidad a la fractura y la energía de impacto (CVN obtenida del ensayo de Charpy.Se hace una discusión sobre las correlaciones que más se ajustan en la región de transición y en upper shelf. Se comparanlos valores obtenidos de estas correlaciones a valores de tenacidad a la fractura establecidos en la literatura.Palabras claves: Fractura, energía de impacto, acero fundido.______________________________________________________________________________Abstract.In this paper, the values of fracture toughness (KIC are determined on specimens of cast steel grade 45, using thecorrelations among the fracture toughness (KIC and the impact energy (CVN obtained from a Charpy test. A discussion ismade on the correlations that are better adjusted in the transition region and in upper shelf region. The obtained values arecompared from these correlations to values of fracture toughness (KIC settled down in the literature.Key words. Fracture, impact energy, cast steel.

  18. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most elements are synthesized, or ""cooked"", by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The newly formed elements are released into the interstellar medium during a star's lifetime, and are subsequently incorporated into a new generation of stars, into the planets that form around the stars, and into the life forms that originate on the planets. Moreover, the energy we depend on for life originates from nuclear reactions that occur at the center of the Sun. Synthesis of the elements and nuclear energy production in stars are the topics of nuclear astrophysics, which is the subject of this book

  19. Magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    CERN Document Server

    Schöller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemically peculiar (CP) stars are main-sequence A and B stars with abnormally strong or weak lines for certain elements. They generally have magnetic fields and all observables tend to vary with the same period. Chemically peculiar stars provide a wealth of information; they are natural atomic and magnetic laboratories. After a brief historical overview, we discuss the general properties of the magnetic fields in CP stars, describe the oblique rotator model, explain the dependence of the magnetic field strength on the rotation, and concentrate at the end on HgMn stars.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High quality Spitzer/MIPS obs. of F4-K2 stars (Sierchio+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierchio, J. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gaspar, A.

    2016-11-01

    We used specific criteria to draw samples of stars from the entire Spitzer Debris Disk Database (see section 2.1.1). V magnitudes were taken from Hipparcos and transformed to Johnson V. All stars were also required to have observations on the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) Ks system. Additional measurements were obtained at SAAO on the 0.75m telescope using the MarkII Infrared Photometer (transformed as described by Koen et al. 2007MNRAS.380.1433K), and at the Steward Observatory 61 in telescope using a NICMOS2-based camera with a 2MASS filter set and a neutral density filter to avoid saturation. These measurements will be described in a forthcoming paper (K. Y. L. Su et al., in preparation). The original programs in which our sample stars were measured are identified in Table 1. A large majority (93%) come from seven Spitzer programs: (1) the MIPS Guaranteed Time Observer (GTO) Sun-like star observations (Trilling+ 2008ApJ...674.1086T); (2) Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS; Meyer+ 2006, J/PASP/118/1690); (3) Completing the Census of Debris Disks (Koerner+ 2010ApJ...710L..26K); (4) potential Space Interferometry Mission/Terrestrial Planet Finder (SIM/TPF) targets (Beichman+ 2006ApJ...652.1674B); (5) an unbiased sample of F-stars (Trilling+ 2008ApJ...674.1086T); and (6) two coordinated programs selecting stars on the basis of indicators of youth (Low+ 2005ApJ...631.1170L; Plavchan+ 2009ApJ...698.1068P). See section 2.1.2. (1 data file).

  1. THE FIRST STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Whalen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pop III stars are the key to the character of primeval galaxies, the first heavy elements, the onset of cosmological reionization, and the seeds of supermassive black holes. Unfortunately, in spite of their increasing sophistication, numerical models of Pop III star formation cannot yet predict the masses of the first stars. Because they also lie at the edge of the observable universe, individual Pop III stars will remain beyond the reach of observatories for decades to come, and so their properties are unknown. However, it will soon be possible to constrain their masses by direct detection of their supernovae, and by reconciling their nucleosynthetic yields to the chemical abundances measured in ancient metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo, some of which may bear the ashes of the first stars. Here, I review the state of the art in numerical simulations of primordial stars and attempts to directly and indirectly constrain their properties.

  2. The EBLM project. III. A Saturn-size low-mass star at the hydrogen-burning limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Boetticher, Alexander; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Queloz, Didier; Gill, Sam; Lendl, Monika; Delrez, Laetitia; Anderson, David R.; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Faedi, Francesca; Gillon, Michaël; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Hebb, Leslie; Hellier, Coel; Jehin, Emmanuël; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Martin, David V.; Pepe, Francesco; Pollacco, Don; Ségransan, Damien; Smalley, Barry; Udry, Stéphane; West, Richard

    2017-08-01

    We report the discovery of an eclipsing binary system with mass-ratio q ˜ 0.07. After identifying a periodic photometric signal received by WASP, we obtained CORALIE spectroscopic radial velocities and follow-up light curves with the Euler and TRAPPIST telescopes. From a joint fit of these data we determine that EBLM J0555-57 consists of a sun-like primary star that is eclipsed by a low-mass companion, on a weakly eccentric 7.8-day orbit. Using a mass estimate for the primary star derived from stellar models, we determine a companion mass of 85 ± 4 MJup (0.081 M⊙) and a radius of 0.84+ 0.14-0.04RJup (0.084 R⊙) that is comparable to that of Saturn. EBLM J0555-57Ab has a surface gravity log g2 =5.50+ 0.03-0.13 and is one of the densest non-stellar-remnant objects currently known. These measurements are consistent with models of low-mass stars. The photometry tables and radial velocities are only available at the CDS and on demand via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/L6

  3. HATS-18b: An Extreme Short-period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18b: a 1.980+/- 0.077 {M}{{J}}, {1.337}-0.049+0.102 {R}{{J}} planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037+/- 0.047 {M}⊙ and radius {1.020}-0.031+0.057 {R}⊙ ) with V=14.067+/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range of 6.5≲ {{log}}10({Q}* /{k}2)≲ 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star-planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic, or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  4. Multiplicity of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Preibisch, T; Zinnecker, H; Preibisch, Thomas; Weigelt, Gerd; Zinnecker, Hans

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the observed multiplicity of massive stars and implications on theories of massive star formation. After a short summary of the literature on massive star multiplicity, we focus on the O- and B-type stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster, which constitute a homogenous sample of very young massive stars. 13 of these stars have recently been the targets of a bispectrum speckle interferometry survey for companions. Considering the visual and also the known spectroscopic companions of these stars, the total number of companions is at least 14. Extrapolation with correction for the unresolved systems suggests that there are at least 1.5 and perhaps as much as 4 companions per primary star on average. This number is clearly higher than the mean number of about 0.5 companions per primary star found for the low-mass stars in the general field population and also in the Orion Nebula cluster. This suggests that a different mechanism is at work in the formation of high-mass multiple systems in the dense Orion Nebu...

  5. Star Clusters within FIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  6. Dark stars: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  7. Dark stars: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  8. Star-Branched Polymers (Star Polymers)

    KAUST Repository

    Hirao, Akira

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis of well-defined regular and asymmetric mixed arm (hereinafter miktoarm) star-branched polymers by the living anionic polymerization is reviewed in this chapter. In particular, much attention is being devoted to the synthetic development of miktoarm star polymers since 2000. At the present time, the almost all types of multiarmed and multicomponent miktoarm star polymers have become feasible by using recently developed iterative strategy. For example, the following well-defined stars have been successfully synthesized: 3-arm ABC, 4-arm ABCD, 5-arm ABCDE, 6-arm ABCDEF, 7-arm ABCDEFG, 6-arm ABC, 9-arm ABC, 12-arm ABC, 13-arm ABCD, 9-arm AB, 17-arm AB, 33-arm AB, 7-arm ABC, 15-arm ABCD, and 31-arm ABCDE miktoarm star polymers, most of which are quite new and difficult to synthesize by the end of the 1990s. Several new specialty functional star polymers composed of vinyl polymer segments and rigid rodlike poly(acetylene) arms, helical polypeptide, or helical poly(hexyl isocyanate) arms are introduced.

  9. Touchstone Stars: Highlights from the Cool Stars 18 Splinter Session

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Boyajian, Tabetha; Gaidos, Eric; von Braun, Kaspar; Feiden, Gregory A; Metcalfe, Travis; Swift, Jonathan J; Curtis, Jason L; Deacon, Niall R; Filippazzo, Joseph C; Gillen, Ed; Hejazi, Neda; Newton, Elisabeth R

    2014-01-01

    We present a summary of the splinter session on "touchstone stars" -- stars with directly measured parameters -- that was organized as part of the Cool Stars 18 conference. We discuss several methods to precisely determine cool star properties such as masses and radii from eclipsing binaries, and radii and effective temperatures from interferometry. We highlight recent results in identifying and measuring parameters for touchstone stars, and ongoing efforts to use touchstone stars to determine parameters for other stars. We conclude by comparing the results of touchstone stars with cool star models, noting some unusual patterns in the differences.

  10. STAR in CTO PCI: When is STAR not a star?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Ravi S; Dean, Larry S

    2016-04-01

    Subintimal tracking and reentry (STAR) has been used as a bailout strategy and involves an uncontrolled dissection and recanalization into the distal lumen to reestablish vessel patency. In the current study, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow < 3 was the only variable which they found to be significantly associated with restenosis and reocclusion after stent placement. It may be reasonable to consider second generation drug eluting stent placement in patients receiving STAR that have TIMI 3 flow, however, this should only be done if there is no compromise of major side branches. If unsure, we recommend to perform balloon angioplasty without stenting. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The First Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  12. Strange nonchaotic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, John F; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-01-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  13. KIC 8462852: THE INFRARED FLUX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marengo, Massimo; Hulsebus, Alan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Willis, Sarah [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We analyzed the warm Spitzer/IRAC data of KIC 8462852. We found no evidence of infrared excess at 3.6 μm and a small excess of 0.43 ± 0.18 mJy at 4.5 μm below the 3σ threshold necessary to claim a detection. The lack of strong infrared excess 2 years after the events responsible for the unusual light curve observed by Kepler further disfavors the scenarios involving a catastrophic collision in a KIC 8462852 asteroid belt, a giant impact disrupting a planet in the system or a population of dust-enshrouded planetesimals. The scenario invoking the fragmentation of a family of comets on a highly elliptical orbit is instead consistent with the lack of strong infrared excess found by our analysis.

  14. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  15. ENERGY STAR Unit Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These quarterly Federal Fiscal Year performance reports track the ENERGY STAR qualified HOME units that Participating Jurisdictions record in HUD's Integrated...

  16. Horizontal Branch stars as AmFm/HgMn stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations and models for horizontal branch stars are briefly described and compared to models for AmFm stars. The limitations of those models are emphasized by a comparison to observations and models for HgMn stars.

  17. Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Sculpture of gas and dust hi-res Size hi-res: 125 Kb Credits: ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust The so-called Cat's Eye Nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543 and seen here in this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space. A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes. Hubble first revealed NGC 6543's surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas in 1994. This new image, taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), reveals the full beauty of a bull's-eye pattern of eleven or more concentric rings, or shells, around the Cat’s Eye. Each ‘ring’ is actually the edge of a spherical bubble seen projected onto the sky - which is why it appears bright along its outer edge. High resolution version (JPG format) 125 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 2569 Kb Acknowledgment: R. Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) and Z. Tsvetanov (NASA). Sculpture of gas and dust hi-res Size hi-res: 287 Kb Credits: Nordic Optical Telescope and Romano Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust An enormous but extremely faint halo of gaseous material surrounds the Cat’s Eye Nebula and is over three light-years across. Some planetary nebulae been found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material ejected during earlier active episodes in the star's evolution - most likely some 50 000 to 90 000 years ago. This image was taken by Romano Corradi with the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The image is constructed from two narrow-band exposures showing oxygen atoms (1800 seconds, in blue) and nitrogen atoms (1800 seconds, in red). High resolution version (JPG

  18. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Temporally- and Spectrally-Resolved Irradiance from Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Youngblood, Allison; Linsky, Jeffrey; MUSCLES Treasury Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to near-UV; 5 - 3200 Ang) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential "biomarker" gases. It has been shown that the atmospheric signatures of potentially habitable planets around low-mass stars may be significantly different from planets orbiting Sun-like stars owing to the different UV spectral energy distribution. I will present results from a panchromatic survey (Hubble/Chandra/XMM/optical) of M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts, the MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems). We reconstruct the Lyman-alpha and extreme-UV (100-900 Ang) radiation lost to interstellar attenuation and create 5 Angstrom to 5 micron stellar irradiance spectra; these data will be publically available as a High-Level Science Product on MAST. We find that all low-mass exoplanet host stars exhibit significant chromospheric/transition region/coronal emission -- no "UV inactive" M dwarfs are observed. The F(far-UV)/F(near-UV) flux ratio, a driver for possible abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, increases by ~3 orders of magnitude as the habitable zone moves inward from 1 to 0.1 AU, while the incident far-UV (912 - 1700 Ang) and XUV (5 - 900 Ang) radiation field strengths decrease by factors of a few across this range. Far-UV flare activity is common in 'optically inactive' M dwarfs; statistics from the entire sample indicate that large UV flares (E(300 - 1700 Ang) >= 10^31 erg) occur several times per day on typical M dwarf exoplanet hosts.

  19. The Impact of Stars on Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    . The black dotted line shows how the critical semimajor axis for stability evolves with time as the planet loses mass. [Yang et al. 2016]Yang and collaborators find that the photoevaporation process has a critical impact on whether or not the moons remain in stable orbits. As the photoevaporation drives mass loss of the planet, the planets gravitational influence shrinks and the orbits of its exomoons expand and become more eccentric. Eventually these orbits can reach critical values where theyre no longer stable, often resulting in systems with only one or no surviving moons.The team finds that even in the best-case scenario of only small moons, no more than roughly a quarter of them survive the simulation still in orbit around their planet. In simulations that include larger moons further out, the system is even more likely to become unstable as the planet loses mass, with more moons ultimately escaping.What happens to the moons that escape? Some leave the planetmoon system to become planet-like objects that remain in orbit around the host star. Others are smashed to bits when they collide with other moons or with the planet. And some can even escape their entire solar system to become a free-floating object in the galaxy!Based on their simulations, the authors speculate that exomoons are less common around planets that are close to their host stars (0.1 AU). Furthermore, exomoons are likely less common in solar systems around especially X-ray-luminous stars (e.g., M dwarfs) that can more easily drive photoevaporation. For these reasons, our best chances for finding exomoons in future missions will be aroundstars that are more Sun-like, orbitingplanets that arent too close to their hosts.CitationMing Yang et al 2016 ApJ 833 7. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/833/1/7

  20. Star Trek in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes specific educational programs for using the Star Trek TV program from kindergarten through college. For each grade level lesson plans, ideas for incorporating Star Trek into future classes, and reports of specific programs utilizing Star Trek are provided. (SL)

  1. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  2. Hybrid stars that masquerade as neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Paris; Mark Alford; Matt Braby; Sanjay Reddy

    2004-11-01

    We show that a hybrid (nuclear + quark matter) star can have a mass-radius relationship very similar to that predicted for a star made of purely nucleonic matter. We show this for a generic parameterization of the quark matter equation of state, and also for an MIT bag model, each including a phenomenological correction based on gluonic corrections to the equation of state. We obtain hybrid stars as heavy as 2 M{sub solar} for reasonable values of the bag model parameters. For nuclear matter, we use the equation of state calculated by Akmal, Pandharipande, and Ravenhall using many-body techniques. Both mixed and homogeneous phases of nuclear and quark matter are considered.

  3. 2M1938+4603: A rich, multimode pulsating sdB star with an eclipsing dM companion observed with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Østensen, R H; Bloemen, S; Marsh, T R; Laird, J B; Morris, M; Moriyama, E; Oreiro, R; Reed, M D; Kawaler, S D; Aerts, C; Vuckovic, M; Degroote, P; Telting, J H; Kjeldsen, H; Gilliland, R L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Borucki, W J; Koch, D

    2010-01-01

    2M1938+4603 (KIC 9472174) displays a spectacular light curve dominated by a strong reflection effect and rather shallow, grazing eclipses. The orbital period is 0.126 days, the second longest period yet found for an eclipsing sdB+dM, but still close to the minimum 0.1-d period among such systems. The phase-folded light curve was used to detrend the orbital effects from the dataset, and the resulting amplitude spectrum shows a rich collection of pulsation peaks spanning frequencies from ~50 to 4500 uHz. The presence of a complex pulsation spectrum in both the p-mode and the g-mode regions has never been seen before in a compact pulsator. Eclipsing sdB+dM stars are very rare, with only seven systems known and only one with a pulsating primary. Pulsating stars in eclipsing binaries are especially important since they permit masses derived from seismological model fits to be cross checked with orbital mass constraints. We present a first analysis of this star based on the Kepler 9.7-day commissioning light curve ...

  4. PAHs and star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Peeters, E; Bakes, ELO; Spoon, HWW; Hony, S; Johnstone, D; Adams, FC; Lin, DNC; Neufeld, DA; Ostriker, EC

    2004-01-01

    Strong IR emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 mum are a common characteristic of regions of massive star formation. These features are carried by large (similar to 50 C-atom) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules which are pumped by the strong FUV photon flux from these stars. Thes

  5. Observing Double Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  6. How do stars form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscharnuter, W. M.

    1980-02-01

    Modes and model concept of star formation are reviewed, beginning with the theory of Kant (1755), via Newton's exact mathematical formulation of the laws of motion, his recognition of the universal validity of general gravitation, to modern concepts and hypotheses. Axisymmetric and spherically symmetric collapse models are discussed, and the origin of double and multiple star systems is examined.

  7. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  8. Mira Symbiotic Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Liang Lü; Chun-Hua Zhu; Zhan-Wen Han

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed study of Mira symbiotic stars by means of a population synthesis code. We estimate the number of Mira symbiotic stars in the Galaxy as 1700 - 3100 and the Galactic occurrence rate of Mira symbiotic novae as from ~ 0.9 to 6.0 yr-1,depending on the model assumptions. The distributions of the orbital periods, the masses of the components, mass-loss rates of cool components, mass-accretion rates of hot components and Mira pulsation periods in Mira symbiotic stars are simulated. By a comparison of the number ratio of Mira symbiotic stars to all symbiotic stars, we find the model with the stellar wind model of Winters et al. to be reasonable.

  9. Revised Anatomy of Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dubin, M; Dubin, Maurice; Soberman, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    Stars accrete near invisible hydrogen dominated agglomerates. This population, the `dark matter,' effects the nature of stars. Measurements show plasma streams impacting Earth, planets, Sun and stars. This mass-energy source contradicts nebula collapse model for stars. The visual derived model, to which later discoveries (e.g., fusion) were appended, is confounded and contradicted by new observations. Discovery of a quantity of beryllium 7 (53 day half-life) in the Earth's upper atmosphere, fusion produced, hence from the solar outer zone, proves core fusion wrong. Magnetically pinched plasmas from aggregates impact stars at hundreds of km/s, create impulsive conditions for nuclear explosions below the surface. Disks with planets aid cluster capture. Planets modulate the influx varying fusion, hence luminosity (e.g., solar cycle). This population, with no assumptions or ad hoc physics, explains mysterious phenomena, e.g., luminosity/wind variation, sunspots, high temperature corona, CMEs, etc. Standard explan...

  10. The Carbon Star Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Robert F.

    2000-06-01

    The atmospheres of many stars have chemical compositions that are significantly different from that of the interstellar medium from which they are formed. This symposium considered all kinds of late-type stars showing altered compositions, the carbon stars being simply the best-known of these. All stages of stellar evolution from the main sequence to the ejection of a planetary nebula were considered, with emphasis on the changes that occur on the asymptotic giant branch. The spectroscopic properties of the photospheres and circumstellar envelopes of chemically-peculiar red giant stars, their origins via single-star evolution or mass transfer in binary systems, and the methods currently used to study them were all discussed in detail. This volume includes the full texts of papers given orally at the symposium and abstracts of the posters. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/book.htm/0-7923-6347-7

  11. Gaia and Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Udalski, A; Skowron, D M; Skowron, J; Pietrukowicz, P; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Szymański, M K; Kozłowski, S; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Ulaczyk, K; Pawlak, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a comparison of the Gaia DR1 samples of pulsating variable stars - Cepheids and RR Lyrae type - with the OGLE Collection of Variable Stars aiming at the characterization of the Gaia mission performance in the stellar variability domain. Out of 575 Cepheids and 2322 RR Lyrae candidates from the Gaia DR1 samples located in the OGLE footprint in the sky, 559 Cepheids and 2302 RR Lyrae stars are genuine pulsators of these types. The number of misclassified stars is low indicating reliable performance of the Gaia data pipeline. The completeness of the Gaia DR1 samples of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars is at the level of 60-75% as compared to the OGLE Collection dataset. This level of completeness is moderate and may limit the applicability of the Gaia data in many projects.

  12. Ages of young stars

    CERN Document Server

    Soderblom, David R; Jeffries, Rob D; Mamajek, Eric E; Naylor, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Determining the sequence of events in the formation of stars and planetary systems and their time-scales is essential for understanding those processes, yet establishing ages is fundamentally difficult because we lack direct indicators. In this review we discuss the age challenge for young stars, specifically those less than ~100 Myr old. Most age determination methods that we discuss are primarily applicable to groups of stars but can be used to estimate the age of individual objects. A reliable age scale is established above 20 Myr from measurement of the Lithium Depletion Boundary (LDB) in young clusters, and consistency is shown between these ages and those from the upper main sequence and the main sequence turn-off -- if modest core convection and rotation is included in the models of higher-mass stars. Other available methods for age estimation include the kinematics of young groups, placing stars in Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, pulsations and seismology, surface gravity measurement, rotation and activ...

  13. Producing Runaway Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  14. Neutron stars - General review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of star/linear and star/star blends with chemically identical monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, P E [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Facultad de Ciencias, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kosmas, M [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vlahos, C [Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-11-21

    The effects of chain size and architectural asymmetry on the miscibility of blends with chemically identical monomers, differing only in their molecular weight and architecture, are studied via Monte Carlo simulation by using the bond fluctuation model. Namely, we consider blends composed of linear/linear, star/linear and star/star chains. We found that linear/linear blends are more miscible than the corresponding star/star mixtures. In star/linear blends, the increase in the volume fraction of the star chains increases the miscibility. For both star/linear and star/star blends, the miscibility decreases with the increase in star functionality. When we increase the molecular weight of linear chains of star/linear mixtures the miscibility decreases. Our findings are compared with recent analytical and experimental results.

  16. Catch a Star!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus

  17. Hot Subluminous Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  18. Cooling of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorian H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the theoretical basis for modeling the cooling evolution of compact stars starting from Boltzmann equations in curved space-time. We open a discussion on observational verification of different neutron star models by consistent statistics. Particular interest has the question of existence of quark matter deep inside of compact object, which has to have a specific influence on the cooling history of the star. Besides of consideration of several constraints and features of cooling evolution, which are susceptible of being critical for internal structure of hot compact stars we have introduced a method of extraction of the mass distribution of the neutron stars from temperature and age data. The resulting mass distribution has been compared with the one suggested by supernove simulations. This method can be considered as an additional checking tool for the consistency of theoretical modeling of neutron stars. We conclude that the cooling data allowed existence of neutron stars with quark cores even with one-flavor quark matter.

  19. Dense Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure.If the axion mass energy is $mc^2= 10^{-4}$ eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about $10^{-14} M_\\odot$. We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If $mc^2 = 10^{-4}$ eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mas...

  20. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  1. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  2. A Novel Approach for Star Extraction from Star Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGSheng; LIUJian; TIANJinwen; YANGRuijuan

    2005-01-01

    Star acquisition is one of the most timeconsuming routines in star tracker operation. One star Point spread function (PSF) forms a near Gaussian distribution in the star image, the star image can be regarded as 2-D intensity surface, and every pixel is the sampled point. The star cluster grouping is to find the highes tintensity pixel among the PSFs and collect the adjacent pixels and group them. The possible highest intensity pixels are the maximum extremum points of the 2-D intensity surface. To efficiently extract star from the star image, a novel star acquisition approach, which uses the simplified least squares support vector machines regression algorithm to find the optimal intensity surface function and predictthe maximum extremum points, is proposed. Comput erexperiments are carried out for the simulated star images.The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has a lot of advantages, including the high efficiency and good robustness over a wide range of sensor noise.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  4. Nuclear physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Thermonuclear reactions in stars is a major topic in the field of nuclear astrophysics, and deals with the topics of how precisely stars generate their energy through nuclear reactions, and how these nuclear reactions create the elements the stars, planets and - ultimately - we humans consist of. The present book treats these topics in detail. It also presents the nuclear reaction and structure theory, thermonuclear reaction rate formalism and stellar nucleosynthesis. The topics are discussed in a coherent way, enabling the reader to grasp their interconnections intuitively. The book serves bo

  5. Entropy Production of Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M. Martyushev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The entropy production (inside the volume bounded by a photosphere of main-sequence stars, subgiants, giants, and supergiants is calculated based on B–V photometry data. A non-linear inverse relationship of thermodynamic fluxes and forces as well as an almost constant specific (per volume entropy production of main-sequence stars (for 95% of stars, this quantity lies within 0.5 to 2.2 of the corresponding solar magnitude is found. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of known extreme principles related to entropy production.

  6. The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey. V. Discovery of an Old and Cold Benchmark T-dwarf Orbiting the Nearby G-star HD 19467

    CERN Document Server

    Crepp, Justin R; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Brewer, John; Fischer, Debra A; Wright, Jason T; Isaacson, Howard

    2013-01-01

    The nearby Sun-like star HD 19467 shows a subtle radial velocity (RV) acceleration of -1.37+/-0.09 m/s/yr over an 16.9 year time baseline (an RV trend), hinting at the existence of a distant orbiting companion. We have obtained high-contrast adaptive optics images of the star using NIRC2 at Keck Observatory and report the direct detection of the body that causes the acceleration. The companion, HD 19467 B, is dK=12.57+/-0.09 mag fainter than its parent star (contrast ratio of 9.4e-6), has blue colors J-K_s=-0.36+/-0.14 (J-H=-0.29+/-0.15), and is separated by 1.653+/-0.004" (51.1+/-1.0 AU). Follow-up astrometric measurements obtained over an 1.1 year time baseline demonstrate physical association through common parallactic and proper motion. We calculate a firm lower-limit of m>51.9^{+3.6}_{-4.3}Mjup for the companion mass from orbital dynamics using a combination of Doppler observations and imaging. We estimate a model-dependent mass of m=56.7^{+4.6}_{-7.2}Mjup from a gyrochronological age of 4.3^{+1.0}_{-1.2...

  7. On the conversion of neutron stars into quark stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pagliara, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The possible existence of two families of compact stars, neutron stars and quark stars, naturally leads to a scenario in which a conversion process between the two stellar objects occurs with a consequent release of energy of the order of $10^{53}$ erg. We discuss recent hydrodynamical simulations of the burning process and neutrino diffusion simulations of cooling of a newly formed strange star. We also briefly discuss this scenario in connection with recent measurements of masses and radii of compact stars.

  8. Interferometric star tracker Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) proposes to develop a high accuracy version of its interferometric star tracker capable of meeting the milli-arcsecond-level pointing...

  9. Notes on Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of star formation at a level suitable for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in astronomy or physics. The structure of the book is as follows. The first two chapters begin with a discussion of observational techniques, and the basic phenomenology they reveal. The goal is to familiarize students with the basic techniques that will be used throughout, and to provide a common vocabulary for the rest of the book. The next five chapters provide a similar review of the basic physical processes that are important for star formation. Again, the goal is to provide a basis for what follows. The remaining chapters discuss star formation over a variety of scales, starting with the galactic scale and working down to the scales of individual stars and their disks. The book concludes with a brief discussion of the clearing of disks and the transition to planet formation. The book includes five problem sets, complete with solutions.

  10. Spectroscopy among the stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnewisser, G

    1996-06-01

    The space between the stars is not void, but filled with interstellar matter, mainly composed of dust and gas, which gather in large interstellar clouds. In our Galaxy these interstellar clouds are distributed along a thin, but extended layer which basically traces out the spiral distribution of matter: the stars, the gas, and the dust component. Up to the present time more than 100 different molecules have been identified in interstellar molecular clouds. The majority of the interstellar molecules constitute carbon containing organic substances. During the past years, overwhelming evidence has been gathered, mainly through spectroscopic observations, that interstellar molecular clouds provide the birthplaces for stars. In fact detailed high spectral and spatial resolution spectroscopic measurements reveal physical and chemical processes of the intricate star formation process.

  11. Sports Stars Shine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yan

    2012-01-01

    Alive and exciting award ceremony drew the attention of numerous Chinese households on the night of January 15.The most popular Chinese sports stars attended the 2011 CCTV Sports Personality Award Ceremony at the National Indoor Stadium in Beijing.

  12. Temperature of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2016-07-01

    We start with a brief introduction to the historical background in the early pioneering days when the first neutron star thermal evolution calculations predicted the presence of neutron stars hot enough to be observable. We then report on the first detection of neutron star temperatures by ROSAT X-ray satellite, which vindicated the earlier prediction of hot neutron stars. We proceed to present subsequent developments, both in theory and observation, up to today. We then discuss the current status and the future prospect, which will offer useful insight to the understanding of basic properties of ultra-high density matter beyond the nuclear density, such as the possible presence of such exotic particles as pion condensates.

  13. Magnetospheres of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küker, M.

    We study the interaction of line-driven winds from massive stars with the magnetic field rooted in these stars by carrying out numerical simulations using the Nirvana MHD code in 2D in spherical polar coordinates. The code's adaptive mesh refinement feature allows high spatial resolution across the whole simulation box. We study both O and Wolf-Rayet stars for a range of magnetic field strengths from weak to strong as measured by the confinement parameter. For weak fields our simulations show that the initially dipolar field opens up far away from the star and a thin disk-like structure forms in the equatorial plane of the magnetic field. For stronger fields the disk is disrupted close to the stellar surface and closed field lines persist at low latitudes. For very strong fields a pronounced magnetosphere forms where the gas is forced to move along the field lines and eventually falls back to the stellar surface.

  14. Stars resembling the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel de Strobel, G.

    This review is primarily directed to the question whether photometric solar analogues remain such when subjected to detailed spectroscopic analyses and interpreted with the help of internal stucture models. In other words, whether the physical parameters: mass, chemical composition, age (determining effective temperature and luminosity), chromospheric activity, equatorial rotation, lithium abundance, velocity fields etc., we derive from the spectral analysis of a photometric solar analogue, are really close to those of the Sun. We start from 109 photometric solar analogues extracted from different authors. The stars selected had to satisfy three conditions: i) their colour index (B-V) must be contained in the interval: Δ (B-V) = 0.59-0.69, ii) they must possess a trigonometric parallax, iii) they must have undergone a high resolution detailed spectroscopic analysis. First, this review presents photometric and spectrophotometric researches on solar analogues and recalls the pionneering work on these stars by the late Johannes Hardorp. After a brief discussion on low and high resolution spectroscopic researches, a comparison is made between effective temperatures as obtained, directly, from detailed spectral analyses and those obtained, indirectly, from different photometric relations. An interesting point in this review is the discussion on the tantalilizing value of the (B-V)solar of the Sun, and the presentation of a new reliable value of this index. A short restatement of the kinematic properties of the sample of solar analogues is also made. And, finally, the observational ( T eff, M bol) diagram, obtained with 99 of the initially presented 109 analogues, is compared to a theoretical ( T eff, M bol) diagram. This latter has been constructed with a grid of internal structure models for which, (very important for this investigation), the Sun was used as gauge. In analysing the position, with respect to the Sun, of each star we hoped to find a certain number of

  15. Neutron Stars Recent Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Heiselberg, H

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments in neutron star theory and observation are discussed. Based on modern nucleon-nucleon potentials more reliable equations of state for dense nuclear matter have been constructed. Furthermore, phase transitions such as pion, kaon and hyperon condensation, superfluidity and quark matter can occur in cores of neutron stars. Specifically, the nuclear to quark matter phase transition and its mixed phases with intriguing structures is treated. Rotating neutron stars with and without phase transitions are discussed and compared to observed masses, radii and glitches. The observations of possible heavy $\\sim 2M_\\odot$ neutron stars in X-ray binaries and QPO's require relatively stiff equation of states and restrict strong phase transitions to occur at very high nuclear densities only.

  16. Worlds around other stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The possible, though tentative, detection of planetary companions to other stars which may be capable of supporting life as we know it through the use of a new generation of detectors and telescopes, combined with some innovative detection techniques, is discussed. The current view of the origin of the solar system, based on the nebular hypothesis, is discussed as it pertains to the formation of how and where planets form and, hence, how and where to search for them. Both direct methods of search for other planetary systems, which involve detecting reflected light or infrared radiation form the planets themselves, and indirect methods, which involve the scrutinization of a star for signs that it is responding to the gravitational tug of an orbiting planet, are discussed at length. In particular, various methods for detecting minute velocity perturbations of stars are discussed. It is noted that the study of brown dwarfs may also provide clues on the formation of stars and planets.

  17. Catch a Star 2008!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  18. Alkaline broadening in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    De Kertanguy, A

    2015-01-01

    Giving new insight for line broadening theory for atoms with more structure than hydrogen in most stars. Using symbolic software to build precise wave functions corrected for ds;dp quantum defects. The profiles obtained with that approach, have peculiar trends, narrower than hydrogen, all quantum defects used are taken from atomic database topbase. Illustration of stronger effects of ions and electrons on the alkaline profiles, than neutral-neutral collision mechanism. Keywords : Stars: fundamental parameters - Atomic processes - Line: profiles.

  19. Chaotic Star Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives. The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region. The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333. In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  20. The Age and Distance of the Kepler Open Cluster NGC 6811 from an Eclipsing Binary, Turnoff Star Pulsation, and Giant Asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Brogaard, Karsten; Meibom, Søren; Leitner, Marika; Stello, Dennis; Bruntt, Hans; Antoci, Victoria; Orosz, Jerome A.; Grundahl, Frank; Frandsen, Søren

    2016-11-01

    We present the analysis of an eccentric, partially eclipsing long-period (P = 19.23 days) binary system KIC 9777062 that contains main-sequence stars near the turnoff of the intermediate-age open cluster NGC 6811. The primary is a metal-lined Am star with a possible convective blueshift to its radial velocities, and one star (probably the secondary) is likely to be a γ Dor pulsator. The component masses are 1.603 ± 0.006(stat.) ± 0.016(sys.) and 1.419 ± 0.003 ± 0.008 {M}⊙ , and the radii are 1.744 ± 0.004 ± 0.002 and 1.544 ± 0.002 ± 0.002 {R}⊙ . The isochrone ages of the stars are mildly inconsistent: the age from the mass-radius combination for the primary (1.05 ± 0.05 ± 0.09 Gyr, where the last quote was systematic uncertainty from models and metallicity) is smaller than that from the secondary (1.21 ± 0.05 ± 0.15 Gyr) and is consistent with the inference from the color-magnitude diagram (1.00 ± 0.05 Gyr). We have improved the measurements of the asteroseismic parameters Δν and ν max for helium-burning stars in the cluster. The masses of the stars appear to be larger (or alternately, the radii appear to be smaller) than predicted from isochrones using the ages derived from the eclipsing stars. The majority of stars near the cluster turnoff are pulsating stars: we identify a sample of 28 δ Sct, 15 γ Dor, and 5 hybrid types. We used the period-luminosity relation for high-amplitude δ Sct stars to fit the ensemble of the strongest frequencies for the cluster members, finding {(m-M)}V=10.37+/- 0.03. This is larger than most previous determinations, but smaller than values derived from the eclipsing binary (10.47 ± 0.05). Based on observations made with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, and with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by the Nordic

  1. Young Stars with SALT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Adric R.; Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Henry, Todd J.

    2017-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  2. DETERMINING THE AGE OF THE KEPLER OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6819 WITH A NEW TRIPLE SYSTEM AND OTHER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, Lauren N.; Sandquist, Eric L.; Jeffries, Mark W. Jr.; Orosz, Jerome A. [San Diego State University, Department of Astronomy, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    As part of our study of the old (∼2.5 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819 in the Kepler field, we present photometric (Kepler and ground-based BVR{sub C}I{sub C}) and spectroscopic observations of the detached eclipsing binary WOCS 24009 (Auner 665; KIC 5023948) with a short orbital period of 3.6 days. WOCS 24009 is a triple-lined system, and we verify that the brightest star is physically orbiting the eclipsing binary using radial velocities and eclipse timing variations. The eclipsing binary components have masses M{sub B} = 1.090 ± 0.010 M{sub ⊙} and M{sub C} = 1.075 ± 0.013 M{sub ⊙}, and radii R{sub B} = 1.099 ± 0.006 ± 0.005 R{sub ⊙} and R{sub C} = 1.069 ± 0.006 ± 0.013 R{sub ⊙}. The bright non-eclipsing star resides at the cluster turnoff, and ultimately its mass will directly constrain the turnoff mass: our preliminary determination is M{sub A} = 1.251 ± 0.057 M{sub ⊙}. A careful examination of the light curves indicates that the fainter star in the eclipsing binary undergoes a very brief period of total eclipse, which enables us to precisely decompose the light of the three stars and place them in the color–magnitude diagram (CMD). We also present improved analysis of two previously discussed detached eclipsing stars in NGC 6819 (WOCS 40007 and WOCS 23009) en route to a combined determination of the cluster’s distance modulus (m − M){sub V} = 12.38 ± 0.04. Because this paper significantly increases the number of measured stars in the cluster, we can better constrain the age of the CMD to be 2.21 ± 0.10 ± 0.20 Gyr. Additionally, using all measured eclipsing binary star masses and radii, we constrain the age to 2.38 ± 0.05 ± 0.22 Gyr. The quoted uncertainties are estimates of measurement and systematic uncertainties (due to model physics differences and metal content), respectively.

  3. Search for Planetary-mass Companions of the LHB Star eta Corvi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Massimo; Lisse, Carey; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hulsebus, Alan; Sitko, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The nearby sun-like star eta Corvi (F2V, d = 18 pc, age = 1.2 Gyr) has long been known to possess a bright, dusty Kuiper belt that has been recently resolved with Herschel/PACS. In addition to this structure, eta Corvi is one of the rare mature planetary systems to possess also an inner warm belt (~ 3 AU radius), located within the Terrestrial Habitable Zone (TLZ) of this star. Our characterization of this structure, based on Spitzer/IRS and NASA/IRTF SpeX spectral observations, reveals the signature of ice, organics and silicate dust in this warm belt. This supports the hypothesis that eta Corvi is undergoing a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), delivering life-bearing water- and organic-rich material from the Kuiper belt to the TLZ, at roughly the same age as the Solar System?s LHB. For the past four years we have monitored the brightness of eta Corvi?s warm belt with Spitzer/IRAC, finding that its infrared emission has been stable over a multi-year timescale. In 2012 we have also conducted a search for widely separated substellar-mass companions of this star, whose presence as been suggested as a possible trigger for the LHB currently undergoing in the system. This search has led to the identification of three sources with colors and magnitudes consistent with being late-T and Y dwarf companions of this star. We here propose to acquire a new deep roll-subtracted image of the system, 5 years after our first visit, to test for common proper motion of these candidate companions, and determine if any of this sources is physically associated with eta Corvi. A positive identification of a substellar-mass companions (one of which could be a 3-5 MJ planet at ~360 AU from the star) would be a significant step in understanding the processes leading to LHB-like events in a system analogous to the Solar System.

  4. Life Cycle of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper left of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). This true-color picture was taken on March 5, 1999 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  5. Stars, Galaxies and Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief introduction to the basics of stars, galaxies and Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs. In stars, the central pressure and temperature must be high in order to halt the stellar gravitational collapse. High temperature leads to thermonuclear fusion in the stellar core, releasing thereby enormous amount of nuclear energy, making the star shine brilliantly. On the other hand, the QSOs are very bright nuclei lying in the centres of some galaxies. Many of these active galactic nuclei, which appear star-like when observed through a telescope and  whose power output are more than 1011 times that of the Sun, exhibit rapid time variability in their X-ray emissions.  Rapid variability along with the existence of a maximum speed limit, c, provide a strong argument in favour of a compact central engine model for QSOs in which a thick disc of hot gas going around a supermassive blackhole is what makes a QSO appear like a bright point source. Hence, unlike stars, QSOs are powered by gravitational potential energy.

  6. Hot subluminous stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heber, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich vs. He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters omega Cen and NGC~2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope phase of evolution.They provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet purely understood phase of stellar evolution. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW~Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the pulsator V391 ...

  7. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  8. Dark Stars: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The curre...

  9. Young Stars with SALT

    CERN Document Server

    Riedel, Adric R; Rice, Emily L; Cruz, Kelle L; Henry, Todd J

    2016-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT), we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, Lithium 6708\\AA, and Potassium 7699\\AA~equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 parsecs of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, nine members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find fourteen young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star syst...

  10. Stars a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    King, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Stars: A Very Short Introduction looks at how stars live, producing all the chemical elements beyond helium, and how they die, leaving remnants such as black holes. Every atom of our bodies has been part of a star. Our very own star, the Sun, is crucial to the development and sustainability of life on Earth. Understanding stars is key to understanding the galaxies they inhabit, the existence of planets, and the history of our entire Universe. This VSI explores the science of stars, the mechanisms that allow them to form, the processes that allow them to shine, and the results of their death.

  11. Orbital properties of an unusually low-mass sdB star in a close binary system with a white dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Silvotti, R; Bloemen, S; Telting, J H; Heber, U; Oreiro, R; Reed, M D; Farris, L E; O'Toole, S J; Lanteri, L; Degroote, P; Hu, H; Baran, A S; Hermes, J J; Althaus, L G; Marsh, T R; Charpinet, S; Li, J; Morris, R L; Sanderfer, D T

    2012-01-01

    We have used 605 days of photometric data from the Kepler spacecraft to study KIC 6614501, a close binary system with an orbital period of 0.15749747(25) days (3.779939 hours), that consists of a low-mass subdwarf B (sdB) star and a white dwarf. As seen in many other similar systems, the gravitational field of the white dwarf produces an ellipsoidal deformation of the sdB which appears in the light curve as a modulation at two times the orbital frequency. The ellipsoidal deformation of the sdB implies that the system has a maximum inclination of \\sim40 degrees, with i \\approx 20\\degrees being the most likely. The orbital radial velocity of the sdB star is high enough to produce a Doppler beaming effect with an amplitude of 432 \\pm 5 ppm, clearly visible in the folded light curve. The photometric amplitude that we obtain, K1 = 85.8 km/s, is \\sim 12 per cent less than the spectroscopic RV amplitude of 97.2 \\pm 2.0 km/s. The discrepancy is due to the photometric contamination from a close object at about 5 arcse...

  12. Dynamical Boson Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Liebling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of stable, localized bundles of energy has strong appeal as a model for particles. In the 1950s, John Wheeler envisioned such bundles as smooth configurations of electromagnetic energy that he called geons, but none were found. Instead, particle-like solutions were found in the late 1960s with the addition of a scalar field, and these were given the name boson stars. Since then, boson stars find use in a wide variety of models as sources of dark matter, as black hole mimickers, in simple models of binary systems, and as a tool in finding black holes in higher dimensions with only a single Killing vector. We discuss important varieties of boson stars, their dynamic properties, and some of their uses, concentrating on recent efforts.

  13. Collapse of axion stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  14. Carbon neutron star atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Pavlov, G G; Werner, K

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars is limited in particular by uncertainties in chemical composition of their atmospheres. For example, atmospheres of thermally - emitting neutron stars in supernova remnants might have exotic chemical compositions, and for one of them, the neutron star in CasA, a pure carbon atmosphere has recently been suggested by Ho & Heinke (2009). To test such a composition for other similar sources, a publicly available detailed grid of carbon model atmosphere spectra is needed. We have computed such a grid using the standard LTE approximation and assuming that the magnetic field does not exceed 10^8 G. The opacities and pressure ionization effects are calculated using the Opacity Project approach. We describe the properties of our models and investigate the impact of the adopted assumptions and approximations on the emergent spectra.

  15. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  16. Giant star seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Hekker, S

    2016-01-01

    The internal properties of stars in the red-giant phase undergo significant changes on relatively short timescales. Long near-interrupted high-precision photometric timeseries observations from dedicated space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler have provided seismic inferences of the global and internal properties of a large number of evolved stars, including red giants. These inferences are confronted with predictions from theoretical models to improve our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. Our knowledge and understanding of red giants have indeed increased tremendously using these seismic inferences, and we anticipate that more information is still hidden in the data. Unraveling this will further improve our understanding of stellar evolution. This will also have significant impact on our knowledge of the Milky Way Galaxy as well as on exo-planet host stars. The latter is important for our understanding of the formation and structure of planetary systems.

  17. Uniformly rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review the recent results on the equilibrium configurations of static and uniformly rotating neutron stars within the Hartle formalism. We start from the Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations formulated and extended by Belvedere et al. (2012, 2014). We demonstrate how to conduct numerical integration of these equations for different central densities ${\\it \\rho}_c$ and angular velocities $\\Omega$ and compute the static $M^{stat}$ and rotating $M^{rot}$ masses, polar $R_p$ and equatorial $R_{\\rm eq}$ radii, eccentricity $\\epsilon$, moment of inertia $I$, angular momentum $J$, as well as the quadrupole moment $Q$ of the rotating configurations. In order to fulfill the stability criteria of rotating neutron stars we take into considerations the Keplerian mass-shedding limit and the axisymmetric secular instability. Furthermore, we construct the novel mass-radius relations, calculate the maximum mass and minimum rotation periods (maximum frequencies) of neutron stars. Eventually, we compare a...

  18. Collapse of axion stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States); Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L.C.R. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  19. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  20. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  1. A search for nearby young stars among the flare stars

    CERN Document Server

    König, B; Hambaryan, V; Neuh\\"auser, Ralph; Hambaryan, Valeri

    2001-01-01

    Flare stars were discovered in the late 1940s in the solar vicinity and were named UV Cet-type variables (classical FSs). Among the FSs within 100 pc we search for young stars. For the search we take spectra with sufficient resolution to resolve Lithium at 6707 \\AA and Calcium at 6718 \\AA of all the stars. The real young stars are prime targets for the search of extra-solar planets by direct imaging.

  2. Really Hot Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  3. American Urban Star Fest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmino, John

    2003-12-01

    Over the last couple of decades New York City implemented, and continues to carry out, several schemes of eradicating luminous graffiti. One result has been the gradual recovery of the natural night sky. By 1994 the normal clear sky transparency over Manhattan deepened to fourth magnitude and has been slowly creeping deeper, until in 2002 it is at magnitude 4 to 4.5. In the spring of 1995, during some lazing on a Manhattan rooftop under a sky full of stars, several New York astronomers hatched the idea of letting the whole people celebrate the renewed starry sky. In due course they, through the Amateur Astronomers Association, engaged the New York City Parks Department and the Urban Park Rangers in an evening of quiet picnicking to enjoy the stars in their natural sky. Thus the Urban Star Fest was born. The event thrilled about 3,000 visitors in Central Park's Sheep Meadow on Saturday 30 September 1995. This year's Fest, the eighth in the series demonstrated the City's upper skyline of stars on Saturday 5 October 2002 to about 2,200 enthused visitors. Although the Fest is always noted as cancelable for inclement weather, so far, it has convened every year, with attendance ranging from 4,000 down to a mere 1,000, this latter being under the smoke plume of the World Trade Center in 2001. Despite this swing in attendance, the American Urban Star Fest is America's largest regularly scheduled public astronomy event. Of course, special occasions, like comets or eclipses, can and do attract far larger interest both in the city and elsewhere. The presentation shows the setup and program of the American Urban Star Fest, to illustrate how the general public can actively become aware of the night sky and see for themselves the result of their very own efforts at removing light pollution--and note where improvement is yet to come.

  4. Morphodynamics of star dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.; Courrech du Pont, S.

    2012-04-01

    Star dunes are among the biggest and the most impressive dunes in Earth sand seas. Nonetheless, they remain poorly studied, probably because of their apparent complexity. They are massive pyramidal dunes with interlaced arms whose slip faces are oriented in various directions. Being large, they can integrate wind properties over a wide range of time scales. Thus, they are observed for wind regimes with multiple directions, and may result from the amalgamation of dunes or from the development of arms on a well-established dune pattern. In both cases, the roles of wind directional variability and secondary flow have been emphasized but not precisely quantified. Here, we report simulations where the star dune shape results from a a combination of longitudinal dunes, which form the star dune arms. These arms may radiate and so interact with the other dunes in the field. This mass exchange, controlled by the morphodynamics of star dunes arms, must play an important role in the large-scale arrangement of star dunes networks. We first demonstrate that star dune arms orientation maximizes the flux in the direction of crests. This is opposed to the usually admit dunes orientation, which maximizes the sediment transport perpendicular to the crest. Indeed, depending on sand availability, dunes development results from the growth of a wave on a sand bed or from a net transport of sediment, which grows and extends an isolated longitudinal dune over a non-erodible soil. These two different mechanisms lead to two different modes of crests orientation. Then, we show that the propagating arms reach a stationary state characterized by constant width, height and growth rate. These are controlled by the frequency at which the wind changes direction. Arm width and height increase, whereas the propagation speed decreases with a decreasing frequency. These morphodynamics properties are helpful to assess from pattern observation the variability of wind directionality over several time

  5. Atmospheres around Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Benz, Willy

    1994-12-01

    Interest in the behavior of atmospheres around neutron stars has grown astronomically in the past few years. Some of this interest arrived in the wake of the explosion of Supernova 1987A and its elusive remnant; spawning renewed interest in a method to insure material ``fall-back'' onto the adolescent neutron star in an effort to transform it into a silent black hole. However, the bulk of the activity with atmospheres around neutron stars is concentrated in stellar models with neutron star, rather than white dwarf, cores; otherwise known as Thorne-Zytkow objects. First a mere seed in the imagination of theorists, Thorne-Zytkow objects have grown into an observational reality with an ever-increasing list of formation scenarios and observational prospects. Unfortunately, the analytic work of Chevalier on supernova fall-back implies that, except for a few cases, the stellar simulations of Thorne-Zytkow objects are missing an important aspect of physics: neutrinos. Neutrino cooling removes the pressure support of these atmospheres, allowing accretion beyond the canonical Eddington rate for these objects. We present here the results of detailed hydrodynamical simulations in one and two dimensions with the additional physical effects of neutrinos, advanced equations of state, and relativity over a range of parameters for our atmosphere including entropy and chemical composition as well as a range in the neutron star size. In agreement with Chevalier, we find, under the current list of formation scenarios, that the creature envisioned by Thorne and Zytkow will not survive the enormous appetite of a neutron star. However, neutrino heating (a physical effect not considered in Chevalier's analysis) can play an important role in creating instabilities in some formation schemes, leading to an expulsion of matter rather than rapid accretion. By placing scrutiny upon the formation methods, we can determine the observational prospects for each.

  6. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    VLT Finds Young, Very Low Mass Objects Are Twice As Heavy As Predicted Summary Thanks to the powerful new high-contrast camera installed at the Very Large Telescope, photos have been obtained of a low-mass companion very close to a star. This has allowed astronomers to measure directly the mass of a young, very low mass object for the first time. The object, more than 100 times fainter than its host star, is still 93 times as massive as Jupiter. And it appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be. This discovery therefore suggests that, due to errors in the models, astronomers may have overestimated the number of young "brown dwarfs" and "free floating" extrasolar planets. PR Photo 03/05: Near-infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion (NACO SDI/VLT) A winning combination A star can be characterised by many parameters. But one is of uttermost importance: its mass. It is the mass of a star that will decide its fate. It is thus no surprise that astronomers are keen to obtain a precise measure of this parameter. This is however not an easy task, especially for the least massive ones, those at the border between stars and brown dwarf objects. Brown dwarfs, or "failed stars", are objects which are up to 75 times more massive than Jupiter, too small for major nuclear fusion processes to have ignited in its interior. To determine the mass of a star, astronomers generally look at the motion of stars in a binary system. And then apply the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth, knowing the distance of the Moon and the time it takes for its satellite to complete one full orbit (the so-called "Kepler's Third Law"). In the same way, they have also measured the mass of the Sun by knowing the Earth-Sun distance and the time - one year - it takes our planet to make a tour around the Sun. The problem with low-mass objects is that they are very faint and will often be hidden in the glare of the brighter star they orbit, also when viewed

  7. HUBBLE PROVIDES 'ONE-TWO PUNCH' TO SEE BIRTH OF STARS IN GALACTIC WRECKAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Two powerful cameras aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope teamed up to capture the final stages in the grand assembly of galaxies. The photograph, taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the revived Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS), shows a tumultuous collision between four galaxies located 1 billion light-years from Earth. The galactic car wreck is creating a torrent of new stars. The tangled up galaxies, called IRAS 19297-0406, are crammed together in the center of the picture. IRAS 19297-0406 is part of a class of galaxies known as ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). ULIRGs are considered the progenitors of massive elliptical galaxies. ULIRGs glow fiercely in infrared light, appearing 100 times brighter than our Milky Way Galaxy. The large amount of dust in these galaxies produces the brilliant infrared glow. The dust is generated by a firestorm of star birth triggered by the collisions. IRAS 19297-0406 is producing about 200 new Sun-like stars every year -- about 100 times more stars than our Milky Way creates. The hotbed of this star formation is the central region [the yellow objects]. This area is swamped in the dust created by the flurry of star formation. The bright blue material surrounding the central region corresponds to the ultraviolet glow of new stars. The ultraviolet light is not obscured by dust. Astronomers believe that this area is creating fewer new stars and therefore not as much dust. The colliding system [yellow and blue regions] has a diameter of about 30,000 light-years, or about half the size of the Milky Way. The tail [faint blue material at left] extends out for another 20,000 light-years. Astronomers used both cameras to witness the flocks of new stars that are forming from the galactic wreckage. NICMOS penetrated the dusty veil that masks the intense star birth in the central region. ACS captured the visible starlight of the colliding system's blue outer region. IRAS 19297-0406 may be

  8. The physics of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, A C

    1999-01-01

    The Physics of Stars, Second Edition, is a concise introduction to the properties of stellar interiors and consequently the structure and evolution of stars. Strongly emphasising the basic physics, simple and uncomplicated theoretical models are used to illustrate clearly the connections between fundamental physics and stellar properties. This text does not intend to be encyclopaedic, rather it tends to focus on the most interesting and important aspects of stellar structure, evolution and nucleosynthesis. In the Second Edition, a new chapter on Helioseismology has been added, along with a list

  9. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  10. Digital Standard Star Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuerry, J. P., Jr.

    The Digital Standard Star Tracker (DSST) is an electro-optical instrument which provides position data used for precise attitude determination. The new DSST design uses flight-proven optical and sensor components from the BASD/NASA Standard Star Tracker (SST) programs while incorporating digital electronics techniques to improve producibility and reliability. This design approach has resulted in a new instrument capable of less than 10 arc second calibrated accuracy with 50 percent of the electrical components and only 10 percent of the electrical assemblies used in the SST.

  11. A Real Shooting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of A Real Shooting Star This artist's animation illustrates a star flying through our galaxy at supersonic speeds, leaving a 13-light-year-long trail of glowing material in its wake. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' sheds material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the long trail of material behind Mira during its survey of the entire sky in ultraviolet light. The animation begins by showing a close-up of Mira -- a red-giant star near the end of its life. Red giants are red in color and extremely bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace our sun, it would engulf everything out to the orbit of Mars. They constantly blow off gas and dust in the form of stellar winds, supplying the galaxy with molecules, such as oxygen and carbon, that will make their way into new solar systems. Our sun will mature into a red giant in about 5 billion years. As the animation pulls out, we can see the enormous trail of material deposited behind Mira as it hurls along between the stars. Like a boat traveling through water, a bow shock, or build up of gas, forms ahead of the star in the direction of its motion. Gas in the bow shock is heated and then mixes with the cool hydrogen gas in the wind that is blowing off Mira. This heated hydrogen gas then flows around behind the star, forming a turbulent wake. Why does the trailing hydrogen gas glow in ultraviolet light? When it is heated, it transitions into a higher-energy state, which then loses energy by emitting ultraviolet light - a process known as fluorescence. Finally, the artist's rendering gives way to the actual ultraviolet image taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Mira is located 350 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cetus, otherwise known as the whale. Coincidentally, Mira and its 'whale of a tail' can be

  12. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  13. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  14. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  15. Evidence of resonant mode coupling and the relationship between low and high frequencies in a rapidly rotating A star

    CERN Document Server

    Breger, Michel

    2014-01-01

    In the theory of resonant mode coupling, the parent and child modes are directly related in frequency and phase. The oscillations present in the fast rotating Delta Scuti star KIC 8054146 allow us to test the most general and generic aspects of such a theory. The only direct way to separate the parent and coupled (child) modes is to examine the correlations in amplitude variability between the different frequencies. For the dominant family of related frequencies, only a single mode and a triplet are the origins of nine dominant frequency peaks ranging from 2.93 to 66.30 cycles per day (as well as dozens of small-amplitude combination modes and a predicted and detected third high-frequency triplet). The mode-coupling model correctly predicts the large amplitude variations of the coupled modes as a product of the amplitudes of the parent modes, while the phase changes are also correctly modeled. This differs from the behavior of 'normal' combination frequencies in that the amplitudes are three orders of magnitu...

  16. ENERGY STAR Certified Imaging Equipment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Imaging Equipment that are effective as of...

  17. ENERGY STAR Certified Water Coolers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Water Coolers that are effective as of February...

  18. ENERGY STAR Certified Vending Machines

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines that are...

  19. ENERGY STAR Certified Water Heaters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Water Heaters that are effective April 16, 2015....

  20. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Dishwashers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Dishwashers that are effective as of...