WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun stars galaxies

  1. The sun, our star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  2. Stars resembling the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel de Strobel, G.

    This review is primarily directed to the question whether photometric solar analogues remain such when subjected to detailed spectroscopic analyses and interpreted with the help of internal stucture models. In other words, whether the physical parameters: mass, chemical composition, age (determining effective temperature and luminosity), chromospheric activity, equatorial rotation, lithium abundance, velocity fields etc., we derive from the spectral analysis of a photometric solar analogue, are really close to those of the Sun. We start from 109 photometric solar analogues extracted from different authors. The stars selected had to satisfy three conditions: i) their colour index (B-V) must be contained in the interval: Δ (B-V) = 0.59-0.69, ii) they must possess a trigonometric parallax, iii) they must have undergone a high resolution detailed spectroscopic analysis. First, this review presents photometric and spectrophotometric researches on solar analogues and recalls the pionneering work on these stars by the late Johannes Hardorp. After a brief discussion on low and high resolution spectroscopic researches, a comparison is made between effective temperatures as obtained, directly, from detailed spectral analyses and those obtained, indirectly, from different photometric relations. An interesting point in this review is the discussion on the tantalilizing value of the (B-V)solar of the Sun, and the presentation of a new reliable value of this index. A short restatement of the kinematic properties of the sample of solar analogues is also made. And, finally, the observational ( T eff, M bol) diagram, obtained with 99 of the initially presented 109 analogues, is compared to a theoretical ( T eff, M bol) diagram. This latter has been constructed with a grid of internal structure models for which, (very important for this investigation), the Sun was used as gauge. In analysing the position, with respect to the Sun, of each star we hoped to find a certain number of

  3. Stars, Galaxies and Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief introduction to the basics of stars, galaxies and Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs. In stars, the central pressure and temperature must be high in order to halt the stellar gravitational collapse. High temperature leads to thermonuclear fusion in the stellar core, releasing thereby enormous amount of nuclear energy, making the star shine brilliantly. On the other hand, the QSOs are very bright nuclei lying in the centres of some galaxies. Many of these active galactic nuclei, which appear star-like when observed through a telescope and  whose power output are more than 1011 times that of the Sun, exhibit rapid time variability in their X-ray emissions.  Rapid variability along with the existence of a maximum speed limit, c, provide a strong argument in favour of a compact central engine model for QSOs in which a thick disc of hot gas going around a supermassive blackhole is what makes a QSO appear like a bright point source. Hence, unlike stars, QSOs are powered by gravitational potential energy.

  4. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  5. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  6. Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, C M; Funes, J G; Ribeiro, M B

    2006-01-01

    We present narrow-band observations of the H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample of 31 satellite orbiting isolated giant spiral galaxies. The sample studied spans the range $-19star formation rates are 0.68 and 3.66 M$_\\sun$ yr$^{-1}$ respectively. Maps of the spatial distribution of ionized gas are presented. The star-forming regions show a rich structure in which frequently discrete complexes are imposed over more diffuse structures. In general, the current star formation rates are smaller that the mean values in the past obtained from the current stellar content; this probably indicates a declining rhythm with time in the generation of new stars. However, the reserve of gas is enough to continue fueling the current levels of star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. Four of the o...

  7. Massive star clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, William E

    2009-01-01

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCSs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GCS research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  8. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  9. Star Formation in MUSCEL Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary star-formation histories for a subset of the low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the MUSCEL (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry, and Evolution of LSB galaxies) program. These histories are fitted against ground-based IFU spectra in tandem with space-based UV and IR photometry. MUSCEL aims to use these histories along with kinematic analyses to determine the physical processes that have caused the evolution of LSB galaxies to diverge from their high surface brightness counterparts.

  10. Cartography of the sun and the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, Coralie

    2016-01-01

    The mapping of the surface of stars requires diverse skills, analysis techniques and advanced modeling, i.e. the collaboration of scientists in various specialties. This volume gives insights into new techniques allowing for the first time to obtain resolved images of stars. It takes stock of what has been achieved so far in Chile, on the ESO VLTI instrument or, in the States, on the CHARA instrument. In recent times interferometry, combined with adaptive optics has allowed to reconstruct images of stars. Besides the Sun (of course) by now five stars have been resolved in detail. In addition to interferometry, this book highlights techniques used for mapping the surfaces of stars using photometry made by space observatories; Zeeman- and Doppler Imaging; mapping the surface element abundances via spectroscopy. This book will also take stock of the best images of the  solar surface, made by connecting the differential rotation to the underlying physical parameters derived from helioseismology. Recent measureme...

  11. Gas, Stars and Star Formation in ALFALFA Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, S; Giovanelli, R; Brinchmann, J; Stierwalt, S; Neff, S G

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and HI components of 229 low HI mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with HI masses < 10^{7.7} M_sun and HI line widths < 80 km s^{-1}. SDSS data are combined with photometric properties derived from GALEX to derive stellar masses (M_*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs) and estimates of their SFRs and M_* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M_* < 10^8 M_sun is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of t...

  12. The Colorful Demise of a Sun-like Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the colorful 'last hurrah' of a star like our Sun. The star is ending its life by casting off its outer layers of gas, which formed a cocoon around the star's remaining core. Ultraviolet light from the dying star makes the material glow. The burned-out star, called a white dwarf, is the white dot in the center. Our Sun will eventually burn out and shroud itself with stellar debris, but not for another 5 billion years. Our Milky Way Galaxy is littered with these stellar relics, called planetary nebulae. The objects have nothing to do with planets. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century astronomers named them planetary nebulae because through small telescopes they resembled the disks of the distant planets Uranus and Neptune. The planetary nebula in this image is called NGC 2440. The white dwarf at the center of NGC 2440 is one of the hottest known, with a surface temperature of nearly 400,000 degrees Fahrenheit (200,000 degrees Celsius). The nebula's chaotic structure suggests that the star shed its mass episodically. During each outburst, the star expelled material in a different direction. This can be seen in the two bow tie-shaped lobes. The nebula also is rich in clouds of dust, some of which form long, dark streaks pointing away from the star. NGC 2440 lies about 4,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Puppis. The image was taken Feb. 6, 2007 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The colors correspond to material expelled by the star. Blue corresponds to helium; blue-green to oxygen; and red to nitrogen and hydrogen.

  13. The faintest star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P

    2003-01-01

    I briefly report on the X-ray detection of 10 radio sub-mJy sources in the 2 Ms Chandra observation of the Hubble Deep Field North region. These sources follow the same radio/X-ray luminosities relation which holds for nearby galaxies. Making use of this relation, X-ray number counts from star forming galaxies are predicted from the deep radio Log N-Log S's.

  14. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casiana Muñoz-Tuñon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is rmly  established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP galaxies, we identied tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample - nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and dicult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the star formation is driven by pristine gas falling into the galaxy disk. If conrmed, we could be unveiling, for the rst time, cool  ows in action in our nearby world. The tadpole class is relatively frequent at high redshift - 10% of resolvable galaxies in the Hubble UDF but less than 1% in the local Universe. They are systems that could track cool ows and test models of galaxy formation.

  15. Observing the Sun with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a space telescope primarily designed to detect high-energy X-rays from faint, distant astrophysical sources. Recently, however, its occasionally been pointing much closer to home, with the goal of solving a few longstanding mysteries about the Sun.Intensity maps from an observation of a quiet-Sun region near the north solar pole and an active region just below the solar limb. The quiet-Sun data will be searched for small flares that could be heating the solar corona, and the high-altitude emission above the limb may provide clues about particle acceleration. [Adapted from Grefenstette et al. 2016]An Unexpected TargetThough we have a small fleet of space telescopes designed to observe the Sun, theres an important gap: until recently, there was no focusing telescope making solar observations in the hard X-ray band (above ~3 keV). Conveniently, there is a tool capable of doing this: NuSTAR.Though NuSTARs primary mission is to observe faint astrophysical X-ray sources, a team of scientists has recently conducted a series of observations in which NuSTAR was temporarily repurposed and turned to focus on the Sun instead.These observations pose an interesting challenge precisely because of NuSTARs extreme sensitivity: pointing at such a nearby, bright source can quickly swamp the detectors. But though the instrument cant be used to observe the bright flares and outbursts from the Sun, its the perfect tool for examining the parts of the Sun weve been unable to explore in hard X-rays before now such as faint flares, or the quiet, inactive solar surface.In a recently published study led by Brian Grefenstette (California Institute of Technology), the team describes the purpose and initial results of NuSTARs first observations of the Sun.Solar MysteriesWhat is NuSTAR hoping to accomplish with its solar observations? There are two main questions that hard X-ray observations may help to answer.How are particles accelerated in

  16. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-16

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no 'metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe.

  17. Star Formation Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunbin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Chung, Haeun; Lee, Gwang-Ho; Park, Changbom; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2017-08-01

    We study the star formation activity of nearby galaxies with bars using a sample of late-type galaxies at 0.02≤slant z≤slant 0.05489 and {M}rmass and redshift distributions similar to barred galaxies. We find that the star formation activity of strongly barred galaxies probed by starburstiness, g-r, {NUV}-r, and mid-infrared [3.4]-[12] colors is, on average, lower than that of non-barred galaxies. However, weakly barred galaxies do not show such a difference between barred and non-barred galaxies. The amounts of atomic and molecular gas in strongly barred galaxies are smaller than those in non-barred galaxies, and the gas metallicity is higher in strongly barred galaxies than in non-barred galaxies. The gas properties of weakly barred galaxies again show no difference from those of non-barred galaxies. We stack the optical spectra of barred and non-barred galaxies in several mass bins and fit to the stacked spectra with a spectral fitting code, STARLIGHT. We find no significant difference in stellar populations between barred and non-barred galaxies for both strongly and weakly barred galaxies. Our results are consistent with the idea that the star formation activity of barred galaxies was enhanced in the past along with significant gas consumption, and is currently lower than or similar to that of non-barred galaxies. The past star formation enhancement depends on the strength of bars.

  18. Stars at Low Metallicity in Dwarf Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Cole, Andrew; Hunt, LK; Madden, S; Schneider, R

    2008-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies offer an opportunity to understand the properties of low metallicity star formation both today and at the earliest times at the, epoch of the formation of the first stars. Here we concentrate on two galaxies in the Local Group: the dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A, which has been the rece

  19. THE CURRENT STAR FORMATION RATE OF K+A GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Danielle M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ridgway, Susan E.; De Propris, Roberto [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Goto, Tomotsugu, E-mail: nielsen@astro.wisc.edu [Dark Cosmology Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2012-12-20

    We derive the stacked 1.4 GHz flux from the FIRST survey for 811 K+A galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. For these objects we find a mean flux density of 56 {+-} 9 {mu}Jy. A similar stack of radio-quiet white dwarfs yields an upper limit of 43 {mu}Jy at a 5{sigma} significance to the flux in blank regions of the sky. This implies an average star formation rate of 1.6 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for K+A galaxies. However, the majority of the signal comes from {approx}4% of K+A fields that have aperture fluxes above the 5{sigma} noise level of the FIRST survey. A stack of the remaining galaxies shows little residual flux consistent with an upper limit on star formation of 1.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Even for a subset of 456 'young' (spectral ages <250 Myr) K+A galaxies, we find that the stacked 1.4 GHz flux is consistent with no current star formation. Our data suggest that the original starburst has been terminated in the majority of K+A galaxies, but that this may represent part of a duty cycle where a fraction of these galaxies may be active at a given moment with dusty starbursts and active galactic nuclei being present.

  20. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra M; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is firmly established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies, we identified tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample- nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and difficult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the ...

  1. Galaxy bachelors, couples, spouses: Star formation in interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Barger, Kathleen; Richstein, Hannah; SDSS-IV/MaNGA

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the star formation activity in three galaxy systems in different stages of interaction to determine how the environment of galaxies affects their star forming ability and potential. These systems include an isolated galaxy, a pair of interacting galaxies, and a pair of merging galaxies. All of the target galaxies in these systems have similar stellar masses and similar radii and are at similar redshifts. We trace the star formation activity over the past 1-2 Gyr using spatially and kinematically resolved H-alpha emission, H-alpha equivalent width, and 4000-Angstrom break maps. This work is based on data from the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV)/Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), and is part of the Project No.0285 in SDSS-IV.

  2. The History of Star Formation in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas M; Calzetti, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    If we are to develop a comprehensive and predictive theory of galaxy formation and evolution, it is essential that we obtain an accurate assessment of how and when galaxies assemble their stellar populations, and how this assembly varies with environment. There is strong observational support for the hierarchical assembly of galaxies, but by definition the dwarf galaxies we see today are not the same as the dwarf galaxies and proto-galaxies that were disrupted during the assembly. Our only insight into those disrupted building blocks comes from sifting through the resolved field populations of the surviving giant galaxies to reconstruct the star formation history, chemical evolution, and kinematics of their various structures. To obtain the detailed distribution of stellar ages and metallicities over the entire life of a galaxy, one needs multi-band photometry reaching solar-luminosity main sequence stars. The Hubble Space Telescope can obtain such data in the outskirts of Local Group galaxies. To perform the...

  3. Star clusters in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of observational studies of the star cluster population in the interacting spiral galaxy M51, also known as the Whirlpool galaxy. Observations taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical and the near-UV are used to determine fundamental properties of the star

  4. Galaxy Zoo Green Peas: Discovery of A Class of Compact Extremely Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cardamone, Carolin N; Sarzi, Marc; Bamford, Steven P; Bennert, Nicola; Urry, C M; Lintott, Chris; Keel, William C; Parejko, John; Nichol, Robert C; Thomas, Daniel; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alex; VandenBerg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate a class of rapidly growing emission line galaxies, known as "Green Peas", first noted by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project because of their peculiar bright green colour and small size, unresolved in SDSS imaging. Their appearance is due to very strong optical emission lines, namely [O III] 5007 A, with an unusually large equivalent width of up to ~1000 A. We discuss a well-defined sample of 251 colour-selected objects, most of which are strongly star forming, although there are some AGN interlopers including 8 newly discovered narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. The star-forming Peas are low mass galaxies (M~10^8.5 - 10^10 M_sun) with high star formation rates (~10 M_sun/yr), low metallicities (log[O/H] + 12 ~ 8.7) and low reddening (E(B-V) < 0.25) and they reside in low density environments. They have some of the highest specific star formation rates (up to ~10^{-8} yr^{-1}) seen in the local Universe, yielding doubling times for their stellar mass of hundreds of Myrs. The few star-forming P...

  5. Star clusters as tracers of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S

    2009-01-01

    Star clusters represent the most common 'mode' of star formation. They are found in all types of environments, cascading down from galaxy groups and merging pairs through starbursts to normal galaxies and dwarves and even isolated regions in extragalactic space. As they maintain a link to the overall star formation in a system, they can be used as tracers of the star formation history of environments located at distances prohibitive to the study of individual stars. This makes them ideally suited to the study of mergers and interactions in galaxy pairs and groups. In this work we present observations of the star cluster populations in the local starburst galaxy M82, post-interaction spiral NGC 6872, the "Antennae" merging pair and two compact groups, "Stephan's Quintet" and HCG 7. In each case, we extract information on the clusters and their hosts using mainly HST photometry and Gemini spectroscopy.

  6. Star formation in Kiso measle galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2012-05-01

    The Kiso sample of several thousand local ultraviolet-bright galaxies includes galaxies classified as irregular disk galaxies with large star-forming complexes (I,g). We selected a sample of all I,g galaxies with both Sloan Digital Sky Survey images and spectra. They contain up to several dozen giant clumps each, so we refer to them as measle galaxies. We determined ages and masses of the clumps based on a comparison of photometry with population synthesis models of cluster evolution. The spectra were used to determine global star formation rates. Several hundred clumps were measured in the sample, with masses ranging from 10^5 to several x10^8 solar masses, scaling with galaxy absolute g magnitude of -14 to -21 mag. The galaxies are starbursting, sitting above the Groth strip “main sequence” of star formation rate versus galaxy mass by an order of magnitude. These Kiso measle galaxies have 10x the star formation rates of the Kiso tadpole galaxies. We compare their clump luminosity distribution functions with normal disk galaxies.

  7. Making Galaxies: One Star at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Tom

    2006-09-18

    In the age of precision cosmology the fundamental parameters of our world model are being measured to unprecedented accuracy. In particular, measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation detail the state of the universe only 400,000 years after the big bang. Unfortunately, we have no direct observational evidence about the following few hundred million years, the so called dark ages. However, we do know from the composition of the highest redshift galaxies that it is there where the earliest and first galaxies are being formed. From a physics point of view these earliest times are much easier to understand and model because the chemical composition of the early gas is simpler and the first galaxies are much smaller than the ones found nearby. The absence of strong magnetic fields, cosmic rays, dust grains and UV radiation fields clearly also helps. The first generation of structure formation is as such a problem extremely well suited for direct ab initio calculations using supercomputers. In this colloquium I will discuss the rich physics of the formation of the first objects as computed via ab initio Eulerian cosmological adaptive mesh refinement calculations. We find the first generation of stars to be massive and to form in isolation with mass between 30 and 300 times the mass of the sun. Remarkably the relevant mass scales can all be understood analytically from the microscopic properties of atomic and molecular hydrogen. The UV radiation from these stars photo-evaporates their parent clouds within their lifetimes contributing significantly to cosmological reionization. Their supernovae distribute the first heavy elements over thousands of light years and enrich the intergalactic medium. As we are beginning to illuminate these earliest phases of galaxy formation many new questions arise and become addressable with our novel numerical techniques. How and where are the earliest magnetic fields made? How do the first super-massive black holes form

  8. Colors, Star formation Rates, and Environments of Star forming and Quiescent Galaxies at the Cosmic Noon

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert; Hopkins, Philip F; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the SFRs, stellar masses, galaxy colors, and dust extinctions of galaxies in massive (10^12.5-10^13.5 M_sun) halos at z~2 in high-resolution, cosmological zoom-in simulations as part of the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. The simulations do not model feedback from AGN but reproduce well the observed relations between stellar and halo mass and between stellar mass and SFR. About half of the simulated massive galaxies at z~2 have broad-band colors classifying them as `quiescent', and the fraction of quiescent centrals is steeply decreasing towards higher redshift, in agreement with observations. However, our simulations do not reproduce the reddest of the quiescent galaxies observed at z~2. While simulated quiescent galaxies are less dusty than star forming galaxies, their broad band colors are often affected by moderate levels of interstellar dust. The star formation histories of the progenitors of z~2 star forming and quiescent galaxies are typically bursty, especially at early t...

  9. The Suppression of Star Formation and the Effect of Galaxy Environment in Low-Redshift Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use GALEX imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z=0.06 to explore how local and global group environment affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates of their member galaxies. The data provide star formation rates out to beyond 2R_200 in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M_sun/yr and 10^8 M_sun, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R ~ 1.5 Mpc ~ 2R_200, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time we also report a similar suppression of the specific star formation rate within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infallin...

  10. The History of Star Formation in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas M; Calzetti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    If we are to develop a comprehensive and predictive theory of galaxy formation and evolution, it is essential that we obtain an accurate assessment of how and when galaxies assemble their stellar populations, and how this assembly varies with environment. There is strong observational support for the hierarchical assembly of galaxies, but our insight into this assembly comes from sifting through the resolved field populations of the surviving galaxies we see today, in order to reconstruct their star formation histories, chemical evolution, and kinematics. To obtain the detailed distribution of stellar ages and metallicities over the entire life of a galaxy, one needs multi-band photometry reaching solar-luminosity main sequence stars. The Hubble Space Telescope can obtain such data in the low-density regions of Local Group galaxies. To perform these essential studies for a fair sample of the Local Universe, we will require observational capabilities that allow us to extend the study of resolved stellar popula...

  11. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy of star formation in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara C.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Turner, Jean L.

    1987-01-01

    The Brackett alpha and beta lines with 7.2 seconds angular and 350 km/s velocity resolution were observed in 11 infrared-bright galaxies. From these measurements extinctions, Lyman continuum fluxes, and luminosities due to OB stars were derived. The galaxies observed to date are NGC3690, M38, NGC 5195, Arp 220, NGC 520, NGC660, NGC1614, NGC 3079, NGC 6946, NGC 7714, and Maffei 2, all of which were suggested at some time to be starburst ogjects. The contributions of OB stars to the luminosities of these galaxies can be quantified from the measurements and range from insignificant to sufficient to account for the total energy output. The OB stellar luminosities observed are as high as 10 to the 12th solar luminosities in the galaxy NGC 1614. It is noteworthy that star formation can play very different roles in the infrared energy output of galaxies of similar luminosity, as for example Arp 220 and NGC 1614. In addition to probing the star formation process in these galaxies, the Brackett line measurements, when compared to radio and infrared continuum results, have revealed some unexpected and at present imperfectly understood phenomena: in some very luminous sources the radio continuum appears to be suppressed relative to the infrared recombination lines; in many galaxies there is a substantial excess of 10 micron flux over that predicted from simple models of Lyman alpha heating of dust if young stars are the only significant energy source.

  13. The Void Galaxy Survey: Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Beygu, B; van der Hulst, J M; Jarrett, T H; Peletier, R; van de Weygaert, R; van Gorkom, J H; Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from $\\rm{H\\alpha}$ and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4 $\\rm{\\mu m}$, 4.6 $\\rm{\\mu m}$, 12 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ and 22 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ WISE emission is used as star formation and mass indicator. Infrared and optical colours show that the VGS sample displays a wide range of dust and metallicity properties. We combine these measurements with stellar and HI masses to measure the specific SFRs ($\\rm{SFR/M_{*}}$) and star formation efficiencies ($\\rm{SFR/M_{HI}}$). We compare the star formation properties of our sample with galaxies in the more moderate density regions of the cosmic web, 'the field'. We find that specific SFRs of the VGS galaxies as a function of stellar and HI mass are similar to those of the galaxies in these field regions. Their $\\rm{SFR\\alpha}$ is slightly elevated than the galaxies in the field for a given total HI mass. ...

  14. AsteroFLAG - from the Sun to the stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaplin, W J; Elsworth, Y [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Appourchaux, T; Baudin, F [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), Batiment 121, F-91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Arentoft, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kjeldsen, H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ballot, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, 85741, Garching (Germany); Bazot, M [Centro de AstrofIsica Universidade do Porto, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Bedding, T R [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Creevey, O L [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Duez, V; Garcia, R A [DAPNIA/CEA, CE Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Fletcher, S T [Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Gough, D O; Houdek, G [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Jimenez, A; Jimenez-Reyes, S J [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Lazrek, M [LPHEA, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Leibacher, J W, E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk (and others)

    2008-10-15

    We stand on the threshold of a critical expansion of asteroseismology of Sun-like stars, the study of stellar interiors by observation and analysis of their global acoustic modes of oscillation. The Sun-like oscillations give a very rich spectrum allowing the internal structure and dynamics to be probed down into the stellar cores to very high precision. Asteroseismic observations of many stars will allow multiple-point tests of crucial aspects of stellar evolution and dynamo theory. The aims of the asteroFLAG collaboration are to help the community to refine existing, and to develop new, methods for analysis of the asteroseismic data on the Sun-like oscillators.

  15. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.;

    2015-01-01

    , bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and earlytype galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression...... color space. This supports the idea that at least some galaxies in HCGs are transitioning objects, where a disruption of the existing molecular gas in the system suppresses SF by inhibiting the molecular gas from collapsing and forming stars efficiently. These observations, combined with recent work...

  16. Blue straggler stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Sigurdsson, S.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.

    2007-01-01

    Blue straggler star (BSS) candidates have been observed in all old dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), however whether or not they are authentic BSSs or young stars has been a point of debate. To both address this issue and obtain a better understanding of the formation of BSSs in different environme

  17. Fugitive stars in active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate in detail the escape dynamics in an analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a quasar galaxy with a disk and a massive nucleus. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the con...

  18. The First Galaxies: Chemical Enrichment, Mixing, and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Greif, Thomas H; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S

    2010-01-01

    Using three-dimensional cosmological simulations, we study the assembly process of one of the first galaxies, with a total mass of 10^8 M_sun, collapsing at z = 10. Our main goal is to trace the transport of the heavy chemical elements produced and dispersed by a pair-instability supernova exploding in one of the minihalo progenitors. To this extent, we incorporate an efficient algorithm into our smoothed particle hydrodynamics code which approximately models turbulent mixing as a diffusion process. We study this mixing with and without the radiative feedback from Pop III stars that subsequently form in neighboring minihalos. Our simulations allow us to constrain the initial conditions for second-generation star formation, within the first galaxy itself, and inside of minihalos that virialize after the supernova explosion. We find that most minihalos remain unscathed by ionizing radiation or the supernova remnant, while some are substantially photoheated and enriched to supercritical levels, likely resulting ...

  19. Counterrotating Stars in Simulated Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Algorry, David G; Abadi, Mario G; Sales, Laura V; Steinmetz, Matthias; Piontek, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Counterrotating stars in disk galaxies are a puzzling dynamical feature whose origin has been ascribed to either satellite accretion events or to disk instabilities triggered by deviations from axisymmetry. We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of a disk galaxy to show that counterrotating stellar disk components may arise naturally in hierarchically-clustering scenarios even in the absence of merging. The simulated disk galaxy consists of two coplanar, overlapping stellar components with opposite spins: an inner counterrotating bar-like structure made up mostly of old stars surrounded by an extended, rotationally-supported disk of younger stars. The opposite-spin components originate from material accreted from two distinct filamentary structures which at turn around, when their net spin is acquired, intersect delineating a "V"-like structure. Each filament torques the other in opposite directions; the filament that first drains into the galaxy forms the inner counterrotating bar, while material ...

  20. Grand Challenges in the Physics of the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The study of stellar structure and evolution is one of the main building blocks of astrophysics, and the Sun has an importance both as the star that is most amenable to detailed study and as the star that has by far the biggest impact on the Earth and near-Earth environment through its radiative and particulate outputs. Over the past decades, studies of stars and of the Sun have become somewhat separate. But in recent years, the rapid advances in asteroseismology, as well as the quest to better understand solar and stellar dynamos, have emphasized once again the synergy between studies of the stars and the Sun. In this article I have selected two "grand challenges" both for their crucial importance and because I thnk that these two problems are tractable to significant progress in the next decade. They are (i) understanding how solar and stellar dynamos generate magnetic field, and (ii) improving the predictability of geo-effective space weather.

  1. Star Formation History In Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chien, Li-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are known to trigger starbursts. Young massive star clusters formed in interacting galaxies and mergers may become young globular clusters. The ages of these clusters can provide clues about the timing of interaction-triggered events, and thus provide an important way to reconstruct the star formation history of merging galaxies. Numerical simulations of galaxy mergers can implement different star formation rules. For instance, star formation dependent on gas density or triggered by shocks, predicts significantly different star formation histories. To test the validity of these models, multi-object spectroscopy was used to map the ages of young star clusters throughout the bodies and tails of a series of galaxy mergers at different stages (Arp 256, NGC 7469, NGC 4676, Arp 299, IC 883 and NGC 2623). We found that the cumulative distribution of ages becomes shallower as the stage of merger advances. This result suggests a trend of cluster ages as a function of merger stage. In NGC 4676 we fo...

  2. The Sun: A Star at the Center of Our Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi L.

    2016-01-01

    There is a star at the center of our solar system! But what is a star? How do stars work? What are the characteristics of our Sun and how are these traits different from other stars? How does the Sun compare to stars such as Betelgeuse and Rigel? "Will the Sun end its life with a bang or a whimper?"

  3. The EGNoG Survey: Molecular Gas in Intermediate-Redshift Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bauermeister, Amber; Bolatto, Alberto D; Bureau, Martin; Leroy, Adam; Ostriker, Eve; Teuben, Peter J; Wong, Tony; Wright, Melvyn C H

    2013-01-01

    We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z=0.05 to z=0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30)x10^10 M_Sun and star formation rates of 4-100 M_Sun yr^-1. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 \\pm 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 \\pm 0.04 Gyr for star...

  4. Two sun-like superflare stars rotating as slow as the Sun*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Daisaku; Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-04-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two "superflare stars," KIC 9766237 and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have recently been discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 d on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have rotation periods of 21.8 d and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairly high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not detect any hint of binarity in our spectra, although more data are needed to firmly rule out the presence of an unseen low-mass companion. These results claim that the spectroscopic properties of these superflare stars are very close to those of the Sun, and support the hypothesis that the Sun might cause a superflare.

  5. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, P. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Telles, E. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua Jose Cristino, 77, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Nigoche-Netro, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA), Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Carrasco, E. R., E-mail: plagos@astro.up.pt, E-mail: etelles@on.br, E-mail: nigoche@iaa.es, E-mail: rcarrasco@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory/AURA, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  6. Photometric Variations In The Sun And Solar-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark

    The rich array of solar magnetic field-related phenomena we see occurs not only on stellar counterparts of our Sun but in stars that represent significant departures in their fundamental parameters from those of the Sun. Though these phenomena appear energetically negligible when compared to the total luminosity of stars, they nevertheless govern the angular momentum evolution and modulate the radiative and particle output of the Sun and late-type stars. The term "The Solar-Stellar Connection" has been coined to describe the solar-stellar synergisms in the investigation of the generation, emergence and coupling of magnetic fields with the outer solar-stellar atmosphere to produce what we broadly refer to as magnetic activity. With the discovery of literally thousands of planets beyond our solar system, the Solar-Stellar-Planet Connection is quickly emerging as a new area of investigation of the impacts of magnetic activity on exoplanet atmospheres. In parallel with this rapid evolution in our perspectives is the advent of transformative facilities for the study of the Sun and the dynamic Universe. The primary focus of this invited talk will be on photometric variations in solar-type stars and the Sun. These brightness variations are associated with thermal homogeneities typically defined by magnetic structures that are also spatially coincident with key radiative proxies. Photometric variability in solar-type stars and the Sun includes transient brightening, rotational modulation by cool spots and cycle-related variability, each with a characteristic signature in time and wavelength. The emphasis of this presentation will be on the relationship between broadband photometric variations and magnetic field-related activity in solar-type stars and the Sun. Facets of this topic will be discussed both retrospectively and prospectively as we enter a revolutionary, new era for astronomy.

  7. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Kaisin, Serafim S; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2014-01-01

    We use data for faint (M_B > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the FIGGS survey to study the correlation between the atomic gas density (Sigma_gas,atomic) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ~ 0.1 Z_sun. Understanding star formation in such molecule poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20% (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the HI distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and HI distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies we compute the Sigma_gas,atomic and Sigma_SFR averaged over the entire star forming disk of the galaxy. For these galaxies we find a nearly linear relation betw...

  8. Star formation history in forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.; Kravchuk, S. G.

    The processes of formation and evolution of isolated dwarf galaxies over the Hubble timescale is followed by means of SPH techniques. As an initial protogalaxy perturbation we consider an isolated, uniform, solid -- body rotated sphere involved into the Hubble flow and made of dark and baryonic matter in a 10:1 ratio. The simulations are carried out for the set of models having spin parameters lambda in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 and the total mass of dark matter 1011 M_odot . Our model includes gasdynamics, radiative processes, star formation, supernova feedback and simplified chemistry. The application of modified star formation criterion which accounts for chaotic motions and the time lag between initial development of suitable conditions for star formation and star formation itself (Berczik P.P, Kravchuk S.G. 1997, Ap.Sp.Sci.) provides the realistic description of the process of galaxy formation and evolution. Two parameters: total mass and initial angular momentum of the dwarf protogalaxy play the crucial role in its star formation activity. After the 15 Gyr of the evolution the rapidly rotated dwarf galaxies manifest themselves as an extremly gasrich, heavy element deficient objects showing the initial burst of star formation activity in several spatially separated regions. Slowly rotating objects manifest themselves finally as typical evolved dwarf galaxies.

  9. New Suns in the Cosmos II: Differential rotation in $Kepler$ Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chagas, M L Das; Costa, A D; Lopes, C E Ferreira; Sobrinho, R Silva; Paz-Chinchón, F; Leão, I C; Valio, A; de Freitas, D B; Martins, B L Canto; Lanza, A F; De Medeiros, J R

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with $T_{\\rm eff}$, $\\log g$ and rotation periods $P_{rot}$ similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation. An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the $Kepler$ space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of differential rotation; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period $P$, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the differential rotation.

  10. New Suns in the Cosmos II: differential rotation in Kepler Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Chagas, M. L.; Bravo, J. P.; Costa, A. D.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Silva Sobrinho, R.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Leão, I. C.; Valio, A.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Lanza, A. F.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports the discovery of Sun-like stars, namely main-sequence stars with Teff, log g and rotation periods Prot similar to solar values, presenting evidence of surface differential rotation (DR). An autocorrelation of the time series was used to select stars presenting photometric signal stability from a sample of 881 stars with light curves collected by the Kepler space-borne telescope, in which we have identified 17 stars with stable signals. A simple two-spot model together with a Bayesian information criterion were applied to these stars in the search for indications of DR; in addition, for all 17 stars, it was possible to compute the spot rotation period P, the mean values of the individual spot rotation periods and their respective colatitudes, and the relative amplitude of the DR.

  11. Star-Forming Complexes in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G

    2004-01-01

    Star complexes are the largest globular regions of star formation in galaxies. If there is a spiral density wave, nuclear ring, tidal arm, or other well-defined stellar structure, then gravitational instabilities in the gaseous component produce giant cloud complexes with a spacing of about three times the width. These gas complexes form star complexes, giving the familiar beads on a string of star formation along spiral arms, or nuclear hotspots in the case of a ring. Turbulence compression, supernovae, and self-gravitational contraction inside the giant clouds produce a nearly scale-free structure, including giant molecular clouds that form OB associations and molecular cloud cores that form clusters. Without stellar density waves or similar structures, random gravitational instabilities form flocculent spirals and these fragment into star complexes, OB associations and star clusters in the same way. The largest coherent star-forming regions are the flocculent arms themselves. At the core of the hierarchy a...

  12. Modern Paradigm of Star Formation in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding by the scientific community of the star formation processes in the Galaxy undergone significant changes in recent years. This is largely due to the development of the observational basis of astronomy in the infrared and submillimeter ranges. Analysis of new observational data obtained in the course of the Herschel project, by radio interferometer ALMA and other modern facilities significantly advanced our understanding of the structure of the regions of star formation, young stellar object vicinities and provided comprehensive data on the mass function of proto-stellar objects in a number of star-forming complexes of the Galaxy. Mapping of the complexes in molecular radio lines allowed to study their spatial and kinematic structure on the spatial scales of tens and hundreds of parsecs. The next breakthrough in this field can be achieved as a result of the planned project “Spektr-MM” (Millimetron) which implies a significant improvement in angular resolution and sensitivity. The use of sensitive interferometers allowed to investigate the details of star formation processes at small spatial scales - down to the size of the solar system (with the help of the ALMA), and even the Sun (in the course of the space project “Spektr-R” = RadioAstron). Significant contribution to the study of the processes of accretion is expected as a result of the project “Spektr-UV” (WSO-UV = “World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet”). Complemented with significant theoretical achievements obtained observational data have greatly promoted our understanding of the star formation processes.

  13. Nearest star the surprising science of our sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2014-01-01

    How did the Sun evolve, and what will it become? What is the origin of its light and heat? How does solar activity affect the atmospheric conditions that make life on Earth possible? These are the questions at the heart of solar physics, and at the core of this book. The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help us understand the more distant and exotic objects throughout the cosmos. Having observed the Sun using both ground-based and spaceborne instruments, the authors bring their extensive personal experience to this sto

  14. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Soeren S

    2015-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies can have very high globular cluster specific frequencies, and the GCs are in general significantly more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars. In some dwarfs, such as Fornax, WLM, and IKN, the fraction of metal-poor stars that belong to GCs can be as high as 20%-25%, an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-2% typical of GCs in halos of larger galaxies. Given that chemical abundance anomalies appear to be present also in GCs in dwarf galaxies, this implies severe difficulties for self-enrichment scenarios that require GCs to have lost a large fraction of their initial masses. More generally, the number of metal-poor field stars in these galaxies is today less than what would originally have been present in the form of low-mass clusters if the initial cluster mass function was a power-law extending down to low masses. This may imply that the initial GC mass function in these dwarf galaxies was significantly more top-heavy than typically observed in present-day star forming environments.

  15. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Jesper [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bai, Lei [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dariush, Ali, E-mail: jr@dark-cosmology.dk [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  16. Star-formation knots in IRAS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchings, J B

    1995-01-01

    Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

  17. Dust reddening in star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Ting; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Lu, HongLin; Dong, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    We present empirical relations between the global dust reddening and other physical galaxy properties including the Halpha luminosity, Halpha surface brightness, metallicity and axial ratio for star-forming disc galaxies. The study is based on a large sample of ~22 000 well-defined star-forming galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The reddening parameterized by color excess E(B-V) is derived from the Balmer decrement. Besides the dependency of reddening on Halpha luminosity / surface brightness and gas phase metallicity, it is also correlated with the galaxy inclination, in the sense that edge-on galaxies are more attenuated than face-on galaxies at a give intrinsic luminosity. In light of these correlations, we present the empirical formulae of E(B-V) as a function of these galaxy properties, with a scatter of only 0.07 mag. The empirical relation can be reproduced if most dust attenuation to the HII region is due to diffuse background dust distributing in a disc thicker than that of H...

  18. Detecting stars, galaxies, and asteroids with Gaia

    CERN Document Server

    de Bruijne, J H J; Azaz, S; Krone-Martins, A; Prod'homme, T; Hestroffer, D

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) Gaia aims to make a 3-dimensional map of 1,000 million stars in our Milky Way to unravel its kinematical, dynamical, and chemical structure and evolution. Gaia's on-board detection software discriminates stars from spurious objects like cosmic rays and Solar protons. For this, parametrised point-spread-function-shape criteria are used. This study aims to provide an optimum set of parameters for these filters. We developed an emulation of the on-board detection software, which has 20 free, so-called rejection parameters which govern the boundaries between stars on the one hand and sharp or extended events on the other hand. We evaluate the detection and rejection performance of the algorithm using catalogues of simulated single stars, double stars, cosmic rays, Solar protons, unresolved galaxies, and asteroids. We optimised the rejection parameters, improving - with respect to the functional baseline - the detection performance of single and double stars, while, at the same time, improving the rejec...

  19. Magnetic fields in star formation: from galaxies to stars

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel J; Dobbs, Clare L

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important at every scale in the star formation process: from the dynamics of the ISM in galaxies, to the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars and in the fragmentation of individual star forming cores. The recent development of a robust algorithm for MHD in the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method has enabled us to perform simulations of star formation including magnetic fields at each of these scales. This paper focusses on three questions in particular: What is the effect of magnetic fields on fragmentation in star forming cores? How do magnetic fields affect the collapse of turbulent molecular clouds to form stars? and: What effect do magnetic fields have on the dynamics of the interstellar medium?

  20. Ancient Black Hole Speeds Through Sun's Galactic Neighborhood, Devouring Companion Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have found an ancient black hole speeding through the Sun's Galactic neighborhood, devouring a small companion star as the pair travels in an eccentric orbit looping to the outer reaches of our Milky Way Galaxy. The scientists believe the black hole is the remnant of a massive star that lived out its brief life billions of years ago and later was gravitationally kicked from its home star cluster to wander the Galaxy with its companion. "This discovery is the first step toward filling in a missing chapter in the history of our Galaxy," said Felix Mirabel, an astrophysicist at the Institute for Astronomy and Space Physics of Argentina and French Atomic Energy Commission. "We believe that hundreds of thousands of very massive stars formed early in the history of our Galaxy, but this is the first black hole remnant of one of those huge primeval stars that we've found." "This also is the first time that a black hole's motion through space has been measured," Mirabel added. A black hole is a dense concentration of mass with a gravitational pull so strong that not even light can escape it. The research is reported in the Sept. 13 issue of the scientific journal Nature. XTE J1118+480 The object is called XTE J1118+480 and was discovered by the Rossi X-Ray satellite on March 29, 2000. Later observations with optical and radio telescopes showed that it is about 6,000 light-years from Earth and that it is a "microquasar" in which material sucked by the black hole from its companion star forms a hot, spinning disk that spits out "jets" of subatomic particles that emit radio waves. Most of the stars in our Milky Way Galaxy are within a thin disk, called the plane of the Galaxy. However, there also are globular clusters, each containing hundreds of thousands of the oldest stars in the Galaxy which orbit the Galaxy's center in paths that take them far from the Galaxy's plane. XTE J

  1. Are the majority of Sun-like stars single?

    CERN Document Server

    Whitworth, A P

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that, in the field, $\\sim\\!\\!56\\%$ of Sun-like stars ($0.8\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\lesssim M_\\star\\lesssim 1.2\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$) are single. We argue here that this suggestion may be incorrect, since it appears to be based on the multiplicity frequency of systems with Sun-like primaries, and therefore takes no account of Sun-like stars that are secondary (or higher-order) components in multiple systems. When these components are included in the reckoning, it seems likely that only $\\sim\\!46\\%$ of Sun-like stars are single. This estimate is based on a model in which the system mass function has the form proposed by Chabrier, with a power-law Salpeter extension to high masses; there is a flat distribution of mass ratios; and the probability that a system of mass $M$ is a binary is $\\,0.50 + 0.46\\log_{_{10}}\\!\\left(M/{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\right)\\,$ for $\\,0.08\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}\\leq M\\leq 12.5\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$, $\\,0\\,$ for $\\,M12.5\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$. The constants in this last relation ar...

  2. The Sun. A typical star in the solar neighborhood?

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Sun is used as the fundamental standard in chemical abundance studies, thus it is important to know whether the solar abundance pattern is representative of the solar neighborhood. Albeit at low precision (0.05 - 0.10 dex) the Sun seems to be a typical solar-metallicity disk star, at high precision (0.01 dex) its abundance pattern seems abnormal when compared to solar twins. The Sun shows a deficiency of refractory elements that could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets. The formation of giant planets may also introduce a signature in the chemical composition of stars. We discuss both planet signatures and also the enhancement of neutron-capture elements in the solar twin 18 Sco.

  3. Hierarchical Star Formation in Nearby LEGUS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Andrews, Jennifer; Annibali, Francesca; Bright, Stacey N; Calzetti, Daniela; Cignoni, Michele; Evans, Aaron S; Gallagher, John S; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Grebel, Eva K; Hunter, Deidre A; Johnson, Kelsey; Kim, Hwi; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Smith, Linda; Thilker, David; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ~1 to ~200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in 7 galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarf...

  4. The sizes of massive quiescent and star forming galaxies at z~4 with ZFOURGE and CANDELS

    CERN Document Server

    Straatman, Caroline M S; Spitler, Lee R; Glazebrook, Karl; Tomczak, Adam; Allen, Rebecca; Brammer, Gabriel B; Cowley, Michael; van Dokkum, Pieter; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Kawinwanichakij, Lalit; Mehrtens, Nicola; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Papovich, Casey; Persson, S Eric; Quadri, Ryan F; Rees, Glen; Tilvi, Vithal; Tran, Kim-Vy; Whitaker, Katherine E

    2015-01-01

    We study the rest-frame ultra-violet sizes of massive (~0.8 x 10^11 M_Sun) galaxies at 3.45 x, between 2star-forming galaxies at z~4 and their large rest-frame ultra-violet median sizes suggest that the formation phase of compact cores is very short and/or highly dust obscured.

  5. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Taranu, Dan S; Balogh, Michael L; Smith, Russell J; Power, Chris; Krane, Brad

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation within rich clusters, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from lambdaCDM cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. The orbits are combined with models of star formation followed by quenching in the cluster environment to predict colours and spectroscopic line indices of satellite galaxies. Simple models with only halo mass-dependent quenching and without environmental (i.e. cluster-dependent) quenching fail to reproduce the observed cluster-centric colour and absorption linestrength gradients. Models in which star formation is instantly quenched at the virial radius also fail to match the observations. Better matches to the data are achieved by more complicated bulge-disc models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc quenching depends on the cluster environment. In the most successful models quenching begins at pericentre, operating on an exponential timescale of 2 -- 3...

  6. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  7. PRECIPITATION-REGULATED STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voit, G. Mark; O’Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bryan, Greg L., E-mail: voit@pa.msu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Galaxy growth depends critically on the interplay between radiative cooling of cosmic gas and the resulting energetic feedback that cooling triggers. This interplay has proven exceedingly difficult to model, even with large supercomputer simulations, because of its complexity. Nevertheless, real galaxies are observed to obey simple scaling relations among their primary observable characteristics. Here we show that a generic emergent property of the interplay between cooling and feedback can explain the observed scaling relationships between a galaxy's stellar mass, its total mass, and its chemical enrichment level, as well as the relationship between the average orbital velocity of its stars and the mass of its central black hole. These relationships naturally result from any feedback mechanism that strongly heats a galaxy's circumgalactic gas in response to precipitation of colder clouds out of that gas, because feedback then suspends the gas in a marginally precipitating state.

  8. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  9. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N.; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and Hα (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Hα luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Hα morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Hα luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Hα ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) ~ 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from ~0.05 M sun yr-1 in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to ~5 M sun yr-1 in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, Hα, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14+18 - 8%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  10. Description of the Sun as a Star: General Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Theresa; Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    Numerical parameters characterizing the size and energy output of the sun are presented. These values are the standard yardstick by which other stars are measured. The large number of significant digits tabulated here serve mainly to illustrate the precision to which these parameters are known. Also listed are parameters characterizing the earth's orbit around the sun and the intensity of the sun's radiation at the mean orbital distance. The appearance of the sun depends critically on how it is observed. Each type of radiation observed carries specific information about the physical processes at work on the sun. Special types of instruments reveal aspects otherwise invisible. Coronagraphs reveal the dimmer outer regions of the sun's atmosphere otherwise visible only during total solar eclipses. Spectroscopy can reveal motions, magnetic field strengths, temperatures and densities. In situ measurements have revealed the characteristics of the solar wind and extended our knowledge of the solar magnetic field both near the earth and beyond the orbits of the planets. As an example, the sun's disk observed almost simultaneously in six different wavelengths of light is shown. In visible light we can see the white disk of the sun with the dark spots known as sunspots. By analyzing the spectral lines produced by the sun we can measure the strength of the sun's magnetic field at its surface, producing a magnetogram. This magnetogram reveals that the sunspots are regions of intense magnetic field. Further images of the sun reveal that the sunspot regions are just the bases of systems of hot loops which emit radio-waves, ultraviolet light and X-rays. The sun imaged in a spectral line of hydrogen known as "H alpha" is shown. In this line we also see the long dark "filaments". These filaments form in long channels between areas of opposing magnetic field. Such channels can be seen in the ultraviolet image. Data concerning the sun are obtained with many different kinds of

  11. The star formation history of mass-selected galaxies in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, Alexander; Martinez-Sansigre, Alejo; Sargent, Mark T; van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ilbert, Olivier; Smolcic, Vernesa; Carilli, Chris; Pannella, Maurilio; Koekemoer, Anton M; Bell, Eric F; Salvato, Mara

    2010-01-01

    We explore the evolution of the specific star formation rate (SSFR) for 3.6um-selected galaxies of different M_* in the COSMOS field. The average SFR for sub-sets of these galaxies is estimated with stacked 1.4GHz radio continuum emission. We separately consider the total sample and a subset of galaxies (SF) that shows evidence for substantive recent star formation in the rest-frame optical SED. At 0.22, at least above 4x10^10M_Sun where our conclusions are most robust. We find a tight correlation with power-law dependence, SSFR~(M_*)^beta, between SSFR and M_* at all z. It tends to flatten below ~10^10M_Sun if quiescent galaxies are included; if they are excluded a shallow index beta_SFG~-0.4 fits the correlation. On average, higher M_* objects always have lower SSFRs, also among SF galaxies. At z>1.5 there is tentative evidence for an upper SSFR-limit that an average galaxy cannot exceed. It is suggested by a flattening of the SSFR-M_* relation (also for SF sources), but affects massive (>10^10M_Sun) galaxi...

  12. Two Sun-like Superflare Stars Rotating as Slow as the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nogami, Daisaku; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two `superflare stars', KIC 9766237, and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have been recently discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 days on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have a rotation period of 21.8 d, and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairy high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not det...

  13. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  14. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  15. Physical Galaxy Pairs and Their Effects on Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Selim, I M; Bendary, R

    2014-01-01

    We present 776 truly physical galaxy pairs, 569 of them are close pairs and 208 false pairs from Karachentsev (1972) and Reduzzi & Rampazzo (1995) catalogues, which contains 1012 galaxy pairs. Also we carried out star formation activity through the far-infrared emission (FIR) in physical (truly) interacting galaxies in some galaxy pairs and compared them with projection (optical) interacting galaxy pairs. We focused on the triggering of star formation by interactions and analyzed the enhancement of star formation activity in terms of truly physical galaxy pairs. The large fraction of star formation activity is probably due to the activity in the exchange of matter between the truly companions. The star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies in truly galaxy pairs is found to be more enhanced than the apparent pairs.

  16. Photometric Variability in Kepler Target Stars: The Sun Among Stars -- A First Look

    CERN Document Server

    Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Gilliland, Ronald L; Jenkins, Jon; Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Caldwell, Doug; Dupree, Andrea K; Latham, David W; Meibom, Soeren; Howell, Steve; Brown, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission provides an exciting opportunity to study the lightcurves of stars with unprecedented precision and continuity of coverage. This is the first look at a large sample of stars with photometric data of a quality that has heretofore been only available for our Sun. It provides the first opportunity to compare the irradiance variations of our Sun to a large cohort of stars ranging from vary similar to rather different stellar properties, at a wide variety of ages. Although Kepler data is in an early phase of maturity, and we only analyze the first month of coverage, it is sufficient to garner the first meaningful measurements of our Sun's variability in the context of a large cohort of main sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. We find that nearly half of the full sample is more active than the active Sun, although most of them are not more than twice as active. The active fraction is closer to a third for the stars most similar to the Sun, and rises to well more than half for stars cooler t...

  17. The Role of Galaxy Interaction in Environmental Dependence of the Star Formation Activity at z~1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Ideue, Yuko; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Kajisawa, Masaru; Trump, Jonathan R; Vergani, Daniela; Iovino, Angela; Koekemoer, Anton M; Fevre, Olivier Le; Ilbert, Olivier; Scoville, Nick

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand environmental effects on star formation in high-redshift galaxies, we investigate the physical relationships between the star formation activity, stellar mass, and environment for z ~1.2 galaxies in the 2 deg^2 COSMOS field. We estimate star formation using the [OII] emission line and environment from the local galaxy density. Our analysis shows that for massive galaxies M_*>10^10 M_sun, the fraction of [OII] emitters in high-density environments is 1.7 times higher than in low-density environments, while the [OII] emitter fraction does not depend on environment for low-mass M_* 10^10 M_sun. In addition, massive galaxies are more likely to have companions in high-density environments. However, although the "number" of star forming galaxies increases for massive galaxies with close companions and in dense environments, the "average" star formation rate of star forming galaxies at a given mass is independent of environment and the presence/absence of a close companion. These results sugg...

  18. THE ROLE OF GALAXY INTERACTION IN ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx_equal} 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ideue, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Kajisawa, M. [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Nagao, T. [The Hakubi Project, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Trump, J. R. [UCO/Lick, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Vergani, D. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bolona, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Iovino, A. [INSF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Brera 28, I-20159 Milano (Italy); Koekemoer, A. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Le Fevre, O. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseile, CNRS-Universite d' Aix-Marseille, 38 rue Frederic Joliot Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Ilbert, O. [Observatoriore de Marseille-Provence, Pole de I' Etoile Site de Chiateau-Gombert, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Scoville, N. Z., E-mail: ideue@cosmos.phys.sci.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, MS 105-24, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    In order to understand environmental effects on star formation in high-redshift galaxies, we investigate the physical relationships between the star formation activity, stellar mass, and environment for z {approx_equal} 1.2 galaxies in the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field. We estimate star formation using the [O II]{lambda}3727 emission line and environment from the local galaxy density. Our analysis shows that for massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }), the fraction of [O II] emitters in high-density environments ({Sigma}{sub 10th} {approx}> 3.9 Mpc{sup -2}) is 1.7 {+-} 0.4 times higher than in low-density environments ({Sigma}{sub 10th} {approx}< 1.5 Mpc{sup -2}), while the [O II] emitter fraction does not depend on environment for low-mass M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} galaxies. In order to understand what drives these trends, we investigate the role of companion galaxies in our sample. We find that the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies with companions is 2.4 {+-} 0.5 times as high as that in galaxies without companions at M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. In addition, massive galaxies are more likely to have companions in high-density environments. However, although the number of star-forming galaxies increases for massive galaxies with close companions and in dense environments, the average star formation rate of star-forming galaxies at a given mass is independent of environment and the presence/absence of a close companion. These results suggest that interactions and/or mergers in a high-density environment could induce star formation in massive galaxies at z {approx} 1.2, increasing the fraction of star-forming galaxies with M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }.

  19. Lyman Break Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate of the Universe at z~6

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, E; Stanway, Elizabeth; Mahon, Andrew Bunker & Richard Mc

    2003-01-01

    We determine the space density of UV-luminous star-burst galaxies at z~6 using deep HST ACS SDSS-i' (F775W) and SDSS-z' (F850LP) and VLT ISAAC J and K_s band imaging of the Chandra Deep Field South. We find 8 galaxies and one star with (i'-z')>1.5 to a depth of z'(AB)= 25.6 (an 8 sigma detection in each of the 3 available ACS epochs). This corresponds to an unobscured star formation rate of ~15 M_sun/yr/h_{70}^2 at z=5.9, equivalent to L^* for the Lyman-break population at z = 3-4 (Omega_Lambda=0.7, Omega_M=0.3). We are sensitive to star forming galaxies at 5.6< z < 7.0 with an effective comoving volume of ~1.8E5 Mpc^3/h_{70}^3 after accounting for incompleteness at the higher redshifts due to luminosity bias. This volume should encompass the primeval sub-galactic scale fragments of the progenitors of about a thousand L^* galaxies at the current epoch. We determine a volume averaged global star formation rate of (6.7+/- 2.7) 10^{-4} h_{70} M_sun/yr/Mpc^3 at z~6 from rest-frame UV selected star-bursts. T...

  20. HARPS-N observes the Sun as a star

    CERN Document Server

    Dumusque, Xavier; Phillips, David F; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Latham, David W; Li, Chih-Hao; Lodi, Marcello; Lovis, Christophe; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stephane; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to radial velocity changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50\\cms radial velocity rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and...

  1. From the sun to the Galactic Center: dust, stars and black hole(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Tobias

    2013-07-01

    Way. I obtain the mass distribution and the light distribution of these stars. I ! find that the flattening of the stellar distribution increases outside 70''. This indicates that inside a nearly spherical nuclear cluster dominates and that the surrounding light belongs mostly to the nuclear disk. I dissect the light in two components and obtain for the nuclear cluster L_Ks=2.7*10^7 L_sun. I obtain proper motions for more than 10000 stars and radial velocities for more than 2400 stars. Using Jeans modeling I combine velocities and the radial profile to obtain within 100'' (4 pc) a mass of 6.02*10^6 M_sun and a total nuclear cluster mass of 12.88*10^6 M_sun. The Jeans modeling and various other evidence weakly favor a core in the extended mass compared to a cusp. The old star light shows a similar core. The mass to light ratio of the old stars of the nuclear cluster is consistent with the usual initial mass function in the Galaxy. This suggests that most stars in GC formed in the usual way, in a mode different from the origin of the youngest stars there.

  2. Star formation in proto dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the onset of star formation on the residual gas in primordial low-mass Local-Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies is studied by a series of hydrodynamical simulations. The models have concentrated on the effect of photoionization. The results indicate that photoionization in the presence of a moderate gas density gradient can eject most of the residual gas on a time scale of a few 10 to the 7th power years. High central gas density combined with inefficient star formation, however, may prevent mass ejection. The effect of supernova explosions is discussed briefly.

  3. The Quest for Dusty Star-forming Galaxies at High Redshift z>4

    CERN Document Server

    Mancuso, C; Shi, J; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Aversa, R; Danese, L

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the continuity equation approach and the `main sequence' star-formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses > a few 10^10 M_sun at redshift z>4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) > 10^2 M_sun/yr in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z30 M_sun/yr cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data...

  4. The ISO View of Star Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, George

    1999-01-01

    ISO studies of normal galaxies in the local Universe have revealed basic new properties whose significant implications for the star formation process and cosmology are only starting to be understood. This review will touch on the general results of a statistical nature, and provide a quick summary of the profusion of exciting results on individual objects. In the mid-infrared, PHT-S has established that the spectra of star forming galaxies between 6 and-13microns are dominated by the Aromatic Features in Emission (AFE), and show little variation as a function of the heating intensity. The Carriers of the AFE (CAFE) are thus a universal component of dust with standard properties, and contribute between 10 and 25% of the total dust luminosity. In addition to AFE, the spectra show a low-level continuum detectable at wavelengths longer than 3.5microns whose origin is still under investigation. The mid-infrared colors formed as the ratio of flux densities in the 6.75micron and the 15micron bands of ISO-CAM remain essentially constant and near unity for quiescent and mildly active galaxies. As dust heating increases further, the 15micron flux increases steeply compared to 6.75microns, indicating that dust heated to 100Kgalaxy become more active in star formation, its [CII] flux weakens relative to total dust emission while the [OI] does not. This behavior has attracted much interest because it extrapolates to the most active galaxies, making them weaker in [CII] than previously expected. Several explanations for the effect have been advanced, and will be discussed in this review. Spectroscopy with SWS has measured molecular hydrogen in galaxies, providing a powerful handle on the warm molecular gas content. SWS and CAM-CVF studies targeting ionic fine-structure lines have demonstrated their value as diagnostics of the radiation field.

  5. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  6. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity -- comparison with the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Shimanovskaya, E V

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycles, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of the chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with the low level of the chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by the minimum level of its coronal radiation and the minimum level of its variations of the photospheric flux.

  7. Challenges for asteroseismic analysis of Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Appourchaux, T; Elsworth, Y; New, R; Toutain, T

    2008-01-01

    Asteroseismology of Sun-like stars is undergoing rapid expansion with, for example, new data from the CoRoT mission and continuation of ground-based campaigns. There is also the exciting upcoming prospect of NASA's Kepler mission, which will allow the asteroseismic study of several hundred Sun-like targets, in some cases for periods lasting up to a few years. The seismic mode parameters are the input data needed for making inference on stars and their internal structures. In this paper we discuss the ease with which it will be possible to extract estimates of individual mode parameters, dependent on the mass, age, and visual brightness of the star. Our results are generally applicable; however, we look at mode detectability in the context of the upcoming Kepler observations. To inform our discussions we make predictions of various seismic parameters. To do this we use simple empirical scaling relations and detailed pulsation computations of the stochastic excitation and damping characteristics of the Sun-like...

  8. Star formation properties of galaxy cluster A1767

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abell 1767 is a dynamically relaxed, cD cluster of galaxies with a redshift of 0.0703. Among 250 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within a projected radius of 2.5r_{200}, 243 galaxies (~ 97%) are spectroscopically covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on this homogeneous spectral sample, the stellar evolutionary synthesis code, STARLIGHT, is applied to investigate the stellar populations and star formation histories (SFHs) of cluster galaxies. The star formation properties of galaxies, such as mean stellar ages, metallicities, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs), are presented as the functions of local galaxy density. Strong environmental effect is found in the manner that massive galaxies in the high-density core region of cluster tend to have higher metallicities, longer mean stellar ages, and lower specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and their recent star formation activities have been remarkably suppressed. In addition, the correlations of the metallicity and SSFR...

  9. AGN-driven quenching of star formation: morphological and dynamical implications for early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien; Silk, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms at work during the formation of massive early-type galaxies, we performed six zoomed hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of halos in the mass range 4.3 10^12 < M_vir < 8.0 10^13 M_sun at z=0, using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement code RAMSES. These simulations explore the role of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), through jets powered by the accretion onto supermassive black holes on the formation of massive elliptical galaxies. In the absence of AGN feedback, large amounts of stars accumulate in the central galaxies to form overly massive, blue, compact and rotation-dominated galaxies. Powerful AGN jets transform the central galaxies into red extended and dispersion-dominated galaxies. This morphological transformation of disc galaxies into elliptical galaxies is driven by the efficient quenching of the in situ star formation due to AGN feedback, which transform these galaxies into systems built up by accretion. For galaxies mainly formed by accretion, the pro...

  10. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-04-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using optical spectra taken by the California Planet Search. I found a large range in the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen in this sample, including a handful of carbon-rich stars. I also developed a new technique called SpecMatch for extracting fundamental stellar parameters from optical spectra. SpecMatch is particularly applicable to the relatively faint planet-hosting stars discovered by Kepler.

  11. Astrobiologically Interesting Stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    De Mello, G F P; Ghezzi, L

    2006-01-01

    The existence of life based on carbon chemistry and water oceans relies upon planetary properties, chiefly climate stability, and stellar properties, such as mass, age, metallicity and Galactic orbits. The latter can be well constrained with present knowledge. We present a detailed, up-to-date compilation of the atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, multiplicity and degree of chromospheric activity for the astrobiologically interesting solar-type stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun. We determine their state of evolution, masses, ages and space velocities, and produce an optimized list of candidates that merit serious scientific consideration by the future space-based interferometry probes aimed at directly detecting Earth-sized extrasolar planets and seeking spectroscopic infrared biomarkers as evidence of photosynthetic life. The initially selected stars number 33 solar-type within the population of 182 stars (excluding late M-dwarfs) closer than 10 pc. A comprehensive and detailed data compilation fo...

  12. UV, optical and infrared properties of star forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchra, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The UVOIR properties of galaxies with extreme star formation rates are examined. These objects seem to fall into three distinct classes which can be called (1) extragalactic H II regions, (2) clumpy irregulars, and (3) starburst galaxies. Extragalactic H II regions are dominated by recently formed stars and may be considered 'young' galaxies if the definition of young is having the majority of total integrated star formation occurring in the last billion years. Clumpy irregulars are bursts of star formation superposed on an old population and are probably good examples of stochastic star formation. It is possible that star formation in these galaxies is triggered by the infall of gas clouds or dwarf companions. Starburst galaxies are much more luminous, dustier and more metal rich than the other classes. These objects show evidence for shock induced star formation where shocks may be caused by interaction with massive companions or are the result of an extremely strong density wave.

  13. HARPS-N OBSERVES THE SUN AS A STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumusque, Xavier; Glenday, Alex; Phillips, David F.; Charbonneau, David; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buchschacher, Nicolas; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stéphane [Observatoire Astronomique de l’Université de Genève, 51 Chemin des Maillettes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Cameron, Andrew Collier [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Cecconi, Massimo; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Lodi, Marcello; Molinari, Emilio, E-mail: xdumusque@cfa.harvard.edu [INAF—Fundación Galileo Galilei, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to RV changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50 cm s{sup −1} RV rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and plage perturbations using full-disk photometry of the Sun, we lower by a factor of two the weekly RV rms to 60 cm s{sup −1}. The solar telescope is now entering routine operation, and will observe the Sun every clear day for several hours. We will use these radial velocities combined with data from solar satellites to improve our understanding of stellar noise and develop optimal correction methods. If successful, these new methods should enable the detection of Venus over the next two to three years, thus demonstrating the possibility of detecting Earth-twins around other solar-like stars using the RV technique.

  14. A law for star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres

    2011-01-01

    We study the galactic-scale triggering of star formation. We find that the largest mass-scale not stabilized by rotation, a well defined quantity in a rotating system and with clear dynamical meaning, strongly correlates with the star formation rate in a wide range of galaxies. We find that this relation can be understood in terms of self-regulation towards marginal Toomre stability and the amount of turbulence allowed to sustain the system in this self-regulated quasi-stationary state. We test such an interpretation by computing the predicted star formation rates for a galactic interstellar medium characterized by lognormal probability distribution function and find good agreement with the observed relation.

  15. The Spiral Arm Segments of the Galaxy within 3 kpc from the Sun: A Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Hou, Li-Gang

    2017-08-01

    As can be reasonably expected, upcoming large-scale APOGEE, GAIA, GALAH, LAMOST, and WEAVE stellar spectroscopic surveys will yield rather noisy Galactic distributions of stars. In view of the possibility of employing these surveys, our aim is to present a statistical method to extract information about the spiral structure of the Galaxy from currently available data, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. The model differs from previous works studying how objects are distributed in space in its calculation of the statistical significance of the hypothesis that some of the objects are actually concentrated in a spiral. A statistical analysis of the distribution of cold dust clumps within molecular clouds, H ii regions, Cepheid stars, and open clusters in the nearby Galactic disk within 3 kpc from the Sun is carried out. As an application of the method, we obtain distances between the Sun and the centers of the neighboring Sagittarius arm segment, the Orion arm segment in which the Sun is located, and the Perseus arm segment. Pitch angles of the logarithmic spiral segments and their widths are also estimated. The hypothesis that the collected objects accidentally form spirals is refuted with almost 100% statistical confidence. We show that these four independent distributions of young objects lead to essentially the same results. We also demonstrate that our newly deduced values of the mean distances and pitch angles for the segments are not too far from those found recently by Reid et al. using VLBI-based trigonometric parallaxes of massive star-forming regions.

  16. What triggers star formation in galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    Processes that promote the formation of dense cold clouds in the interstellar media of galaxies are reviewed. Those that involve background stellar mass include two-fluid instabilities, spiral density wave shocking, and bar accretion. Young stellar pressures trigger gas accumulation on the periphery of cleared cavities, which often take the form of rings by the time new stars form. Stellar pressures also trigger star formation in bright-rim structures, directly squeezing the pre-existing clumps in nearby clouds and clearing out the lower density gas between them. Observations of these processes are common. How they fit into the empirical star formation laws, which relate the star formation rate primarily to the gas density, is unclear. Most likely, star formation follows directly from the formation of cold dense gas, whatever the origin of that gas. If the average pressure from the weight of the gas layer is large enough to produce a high molecular fraction in the ambient medium, then star formation should fo...

  17. Spatially-resolved NUV-r color of local star-forming galaxies and clues for quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Zhizheng; Lin, Weipeng; Li, Jinrong; Wang, Jing; Fan, Lulu; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of ~6,000 local face-on star-forming galaxies (SFGs), we examine the correlations between the NUV-r colors both inside and outside the half-light radius, stellar mass M* and S\\'{e}rsic index n in order to understand how the quenching of star formation is linked to galaxy structure. For these less dust-attenuated galaxies, NUV-r is found to be linearly correlated with Dn4000, supporting that NUV-r is a good photometric indicator of stellar age (or specific star formation rate). We find that: (1) At M*10^{10.2}M_{\\sun}. (2) The central NUV-r shows no dependence on S\\'{e}rsic index n at M*R_{50} region. In contrast, a considerable fraction of the M*>10^{10.2}M_{\\sun} galaxies, especially those with a high n, have harbored a relatively inactive bulge component.

  18. Star formation quenching in simulated group and cluster galaxies: When, how, and why?

    CERN Document Server

    Bahe, Yannick M

    2014-01-01

    Star formation is observed to be suppressed in group and cluster galaxies compared to the field. To gain insight into the quenching process, we have analysed ~2000 galaxies formed in the GIMIC suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The time of quenching varies from ~2 Gyr before accretion (first crossing of r200,c) to >4 Gyr after, depending on satellite and host mass. Once begun, quenching is rapid (>~ 500 Myr) in low-mass galaxies (M* < 10^10 M_Sun), but significantly more protracted for more massive satellites. The simulations predict a substantial role of outflows driven by ram pressure -- but not tidal forces -- in removing the star-forming interstellar matter (ISM) from satellite galaxies, especially dwarfs (M* ~ 10^9 M_Sun) where they account for nearly two thirds of ISM loss in both groups and clusters. Immediately before quenching is complete, this fraction rises to ~80% even for Milky Way analogues (M* ~ 10^10.5 M_Sun) in groups (M_host ~ 10^13.5 M_Sun). We show that (i) ISM stripping ...

  19. Catastrophic rotational braking among Sun-like stars. A model of the Sun's rotation evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoin, P.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Observations of young open clusters show a bimodal distribution of stellar rotation. In those clusters, Sun-like stars group into two main populations of fast and slow rotators. Beyond an age of approximately 600 Myr, the two populations converge towards a single sequence of slow rotators. Aims: The present study addresses the origin of this bimodal distribution and the cause of its observed evolution. Methods: New prescriptions of mass-loss rate and Alfven radius dependences on Rossby number suggested by observations are implemented in a phenomenological model of angular-momentum loss and redistribution. The obtained model is used to calculate the time evolution of a rotation-period distribution of solar-mass stars similar to that observed in the 5 Myr-old NGC 2362 open cluster. The simulated distributions at subsequent ages are compared with those of h Per, the Pleiades, M 50, M 35, and M 37. Results: The model is able to reproduce the appearance and disappearance of a bimodal rotation-period distribution in open clusters providing that a brief episode of large-angular-momentum loss is included in the early evolution of Sun-like stars. Conclusions: I argue that a transitory episode of large-angular-momentum loss occurs on Sun-like stars with Rossby numbers between 0.13 and 0.3. This phenomenon of enhanced magnetic braking by stellar wind would be mainly driven by a rapid increase of mass loss at a critical rotation rate. This scenario accounts for the bimodal distribution of stellar rotation in open clusters with ages between 20-30 Myr and approximately 600 Myr. The mass-loss rate increase could account for a significant fraction of the X-ray luminosity decay of Sun-like stars in the 0.13-0.3 Rossby number range where a transition from the saturated to the non-saturated regime of X-ray emission is observed. Observed correlations between Li abundance and rotation sequences in the Pleiades and M 34 clusters support this scenario.

  20. The Star-Forming Main Sequence at Low Galaxy Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Patton, David R.; Besla, Gurtina; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Liss, Sandra; Pearson, Sarah; Privon, George C.; Putman, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    We present an investigation of the star-forming main sequence at the low mass end. The relation between galaxy stellar mass and star formation rate has been well-studied in the recent literature for a range of redshifts and galaxy type, but almost all of these studies are limited to galaxies with stellar masses above the dwarf galaxy range ( 109 Msun ). Our work, based on the panchromatic TiNy Titans survey of interacting dwarf galaxies, shows that dwarf galaxies extend the well-established main sequence at z=0 down to lower masses. Furthermore, like their more massive counterparts, dwarf mergers appear on an elevated main sequence with higher star formation rates for a given stellar mass. Finally we show that star formation is enhanced to a greater extent in low mass galaxy mergers than for higher mass systems.

  1. Constraints on MACHO Dark Matter from the Star Cluster in the Dwarf Galaxy Eridanus II

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    I show that a recently discovered star cluster near the center of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Eridanus II provides strong constraints on massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) of >~5 M_sun as the main component of dark matter. MACHO dark matter will dynamically heat the cluster, driving it to larger sizes and higher velocity dispersions until it dissolves into its host galaxy. The star cluster has a luminosity of just ~2000 L_sun and is relatively puffy, with a half-light radius of 13 pc, making it much more fragile than other known clusters in dwarf galaxies. For a wide range of plausible dark matter halo properties, Eri II's star cluster combines with existing constraints from microlensing, wide binaries, and disk kinematics to rule out dark matter composed entirely of MACHOs from ~10$^{-7}$ M_sun up to arbitrarily high masses. The cluster in Eri II closes the ~20--100 M_sun window of allowed MACHO dark matter and provides much stronger constraints than wide Galactic binaries for MACHOs of up to thousands o...

  2. Active star-forming galaxies in the X ray foreground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R. E.; Padovani, P.

    1989-01-01

    Star forming galaxies were discovered as a component of the X-ray background (XRB) in the Einstein deep surveys. Such star forming galaxies may be largely powered by superluminous Population 1 massive X-ray binaries (MXRB), formed in the wake of star formation in regions of low metallicity. The star forming galaxies with moderate numbers of MXRB may evolve into the infrared starburst galaxies found at low redshifts using IRAS (Infrared Astronomy Satellite), and may also be related to those galaxies identified with sub-mJy radio sources. A conservative contribution to the XRB of at least approximately 15 percent, without evolution is estimated. It is shown that moderate evolution leads to a contribution at least equalling that of quasars. Above 3 keV, star forming galaxies may dominate the XRB.

  3. Detection of Planetary Transits Across a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonneau, D; Latham, D W; Mayor, M; Charbonneau, David; Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Mayor, Michel

    1999-01-01

    We report high precision, high cadence photometric measurements of the star HD 209458, which is known from radial velocity measurements to have a planetary mass companion in a close orbit. We detect two separate transit events at times that are consistent with the radial velocity measurements. In both cases, the detailed shape of the transit curve due to both the limb darkening of the star and the finite size of the planet is clearly evident. Assuming stellar parameters of 1.1 R_Sun and 1.1 M_Sun, we find that the data are best interpreted as a gas giant with a radius of 1.27 +/- 0.02 R_Jup in an orbit with an inclination of 87.1 +/- 0.2 degrees. We present values for the planetary surface gravity, escape velocity, and average density, and discuss the numerous observations that are warranted now that a planet is known to transit the disk of its parent star.

  4. High-energy irradiances of Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Ribas, Ignasi

    2015-07-01

    Research on exoplanetary atmospheres has developed an increasing interest. Astrobiology has put its eyes on the effects that stellar irradiance may have on the atmosphere of planets, and on the early development of life. The high energy (XUV and UV) part of the spectrum is of special interest for this purpose. Part of this spectral range, the EUV is of no access to current telescopes, hampering the studies that intend to model planetary atmospheres. A program was developed to to circumvent this problem, and to provide with spectral energy distributions of stars hosting exoplanets (X-exoplanets) in the XUV range. We present here a work in which we develop further this program to create a semiempirical grid of models of emission of Sun-like stars, based on real data and coronal models, covering the XUV and UV ranges. These models will represent a great improvement with respect to currently used models of the solar irradiance at different ages, and intend to be the reference for the years to come. These models will be of special interest to reproduce the conditions of the Earth and solar system planets during different stages of the evolution, and can be safely exported to exoplanets orbiting Sun-like stars.

  5. Recent galaxy mergers and residual star formation of red sequence galaxies in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Ree, Chang H; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the GALEX ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in 4 rich Abell clusters at z \\leq 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r' colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5), and that number was doubled (~ 72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5xR_{200}. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R_{200}. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the sub-structures in ...

  6. Molecular cloud regulated star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M; Okamoto, T

    2007-01-01

    We describe a numerical implementation of star formation in disk galaxies, in which the conversion of cooling gas to stars in the multiphase interstellar medium is governed by the rate at which molecular clouds are formed and destroyed. In the model, clouds form from thermally unstable ambient gas and get destroyed by feedback from massive stars and thermal conduction. Feedback in the ambient phase cycles gas into a hot galactic fountain or wind. We model the ambient gas hydrodynamically using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). However, we cannot resolve the Jeans mass in the cold and dense molecular gas and, therefore, represent the cloud phase with ballistic particles that coagulate when colliding. We show that this naturally produces a multiphase medium with cold clouds, a warm disk, hot supernova bubbles and a hot, tenuous halo. Our implementation of this model is based on the Gadget N-Body code. We illustrate the model by evolving an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy and study the properties of a disk f...

  7. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.

  8. Revisiting The First Galaxies: The Epoch of Population III Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, Alexander; Gnedin, O. Y.; Gnedin, N. Y.; Zemp, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the ART code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for dust-based formation of molecular gas. Here, we develop and implement a new recipe for the formation of metal-free Pop III stars. We reach a spatial resolution of 2 pc at z=10 and resolve star-forming galaxies with the masses above 10^6 solar masses. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominate the energy and metal budget of the universe to be short-lived. While these stars seed their host galaxies with metals, they cannot drive significant outflows to enrich the IGM in our simulations. Feedback from pair instability supernovae causes Pop III star formation to self-terminate within their host galaxies, but is not strong enough to suppress star formation in external galaxies. Within any individual galaxy, Pop II stars overtake Pop III stars within ~50-150 Myr. A threshold of M = 3 * 10^6 solar masses separates galaxies that lose a significant fraction of their baryons due to Pop III feedback from those that do not. Understanding the nature of the transition between Pop III and Pop II star formation is of key importance for studying the dawn of galaxy formation.

  9. Galaxy Zoo: star formation versus spiral arm number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ross E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Kruk, Sandor J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.

    2017-06-01

    Spiral arms are common features in low-redshift disc galaxies, and are prominent sites of star formation and dust obscuration. However, spiral structure can take many forms: from galaxies displaying two strong 'grand design' arms to those with many 'flocculent' arms. We investigate how these different arm types are related to a galaxy's star formation and gas properties by making use of visual spiral arm number measurements from Galaxy Zoo 2. We combine ultraviolet and mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from GALEX and WISE to measure the rates and relative fractions of obscured and unobscured star formation in a sample of low-redshift SDSS spirals. Total star formation rate has little dependence on spiral arm multiplicity, but two-armed spirals convert their gas to stars more efficiently. We find significant differences in the fraction of obscured star formation: an additional ˜10 per cent of star formation in two-armed galaxies is identified via MIR dust emission, compared to that in many-armed galaxies. The latter are also significantly offset below the IRX-β relation for low-redshift star-forming galaxies. We present several explanations for these differences versus arm number: variations in the spatial distribution, sizes or clearing time-scales of star-forming regions (i.e. molecular clouds), or contrasting recent star formation histories.

  10. Chemodynamical analysis of bulge stars for simulated disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Kawata, D.; Brook, Chris B.; Gibson, Brad K.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the kinematics and chemistry of the bulge stars of two simulated disc galaxies using our chemodynamical galaxy evolution code GCD+. First, we compare stars that are born inside the galaxy with those that are born outside the galaxy and are accreted into the centre of the galaxy. Stars that originate outside the bulge are accreted into it early in its formation within 3 Gyr so that these stars have high [α/Fe] as well as a high total energy reflecting their accretion to the centre of the galaxy. Therefore, higher total energy is a good indicator for finding accreted stars. The bulges of the simulated galaxies formed through multiple mergers separated by about a Gyr. Since [α/Fe] is sensitive to the first few Gyr of star formation history, stars that formed during mergers at different epochs show different [α/Fe]. We show that the [Mg/Fe] against star formation time relation can be very useful to identify a multiple merger bulge formation scenario, provided there is sufficiently good age information available. Our simulations also show that stars formed during one of the merger events retain a systematically prograde rotation at the final time. This demonstrates that the orbit of the ancient merger that helped to form the bulge could still remain in the kinematics of bulge stars.

  11. The pulsations of the Sun and the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rozelot, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    This volume of lecture notes brings together the knowledge on pulsations of the Sun and the stars, with a particular emphasis on recent observations and modelling, and on the influence of pulsations of other physical processes. The book begins with an extensive introduction to helioseismology. The solar cycle and gravity modes are discussed before the focus is widened from helioseismology to asteroseismology which is detailed in a series of specific chapters. Based on courses given at a graduate school, these tutorial lecture notes will be of interest and useful to a rather broad audience of scientists and students.

  12. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 6th Cambridge Workshop, Seattle, WA, Sept. 18-21, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun encompasses stellar chromospheres and coronae, binary stars, the stellar evolution of contracting stars and red giants, stellar evolution abundances of the elements, mass loss and envelopes, and stellar pulsation. Specific issues addressed include theories regarding the acoustic and magnetic heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae, stellar granulation, wave heating in magnetic flux tubes, observations of the solar Ca-II lines, longitudinal-transverse magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere, radio emission from rapidly rotating cool giant stars, and spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars. Also addressed are the optical and UV spectra of RS-CVn stars, emission lines from T-Tauri stars, the spectroscopy of HR1614 group stars, red giants in external galaxies, the rotation of evolved stars, the transition from red giant to planetary nebula, and radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of variable stars.

  13. Star Formation and Gas Accretion in Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yim, Kijeong

    2016-01-01

    In order to quantify the relationship between gas accretion and star formation, we analyse a sample of 29 nearby galaxies from the WHISP survey which contains galaxies with and without evidence for recent gas accretion. We compare combined radial profiles of FUV (GALEX) and IR 24 {\\mu}m (Spitzer) characterizing distributions of recent star formation with radial profiles of CO (IRAM, BIMA, or CARMA) and HI (WSRT) tracing molecular and atomic gas contents to examine star formation efficiencies in symmetric (quiescent), asymmetric (accreting), and interacting (tidally disturbed) galaxies. In addition, we investigate the relationship between star formation rate and HI in the outer discs for the three groups of galaxies. We confirm the general relationship between gas surface density and star formation surface density, but do not find a significant difference between the three groups of galaxies.

  14. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Edmond; Bundy, Kevin; Cappellari, Michele; Peirani, Sébastien; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Drory, Niv; Law, David R; Masters, Karen L; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Rubin, Kate; Belfiore, Francesco; Vulcani, Benedetta; Chen, Yan-mei; Zhang, Kai; Gelfand, Joseph D; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Roman-Lopes, A; Schneider, Donald P

    2016-05-26

    Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the population of galaxies with masses above 2 × 10(10) times that of the Sun; the number of quiescent galaxies has increased by a factor of about 25 over the past ten billion years (refs 1-4). Once star formation has been shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat the gas that is subsequently accreted from either stellar mass loss or mergers and that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centres of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized-gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies are surprisingly common, accounting for as much as ten per cent of the quiescent population with masses around 2 × 10(10) times that of the Sun. In a prototypical example, we calculate that the energy input from the galaxy's low-level active supermassive black hole is capable of driving the observed wind, which contains sufficient mechanical energy to heat ambient, cooler gas (also detected) and thereby suppress star formation.

  15. The Environments of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies: Star Formation Rates increase with Density

    CERN Document Server

    Tekola, Abiy G; Berlind, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This work studies the environments and star formation relationships of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRG) in comparison to other types of local and distant z~1 galaxies. The infrared (IR) galaxies are drawn from the IRAS sample. The density of the environment is quantified using 6dF and Point Source Catalogue redshift survey (PSCz) galaxies in a cylinder of 2 Mpc radius and 10 Mpc length. Our most important result shows the existence of a dramatic density difference between local LIRGs and local non-LIRG IR galaxies. LIRGs live in denser environments than non-LIRG IR galaxies implying that L_IR = 10^11 L_sun marks an important transition point among IR-selected local galaxies. We also find that there is a strong correlation between the densities around LIRGs and their L_IR luminosity. On the other hand, the IR-activity of non-LIRG IR galaxies does not show any dependence on environment. Moreover, it is noted that the star formation rate and density around LIRGs are correlated. This trend in local LIRGs i...

  16. Cosmic-ray energy densities in star-forming galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persic Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy density of cosmic ray protons in star forming galaxies can be estimated from π0-decay γ-ray emission, synchrotron radio emission, and supernova rates. To galaxies for which these methods can be applied, the three methods yield consistent energy densities ranging from Up ~ 0.1 − 1 eV cm−3 to Up ~ 102 − 103 eV cm−3 in galaxies with low to high star-formation rates, respectively.

  17. Star Formation Modes in Low-Mass Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, J S

    2001-01-01

    Low-mass disk galaxies with well-organized structures are relatively common in low density regions of the nearby Universe. They display a wide range in levels of star formation activity, extending from sluggishly evolving `superthin' disk systems to nearby starbursts. Investigations of this class of galaxy therefore provides opportunities to test and define models of galactic star formation processes. In this paper we briefly explore characteristics of examples of quiescent and starbursting low-mass disk galaxies.

  18. Galaxy Collisions, Gas Stripping and Star Formation in the Evolution of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Palous, J

    2004-01-01

    A review of gravitational and hydrodynamical processes during formation of clusters and evolution of galaxies is given. Early, at the advent of N-body computer simulations, the importance of tidal fields in galaxy encounters has been recognized. Orbits are crowded due to tides along spiral arms, where the star formation is enhanced. Low relative velocity encounters lead to galaxy mergers. The central dominating galaxies in future clusters form before the clusters in a merging process in galaxy groups. Galaxy clusters are composed in a hierarchical scenario due to relaxation processes between galaxies and galaxy groups. As soon as the overall cluster gravitational potential is built, high speed galaxy versus galaxy encounters start to play a role. These harassment events gradually thicken and shorten spiral galaxy disks leading to the formation of S0 galaxies and ellipticals. Another aspect of the high speed motion in the hot and diluted Intracluster Medium (ICM) is the ram pressure exerted on the Interstellar...

  19. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using ...

  20. Dying Stars Indicate Lots of Dark Matter in Giant Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    making larger and larger bodies as time progresses. But how sure can we be that this theory is correct ? It turns out that a crucial test is to measure how the matter now moves in the outskirts of these huge galaxies, at distances of 100,000 light-years or more from their centres. MOTIONS IN GIANT GALAXIES Swirling motion, or rotation, in galaxies comes originally from clumps of matter raising tides on each other through their gravitational pull, just as the Moon raises tides on the Earth. The tug of these tides makes the clumps spin. When the swirling clumps come together in computer simulations of what is going on in a newborn galaxy, they keep interacting, and the amount of swirling motion (``angular momentum'') is gradually shifted outward into the far outer regions of the new galaxy. If this theory is correct, we should therefore now see slow swirling motion or rotation in the inner parts of the giant galaxies, but quite rapid motion in their far outer regions. The first part is not so difficult to check observationally: the inner parts of giant galaxies are relatively bright and we can easily measure their rotation from the observed Doppler shift of the light from the stars and nebulae which are located here. However, to measure the rotation in the outer parts has, until now, proved impossible, because out there the light from the galaxy is just too faint to be observed, even with large astronomical telescopes. PLANETARY NEBULAE AS BEACONS Fortunately, a few years ago it was realised that there are some excellent beacons that we can use to measure the swirling motion far out in giant galaxies. These are the planetary nebulae that are created during the last dying act of stars like the Sun. Such objects are rare, because the planetary nebula phase does not last long in astronomical terms, but in these huge galaxies a few hundred of them may still be present in the outer regions at any time. The shining gas in a planetary nebula emits most of its light at one

  1. A mathematical model of star formation in the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sharaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is generally concerned with star formation in the Galaxy, especially blue stars. Blue stars are the most luminous, massive and the largest in radius. A simple mathematical model of the formation of the stars is established and put in computational algorithm. This algorithm enables us to know more about the formation of the star. Some real and artificial examples had been used to justify this model.

  2. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  3. Astrometric jitter of the sun as a star

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, V V; Ulrich, R K

    2010-01-01

    The daily variation of the solar photocenter over some 11 years is derived from the Mount Wilson data reprocessed by Ulrich et al. 2010 to closely match the surface distribution of solar irradiance. The standard deviations of astrometric jitter are 0.52 $\\mu$AU and 0.39 $\\mu$AU in the equatorial and the axial dimensions, respectively. The overall dispersion is strongly correlated with the solar cycle, reaching $0.91 \\mu$AU at the maximum activity in 2000. The largest short-term deviations from the running average (up to 2.6 $\\mu$AU) occur when a group of large spots happen to lie on one side with respect to the center of the disk. The amplitude spectrum of the photocenter variations never exceeds 0.033 $\\mu$AU for the range of periods 0.6--1.4 yr, corresponding to the orbital periods of planets in the habitable zone. Astrometric detection of Earth-like planets around stars as quiet as the Sun is not affected by star spot noise, but the prospects for more active stars may be limited to giant planets.

  4. The evolution of the equivalent width of the Hα emission line and specific star formation rate in star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol-Queraltó, E.; McLure, R. J.; Cullen, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Fontana, A.; McLeod, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a study which uses spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to investigate the evolution of the equivalent width (EW) of the Hα emission line in star-forming galaxies over the redshift interval 1 mass range (9.5 luminosity and Hα line flux, we use our galaxy samples to compare the evolution of EW(Hα) and specific star formation rate (sSFR). Our results indicate that over the redshift range 1 masses M⋆ ≃ 10^{10}{ M_{sun;} are related by EW(Hα)/Å = (63 ± 7) × sSFR/Gyr-1. Given the current uncertainties in measuring the SFRs of high-redshift galaxies, we conclude that EW(Hα) provides a useful independent tracer of sSFR for star-forming galaxies out to redshifts of z = 5.

  5. Outer Disk Star Formation in HI selected Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Meurer, Gerhardt

    2016-01-01

    The HI in galaxies often extends past their conventionally defined optical extent. I report results from our team which has been probing low intensity star formation in outer disks using imaging in H-alpha and ultraviolet. Using a sample of hundreds of HI selected galaxies, we confirm that outer disk HII regions and extended UV disks are common. Hence outer disks are not dormant but are dimly forming stars. Although the ultraviolet light in galaxies is more centrally concentrated than the HI, the UV/HI ratio (the Star Formation Efficiency) is nearly constant, with a slight dependency on surface brightness. This result is well accounted for in a model where disks maintain a constant stability parameter Q. This model also accounts for how the ISM and star formation are distributed in the bright parts of galaxies, and how HI appears to trace the distribution of dark matter in galaxy outskirts.

  6. Central star formation and metallicity in CALIFA interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J K; García-Lorenzo, B; Falcón-Barroso, J; Mast, D; García-Benito, R; Husemann, B; van de Ven, G; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Pérez-Torres, M A; Márquez, I; Kehrig, C; Vilchez, J M; Galbany, L; López-Sánchez, Á R; Walcher, C J

    2015-01-01

    We use optical integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) data from 103 nearby galaxies at different stages of the merging event, from close pairs to merger remnants provided by the CALIFA survey, to study the impact of the interaction in the specific star formation and oxygen abundance on different galactic scales. To disentangle the effect of the interaction and merger from internal processes, we compared our results with a control sample of 80 non-interacting galaxies. We confirm the moderate enhancement (2-3 times) of specific star formation for interacting galaxies in central regions as reported by previous studies; however, the specific star formation is comparable when observed in extended regions. We find that control and interacting star-forming galaxies have similar oxygen abundances in their central regions, when normalized to their stellar masses. Oxygen abundances of these interacting galaxies seem to decrease compared to the control objects at the large aperture sizes measured in effective radius. Altho...

  7. Star Formation in Galaxy Mergers with Realistic Models of Stellar Feedback & the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Hernquist, Lars; Narayanan, Desika; Hayward, Christopher C; Murray, Norman

    2012-01-01

    We use simulations with realistic models for stellar feedback to study galaxy mergers. These high resolution (1 pc) simulations follow formation and destruction of individual GMCs and star clusters. The final starburst is dominated by in situ star formation, fueled by gas which flows inwards due to global torques. The resulting high gas density results in rapid star formation. The gas is self gravitating, and forms massive (~10^10 M_sun) GMCs and subsequent super-starclusters (masses up to 10^8 M_sun). However, in contrast to some recent simulations, the bulk of new stars which eventually form the central bulge are not born in superclusters which then sink to the center of the galaxy, because feedback efficiently disperses GMCs after they turn several percent of their mass into stars. Most of the mass that reaches the nucleus does so in the form of gas. The Kennicutt-Schmidt law emerges naturally as a consequence of feedback balancing gravitational collapse, independent of the small-scale star formation micro...

  8. Starbursts versus Truncated Star Formation in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, J A; Caldwell, N; Chaboyer, B; Rose, James A.; Gaba, Alejandro E.; Caldwell, Nelson; Chaboyer, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopy, B and R bandpass imaging, and 21 cm observations of a sample of early-type galaxies in nearby clusters which are known to be either in a star-forming phase or to have had star formation which recently terminated. From the long-slit spectra, obtained with the Blanco 4-m telescope, we find that emission lines in the star-forming cluster galaxies are significantly more centrally concentrated than in a sample of field galaxies. The broadband imaging reveals that two currently star-forming early-type galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster have blue nuclei, again indicating that recent star formation has been concentrated. In contrast, the two galaxies for which star formation has already ended show no central color gradient. The Pegasus I galaxy with the most evident signs of ongoing star formation (NGC7648), exhibits signatures of a tidal encounter. Neutral hydrogen observations of that galaxy with the Arecibo radiotelescope reveal the presence of ~4 x 10^8 solar masses of HI. Arecib...

  9. Stars, Galaxies, and the Origin of Chemical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    "That I am mortal I know, and that my days are numbered, but when in my mind I follow the multiply entwined orbits of the stars, then my feet do no longer touch the Earth. At the table of Zeus himself do I eat Ambrosia, the food of the Gods". These words by Ptolemy from around 125 A.D. are handed down together with his famous book The Almagest, the bible of astronomy for some 1500 years. They capture mankind's deep fascination with the movements of the heavens, and the miracles of the biological world. After the Babylonians observed the motions of the Sun, Moon, and planets for millennia, the ancient Greeks were the first to speculate about the nature of these celestial bodies. Yet it is only as a consequence of developments in the last 150 years that a much clearer picture of the physical universe has begun to emerge. Among the most important discoveries have been the stellar parallax, confirming Copernicus's heliocentric system, the realization that galaxies are comprised of billions of stars, the awareness of the size of the universe, and the evolutionary nature of living organisms.

  10. Mass Ejection from Old and Young Stars and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Para poder explicar: 1) la enorme cantidad de perdida de masa y la baja velocidad asint5tica de las estrellas gigantes de o, y 2) los flujos de masa observados en protoestrellas, se sugiere un modelo para Ia perdida de masa, en donde se usa un flujo de ondas de Alfvencomo un mecanismo de aceleraci6n para los vientos de estrellas de tipo y vientos en protoestrellas. Se estudian los mecanismos de disipaci5n de las ondas de Alfven: los amortiguamientos no lineal, de superficie reso- nante y turbulento. En nuestro modelo se usa una divergente A(r) = A(R0) (r/r0)5 (donde A(r) es el area a una distancia radial r, y (A(r)/r2)max/(A(ro)/r02 - 10). Tambien se sugiere un modelo para una de hoyo coronal en el Sol. Se muestra que para satisfacer los datos observacionales en el Sol, tomando en cuenta la deposici6n del momento de las ondas de Alfven sobre el viento, se necesita: (a) una divergencia lenta en un hoyo coronal hasta una altura de 0.01 - 0.1 R seguido de (b) una divergencia rap ida de hasta una altura aproximada de 1 R . ABSTRACT: In order to explain (1) a large mass-loss rate and a small asymptotic flow speed of late-type giant stars and (2) the observed protostellar mass outflows, we suggest a model for mass loss, where we use a flux of Alfven waves as a mechanism of acceleration for late-type giant star winds and protostellar winds. We study the Alfven wave dissipation mechanisms: nonlinear damping, resonant surface damping, and turbulent damping. In our model we use a diverging geometry A(r) = A(r0) (r I r )S (where A(r) is the cross sectional area of the geometry at a radial distance r, and(A(r) I r2)max/(A(r0)/r02) = 10). We also suggest a model for a coronal hole geometry in the sun. We show that in order to satisfy the observational data of the sun, taking into account Alfven wave momentum deposition in the wind, we need: (a) a slow divergence in a coronal hole up t6 a height of 0.01 - 0.1 followed by (b) a rapid divergence up to a height of

  11. Star Formation and the ISM in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, L M; Dohm-Palmer, R C; Lo, K Y

    2000-01-01

    High spatial and spectral resolution observations of the atomic interstellar medium in nearby dwarf galaxies reveal evidence for warm and cold neutral gas, just like the phases in our own Galaxy. The cold or quiescent phase (about 20% of the HI in the galaxies studied, except for LGS 3) seems to be associated with star formation activity--- it may mark the regions where the conditions are right for star formation. These results help to explain the patterns of star formation activity which are seen in color-magnitude data for the dwarf irregulars.

  12. TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul [Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08024 Barcelona (Spain); Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Heavens, Alan [Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Clarkson, Chris [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2013-01-01

    Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

  13. Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. II. Schmidt Laws and Star Formation Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2005-01-01

    We model star formation in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies, using a three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The model galaxies include a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas. Absorbing sink particles are used to directly measure the mass of gravitationally collapsing gas. Below the density at which they are inserted, the collapsing gas is fully resolved. The star formation rate measured in our models declines exponentially with time. Radial profiles of atomic and molecular gas and star formation rate reproduce observed behavior. We derive from our models and discuss both the global and local Schmidt laws for star formation: power-law relations between surface densities of gas and star formation rate. The global Schmidt law observed in disk galaxies is quantitatively reproduced by our models. We find that the surface density of star formation rate directly correlates with the strength of local gravitational instability. The local Schmidt laws of individual galaxies in...

  14. Superflares on Sun-Like Stars: Bane of Habitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T.

    2014-04-01

    A key aspect of planetary habitability is the existence of rare, but catastrophic events. One Earthly example is the attribution of several geological mass extinctions to asteroid collisions. Indeed, the Late Heavy Bombardment, during which the 600 Myr old Earth was pummeled persistently by impactors over a period of perhaps a hundred Myr, likely significantly delayed the permanent foothold of life on our planet. Another, less well known, example is the proposed existence of "superflares" on Sun-like stars. Although the quantity of energy in a superflare is negligible compared with the time-integrated X-ray dose from the quiescent multi-MK corona, the quality of the radiation (i.e., composition dominated by gamma rays) released from the transient, but extreme, outburst is what could be of concern to the survival of primitive lifeforms struggling for existence on a semi-habitable world. However, existing reports of superflares mainly involve interpretations of historical materials, such as long-term astronomical plate collections; there are very few concrete examples of such events observed by modern techniques at the most relevant wavelengths, namely ultraviolet or X-rays. The lack of good examples is mostly because these rare events are, well, rare. However, a recent HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph program to record the ultraviolet spectrum of young (~50 Myr) solar analog EK Draconis, fortuitously captured a giant, hour-long FUV transient, in hot lines like the C IV 155 nm doublet (T~100,000 K), and very toasty Fe XXI 124 nm coronal forbidden line (~10 MK). If translated into the equivalent GOES 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray fluence, the event would correspond to an X25000-class flare (most extreme observed on the Sun might reach as high as a mere X50). The EK Dra giant flare, as viewed with the excellent wavelength resolution, broad coverage, and high sensitivity of COS, provides the opportunity to deduce properties of such events to help inform possible impacts on planetary

  15. Gamma Rays from Star Formation in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission. The detection of gamma rays from star-forming galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity (Ackermann et. al. 2012). Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 micrometers) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study we apply the relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities derived in Ackermann et. al. 2012 to a sample of galaxy clusters from Ackermann et. al. 2010 in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with sta...

  16. Star-forming galaxies in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    The infrared properties from IRAS of galaxy samples previously observed in the optical and ultraviolet are summarized in order to predict quantitatively the infrared fluxes corresponding to galaxies of given fluxes in other wavebands. An infrared luminosity function of galaxies is presented and used to predict galaxy counts and redshift ranges at the flux limits expected for SIRTF. Depending on the precise limit and whether or not galaxies evolve, SIRTF will see as many as 2200 galaxies/sq deg at 30 microns.

  17. Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. I. Models and Star Formation Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2005-01-01

    We model star formation in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies composed of a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas, using a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Absorbing sink particles are used to directly measure the mass of gravitationally collapsing gas. They reach masses characteristic of stellar clusters. In this paper, we describe our galaxy models and numerical methods, followed by an investigation of the gravitational instability in these galaxies. Gravitational collapse forms star clusters with correlated positions and ages, as observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Gravitational instability alone acting in unperturbed galaxies appears sufficient to produce flocculent spiral arms, though not more organized patterns. Unstable galaxies show collapse in thin layers in the galactic plane; associated dust will form thin dust lanes in those galaxies, in agreement with observations. We find an exponential relationship between the global star formation timescale and ...

  18. Turbulence and Star Formation in a Sample of Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Erin; Chien, Li-Hsin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. on the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, as indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the neutral hydrogen (H i) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We apply the statistical moments in three different methods—the galaxy as a whole, divided into a function of radii and then into grids. We create individual grid maps of kurtosis for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with their far-ultraviolet images taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite.We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies, in which the variation does not appear to trace any star-forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions that we are sensitive to greater than ∼700 pc. From comparison between the moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sampled galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis also shows that the Burkhart et al. methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but also to normal spiral galaxies.

  19. Star formation and structure formation in galaxy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    A number of theoretical and simulation results on star and structure formation in galaxy interactions and mergers is reviewed, and recent hydrodynamic simulations are presented. The role of gravity torques and ISM turbulence in galaxy interactions, in addition to the tidal field, is highlighted. Interactions can drive gas inflows towards the central kpc and trigger a central starburst, the intensity and statistical properties of which are discussed. A kinematically decoupled core and a supermassive central black hole can be fueled. Outside of the central kpc, many structures can form inside tidal tails, collisional ring, bridges, including super star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. The formation of super star clusters in galaxy mergers can now be directly resolved in hydrodynamic simulations. Their formation mechanisms and long-term evolution are reviewed, and the connection with present-day early-type galaxies is discussed.

  20. The Star Formation History of Late Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, R C

    2007-01-01

    The combination of huge databases of galaxy spectra and advances in evolutionary synthesis models in the past few years has renewed interest in an old question: How to estimate the star formation history of a galaxy out of its integrated spectrum? Fresh approaches to this classical problem are making it possible to extract the best of both worlds, producing exquisite pixel-by-pixel fits to galaxy spectra with state-of-the-art stellar population models while at the same time exploring the fabulous statistics of mega-surveys to derive the star-formation and chemical enrichment histories of different types of galaxies with an unprecedented level of detail. This review covers some of these recent advances, focusing on results for late-type, star-forming galaxies, and outlines some of the issues which will keep us busy in the coming years.

  1. Galaxy Mass, Metallicity, Radius and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Brisbin, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Working with 108,786 Sloan Digital Sky Survey low redshift galaxies, we have examined the relation between galaxy mass, metallicity, radius, and star formation rates. We subdivided the redshift range covered in our sample 0.072.8E10 Msun and exhibit high metallicities at high star formation rates, suggesting that for these galaxies star formation independent of mass infall plays a significant role. A toy model for the physics of infall accounts for the SFR Mi^(3/2) relation and permits us to estimate the mean densities and velocities of clumps of baryonic matter traversing the dark matter halos in which the SDSS galaxies may be embedded. The model also reproduces the gross features of the galaxy main sequence.

  2. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. Ultimately this may lead to a bet

  3. Linking dwarf galaxies to halo building blocks with the most metal-poor star in Sculptor

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, Anna; Simon, Joshua D

    2009-01-01

    Current cosmological models indicate that the Milky Way's stellar halo was assembled from many smaller systems. Based on the apparent absence of the most metal-poor stars in present-day dwarf galaxies, recent studies claimed that the true Galactic building blocks must have been vastly different from the surviving dwarfs. The discovery of an extremely iron-poor star (S1020549) in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy based on a medium-resolution spectrum cast some doubt on this conclusion. However, verification of the iron-deficiency and measurements of additional elements, such as the alpha-element Mg, are mandatory for demonstrating that the same type of stars produced the metals found in dwarf galaxies and the Galactic halo. Only then can dwarf galaxy stars be conclusively linked to early stellar halo assembly. Here we report high-resolution spectroscopic abundances for 11 elements in S1020549, confirming the iron abundance of less than 1/4000th that of the Sun, and showing that the overall abundance pattern mirrors th...

  4. Star-galaxy separation in the AKARI NEP deep field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarz, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Pȩpiak, A.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Oyabu, S.; Takagi, T.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Pearson, C. P.; Hanami, H.; Ishigaki, T.

    2012-05-01

    Context. It is crucial to develop a method for classifying objects detected in deep surveys at infrared wavelengths. We specifically need a method to separate galaxies from stars using only the infrared information to study the properties of galaxies, e.g., to estimate the angular correlation function, without introducing any additional bias. Aims: We aim to separate stars and galaxies in the data from the AKARI north ecliptic pole (NEP) deep survey collected in nine AKARI/IRC bands from 2 to 24 μm that cover the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths (hereafter NIR and MIR). We plan to estimate the correlation function for NIR and MIR galaxies from a sample selected according to our criteria in future research. Methods: We used support vector machines (SVM) to study the distribution of stars and galaxies in the AKARIs multicolor space. We defined the training samples of these objects by calculating their infrared stellarity parameter (sgc). We created the most efficient classifier and then tested it on the whole sample. We confirmed the developed separation with auxiliary optical data obtained by the Subaru telescope and by creating Euclidean normalized number count plots. Results: We obtain a 90% accuracy in pinpointing galaxies and 98% accuracy for stars in infrared multicolor space with the infrared SVM classifier. The source counts and comparison with the optical data (with a consistency of 65% for selecting stars and 96% for galaxies) confirm that our star/galaxy separation methods are reliable. Conclusions: The infrared classifier derived with the SVM method based on infrared sgc - selected training samples proves to be very efficient and accurate in selecting stars and galaxies in deep surveys at infrared wavelengths carried out without any previous target object selection.

  5. Star formation and quenching among the most massive galaxies at z~1.7

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Chiara; Daddi, Emanuele; Rodighiero, Giulia; Berta, Stefano; Grogin, Norman; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed object-by-object study of a mass-complete (M*>10^11 M_sun) sample of 56 galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2 in the GOODS-South field, showing that an accurate de-blending in MIPS/24um images is essential to properly assign to each galaxy its own star formation rate (SFR), whereas an automatic procedure often fails. This applies especially to galaxies with SFRs below the Main Sequence (MS) value, which may be in their quenching phase. After that, the sample splits evenly between galaxies forming stars within a factor of 4 of the MS rate (~45%), and sub-MS galaxies with SFRs ~10-1000 times smaller (~55%). We did not find a well defined class of intermediate, transient objects below the MS, suggesting that the conversion of a massive MS galaxy into a quenched remnant may take a relatively short time (<1 Gyr), though a larger sample should be analyzed in the same way to set precise limits on the quenching timescale. X-ray detected AGNs represent a ~30% fraction of the sample, and are fou...

  6. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.

    2015-01-01

    on poststarburst galaxies with molecular reservoirs, indicates that galaxies do not need to expel their molecular reservoirs prior to quenching SF and transitioning from blue spirals to red early-type galaxies. This may imply that SF quenching can occur without the need to starve a galaxy of cold gas first....

  7. The Void Galaxy Survey: Morphology and Star Formation Properties of Void Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beygu, B; van der Hulst, J M; Peletier, R; Jarrett, T; van de Weygaert, R; van Gorkom, J H; Aragón-Calvo, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the structural and star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Our aim is to study in detail the physical properties of these void galaxies and study the effect of the void environment on galaxy properties. We use Spitzer 3.6 $\\rm{\\mu m}$ and B-band imaging to study the morphology and color of the VGS galaxies. For their star formation properties, we use Halpha and GALEX near-UV imaging. We compare our results to a range of galaxies of different morphologies in higher density environments. We find that the VGS galaxies are in general disk dominated and star forming galaxies. Their star formation rates are, however, often less than 1 $\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$ $\\rm{yr^{-1}}$. There are two early-type galaxies in our sample as well. In $\\rm{r_{e}}$ versus $\\rm{M_{B}}$ parameter space, VGS galaxies occupy the same space as dwarf irregulars and spirals.

  8. On the Star Formation Properties of Void Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moorman, Crystal M; White, Amanda; Vogeley, Michael S; Hoyle, Fiona; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using H$\\alpha$ emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable HI detections from ALFALFA. For the full HI detected sample, SSFRs do not vary systematically with large-scale environment. However, investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass (known as the star formation efficiency; SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice n...

  9. Infrared Observations of Star-Forming Dwarf Galaxies with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J. L.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Salzer, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    We present a study of the infrared properties of a sample of actively star-forming dwarf galaxies (MB >-18) drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. Nearby actively star-forming dwarf galaxies are possible analogs to the high redshift star-forming systems that serve as galactic building blocks in hierarchical galaxy formation scenarios. These galaxies are gas-rich, metal-poor systems undergoing bursts of star formation in the local universe. A subset of such objects from the line-flux limited objective-prism survey of Salzer et al. (2001) lie in the NOAO Bootes field, and have therefore been observed by Spitzer as part of the IRAC Shallow Survey. We use the IRAC data to measure the stellar mass in these galaxies. In addition, we examine whether these metal-poor dwarf galaxies show warm dust emission, and examine whether it traces the star formation as it does in normal disk galaxies. J. L. Rosenberg would like to acknowledge the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship for support of this work. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. Support for this work was provided by NASA.

  10. Cosmic evolution of star formation properties of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungeun

    2014-01-01

    Development of bolometer array and camera at submillimeter wavelength has played an important role in detecting submillimeter bright galaxies, so called submillimeter galaxies. These galaxies seem to be progenitors of present-day massive galaxies and account for their considerable contributions to the light from the early universe and their expected high star formation rates if there is a close link between the submillimeter galaxies and the star formation activities, and the interstellar dust in galaxies is mainly heated by the star light. We review assembly of submillimeter galaxies chosen from the AzTEC and the Herschel SPIRE/PACS data archives, and investigate their spectral energy distribution fits including the data at other wavelengths to deduce details about stellar parameters including star formation rates and parameters yielding the metallicity, composition and abundance in dust, and disc structure of these galaxies. This work has been supported in part by Mid-career Researcher Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology 2011-0028001.

  11. Origin of the Galaxy Mass-Metallicity-Star-Formation Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies in the low-redshift range $0.07\\leq z\\leq 0.3$ considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates (SFRs) to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy-mass-metallicity-star-formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most conseq...

  12. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masini, A.; Comastri, A.; Puccetti, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (also known as UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods. The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 yr. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in the context of previously...

  13. On stars, galaxies and black holes in massive bigravity

    CERN Document Server

    Enander, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the phenomenology of stars and galaxies in massive bigravity. We give parameter conditions for the existence of viable star solutions when the radius of the star is much smaller than the Compton wavelength of the graviton. If these parameter conditions are not met, we constrain the ratio between the coupling constants of the two metrics, in order to give viable conditions for e.g. neutron stars. For galaxies, we put constraints on both the Compton wavelength of the graviton and the conformal factor and coupling constants of the two metrics. The relationship between black holes and stars, and whether the former can be formed from the latter, is discussed. We argue that the different asymptotic structure of stars and black holes makes it unlikely that black holes form from the gravitational collapse of stars in massive bigravity.

  14. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  15. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar

  16. ORIGIN OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY-STAR FORMATION RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwit, Martin; Brisbin, Drew, E-mail: harwit@verizon.net [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in the low-redshift range 0.07 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy mass-metallicity-star formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most consequential among our findings is that, on average, extragalactic infall accounts for one half of the gas required for star formation, a ratio that is remarkably constant across galaxies with stellar masses ranging at least from M* = 2 × 10{sup 9} to 6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. This leads us to propose that star formation is initiated when extragalactic infall roughly doubles the mass of marginally stable interstellar clouds. The processes described may also account quantitatively for the metallicity of extragalactic space, though to check this the fraction of extragalactic baryons will need to be more firmly established.

  17. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  18. Accretion phenomena in nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibali, F.; Tosi, M.; Aloisi, A.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Cignoni, M.; Ciotti, L.; Cusano, F.; Nipoti, C.; Sacchi, E.; Paris, D.; Romano, D.

    2017-03-01

    We present two pilot studies for the search and characterization of accretion events in star-forming dwarf galaxies. Our strategy consists of two complementary approaches: i) the direct search for stellar substructures around dwarf galaxies through deep wide-field imaging, and ii) the characterization of the chemical properties in these systems up to large galacto-centric distances. We show our results for two star-forming dwarf galaxies, the starburst irregular NGC 4449, and the extremely metal-poor dwarf DDO 68.

  19. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a statistically controlled sample of stars as well.

  20. A NuSTAR survey of nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Rigby, Jane R.; Stern, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    We present a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Chandra, and XMM-Newton survey of nine of the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR at energies above 10 keV enables spectral modeling with far better precision than was previously...

  1. Star formation in the outskirts of disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, AMN

    2002-01-01

    The far outer regions of galactic disks allow an important probe of both star formation and galaxy formation. I discuss how observations of HII regions in these low gas density, low metallicity environments can shed light on the physical processes which drive galactic star formation. The history of

  2. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: spatially resolving the environmental quenching of star formation in GAMA galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, A. L.; Croom, S. M.; Allen, J. T.; Brough, S.; Medling, A. M.; Ho, I.-T.; Scott, N.; Richards, S. N.; Pracy, M. B.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Norberg, P.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A. E.; Bekki, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Bryant, J. J.; Couch, W. J.; Driver, S. P.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Foster, C.; Goldstein, G.; Green, A. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Owers, M. S.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Taylor, E. N.; van de Sande, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Wong, O. I.

    2017-01-01

    We use data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph Galaxy Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to investigate the spatially resolved signatures of the environmental quenching of star formation in galaxies. Using dust-corrected measurements of the distribution of Hα emission, we measure the radial profiles of star formation in a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies covering three orders of magnitude in stellar mass (M*; 108.1-1010.95 M⊙) and in fifth nearest neighbour local environment density (Σ5; 10-1.3-102.1 Mpc-2). We show that star formation rate gradients in galaxies are steeper in dense (log10(Σ5/Mpc2) > 0.5) environments by 0.58 ± 0.29 dex re^{-1} in galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^{10} measure the degree to which the star formation is centrally concentrated using the unitless scale-radius ratio (r50,Hα/r50,cont), which compares the extent of ongoing star formation to previous star formation. With this metric, we find that the fraction of galaxies with centrally concentrated star formation increases with environment density, from ˜5 ± 4 per cent in low-density environments (log10(Σ5/Mpc2) 1.0). These lines of evidence strongly suggest that with increasing local environment density, the star formation in galaxies is suppressed, and that this starts in their outskirts such that quenching occurs in an outside-in fashion in dense environments and is not instantaneous.

  3. Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Caitlin M; Cooray, Asantha

    2014-01-01

    Far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength surveys have now established the important role of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) in the assembly of stellar mass and the evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. The brightest of these galaxies have infrared luminosities in excess of 10$^{13}$ L$_{\\odot}$ with implied star-formation rates of thousands of solar masses per year. They represent the most intense starbursts in the Universe, yet many are completely optically obscured. Their easy detection at submm wavelengths is due to dust heated by ultraviolet radiation of newly forming stars. When summed up, all of the dusty, star-forming galaxies in the Universe produce an infrared radiation field that has an equal energy density as the direct starlight emission from all galaxies visible at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths. The bulk of this infrared extragalactic background light emanates from galaxies as diverse as gas-rich disks to mergers of intense starbursting galaxies. Major advances in far-infrare...

  4. Peculiar early-type galaxies with central star formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Ge; Qiu-Sheng Gu

    2012-01-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are very important for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies.Recent observations suggest that ETGs are not simply old stellar spheroids as we previously thought.Widespread recent star formation,cool gas and dust have been detected in a substantial fraction of ETGs.We make use of the radial profiles of g - r color and the concentration index from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database to pick out 31 peculiar ETGs with central blue cores.By analyzing the photometric and spectroscopic data,we suggest that the blue cores are caused by star formation activities rather than the central weak active galactic nucleus.From the results of stellar population synthesis,we find that the stellar population of the blue cores is relatively young,spreading from several Myr to less than one Gyr.In 14 galaxies with H I observations,we find that the average gas fraction of these galaxies is about 0.55.The bluer galaxies show a higher gas fraction,and the total star formation rate (SFR) correlates very well with the H l gas mass.The star formation history of these ETGs is affected by the environment,e.g.in the denser environment the H 1 gas is less and the total SFR is lower.We also discuss the origin of the central star formation of these early-type galaxies.

  5. Super Star Cluster Nebula in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, J. P.; Turner, J. L.; Tsai, C.-W.; Beck, S. C.; Ho, P. T. P.

    2004-12-01

    We have mapped the starburst galaxy NGC 660 at 100mas resolution at K band (1.3 cm) with the NRAO Very Large Array. A peculiar galaxy at a distance of 13 Mpc, NGC 660 contains concentrated central star formation of power ˜ 2 x 1010 Lsun. Our 1.3 cm continuum image reveals a bright, compact source of less than 10 pc extent with a rising spectral index. We infer that this is optically thick free-free emission from a super star cluster nebula. The nebula is less than 10 pc in size, comparable in luminosity to the ``supernebula" in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. We estimate that there are a few thousand O stars contained in this single young cluster. There are a number of other weaker continuum sources, either slightly smaller or more evolved clusters of similar size within the central 300 parsecs of the galaxy. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Star formation triggered by galaxy interactions in modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Together with interstellar turbulence, gravitation is one key player in star formation. It acts both at galactic scales in the assembly of gas into dense clouds, and inside those structures for their collapse and the formation of pre-stellar cores. To understand to what extent the large scale dynamics govern the star formation activity of galaxies, we present hydrodynamical simulations in which we generalise the behaviour of gravity to make it differ from Newtonian dynamics in the low acceleration regime. We focus on the extreme cases of interacting galaxies, and compare the evolution of galaxy pairs in the dark matter paradigm to that in the Milgromian Dynamics (MOND) framework. Following up on the seminal work by Tiret & Combes, this paper documents the first simulations of galaxy encounters in MOND with a detailed Eulerian hydrodynamical treatment of baryonic physics, including star formation and stellar feedback. We show that similar morphologies of the interacting systems can be produced by both the ...

  7. Nearby Galaxy is a Hotbed of Star Birth Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This new image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is of the nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 1569. This galaxy is a hotbed of vigorous star birth activity which blows huge bubbles that riddle its main body. The bubble structure is sculpted by the galactic super-winds and outflows caused by a colossal input of energy from collective supernova explosions that are linked with a massive episode of star birth. The bubbles seen in this image are made of hydrogen gas that glows when hit by the fierce wind and radiation from hot young stars and is racked by supernova shocks. Its 'star factories' are also manufacturing brilliant blue star clusters. NGC 1569 had a sudden onset of star birth about 25 million years ago, which subsided about the time the very earliest human ancestors appeared on Earth. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST.

  8. On the Metallicity of Star-forming Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Legrand, F; Silich, S A; Kunth, D; Cerviño, M; Legrand, Francois; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Kunth, Daniel; Cervino, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We construct three extreme different scenarios of the star formation histories applicable to a sample of dwarf galaxies, based either on their present metallicity or their luminosity. The three possible scenarios imply different mechanical energy input rates and these we compare with the theoretical lower limits established for the ejection of processed matter out of dwarf galaxies. The comparison strongly points at the existence of extended gaseous haloes in these galaxies, acting as the barrier that allows galaxies to retain their metals and enhance their abundance. At the same time our findings strongly point at a continuous star-forming process, rather than to coeval bursts, as the main contributors to the overall metallicity in our galaxy sample.

  9. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive halos

    CERN Document Server

    Popesso, P; Finoguenov,; Wilman, D; Salvato, M; Magnelli, B; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Rodighiero, G; Ziparo, F; Berta, S; Elbaz, D; Dickinson, M; Lutz, D; Altieri, B; Aussel, H; Cimatti, A; Fadda, D; Ilbert, O; Floch, E Le; Nordon, R; Poglitsch, A; Xu, C K

    2014-01-01

    There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the Cosmic Star Formation History (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase at 1~1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are preferentially located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star-formation rate vs .density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z~1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the significant role of "environment" quenching in shaping the CSFH.

  10. On the global triggering mechanism of star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Andres

    2009-01-01

    We study the large-scale triggering of star formation in galaxies. We find that the largest mass-scale not stabilized by rotation, a well defined quantity in a rotating system and with clear dynamical meaning, strongly correlates with the star formation rate in a wide range of galaxies. We find that this relation can be explained in terms of the threshold for stability and the amount of turbulence allowed to sustain the system in equilibrium. Using this relation we also derived the observed correlation between the star formation rate and the luminosity of the brightest young stellar cluster.

  11. THE AVERAGE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES IN DARK MATTER HALOS FROM z = 0-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We present a robust method to constrain average galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), star formation histories (SFHs), and the intracluster light (ICL) as a function of halo mass. Our results are consistent with observed galaxy stellar mass functions, specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and cosmic star formation rates (CSFRs) from z = 0 to z = 8. We consider the effects of a wide range of uncertainties on our results, including those affecting stellar masses, SFRs, and the halo mass function at the heart of our analysis. As they are relevant to our method, we also present new calibrations of the dark matter halo mass function, halo mass accretion histories, and halo-subhalo merger rates out to z = 8. We also provide new compilations of CSFRs and SSFRs; more recent measurements are now consistent with the buildup of the cosmic stellar mass density at all redshifts. Implications of our work include: halos near 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are the most efficient at forming stars at all redshifts, the baryon conversion efficiency of massive halos drops markedly after z {approx} 2.5 (consistent with theories of cold-mode accretion), the ICL for massive galaxies is expected to be significant out to at least z {approx} 1-1.5, and dwarf galaxies at low redshifts have higher stellar mass to halo mass ratios than previous expectations and form later than in most theoretical models. Finally, we provide new fitting formulae for SFHs that are more accurate than the standard declining tau model. Our approach places a wide variety of observations relating to the SFH of galaxies into a self-consistent framework based on the modern understanding of structure formation in {Lambda}CDM. Constraints on the stellar mass-halo mass relationship and SFRs are available for download online.

  12. Brightness Variations of Sun-like Stars: The Mystery Deepens - Astronomers facing Socratic "ignorance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    An extensive study made with ESO's Very Large Telescope deepens a long-standing mystery in the study of stars similar to the Sun. Unusual year-long variations in the brightness of about one third of all Sun-like stars during the latter stages of their lives still remain unexplained. Over the past few decades, astronomers have offered many possible explanations, but the new, painstaking observations contradict them all and only deepen the mystery. The search for a suitable interpretation is on. "Astronomers are left in the dark, and for once, we do not enjoy it," says Christine Nicholls from Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australia, lead author of a paper reporting the study. "We have obtained the most comprehensive set of observations to date for this class of Sun-like stars, and they clearly show that all the possible explanations for their unusual behaviour just fail." The mystery investigated by the team dates back to the 1930s and affects about a third of Sun-like stars in our Milky Way and other galaxies. All stars with masses similar to our Sun become, towards the end of their lives, red, cool and extremely large, just before retiring as white dwarfs. Also known as red giants, these elderly stars exhibit very strong periodic variations in their luminosity over timescales up to a couple of years. "Such variations are thought to be caused by what we call 'stellar pulsations'," says Nicholls. "Roughly speaking, the giant star swells and shrinks, becoming brighter and dimmer in a regular pattern. However, one third of these stars show an unexplained additional periodic variation, on even longer timescales - up to five years." In order to find out the origin of this secondary feature, the astronomers monitored 58 stars in our galactic neighbour, the Large Magellanic Cloud, over two and a half years. They acquired spectra using the high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope and combined them with images from other telescopes [1

  13. Fuel Efficient Galaxies: Sustaining Star Formation with Stellar Mass Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, Samuel N

    2010-01-01

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M*-star formation rate relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Using cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, we test a prescription for modeling the rate at which gas that was returned by stars to interstellar medium will be consumed by star formation. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star format...

  14. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spatially resolving the environmental quenching of star formation in GAMA galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, A L; Allen, J T; Brough, S; Medling, A M; Ho, I -T; Scott, N; Richards, S N; Pracy, M B; Gunawardhana, M L P; Norberg, P; Alpaslan, M; Bauer, A E; Bekki, K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bloom, J V; Bryant, J J; Couch, W J; Driver, S P; Fogarty, L M R; Foster, C; Goldstein, G; Green, A W; Hopkins, A M; Konstantopoulos, I S; Lawrence, J S; López-Sánchez, A R; Lorente, N P F; Owers, M S; Sharp, R; Sweet, S M; Taylor, E N; van de Sande, J; Walcher, C J; Wong, O I

    2016-01-01

    We use data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to investigate the spatially-resolved signatures of the environmental quenching of star formation in galaxies. Using dust-corrected measurements of the distribution of H$\\alpha$ emission we measure the radial profiles of star formation in a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies covering three orders of magnitude in stellar mass (M$_{*}$; $10^{8.1}$-$10^{10.95}\\, $M$_{\\odot}$) and in $5^{th}$ nearest neighbour local environment density ($\\Sigma_{5}$; $10^{-1.3}$-$10^{2.1}\\,$Mpc$^{-2}$). We show that star formation rate gradients in galaxies are steeper in dense ($\\log_{10}(\\Sigma_{5}/$Mpc$^{2})>0.5$) environments by $0.58\\pm 0.29\\, dex\\, $r$_{e}^{-1}$ in galaxies with stellar masses in the range $10^{10}1.0$). These lines of evidence strongly suggest that with increasing local environment density the star formation in galaxies is suppressed, and that this starts in their ou...

  15. A BRIGHT RING OF STAR BIRTH AROUND A GALAXY'S CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    n image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals clusters of infant stars that formed in a ring around the core of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 4314. This stellar nursery, whose inhabitants were created within the past 5 million years, is the only place in the entire galaxy where new stars are being born. The Hubble image is being presented today (June 11) at the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, Calif. This close-up view by Hubble also shows other interesting details in the galaxy's core: dust lanes, a smaller bar of stars, dust and gas embedded in the stellar ring, and an extra pair of spiral arms packed with young stars. These details make the center resemble a miniature version of a spiral galaxy. While it is not unusual to have dust lanes and rings of gas in the centers of galaxies, it is uncommon to have spiral arms full of young stars in the cores. NGC 4314 is one of the nearest (only 40 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices) examples of a galaxy with a ring of infant stars close to the core. This stellar ring - whose radius is 1,000 light-years - is a great laboratory to study star formation in galaxies. The left-hand image, taken in February 1996 by the 30-inch telescope Prime Focus Camera at the McDonald Observatory in Texas, shows the entire galaxy, including the bar of stars bisecting the core and the outer spiral arms, which begin near the ends of this bar. The box around the galaxy's core pinpoints the focus of the Hubble image. The right-hand image shows Hubble's close-up view of the galaxy's core, taken in December 1995 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The bluish-purple clumps that form the ring are the clusters of infant stars. Two dark, wispy lanes of dust and a pair of blue spiral arms are just outside the star-forming ring. The lanes of dust are being shepherded into the ring by the longer, primary stellar bar seen in the ground-based (left-hand) image. The gas is trapped inside the ring

  16. Bright stars and recent star formation in the irregular magellanic galaxy NGC2366

    CERN Document Server

    Aparicio, A; Gallart, C; Castaneda, H O; Chiosi, C; Bertelli, G; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Telles, E; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Díaz, A I; García-Vargas, M L; Garzón, F; González-Delgado, R M; Mas-Hesse, J M; Pérez, E; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J M; Terlevich, E; Terlevich, R J; Varela, A M; Vílchez, J M; Cepa, J; Gallart, C; Castaneda, H; Chiosi, C; Bertelli, G; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Telles, Eduardo; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Diaz, A I; Garcia-Vargas, M L; Garzon, F; Gonzalez-Delgado, R Ma; Mas-Hesse, M; Perez, E; Rodriguez-Espinosa, J M; Terlevich, E; Terlevich, R J; Varela, A M; Vilchez, J M

    1995-01-01

    The stellar content of the Im galaxy NGC 2366 is discussed on the basis of CCD BVR photometry. The three brightest blue and red stars have been used to estimate its distance, obtaining a balue of 2.9 Mpc. The spatial distribution of the young stellar population is discussed in the light of the integrated color indices and the color-magnitude diagrams of different zones of the galaxy. A generalized star formation burst seems to have taken place about 50 Myr ago. The youngest stars are preferentially formed in the South-West part of the bar, where the giant HII complex NGC 2363 is located, being younger and bluer. The bar seems to play a role favouring star formation in one of its extremes. Self-propagation however, does not seem to be triggering star formation at large scale. A small region, populated by very young stars has also been found at the East of the galaxy.

  17. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  18. Observational Searches for Star-Forming Galaxies at z > 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.

    2016-08-01

    Although the universe at redshifts greater than six represents only the first one billion years ( 6, with spectroscopically confirmed galaxies out to nearly z = 9. Using these large samples, we have begun to gain a physical insight into the processes inherent in galaxy evolution at early times. In this review, I will discuss (i) the selection techniques for finding distant galaxies, including a summary of previous and ongoing ground and space-based searches, and spectroscopic follow-up efforts, (ii) insights into galaxy evolution gleaned from measures such as the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function, the stellar mass function, and galaxy star-formation rates, and (iii) the effect of galaxies on their surrounding environment, including the chemical enrichment of the universe, and the reionisation of the intergalactic medium. Finally, I conclude with prospects for future observational study of the distant universe, using a bevy of new state-of-the-art facilities coming online over the next decade and beyond.

  19. Modeling the exchange of comets between the Sun and passing stars in a low stellar density environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stephen; Gosmeyer, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the importance of close encounters between our Sun and its Oort cloud and passing stars with similar Oort clouds in the low stellar density environment of the outer portion of our Galaxy. By constructing a set of interaction cross-sections that describe the interchange of material between the two passing Oort clouds, and then randomly computing sets of encounters that a star would have during its orbit in the Galaxy over a period of time equivalent to the life of the Sun after the dissolution of its birth cluster, we have examined how the ensemble of passing encounters could impact the evolution of our Oort cloud. From the set of 1,000 possible realizations of the interactions over a solar lifetime, we find that the resulting solar Oort cloud is likely to be significantly eroded as a result of the set of encounters, and is also likely today to contain a significant amount of material that was formed in passing extra-solar systems.

  20. Bursts of star formation in computer simulations of dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comins, N.F.

    1984-09-01

    A three-dimensional Stochastic Self-Propagating Star Formation (SSPSF) model of compact galacies is presented. Two phases of gas, active and inactive, are present, and permanent depletion of gas in the form of long lived, low mass stars and remnants occurs. Similarly, global infall of gas from a galactic halo or through galactic cannibalism is permitted. We base our parameters on the observed properties of the compact blue galaxy I Zw 36. Our results are that bursts of star formation occur much more frequently in these runs than continuous nonbursting star formation, suggesting that the blue compact galaxies are probably undergoing bursts rather than continuous, nonbursting low-level star formation activity.

  1. Interaction-Triggered Star Formation in Distant Galaxies and the Role of Mergers in Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lihwai

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of galaxy merger rates and its impact on galaxy properties have been studied intensively over the last decade. It becomes clear now that various types of mergers, i.e. gas-rich (wet), gas-poor (dry), or mixed mergers, affect the merger products in different ways. The epoch when each type of merger dominates also differs. In this talk, I review the recent progress on the measurements of galaxy merger rates out to z ~ 3 and the level of interaction-triggered star formation using large samples from various redshift surveys. These results provide insights to the importance of mergers in the mass assembly history of galaxies and in the evolution of galaxy properties. I also present new results in characterizing the environment of galaxy mergers, and discuss their implications in the built up of red-sequence galaxies.

  2. Unveiling The Physics of Star Formation and Feedback in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Kramer, C; Schinnerer, E; Beckman, J; Knapen, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of feedback in the evolution of the star formation rate in the Universe. However, the nature and physics of the feedback are still pressing questions. Radio continuum observations can provide unique dust-unbiased tracers of massive star formation and of the interstellar medium (ISM) and hence are ideal to address the regulation of star formation in galaxies. Our multi-frequency and multi-resolution radio surveys in nearby galaxies enable us to trace various phases of star formation and dissect the thermal and nonthermal ISM in galaxies. Mapping the cosmic ray electron energy index and magnetic field strength, we have found observational evidence that massive star formation significantly affects the energy balance in the ISM through the injection and acceleration of cosmic rays and the amplification of magnetic fields. How the next generation of stars could form in such a magnetized and turbulent ISM will be addressed in our 'EVLA cloud-scale survey of the local group galaxy ...

  3. Star-Galaxy Classification in Multi-band Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadely, Ross; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth

    2012-11-01

    Ground-based optical surveys such as PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST will produce large catalogs to limiting magnitudes of r >~ 24. Star-galaxy separation poses a major challenge to such surveys because galaxies—even very compact galaxies—outnumber halo stars at these depths. We investigate photometric classification techniques on stars and galaxies with intrinsic FWHM training data to classify unknown sources; ML and HB do not. We consider (1) a best-case scenario (SVMbest) where the training data are (unrealistically) a random sampling of the data in both signal-to-noise and demographics and (2) a more realistic scenario where training is done on higher signal-to-noise data (SVMreal) at brighter apparent magnitudes. Testing with COSMOS ugriz data, we find that HB outperforms ML, delivering ~80% completeness, with purity of ~60%-90% for both stars and galaxies. We find that no algorithm delivers perfect performance and that studies of metal-poor main-sequence turnoff stars may be challenged by poor star-galaxy separation. Using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve, we find a best-to-worst ranking of SVMbest, HB, ML, and SVMreal. We conclude, therefore, that a well-trained SVM will outperform template-fitting methods. However, a normally trained SVM performs worse. Thus, HB template fitting may prove to be the optimal classification method in future surveys.

  4. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Conroy, Charlie

    2008-01-01

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs -- i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo--galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the n...

  5. Revealing the nature of star forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    George, Koshy

    2015-01-01

    Context: Star forming early-type galaxies with blue optical colours at low redshift can be used to test our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Aims: We want to reveal the fuel and triggering mechanism for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. Methods: We undertook an optical and ultraviolet study of 55 star forming blue early-type galaxies, searching for signatures of recent interactions that could be driving the molecular gas into the galaxy and potentially triggering the star formation. Results: We report here our results on star forming blue early-type galaxies with tidal trails and in close proximity to neighbouring galaxies that are evidence of ongoing or recent interactions between galaxies. There are 12 galaxies with close companions with similar redshifts, among which two galaxies are having ongoing interactions that potentially trigger the star formation. Two galaxies show a jet feature that could be due to the complete tidal disrupti...

  6. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  7. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Bivariate functions of H$\\alpha$ star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gunawardhana, M L P; Taylor, E N; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Norberg, P; Baldry, I K; Loveday, J; Owers, M S; Wilkins, S M; Colless, M; Brown, M J I; Driver, S P; Alpaslan, M; Brough, S; Cluver, M; Croom, S; Kelvin, L; Lara-López, M A; Liske, J; López-Sánchez, A R; Robotham, A S G

    2014-01-01

    We present bivariate luminosity and stellar mass functions of H$\\alpha$ star forming galaxies drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. While optically deep spectroscopic observations of GAMA over a wide sky area enable the detection of a large number of $0.001<{SFR}_{H\\alpha}$ (M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$)$<100$ galaxies, the requirement for an H$\\alpha$ detection in targets selected from an $r$-band magnitude limited survey leads to an incompleteness due to missing optically faint star forming galaxies. Using $z<0.1$ bivariate distributions as a reference we model the higher-$z$ distributions, thereby approximating a correction for the missing optically faint star forming galaxies to the local SFR and stellar mass densities. Furthermore, we obtain the $r$-band LFs and stellar mass functions of H$\\alpha$ star forming galaxies from the bivariate LFs. As our sample is selected on the basis of detected H$\\alpha$ emission, a direct tracer of on-going star formation, this sample represents a true ...

  8. Signatures of recent star formation in ring S0 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, A; Rampazzo, R; Thilker, D; Annibali, F; Bressan, A; Buson, L M; 10.1007/s10509-010-0588-3

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the stellar populations of ring and/or arm-like structures in a sample of S0 galaxies using GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet imaging and SDSS optical data. Such structures are prominent in the UV and reveal recent star formation. We quantitatively characterize these rejuvenation events, estimating the average age and stellar mass of the ring structures, as well as of the entire galaxy. The mass fraction of the UV-bright rings is a few percent of the total galaxy mass, although the UV ring luminosity reaches 70% of the galaxy luminosity. The integrated colors of these S0s locates them in the red sequence (NGC 2962) and in the so-called green valley. We suggest that the star formation episodes may be induced by different triggering mechanisms, such as the inner secular evolution driven by bars, and interaction episodes.

  9. The fate of a red nugget: In-situ star formation of satellites around a massive compact galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Morishita, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    To study the accretion phase for local massive galaxies, we search accreting satellites around a massive compact galaxy (M_*~3.9x10^10Msun), spectroscopically confirmed (z_spec-1.9213) in the eXtreme Deep Field, which has been originally reported in Szomoru et al. We detect 1369 satellite candidates within the projected virial radius (rvir~300 kpc) of the compact galaxy in the all-combined ACS image with 5sigma-limiting magnitude of mACS~30.6 ABmag, which corresponds to ~1.6x10^7M_sun at the redshift. The photometric redshift measured with 12 multi-band images confirms 34 satellites out of the candidates. Most of the satellites are found to have the rest-frame colors consistent with star forming galaxies. We investigate the relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (the star formation main sequence), and find the steeper slope at the low-mass end (<10^8M_sun), while more massive satellites are consistently on the sequence reported in previous studies. Within the uncertainties of star formation ...

  10. Lyman-alpha emission in star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee W.; Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.; O'Brien, Paul; Wilson, Robert

    1988-01-01

    IUE observations of five blue, low-metallicity, star-forming galaxies sufficiently redshifted to permit detection of Lyman-alpha are reported. The galaxies with metallicities 0.1 time solar or more have weak or absent Lyman-alpha emission. There is evidence for increasing Lyman-alpha emission with decreasing metallicity. The reduction of Lyman-alpha fluxes from recombination values is attributed to absorption of multiply scattered Lyman-alpha by dust.

  11. Physics of star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, F

    2002-01-01

    Begining with a historical introduction, ""Star Formation: The Early History"", this text then presents two long articles on ""Pre-Main-Sequence Evolution of Stars and Young Clusters"" and ""Observations of Young Stellar Objects"".

  12. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  13. IROCKS: Spatially resolved kinematics of z~1 star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mieda, Etsuko; Larkin, James E; Armus, Lee; Juneau, Stephanie; Salim, Samir; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    We present results from IROCKS (Intermediate Redshift OSIRIS Chemo-Kinematic Survey) for sixteen z~1 and one z~1.4 star-forming galaxies. All galaxies were observed with OSIRIS with the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Keck Observatory. We use rest-frame nebular Ha emission lines to trace morphologies and kinematics of ionized gas in star-forming galaxies on sub-kiloparsec physical scales. We observe elevated velocity dispersions (sigma > 50 km/s) seen in z > 1.5 galaxies persist at z~1 in the integrated galaxies. Using an inclined disk model and the ratio of v/sigma, we find that 1/3 of the z~1 sample are disk candidates while the other 2/3 of the sample are dominated by merger-like and irregular sources. We find that including extra attenuation towards HII regions derived from stellar population synthesis modeling brings star formation rates (SFR) using Ha and stellar population fit into a better agreement. We explore properties of compact Ha sub-component, or "clump," at z~1 and find that they fo...

  14. Star formation triggered by galaxy interactions in modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Florent; Famaey, Benoit; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    Together with interstellar turbulence, gravitation is one key player in star formation. It acts both at galactic scales in the assembly of gas into dense clouds, and inside those structures for their collapse and the formation of pre-stellar cores. To understand to what extent the large scale dynamics govern the star formation activity of galaxies, we present hydrodynamical simulations in which we generalise the behaviour of gravity to make it differ from Newtonian dynamics in the low acceleration regime. We focus on the extreme cases of interacting galaxies, and compare the evolution of galaxy pairs in the dark matter paradigm to that in the Milgromian Dynamics (MOND) framework. Following up on the seminal work by Tiret & Combes, this paper documents the first simulations of galaxy encounters in MOND with a detailed Eulerian hydrodynamical treatment of baryonic physics, including star formation and stellar feedback. We show that similar morphologies of the interacting systems can be produced by both the dark matter and MOND formalisms, but require a much slower orbital velocity in the MOND case. Furthermore, we find that the star formation activity and history are significantly more extended in space and time in MOND interactions, in particular in the tidal debris. Such differences could be used as observational diagnostics and make interacting galaxies prime objects in the study of the nature of gravitation at galactic scales.

  15. Decreased Specific Star Formation Rates in AGN Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, T Taro; Melendez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (\\mstar) from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and \\mstar{} as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray lum...

  16. The Star Formation Demographics of Galaxies in the Local Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Janice C; Jose J Funes, S J; Sakai, Shoko; Akiyama, Sanae

    2007-01-01

    We examine the connections between the current global star formation activity, luminosity, dynamical mass and morphology of galaxies in the Local Volume, using H-alpha data from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS). Taking the equivalent width (EW) of the H-alpha emission line as a tracer of the specific star formation rate, we analyze the distribution of galaxies in the M_B-EW and rotational velocity (V_{max})-EW planes. Star-forming galaxies show two characteristic transitions in these planes. A narrowing of the galaxy locus occurs at M_B~-15 and V_{max}~50 km/s, where the scatter in the logarithmic EWs drops by a factor of two as the luminosities/masses increase, and galaxy morphologies shift from predominately irregular to late-type spiral. Another transition occurs at M_B~-19 and V_{max}~120 km/s, above which the sequence turns off toward lower EWs and becomes mostly populated by intermediate and early-type bulge-prominent spirals. Between these two transitions, the mean logarithmic ...

  17. ADVANCED BURNING STAGES AND FATE OF 8-10 M{sub Sun} STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Hirschi, R. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard Jones Building, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Nomoto, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Fischer, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, University of Arizona, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Herwig, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paxton, B. [KITP and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Toki, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Lam, Y. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bertolli, M. G., E-mail: s.w.jones@keele.ac.uk [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The stellar mass range 8 {approx}< M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 12 corresponds to the most massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and the most numerous massive stars. It is host to a variety of supernova (SN) progenitors and is therefore very important for galactic chemical evolution and stellar population studies. In this paper, we study the transition from super-AGB (SAGB) star to massive star and find that a propagating neon-oxygen-burning shell is common to both the most massive electron capture supernova (EC-SN) progenitors and the lowest mass iron-core-collapse supernova (FeCCSN) progenitors. Of the models that ignite neon-burning off-center, the 9.5 M{sub Sun} star would evolve to an FeCCSN after the neon-burning shell propagates to the center, as in previous studies. The neon-burning shell in the 8.8 M{sub Sun} model, however, fails to reach the center as the URCA process and an extended (0.6 M{sub Sun }) region of low Y{sub e} (0.48) in the outer part of the core begin to dominate the late evolution; the model evolves to an EC-SN. This is the first study to follow the most massive EC-SN progenitors to collapse, representing an evolutionary path to EC-SN in addition to that from SAGB stars undergoing thermal pulses (TPs). We also present models of an 8.75 M{sub Sun} SAGB star through its entire TP phase until electron captures on {sup 20}Ne begin at its center and of a 12 M{sub Sun} star up to the iron core collapse. We discuss key uncertainties and how the different pathways to collapse affect the pre-SN structure. Finally, we compare our results to the observed neutron star mass distribution.

  18. MEASURING GALAXY STAR FORMATION RATES FROM INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY: INSIGHTS FROM COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF RESOLVED STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Benjamin D. [Institute d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Departamento de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Lee, Janice C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Boquien, Mederic [Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)

    2013-07-20

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from Hubble-Space-Telescope-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 8.5, with metallicities {approx}10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically overpredict observed luminosities by up to {approx}0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of {approx}2 variations in the UV luminosities relative to the assumption of a constant SFH over the past 100 Myr. These variations are not strongly correlated with UV-optical colors, implying that correcting UV-based SFRs for the effects of realistic SFHs is difficult using only the broadband SED. Additionally, for this diverse sample of galaxies, we find that stars older than 100 Myr can contribute from <5%-100% of the present day UV luminosity, highlighting the challenges in defining a characteristic star formation timescale associated with UV emission. We do find a relationship between UV emission timescale and broadband UV-optical color, though it is different than predictions based on exponentially declining SFH models. Our findings have significant implications for the comparison of UV-based SFRs across low-metallicity populations with diverse SFHs.

  19. Star Formation History of Dwarf Galaxies in Cosmological Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nagamine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the past and current work on the star formation (SF histories of dwarf galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The results obtained from different numerical methods are still somewhat mixed, but the differences are understandable if we consider the numerical and resolution effects. It remains a challenge to simulate the episodic nature of SF history in dwarf galaxies at late times within the cosmological context of a cold dark matter model. More work is needed to solve the mysteries of SF history of dwarf galaxies employing large-scale hydrodynamic simulations on the next generation of supercomputers.

  20. CONSTRAINING THE DETERMINATION OF THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the ability of two di erent algorithms, GASPEX and DinBas2D, to derive the Star Formation History from a galaxy spectrum. The former is a non-parametric method which derives the galaxy mass fraction formed in a pre-selected set of epochs. The second is a new approach that nds the best combination of age and mass fraction of two simple stellar populations that ts the target spectrum. In order to constrain the advantages and limitations of this novel method, we apply it to simulated galaxy spectra that cover the Hubble sequence.

  1. The Determination of the Star Formation Rate in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, G

    1997-01-01

    A spectrophotometric model able to compute the integrated spectrum of a galaxy, including the contribution both of the stellar populations and of the ionized interstellar gas of the HII regions powered by young hot stars, has been used to study several spectral features and photometric quantities in order to derive calibrations of the star formation history of late type galaxies. Attention has been paid to analyze the emission of the Balmer lines and the [OII]$\\lambda$3727 line to test their attitude at providing estimates of the present star formation rate in galaxies. Other features, like D$_{4000}$ and the equivalent width of the H$_{\\delta}$ line, influenced by the presence of intermediate age stars, have been considered. Several ways of estimating the star formation rates in normal galaxies are discussed and some considerations concerning the applicability of the models are presented. Criteria have been also studied for ascertaining the presence of a burst, current or ended not long ago. Bursts usually h...

  2. An Integrated Spectrophotometric Survey of Nearby Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moustakas, J

    2005-01-01

    We present integrated optical spectrophotometry for a sample of 417 nearby galaxies. Our observations consist of spatially integrated, S/N=10-100 spectroscopy between 3600 and 6900 Angstroms at ~8 Angstroms FWHM resolution. In addition, we present nuclear (2.5"x2.5") spectroscopy for 153 of these objects. Our sample targets a diverse range of galaxy types, including starbursts, peculiar galaxies, interacting/merging systems, dusty, infrared-luminous galaxies, and a significant number of normal galaxies. We use population synthesis to model and subtract the stellar continuum underlying the nebular emission lines. This technique results in emission-line measurements reliably corrected for stellar absorption. Here, we present the integrated and nuclear spectra, the nebular emission-line fluxes and equivalent widths, and a comprehensive compilation of ancillary data available in the literature for our sample. In a series of subsequent papers we use these data to study optical star-formation rate indicators, nebul...

  3. An atlas of ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, A. L.; Bohlin, R. C.; Calzetti, D.; Panagia, N.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the UV spectra of star-forming galaxies of different morphological type and activity class using a sample drawn from a uniformly reduced IUE data set. The spectra for a wide variety of galaxies, including normal spiral, LINER, starburst, blue compact, blue compact dwarf, and Seyfert 2 galaxies, are presented in the form of spectral energy distributions to demonstrate the overall characteristics according to morphology and activity class and in the form of absolute flux distributions to better show the absorption and emission features of individual objects. The data support the picture based on UV spectra of the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory and of the Astronautical Netherlands Satellite that spiral galaxies of later Hubble class have more flux at the shortest UV wavelengths than do spiral galaxies of earlier Hubble class.

  4. Reconstructing The Star Formation Histories Of Galaxies Through Sed Fitting Using The Dense Basis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Kartheik; Gawiser, Eric

    2017-06-01

    The Dense Basis SED fitting method reveals previously inaccessible information about the number and duration of star formation episodes and the timing of stellar mass assembly as well as uncertainties in these quantities, in addition to accurately recovering traditional SED parameters including M*, SFR and dust attenuation. This is done using basis Star Formation Histories (SFHs) chosen by comparing the goodness-of-fit of mock galaxy SEDs to the goodness-of-reconstruction of their SFHs, trained and validated using three independent datasets of mock galaxies at z=1 from SAMs, Hydrodynamic simulations and stochastic realizations. Of the six parametrizations of SFHs considered, we reject the traditional parametrizations of constant and exponential SFHs and suggest four novel improvements, quantifying the bias and scatter of each parametrization. We then apply the method to a sample of 1100 CANDELS GOODS-S galaxies at 110^9 M_sun, in contrast to current simulations. About 40% of the CANDEL galaxies have SFHs whose maximum occurs at or near the epoch of observation. These results are presented in Iyer and Gawiser (2017, ApJ 838 127), available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.04371

  5. Turbulence and Star Formation in a Sample of Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Erin; Hunter, Deidre A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. (2010) on the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, as indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the neutral hydrogen (HI) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS, Walter et al. 2008). We apply the statistical moments in three different methods- the galaxy as a whole, divided into a function of radii and then into grids. We create individual grid maps of kurtosis for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with their far-ultraviolet images taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies, in which the variatio...

  6. The star formation history of the LSB Galaxy UGC 5889

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, A; Bomans, D J

    2005-01-01

    We present HST photometry of the LSB galaxy UGC 5889 and derive its recent star formation history. In the last 200 Myr the star formation proceeded in modest bursts at a rate of the order of e-2 to e-3 solar masses masses per year, with periods of extremely low SFR or even quiescence. The rate derived from the present study for the last 20 Myr is in agreement with the Halpha emission from the galaxy. The presence of a consistent population older than 200 Myr is suggested by the data. However, observational errors and completeness correction prevent any firm conclusion on the oldest age. The total mass of stars is of the order of 5.5e7 solas masses. Even if the recent episodes of star formation have heated the gas and carved a hole in the disk, blow-away of the gas is unlikely to occur.

  7. The host galaxy and environment of a neutron star merger

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Rowlinson, A; Garcia-Benito, R; Levan, A J; Gorosabel, J; Goldoni, P; Schulze, S; Zafar, T; Wiersema, K; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Melandri, A; D'Avanzo, P; Oates, S; D'Elia, V; De Pasquale, M; Kruehler, T; van der Horst, A J; Xu, D; Watson, D; Piranomonte, S; Vergani, S; Milvang-Jensen, B; Kaper, L; Malesani, D; Fynbo, J P U; Cano, Z; Covino, S; Flores, H; Greiss, S; Hammer, F; Hartoog, O E; Hellmich, S; Heuser, C; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Mottola, S; Sparre, M; Sollerman, J; Tagliaferri, G; Tanvir, N R; Vestergaard, M; Wijers, R A M J

    2013-01-01

    The mergers of neutron stars have been predicted to cause an r-process supernova - a luminous near-infrared transient powered by the radioactive decay of freshly formed heavy metals. An r-process supernova, or kilonova, has recently been discovered coincident with the short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B, simultaneously confirming the widely-held theory of the origin of most short-durations GRBs in neutron star mergers. We report here the absorption spectrum of the afterglow of this GRB. From it we determine the redshift of the burst and the properties of the host galaxy and the environment in which the merger occurred. The merger is not associated with the most star-forming region of the galaxy; however, it did occur in a dense region, implying a rapid merger or a low natal kick velocity for the neutron star binary.

  8. Separating Stars and Galaxies Probabilistically Based on Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Using photometric data from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) we develop a star-galaxy separation algorithm based on objects' colors in six bands (B,V,R,z,J,K). Using a training set selected from a catalog of stars classified via their DLS shapes, we fit a third order polynomial to the filtered color-color data to approximate the stellar locus. Our algorithm produces a weighted probability of an object being a star. Based on each object's distance from the stellar locus in color-color space, we fit the resulting histogram as the sum of two Gaussians. We find that near-infrared information (J and K) provide the best separation, but explore using optical information alone to determine the classification as well. Our results demonstrate that the use of color information in a probabilistic algorithm has the potential to dramatically improve star-galaxy classification when used in conjunction with existing shape-based algorithms.​

  9. Dwarf galaxies in voids: Suppressing star formation with photo-heating

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeft, M; Gottlöber, S; Springel, V; Hoeft, Matthias; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottloeber, Stefan; Springel, Volker

    2005-01-01

    We study structure formation in cosmological void regions using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. Despite being significantly underdense, voids are populated abundantly with small dark matter halos which should appear as dwarf galaxies if their star formation is not suppressed significantly. We here investigate to which extent the cosmological UV-background photo-evaporates baryons out of halos of dwarf galaxies, and thereby limits their cooling and star formation rates. Assuming a Haardt & Madau UV-background with reionisation at redshift z=6, our samples of simulated galaxies show that halos with masses below a characteristic mass of M_c(z=0) = 6.5 x 10^9 h^{-1} M_sun are baryon-poor, but in general not completely empty, because baryons that are in the condensed cold phase or are already locked up in stars resist evaporation. In halos with mass M < M_c, we find that photo-heating suppresses further cooling of gas. The redshift and UV-background dependent characteristic mass M_c(z) can be un...

  10. Variability and star formation in Leo T, the lowest luminosity star-forming galaxy known today

    CERN Document Server

    Clementini, Gisella; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Federici, Luciana; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Tosi, Monica; Musella, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    We present results from the first combined study of variable stars and star formation history (SFH) of the Milky Way (MW) "ultra-faint" dwarf (UFD) galaxy Leo T, based on F606W and F814W multi-epoch archive observations obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have detected 14 variable stars in the galaxy. They include one fundamental-mode RR Lyrae star and 10 Anomalous Cepheids with periods shorter than 1 day, thus suggesting the occurrence of multiple star formation episodes in this UFD, of which one about 10 Gyr ago produced the RR Lyrae star. A new estimate of the distance to Leo T of 409 $^{+29}_{-27}$ kpc (distance modulus of 23.06 $\\pm$ 0.15 mag) was derived from the galaxy's RR Lyrae star. Our V, V-I color-magnitude diagram of Leo T reaches V~29 mag and shows features typical of a galaxy in transition between dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal types. A quantitative analysis of the star formation history, based on the comparison of the observed V,V-I CMD...

  11. Evolution of galaxy stellar masses and star formation rates in the EAGLE simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Furlong, M; Theuns, T; Schaye, J; Crain, R A; Schaller, M; Vecchia, C Dalla; Frenk, C S; McCarthy, I G; Helly, J; Jenkins, A; Rosas-Guevara, Y M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of galaxy masses and star formation rates in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) simulations. These comprise a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in a $\\Lambda$CDM cosmogony with subgrid models for radiative cooling, star formation, stellar mass loss, and feedback from stars and accreting black holes. The subgrid feedback was calibrated to reproduce the observed present-day galaxy stellar mass function and galaxy sizes. Here we demonstrate that the simulations reproduce the observed growth of the stellar mass density to within 20 per cent. The simulation also tracks the observed evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function out to redshift z = 7, with differences comparable to the plausible uncertainties in the interpretation of the data. Just as with observed galaxies, the specific star formation rates of simulated galaxies are bimodal, with distinct star forming and passive sequences. The specific star formation rates of star forming galaxies ar...

  12. The anatomy of a star-forming galaxy: pressure-driven regulation of star formation in simulated galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, S. M.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Keller, B. W.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the regulation of star formation in star-forming galaxies through a suite of high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations. We use the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GASOLINE, including photoelectric heating and metal cooling, which produces a multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM). We show that representative star formation and feedback sub-grid models naturally lead to a weak, sub-linear dependence between the amount of star formation and changes to star formation parameters. We incorporate these sub-grid models into an equilibrium pressure-driven regulation framework. We show that the sub-linear scaling arises as a consequence of the non-linear relationship between scaleheight and the effective pressure generated by stellar feedback. Thus, simulated star formation regulation is sensitive to how well vertical structure in the ISM is resolved. Full galaxy discs experience density waves which drive locally time-dependent star formation. We develop a simple time-dependent, pressure-driven model that reproduces the response extremely well.

  13. The anatomy of a star-forming galaxy: Pressure-driven regulation of star formation in simulated galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, S M; Couchman, H M P; Keller, B W

    2016-01-01

    We explore the regulation of star formation in star-forming galaxies through a suite of high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations. We use the SPH code GASOLINE, including photoelectric heating and metal cooling, which produces a multi-phase interstellar medium. We show that representative star formation and feedback sub-grid models naturally lead to a weak, sub-linear dependence between the amount of star formation and changes to star formation parameters. We incorporate these sub-grid models into an equilibrium pressure-driven regulation framework. We show that the sub-linear scaling arises as a consequence of the non-linear relationship between scale height and the effective pressure generated by stellar feedback. Thus, simulated star-formation regulation is sensitive to how well vertical structure in the ISM is resolved. Full galaxy disks experience density waves which drive locally time-dependent star formation. We develop a simple time-dependent, pressure-driven model that reproduces the response extre...

  14. The Breakthrough Listen Search for Intelligent Life: Target Selection of Nearby Stars and Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Howard; Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Lebofsky, Matt; Price, Danny C.; MacMahon, David; Croft, Steve; DeBoer, David; Hickish, Jack; Werthimer, Dan; Sheikh, Sofia; Hellbourg, Greg; Enriquez, J. Emilio

    2017-05-01

    We present the target selection for the Breakthrough Listen search for extraterrestrial intelligence during the first year of observations at the Green Bank Telescope, Parkes Telescope, and Automated Planet Finder. On the way to observing 1,000,000 nearby stars in search of technological signals, we present three main sets of objects we plan to observe in addition to a smaller sample of exotica. We chose the 60 nearest stars, all within 5.1 pc from the Sun. Such nearby stars offer the potential to observe faint radio signals from transmitters that have a power similar to those on Earth. We add a list of 1649 stars drawn from the Hipparcos catalog that span the Hertzprung-Russell diagram, including all spectral types along the main sequence, subgiants, and giant stars. This sample offers diversity and inclusion of all stellar types, but with thoughtful limits and due attention to main sequence stars. Our targets also include 123 nearby galaxies composed of a “morphological-type-complete” sample of the nearest spirals, ellipticals, dwarf spherioidals, and irregulars. While their great distances hamper the detection of technological electromagnetic radiation, galaxies offer the opportunity to observe billions of stars simultaneously and to sample the bright end of the technological luminosity function. We will also use the Green Bank and Parkes telescopes to survey the plane and central bulge of the Milky Way. Finally, the complete target list includes several classes of exotica, including white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, black holes, neutron stars, and asteroids in our solar system.

  15. The First Focused Hard X-Ray Images of the Sun With NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) hard X-ray (HXR) telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, NuSTAR nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at HXR energies (>3 ke......V) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where NuSTAR will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with NuSTAR, their limitations......, and full-disk HXR images of the Sun....

  16. The Sun as a star: empirical estimates of stellar coronal mass ejection rates and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    Our nearest star provides exquisite, up-close views of the physical processes driving energetic phenomena we observe on stars and cannot yet spatially resolve. Stars provide a statistical ensemble of solar analogs spanning a range of ages representing snapshots along our Sun's full life cycle. In this talk, I will share a project bringing the astronomer's large scale statistical approach to bear on solar data. Combining a decades' worth of solar flare and CME data, we characterize for the first time a relationship between flare and CME properties in order to extend analogy to readily observable stellar flares. We aim to better understand the properties and evolution of magnetic activity on Sun-like stars and exoweather on planets about distant Suns.

  17. The First Focused Hard X-Ray Images of the Sun With NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) hard X-ray (HXR) telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, NuSTAR nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at HXR energies (>3 ke......V) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where NuSTAR will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with NuSTAR, their limitations......, and full-disk HXR images of the Sun....

  18. The variability of Sun-like stars: reproducing observed photometric trends

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Schmutz, W K; Ball, W T; Knaack, R; Rozanov, E V; Unruh, Y C

    2014-01-01

    The Sun and stars with low magnetic activity levels, become photometrically brighter when their activity increases. Magnetically more active stars display the opposite behaviour and get fainter when their activity increases. We reproduce the observed photometric trends in stellar variations with a model that treats stars as hypothetical Suns with coverage by magnetic features different from that of the Sun. The presented model attributes the variability of stellar spectra to the imbalance between the contributions from different components of the solar atmosphere, such as dark starspots and bright faculae. A stellar spectrum is calculated from spectra of the individual components, by weighting them with corresponding disc area coverages. The latter are obtained by extrapolating the solar dependences of spot and facular disc area coverages on chromospheric activity to stars with different levels of mean chromospheric activity. We have found that the contribution by starspots to the variability increases faster...

  19. The Star Formation Histories of Disk and E/S0 Galaxies from Resolved Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Knut A G; Saha, Abhijit; Skillman, Evan; Williams, Benjamin F; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2009-01-01

    The resolved stellar populations of local galaxies, from which it is possible to derive complete star formation and chemical enrichment histories, provide an important way to study galaxy formation and evolution that is complementary to lookback time studies. We propose to use photometry of resolved stars to measure the star formation histories in a statistical sample of galaxy disks and E/S0 galaxies near their effective radii. These measurements would yield strong evidence to support critical questions regarding the formation of galactic disks and spheroids. The main technological limitation is spatial resolution for photometry in heavily crowded fields, for which we need improvement by a factor of ~10 over what is possible today with filled aperture telescopes.

  20. Quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, A.; Roehlly, Y.; Fossati, M.; Buat, V.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Ciesla, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Serra, P.

    2016-11-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SEDs of the target galaxies were fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies was parametrised using a specific star formation history with two free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These two parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism, which acts on long timescales when starvation processes are at work, but is rapid and efficient when ram pressure occurs. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combined twenty photometric bands in the UV to far-infrared in a new way with three age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution (R 1000) integrated spectroscopy and with Hα narrow-band imaging data. The use of a truncated star formation history significantly increases the quality of the fit in HI-deficient galaxies of the sample, that is to say, in those objects whose atomic gas content has been removed during the interaction with the hostile cluster environment. The typical quenching age of the perturbed late-type galaxies is QA ≲ 300 Myr whenever the activity of star formation is reduced by 50% 80%, while that of the quiescent early-type objects is QA ≃ 1-3 Gyr. The fraction of late-type galaxies with a star formation activity reduced by QF > 80% and with an HI-deficiency parameter HI-def > 0.4 drops by a factor of 5 from the inner half virial radius of the Virgo cluster (R/Rvir 4). The efficient quenching of the star formation activity observed in Virgo suggests that the dominant stripping process is ram pressure. We discuss the implication of this result in

  1. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Villa, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. We aim to constrain the amount of star formation happening in long-lived clusters for four galaxies through the homogeneous study of field stars and star clusters. Using HST/ACS-WFPC2 images of the galaxies NGC45, NGC1313, NGC5236 and NGC7793, we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Masses and ages of star clusters are estimated using simple stellar population model fitting. Comparing observed and modeled luminosity functions we estimate cluster formation rates. By randomly sampling the stellar IMF, we construct artificial star clusters and quantify how stochastic effects influence cluster detection, integrated colors and age estimates. Star formation rates appear to be constant over the past 10-100 Myr. The number of clu...

  2. Little Bear's pulsating stars: Variable star census of UMi dSph Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Jeffery, E.; Kuehn, C.; Grabowski, K.; Nemec, J.

    2017-09-01

    Recent observations and a photometric search for variable stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (UMi dSph) are presented. Our observations were taken at Apache Point Observatory in 2014 and 2016 using the 0.5m ARCSAT telescope and the West Mountain Observatory (WMO) 0.9m telescope of Brigham Young University in 2016. Previously known RR Lyrae stars in our field of view of the UMi dSph are identified, and we also catalog new variable star candidates. Tentative classifications are given for some of the new variable stars. We have conducted period searches with the data collected with the WMO telescope. Our ultimate goal is to create an updated catalog of variable stars in the UMi dSph and to compare the RR Lyrae stellar characteristics to other RR Lyrae stars found in the Local Group dSph galaxies.

  3. Little Bear’s pulsating stars: Variable star census of UMi dSph Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinemuchi K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations and a photometric search for variable stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (UMi dSph are presented. Our observations were taken at Apache Point Observatory in 2014 and 2016 using the 0.5m ARCSAT telescope and the West Mountain Observatory (WMO 0.9m telescope of Brigham Young University in 2016. Previously known RR Lyrae stars in our field of view of the UMi dSph are identified, and we also catalog new variable star candidates. Tentative classifications are given for some of the new variable stars. We have conducted period searches with the data collected with the WMO telescope. Our ultimate goal is to create an updated catalog of variable stars in the UMi dSph and to compare the RR Lyrae stellar characteristics to other RR Lyrae stars found in the Local Group dSph galaxies.

  4. NEARBY CLUMPY, GAS RICH, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: LOCAL ANALOGS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUMPY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, C. A. [Natural Sciences Department, Jeffords Science Center, Castleton State College, Castleton, VT 05735 (United States); Pisano, D. J.; Rabidoux, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, 135 Willey Street, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Low, M.-M. Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Kreckel, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Guzmán, R., E-mail: catherine.garland@castleton.edu, E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu, E-mail: krabidou@mix.wvu.edu, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: kreckel@mpia.de, E-mail: guzman@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%); (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%); and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  5. Revisiting The First Galaxies: The effects of Population III stars on their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander L; Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Zemp, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the ART code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H2 formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a new recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III stars. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies which host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10^8 yr after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they will typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies more massive than ...

  6. ON THE STAR FORMATION LAW FOR SPIRAL AND IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G., E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A dynamical model for star formation on a galactic scale is proposed in which the interstellar medium is constantly condensing to star-forming clouds on the dynamical time of the average midplane density, and the clouds are constantly being disrupted on the dynamical timescale appropriate for their higher density. In this model, the areal star formation rate scales with the 1.5 power of the total gas column density throughout the main regions of spiral galaxies, and with a steeper power, 2, in the far outer regions and in dwarf irregular galaxies because of the flaring disks. At the same time, there is a molecular star formation law that is linear in the main and outer parts of disks and in dIrrs because the duration of individual structures in the molecular phase is also the dynamical timescale, canceling the additional 0.5 power of surface density. The total gas consumption time scales directly with the midplane dynamical time, quenching star formation in the inner regions if there is no accretion, and sustaining star formation for ∼100 Gyr or more in the outer regions with no qualitative change in gas stability or molecular cloud properties. The ULIRG track follows from high densities in galaxy collisions.

  7. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; 3D-HST Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*), the "star formation sequence," and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. In this talk, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-M* plane. Using a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 3D-HST photometric catalogs, we find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M* than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M*, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  8. Neutron Star Motion in the Disk Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ying-Chun; A.Taani; PAN Yuan-Yue; WANG Jing; CAI Yan; LIU Gao-Chao; LUO A-Li; ZHANG Hong-Bo; ZHAO Yong-Heng

    2010-01-01

    @@ The neutron star motions are based on the undisturbed finitely thick galactic disk gravitational potential model.Two initial conditions,I.e.the locations and velocities,are considered.The Monte Carlo method is employed to separate rich diversities of the orbits of neutron stars into several sorts.The Poincaré section has the potential to play an important role in the diagnosis of the neutron star motion.It has been observed that the increasing ratio of the motion range vertical to the galactic plane to that parallel to the galactic plane results in the irregularity of neutron star motion.

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the effect of close interactions on star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, L J M; Driver, S P; Alpaslan, M; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Cluver, M E; Drinkwater, M J; Foster, C; Grootes, M W; Konstantopoulos, I S; Lara-Lopez, M A; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Loveday, J; Meyer, M J; Moffett, A J; Norberg, P; Owers, M S; Popescu, C C; De Propris, R; Sharp, R; Tuffs, R J; Wang, L; Wilkins, S M; Bourne, L Dunne N; Smith, M W L

    2015-01-01

    The modification of star formation (SF) in galaxy interactions is a complex process, with SF observed to be both enhanced in major mergers and suppressed in minor pair interactions. Such changes likely to arise on short timescales and be directly related to the galaxy-galaxy interaction time. Here we investigate the link between dynamical phase and direct measures of SF on different timescales for pair galaxies, targeting numerous star-formation rate (SFR) indicators and comparing to pair separation, individual galaxy mass and pair mass ratio. We split our sample into the higher (primary) and lower (secondary) mass galaxies in each pair and find that SF is indeed enhanced in all primary galaxies but suppressed in secondaries of minor mergers. We find that changes in SF of primaries is consistent in both major and minor mergers, suggesting that SF in the more massive galaxy is agnostic to pair mass ratio. We also find that SF is enhanced/suppressed more strongly for short-time duration SFR indicators (e.g. H-a...

  10. Star formation and mass assembly in high redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Santini, P; Grazian, A; Salimbeni, S; Fiore, F; Fontanot, F; Boutsia, K; Castellano, M; Cristiani, S; De Santis, C; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Menci, N; Nonino, M; Paris, D; Pentericci, L; Vanzella, E

    2009-01-01

    We study the star formation and the mass assembly process of 0.30.3, the SFR is well correlated with stellar mass, and this relationship seems to steepen with redshift (using IR-based SFRs); b) The contribution to the global SFRD by massive galaxies increases with redshift up to ~2.5, faster than for galaxies of lower mass, but appears to flatten at higher z; c) Despite this increase, the most important contributors to the SFRD at any z are galaxies around, or immediately below, the characteristic stellar mass; d) At z~2, massive galaxies are actively star-forming, with a median SFR 300 Msun/yr. During this epoch, they assemble a substantial part of their final stellar mass; e) The SSFR shows a clear bimodal distribution. The analysis of the SFRD and the SSFR seems to sup port the downsizing scenario, according to which high mass galaxies have formed their stars earlier and faster than their low mass counterparts. A comparison with recent theoretical models shows that they follow the global increase of the SS...

  11. Radial Star Formation Histories in Fifteen Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, Daniel A; Egan, Arika A; Hatlestad, Alan J; Herzog, Laura J; Leung, Andrew S; McLane, Jacob N; Phenicie, Christopher; Roberts, Jareth S; Barnes, Kate L; Boquien, Mederic; Calzetti, Daniela; Cook, David O; Kobulnicky, Henry A; Staudaher, Shawn M; van Zee, Liese

    2015-01-01

    New deep optical and near-infrared imaging is combined with archival ultraviolet and infrared data for fifteen nearby galaxies mapped in the Spitzer Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science survey. These images are particularly deep and thus excellent for studying the low surface brightness outskirts of these disk-dominated galaxies with stellar masses ranging between 10^8 and 10^11 Msun. The spectral energy distributions derived from this dataset are modeled to investigate the radial variations in the galaxy colors and star formation histories. Taken as a whole, the sample shows bluer and younger stars for larger radii until reversing near the optical radius, whereafter the trend is for redder and older stars for larger galacto-centric distances. These results are consistent with an inside-out disk formation scenario coupled with an old stellar outer disk population formed through radial migration and/or the cumulative history of minor mergers and accretions of satellite dwarf galaxies. However, these trends...

  12. Star formation in isolated AMIGA galaxies: dynamical influence of bars

    CERN Document Server

    Verley, S; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Bergond, G; Leon, S

    2007-01-01

    Star formation depends strongly both on the local environment of galaxies, and on the internal dynamics of the interstellar medium. To disentangle the two effects, we obtained, in the framework of the AMIGA project, Ha and Gunn r photometric data for more than 200 spiral galaxies lying in very low-density regions of the local Universe. We characterise the Ha emission, tracing current star formation, of the 45 largest and less inclined galaxies observed for which we estimate the torques between the gas and the bulk of the optical matter. We could subsequently study the Ha morphological aspect of these isolated spiral galaxies. Using Fourier analysis, we focus on the modes of the spiral arms and also on the strength of the bars, computing the torques between the gas and newly formed stars (Ha) and the bulk of the optical matter (Gunn r). We interpret the various bar/spiral morphologies observed in terms of the secular evolution experienced by galaxies in isolation. We also classify the different spatial distrib...

  13. Star-galaxy separation in the AKARI NEP Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Solarz, A; Takeuchi, T T; Pepiak, A; Matsuhara, H; Wada, T; Oyabu, S; Takagi, T; Goto, T; Ohyama, Y; Pearson, C P; Hanami, H; Ishigaki, T

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is crucial to develop a method for classifying objects detected in deep surveys at infrared wavelengths. We specifically need a method to separate galaxies from stars using only the infrared information to study the properties of galaxies, e.g., to estimate the angular correlation function, without introducing any additional bias. Aims. We aim to separate stars and galaxies in the data from the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) Deep survey collected in nine AKARI / IRC bands from 2 to 24 {\\mu}m that cover the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths (hereafter NIR and MIR). We plan to estimate the correlation function for NIR and MIR galaxies from a sample selected according to our criteria in future research. Methods: We used support vector machines (SVM) to study the distribution of stars and galaxies in the AKARIs multicolor space. We defined the training samples of these objects by calculating their infrared stellarity parameter (sgc). We created the most efficient classifier and then tested it on the...

  14. Star Formation in the Extreme Outer Galaxy: Digel Cloud 2 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T; Terada, Hiroshi; Saito, Masao

    2007-01-01

    As a first step for studying star formation in the extreme outer Galaxy (EOG), we obtained deep near-infrared images of two embedded clusters at the northern and southern CO peaks of Cloud 2, which is one of the most distant star forming regions in the outer Galaxy (galactic radius R_g ~ 19 kpc). With high spatial resolution (FWHM ~ 0".35) and deep imaging (K ~ 21 mag) with the IRCS imager at the Subaru telescope, we detected cluster members with a mass detection limit of < 0.1 M_{sun}, which is well into the substellar regime. These high quality data enables a comparison of EOG to those in the solar neighborhood on the same basis for the first time. Before interpreting the photometric result, we have first constructed the NIR color-color diagram (dwarf star track, classical T Tauri star (CTTS) locus, reddening law) in the Mauna Kea Observatory filter system and also for the low metallicity environment since the metallicity in EOG is much lower than those in the solar neighborhood. The estimated stellar de...

  15. (Star)bursts of FIRE: observational signatures of bursty star formation in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Feldmann, Robert; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-04-01

    Galaxy formation models are now able to reproduce observed relations such as the relation between galaxies' star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (M*) and the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. We demonstrate that comparisons of the short-time-scale variability in galaxy SFRs with observational data provide an additional useful constraint on the physics of galaxy formation feedback. We apply SFR indicators with different sensitivity time-scales to galaxies from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. We find that the SFR-M* relation has a significantly greater scatter when the Hα-derived SFR is considered compared with when the far-ultraviolet (FUV)-based SFR is used. This difference is a direct consequence of bursty star formation because the FIRE galaxies exhibit order-of-magnitude SFR variations over time-scales of a few Myr. We show that the difference in the scatter between the simulated Hα- and FUV-derived SFR-M* relations at z = 2 is consistent with observational constraints. We also find that the Hα/FUV ratios predicted by the simulations at z = 0 are similar to those observed for local galaxies except for a population of low-mass (M* ≲ 109.5 M⊙) simulated galaxies with lower Hα/FUV ratios than observed. We suggest that future cosmological simulations should compare the Hα/FUV ratios of their galaxies with observations to constrain the feedback models employed.

  16. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    "variable star". The percentage is much higher among large, cool stars ("red giants") - in fact, almost all luminous stars of that type are variable. Such stars are known as Mira-variables ; the name comes from the most prominent member of this class, Omicron Ceti in the constellation Cetus (The Whale), also known as "Stella Mira" (The Wonderful Star). Its brightness changes with a period of 332 days and it is about 1500 times brighter at maximum (visible magnitude 2 and one of the fifty brightest stars in the sky) than at minimum (magnitude 10 and only visible in small telescopes) [2]. Stars like Omicron Ceti are nearing the end of their life. They are very large and have sizes from a few hundred to about a thousand times that of the Sun. The brightness variation is due to pulsations during which the star's temperature and size change dramatically. In the following evolutionary phase, Mira-variables will shed their outer layers into surrounding space and become visible as planetary nebulae with a hot and compact star (a "white dwarf") at the middle of a nebula of gas and dust (cf. the "Dumbbell Nebula" - ESO PR Photo 38a-b/98 ). Several thousand Mira-type stars are currently known in the Milky Way galaxy and a few hundred have been found in other nearby galaxies, including the Magellanic Clouds. The peculiar galaxy Centaurus A ESO PR Photo 14a/03 ESO PR Photo 14a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 451 pix - 53k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 903 pix - 528k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3612 x 4075 pix - 8.4M] ESO PR Photo 14b/03 ESO PR Photo 14b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 570 x 400 pix - 52k [Normal - JPEG: 1140 x 800 pix - 392k] ESO PR Photo 14c/03 ESO PR Photo 14c/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 451 pix - 61k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 903 pix - 768k] ESO PR Photo 14d/03 ESO PR Photo 14d/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 451 pix - 56k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 903 pix - 760k] Captions : PR Photo 14a/03 is a colour composite photo of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) , obtained with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) camera at

  17. STAR-FORMATION THRESHOLDS IN LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHULST, JM; SKILLMAN, ED; SMITH, TR; BOTHUN, GD; MCGAUGH, SS; DEBLOK, WJG

    1993-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies appear to have low star formation rates despite their often quite normal H I contents as judged from global H I properties such as M(H I)/L and M(H I)/M(T) ratios. H I imaging with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (the NRAO is ope

  18. The Correlation Dimension of Young Stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Odekon, M C

    2006-01-01

    We present the correlation dimension of resolved young stars in four actively star-forming dwarf galaxies that are sufficiently resolved and transparent to be modeled as projections of three-dimensional point distributions. We use data in the Hubble Space Telescope archive; photometry for one of them, UGCA 292, is presented here for the first time. We find that there are statistically distinguishable differences in the nature of stellar clustering among the sample galaxies. The young stars of VII Zw 403, the brightest galaxy in the sample, have the highest value for the correlation dimension and also the most dramatic decrease with logarithmic scale, falling from $1.68\\pm0.14$ to $0.10\\pm0.05$ over less than a factor of ten in $r$. This decrease is consistent with the edge effect produced by a projected Poisson distribution within a 2:2:1 ellipsoid. The young stars in UGC 4483, the faintest galaxy in the sample, exhibit very different behavior, with a constant value of about 0.5 over this same range in $r$, e...

  19. UVES abundances of stars in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E; Venn, K; Shetrone, M; Primas, F; Hill, [No Value; Kaufer, A; Szeifert, T

    2002-01-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of contr

  20. Outflows and complex stellar kinematics in SDSS star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cicone, Claudia; Marconi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of star formation-driven outflows by using a large spectroscopic sample of ~160,000 local "normal" star forming galaxies, drawn from the SDSS, spanning a wide range of star formation rates and stellar masses. The galaxy sample is divided into a fine grid of bins in the M_*-SFR parameter space, for each of which we produce a composite spectrum by stacking together the SDSS spectra of the galaxies contained in that bin. We exploit the high signal-to-noise of the stacked spectra to study the emergence of faint features of optical emission lines that may trace galactic outflows and would otherwise be too faint to detect in individual galaxy spectra. We adopt a novel approach that relies on the comparison between the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LoSVD) of the ionised gas (as traced by the [OIII]5007 and Halpha+[NII]6548,6583 emission lines) and the LoSVD of the stars, which are used as a reference tracing virial motions. Significant deviations of the gas kinematics from the st...

  1. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  2. Detecting planets around stars in nearby galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Covone, G; de Ritis, R; Dominik, M; Marino, AA

    2000-01-01

    The only way to detect planets around stars at distances greater than or similar to several kpc is by (photometric or astrometric) microlensing (mu L) observations. In this paper, we show that the capability of photometric mu L extends to the detection of signals caused by planets around stars in ne

  3. Detecting planets around stars in nearby galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Covone, G; de Ritis, R; Dominik, M; Marino, AA

    2000-01-01

    The only way to detect planets around stars at distances greater than or similar to several kpc is by (photometric or astrometric) microlensing (mu L) observations. In this paper, we show that the capability of photometric mu L extends to the detection of signals caused by planets around stars in ne

  4. Circumnuclear Regions of Star Formation in Early Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, Angeles I; Hagele, Guillermo F; Castellanos, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Circumnuclear star forming regions, also called hotspots, are often found in the inner regions of some spiral galaxies where intense processes of star formation are taking place. In the UV, massive stars dominate the observed circumnuclear emission even in the presence of an active nucleus, contributing between 30 and 50% to the H$\\beta$ total emission of the nuclear zone. Spectrophotometric data of moderate resolution (3000 < R < 11000) are presented from which the physical properties of the ionized gas: electron density, oxygen abundances, ionization structure etc. have been derived.

  5. Evolutionary Synthesis Modelling of Young Star Clusters in Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, P; De Grijs, R; Anders, Peter; Alvensleben, Uta Fritze - v.; Grijs, Richard de

    2003-01-01

    The observational properties of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are vital tools to investigate the violent star formation histories of their host galaxies. This violence is thought to have been triggered by galaxy interactions or mergers. The most basic properties of a GCS are its luminosity function (number of clusters per luminosity bin) and color distributions. A large number of observed GCS show bimodal color distributions, which can be translated into a bimodality in either metallicity and/or age. An additional uncertainty comes into play when one considers extinction. These effects can be disentangled either by obtaining spectroscopic data for the clusters or by imaging observations in at least four passbands. This allows us then to discriminate between various formation scenarios of GCSs, e.g. the merger scenario by Ashman & Zepf, and the multi-phase collapse model by Forbes et. al.. Young and metal-rich star cluster populations are seen to form in interacting and merging galaxies. We analyse multi...

  6. First Stars and Galaxies, the Roadmap Ahead: Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    A complete observational understanding of the first stars and galaxies will require four facilities: JWST, 30m ground-based telescopes, ALMA, and the SKA. Each provides complementary capabilities. JWST is our best hope for looking to very high redshift. 30m-class ground-based telescopes provide sensitivity to the rest-frame ultraviolet with high-resolution imaging and high-resolution NIR spectroscopy, possibly reaching as far as z approx.15. They will also allow us to study stellar populations in nearby galaxies and examine the fossil record of the first stars. ALMA will image the redshifted dust continuum emission from evolving galaxies out to z approx.10. The SKA will do cosmic tomography, mapping the process of reionization.

  7. H$_2$-based star formation laws in galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Lizhi; Hirschmann, Michaela; Fontanot, Fabio; Zoldan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We update our recently published model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA), to include a self-consistent treatment of the partition of cold gas in atomic and molecular hydrogen. Our model provides significant improvements with respect to previous ones used for similar studies. In particular, GAEA (i) includes a sophisticated chemical enrichment scheme accounting for non-instantaneous recycling of gas, metals, and energy; (ii) reproduces the measured evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function; (iii) reproduces the observed correlation between galaxy stellar mass and gas metallicity at different redshifts. These are important prerequisites for models considering a metallicity dependent efficiency of molecular gas formation. We also update our model for disk sizes and show that model predictions are in nice agreement with observational estimates for the gas, stellar and star forming disks at different cosmic epochs. We analyse the influence of different star formation laws including empirical relations b...

  8. Cosmic dawn the search for the first stars and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rhee, George

    2013-01-01

    The visible universe consists of stars and galaxies. One of the challenges of astronomy is to understand how galaxies and stars first came into existence over thirteen billion years ago. This book tells the story of our quest to solve this problem. Four hundred years after Galileo used his telescope to discover the  moons of Jupiter, we are using new telescopes and instruments to search for the first galaxies to form after the Big Bang. This book brings the reader to the current frontier of this subject and lays out some of the exciting developments we can expect in the years to come.

  9. Cold gas and star formation in a merging galaxy sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakakis, Antonis; Forbes, Duncan A.; Norris, Ray P.

    2000-10-01

    We explore the evolution of the cold gas (molecular and neutral hydrogen) and star formation activity during galaxy interactions, using a merging galaxy sequence comprising both pre- and post-merger candidates. Data for this study come from the literature, but are supplemented by some new radio observations presented here. First, we confirm that the ratio of far-infrared luminosity to molecular hydrogen mass (LFIRM(H2); star formation efficiency) increases close to nuclear coalescence. After the merging of the two nuclei there is evidence that the star formation efficiency declines again to values typical of ellipticals. This trend can be attributed to M(H2) depletion arising from interaction induced star formation. However, there is significant scatter, likely to arise from differences in the interaction details (e.g., disc-to-bulge ratio, geometry) of individual systems. Secondly, we find that the central molecular hydrogen surface density, ΣH2, increases close to the final stages of the merging of the two nuclei. Such a trend, indicating gas inflows caused by gravitational instabilities during the interaction, is also predicted by numerical simulations. Furthermore, there is evidence for a decreasing fraction of cold gas mass from early interacting systems to merger remnants, attributed to neutral hydrogen conversion into other forms (e.g., stars, hot gas) and molecular hydrogen depletion resulting from ongoing star formation. The evolution of the total-radio to blue-band luminosity ratio, reflecting the total (disc and nucleus) star formation activity, is also investigated. Although this ratio is on average higher than that for isolated spirals, we find a marginal increase along the merging sequence, attributed to the relative insensitivity of disc star formation to interactions. However, a similar result is also obtained for the nuclear radio emission, although galaxy interactions are believed to significantly affect the activity (star formation, AGN) in the

  10. Scaling Relations between Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bigiel, F; Walter, F

    2010-01-01

    High resolution, multi-wavelength maps of a sizeable set of nearby galaxies have made it possible to study how the surface densities of HI, H2 and star formation rate (Sigma_HI, Sigma_H2, Sigma_SFR) relate on scales of a few hundred parsecs. At these scales, individual galaxy disks are comfortably resolved, making it possible to assess gas-SFR relations with respect to environment within galaxies. Sigma_H2, traced by CO intensity, shows a strong correlation with Sigma_SFR and the ratio between these two quantities, the molecular gas depletion time, appears to be constant at about 2Gyr in large spiral galaxies. Within the star-forming disks of galaxies, Sigma_SFR shows almost no correlation with Sigma_HI. In the outer parts of galaxies, however, Sigma_SFR does scale with Sigma_HI, though with large scatter. Combining data from these different environments yields a distribution with multiple regimes in Sigma_gas - Sigma_SFR space. If the underlying assumptions to convert observables to physical quantities are m...

  11. Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassin, Susan A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Brooks, Alyson [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gardner, Jonathan P., E-mail: kassin@stsci.edu [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ∼8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of 'disk settling'. For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art 'zoom in' hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (σ{sub g}) and increase in ordered rotation (V{sub rot}) with time. The slopes of the relations between both σ{sub g} and V{sub rot} with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling'.

  12. The evolution of star formation histories of quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pacifici, Camilla; Weiner, Benjamin J; Holden, Bradford; Gardner, Jonathan P; Faber, Sandra M; Ferguson, Henry C; Koo, David C; Primack, Joel R; Bell, Eric F; Dekel, Avishai; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Rafelski, Marc; Simons, Raymond C; Barro, Guillermo; Croton, Darren J; Dave, Romeel; Fontana, Adriano; Grogin, Norman A; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lee, Seong-Kook; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel; Behroozi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been much progress in understanding how galaxies evolve, we still do not understand how and when they stop forming stars and become quiescent. We address this by applying our galaxy spectral energy distribution models, which incorporate physically motivated star formation histories (SFHs) from cosmological simulations, to a sample of quiescent galaxies at $0.2galaxies with multi-band photometry spanning rest-frame ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths are selected from the CANDELS dataset. We compute median SFHs of these galaxies in bins of stellar mass and redshift. At all redshifts and stellar masses, the median SFHs rise, reach a peak, and then decline to reach quiescence. At high redshift, we find that the rise and decline are fast, as expected because the Universe is young. At low redshift, the duration of these phases depends strongly on stellar mass. Low-mass galaxies ($\\log(M_{\\ast}/M_{\\odot})\\sim9.5$) grow on average slowly, take a lo...

  13. Star forming regions in gas-rich SO galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogge, Richard W.; Eskridge, Paul B.

    1987-01-01

    The first results of an H alpha imaging survey of HI rich SO galaxies, which were searched for HII regions and other sources of emission, are presented. The charge coupled device H alpha interference filter images were made of 16 galaxies. Eight of these galaxies show evidence for on-going star formation, one has nuclear emission but no HII regions, and the remaining seven have no emissions detected within well defined upper limits. With the exception of one notably peculiar galaxy in which the emission from HII regions appears pervasive, the HII regions are either organized into inner-disk rings or randomly distributed throughout the disk. A few of these galaxies are found to be clearly not SO's; or peculiar objects atypical of the SO class. Using simple models star formation rates (SFRs) and gas depletion times from the observed H alpha fluxes were estimated. In general, the derived SFRs are much lower than those found in isolated field spiral galaxies and the corresponding gas depletion time scales are also longer.

  14. Kinematic Evolution of Simulated Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last approximately 8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of "disk settling." For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art "zoom in" hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking as the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (sigma(sub g)) and increase in ordered rotation (V(sub rot)) with time. The slopes of the relations between both sigma(sub g) and V(sub rot) with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling.

  15. Galaxies on FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments): Stellar Feedback Explains Cosmologically Inefficient Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Onorbe, Jose; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norm; Bullock, James S

    2013-01-01

    We present a series of high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy formation to z=0, spanning halo masses ~10^8-10^13 M_sun, and stellar masses ~10^4-10^11. Our simulations include fully explicit treatment of both the multi-phase ISM (molecular through hot) and stellar feedback. The stellar feedback inputs (energy, momentum, mass, and metal fluxes) are taken directly from stellar population models. These sources of stellar feedback, with zero adjusted parameters, reproduce the observed relation between stellar and halo mass up to M_halo~10^12 M_sun (including dwarfs, satellites, MW-mass disks, and small groups). By extension, this leads to reasonable agreement with the stellar mass function for M_star6. We find that the M_star-M_halo relation is insensitive to numerical details, but is sensitive to the feedback physics. Simulations with only supernova feedback fail to reproduce the observed stellar masses, particularly in dwarf and high-redshift galaxies: radiative feedback (photo-heating and radiation...

  16. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David O; Lee, Janice C; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (alpha) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that alpha correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (Sigma_SFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity f...

  17. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Puertas, S Duarte; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Kehrig, C; Perez-Montero, E; Rosales-Ortega, F F

    2016-01-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured $\\rm H\\alpha$ flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the $\\rm H\\alpha$ fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the $\\rm H\\alpha/H\\beta$ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for $\\sim$210,000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical $\\rm H\\alpha$ and $\\rm H\\alpha/H\\beta$ aperture corrections based ...

  18. CLOSE-UP OF STAR FORMATION IN ANTENNAE GALAXY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These four close-up views are taken from a head-on collision between two spiral galaxies, called the Antennae galaxies, seen at image center. The scale bar at the top of each image is 1,500 light-years across. [Left images] The collision triggers the birth of new stars in brilliant blue star clusters, the brightest of which contains roughly a million stars. The star clusters are blue because they are very young, the youngest being only a few million years old, a mere blink of the eye on the astronomical time scale. [Right images] These close-up views of the cores of each galaxy show entrapped dust and gas funneled into the center. The nucleus of NGC 4038 (lower right) is obscured by dust which dims and reddens starlight by scattering the shorter, bluer wavelengths. This is also the reason the young star clusters in the dusty regions appear red instead of blue. This natural-color image is a composite of four separately filtered images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), on January 20, 1996. Resolution is 15 light-years per pixel (picture element). Credit: Brad Whitmore (STScI), and NASA

  19. Decision Tree Classifiers for Star/Galaxy Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, E. C.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Gal, R. R.; LaBarbera, F. L.; Capelato, H. V.; Frago Campos Velho, H.; Trevisan, M.; Ruiz, R. S. R.

    2011-06-01

    We study the star/galaxy classification efficiency of 13 different decision tree algorithms applied to photometric objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven (SDSS-DR7). Each algorithm is defined by a set of parameters which, when varied, produce different final classification trees. We extensively explore the parameter space of each algorithm, using the set of 884,126 SDSS objects with spectroscopic data as the training set. The efficiency of star-galaxy separation is measured using the completeness function. We find that the Functional Tree algorithm (FT) yields the best results as measured by the mean completeness in two magnitude intervals: 14 = 19 (82.1%). We compare the performance of the tree generated with the optimal FT configuration to the classifications provided by the SDSS parametric classifier, 2DPHOT, and Ball et al. We find that our FT classifier is comparable to or better in completeness over the full magnitude range 15 19), our classifier is the only one that maintains high completeness (>80%) while simultaneously achieving low contamination (~2.5%). We also examine the SDSS parametric classifier (psfMag - modelMag) to see if the dividing line between stars and galaxies can be adjusted to improve the classifier. We find that currently stars in close pairs are often misclassified as galaxies, and suggest a new cut to improve the classifier. Finally, we apply our FT classifier to separate stars from galaxies in the full set of 69,545,326 SDSS photometric objects in the magnitude range 14 <= r <= 21.

  20. Clustering Properties of restframe UV selected galaxies II: Migration of Star Formation sites with cosmic time from GALEX and CFHTLS

    CERN Document Server

    Heinis, Sebastien; Arnouts, Stephane; Blaizot, Jeremy; Schiminovich, David; Budavari, Tamas; Ilbert, Olivier; Treyer, Marie; Wyder, Ted K; McCracken, Henry J; Barlow, Tom A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Bianchi, Luciana; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K; Xu, C K

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the clustering properties of ultraviolet selected galaxies by using GALEX-SDSS data at z 2) to low redshift (b ~ 0.79^{+0.1}_{-0.08}). When accounting for the fraction of the star formation activity enclosed in the different samples, our results suggest that the bulk of star formation migrated from high mass dark matter halos at z>2 (10^12 < M_min < 10^13 M_sun, located in high density regions), to less massive halos at low redshift (M_min < 10^12 M_sun, located in low density regions). This result extends the ``downsizing'' picture (shift of the star formation activity from high stellar mass systems at high z to low stellar mass at low z) to the dark matter distribution.

  1. Galaxies with DENIS Preliminary star\\/galaxy separation and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A; Tricottet, M; Banchet, V

    1997-01-01

    The numerous extragalactic and cosmological motivations of the DENIS and 2MASS near infrared surveys are outlined. The performance of the DENIS survey is estimated from 50 deg^2 of high galactic latitude data (20 deg < |b| < 60 deg). Simple star/galaxy separation methods are presented and comparison with 300 visually classified objects as well as COSMOS and APM classifications. We find that the peak intensity over isophotal area is an excellent star/galaxy separation algorithm, fairly robust to variations of the PSF within the frames, achieving 98.5% completeness and 92.5% reliability for I < 16.5, in comparison with visual classification. A new estimate of the photometric accuracy for galaxies is presented. The limiting factors for homogeneous galaxy extraction at high galactic latitudes are completeness and photometric accuracy in K, photometric accuracy in J and star/galaxy separation in I (also used for classification in J and K). Galaxy counts are presented on 50 deg^2. The I counts are in excel...

  2. Simulating galaxy Clusters -II: global star formation histories and galaxy populations

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A D; Sommer-Larsen, J

    2004-01-01

    Cosmological (LambdaCDM) TreeSPH simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy groups and clusters have been performed. The simulations invoke star formation, chemical evolution with non-instantaneous recycling, metal dependent radiative cooling, strong star burst and (optionally) AGN driven galactic super winds, effects of a meta-galactic UV field and thermal conduction. The properties of the galaxy populations in two clusters, one Virgo-like (T~3 keV) and one (sub) Coma-like (T~6 keV), are discussed. The global star formation rates of the cluster galaxies are found to decrease very significantly with time from redshift z=2 to 0, in agreement with observations. The total K-band luminosity of the cluster galaxies correlates tightly with total cluster mass, and for models without additional AGN feedback, the zero point of the relation matches the observed one fairly well. The match to observed galaxy luminosity functions is reasonable, except for a deficiency of bright galaxies (M_B < -20), which bec...

  3. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Mitchell, Noah P

    2015-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing star formation activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The datasets are from the panchromatic STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, HST optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs - using four different models - agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far UV predicted fluxes do not. Further, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated far U...

  4. The influence of binary stars on dwarf spheroidal galaxy kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, J C; Annan, J D

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a Monte-Carlo simulation to estimate the effect of binary star orbits on the measured velocity dispersion in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This paper analyses previous attempts at this calculation, and explains the simulations which were performed with mass, period and ellipticity distributions similar to that measured for the solar neighbourhood. The conclusion is that with functions such as these, the contribution of binary stars to the velocity dispersion is small. The distributions are consistent with the percentage of binaries detected by observations, although this is quite dependent on the measuring errors and on the number of years over which measurements have been taken. For binaries to be making a significant contribution to the dispersion measured in dSph galaxies, the distributions of the orbital parameters would need to be very different from those of stars in the solar neighbourhood. In particular more smaller period orbits with higher mass secondaries would be required. The shape...

  5. Hα Kinematics of High-z Dusty Star Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Patrick; Casey, Caitlin; Hung, Chao-Ling; Cooray, Asantha R.; Sanders, David B.; Fu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Dusty Star Forming Galaxies (DSFGs) have the highest star formation rates in the Universe, but compared with other star forming galaxies at z > ~1 they are difficult to characterize, physically. Their low number density and extreme dust obscuration has led to very few kinematic studies of DSFGs at optical wavelengths. We present a rest-frame optical kinematic analysis of 5 DSFGs at z ~1.5 using long slit spectroscopy obtained with MOSFIRE at Keck Observatory. From our high signal-to-noise spectra we simultaneously fit Hα, [NII] λ6548, and [NII] λ6583 along each slit to generate position-velocity diagrams. We infer the kinematic disturbances and derive dynamical masses in order to compare with other derived quantities such as fractional obscuration, stellar and gas fractions, and dust characteristics.

  6. Star formation rates and mass distributions in interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapferer, W; Schindler, S; Van Kampen, E

    2005-01-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the star formation rate (hereafter SFR) in interacting disk galaxies. We determine the dependence of the overall SFR on different spatial alignments and impact parameters of more than 50 different configurations in combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations. We also show mass profiles of the baryonic components. We find that galaxy-galaxy interactions can enrich the surrounding intergalatic medium with metals very efficiently up to distances of several 100 kpc. This enrichment can be explained in terms of indirect processes like thermal driven galactic winds or direct processes like 'kinetic' spreading of baryonic matter. In the case of equal mass mergers the direct -kinetic- redistribution of gaseous matter (after 5 Gyr) is less efficient than the environmental enrichment of the same isolated galaxies by a galactic wind. In the case of non-equal mass mergers however, the direct -kinetic- process dominates the redistribution of gaseous matter. Compared to the isolated sy...

  7. Star\\/Galaxy Separation Revisited Into the Zone of Avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Naim, A

    1997-01-01

    The problem of automated separation of stars and galaxies on photographic plates is revisited with two goals in mind : First, to separate galaxies from everything else (as opposed to most previous work, in which galaxies were lumped together with all other non-stellar images). And second, to search optically for galaxies at low Galactic latitudes (an area that has been largely avoided in the past). This paper demonstrates how an artificial neural network can be trained to achieve both goals on Schmidt plates of the Digitised Sky Survey. Here I present the method while its application to large numbers of plates is deferred to a later paper. Analysis is also provided of the way in which the network operates and the results are used to counter claims that it is a complicated and incomprehensible tool.

  8. HELP: star formation as function of galaxy environmentwith Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Duivenvoorden, S; Buat, V; Darvish, B; Efstathiou, A; Farrah, D; Griffin, M; Hurley, P D; Ibar, E; Jarvis, M; Papadopoulos, A; Sargent, M T; Scott, D; Scudder, J M; Symeonidis, M; Vaccari, M; Viero, M P; Wang, L

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project (HELP) brings together a vast range of data from many astronomical observatories. Its main focus is on the Herschel data, which maps dust obscured star formation over 1300 deg$^2$. With this unprecedented combination of data sets, it is possible to investigate how the star formation vs stellar mass relation (main-sequence) of star-forming galaxies depends on environment. In this pilot study we explore this question between 0.1 2. We also estimate the evolution of the star formation rate density in the COSMOS field and our results are consistent with previous measurements at z 2 but we find a $1.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ times higher peak value of the star formation rate density at $z \\sim 1.9$.

  9. Star-forming galaxies in low-redshift clusters: Data and integrated galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, C F; James, P A; Bennett, S M; Aragón-Salamanca, A; Whittle, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of an ongoing study of the evolutionary processes affecting cluster galaxies. Both CCD R band and H alpha narrow-band imaging was used to determine photometric parameters (m_(r), r_(24), H alpha flux and equivalent width) and derive star formation rates for 227 CGCG galaxies in 8 low-redshift clusters. The galaxy sample is a subset of CGCG galaxies in an objective prism survey of cluster galaxies for H alpha emission. It is found that detection of emission-line galaxies in the OPS is 85%, 70%, and 50% complete at the mean surface brightness values of 1.25 x 10^(-19), 5.19 x 10^(-20), and 1.76 x 10^(-20) W m^(-2) arcsec^(-2), respectively, measured within the R band isophote of 24 mag arcsec^(-2) for the galaxy. The CCD data, together with matched data from a recent H alpha galaxy survey of UGC galaxies within 3000 km s^(-1), will be used for a comparative study of R band and H alpha surface photometry between cluster and field spirals.

  10. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR: Instrument Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Shinozuka

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  11. Star-Galaxy Classification in Multi-Band Optical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Fadely, Ross; Willman, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Ground-based optical surveys such as PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST, will produce large catalogs to limiting magnitudes of r > 24. Star-galaxy separation will pose a major challenge to such surveys because galaxies---even very compact galaxies---outnumber halo stars at these depths. Here we investigate photometric classification techniques on stars and galaxies with intrinsic FWHM < 0.2 arcsec. We consider unsupervised SED template fitting and supervised, data-driven Support Vector Machines (SVM). For template fitting, we use a Maximum Likelihood (ML) method and a new Hierarchical Bayesian (HB) method, in which we learn the prior distribution of template probabilities by optimizing the likelihood for the entire dataset. SVM requires training data to classify unknown sources; ML and HB don't. We consider both i.) a best-case scenario (SVM_best) in which the training data is (unrealistically) a random sampling of the data in both signal-to-noise and demographics, and ii.) a more realistic scenario in which the SVM...

  12. Star cluster disruption in the starburst galaxy Messier 82

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo; Anders, Peter; Li, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, multiple-passband Hubble Space Telescope images spanning the entire optical/near-infrared wavelength range, we obtained a statistically complete sample, $U$-band selected sample of 846 extended star clusters across the disk of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Based on careful analysis of their spectral energy distributions, we determined their galaxy-wide age and mass distributions. The M82 clusters exhibit three clear peaks in their age distribution, thus defining a relatively young, log(t/yr) 8.5. Comparison of the completeness-corrected mass distributions offers a firm handle on the galaxy's star cluster disruption history. The most massive star clusters in the young and old samples are (almost) all concentrated in the most densely populated central region, while the intermediate-age sample's most massive clusters are more spatially dispersed, which may reflect the distribution of the highest-density gas throughout the galaxy's evolutionary history, combined with the solid-body natu...

  13. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    CERN Document Server

    Grossi, M; Pritzl, B J; Knezek, P M; Gallagher, J S; Minchin, R F; Freeman, K C

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas-rich (M_{HI}/L_{B} > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed Colour Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas-rich because their star formation rates (SFRs) have been very low (< 10^{-3} M_{sun}/yr) throughout. In such systems, sta...

  14. Comparing models of star formation simulating observed interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, L. F.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Rodrigues, I.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we make a comparison between different models of star formation to reproduce observed interacting galaxies. We use observational data to model the evolution of a pair of galaxies undergoing a minor merger. Minor mergers represent situations weakly deviated from the equilibrium configuration but significant changes in star fomation (SF) efficiency can take place, then, minor mergers provide an unique scene to study SF in galaxies in a realistic but yet simple way. Reproducing observed systems also give us the opportunity to compare the results of the simulations with observations, which at the end can be used as probes to characterize the models of SF implemented in the comparison. In this work we compare two different star formation recipes implemented in Gadget3 and GIZMO codes. Both codes share the same numerical background, and differences arise mainly in the star formation recipe they use. We use observations from Pico dos Días and GEMINI telescopes and show how we use observational data of the interacting pair in AM2229-735 to characterize the interacting pair. Later we use this information to simulate the evolution of the system to finally reproduce the observations: Mass distribution, morphology and main features of the merger-induced star formation burst. We show that both methods manage to reproduce roughly the star formation activity. We show, through a careful study, that resolution plays a major role in the reproducibility of the system. In that sense, star formation recipe implemented in GIZMO code has shown a more robust performance. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by Colciencias, Doctorado Nacional - 617 program.

  15. Capture of the Sun's Oort cloud from stars in its birth cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Harold F; Duncan, Martin J; Brasser, Ramon; Kaufmann, David E

    2010-07-09

    Oort cloud comets are currently believed to have formed in the Sun's protoplanetary disk and to have been ejected to large heliocentric orbits by the giant planets. Detailed models of this process fail to reproduce all of the available observational constraints, however. In particular, the Oort cloud appears to be substantially more populous than the models predict. Here we present numerical simulations that show that the Sun captured comets from other stars while it was in its birth cluster. Our results imply that a substantial fraction of the Oort cloud comets, perhaps exceeding 90%, are from the protoplanetary disks of other stars.

  16. Kinematic Evolution of Simulated Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kassin, Susan A; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J; Gardner, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ~8 billion years since z=1.2, undergoing a process of "disk settling." For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art "zoom in" hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking as the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (sigma_g) and increase in ordered rotation (Vrot) with time. The slopes of the relations between both sigma_g and Vrot with r...

  17. Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, KONG; Lin, LIN; Jin-rong, LI; Xu, ZHOU; Hu, ZOU; Hong-yu, LI; Fu-zhen, CHEN; Wei, DU; Zhou, FAN; Ye-wei, MAO; Jing, WANG; Yi-nan, ZHU; Zhi-min, ZHOU

    2014-10-01

    In recent years the number of worldwide 8∼10 m-class ground-based telescopes is continually increased, the 4 m-diameter or smaller telescopes have become the small and medium-sized telescopes. In order to obtain some noticeable scientific results by using these existing small and medium-sized telescopes, we have to consider very carefully what we can do, and what we can not. For this reason, the Time Allocation Committee of the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical observatories of China (NAOC) has decided to support some key projects since 2013. The long-term project “Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies” proposed by us is one of three key projects, it is supported by the committee with 30 dark/grey nights in each of three years. The primary goal of this project is to make the spectroscopic observations of the star formation regions along the directions parallel and perpendicular to the main-axes of 20 nearby galaxies with the NAO 2.16 m telescope and the Hec-tospec multi-fiber spectrograph on the 6.5 m MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) via the Telescope Access Program (TAP). With the spectra of a large sample of star formation regions, combining with the exising multi-wavelength data from UV to IR, we can study the galaxy dust extinction, star formation rate, metal abundance, and the two-dimensional distributions of stellar population proper-ties, as well as the relationships of the galaxy two-dimensional properties with the galaxy morphologies and environments. As the first paper of this project, we describe here the scientific objectives, sample selection, observation strategy, and present the preliminary result of the spectroscopic observation towards the galaxy NGC 2403.

  18. A Comparative Study of Knots of Star Formation in Interacting vs. Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Beverly J; Struck, Curtis; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published H-alpha images, we have compared the star formation rates of ~700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high star formation rates than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The star formation rates of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest star formation rates, the apparent dust a...

  19. The Star Formation Histories of Disk Galaxies: the Live, the Dead, and the Undead

    CERN Document Server

    Oemler, Augustus; Gladders, Michael D; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca M; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    We reexamine the systematic properties of local galaxy populations, using published surveys of star formation, structure, and gas content. After recalibrating star formation measures, we are able to reliably measure specific star formation rates well below the "main sequence" of star formation vs mass. We find an unexpectedly large population of galaxies with star formation rates intermediate between vigorously star-forming main sequence galaxies and passive galaxies, and with gas content disproportionately high for their star formation rates. Several lines of evidence suggest that these quiescent galaxies form a distinct population rather than a low star formation tail of the main sequence. We demonstrate that a tight main sequence, evolving with epoch, is a natural outcome of most histories of star formation and has little astrophysical significance, but that the quiescent population requires additional astrophysics to explain its properties. Using a simple model for disk evolution based on the observed dep...

  20. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Zeimann, G. R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pope, A.; Alberts, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brown, M. J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Chary, R.-R. [Spitzer Science Center, MC 220-6, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Galametz, A. [INAF—Osservatorio di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Jannuzi, B. T. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85121 (United States); Miller, E. D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Moustakas, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  1. Seismic constraints on rotation of Sun-like star and mass of exoplanet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizon, Laurent; Ballot, Jérome; Michel, Eric; Stahn, Thorsten; Vauclair, Gérard; Bruntt, Hans; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Benomar, Othman; Vauclair, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Auvergne, Michel; Baglin, Annie; Barban, Caroline; Baudin, Fréderic; Bazot, Michaël; Campante, Tiago; Catala, Claude; Chaplin, William; Creevey, Orlagh; Deheuvels, Sébastien; Dolez, Noël; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael; Gaulme, Patrick; Mathis, Stéphane; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoît; Régulo, Clara; Roxburgh, Ian; Salabert, David; Samadi, Réza; Sato, Kumiko; Verner, Graham; Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2013-08-13

    Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85(-0.42)(+0.52)M(Jupiter), which implies that it is a planet, not a brown dwarf.

  2. Seismic constraints on rotation of Sun-like star and mass of exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; Michel, Eric; Stahn, Thorsten; Vauclair, Gérard; Bruntt, Hans; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Benomar, Othman; Vauclair, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Auvergne, Michel; Baglin, Annie; Barban, Caroline; Baudin, Fréderic; Bazot, Michaël; Campante, Tiago; Catala, Claude; Chaplin, William; Creevey, Orlagh; Deheuvels, Sébastien; Dolez, Noël; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael; Gaulme, Patrick; Mathis, Stéphane; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoît; Régulo, Clara; Roxburgh, Ian; Salabert, David; Samadi, Réza; Sato, Kumiko; Verner, Graham; Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2013-01-01

    Rotation is thought to drive cyclic magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. Stellar dynamos, however, are poorly understood owing to the scarcity of observations of rotation and magnetic fields in stars. Here, inferences are drawn on the internal rotation of a distant Sun-like star by studying its global modes of oscillation. We report asteroseismic constraints imposed on the rotation rate and the inclination of the spin axis of the Sun-like star HD 52265, a principal target observed by the CoRoT satellite that is known to host a planetary companion. These seismic inferences are remarkably consistent with an independent spectroscopic observation (rotational line broadening) and with the observed rotation period of star spots. Furthermore, asteroseismology constrains the mass of exoplanet HD 52265b. Under the standard assumption that the stellar spin axis and the axis of the planetary orbit coincide, the minimum spectroscopic mass of the planet can be converted into a true mass of 1.85 (+0.52,-0.42) M...

  3. The formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Moupiya; Li, Yuexing; Charlton, Jane; Hernquist, Lars; Knebe, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Observations of globular clusters show that they have universal lognormal mass functions with a characteristic peak at $\\sim 2\\times 10^{5}\\, {\\rm{M_{\\odot}}}$, but the origin of this peaked distribution is highly debated. Here we investigate the formation and evolution of star clusters in interacting galaxies using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations performed with two different codes in order to mitigate numerical artifacts. We find that massive star clusters in the range of $\\sim 10^{5.5} - 10^{7.5}\\, {\\rm{M_{\\odot}}}$ form preferentially in the highly-shocked regions produced by galaxy interactions. The nascent cluster-forming clouds have high gas pressures in the range of $P/k \\sim 10^8 - 10^{12}\\, \\rm{K}\\,\\rm{cm^{-3}}$, which is $\\sim 10^4 - 10^8$ times higher than the typical pressure of the interstellar medium but consistent with recent observations of a pre-super star cluster cloud in the Antennae Galaxies. Furthermore, these massive star clusters have quasi-lognormal initial mass functions wi...

  4. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Puertas, S.; Vilchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.

    2017-03-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured Hα flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the Hα fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the Hα/ Hβ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical Hα and Hα/ Hβ aperture corrections based on the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. We find that, on average, the aperture-corrected SFR is 0.65 dex higher than the SDSS fibre-based SFR. The relation between the SFR and stellar mass for SDSS star-forming galaxies (SFR-M⋆) has been obtained, together with its dependence on extinction and Hα equivalent width. We compare our results with those obtained in previous works and examine the behaviour of the derived SFR in six redshift bins, over the redshift range 0.005 ≤ z ≤ 0.22. The SFR-M⋆ sequence derived here is in agreement with selected observational studies based on integral field spectroscopy of individual galaxies as well as with the predictions of recent theoretical models of disc galaxies. A table of the aperture-corrected fluxes and SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies and related relevant data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A71 Warning, no authors

  5. Delayed Star Formation in Isolated Dwarf Galaxies: HST Star Formation History of the Aquarius Dwarf Irregular

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Andrew A; Dolphin, Andrew E; Skillman, Evan D; McConnachie, Alan W; Brooks, Alyson M; Leaman, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ~10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ~10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ~2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ~6-8 Gyr ago (z ~ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M(HI)/M(stellar), dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CD...

  6. Star Formation in the First Galaxies I: Collapse Delayed by Lyman-Werner Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Federrath, Christoph; Dubey, Anshu; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the process of metal-free star formation in the first galaxies with a high-resolution cosmological simulation. We consider the cosmologically motivated scenario in which a strong molecule-destroying Lyman-Werner (LW) background inhibits effective cooling in low-mass haloes, delaying star formation until the collapse or more massive haloes. Only when molecular hydrogen (H2) can self-shield from LW radiation, which requires a halo capable of cooling by atomic line emission, will star formation be possible. To follow the formation of multiple gravitationally bound objects, at high gas densities we introduce sink particles which accrete gas directly from the computational grid. We find that in a 1 Mpc^3 (comoving) box, runaway collapse first occurs in a 3x10^7 M_sun dark matter halo at z~12 assuming a background intensity of J21=100. Due to a runaway increase in the H2 abundance and cooling rate, a self-shielding, supersonically turbulent core develops abruptly with ~10^4 M_sun in cold gas availabl...

  7. Evolution of the cycles of magnetic activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars in time

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Artamonov, B P

    2016-01-01

    We applied the method of continuous wavelet-transform to the time-frequency analysis to the sets of observations of relative sunspot numbers, sunspot areas and to 6 Mount Wilson HK-project stars with well-defined magnetic cycles. Wavelet analysis of these data reveals the following pattern: at the same time there are several activity cycles whose periods vary widely from the quasi-biennial up to the centennial period for the Sun and vary significant during observations time of the HK-project stars. These relatively low-frequency periodic variations of the solar and stellar activity gradually change the values of periods of different cycles in time. This phenomenon can be observed in every cycles of activity

  8. The Intrinsic Scatter Along The Main Sequence of Star-Forming Galaxies at z ~ 0.7

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Kexin; Fu, Hai

    2013-01-01

    A sample of 12614 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with stellar mass >10^9.5 M_sun between 0.6star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass. We derive SFR from ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) luminosities. A stacking technique is adopted to measure IR emission for galaxies undetected at 24 micron. We confirm that the slope of the mass-SFR relation is close to unity. We examine the distributions of specific SFRs (SSFRs) in four equally spaced mass bins from 10^9.5 M_sun to 10^11.5 M_sun. Different models are used to constrain the scatter of SSFR for lower mass galaxies that are mostly undetected at 24 micron. The SFR scatter is dominated by the scatter of UV luminosity and gradually that of IR luminosity at increasing stellar mass. We derive SSFR dispersions of 0.18, 0.21, 0.26 and 0.31 dex with a typical measurement uncertainty of <~ 0.01 dex for the four mass bins. Interestingly, the scatter of the mass-SFR relation...

  9. Star Formation in the Outer Galaxy: Coronal Properties of NGC 1893

    CERN Document Server

    Caramazza, M; Prisinzano, L; Sciortino, S; Damiani, F; Favata, F; Stauffer, J R; Vallenari, A; Wolk, S J

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray properties of NGC 1893, a young cluster (~ 1-2 Myr) in the outer part of the Galaxy (galactic radius \\geq 11 kpc) where we expect differences in the disk evolution and in the mass distribution of the stars, to explore the X-ray emission of its members and compare it with that of young stars in star forming regions near to the Sun. We analyze 5 deep Chandra ACIS-I observations with a total exposure time of 450 ks. Source events of the 1021 X-ray sources have been extracted with the IDL-based routine ACIS-Extract. Using spectral fitting and quantile analysis of X-ray spectra, we derive X-ray luminosities and compare the respective properties of Class II and Class III members. We also evaluate the variability of sources using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and we identify flares in the lightcurves. The X-ray luminosity of NGC 1893 X-ray members is in the range 10^29.5 - 10^31.5 erg/s. Diskless stars are brighter in X-rays than disk-bearing stars, given the same bolometric luminosity. We fou...

  10. Rest-frame UV--Optically Selected Galaxies at 2.3Star-forming and Passively-Evolving Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yicheng; Cassata, Paolo; Ferguson, Henry C; Williams, Christina C; Dickinson, Mark; Koekemoer, Anton M; Grogin, Norman A; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Messias, Hugo; Tundo, Elena; Lin, Lihwai; Lee, Seong-Kook; Salimbeni, Sara; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Kocevski, Dale; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Villanueva, Edward; van der Wel, Arjen

    2011-01-01

    A new set of color selection criteria (VJL) analogous with the BzK method is designed to select both star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and passively-evolving galaxies (PEGs) at 2.310^{10}M_{Sun}) galaxies at 2.30.4) SFGs, which however, only account for ~20% of the number density of massive SFGs. We also use the mid-infrared fluxes to clean our PEG sample, and find that galaxy size can be used as a secondary criterion to effectively eliminate the contamination of dusty SFGs. The redshift distribution of the cleaned PEG sample peaks at z~2.5. We find 6 PEG candidates at z>3 and discuss possible methods to distinguish them from dusty contamination. We conclude that at least part of our candidates are real PEGs at z~3, implying that this type of galaxies began to form their stars at z>5. We measure the integrated stellar mass density of PEGs at z~2.5 and set constraints on it at z>3. We find that the integrated stellar mass density grows by at least about factor of 10 in 1 Gyr at 3

  11. Bubble-Induced Star Formation in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Daisuke; Barnes, David J; Grand, Robert J J; Rahimi, Awat

    2013-01-01

    To study the star formation and feedback mechanism, we simulate the evolution of an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr) in a fixed dark matter halo, similar in size to WLM. We use the new version of our original N-body/smoothed particle chemodynamics code, GCD+, which adopts improved hydrodynamics, metal diffusion between the gas particles and new modelling of star formation and stellar wind and supernovae (SNe) feedback. Comparing the simulations with and without stellar feedback effects, we demonstrate that the collisions of bubbles produced by strong feedback can induce star formation in a more widely spread area. We also demonstrate that the metallicity in star forming regions is kept low due to the mixing of the metal-rich bubbles and the metal-poor inter-stellar medium. Our simulations also suggest that the bubble-induced star formation leads to many counter-rotating stars. The bubble-induced star formation could be a dominant mechanism to maintain star formation in dIrrs, which is different from lar...

  12. Galaxies undergoing ram-pressure stripping: the influence of the bulge on morphology and star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauser, Dominik; Kapferer, Wolfgang; Schindler, Sabine; 10.1051/0004-6361/201118311

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of stellar bulges on the star formation and morphology of disc galaxies that suffer from ram pressure. Several tree-SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations have been carried out to study the dependence of the star formation rate on the mass and size of a stellar bulge. In addition, different strengths of ram pressure and different alignments of the disc with respect to the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are applied. As claimed in previous works, when ram pressure is acting on a galaxy, the star formation rate (SFR) is enhanced and rises up to four times with increasing ICM density compared to galaxies that evolve in isolation. However, a bulge suppresses the SFR when the same ram pressure is applied. Consequently, fewer new stars are formed because the SFR can be lowered by up to 2 M_sun/yr. Furthermore, the denser the surrounding gas, the more inter-stellar medium (ISM) is stripped. While at an ICM density of 10^-28 g/cm^3 about 30% of the ISM is stripped, the galaxy is alm...

  13. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. Ultimately this may lead to a better understanding of star formation in galaxies, and galaxy evolution in general. Aims: We aim to constrain the amount of star formation happening in long-lived clusters for four galaxies through the homogeneous, simultaneous study of field stars and star clusters. Methods: Using HST/ACS and HST/WFPC2 images of the galaxies NGC 45, NGC 1313, NGC 5236, and NGC 7793, we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Masses and ages of star clusters are estimated using simple stellar population model fitting. Comparing observed and modeled luminosity functions, we estimate cluster formation rates. By randomly sampling the stellar initial mass function (SIMF), we construct artificial star clusters and quantify how stochastic effects influence cluster detection, integrated colors, and age estimates. Results: Star formation rates appear to be constant over the past 107 - 108 years within the fields covered by our observations. The number of clusters identified per galaxy varies, with a few detected massive clusters (M ≥ 105 M⊙) and a few older than 1 Gyr. Among our sample of galaxies, NGC 5236 and NGC 1313 show high star and cluster formation rates, while NGC 7793 and NGC 45 show lower values. We find that stochastic sampling of the SIMF has a strong impact on the estimation of ages, colors, and completeness for clusters with masses ≤ 103 - 104 M⊙, while the effect is less pronounced for high masses. Stochasticity also makes size measurements highly uncertain at young ages (τ ≲ 108 yr), making it difficult to distinguish between clusters and stars based on sizes. Conclusions: The ratio of star formation happening in clusters (Γ) compared to

  14. Evolution of star-forming dwarf galaxies: characterizing the star formation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Manjón, M. L.; Mollá, M.; Díaz, A. I.; Terlevich, R.

    2012-02-01

    We use the self-consistent model technique developed by Martín-Manjón et al. that combines the chemical evolution with stellar population synthesis and photoionization codes, to study the star formation scenarios capable of reproducing the observed properties of star-forming galaxies. The comparison of our model results with a data base of H II galaxies shows that the observed spectra and colours of the present burst and the older underlying population are reproduced by models in a bursting scenario with star formation efficiency involving close to 20 per cent of the total mass of gas, and interburst times longer than 100 Myr, and more probably around 1 Gyr. Other modes like gasping and continuous star formation are not favoured.

  15. Arm & Interarm Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Foyle, Kelly; Walter, Fabian; Leroy, Adam

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between spiral arms and star formation in the grand-design spirals NGC 5194 and NGC 628 and in the flocculent spiral NGC 6946. Filtered maps of near-IR (3.6 micron) emission allow us to identify "arm regions" that should correspond to regions of stellar mass density enhancements. The two grand-design spirals show a clear two-armed structure, while NGC 6946 is more complex. We examine these arm and interarm regions, looking at maps that trace recent star formation - far-ultraviolet (GALEX NGS) and 24 micron emission (Spitzer, SINGS) - and cold gas - CO (Heracles) and HI (Things). We find the star formation tracers and CO more concentrated in the spiral arms than the stellar 3.6 micron flux. If we define the spiral arms as the 25% highest pixels in the filtered 3.6 micron images, we find that the majority (60%) of star formation tracers occurs in the interarm regions; this result persists qualitatively even when considering the potential impact of finite data resolution and diffu...

  16. On the Star Formation Law for Spiral and Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical model for star formation on a galactic scale is proposed in which the interstellar medium is constantly condensing to star-forming clouds on the dynamical time of the average midplane density, and the clouds are constantly being disrupted on the dynamical time scale appropriate for their higher density. In this model, the areal star formation rate scales with the 1.5 power of the total gas column density throughout the main regions of spiral galaxies, and with a steeper power, 2, in the far outer regions and in dwarf irregular galaxies because of the flaring disks. At the same time, there is a molecular star formation law that is linear in the main and outer parts of disks and in dIrrs because the duration of individual structures in the molecular phase is also the dynamical time scale, canceling the additional 0.5 power of surface density. The total gas consumption time scales directly with the midplane dynamical time, quenching star formation in the inner regions if there is no accretion, and su...

  17. Detecting Star Formation in Brightest Cluster Galaxies with GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Amalia; Donahue, Megan

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of GALEX observations of 17 cool core (CC) clusters of galaxies. We show that GALEX is easily capable of detecting star formation in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) out to $z\\ge 0.45$ and 50-100 kpc. In most of the CC clusters studied, we find significant UV luminosity excesses and colors that strongly suggest recent and/or current star formation. The BCGs are found to have blue UV colors in the center that become increasingly redder with radius, indicating that the UV signature of star formation is most easily detected in the central regions. Our findings show good agreement between UV star formation rates and estimates based on H$\\alpha$ observations. IR observations coupled with our data indicate moderate-to-high dust attenuation. Comparisons between our UV results and the X-ray properties of our sample suggest clear correlations between UV excess, cluster entropy, and central cooling time, confirming that the star formation is directly and incontrovertibly related to the cooling g...

  18. Metallicity gradients of disc stars for a cosmologically simulated galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Awat; Kawata, Daisuke; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Brook, Chris B.; Gibson, Brad K.; Kiessling, Alina

    2011-08-01

    We analyse for the first time the radial abundance gradients of the disc stars of a disc galaxy simulated with our three-dimensional, fully cosmological chemodynamical galaxy evolution code GCD+. We study how [Fe/H], [N/O], [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] vary with galactocentric radius. For the young stars of the disc, we found a negative slope for [Fe/H] and [N/O] but a positive [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] slope with radius. By analysing the star formation rate at different radii, we found that the simulated disc contains a greater fraction of young stars in the outer regions, while the old stars tend to be concentrated in the inner parts of the disc. This can explain the positive [α/Fe] gradient as well as the negative [N/O] gradient with radius. This radial trend is a natural outcome of an inside-out formation of the disc, regardless of its size and can thus explain the recently observed positive [α/Fe] gradients in the Milky Way disc open clusters.

  19. Metallicity gradients of disc stars for a cosmologically simulated galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Rahimi, Awat; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Brook, Chris B; Gibson, Brad K; Kiessling, Alina

    2011-01-01

    We analyse for the first time the radial abundance gradients of the disc stars of a disc galaxy simulated with our three dimensional, fully cosmological chemodynamical galaxy evolution code GCD+. We study how [Fe/H], [N/O], [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] vary with galactocentric radius. For the young stars of the disc, we found a negative slope for [Fe/H] and [N/O] but a positive [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] slope with radius. By analysing the star formation rate (SFR) at different radii, we found that the simulated disc contains a greater fraction of young stars in the outer regions, while the old stars tend to be concentrated in the inner parts of the disc. This can explain the positive [alpha/Fe] gradient as well as the negative [N/O] gradient with radius. This radial trend is a natural outcome of an inside-out formation of the disc, regardless of its size and can thus explain the recently observed positive [alpha/Fe] gradients in the Milky Way disc open clusters.

  20. CANDELS: Correlations of SEDs and Morphologies with Star-formation Status for Massive Galaxies at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tao; Faber, S M; Fang, Guanwen; Wuyts, Stijn; Fazio, G G; Yan, Haojing; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Ferguson, Henry C; Grogin, Norman; Lotz, Jennifer M; Weiner, Benjamin; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Kocevski, Dale; Hathi, Nimish P; Lucas, Ray A; Koekemoer, A M; Kong, Xu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    We present a study on Spectral Energy Distributions, Morphologies, and star formation for an IRAC-selected extremely red object sample in the GOODS Chandra Deep Field-South. This work was enabled by new HST/WFC3 near-IR imaging from the CANDELS survey as well as the deepest available X-ray data from Chandra 4 Ms observations. This sample consists of 133 objects with the 3.6um limiting magnitude of [3.6] = 21.5, and is approximately complete for galaxies with M >10^{11}M_sun at 1.5 10^{11}M_sun have disks in their rest-frame optical morphologies. The prevalence of these extended, relatively undisturbed disks challenges the merging scenario as the main mode of massive galaxy formation.

  1. Star Formation in Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Haynes, Martha P.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Troischt, Parker; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around 36 nearby (zALFALFA HI observations, optical observations, and digital databases like SDSS, and incorporates work undertaken by faculty and students at different institutions within the UAT. Here we present results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO, including an analysis of radial star formation rates and extents of galaxies in the NGC 5846, Abell 779, NRGb331, and HCG 69 groups/clusters. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  2. Star-galaxy classification using deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward J.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    Most existing star-galaxy classifiers use the reduced summary information from catalogues, requiring careful feature extraction and selection. The latest advances in machine learning that use deep convolutional neural networks (ConvNets) allow a machine to automatically learn the features directly from the data, minimizing the need for input from human experts. We present a star-galaxy classification framework that uses deep ConvNets directly on the reduced, calibrated pixel values. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, we demonstrate that ConvNets are able to produce accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classifications that are competitive with conventional machine learning techniques. Future advances in deep learning may bring more success with current and forthcoming photometric surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, because deep neural networks require very little, manual feature engineering.

  3. Star-galaxy Classification Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Most existing star-galaxy classifiers use the reduced summary information from catalogs, requiring careful feature extraction and selection. The latest advances in machine learning that use deep convolutional neural networks allow a machine to automatically learn the features directly from data, minimizing the need for input from human experts. We present a star-galaxy classification framework that uses deep convolutional neural networks (ConvNets) directly on the reduced, calibrated pixel values. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), we demonstrate that ConvNets are able to produce accurate and well-calibrated probabilistic classifications that are competitive with conventional machine learning techniques. Future advances in deep learning may bring more success with current and forthcoming photometric surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), because deep neural networks require...

  4. A Hybrid Ensemble Learning Approach to Star-Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edward J; Kind, Matias Carrasco

    2015-01-01

    There exist a variety of star-galaxy classification techniques, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we present a novel meta-classification framework that combines and fully exploits different techniques to produce a more robust star-galaxy classification. To demonstrate this hybrid, ensemble approach, we combine a purely morphological classifier, a supervised machine learning method based on random forest, an unsupervised machine learning method based on self-organizing maps, and a hierarchical Bayesian template fitting method. Using data from the CFHTLenS survey, we consider different scenarios: when a high-quality training set is available with spectroscopic labels from DEEP2, SDSS, VIPERS, and VVDS, and when the demographics of sources in a low-quality training set do not match the demographics of objects in the test data set. We demonstrate that our Bayesian combination technique improves the overall performance over any individual classification method in these scenarios. Thus, s...

  5. BURST OF STAR FORMATION DRIVES BUBBLE IN GALAXY'S CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshots reveal dramatic activities within the core of the galaxy NGC 3079, where a lumpy bubble of hot gas is rising from a cauldron of glowing matter. The picture at left shows the bubble in the center of the galaxy's disk. The structure is more than 3,000 light-years wide and rises 3,500 light-years above the galaxy's disk. The smaller photo at right is a close-up view of the bubble. Astronomers suspect that the bubble is being blown by 'winds' (high-speed streams of particles) released during a burst of star formation. Gaseous filaments at the top of the bubble are whirling around in a vortex and are being expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down upon the galaxy's disk where it may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars. The two white dots just above the bubble are probably stars in the galaxy. The close-up reveals that the bubble's surface is lumpy, consisting of four columns of gaseous filaments that tower above the galaxy's disk. The filaments disperse at a height of 2,000 light-years. Each filament is about 75 light-years wide. Velocity measurements taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii show that the gaseous filaments are ascending at more than 4 million miles an hour (6 million kilometers an hour). According to theoretical models, the bubble formed when ongoing winds from hot stars mixed with small bubbles of very hot gas from supernova explosions. Observations of the core's structure by radio telescopes indicate that those processes are still active. The models suggest that this outflow began about a million years ago. They occur about every 10 million years. Eventually, the hot stars will die, and the bubble's energy source will fade away. Astronomers have seen evidence of previous outbursts from radio and X-ray observations. Those studies show rings of dust and gas and long plumes of material, all of which are larger than the bubble. NGC 3079 is 50

  6. Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sun Microsystems, Inc. is committed to open standards,a standardization system, and sharing within the information tech nology field, focusing not only on technical innovation, but also on new ideas, practices and future development.

  7. Constraints from $^{26}Al$ Measurements on the Galaxy's Recent Global Star Formation Rate and Core Collapse Supernovae Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Hartmann, D H

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from the decay of $^{26}$Al offer a stringent constraint on the Galaxy's global star formation rate over the past million years, supplementing other methods for quantifying the recent Galactic star formation rate, such as equivalent widths of H$\\alpha$ emission. Advantages and disadvantages of using $^{26}$Al gamma-ray measurements as a tracer of the massive star formation rate are analyzed. Estimates of the Galactic $^{26}$Al mass derived from COMPTEL measurements are coupled with a simple, analytical model of the $^{26}$Al injection rate from massive stars and restrict the Galaxy's recent star formation rate to \\hbox{5 $\\pm$ 4 M\\sun yr$^{-1}$}. In addition, we show that the derived $^{26}$Al mass implies a present day \\hbox{Type II + Ib} supernovae rate of 3.4 $\\pm$ 2.8 per century, which seems consistent with other independent estimates of the Galactic core collapse supernova rate. If some independent measure of the massive star initial mass function or star formation rate or \\hbox{Type II + Ib}...

  8. The dearth of nuclear star clusters in bright galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Spera, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interaction of a massive globular cluster (GC) with a super massive black hole (SMBH), located at the centre of its host galaxy, by means of direct N-body simulations. The results show that tidal distortions induced by the stellar background and the SMBH act on a time shorter than that of dynamical friction decay for a 106 M⊙ GC whenever the SMBH mass exceeds ˜108 M⊙. This implies an almost complete dissolution of the infalling GC before it reaches the inner region (≲5 pc) of the parent galaxy. The generalization of this result to a larger sample of infalling GCs shows that such destructive process may prevent the formation and growth of a bright galactic nucleus. Another interesting, serendipitous, result we obtained is that the close interaction between the SMBH and the GC produces a `wave' of stars that escape from the cluster and, in a fraction, even from the whole galaxy.

  9. SPT-CLJ2040-4451: An SZ-Selected Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.478 With Significant Ongoing Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, M B; Ruel, J; Brodwin, M; Aird, K A; Bautz, M W; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; George, E M; Gettings, D; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; de Haan, T; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; Mawatari, K; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Stalder, B; Suhada, R; Spieler, H G; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2013-01-01

    SPT-CLJ2040-4451 -- spectroscopically confirmed at z = 1.478 -- is the highest redshift galaxy cluster yet discovered via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. SPT-CLJ2040-4451 was identified in the first 720 deg^2 of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey, and confirmed in follow-up imaging and spectroscopy. From multi-object spectroscopy with Magellan-I/Baade+IMACS we measure spectroscopic redshifts for 15 cluster member galaxies, all of which have strong [O II] 3727 emission. SPT-CLJ2040-4451 has an SZ-measured mass of M_500,SZ = 3.2 +/- 0.8 X 10^14 M_Sun/h_70, corresponding to M_200,SZ = 5.8 +/- 1.4 X 10^14 M_Sun/h_70. The velocity dispersion measured entirely from blue star forming members is sigma_v = 1500 +/- 520 km/s. The prevalence of star forming cluster members (galaxies with > 1.5 M_Sun/yr) implies that this massive, high-redshift cluster is experiencing a phase of active star formation, and supports recent results showing a marked increase in star formation occurring in galaxy clust...

  10. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Katherine E; Bezanson, Rachel; Brammer, Gabriel B; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska T; Labbe, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Nelson, Erica J; Rigby, Jane R; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M$_{\\star}$), the "star-formation sequence", and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star-formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sersic indices, $n$, of galaxies across the SFR-M$_{\\star}$ plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at $0.52$ (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M$_{\\star}$ than the main ridgeline of the star-formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive $z\\sim2$ galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At $z<1$, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M$_{\\star}$, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the ...

  11. Dust and Nebular Emission in Star Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Panuzzo, P; Granato, G L; Silva, L; Danese, L; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Bressan, Alessandro; Granato, Gian Luigi; Silva, Laura; Danese, Luigi

    2001-01-01

    Star forming galaxies exhibit a variety of physical conditions, from quiescent normal spirals to the most powerful dusty starbursts. In order to study these complex systems, we need a suitable tool to analyze the information coming from observations at all wavelengths. We present a new spectro-photometric model which considers in a consistent way starlight as reprocessed by gas and dust. We discuss preliminary results to interpret some observed properties of VLIRGs.

  12. A Solar cycle correlation of coronal element abundances in Sun-as-a-star observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H.; Baker, Deborah; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The elemental composition in the coronae of low-activity solar-like stars appears to be related to fundamental stellar properties such as rotation, surface gravity, and spectral type. Here we use full-Sun observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, to show that when the Sun is observed as a star, the variation of coronal composition is highly correlated with a proxy for solar activity, the F10.7 cm radio flux, and therefore with the solar cycle phase. Similar cyclic variations should therefore be detectable spectroscopically in X-ray observations of solar analogs. The plasma composition in full-disk observations of the Sun is related to the evolution of coronal magnetic field activity. Our observations therefore introduce an uncertainty into the nature of any relationship between coronal composition and fixed stellar properties. The results highlight the importance of systematic full-cycle observations for understanding the elemental composition of solar-like stellar coronae.

  13. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Sara L; Rosario, David J; Mendel, J Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Using artificial neural network (ANN) predictions of total infra-red luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ~21,000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR selected AGN. SFR offsets (Delta SFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main sequence' galaxies (matched in M*, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of Delta SFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median Delta SFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median Delta SFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor ~1.5. We interpret the different distributions of Delta SFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied ...

  14. The Era of Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brodwin, M; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zeimann, G R; Snyder, G F; Mancone, C L; Pope, A; Eisenhardt, P R; Stern, D; Alberts, S; Ashby, M L N; Brown, M J I; Chary, R -R; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A; Gettings, D P; Jannuzi, B T; Miller, E D; Moustakas, J; Moustakas, L A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at $1 1.35$. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/MIPS observations at 24 $\\mu$m, along with robust optical+IRAC photometric redshifts and SED-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that $z\\sim 1.4$ represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at $z>1.4$ environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. Combining these obse...

  15. The Role of AGB Stars Feedback in Sustaining Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared monitoring campaign at the UK InfraRed Telescope, of the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The main aim was to identify stars in the very final stage of their evolution, and for which the luminosity is more directly related to the birth mass than the more numerous less--evolved giant stars that continue to increase in luminosity. In first instance, only the central square kiloparsec were monitored and analysed, with the UIST camera. Photometry was obtained for 18,398 stars; of these 812 stars were found to be variable, most of which are asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We constructed the birth mass function and hence derived the star formation history. These stars are also important dust factories. We measure their dust production rates from a combination of our data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-IR photometry. The mass loss rates are seen to increase with increasing strength of pulsation and with increasing bolometric luminosity. We construct a 2D map of the mass return ...

  16. THE RELATION BETWEEN COOL CLUSTER CORES AND HERSCHEL-DETECTED STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Fiedler, A.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Portouw, J.; Walth, G. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Smith, G. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500 {mu}m), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22{sup +6.2}{sub -5.3}% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR = 1-150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing H{alpha} emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), only a small ({approx}<0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(H{alpha}) to agree with SFR{sub FIR}. The relatively low H{alpha} extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate from normal stellar mass loss.

  17. Planet signatures in the chemical composition of Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    There are two possible mechanisms to imprint planet signatures in the chemical composition of Sun-like stars: i) dust condensation at the early stages of planet formation, causing a depletion of refractory elements in the gas accreted by the star in the late stages of its formation; ii) planet engulfment, enriching the host star in lithium and refractory elements. We discuss both planet signatures, the influence of galactic chemical evolution, and the importance of binaries composed of stellar twins as laboratories to verify abundance anomalies imprinted by planets.

  18. Gas Inflow and Metallicity Drops in Star-forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ceverino, Daniel; Muñoz-Tuñon, Casiana; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Elmegreen, Debra M; Primack, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Gas inflow feeds galaxies with low metallicity gas from the cosmic web, sustaining star formation across the Hubble time. We make a connection between these inflows and metallicity inhomogeneities in star-forming galaxies, by using synthetic narrow-band images of the Halpha emission line from zoom-in AMR cosmological simulations of galaxies with stellar masses of $M \\simeq 10^9 $Msun at redshifts z=2-7. In $\\sim$50\\% of the cases at redshifts lower than 4, the gas inflow gives rise to star-forming, Halpha-bright, off-centre clumps. Most of these clumps have gas metallicities, weighted by Halpha luminosity, lower than the metallicity in the surrounding interstellar medium by $\\sim$0.3 dex, consistent with observations of chemical inhomogeneities at high and low redshifts. Due to metal mixing by shear and turbulence, these metallicity drops are dissolved in a few disc dynamical times. Therefore, they can be considered as evidence for rapid gas accretion coming from cosmological inflow of pristine gas.

  19. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Carniani, S; Maiolino, R; Balmaverde, B; Brusa, M; Cano-Díaz, M; Cicone, C; Comastri, A; Cresci, G; Fiore, F; Feruglio, C; La Franca, F; Mainieri, V; Mannucci, F; Nagao, T; Netzer, H; Piconcelli, E; Risaliti, G; Schneider, R; Shemmer, O

    2016-01-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only "potentially" able to quench star formation and we are still missing a decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field spectroscopic observations of two quasars at $z\\sim$2.4 characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [OIII]$\\lambda$5007 line (Carniani et al. 2015). The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHM $< 500$ km/s), and spatially extended components in [OIII]$\\lambda$5007 and H$\\alpha$ emission associated with star formation in the host galaxy. Such star-formation powered emission is spatially anti-correlated with the fast outflow...

  20. The Mean Star-Forming Properties of QSO Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rosario, D J; Lutz, D; Netzer, H; Trump, J R; Silverman, J D; Schramm, M; Lusso, E; Berta, S; Bongiorno, A; Brusa, M; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Genzel, R; Lilly, S; Magnelli, B; Mainieri, V; Maiolino, R; Merloni, A; Mignoli, M; Nordon, R; Popesso, P; Salvato, M; Santini, P; Tacconi, L J; Zamorani, G

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) occur in galaxies in which supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are growing substantially through rapid accretion of gas. Many popular models of the co-evolutionary growth of galaxies and SMBHs predict that QSOs are also sites of substantial recent star formation, mediated by important processes, such as major mergers, which rapidly transform the nature of galaxies. A detailed study of the star-forming properties of QSOs is a critical test of such models. We present a far-infrared Herschel/PACS study of the mean star formation rate (SFR) of a sample of spectroscopically observed QSOs to z~2 from the COSMOS extragalactic survey. This is the largest sample to date of moderately luminous AGNs studied using uniform, deep far-infrared photometry. We study trends of the mean SFR with redshift, black hole mass, nuclear bolometric luminosity and specific accretion rate (Eddington ratio). To minimize systematics, we have undertaken a uniform determination of SMBH properties, as well as an anal...

  1. Distributions of Neutron Exposures in AGB Stars and the Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Yuan Cui; Feng-Hua Zhang; Wei-Juan Zhang; Lu Zhang; Bo Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the s-process nucleosynthesis model with the 13C(α, n)16O reaction occurring under radiative conditions in the interpulse phases, we investigate the characteristics of the distribution of neutron exposure in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars.We introduce a new concept, the distribution of neutron exposures of the Galaxy (NEG), to study the chemical evolution characteristics of the Galaxy for s-process elements. Using a chemical evolution model of the Galaxy, we develop a model for the NEG and obtain the evolution results of the NEG in different epochs. The present results appear to reasonably reproduce the distribution of neutron exposures of the solar system (hereafter NES). The main component and the strong component in the NES are built up in different epochs. The strong component of the s-process is mainly synthesised in the low-mass and metal-poor AGB stars,and the main component is produced by the s-process in the low-mass AGB stars with higher metallicities.

  2. Dwarf galaxy formation with H2-regulated star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlen, M; Madau, P; Smith, B; Wise, J

    2011-01-01

    We describe cosmological galaxy formation simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo that incorporate a star formation prescription regulated by the local abundance of molecular hydrogen. We show that this H2-regulated prescription leads to a suppression of star formation in low mass halos (M_h 4, alleviating some of the dwarf galaxy problems faced by theoretical galaxy formation models. H2 regulation modifies the efficiency of star formation of cold gas directly, rather than indirectly reducing the cold gas content with "supernova feedback". We determine the local H2 abundance in our most refined grid cells (76 proper parsec in size at z=4) by applying the model of Krumholz, McKee, & Tumlinson, which is based on idealized 1D radiative transfer calculations of H2 formation-dissociation balance in ~100 pc atomic--molecular complexes. Our H2-regulated simulations are able to reproduce the empirical (albeit lower z) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, including the low Sigma_gas cutoff due to the transi...

  3. Star formation along the Hubble sequence: Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, R M González; Pérez, E; García-Benito, R; Fernández, R López; Lacerda, E A D; Cortijo-Ferrero, C; de Amorim, A L; Asari, N Vale; Sánchez, S F; Walcher, C J; Wisotzki, L; Mast, D; Alves, J; Ascasibar, Y; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Galbany, L; Kennicutt, R C; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Mollá, M; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Vílchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with IFS, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to obtain radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past, and the local sSFR. To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF) we stack the individual radial profiles in bins of galaxy morphology and stellar masses. Our main results are: a) The intensity of SFR shows declining profiles that exhibit very little differences between spirals. The dispersion between the profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals. This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant intensity of SFR b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outwards, wi...

  4. A star cluster at the edge of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.

    2007-03-01

    Context: This paper is part of our ongoing study of star formation in the (far-) outer Galaxy. Aims: Our goal in this paper is to study stars and molecular gas in the direction of IRAS 06145+1455 (WB89-789). The kinematic distance of the associated molecular cloud is 11.9 kpc. With a galactocentric distance of ~ 20.2 kpc, this object is at the edge of the (molecular) disk of the Galaxy. Methods: We use near-IR (J, H, K), molecular line-, and dust continuum observations. Results: The near-IR data show the presence of an (embedded) cluster of about 60 stars, with a radius ˜ 1.3 pc and an average stellar surface density ~ 12 pc-2. We find at least 14 stars with NIR-excess, 3 of which are possibly Class I objects. The cluster is embedded in a ˜ 1000 M⊙ molecular/dust core, from which a molecular outflow originates. The temperature of most of the outflowing gas is ⪉ 40 K, and the total mass of the swept-up material is ⪉ 10 M⊙. Near the center of the flow, indications of much higher temperatures are found, probably due to shocks. A spectrum taken of one of the probable cluster members shows a tentative likeness to that of a K3 III-star (with an age of at least 20 Myr). If correct, this would confirm the kinematic distance. Conclusions: .This cluster is the furthest one from the Galactic center yet detected. The combination of old and recent activity implies that star formation has been going on for at least 20 Myr, which is difficult to understand considering the location of this object, where external triggers are either absent or weak, compared to the inner Galaxy. This suggests that once star formation is occurring, later generations of stars may form through the effect of the first generation of stars on the (remnants of) the original molecular cloud. Partly based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. THE METALLICITY EVOLUTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES FROM REDSHIFT 0 TO 3: COMBINING MAGNITUDE-LIMITED SURVEY WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, T.-T.; Kewley, L. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Richard, J. [CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Charles Andre, F-69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex (France)

    2013-01-20

    We present a comprehensive observational study of the gas-phase metallicity of star-forming galaxies from z {approx} 0 {yields} 3. We combine our new sample of gravitationally lensed galaxies with existing lensed and non-lensed samples to conduct a large investigation into the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at z > 1. We apply a self-consistent metallicity calibration scheme to investigate the metallicity evolution of star-forming galaxies as a function of redshift. The lensing magnification ensures that our sample spans an unprecedented range of stellar mass (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }). We find that at the median redshift of z = 2.07, the median metallicity of the lensed sample is 0.35 dex lower than the local SDSS star-forming galaxies and 0.18 dex lower than the z {approx} 0.8 DEEP2 galaxies. We also present the z {approx} 2 MZ relation using 19 lensed galaxies. A more rapid evolution is seen between z {approx} 1 {yields} 3 than z {approx} 0 {yields} 1 for the high-mass galaxies (10{sup 9.5} M {sub Sun} < M {sub *} < 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }), with almost twice as much enrichment between z {approx} 1 {yields} 3 than between z {approx} 1 {yields} 0. We compare this evolution with the most recent cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with momentum-driven winds. We find that the model metallicity is consistent with the observed metallicity within the observational error for the low-mass bins. However, for higher masses, the model overpredicts the metallicity at all redshifts. The overprediction is most significant in the highest mass bin of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }.

  6. Gravitational Waves from Stellar Black Hole Binaries and the Impact on Nearby Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the impact of resonant gravitational waves on quadrupole acoustic modes of Sun-like stars located nearby stellar black hole binary systems (such as GW150914 and GW151226). We find that the stimulation of the low-overtone modes by gravitational radiation can lead to sizeable photometric amplitude variations, much larger than the predictions for amplitudes driven by turbulent convection, which in turn are consistent with the photometric amplitudes observed in most Sun-like stars. For accurate stellar evolution models, using up-to-date stellar physics, we predict photometric amplitude variations of 1-103 ppm for a solar mass star located at a distance between 1 au and 10 au from the black hole binary and belonging to the same multi-star system. The observation of such a phenomenon will be within the reach of the Plato mission because the telescope will observe several portions of the Milky Way, many of which are regions of high stellar density with a substantial mixed population of Sun-like stars and black hole binaries.

  7. THE IMPACT OF INTERACTIONS, BARS, BULGES, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN LOCAL MASSIVE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintonge, Amelie; Fabello, Silvia; Wang Jing; Catinella, Barbara [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Tacconi, Linda J.; Genzel, Reinhard; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kramer, Carsten [Instituto Radioastronomia Milimetrica, Av. Divina Pastora 7, Nucleo Central, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Moran, Sean; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Schuster, Karl [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 Rue de la piscine, F-38406 St Martin d' Heres (France)

    2012-10-20

    Using atomic and molecular gas observations from the GASS and COLD GASS surveys and complementary optical/UV data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, we investigate the nature of the variations in the molecular gas depletion time observed across the local massive galaxy population. The large and unbiased COLD GASS sample allows us for the first time to statistically assess the relative importance of galaxy interactions, bar instabilities, morphologies, and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in regulating star formation efficiency. We find that both the H{sub 2} mass fraction and depletion time vary as a function of the distance of a galaxy from the main sequence traced by star-forming galaxies in the SFR-M {sub *} plane. The longest gas depletion times are found in below-main-sequence bulge-dominated galaxies ({mu}{sub *} >5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} kpc{sup -2}, C > 2.6) that are either gas-poor (M{sub H{sub 2}}/M {sub *} <1.5%) or else on average less efficient by a factor of {approx}2 than disk-dominated galaxies at converting into stars any cold gas they may have. We find no link between the presence of AGNs and these long depletion times. In the regime where galaxies are disk-dominated and gas-rich, the galaxies undergoing mergers or showing signs of morphological disruptions have the shortest molecular gas depletion times, while those hosting strong stellar bars have only marginally higher global star formation efficiencies as compared to matched control samples. Our interpretation is that the molecular gas depletion time variations are caused by changes in the ratio between the gas mass traced by the CO(1-0) observations and the gas mass in high-density star-forming cores (as traced by observations of, e.g., HCN(1-0)). While interactions, mergers, and bar instabilities can locally increase pressure and raise the ratio of efficiently star-forming gas to CO-detected gas (therefore lowering the CO

  8. Low-mass galaxy assembly in simulations: regulation of early star formation by radiation from massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Colin, Pedro; Ceverino, Daniel; Arraki, Kenza; Primack, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent success in forming realistic disc galaxies at redshift zero, simulations still form the bulk of their stars prematurely. We investigate the process of stellar mass assembly in low-mass simulated galaxies, a dwarf and a typical spiral, focusing on the effects of radiation from young stellar clusters. We employ a novel model of star formation in which stars form deterministically with a small efficiency per free-fall time, as observed in molecular clouds. Stellar feedback includes radiation pressure from massive stars and energy from supernova explosions and stellar winds. In galaxies with masses up to those of typical spirals, radiation efficiently suppresses star formation by dispersing and heating high density gas, mostly in the central regions, preventing the formation of a massive bulge. Once the galaxies reach this radiation-regulated growth regime, their global properties are robust to the specific choice of model parameters. Only when radiative feedback is included, do galaxies exhibit co...

  9. Global helioseismology (WP4.1): From the Sun to the stars & solar analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Rafael A

    2016-01-01

    Sun-as-a star observations put our star as a reference for stellar observations. Here, I review the activities in which the SPACEINN global seismology team (Working Package WP4.1) has worked during the past 3 years. In particular, we will explain the new deliverables available on the SPACEINN seismic+ portal. Moreover, special attention will be given to surface dynamics (rotation and magnetic fields). After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of around 300 solar-like stars and defining proper metrics for that, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogues for which we study their surface magnetic and seismic properties. This allows us to put the Sun into context compared to its siblings.

  10. Transport Phenomena and Light Element Abundances in the Sun and Solar Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vauclair, S

    2000-01-01

    The observations of light elements in the Sun and Solar type stars givespecial clues for understanding the hydrodynamical processes at work in stellarinteriors. In the Sun 7Li is depleted by 140 while 3He has not increased bymore than 10 0n 3 Gyrs. Meanwhile the inversion of helioseismic modes lead toa precision on the sound velocity of about .1The mixing processes below thesolar convection zone are constrained by these observations. Lithium isdepleted in most Pop I solar type stars. In halo stars however, the lithiumabundance seems constant in the "spite plateau" with no observed dispersion,which is difficult to reconcile with the theory of diffusion processes. In thepresent paper, the various relevant observations will be discussed. It will beshown that the mu-gradients induced by element settling may help solving the"lithium paradox".

  11. Characterizing Dust Attenuation in Local Star Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Andrew; Calzetti, Daniela; Chary, Ranga-Ram

    2017-01-01

    The dust attenuation for a sample of ~10000 local (z ≤ 0.1) star forming galaxies is constrained as a function of their physical properties. We utilize aperture-matched multi-wavelength data from the UV-to-NIR, available from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, and the Two Micron All-Sky Survey, to ensure that regions of comparable size in each galaxy are being analyzed. We characterize the dust attenuation through the slope of the UV flux density and the Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ). The observed relationship between these quantities is similar to the local starburst relation and is not seen to vary strongly with galactic properties. We derive the total attenuation curve over the range 1250 Å < λ < 28500 Å and find that a single attenuation curve is effective for characterizing the majority of galaxies in our sample. This attenuation curve is slightly lower in the far-UV than local starburst galaxies, by roughly 15%, but appears similar at longer wavelengths and has a normalization of RV = 3.7±0.4 (V-band). This indicates that a single attenuation curve is reasonable for wide application in the local Universe.

  12. New Paradigm in Dwarf Galaxy Bursting Star Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Ugryumov, A. V.

    The last decade statistical studies of DG samples with strong SF clearly indicate that most of late-type DGs are not companions of massive galaxies, and moreover, tend to be well isolated from them (e.g. Salzer 1989, Pustilnik et al. 1995). This caused the revival of the idea of Spontaneous Self-Regulating Star Formation as the main SF mechanism in DGs. We summarize recent evidences from HI VLA observations of low-mass companions of HII galaxies (Taylor et al 1995), and new unpublished data on faint blue companions of BCGs (Lipovetsky et al. 1997) which highly prefer the hypothesis that in the most of HII galaxies SF bursts are triggered by tidals from low-mass partners. The important question on back (reverse) effect of the disturbed HII-galaxy to the low-mass companion is discussed in the light of available data on companions' properties. The observed frequency of synchronous SF bursts in low-mass galaxy pairs is confronted with current knowledge on DG type distribution.

  13. Magnetic fields and star formation in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Marita

    2008-01-01

    The main observational results from radio continuum and polarization observations about the magnetic field strength and large-scale pattern for face-on and edge-on spiral galaxies are summarized and compared within our sample of galaxies of different morphological types, inclinations, and star formation rates (SFR). We found that galaxies with low SFR have higher thermal fractions/smaller synchrotron fractions than those with normal or high SFR. Adopting an equipartition model, we conclude that the nonthermal radio emission and the \\emph{total magnetic field} strength grow nonlinearly with SFR, while the regular magnetic field strength does not seem to depend on SFR. We also studied the magnetic field structure and disk thicknesses in highly inclined (edge-on) galaxies. We found in four galaxies that - despite their different radio appearance - the vertical scale heights for both, the thin and thick disk/halo, are about equal (0.3/1.8 kpc at 4.75 GHz), independently of their different SFR. This implies that a...

  14. A Chandra X-ray Analysis of Abell 1664: Cooling, Feedback and Star Formation in the Central Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C; Rafferty, D A; Nulsen, P E J; Birzan, L; Kazemzadeh, F; Wise, M W; Gitti, M; Cavagnolo, K W

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of ~ 23 M_{\\sun} yr^{-1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5x10^8 yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm^2 are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, "bar-like" X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, ~ 10^{10} M_{\\sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of Birzan et al. 2008 to show that the AGN is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low-state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and...

  15. Black Holes and Neutron Stars in Nearby Galaxies: Insights with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulic, Neven; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Zezas, Andreas; Lehmer, Bret

    2017-08-01

    There are a handful of diagnostics that permit determination of compact object identity in X-ray binaries (XRBs), and most of these are confined to bright Galactic sources for which a large number of photons can be gathered. We report on recent work using sensitive hard X-ray constraints to separate black holes from neutron stars in external galaxies with NuSTAR. Determining the ratio of XRBs that are black holes or neutron stars in different galactic environments reveals critical clues about the formation and evolution of binary systems. We analyze a NuSTAR-selected sample of ≈10 nearby galaxies within 5 Mpc that represent a range of star formation rates (0.1 - 10 M⊙ yr-1) and stellar masses (109-11 M⊙). Using color-color and color-intensity diagnostics we classify sources by their accretion states and compact object types. We analyze the 12-25 keV X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of our sample scaled by specific star formation rate and compare with the 0.5-8 keV analogues. Our diagnostic methods allow us to produce black hole-only and neutron star-only extragalactic XLFs for the first time.

  16. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  17. Tracing the first stars and galaxies of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Griffen, Brendan F; Ji, Alexander P; O'Shea, Brian W; Gómez, Facundo A; Frebel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We use 30 high-resolution dark matter halos of the $Caterpillar$ simulation suite to probe the first stars and galaxies of Milky Way-mass systems. We quantify the environment of the high-$z$ progenitors of the Milky Way and connect them to the properties of the host and satellites today. We identify the formation sites of the first generation of Population III (Pop III) stars ($z$ ~ 25) and first galaxies ($z$ ~ 22) with several different models based on a minimum halo mass including a simple model for Lyman-Werner feedback. Through this method we find approximately 23,000 $\\pm$ 5,000 Pop III potentially star-forming sites per Milky Way-mass host, though this number is drastically reduced to ~550 star-forming sites when Lyman-Werner feedback is included, as it has critical effects at these length scales. The majority of these halos identified form in isolation (96% at $z$ = 15) and are not subject to external enrichment by neighboring halos (median separation ~1 pkpc at $z$ = 15), though half merge with a sys...

  18. Constraints on the Star Formation Rate in Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M; Im, M; Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Im, Myungshin

    2006-01-01

    The [O II] 3727 emission line is often used as an indicator of star formation rate in extragalactic surveys, and it can be an equally effective tracer of star formation in systems containing luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In order to investigate the ongoing star formation rate of the host galaxies of AGNs, we measured the strength of [O II] and other optical emission lines from a large sample (~ 3600) of broad-line (Type 1) AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We performed a set of photoionization calculations to help evaluate the relative contribution of stellar and nonstellar photoionization to the observed strength of [O II]. Consistent with the recent study of Ho (2005), we find that the observed [O II] emission can be explained entirely by photoionization from the AGN itself, with little or no additional contribution from HII regions. This indicates that the host galaxies of Type 1 AGNs experience very modest star formation concurrent with the optically active phase of the nucleus. B...

  19. Environments and Morphologies of Red Sequence Galaxies with Residual Star Formation in Massive Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Stott, John P; Jones, D. Heath

    2013-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX NUV photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by blue NUV-R colour), regardless of cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer ...

  20. Spectral magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the sun and stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, A. S.

    The purpose of this lecture is two fold: first, to describe a powerful numerical technic, namely the spectral method, to solve the compressible (anelastic) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in spherical geometry and then to discuss some recent numerical applications to study stellar dynamics and magnetism. We thus start by describing the semi-implicit, anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. In this code, the main field variables are projected into spherical harmonics for their horizontal dimensions and into Chebyshev polynomials for their radial direction. We then present, high resolution 3 D MHD simulations of the convective region of A- and G-type stars in spherical shells. We have chosen to model A and G-type stars because they represent good proxies to study and understand stellar dynamics and magnetism given their strikingly different internal “up-side-down” structure and magnetic activity level. In particular, we discuss the nonlinear interactions between turbulent convection, rotation and magnetic fields and the possibility for such flows and fields to lead to dynamo action. We find that both core and envelope turbulent convective zones are efficient at inducing strong mostly non-axisymmetric fields near equipartition but at the expense of damping the differential rotation present in the purely hydrodynamic progenitor solutions.

  1. Berkeley Prize: Mapping the Fuel for Star Formation in Early Universe Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas, which is relatively rare in galaxies like the Milky Way, which form only a few new stars per year. Massive galaxies in the distant universe formed stars much more rapidly. Was star formation more efficient in the past, and/or were early galaxies richer in molecular gas? The answer was elusive when our instruments could probe molecules only in the most luminous and rare objects such as mergers and quasars. But a new survey of molecular gas in typical massive star-forming galaxies at redshifts from about 1.2 to 2.3 (corresponding to when the universe was 24% to 40% of its current age) reveals that distant star-forming galaxies were indeed molecular-gas rich and that the star-formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch.

  2. ESTIMATING THE STAR FORMATION RATE AT 1 kpc SCALES IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observtory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Boissier, Samuel [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Universite de Provence, CNRS (UMR6110), 38 rue Frederic Joliot Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Madore, Barry; Murphy, Eric [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Using combinations of H{alpha}, ultraviolet (UV), and infrared (IR) emission, we estimate the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, at 1 kpc resolution for 30 disk galaxies that are targets of the IRAM HERACLES CO survey. We present a new physically motivated IR spectral-energy-distribution-based approach to account for possible contributions to 24 {mu}m emission not associated with recent star formation. Considering a variety of 'reference' SFRs from the literature, we revisit the calibration of the 24 {mu}m term in hybrid (UV+IR or H{alpha}+IR) tracers. We show that the overall calibration of this term remains uncertain at the factor of two level because of the lack of wide-field, robust reference SFR estimates. Within this uncertainty, published calibrations represent a reasonable starting point for 1 kpc-wide areas of star-forming disk galaxies, but we re-derive and refine the calibration of the IR term in these tracers to match our resolution and approach to 24 {mu}m emission. We compare a large suite of {Sigma}{sub SFR} estimates and find that above {Sigma}{sub SFR} {approx} 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} the systematic differences among tracers are less than a factor of two across two orders of magnitude dynamic range. We caution that methodology and data both become serious issues below this level. We note from simple model considerations that when focusing on a part of a galaxy dominated by a single stellar population, the intrinsic uncertainty in H{alpha}- and FUV-based SFRs is {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.5 dex.

  3. Spatially Resolved Star Formation Main Sequence of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Zibetti, S.; Ascaribar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Ziegler, B.; González-Delgado, R. M.; Walcher, C. J.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Mendoza-Pérez, M. A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Husemann, B.; Kehring, C.; Marino, R. A.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; López-Cobá, C.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The relation known as Star Formation Main Sequence (SFMS) of galaxies is defined in terms of stellar mass and star formation rate. This approximately linear relation has been proven to be tight and holds for several star formation indicators at local and at high redshifts. In this talk I will show recent results about our first attempts to study the Spatially Resolved SFMS, using integral field spectroscopic data, coming primarily from the CALIFA survey. I will present as a main result that a local SFMS is found with a slope and zero point of 0.72 +/ 0.04, and -7.95 +/ 0.29 respectively. I will also discuss the influence of characteristics such as environment and morphology in the relation. Finally I will present some extensions of these results for data com in from the MaNGA survey.

  4. Signatures of cool gas fueling a star-forming galaxy at redshift 2.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, N; Murphy, M T; Kacprzak, G G; Péroux, C; Contini, T; Martin, C L; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M

    2013-07-05

    Galaxies are thought to be fed by the continuous accretion of intergalactic gas, but direct observational evidence has been elusive. The accreted gas is expected to orbit about the galaxy's halo, delivering not just fuel for star formation but also angular momentum to the galaxy, leading to distinct kinematic signatures. We report observations showing these distinct signatures near a typical distant star-forming galaxy, where the gas is detected using a background quasar passing 26 kiloparsecs from the host. Our observations indicate that gas accretion plays a major role in galaxy growth because the estimated accretion rate is comparable to the star-formation rate.

  5. The star formation history of the Sculptor Dwarf Irregular Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Lianou, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] We study the resolved stellar populations and derive the SFH of the SDIG, a gas-rich dwarf galaxy member of the NGC7793 subgroup in the Sculptor group. We construct a CMD using archival HST observations and examine its stellar content. We derive its SFH using a maximum-likelihood fit to the CMD. The CMD shows that SDIG contains stars from 10Myr to several Gyr old, as revealed from the MS, BL, luminous AGB, and RGB stars. The young stars with ages less than ~250Myr show a spatial distribution confined to its central regions, and additionally the young MS stars exhibit an off-center density peak. The intermediate-age and older stars are more spatially extended. SDIG is dominated by intermediate-age stars with an average age of 6.4Gyr. The average metallicity inferred is [M/H]\\approx -1.5dex. Its SFH is consistent with a constant SFR, except for ages younger than ~200Myr. The lifetime average SFR is 1.3x10^{-3} Mo/yr. More recently than 100Myr, there has been a burst of SF at a rate ~2-3 times higher ...

  6. Prospects for Chemically Tagging Stars in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Goodman, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    It is now well-established that the elemental abundance patterns of stars holds key clues not only to their formation but also to the assembly histories of galaxies. One of the most exciting possibilities is the use of stellar abundance patterns as "chemical tags" to identify stars that were born in the same molecular cloud. In this paper we assess the prospects of chemical tagging as a function of several key underlying parameters. We build an observationally-motivated model for the star formation history (SFH), the gas and stellar mass distributions, and the radial size growth of the Milky Way through cosmic time. The multidimensional grid of parameters includes the fraction of stars that were born in-situ in the Solar annulus, the evolution and slope of the zero age cluster mass function (CMF), the survey geometry, number of stars in the survey, and the dimensionality of the chemical space. We show that in the fiducial case of $10^4$ distinct cells in chemical space and $10^5-10^6$ stars in the survey, one...

  7. LoCuSS: The steady decline and slow quenching of star formation in cluster galaxies over the last four billion years

    CERN Document Server

    Haines, C P; Smith, G P; Egami, E; Sanderson, A J R; Babul, A; Finoguenov, A; Merluzzi, P; Busarello, G; Rawle., T D; Okabe, N

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the levels and evolution of star formation activity in a representative sample of 30 massive galaxy clusters at 0.1510^10 M_sun) star-forming cluster galaxies within r200 are found to be systematically 28% lower than their counterparts in the field at fixed stellar mass and redshift, a difference significant at the 8.7-sigma level. This is the unambiguous signature of star formation in most (and possibly all) massive star-forming galaxies being slowly quenched upon accretion into massive clusters, their SFRs declining exponentially on quenching time-scales in the range 0.7-2.0 Gyr. We measure the mid-infrared Butcher-Oemler effect over the redshift range 0.0-0.4, finding rapid evolution in the fraction (f_SF) of massive (M_K3M_sun/yr, of the form f_SF (1+z)^7.6. We dissect the origins of the Butcher-Oemler effect, revealing it to be due to the combination of a ~3x decline in the mean specific-SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies since z~0.3 with a ~1.5x decrease in number density. T...

  8. ALMA Observations of SPT-Discovered, Strongly Lensed, Dusty, Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hezaveh, Y D; Fassnacht, C D; Spilker, J S; Vieira, J D; Aguirre, J E; Aird, K A; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bothwell, M; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chapman, S C; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; De Breuck, C; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Fomalont, E B; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Greve, T R; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Husband, K; Hunter, T R; Keisler, R; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Malkan, M; McIntyre, V; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L M; Murphy, E J; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Sharon, K; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Weiß, A; Welikala, N; Williamson, R

    2013-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 860 micrometer imaging of four high-redshift (z=2.8-5.7) dusty sources that were detected using the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 1.4 mm and are not seen in existing radio to far-infrared catalogs. At 1.5 arcsec resolution, the ALMA data reveal multiple images of each submillimeter source, separated by 1-3 arcsec, consistent with strong lensing by intervening galaxies visible in near-IR imaging of these sources. We describe a gravitational lens modeling procedure that operates on the measured visibilities and incorporates self-calibration-like antenna phase corrections as part of the model optimization, which we use to interpret the source structure. Lens models indicate that SPT0346-52, located at z=5.7, is one of the most luminous and intensely star-forming sources in the universe with a lensing corrected FIR luminosity of 3.7 X 10^13 L_sun and star formation surface density of 4200 M_sun yr^-1 kpc^-2. We find magnification factors of 5 to 22, w...

  9. Statistical Properties of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Spheroid: Detection of a Moving Group approximately 50 kpc from the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, Matthew J.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newberg, Lee A.; /Rensselaer Poly.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; /Michigan State U.; Fiorentin, Paola Re; /Ljubljana U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-02-01

    A new moving group comprising at least four Blue Horizontal Branch (BHB) stars is identified at (l; b) = (65{sup o}; 48{sup o}). The horizontal branch at g{sub 0} = 18.9 magnitude implies a distance of 50 kpc from the Sun. The heliocentric radial velocity is = -157 {+-} 4 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to V{sub gsr} = -10 km s{sup -1}; the dispersion in line-of-sight velocity is consistent with the instrumental errors for these stars. The mean metallicity of the moving group is [Fe/H] {approx} -2.4, which is significantly more metal poor than the stellar spheroid. We estimate that the BHB stars in the outer halo have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-2.0, with a wide scatter and a distribution that does not change much as a function of distance from the Sun. We explore the systematics of SDSS DR7 surface gravity metallicity determinations for faint BHB stars, and present a technique for estimating the significance of clumps discovered in multidimensional data. This moving group cannot be distinguished in density, and highlights the need to collect many more spectra of Galactic stars to unravel the merger history of the Galaxy.

  10. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Postman, Marc [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  11. Global Properties of Local Star Forming Galaxies (ADP 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitherer, Claus

    2003-01-01

    We performed an archival study of the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) Astro-2 database. Nineteen spectra of star-forming regions and starburst galaxies were retrieved, reprocessed, and analyzed. The spectra cover the wavelength region 912- 1800 A, providing access to the domain of peak luminosity from a young stellar population. We created an atlas of galaxy spectra documenting the continuum and line properties with an emphasis on the relatively unexplored spectral region below 1200 A. The dust obscuration law was derived from a comparison of the HUT spectra with synthetic population models. The law is similar to the commonly adopted starburst reddening curve at longer wavelengths and approaches the Milky Way law near the Lyman break. A simple power-law parameterization is given, which allows users to express the reddening law in terms of the stellar or nebular color excess at ultraviolet or optical wavelengths. We studied the effect of time-dependent dust obscuration on synthetic ultraviolet line profiles of a young stellar population. If the youngest and most massive stars are more obscured than the older, less massive stars, the C IV 1550 and other stellar wind lines are significantly diluted with respect to a simple foreground screen model for the dust. We propose to use stellar wind lines as a probe of the dust-obscuration model instead of the previously employed nebular emission lines. Since purely stellar diagnostics are utilized, uncertain assumptions on the nebular properties are unnecessary. Photoionization models demonstrate that the C IV 1550 emission is typically dominated by stellar winds and nebular contamination is negligible. A first comparison with the galaxy sample observed with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope favors a dust geometry affecting ionizing and nonionizing stars equally. We point out the need for higher quality data for a more rigorous comparison. The Hubble Space Telescope is capable of obtaining such data in the future.

  12. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Rieke, George H; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M; Wang, Yiping; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3x10^7 M_sun using [NeIII]15.56micron and optical [OIII]5007A gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3micron PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios highe...

  13. The Mid-Infrared Spectrum of Star-Forming Galaxies: Global Properties of PAH Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, J D T; Dale, D A; Moustakas, J; Kennicutt, R C; Helou, G; Armus, L; Roussel, H; Sheth, K; Bendo, G J; Buckalew, B A; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Hollenbach, D J; Li, A; Malhotra, S; Murphy, E J; Walter, F

    2006-01-01

    We present a sample of low-resolution 5-38um Spitzer IRS spectra of the inner few square kiloparsecs of 59 nearby galaxies spanning a large range of star formation properties. A robust method for decomposing mid-infrared galaxy spectra is described, and used to explore the behavior of PAH emission and the prevalence of silicate dust extinction. Evidence for silicate extinction is found in ~1/8 of the sample, at strengths which indicate most normal galaxies undergo A_V < ~3 magnitudes averaged over their centers. The contribution of PAH emission to the total infrared power is found to peak near 10% and extend up to ~20%, and is suppressed at metallicities Z < ~Z_sun/4, as well as in low-luminosity AGN environments. Strong inter-band PAH feature strength variations (2-5x) are observed, with the presence of a weak AGN and, to a lesser degree, increasing metallicity shifting power to the longer wavelength bands. A peculiar PAH emission spectrum with markedly diminished 5-8um features arises among the sample...

  14. Morphologies of High Redshift, Dust Obscured Galaxies from Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Melbourne, J; Armus, Lee; Dey, Arjun; Brand, K; Thompson, D; Soifer, B T; Matthews, K; Jannuzi, B T; Houck, J R

    2008-01-01

    Spitzer MIPS images in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey have revealed a class of extremely dust obscured galaxy (DOG) at z~2. The DOGs are defined by very red optical to mid-IR (observed-frame) colors, R - [24 um] > 14 mag, i.e. f_v (24 um) / f_v (R) > 1000. They are Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies with L_8-1000 um > 10^12 -10^14 L_sun, but typically have very faint optical (rest-frame UV) fluxes. We imaged three DOGs with the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGSAO) system, obtaining ~0.06'' resolution in the K'-band. One system was dominated by a point source, while the other two were clearly resolved. Of the resolved sources, one can be modeled as a exponential disk system. The other is consistent with a de Vaucouleurs profile typical of elliptical galaxies. The non-parametric measures of their concentration and asymmetry, show the DOGs to be both compact and smooth. The AO images rule out double nuclei with separations of greater than 0.1'' (< 1 kpc at z=2), making it unlikely ...

  15. The First Focused Hard X-ray Images of the Sun with NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Grefenstette, Brian W; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Hannah, Iain G; Smith, David M; Vogel, Julia K; White, Stephen M; Madsen, Kristin K; Marsh, Andrew J; Caspi, Amir; Chen, Bin; Shih, Albert; Kuhar, Matej; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the \\textit{Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray} ({\\em NuSTAR}) hard X-ray telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, {\\em NuSTAR} nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at hard X-ray energies ($>$3~keV) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where \\textit{NuSTAR} will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with \\textit{NuSTAR}, their limitations and complications, and the procedures developed to optimize solar data quality derived from our experience with the initial solar observations. These first observations are briefly described, including the measurement of the Fe K-shell lines in a decaying X-class flare, hard X-ray emission from high in the solar corona, and full-disk hard X-ray images of the Sun.

  16. Radio Observations of Star Forming Galaxies in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Mancuso, C; Cai, Z-Y; Negrello, M; De Zotti, G; Perrotta, F; Danese, L

    2014-01-01

    We have combined determinations of the epoch-dependent star formation rate (SFR) function with relationships between SFR and radio (synchrotron and free-free) emission to work out detailed predictions for the counts and the redshift distributions of star-forming galaxies detected by planned Square Kilometer Array (SKA) surveys. The evolving SFR function comes from recent models fitting the far-infrared (FIR) to millimeter-wave luminosity functions and the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions up to z=10, extended to take into account additional UV survey data. We used very deep 1.4 GHz number counts from the literature to check the relationship between SFR and synchrotron emission, and the 95 GHz South Pole Telescope (SPT) counts of dusty galaxies to test the relationship between SFR and free-free emission. We show that the SKA will allow us to investigate the SFRs of galaxies down to few Msun/yr up to z=10, thus extending by more than two orders of magnitude the high-z SFR functions derived from Herschel sur...

  17. STAR FORMATION AND RELAXATION IN 379 NEARBY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and level of relaxation in a sample of 379 galaxy clusters at z < 0.2. We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure cluster membership and level of relaxation, and to select star-forming galaxies based on mid-infrared emission detected with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. For galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub r} < −19.5, we find an inverse correlation between SF fraction and cluster relaxation: as a cluster becomes less relaxed, its SF fraction increases. Furthermore, in general, the subtracted SF fraction in all unrelaxed clusters (0.117 ± 0.003) is higher than that in all relaxed clusters (0.097 ± 0.005). We verify the validity of our SF calculation methods and membership criteria through analysis of previous work. Our results agree with previous findings that a weak correlation exists between cluster SF and dynamical state, possibly because unrelaxed clusters are less evolved relative to relaxed clusters.

  18. Are We Correctly Measuring the Star Formation in Galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, K. B. W.; Skillman, E. D.; Dolphin, A. E.; Mitchell, N. P.

    2016-06-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is 53% larger than previous relations.

  19. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Erfanianfar, G; Finoguenov, A; Wuyts, S; Wilman, D; Biviano, A; Ziparo, F; Salvato, M; Nandra, K; Lutz, D; Elbaz, D; Dickinson, M; Tanaka, M; Mirkazemi, M; Balogh, M L; Altieri, M B; Aussel, H; Bauer, F; Berta, S; Bielby, R M; Brandt, N; Cappelluti, N; Cimatti, A; Cooper, M; Fadda, D; Ilbert, O; Floch, E Le; Magnelli, B; Mulchaey, J S; Nordon, R; Newman, J A; Poglitsch, A; Pozzi, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass and halo occupation distribution in massive halos by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from SED fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high redshift groups (0.5

  20. The mode of gas accretion onto star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Marinacci, F; Fraternali, F; Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Londrillo, P

    2010-01-01

    It is argued that galaxies like ours sustain their star formation by transferring gas from an extensive corona to the star-forming disc. The transfer is effected by the galactic fountain -- cool clouds that are shot up from the plane to kiloparsec heights above the plane. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability strips gas from these clouds. If the pressure and the the metallicity of the corona are high enough, the stripped gas causes a similar mass of coronal gas to condense in the cloud's wake. Hydrodynamical simulations of cloud-corona interaction are presented. These confirm the existence of a critical ablation rate above which the corona is condensed, and imply that for the likely parameters of the Galactic corona this rate lies near the actual ablation rate of clouds. In external galaxies trails of HI behind individual clouds will not be detectable, although the integrated emission from all such trails should be significant. Parts of the trails of the clouds that make up the Galaxy's fountain should be observab...

  1. Dense Cloud Formation and Star Formation in a Barred Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Nimori, M; Sorai, K; Watanabe, Y; Hirota, A; Namekata, D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties of massive, dense clouds formed in a barred galaxy and their possible relation to star formation, performing a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation with the gravitational potential obtained from the 2Mass data from the barred spiral galaxy, M83. Since the environment for cloud formation and evolution in the bar region is expected to be different from that in the spiral arm region, barred galaxies are a good target to study the environmental effects on cloud formation and the subsequent star formation. Our simulation uses for an initial 80 Myr an isothermal flow of non-self gravitating gas in the barred potential, then including radiative cooling, heating and self-gravitation of the gas for the next 40 Myr, during which dense clumps are formed. We identify many cold, dense gas clumps for which the mass is more than $10^4M_{\\odot}$ (a value corresponding to the molecular clouds) and study the physical properties of these clumps. The relation of the velocity dispersion of the i...

  2. The Structure of the Interstellar Medium of Star Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical methods for including stellar feedback in galaxy-scale simulations. We include heating by SNe (I & II), gas recycling and shock-heating from O-star & AGB winds, HII photoionization, and radiation pressure from stellar photons. The energetics and time-dependence are taken directly from stellar evolution models. We implement these in simulations with pc-scale resolution, modeling galaxies from SMC-like dwarfs and MW analogues to massive z~2 starburst disks. Absent feedback, gas cools and collapses without limit. With feedback, the ISM reaches a multi-phase steady state in which GMCs continuously form, disperse, and re-form. Our primary results include: (1) Star forming galaxies generically self-regulate at Toomre Q~1. Most of the volume is in diffuse hot gas with most of the mass in dense GMC complexes. The phase structure and gas mass at high densities are much more sensitive probes of stellar feedback physics than integrated quantities (Toomre Q or gas velocity dispersion). (2) Di...

  3. The quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Fossati, M; Buat, V; Boissier, S; Boquien, M; Burgarella, D; Ciesla, L; Gavazzi, G; Serra, P

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the SED of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SED are fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies is parametrised using a specific SFH with 2 free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These 2 parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism which acts on long timescales if starvation while rapid and efficient if ram pressure. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combine in a new way 20 UV to FIR photometric bands with 3 age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution integrated spectroscopy and with Halpha narrow band imaging data. The use of a truncated SFH significantly increases the...

  4. Super Star Clusters in Luminous Infrared Galaxies: the SUNBIRD Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, P; Escala, A; Kankare, E; Kniazev, A; Kotilainen, J K; Mattila, S; Ramphul, R; Ryder, S; Tekola, A

    2014-01-01

    We present recent results from an adaptive optics imaging survey of 40 Luminous IR Galaxies (LIRGs) searching for obscured core collapse supernovae and studying the galaxies themselves. Here, in particular, we discuss the Super Star Clusters (SSC) populations in the LIRGs. We have constructed the first statistically significant samples of Luminosity Functions (LF) of SSCs in the near-IR, and find evidence that the LF slopes in LIRGs are shallower than in more quiescent spiral galaxies. Distance and blending effects were investigated in detail paving the way for SSC studies further out than done previously. We have also correlated the luminosities of the brightest clusters with the star formation rates (SFR) of the hosts. The relation is similar, though somewhat steeper than that found in the optical and at lower SFR levels, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. We find that the characteristics of the relation suggest an underlying physical driver rather than solely a size-of-sample effect. In p...

  5. Self-Regulated Star Formation in Galaxies via Momentum Input from Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Feedback from massive stars is believed to play a critical role in shaping the galaxy mass function, the structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies, and the slow conversion of gas into stars over many dynamical times. This paper is the first in a series studying stellar feedback in galaxy formation. We present a new numerical method for implementing stellar feedback via the momentum imparted to the ISM by radiation pressure, supernovae, and stellar winds. In contrast to the majority of the results in the literature, we do not artificially suppress cooling or 'turn off' the hydrodynamics for a subset of the gas: the gas can cool to <100K and so the ISM inevitably becomes highly inhomogeneous. For reasonable feedback efficiencies galaxies reach an approximate steady state in which gas collapses due to gravity to form giant molecular clouds and feedback disperses these dense regions back into the more diffuse ISM. This is true for a wide range of galaxy models, from SMC-like dwarfs and Milky-way a...

  6. Star formation in galaxies: the role of spiral arms

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Studying star formation in spiral arms tells us not only about the evolution of star formation, and molecular clouds, but can also tell us about the nature of spiral structure in galaxies. I will address both these topics using the results of recent simulations and observations. Galactic scale simulations are beginning to examine in detail the evolution of GMCs as they form in spiral arms, and then disperse by stellar feedback or shear. The overall timescale for this process appears comparable to the crossing time of the GMCs, a few Myrs for $10^5$ M$_{\\odot}$ clouds, 20 Myr or so for more massive GMCs. Both simulations and observations show that the massive clouds are found in the spiral arms, likely as a result of cloud-cloud collisions. Simulations including stars should also tell us about the stellar age distribution in GMCs, and across spiral arms. More generally, recent work on spiral galaxies suggests that the dynamics of gas flows in spiral arms are different in longlived and transient spiral arms, re...

  7. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Masini, A; Puccetti, S; Baloković, M; Gandhi, P; Guainazzi, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Boorman, P G; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Farrah, D; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M J; LaMassa, S M; Ricci, C; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (a.k.a. UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods. The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 years. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in context of previously published observations. Results. NuSTAR observed Mrk 1210 in 2012 for 15.4 ks. The source showed Compton-thin obscuration similar to that observed by Chandra, Suzaku, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton over the past two decades, but different from the first observation by ASCA in 1995, in which the active nucleus was caught in a low flux state - or obscured by Compton-thick matter, with a reflection-dominated spectrum. Thanks to the high-quality hard X-ray spectrum obtained with NuSTAR and exploiting the long-term spectral coverage spanning 16.9 years, we can precisely disentangle the transmission and reflection components and put constraints on both the intrinsic long-term variability and hidden nucleus scenarios. In the former case, t...

  8. Locating Star-Forming Regions in Quasar Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J E; Shemmer, O; Netzer, H; Gronwall, C; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R; Sturm, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II] $\\lambda$3727, H$\\beta$, [O III] $\\lambda$5007 and Pa$\\alpha$ images, taken with the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically aroun...

  9. Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-González, Pablo G; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; López, Javier Piqueras

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and H$\\alpha$ of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 10^11 Lsun and 10^11.8 Lsun. We have combined new narrow-band H$\\alpha$+[NII] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. The SEDs (photometry and integrated H$\\alpha$ flux) have been fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking into account the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation. From the SED fits we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyrs. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enha...

  10. Cold gas and star formation in a merging galaxy sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakakis, A; Norris, R P; Georgakakis, Antonis; Forbes, Duncan A.; Norris, Ray P.

    2000-01-01

    We explore the evolution of the cold gas and star-formation activity during galaxy interactions, using a merging galaxy sequence comprising both pre- and post-mergers. Data for this study come from the literature but supplemented by new radio observations presented here. Firstly, we confirm that the star-formation efficiency (SFE) increases close to nuclear coalescence. At post-merger stages there is evidence that the SFE declines to values typical of ellipticals. This trend can be attributed to M(H_2) depletion due to interaction induced star-formation. However, there is significant scatter, likely to arise from differences in the interaction details of individual systems. Secondly, we find that the central molecular hydrogen surface density, increases close to the final stages of the merging of the two nuclei. Such a trend is also predicted by numerical simulations. Furthermore, there is evidence for a decreasing fraction of cold gas mass from early interacting systems to merger remnants, attributed to gas ...

  11. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, A.; Comastri, A.; Puccetti, S.; Baloković, M.; Gandhi, P.; Guainazzi, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Boorman, P. G.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M. J.; LaMassa, S. M.; Ricci, C.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (also known as UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods: The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 yr. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in the context of previously published observations. Results: NuSTAR observed Mrk 1210 in 2012 for 15.4 ks. The source showed Compton-thin obscuration similar to that observed by Chandra, Suzaku, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton over the past two decades, but different from the first observation by ASCA in 1995, in which the active nucleus was caught in a low flux state or was obscured by Compton-thick matter with a reflection-dominated spectrum. Thanks to the high-quality hard X-ray spectrum obtained with NuSTAR and exploiting the long-term spectral coverage spanning 16.9 yr, we can precisely disentangle the transmission and reflection components and put constraints on both the intrinsic long-term variability and hidden nucleus scenarios. In the former case, the distance between the reflector and the source must be at least 2 pc, while in the latter the eclipsing cloud may be identified with a water maser-emitting clump.

  12. A Star Formation Law for Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2015-01-01

    The radial profiles of gas, stars, and far ultraviolet radiation in 20 dwarf Irregular galaxies are converted to stability parameters and scale heights for a test of the importance of two-dimensional (2D) instabilities in promoting star formation. A detailed model of this instability involving gaseous and stellar fluids with self-consistent thicknesses and energy dissipation on a perturbation crossing time give the unstable growth rates. We find that all locations are effectively stable to 2D perturbations, mostly because the disks are thick. We then consider the average volume densities in the midplanes, evaluated from the observed HI surface densities and calculated scale heights. The radial profiles of the star formation rates are equal to about 1% of the HI surface densities divided by the free fall times at the average midplane densities. This 1% resembles the efficiency per unit free fall time commonly found in other cases. There is a further variation of this efficiency with radius in all of our galaxi...

  13. X-ray properties of the Sun and some compact objects of our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Debnath, Dipak

    2011-01-01

    In the Thesis, I study the X-ray properties of the two major stages of the life cycle of the stars: one is the normal life of a lighter mass star (Sun) and another is the collapsed state (black hole) of a star (black hole candidates GRO J1655-40, GX 339-4 and GRBs). I am lucky to be a team member for developing X-ray solar space instruments RT-2 (S, G and CZT) which observed both the Sun and Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from space. A part of my Thesis contains development of RT-2 instruments, characterization of CZT & CMOS imaging detectors (used in RT-2/CZT instrument), some observational results of solar flares and GRBs. My Thesis also contains the detailed timing & spectral properties of the 2005 outburst of the well known Galactic black hole candidate GRO J1655-40 and initial rising phase of 2010 outburst of the transient Galactic stellar mass black hole candidate GX 339-4.

  14. Population III Stars and Remnants in High Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Recent simulations of Population III star formation have suggested that some fraction form in binary systems, in addition to having a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. The deaths of metal-free stars result in the initial chemical enrichment of the universe and the production of the first stellar-mass black holes. Here we present a cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulation of an overdense region that forms a few 10^9 Msun dark matter halos and over 13,000 Population III stars by redshift 15. We find that most halos do not form Population III stars until they reach Mvir ~ 10^7 Msun because this biased region is quickly enriched from both Population III and galaxies, which also produce high levels of ultraviolet radiation that suppress H2 formation. Nevertheless, Population III stars continue to form, albeit in more massive halos, at a rate of ~ 10^{-4} Msun yr^{-1} Mpc^{-3} at redshift 15. The most massive starless halo has a mass of 7 x 10^7 Msun, which could host massive black hole formation...

  15. Hierarchical Star Formation across the ring galaxy NGC 6503

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Elmegreen, Debra M; Calzetti, Daniela; Lee, Janice C; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Cignoni, Michele; Cook, David O; Dale, Daniel; Gallagher, John S; Grasha, Kathryn; Grebel, Eva K; Davo, Artemio Herrero; Hunter, Deidre A; Johnson, Kelsey E; Kim, Hwihyun; Nair, Preethi; Nota, Antonella; Pellerin, Anne; Ryon, Jenna; Sabbi, Elena; Sacchi, Elena; Smith, Linda J; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo; Whitmore, Brad

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed clustering analysis of the young stellar population across the star-forming ring galaxy NGC 6503, based on the deep HST photometry obtained with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). We apply a contour-based map analysis technique and identify in the stellar surface density map 244 distinct star-forming structures at various levels of significance. These stellar complexes are found to be organized in a hierarchical fashion with 95% being members of three dominant super-structures located along the star-forming ring. The size distribution of the identified structures and the correlation between their radii and numbers of stellar members show power-law behaviors, as expected from scale-free processes. The self-similar distribution of young stars is further quantified from their autocorrelation function, with a fractal dimension of ~1.7 for length-scales between ~20 pc and 2.5 kpc. The young stellar radial distribution sets the extent of the star-forming ring at radial distances betwe...

  16. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey I. Star Forming Molecular Gas in Virgo Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C D; Israel, F P; Serjeant, S; Bendo, G; Brinks, E; Clements, D; Courteau, S; Irwin, J; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Matthews, H E; Muehle, S; Mortier, A M J; Petitpas, G; Sinukoff, E; Spekkens, K; Tan, B K; Tilanus, R P J; Usero, A; Van der Werf, P P; Wiegert, T; Zhu, M

    2008-01-01

    We present large-area maps of the CO J=3-2 emission obtained at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope for four spiral galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. We combine these data with published CO J=1-0, 24 micron, and Halpha images to measure the CO line ratios, molecular gas masses, and instantaneous gas depletion times. For three galaxies in our sample (NGC 4254, NGC4321, and NGC 4569), we obtain molecular gas masses of 7E8-3E9 Msun and disk-averaged instantaneous gas depletion times of 1.1-1.7 Gyr. We argue that the CO J=3-2 line is a better tracer of the dense star forming molecular gas than the CO J=1-0 line, as it shows a better correlation with the star formation rate surface density both within and between galaxies. NGC 4254 appears to have a larger star formation efficiency(smaller gas depletion time), perhaps because it is on its first passage through the Virgo Cluster. NGC 4569 shows a large-scale gradient in the gas properties traced by the CO J=3-2/J=1-0 line ratio, which suggests that its interaction with ...

  17. Comparison of H-alpha and UV Star Formation Rates in the Local Volume: Systematic Discrepancies for Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Janice C; Tremonti, Christy; Kennicutt, Robert C; Salim, Samir; Bothwell, Matthew; Calzetti, Daniela; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dale, Daniel; Engelbracht, Chad; J., Jose G Funes S; Johnson, Benjamin; Sakai, Shoko; Skillman, Evan; van Zee, Liese; Walter, Fabian; Weisz, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) Using a complete sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc, we evaluate the consistency between star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from the far ultraviolet (FUV) non-ionizing continuum and H-alpha nebular emission, assuming standard conversion recipes in which the SFR scales linearly with luminosity at a given wavelength. Our analysis probes SFRs over 5 orders of magnitude, down to ultra-low activities on the order of ~0.0001 M_sun/yr. The data are drawn from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which has obtained H-alpha fluxes from ground-based narrowband imaging, and UV fluxes from imaging with GALEX. For normal spiral galaxies (SFR~1 M_sun/yr), our results are consistent with previous work which has shown that FUV SFRs tend to be lower than H-alpha SFRs before accounting for internal dust attenuation, but that there is relative consistency between the two tracers after proper corrections are applied. However, a puzzle is encountered at the faint end of the lumin...

  18. Spectral variability of photospheric radiation due to faculae. I. The Sun and Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte M.; Beeck, Benjamin; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Solanki, Sami K.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Yeo, Kok Leng

    2017-09-01

    Context. Stellar spectral variability on timescales of a day and longer, arising from magnetic surface features such as dark spots and bright faculae, is an important noise source when characterising extra-solar planets. Current 1D models of faculae do not capture the geometric properties and fail to reproduce observed solar facular contrasts. Magnetoconvection simulations provide facular contrasts accounting for geometry. Aims: We calculate facular contrast spectra from magnetoconvection models of the solar photosphere with a view to improve (a) future parameter determinations for planets with early G type host stars and (b) reconstructions of solar spectral variability. Methods: Regions of a solar twin (G2, log g = 4.44) atmosphere with a range of initial average vertical magnetic fields (100 to 500 G) were simulated using a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code, MURaM, and synthetic intensity spectra were calculated from the ultraviolet (149.5 nm) to the far infrared (160 000 nm) with the ATLAS9 radiative transfer code. Nine viewing angles were investigated to account for facular positions across most of the stellar disc. Results: Contrasts of the radiation from simulation boxes with different levels of magnetic flux relative to an atmosphere with no magnetic field are a complicated function of position, wavelength and magnetic field strength that is not reproduced by 1D facular models. Generally, contrasts increase towards the limb, but at UV wavelengths a saturation and decrease are observed close to the limb. Contrasts also increase strongly from the visible to the UV; there is a rich spectral dependence, with marked peaks in molecular bands and strong spectral lines. At disc centre, a complex relationship with magnetic field was found and areas of strong magnetic field can appear either dark or bright, depending on wavelength. Spectra calculated for a wide variety of magnetic fluxes will also serve to improve total and spectral solar irradiance

  19. Star formation rate in Holmberg IX dwarf galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009 to calculate star formation rate (SFR in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3:4 x 10-4M.yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  20. The Evolution of Stars and Gas in starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, R C; Lacerda, R R; Fernandes, Roberto Cid; Leao, Joao Rodrigo Souza; Lacerda, Reiner Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    In systems undergoing starbursts the evolution of the young stellar population is expected to drive changes in the emission line properties. This evolution is usually studied theoretically, with a combination of evolutionary synthesis models for the spectral energy distribution of starbursts and photoionization calculations. In this paper we present a more empirical approach to this issue. We apply empirical population synthesis techniques to samples of Starburst and HII galaxies in order to measure their evolutionary state and correlate the results with their emission line properties. A couple of useful tools are introduced which greatly facilitate the interpretation of the synthesis: (1) an evolutionary diagram, whose axis are the strengths of the young, intermediate age and old components of the stellar population mix, and (2) the mean age of stars associated with the starburst, $\\ov{t}_{SB}$. These tools are tested with grids of theoretical galaxy spectra and found to work very well even when only a small...

  1. Rotation period distribution of CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, I. C.; Pasquini, L.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Neves, V.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; de Oliveira, L. L. A.; Freire da Silva, D.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Baglin, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. For this purpose, we identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases specifically for a comparison with the solar Prot. Methods: Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs, which were combined with public data of physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the location of the Sun in the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram. Publicly available theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation, which strongly depends on A. Results: The synthetic samples explain the observed Prot distributions of Sun-like stars as having two main populations: one of young objects (group I, with ages younger than ~1 Gyr) and another of main-sequence and evolved stars (group II, with ages older than ~1 Gyr). The proportions of groups I and II in relation to the total number of stars range within 64-84% and 16-36%, respectively. Hence, young objects abound in the distributions, producing the effect of observing a high number of short periods around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Differences in the Prot distributions between the CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like samples may be associated with different Galactic populations. Overall, the synthetic distribution around the solar period agrees with observations, which suggests that the solar rotation is normal with respect to Sun

  2. The spatial distribution of old neutron stars in the Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The spatial distributions of old neutron stars (NSs) with ages 109 to 1010 yr in our Galaxy are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation under two different initial random velocity models.It is found that the scale heights of the distribution increase with the Galactic radial distance.The location of the peak of the NS distribution is closer to the Galactic center than that of their progenitors.The results from our detailed numerical analysis reveal that there is resemblance between the simulated old NS distribution and the structure of the observed HI disk.

  3. The formation of the first stars and galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromm, Volker; Yoshida, Naoki; Hernquist, Lars; McKee, Christopher F

    2009-05-07

    Observations made using large ground-based and space-borne telescopes have probed cosmic history from the present day to a time when the Universe was less than one-tenth of its present age. Earlier still lies the remaining frontier, where the first stars, galaxies and massive black holes formed. They fundamentally transformed the early Universe by endowing it with the first sources of light and chemical elements beyond the primordial hydrogen and helium produced in the Big Bang. The interplay of theory and upcoming observations promises to answer the key open questions in this emerging field.

  4. Origins how the planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe began

    CERN Document Server

    Eales, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This book looks at answers to the biggest questions in astronomy – the questions of how the planets, stars, galaxies and the universe were formed. Over the last decade, a revolution in observational astronomy has produced possible answers to three of these questions. This book describes this revolution. The one question for which we still do not have an answer is the question of the origin of the universe. In the final chapter, the author looks at the connection between science and philosophy and shows how new scientific results have laid the groundwork for the first serious scientific studies of the origin of the universe.

  5. VLA and ALMA Imaging of Intense, Galaxy-Wide Star Formation in z ~ 2 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rujopakarn, W; Rieke, G H; Ivison, R J; Cibinel, A; Nyland, K; Jagannathan, P; Silverman, J D; Alexander, D M; Biggs, A D; Bhatnagar, S; Ballantyne, D R; Dickinson, M; Elbaz, D; Geach, J E; Hayward, C C; Kirkpatrick, A; McLure, R J; Michalowski, M J; Miller, N A; Narayanan, D; Owen, F N; Pannella, M; Papovich, C; Pope, A; Rau, U; Robertson, B E; Scott, D; Swinbank, A M; van der Werf, P; van Kampen, E; Windhorst, R A

    2016-01-01

    We present $\\simeq$0$.\\!\\!^{\\prime\\prime}4$-resolution extinction-independent distributions of star formation and dust in 11 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z = 1.3-3.0$. These galaxies are selected from sensitive, blank-field surveys of the $2' \\times 2'$ Hubble Ultra-Deep Field at $\\lambda = 5$ cm and 1.3 mm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). They have star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and dust properties representative of massive main-sequence SFGs at $z \\sim 2$. Morphological classification performed on spatially-resolved stellar mass maps indicates a mixture of disk and morphologically disturbed systems; half of the sample harbor X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN), thereby representing a diversity of $z \\sim 2$ SFGs undergoing vigorous mass assembly. We find that their intense star formation most frequently occurs at the location of stellar-mass concentration and extends over an area comparable to their stellar-mass distrib...

  6. Variable stars in the Fornax dSph Galaxy. II. Pulsating stars below the horizontal branch

    CERN Document Server

    Poretti, Ennio; Held, Enrico V; Greco, Claudia; Mateo, Mario; Dell'Arciprete, Luca; Rizzi, Luca; Gullieuszik, Marco; Maio, Marcella

    2008-01-01

    We have carried out an intensive survey of the northern region of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the aim of detecting the galaxy's short--period pulsating stars (P<0.25 days). Observations collected over three consecutive nights with the Wide Field Imager of the 2.2m MPI telescope at ESO allowed us to detect 85 high-amplitude (0.20-1.00 mag in B-light) variable stars with periods in the range from 0.046 to 0.126 days, similar to SX Phoenicis stars in Galactic metal-poor stellar populations. The plots of the observed periods vs. the B and V magnitudes show a dispersion largely exceeding the observational errors. To disentangle the matter, we separated the first-overtone from the fundamental-mode pulsators and tentatively identified a group of subluminous variables, about 0.35 mag fainter than the others. Their nature as either metal-poor intermediate-age stars or stars formed by the merging of close binary systems is discussed. The rich sample of the Fornax variables also led us to reconstruct the ...

  7. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagg, Jeff [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Bussmann, Robert S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Le Floc' h, Emeric [AIM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Melbourne, Jason [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: jwagg@eso.org [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  8. The connection between galaxy environment and the luminosity function slopes of star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65 000 star-forming regions (i.e. FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artefact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  9. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF SPT-DISCOVERED, STRONGLY LENSED, DUSTY, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezaveh, Y. D. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Marrone, D. P.; Spilker, J. S.; Bothwell, M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Vieira, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aguirre, J. E. [University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Aravena, M.; De Breuck, C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5 (Canada); and others

    2013-04-20

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 860 {mu}m imaging of four high-redshift (z = 2.8-5.7) dusty sources that were detected using the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 1.4 mm and are not seen in existing radio to far-infrared catalogs. At 1.''5 resolution, the ALMA data reveal multiple images of each submillimeter source, separated by 1''-3'', consistent with strong lensing by intervening galaxies visible in near-IR imaging of these sources. We describe a gravitational lens modeling procedure that operates on the measured visibilities and incorporates self-calibration-like antenna phase corrections as part of the model optimization, which we use to interpret the source structure. Lens models indicate that SPT0346-52, located at z = 5.7, is one of the most luminous and intensely star-forming sources in the universe with a lensing corrected FIR luminosity of 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun} and star formation surface density of 4200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find magnification factors of 5 to 22, with lens Einstein radii of 1.''1-2.''0 and Einstein enclosed masses of 1.6-7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. These observations confirm the lensing origin of these objects, allow us to measure their intrinsic sizes and luminosities, and demonstrate the important role that ALMA will play in the interpretation of lensed submillimeter sources.

  10. Active Galactic Nuclei and the Truncation of Star Formation in K+A Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J I; Caldwell, Nelson; Palamara, David; Cool, Richard J; Dey, Arjun; Hickox, Ryan; Jannuzi, Buell T; Murray, Stephen S; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We have searched for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in K+A galaxies, using multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopy in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. The K+A galaxies, which have had their star formation rapidly truncated, are selected via their strong Balmer absorption lines and weak H-alpha emission. Our sample consists of 24 K+A galaxies selected from 6594 0.10galaxies brighter than I=20 with optical spectroscopy from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. Two thirds of the K+A galaxies are likely ongoing galaxy mergers, with nearby companion galaxies or tidal tails. Galaxy mergers may be responsible for the truncation of star formation, or we are observing the aftermath of merger triggered starbursts. As expected, the optical colors of K+A galaxies largely fall between blue galaxies with ongoing star formation and red passive galaxies. However, only 1% of the galaxies with colors between the red and blue populations are K+A galaxies, and we conclude that the truncation of ...

  11. High molecular gas fractions in normal massive star-forming galaxies in the young Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, L J; Genzel, R; Neri, R; Cox, P; Cooper, M C; Shapiro, K; Bolatto, A; Bouché, N; Bournaud, F; Burkert, A; Combes, F; Comerford, J; Davis, M; Schreiber, N M Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S; Gracia-Carpio, J; Lutz, D; Naab, T; Omont, A; Shapley, A; Sternberg, A; Weiner, B

    2010-02-11

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas. As this is relatively rare in the local Universe, galaxies like the Milky Way form only a few new stars per year. Typical massive galaxies in the distant Universe formed stars an order of magnitude more rapidly. Unless star formation was significantly more efficient, this difference suggests that young galaxies were much more molecular-gas rich. Molecular gas observations in the distant Universe have so far largely been restricted to very luminous, rare objects, including mergers and quasars, and accordingly we do not yet have a clear idea about the gas content of more normal (albeit massive) galaxies. Here we report the results of a survey of molecular gas in samples of typical massive-star-forming galaxies at mean redshifts of about 1.2 and 2.3, when the Universe was respectively 40% and 24% of its current age. Our measurements reveal that distant star forming galaxies were indeed gas rich, and that the star formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch. The average fraction of cold gas relative to total galaxy baryonic mass at z = 2.3 and z = 1.2 is respectively about 44% and 34%, three to ten times higher than in today's massive spiral galaxies. The slow decrease between z approximately 2 and z approximately 1 probably requires a mechanism of semi-continuous replenishment of fresh gas to the young galaxies.

  12. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) Instrument Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Redemann, Jens; Chang, Cecilia; Dahlgren, Robert; Fahey, Lauren; Flynn, Connor; Johnson, Roy; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Leblanc, Samuel; Liss, Jordan; text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20170005591'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20170005591_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20170005591_hide'); "> hide

    2017-01-01

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with grating spectroscopy to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution and climate. Hyper-spectral measurements of direct-beam solar irradiance provide retrievals of gas constituents, aerosol optical depth, and aerosol and thin cloud optical properties. Sky radiance measurements in the principal and almucantar planes enhance retrievals of aerosol absorption, aerosol type, and size mode distribution. Zenith radiance measurements are used to retrieve cloud properties and phase, which in turn are used to quantify the radiative transfer below cloud layers. These airborne measurements tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. In contrast to the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) predecessor instrument, new technologies for each subsystem have been incorporated into 4STAR. In particular, 4STAR utilizes a modular sun-trackingsky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and spectrometerdetector configurations that may be tailored for specific scientific objectives. This paper discusses technical challenges relating to compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage at high resolution. Test results benchmarking the performance of the instrument against the AATS-14 standard and emerging science requirements are presented.

  13. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettenbacher, R M; Monnier, J D; Korhonen, H; Aarnio, A N; Baron, F; Che, X; Harmon, R O; Kővári, Zs; Kraus, S; Schaefer, G H; Torres, G; Zhao, M; ten Brummelaar, T A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L

    2016-05-12

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

  14. Actively Star Forming Elliptical Galaxies at Low Redshifts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Fukugita, M; Turner, E L; Helmboldt, J; Nichol, R C; Fukugita, Masataka; Nakamura, Osamu; Turner, Edwin L.; Helmboldt, Joe

    2004-01-01

    We report discovery of actively star forming elliptical galaxies in a morphologically classified sample of bright galaxies at a low redshift obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The emission lines of these galaxies do not show the characteristics of active galactic nuclei, and thus their strong H$\\alpha$ emission is ascribed to star formation with a rate nearly as high as that is seen in typical late spiral galaxies. This is taken as evidence against the traditional view that all elliptical galaxies formed early and now evolve only passively. The frequency of such star forming elliptical galaxies is a few tenths of a percent in the sample, but increases to 3% if we include active S0 galaxies. We may identify these galaxies as probable progenitors of so-called E+A galaxies that show the strong Balmer absorption feature of A stars superimposed on an old star population. The approximate match of the abundance of active elliptical plus S0 galaxies with that of E+A galaxies indicates that the duration of su...

  15. A Spatially Resolved X-ray Image of a Star Like the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Kürster, M

    1993-10-08

    Observations made with the x-ray satellite ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) have produced the first spatially resolved x-ray image of a corona around a star like our sun. The star is the secondary in the eclipsing binary system alpha Coronae Borealis (CrB), which consists of one star of spectral type A0V and one of type G5V. The x-ray light curve of alpha CrB shows a total x-ray eclipse during secondary optical minimum, with the G star behind the A star. The totality of the eclipse demonstrates that the A-type component in alpha CrB is x-ray dark and that the x-ray flux arises exclusively from the later-type companion. The x-ray eclipse ingress and egress are highly asymmetric compared with the optical eclipse, indicating a highly asymmetric x-ray intensity distribution on the surface of the G star. From a detailed modeling of the ingress and egress of the x-ray light curve, an eclipse map of the G star was constructed by a method based on an optimization by simulated annealing.

  16. Properties and Star Formation Histories of Intermediate Redshift Dwarf Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Gallego, J.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2017-03-01

    The epoch when low-mass star-forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the Universe. We present improved constraints on the physical properties and star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of intermediate redshift LMSFGs selected by their stellar mass or blue-compact-dwarf-like properties. Our work takes advantage of the deep UV-to-FIR photometric coverage available on the Extended-Chandra Deep Field South and our own dedicated deep VLT/VIMOS optical spectroscopy programs. On the one hand, we estimate the stellar mass (M_{*}), star formation rate (SFR), and SFH of each galaxy modeling its spectral energy distribution. We use a novel approach by Pacifici et al. 2012, that (1) consistently combines photometric (broad-band) and spectroscopic (emission line fluxes and equivalent widths) data, and (2) uses physically-motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the SFR as a function of time. On the other hand, we characterize the properties of their interstellar medium by analyzing the emission line features visible in the VIMOS spectroscopy. The final sample includes 91 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 ≤ logM_{*}/M_{⊙} ≤ 9.5) at 0.3 star forming galaxies over 2 dex in stellar mass, and high specific-SFR. Furthermore, they are characterized by strong emission lines, low metallicity, and an enhanced level of excitation. Our selection criterion based on mass gathers galaxies within a wide range of properties, and possibly, different evolutionary stages. Despite the individual differences, the average SFH that we obtain suggests a late and fast (˜2 Gyr prior their observation) assembly scenario for this type of system.

  17. Star formation trends in high-redshift galaxy surveys: the elephant or the tail?

    CERN Document Server

    Stringer, Martin; Frenk, Carlos S; Stark, Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    Star formation rate and accummulated stellar mass are two fundamental physical quantities that describe the evolutionary state of a forming galaxy. Two recent attempts to determine the relationship between these quantities, by interpreting a sample of star-forming galaxies at redshift of z~4, have led to opposite conclusions. We use a model galaxy population to investigate possible causes for this discrepancy and conclude that minor errors in the conversion from observables to physical quantities can lead to major misrepresentation when applied without awareness of sample selection. We also investigate, in a general way, the physical origin of the correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass within hierarchical galaxy formation theory.

  18. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: energy sources of the turbulent velocity dispersion in spatially resolved local star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Federrath, Christoph; Yuan, Tiantian; Bian, Fuyan; Medling, Anne M.; Shi, Yong; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia J.; Brough, Sarah; Catinella, Barbara; Croom, Scott M.; Goodwin, Michael; Goldstein, Gregory; Green, Andrew W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the energy sources of random turbulent motions of ionized gas from H α emission in eight local star-forming galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. These galaxies satisfy strict pure star-forming selection criteria to avoid contamination from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or strong shocks/outflows. Using the relatively high spatial and spectral resolution of SAMI, we find that - on sub-kpc scales, our galaxies display a flat distribution of ionized gas velocity dispersion as a function of star formation rate (SFR) surface density. A major fraction of our SAMI galaxies shows higher velocity dispersion than predictions by feedback-driven models, especially at the low SFR surface density end. Our results suggest that additional sources beyond star formation feedback contribute to driving random motions of the interstellar medium in star-forming galaxies. We speculate that gravity, galactic shear and/or magnetorotational instability may be additional driving sources of turbulence in these galaxies.

  19. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by grain photoelectric feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, John C; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectric heating has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies found some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation. However, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically found that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarfs suggesting that supernovae and not photoelectric heating are responsible for setting the star formation law in galaxies. This result is in tension with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity, as expected for photoelectric heating but not for supernovae, reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, where the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space- and time-dependent photoelectric heating, and we resolve...

  20. Physical properties of local star-forming analogues to z ˜ 5 Lyman-break galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Stephanie M. L.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Levan, Andrew J.

    2016-07-01

    Intense, compact, star-forming galaxies are rare in the local Universe but ubiquitous at high redshift. We interpret the 0.1-22 μm spectral energy distributions of a sample of 180 galaxies at 0.05 origin and evolution of early galaxies.

  1. Galaxy Morphology and Star Formation in the Illustris Simulation at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Gregory F; Lotz, Jennifer M; Genel, Shy; McBride, Cameron K; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Sales, Laura V; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We study how optical galaxy morphology depends on mass and star formation rate (SFR) in the Illustris Simulation. To do so, we measure automated diagnostics of galaxy structure in 10808 simulated galaxies at z=0 with stellar masses 10^9.7 -1).

  2. A giant stream of metal-rich stars in the halo of the galaxy M31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibata, R; Irwin, M; Lewis, G; Ferguson, AMN; Tanvir, N

    2001-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed streams of gas and stars in the halo of the Milky Way(1-3) that are the debris from interactions between our Galaxy and some of its dwarf companion galaxies; the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy and the Magellanic clouds. Analysis of the material has shown that much of the

  3. Early star-forming galaxies and the reionization of the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brant E; Ellis, Richard S; Dunlop, James S; McLure, Ross J; Stark, Daniel P

    2010-11-04

    Star-forming galaxies trace cosmic history. Recent observational progress with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope has led to the discovery and study of the earliest known galaxies, which correspond to a period when the Universe was only ∼800 million years old. Intense ultraviolet radiation from these early galaxies probably induced a major event in cosmic history: the reionization of intergalactic hydrogen.

  4. Photoionising feedback and the star formation rates in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    MacLachlan, J M; Wood, K; Dale, J E

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods. We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results. We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by approximately 23 per cent over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from 0.042 solar masses per year in our control run to 0.032 solar masses per year after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneo...

  5. SHIELD: Comparing Gas and Star Formation in Low Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Teich, Yaron G; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Józsa, Gyula I G; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Salzer, John J; Skillman, Evan D; Warren, Steven R; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E C; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V; Thomann, Clara M; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the relationships between atomic, neutral hydrogen (HI) and star formation (SF) in the 12 low-mass SHIELD galaxies. We compare high spectral (~0.82 km/s/channel) and spatial resolution (physical resolutions of 170 pc - 700 pc) HI imaging from the VLA with H\\alpha and far-ultraviolet imaging. We quantify the degree of co-spatiality between star forming regions and regions of high HI column densities. We calculate the global star formation efficiencies (SFE, $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ / $\\Sigma_{\\rm HI}$), and examine the relationships among the SFE and HI mass, HI column density, and star formation rate (SFR). The systems are consuming their cold neutral gas on timescales of order a few Gyr. While we derive an index for the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation of N ~ 0.68 $\\pm$ 0.04 for the SHIELD sample as a whole, the values of N vary considerably from system to system. By supplementing SHIELD results with those from other surveys, we find that HI mass and UV-based SFR are strongly correlated over five orders of ma...

  6. The IMACS Cluster Building Survey: IV. The Log-normal Star Formation History of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, Michael D; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta; Abramson, Louis

    2013-01-01

    We present here a simple model for the star formation history of galaxies that is successful in describing both the star formation rate density over cosmic time, as well as the distribution of specific star formation rates of galaxies at the current epoch, and the evolution of this quantity in galaxy populations to a redshift of z=1. We show first that the cosmic star formation rate density is remarkably well described by a simple log-normal in time. We next postulate that this functional form for the ensemble is also a reasonable description for the star formation histories of individual galaxies. Using the measured specific star formation rates for galaxies at z~0 from Paper III in this series, we then construct a realisation of a universe populated by such galaxies in which the parameters of the log-normal star formation history of each galaxy are adjusted to match the specific star formation rates at z~0 as well as fitting, in ensemble, the cosmic star formation rate density from z=0 to z=8. This model pr...

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS ATTRIBUTED TO GRANULATION AND FACULAE ON SUN-LIKE STARS FROM THE KEPLER MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karoff, C. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Campante, T. L. [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400, Toulouse (France); Kallinger, T. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K. U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Gruberbauer, M. [Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, B3H 3C3 Halifax (Canada); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Caldwell, D. A.; Christiansen, J. L. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kinemuchi, K., E-mail: karoff@phys.au.dk [Bay Area Environmental Research Inst./NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Sun-like stars show intensity fluctuations on a number of timescales due to various physical phenomena on their surfaces. These phenomena can convincingly be studied in the frequency spectra of these stars-while the strongest signatures usually originate from spots, granulation, and p-mode oscillations, it has also been suggested that the frequency spectrum of the Sun contains a signature of faculae. We have analyzed three stars observed for 13 months in short cadence (58.84 s sampling) by the Kepler mission. The frequency spectra of all three stars, as for the Sun, contain signatures that we can attribute to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations. The temporal variability of the signatures attributed to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations was analyzed and the analysis indicates a periodic variability in the granulation and faculae signatures-comparable to what is seen in the Sun.

  8. Contributions to Proceedings from the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on the Seismology of the Sun and the Distant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research results on the seismology of the Sun and distant stars is presented. Topics presented include: (1) detection of global convective wave flows; (2) observation of low degree p-mode oscillations; and (3) techniques for spectral deconvolution.

  9. Prospects for Chemically Tagging Stars in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Goodman, Alyssa

    2015-07-01

    It is now well-established that the elemental abundance patterns of stars hold key clues not only to their formation, but also to the assembly histories of galaxies. One of the most exciting possibilities is the use of stellar abundance patterns as “chemical tags” to identify stars that were born in the same molecular cloud. In this paper, we assess the prospects of chemical tagging as a function of several key underlying parameters. We show that in the fiducial case of 104 distinct cells in chemical space and {10}5-{10}6 stars in the survey, one can expect to detect ∼ {10}2-{10}3 groups that are ≥slant 5σ overdensities in the chemical space. However, we find that even very large overdensities in chemical space do not guarantee that the overdensity is due to a single set of stars from a common birth cloud. In fact, for our fiducial model parameters, the typical 5σ overdensity is comprised of stars from a wide range of clusters with the most dominant cluster contributing only 25% of the stars. The most important factors limiting the identification of disrupted clusters via chemical tagging are the number of chemical cells in the chemical space and the survey sampling rate of the underlying stellar population. Both of these factors can be improved through strategic observational plans. While recovering individual clusters through chemical tagging may prove challenging, we show, in agreement with previous work, that different CMFs imprint different degrees of clumpiness in chemical space. These differences provide the opportunity to statistically reconstruct the slope and high-mass cutoff of CMF and its evolution through cosmic time.

  10. HERSCHEL EXPLOITATION OF LOCAL GALAXY ANDROMEDA (HELGA). III. THE STAR FORMATION LAW IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, George P.; Gear, Walter K.; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Eales, Steve A.; Gomez, Haley L.; Kirk, Jason [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Gentile, Gianfranco; Gordon, Karl D.; Verstappen, Joris [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boquien, Mederic; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Cooray, Asantha R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Lebouteiller, Vianney [Service d' Astrophysique, l' Orme des Merisiers, CEA, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); O' Halloran, Brian [Astrophysics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Spinoglio, Luigi [INAF, Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, Tor Vergata, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Wilson, Christine D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, ABB-241, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2013-05-20

    We present a detailed study of how the star formation rate (SFR) relates to the interstellar medium (ISM) of M31 at {approx}140 pc scales. The SFR is calculated using the far-ultraviolet and 24 {mu}m emission, corrected for the old stellar population in M31. We find a global value for the SFR of 0.25{sup +0.06}{sub -0.04} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and compare this with the SFR found using the total far-infrared luminosity. There is general agreement in regions where young stars dominate the dust heating. Atomic hydrogen (H I) and molecular gas (traced by carbon monoxide, CO) or the dust mass is used to trace the total gas in the ISM. We show that the global surface densities of SFR and gas mass place M31 among a set of low-SFR galaxies in the plot of Kennicutt. The relationship between SFR and gas surface density is tested in six radial annuli across M31, assuming a power law relationship with index, N. The star formation (SF) law using total gas traced by H I and CO gives a global index of N = 2.03 {+-} 0.04, with a significant variation with radius; the highest values are observed in the 10 kpc ring. We suggest that this slope is due to H I turning molecular at {Sigma}{sub Gas} {approx} 10 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}. When looking at H{sub 2} regions, we measure a higher mean SFR suggesting a better spatial correlation between H{sub 2} and SF. We find N {approx} 0.6 with consistent results throughout the disk-this is at the low end of values found in previous work and argues against a superlinear SF law on small scales.

  11. Environments and Morphologies of Red Sequence Galaxies with Residual Star Formation in Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Crossett, Jacob P; Stott, John P; Jones, D Heath

    2013-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX NUV photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by blue NUV-R colour), regardless of cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer to occupy low density, high cluster radius environments. The morphology of these UV bright galaxies suggests that they are in fact red spirals, which we confirm with light curves and Galaxy Zoo voting percentages as morphological proxies. These UV bright galaxies are therefore seen to be either truncated spiral galaxies, caught by ram pressure in falling into the cluster, or high mass spirals, with the photometry dominated by the older stellar population.

  12. Linking the Structural Properties of Galaxies and their Star Formation Histories with STAGES

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Gray, Meghan E; Wolf, Christian; Maltby, David T; Bell, Eric F; Böhm, Asmus; Jogee, Shardha

    2015-01-01

    We study the links between star formation history and structure for a large mass-selected galaxy sample at 0.05 < z_phot < 0.30. The galaxies inhabit a very broad range of environments, from cluster cores to the field. Using HST images, we quantify their structure following Hoyos et al. (2012), and divide them into disturbed and undisturbed. We also visually identify mergers. Additionally, we provide a quantitative measure of the degree of disturbance for each galaxy ("roughness"). The majority of elliptical and lenticular galaxies have relaxed structure, showing no signs of ongoing star formation. Structurally-disturbed galaxies, which tend to avoid the lowest-density regions, have higher star-formation activity and younger stellar populations than undisturbed systems. Cluster spirals with reduced/quenched star formation have somewhat less disturbed morphologies than spirals with "normal" star-formation activity, suggesting that these "passive" spirals have started their morphological transformation in...

  13. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  14. A hybrid ensemble learning approach to star-galaxy classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward J.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco Kind, Matias

    2015-10-01

    There exist a variety of star-galaxy classification techniques, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we present a novel meta-classification framework that combines and fully exploits different techniques to produce a more robust star-galaxy classification. To demonstrate this hybrid, ensemble approach, we combine a purely morphological classifier, a supervised machine learning method based on random forest, an unsupervised machine learning method based on self-organizing maps, and a hierarchical Bayesian template-fitting method. Using data from the CFHTLenS survey (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey), we consider different scenarios: when a high-quality training set is available with spectroscopic labels from DEEP2 (Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Phase 2 ), SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey), VIPERS (VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey), and VVDS (VIMOS VLT Deep Survey), and when the demographics of sources in a low-quality training set do not match the demographics of objects in the test data set. We demonstrate that our Bayesian combination technique improves the overall performance over any individual classification method in these scenarios. Thus, strategies that combine the predictions of different classifiers may prove to be optimal in currently ongoing and forthcoming photometric surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  15. Decision Tree Classifiers for Star/Galaxy Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Vasconcellos, E C; Gal, R R; LaBarbera, F L; Capelato, H V; Velho, H F Campos; Trevisan, M; Ruiz, R S R

    2010-01-01

    We study the star/galaxy classification efficiency of 13 different decision tree algorithms applied to photometric objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven (SDSS DR7). Each algorithm is defined by a set of parameters which, when varied, produce different final classification trees. We extensively explore the parameter space of each algorithm, using the set of $884,126$ SDSS objects with spectroscopic data as the training set. The efficiency of star-galaxy separation is measured using the completeness function. We find that the Functional Tree algorithm (FT) yields the best results as measured by the mean completeness in two magnitude intervals: $14\\le r\\le21$ ($85.2%$) and $r\\ge19$ ($82.1%$). We compare the performance of the tree generated with the optimal FT configuration to the classifications provided by the SDSS parametric classifier, 2DPHOT and Ball et al. (2006). We find that our FT classifier is comparable or better in completeness over the full magnitude range $15\\le r\\le21$, with m...

  16. GMASS ultradeep spectroscopy of galaxies at z ~ 2 - VII. Star formation, extinction, and gas outflows from UV spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Talia, M; Cimatti, A; Kurk, J; Berta, S; Bolzonella, M; Cassata, P; Daddi, E; Dickinson, M; Franceschini, A; Halliday, C; Pozzetti, L; Renzini, A; Rodighiero, G; Rosati, P; Zamorani, G

    2011-01-01

    We use rest-frame UV spectroscopy to investigate the properties related to large-scale gas outflows, and to the dust extinction and star-formation rates of a sample of z ~ 2 star-forming galaxies from the Galaxy Mass Assembly ultradeep Spectroscopic Survey (GMASS). Dust extinction is estimated from the rest-frame UV continuum slope and used to obtain dust-corrected star-formation rates for the galaxies of the sample. For the entire sample, a mean value of the continuum slope = -1.11 \\pm 0.44 (r.m.s.) was derived, while the average SFR was found to be = 52 \\pm 48 M_sun/yr (r.m.s.). A positive correlation between SFR and stellar mass was observed, in agreement with other works, the logarithmic slope of the relation being 1.10 \\pm 0.10. Low-ionization absorption lines, associated with the interstellar medium, were found to be blueshifted, with respect to the rest frame of the system, which indicates that there is outflowing gas with typical velocities of the order of ~ 100 km/s. Finally, investigating correlat...

  17. STAR Formation Histories Across the Interacting Galaxy NGC 6872, the Largest-Known Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, RIchard G.; deMello, Duilia F.; Gadotti, DImitri A.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; deOliveira, CLaudia Mendes; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    NGC6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 micrometer) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.

  18. The dearth of nuclear star clusters in bright galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Arca-Sedda, Manuel; Spera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a massive globular cluster (GC) with a super massive black hole (SMBH), located at the centre of its host galaxy, by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The results show that tidal distortions induced by the stellar background and the SMBH act on a time shorter than that of dynamical friction decay for a $10^6$ M$_\\odot$ GC whenever the SMBH mass exceeds $\\sim 10^8$ M$_\\odot$. This implies an almost complete dissolution of the infalling GC before it reaches the inner region ($\\lesssim 5$ pc) of the parent galaxy. The generalization of this result to a larger sample of infalling GCs shows that such destructive process may prevent the formation and growth of a bright galactic nucleus. Another interesting, serendipitous, result we obtained is that the close interaction between the SMBH and the GC produces a ``wave'' of stars that escape from the cluster and, in a fraction, even from the whole galaxy.

  19. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Bigiel, Frank; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; de Blok, W J G; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schinnerer, Eva; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; Usero, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by 12CO(2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between Sig_mol and Sig_SFR but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, t_dep^mol = Sig_mol / Sig_SFR. At our 1 kpc common resolution, CO correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally and using a fixed, Milky Way alpha_CO, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, t_dep^mol=Sig_mol/Sig_SFR ~ 2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex scatter, in good agreement with literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density and find N=1+/-0.15 for our full data set with some variation from galaxy to galaxy. However, we caution that a power law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlat...

  20. The jet feedback mechanism (JFM) in stars, galaxies and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-12-01

    I review the influence jets and the bubbles they inflate might have on their ambient gas as they operate through a negative jet feedback mechanism (JFM). I discuss astrophysical systems where jets are observed to influence the ambient gas, in many cases by inflating large, hot, and low-density bubbles, and systems where the operation of the JFM is still a theoretical suggestion. The first group includes cooling flows in galaxies and clusters of galaxies, star-forming galaxies, young stellar objects, and bipolar planetary nebulae. The second group includes core collapse supernovae, the common envelope evolution, the grazing envelope evolution, and intermediate luminosity optical transients. The suggestion that the JFM operates in these four types of systems is based on the assumption that jets are much more common than what is inferred from objects where they are directly observed. Common to all eight types of systems reviewed here is the presence of a compact object inside an extended ambient gas. The ambient gas serves as a potential reservoir of mass to be accreted on to the compact object. If the compact object launches jets as it accretes mass, the jets might reduce the accretion rate as they deposit energy to the ambient gas, or even remove the entire ambient gas, hence closing a negative feedback cycle.

  1. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at 0.4 < z < 1 Revealed by Star Formation Rates Measured From Hβ and FUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yicheng; Rafelski, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Willner, S. P.; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I.; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at 0.4 models, e.g., non-universal initial mass function or stochastic star formation on star cluster scales, are unable to plausibly explain our results.

  2. Star/Galaxy Separation in Hyper Suprime-Cam and Mapping the Milky Way with Star Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmilla, Jose Antonio

    We study the problem of separating stars and galaxies in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) multi-band imaging data at high galactic latitudes. We show that the current separation technique implemented in the HSC pipeline is unable to produce samples of stars with i 24 without a significant contamination from galaxies (> 50%). We study various methods for measuring extendedness in HSC with simulated and real data and find that there are a number of available techniques that give nearly optimal results; the extendedness measure HSC is currently using is among these. We develop a star/galaxy separation method for HSC based on the Extreme Deconvolution (XD) algorithm that uses colors and extendedness simultaneously, and show that with it we can generate samples of faint stars keeping contamination from galaxies under control to i ≤ 25. We apply our star/galaxy separation method to carry out a preliminary study of the structure of the Milky Way (MW) with main sequence (MS) stars using photometric parallax relations derived for the HSC photometric system. We show that it will be possible to generate a tomography of the MW stellar halo to galactocentric radii ˜ 100 kpc with ˜ 106 MS stars in the HSC Wide layer once the survey has been completed. We report two potential detections of the Sagittarius tidal stream with MS stars in the XMM and GAMA15 fields at ≈ 20 kpc and ≈ 40 kpc respectively.

  3. Star Formation at Low Rates: How a Lack of Massive Stars Impacts the Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    In recent years dedicated observations have uncovered star formation at extremely low rates in dwarf galaxies, tidal tails, ram-pressure stripped gas clouds, and the outskirts of galactic disks. At the same time, numerical simulations of galaxy evolution have advanced to higher spatial and mass resolutions, but have yet to account for the underfilling of the uppermost mass bins of stellar initial mass function (IMF) at low star-formation rates. In such situations, simulations may simply scale down the IMF, without realizing that this unrealistically results infractions of massive stars, along with fractions of massive star feedback energy (e.g., radiation and SNII explosions). Not properlyaccounting for such parameters has consequences for the self-regulation of star formation, the energetics of galaxies, as well as for the evolution of chemical abundances.Here we present numerical simulations of dwarf galaxies with low star-formation rates allowing for two extreme cases of the IMF: a "filled" case with fractional massive stars vs. a truncated IMF, at which the IMF is built bottom-up until the gas reservoir allows the formation of a last single star at an uppermost mass. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the different effects on galaxy evolution with respect to self-regulation, feedback, and chemistry. The case of a stochastic sampled IMF is situated somewhere in between these extremes.

  4. star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 star-forming galaxies in galaxy clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  5. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  6. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  7. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  8. The mass dependence of star formation histories in barred spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Christian; Martel, Hugo; Ellison, Sara L.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-11-01

    We performed a series of 29 gas dynamical simulations of disc galaxies, barred and unbarred, with various stellar masses, to study the impact of the bar on star formation history. Unbarred galaxies evolve very smoothly, with a star formation rate (SFR) that varies by at most a factor of 3 over a period of 2 Gyr. The evolution of barred galaxies is much more irregular, especially at high stellar masses. In these galaxies, the bar drives a substantial amount of gas towards the centre, resulting in a high SFR, and producing a starburst in the most massive galaxies. Most of the gas is converted into stars, and gas exhaustion leads to a rapid drop of star formation after the starburst. In massive barred galaxies (stellar mass M_{ast }>2{×} 10^{10} {M_{⊙}}) the large amount of gas funnelled towards the centre is completely consumed by the starburst, while in lower mass barred galaxies it is only partially consumed. Gas concentration is thus higher in lower mass barred galaxies than it is in higher mass ones. Even though unbarred galaxies funnelled less gas towards their centre, the lower SFR allows this gas to accumulate. At late times, the star formation efficiency is higher in barred galaxies than unbarred ones, enabling these galaxies to maintain a higher SFR with a smaller gas supply. Several properties, such as the global SFR, central SFR, or central gas concentration, vary monotonically with time for unbarred galaxies, but not for barred galaxies. Therefore one must be careful when comparing barred and unbarred galaxies that share one observational property, since these galaxies might be at very different stages of their respective evolution.

  9. GEOMETRY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES FROM SDSS, 3D-HST, AND CANDELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Wel, A.; Chang, Yu-Yen; Rix, H.-W.; Martig, M. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Holden, B. P.; Koo, D. C.; Mozena, M.; Faber, S. M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ferguson, H. C.; Brammer, G.; Kassin, S. A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Giavalisco, M. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Skelton, R. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Whitaker, K. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Momcheva, I.; Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Dekel, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Ceverino, D. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Franx, M., E-mail: vdwel@mpia.de [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 AA Leiden (Netherlands); and others

    2014-09-01

    We determine the intrinsic, three-dimensional shape distribution of star-forming galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5, as inferred from their observed projected axis ratios. In the present-day universe, star-forming galaxies of all masses 10{sup 9}-10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} are predominantly thin, nearly oblate disks, in line with previous studies. We now extend this to higher redshifts, and find that among massive galaxies (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}) disks are the most common geometric shape at all z ≲ 2. Lower-mass galaxies at z > 1 possess a broad range of geometric shapes: the fraction of elongated (prolate) galaxies increases toward higher redshifts and lower masses. Galaxies with stellar mass 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} (10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}) are a mix of roughly equal numbers of elongated and disk galaxies at z ∼ 1 (z ∼ 2). This suggests that galaxies in this mass range do not yet have disks that are sustained over many orbital periods, implying that galaxies with present-day stellar mass comparable to that of the Milky Way typically first formed such sustained stellar disks at redshift z ∼ 1.5-2. Combined with constraints on the evolution of the star formation rate density and the distribution of star formation over galaxies with different masses, our findings imply that, averaged over cosmic time, the majority of stars formed in disks.

  10. Dust Attenuation in Clumpy, Star-Forming Galaxies at 0.07 < z < 0.14

    CERN Document Server

    Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B; Wisnioski, Emily; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Green, Andrew W; da Cunha, Elisabete; McGregor, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Dust attenuation in galaxies has been extensively studied nearby, however, there are still many unknowns regarding attenuation in distant galaxies. We contribute to this effort using observations of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.15 from the DYNAMO survey. Highly star-forming DYNAMO galaxies share many similar attributes to clumpy, star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Considering integrated Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations, trends between attenuation and other galaxy properties for DYNAMO galaxies are well matched to star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Integrated gas attenuations of DYNAMO galaxies are 0.2-2.0 mags in the V-band, and the ratio of stellar E(B-V) and gas E(B-V) is 0.78-0.08 (compared to 0.44 at low redshift). Four highly star-forming DYNAMO galaxies were observed at H-alpha using the Hubble Space Telescope and at Pa-alpha using integral field spectroscopy at Keck. The latter achieve similar resolution (~0.8-1 kpc) to our HST imaging using adaptive optics, pro...

  11. C III] EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES NEAR AND FAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby, J. R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bayliss, M. B. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gladders, M. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sharon, K.; Johnson, T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wuyts, E. [Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dahle, H. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Peña-Guerrero, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We measure [C iii] 1907, C iii] 1909 Å emission lines in 11 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6–3, finding much lower equivalent widths than previously reported for fainter lensed galaxies. While it is not yet clear what causes some galaxies to be strong C iii] emitters, C iii] emission is not a universal property of distant star-forming galaxies. We also examine C iii] emission in 46 star-forming galaxies in the local universe, using archival spectra from GHRS, FOS, and STIS on HST and IUE. Twenty percent of these local galaxies show strong C iii] emission, with equivalent widths < −5 Å. Three nearby galaxies show C iii] emission equivalent widths as large as the most extreme emitters yet observed in the distant universe; all three are Wolf–Rayet galaxies. At all redshifts, strong C iii] emission may pick out low-metallicity galaxies experiencing intense bursts of star formation. Such local C iii] emitters may shed light on the conditions of star formation in certain extreme high-redshift galaxies.

  12. C III] Emission in Star-Forming Galaxies Near and Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, J, R.; Bayliss, M. B.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Wuyts, E.; Dahle, H.; Johnson, T.; Pena-Guerrero, M.

    2015-01-01

    We measure C III Lambda Lambda 1907, 1909 Angstrom emission lines in eleven gravitationally-lensed star-forming galaxies at zeta at approximately 1.6-3, finding much lower equivalent widths than previously reported for fainter lensed galaxies (Stark et al. 2014). While it is not yet clear what causes some galaxies to be strong C III] emitters, C III] emission is not a universal property of distant star-forming galaxies. We also examine C III] emission in 46 star-forming galaxies in the local universe, using archival spectra from GHRS, FOS, and STIS on HST, and IUE. Twenty percent of these local galaxies show strong C III] emission, with equivalent widths less than -5 Angstrom. Three nearby galaxies show C III] emission equivalent widths as large as the most extreme emitters yet observed in the distant universe; all three are Wolf-Rayet galaxies. At all redshifts, strong C III] emission may pick out low-metallicity galaxies experiencing intense bursts of star formation. Such local C III] emitters may shed light on the conditions of star formation in certain extreme high-redshift galaxies.

  13. The gas metallicity gradient and the star formation activity of disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tissera, Patricia B; Sillero, Emanuel; Vilchez, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    We study oxygen abundance profiles of the gaseous disc components in simulated galaxies in a hierarchical universe. We analyse the disc metallicity gradients in relation to the stellar masses and star formation rates of the simulated galaxies. We find a trend for galaxies with low stellar masses to have steeper metallicity gradients than galaxies with high stellar masses at z ~0. We also detect that the gas-phase metallicity slopes and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of our simulated disc galaxies are consistent with recently reported observations at z ~0. Simulated galaxies with high stellar masses reproduce the observed relationship at all analysed redshifts and have an increasing contribution of discs with positive metallicity slopes with increasing redshift. Simulated galaxies with low stellar masses a have larger fraction of negative metallicity gradients with increasing redshift. Simulated galaxies with positive or very negative metallicity slopes exhibit disturbed morphologies and/or have a clo...

  14. A New Association of Post-T Tauri Stars Near The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, C A O; Quast, G R; De la Reza, R; Jilinski, E; Torres, Carlos A. O.; Silva, Licio da; Quast, Germano R.; Reza, Ramiro de la; Jilinski, Evgueni

    2000-01-01

    Observing ROSAT sources in 20 x 25 deg centered at the high latitude active star ER Eri, we found evidences for a new young nearby association (~30Myr at~60pc), the Horologium Association (HorA), formed by at least 10 probable and 6 possible members, some being Post-T Tauri stars. We examine several requirements that characterize a young association and they, together, create a strong evidence for the reality of the HorA. In fact, the Li line intensities are between those of the oldest classical T Tauri stars and the ones of the Local Association stars. The space velocities of the HorA relative to the Sun, U= -9.5+/-1.0, V = -20.9 +/- 1.1, W = -2.1 +/- 1.9, are not far from those of the Local Association. We suggest that some hotter and non-X-ray active stars, with similar space velocities, could be massive members of the HorA, among them, the nearby Be star Achernar. The maximum of the mass distribution function of the HorA is around 0.8 solar masses. At its distance, the projected size of the HorA, ~50 pc, ...

  15. Low redshift star-forming galaxies: What can they teach us about primeval galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzetti, D.; Kinney, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the UV plus optical spectra of three star-forming galaxies, Mrk 496, Mrk 357, TOL1924-416, obtained by matching the size of the optical aperture with that of IUE, has given unexpected results. These can be summarized as follows: (1) the dereddened Ly(alpha)/H(beta) ratios are consistent with the prediction of case B recombination for nebular emission, within the uncertainties; (2) the decrease of the Ly(alpha)/H(beta) ratio with increasing metallicities is not confirmed in our three objects, although the sample is too small to consider this result definitive. The first result is surprising, mainly because at least the two Markarian galaxies have a large enough H1 content to markedly increase the optical depth for the Ly(alpha) photons and to trigger their absorption by dust. This finding can probably be explained as an effect of the inhomogeneous distribution of gas and dust within the galaxies. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the detection of the Ly(alpha) emission line in searching for primeval galaxies (PG's) can be still considered a valid technique.

  16. Timing the Evolution of Quiescent and Star-forming Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Camilla; Oh, Sree; Oh, Kyuseok; Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-06-01

    Constraining the star formation histories (SFHs) of individual galaxies is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that regulate their evolution. Here, we combine multi-wavelength (ultraviolet, optical, and infrared) measurements of a very large sample of galaxies (˜230,000) at z motivated models of galaxy spectral energy distributions to extract constraints on galaxy physical parameters (such as stellar mass and star formation rate) as well as individual SFHs. In particular, we set constraints on the timescales in which galaxies form a certain percentage of their total stellar mass (namely, 10%, 50%, and 90%). The large statistics allows us to average such measurements over different populations of galaxies (quiescent and star-forming) and in narrow ranges of stellar mass. As in the downsizing scenario, we confirm that low-mass galaxies have more extended SFHs than high-mass galaxies. We also find that at the same observed stellar mass, galaxies that are now quiescent evolve more rapidly than galaxies that are currently still forming stars. This suggests that stellar mass is not the only driver of galaxy evolution, but plays along with other factors such as merger events and other environmental effects.

  17. Green Peas emit X-rays: Extreme Star Formation in Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Luminous compact galaxies (LCGs), Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs), and Lyman Break Analog galaxies (LBAs) are all used as proxies for star-forming galaxies in the early Universe (z ≥ 6). The X-ray emission from such galaxies has been found to be elevated compared to other star-forming galaxies in our local Universe. It has been suggested that this may be due to the lower metallicity seen in these proxies to high-redshift galaxies and the elevated X-ray emission may affect the heating and Reionization evolution of the early Universe. Our previous studies have suggested the existence of an LX-SFR-metallicity plane for all star-forming galaxies. We present these results in the context of our newest Joint Chandra/HST study containing the first X-ray detection of the Green Pea galaxies, a population of compact starburst galaxies discovered by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Project (Cardamone+2009). The galaxies were given the name Green Peas due to their compact size and green appearance in the gri composite images from SDSS. The green color is caused by a strong [OIII]λ5007Å emission line, an indicator of recent star formation. We observed a few of the most promising candidates with joint Chandra/HST observation and discuss our findings here.

  18. Intense star formation within resolved compact regions in a galaxy at z = 2.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinbank, A M; Smail, I; Longmore, S; Harris, A I; Baker, A J; De Breuck, C; Richard, J; Edge, A C; Ivison, R J; Blundell, R; Coppin, K E K; Cox, P; Gurwell, M; Hainline, L J; Krips, M; Lundgren, A; Neri, R; Siana, B; Siringo, G; Stark, D P; Wilner, D; Younger, J D

    2010-04-01

    Massive galaxies in the early Universe have been shown to be forming stars at surprisingly high rates. Prominent examples are dust-obscured galaxies which are luminous when observed at sub-millimetre wavelengths and which may be forming stars at a rate of 1,000 solar masses (M(middle dot in circle)) per year. These intense bursts of star formation are believed to be driven by mergers between gas-rich galaxies. Probing the properties of individual star-forming regions within these galaxies, however, is beyond the spatial resolution and sensitivity of even the largest telescopes at present. Here we report observations of the sub-millimetre galaxy SMMJ2135-0102 at redshift z = 2.3259, which has been gravitationally magnified by a factor of 32 by a massive foreground galaxy cluster lens. This magnification, when combined with high-resolution sub-millimetre imaging, resolves the star-forming regions at a linear scale of only 100 parsecs. We find that the luminosity densities of these star-forming regions are comparable to the dense cores of giant molecular clouds in the local Universe, but they are about a hundred times larger and 10(7) times more luminous. Although vigorously star-forming, the underlying physics of the star-formation processes at z approximately 2 appears to be similar to that seen in local galaxies, although the energetics are unlike anything found in the present-day Universe.

  19. A NuSTAR SURVEY OF NEARBY ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Rigby, Jane R.; Ptak, Andrew [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alexander, D. M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, Stephen E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brandt, W. Niel; Luo, Bin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gandhi, Poshak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hickox, Ryan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Koss, Michael [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2015-11-20

    We present a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Chandra, and XMM-Newton survey of nine of the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR at energies above 10 keV enables spectral modeling with far better precision than was previously possible. Six of the nine sources observed were detected sufficiently well by NuSTAR to model in detail their broadband X-ray spectra, and recover the levels of obscuration and intrinsic X-ray luminosities. Only one source (IRAS 13120–5453) has a spectrum consistent with a Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN), but we cannot rule out that a second source (Arp 220) harbors an extremely highly obscured AGN as well. Variability in column density (reduction by a factor of a few compared to older observations) is seen in IRAS 05189–2524 and Mrk 273, altering the classification of these borderline sources from Compton-thick to Compton-thin. The ULIRGs in our sample have surprisingly low observed fluxes in high-energy (>10 keV) X-rays, especially compared to their bolometric luminosities. They have lower ratios of unabsorbed 2–10 keV to bolometric luminosity, and unabsorbed 2–10 keV to mid-IR [O iv] line luminosity than do Seyfert 1 galaxies. We identify IRAS 08572+3915 as another candidate intrinsically X-ray weak source, similar to Mrk 231. We speculate that the X-ray weakness of IRAS 08572+3915 is related to its powerful outflow observed at other wavelengths.

  20. THE CHEMICAL SIGNATURE OF A RELIC STAR CLUSTER IN THE SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY-IMPLICATIONS FOR NEAR-FIELD COSMOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Torgny [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Bland-Hawthorn, Joss [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Freeman, Ken C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Silk, Joe, E-mail: torgny.karlsson@physics.uu.se [Physics Department, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-10

    We present tentative evidence for the existence of a dissolved star cluster at [Fe/H] = -2.7 in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use the technique of chemical tagging to identify stars that are highly clustered in a multi-dimensional chemical abundance space (C-space). In a sample of six stars, three, possibly four, stars are identified as potential cluster stars. The initial stellar mass of the parent cluster is estimated from two independent observations to be M{sub *,init}=1.9{sup +1.5}{sub -0.9}(1.6{sup +1.2}{sub -0.8}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, assuming a Salpeter (Kroupa) initial mass function. If corroborated by follow-up spectroscopy, this star cluster is the most metal-poor system identified to date. Chemical signatures of remnant clusters in dwarf galaxies like Sextans provide us with a very powerful probe to the high-redshift universe. From available observational data, we argue that the average star cluster mass in the majority of the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies was notably lower than it is in the Galaxy today and possibly lower than in the more luminous, classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Furthermore, the mean cumulative metallicity function of the dwarf spheroidals falls below that of the ultra-faints, which increases with increasing metallicity as predicted from our stochastic chemical evolution model. These two findings, together with a possible difference in the ([Mg/Fe]) ratio suggest that the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy population, or a significant fraction thereof, and the dwarf spheroidal population were formed in different environments and would thus be distinct in origin.

  1. CHARACTERIZING THE STAR FORMATION OF THE LOW-MASS SHIELD GALAXIES FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Simones, Jacob E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7900 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Elson, Ed C. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Ott, Jürgen, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    The Survey of Hi in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs is an on-going multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies that populate the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the Hi Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey based on their low Hi mass and low baryonic mass. Here, we measure the star formation properties from optically resolved stellar populations for 12 galaxies using a color–magnitude diagram fitting technique. We derive lifetime average star formation rates (SFRs), recent SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions. Overall, the recent SFRs are comparable to the lifetime SFRs with mean birthrate parameter of 1.4, with a surprisingly narrow standard deviation of 0.7. Two galaxies are classified as dwarf transition galaxies (dTrans). These dTrans systems have star formation and gas properties consistent with the rest of the sample, in agreement with previous results that some dTrans galaxies may simply be low-luminosity dwarf irregulars. We do not find a correlation between the recent star formation activity and the distance to the nearest neighboring galaxy, suggesting that the star formation process is not driven by gravitational interactions, but regulated internally. Further, we find a broadening in the star formation and gas properties (i.e., specific SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions) compared to the generally tight correlation found in more massive galaxies. Overall, the star formation and gas properties indicate these very low-mass galaxies host a fluctuating, non-deterministic, and inefficient star formation process.

  2. The Solar Twin Planet Search: IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Leonardo A dos; Nascimento, José-Dias do; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess if these procedures are acceptable. We analyze the rotational velocities -- limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle -- of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins in order to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess if the Sun is a typical rotator. We use high-resolution ($R = 115000$) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO's 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 82 solar twins are estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities are inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Our s...

  3. Massive star formation in Wolf-Rayet galaxies. V: Star formation rates, masses and the importance of galaxy interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) We have performed a comprehensive analysis of a sample of 20 starburst galaxies, most of them classified as Wolf-Rayet galaxies. In this paper, the last of the series, we analyze the global properties of our galaxy sample using multiwavelength data (X-ray, FUV, optical, NIR, FIR, and radio). The agreement between our Ha-based SFR and those provided by indicators at other wavelengths is remarkable, but we consider that the new Ha-based calibration provided by Calzetti et al. (2007) should be preferred over older calibrations. The FUV-based SFR provides a powerful tool to analyze the star-formation activity in both global and local scales independently to the Ha emission. We provide empirical relationships between the ionized gas mass, neutral gas mass, dust mass, stellar mass, and dynamical mass with the B-luminosity. Although all mass estimations increase with increasing luminosity, we find important deviations to the general trend in some objects, that seem to be consequence of their particular ev...

  4. Long-term radial-velocity variations of the Sun as a star: the HARPS view

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, A F; Monaco, L; Haywood, R D

    2016-01-01

    Stellar radial velocities play a fundamental role in the discovery of extrasolar planets and the measurement of their physical parameters as well as in the study of stellar physical properties. We investigate the impact of the solar activity on the radial velocity of the Sun using the HARPS spectrograph to obtain measurements that can be directly compared with those acquired in the extrasolar planet search programs. We use the Moon, the Galilean satellites, and several asteroids as reflectors to measure the radial velocity of the Sun as a star and correlate it with disc-integrated chromospheric and magnetic indexes of solar activity that are similar to stellar activity indexes. We discuss in detail the systematic effects that affect our measurements and the methods to account for them. We find that the radial velocity of the Sun as a star is positively correlated with the level of its chromospheric activity at about 95 percent significance level. The amplitude of the long-term variation measured in the 2006-2...

  5. Clustered star formation as a natural explanation for the Halpha cut-off in disk galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2008-10-02

    The rate of star formation in a galaxy is often determined by the observation of emission in the Halpha line, which is related to the presence of short-lived massive stars. Disk galaxies show a strong cut-off in Halpha radiation at a certain galactocentric distance, which has led to the conclusion that star formation is suppressed in the outer regions of disk galaxies. This is seemingly in contradiction to recent observations in the ultraviolet which imply that disk galaxies have star formation beyond the Halpha cut-off, and that the star-formation-rate surface density is linearly related to the underlying gas surface density, which is a shallower relationship than that derived from Halpha luminosities. In a galaxy-wide formulation, the clustered nature of star formation has recently led to the insight that the total galactic Halpha luminosity is nonlinearly related to the galaxy-wide star formation rate. Here we show that a local formulation of the concept of clustered star formation naturally leads to a steeper radial decrease in the Halpha surface luminosity than in the star-formation-rate surface density, in quantitative agreement with the observations, and that the observed Halpha cut-off arises naturally.

  6. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF KNOTS OF STAR FORMATION IN INTERACTING VERSUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City TN 37614 (United States); Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Struck, Curtis, E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.

  7. Embedded Star Formation in S4G Galaxy Dust Lanes

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Debra M; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H; Teich, Yaron; Popinchalk, Mark; Athanassoula, E; Bosma, Albert; Comeron, Sebastien; Efremov, Yuri N; Gadotti, Dimitri A; de Paz, Armando Gil; Hinz, Joannah L; Ho, Luis C; Holwerda, Benne; Kim, Taehyun; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Mizusawa, Trisha; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Regan, Michael W; Salo, Heikki; Seibert, Mark; Sheth, Kartik

    2013-01-01

    Star-forming regions that are visible at 3.6 microns and Halpha but not in the u,g,r,i,z bands of the Sloan Digital Sky survey (SDSS), are measured in five nearby spiral galaxies to find extinctions averaging ~3.8 mag and stellar masses averaging ~5x10^4 Msun. These regions are apparently young star complexes embedded in dark filamentary shock fronts connected with spiral arms. The associated cloud masses are ~10^7 Msun. The conditions required to make such complexes are explored, including gravitational instabilities in spiral shocked gas and compression of incident clouds. We find that instabilities are too slow for a complete collapse of the observed spiral filaments, but they could lead to star formation in the denser parts. Compression of incident clouds can produce a faster collapse but has difficulty explaining the semi-regular spacing of some regions along the arms. If gravitational instabilities are involved, then the condensations have the local Jeans mass. Also in this case, the near-simultaneous a...

  8. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Rupke, David S N; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Solar Blind Channel) and Halpha (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Halpha luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Halpha morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (Abell 1991, Abell 2052, Abell 2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star-forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Halpha luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Halpha ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming in...

  9. A NuSTAR Survey of Nearby Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Stacy H; Stern, Daniel; Ptak, Andrew; Alexander, D M; Bauer, Franz E; Boggs, Stephen E; Brandt, W Niel; Christensen, Finn E; Comastri, Andrea; Craig, William W; Farrah, Duncan; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Hickox, Ryan C; Koss, Michael; Luo, Bin; Treister, Ezequiel; Zhang, William W

    2015-01-01

    We present a NuSTAR, Chandra, and XMM--Newton survey of nine of the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR at energies above 10 keV enables spectral modeling with far better precision than was previously possible. Six of the nine sources observed were detected sufficiently well by NuSTAR to model in detail their broadband X-ray spectra, and recover the levels of obscuration and intrinsic X-ray luminosities. Only one source (IRAS 13120--5453) has a spectrum consistent with a Compton--thick AGN, but we cannot rule out that a second source (Arp 220) harbors an extremely highly obscured AGN as well. Variability in column density (reduction by a factor of a few compared to older observations) is seen in IRAS 05189--2524 and Mrk 273, altering the classification of these border-line sources from Compton-thick to Compton-thin. The ULIRGs in our sample have surprisingly low observed fluxes in high energy (>10 keV) X-rays, especially compared to their bolometric lumino...

  10. Molecular and atomic line surveys of galaxies I: the dense, star-forming phase as a beacon

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, James E

    2012-01-01

    We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the Universe, and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular and [CII] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses: (a) recently available HCN Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs, L_IR>10^11 L_sun), (b) a value for epsilon=SFR/M_dense(H_2) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium and (c) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal 'emergent' CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the Universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [CII] as the most important of the far-inf...

  11. What Turns Galaxies Off? the Different Morphologies of Star-Forming and Quiescent Galaxies Since z Approximates 2 from CANDELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Eric F.; VanDerWel, Arjen; Papovich, Casey; Kocevski, Dale; Lotz, Jennifer; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Harry; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman; Wuyts, Stijn; Cheung, Edmong; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dunlop, James S.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Herrington, Jessica; Koo, David; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; DeMello, Duilia; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robaina, Aday R.; Williams, Christina C.

    2011-01-01

    We use HST/WFC3 imaging from the CANDELS multicyc1e treasury survey, in conjunction with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, to explore the evolution of galactic structure for galaxies with stellar masses > 3 x 10(exp 10) Solar Mass from Z= 2.2 to the present epoch, a time span of 10 Gyr. We explore the relationship between rest-frame optical color, stellar mass, star formation activity and the structural parameters of galaxies as determined from parametric fits to the surface brightness profiles of galaxies. We confirm the dramatic evolution from z= 2.2 to the present day in the number density of non-star-forming galaxies above 3 x 10(exp 10) Solar Mass reported by other authors. We find that the vast majority of these quiescent systems have concentrated light profiles, as parameterized by the Sersic index, and the population of concentrated galaxies grows similarly rapidly. We examine the joint distribution of star formation activity, Sersic index, stellar mass, mass divided by radius (a proxy for velocity dispersion), and stellar surface density. Quiescence correlates poorly with stellar mass at all z galaxy structure: while the vast majority of quiescent galaxies have prominent bulges, many of them have significant disks, and a number of bulge-dominated galaxies have significant star formation. Noting the rarity of quiescent galaxies without prominent bulges, we argue that a prominent bulge (and, perhaps by association, a supermassive black hole) is a necessary but not sufficient condition for quenching star formation on galactic scales over the last 10 Gyr; such a result is qualitatively consistent with the expectations of the AGN feedback paradigm.

  12. Kinematics in the Interacting, Star-Forming Galaxies NGC 3395/3396 and NGC 3991/3994/3995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistrop, Donna; Nelson, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that induced star formation is more sensitive to galaxy dynamics than to local phenomena and that enhanced star formation is found in galaxies with disturbed velocity structures. We are studying the stellar populations of several UV-bright, interacting galaxies to try to understand the detailed star formation process in these systems. We present preliminary results of an investigation of the kinematics of star-forming regions in the interacting systems NGC 3395/3396 and NGC 3991/3994/3995. Regions of powerful star formation are observed throughout these galaxies. The observatation will be used to investigate rotation curves in the galaxies and motion in the tidal tails.

  13. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    /ISM heating by AGN feedback is directly observed. The ˜15 kpc soft excess filament, part of which is cospatial with extended 1.3 GHz radio emission, may be associated with dredge-up of low entropy gas by the propagating radio source. Results from our study of the hot X-ray gas are framed in the context of inferred young stellar component ages associated with the central emission line nebula in the BCG. We find that inferred ages of the young stellar component are both younger and older than the inferred ages of the X-ray cavities, suggesting that low levels of star formation have managed to persist amid the AGN feedback-driven excavation of the X-ray cavity network. In Chapter 3 we present Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet imaging of seven BCGs in cool core clusters selected on the basis of elevated star formation rates. We find that even at low levels, star formation provides a dominant contribution to the ionizing photon reservoir required to power the observed luminosities of the emission line nebula. Weak, compact radio sources are observed in each of these seven BCGs. The combination of higher SFR and lower radio power is consistent with a scenario wherein a low state of AGN feedback allows for increased residual condensation from the ambient X-ray atmosphere, accounting for the elevated star formation rates. In Chapter 4 we present a comparison study of episodic star formation and AGN activity in the giant radio galaxy 3C 236, which is not associated with a cluster. We find that an episodic AGN/starburst connection can be fostered by a non-steady transport of gas to the nucleus. These results are then compared with Abell 2597, enabling a better understanding of the roles that may be played by cooling flows vs. mergers and hot vs. cold accretion modes in depositing the gaseous reservoirs that fuel both star formation and AGN activity. In Chapter 5 we broaden the context of the thesis with a search for high redshift Fanaroff-Riley class I radio galaxies, which may

  14. Sustaining star formation rates in spiral galaxies - Supernova-driven turbulent accretion disk models applied to THINGS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B

    2010-01-01

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps (Vollmer & Beckert 2003) contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in star formation regime is realized by replacing the fr...

  15. Asteroseismology from multi-month Kepler photometry: the evolved Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 and KIC 10920273

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.L. Campante; R. Handberg; S. Mathur; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; W.J. Chaplin; B. Mosser; O. Benomar; A. Bonanno; E. Corsaro; S.T. Fletcher; P. Gaulme; S. Hekker; C. Karoff; D. Salabert; G.A. Verner; T.R. White; G. Houdek; I.M. Brandao; O.L. Creevey; G. Dogan; M. Bazot; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; M.S. Cunha; Y. Elsworth; D. Huber; H. Kjeldsen; M. Lundkvist; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; D. Stello; B.D. Clarke; F.R. Girouard; J.R. Hall; R.A. Garcia; C. Regulo

    2011-01-01

    Context. The evolved main-sequence Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 (F-type) and KIC 10920273 (G-type) were observed with the NASA Kepler satellite for approximately ten months with a duty cycle in excess of 90%. Such continuous and long observations are unprecedented for solar-type stars other than the

  16. Consequences of bursty star formation on galaxy observables at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez, Alberto; Brooks, Alyson M; Christensen, Charlotte R; Bruzual, Gustavo; Stark, Daniel P; Alavi, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    The star formation histories (SFHs) of dwarf galaxies are thought to be bursty, with large -- order of magnitude -- changes in the star formation rate on timescales similar to O-star lifetimes. As a result, the standard interpretations of many galaxy observables (which assume a slowly varying SFH) are often incorrect. Here we use the SFHs from hydro-dynamical simulations to investigate the effects of bursty SFHs on sample selection and interpretation of observables and make predictions to confirm such SFHs in future surveys. First, because dwarf galaxies' star formation rates change rapidly, the mass-to-light ratio is also changing rapidly in both the ionizing continuum and, to a lesser extent, the non-ionizing UV continuum. Therefore, flux limited surveys are highly biased toward selecting galaxies in the burst phase and very deep observations are required to detect all dwarf galaxies at a given stellar mass. Second, we show that a $\\log_{10}[\

  17. WHAT DO THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES TELL US ABOUT THE STARBURST-AGN CONNECTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Torres-Papaqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the normal star formation histories (SFHs for narrow emission line galaxies classified as star forming galaxies (SFGs, transition type objects (TOs, Seyfert 2s (Sy2s and LINERs. The SFH varied with the activity type, following the mass of the galaxies and the importance of their bulge: LINERs reside in massive early-type galaxies, Sy2s and TOs in intermediate mass galaxies with intermediate morphological types, and SFGs are hosted in lower mass late-type spirals. Also, the maximum star formation rate in the past was found to increase with the virial mass within the aperture (VMA. This correlation suggests that the bulges and the supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies grow in parallel, in good agreement with the MBH -σ∗ relation.

  18. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size (1-2 Earth-radii) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (within a factor of four). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that $11\\pm4%$ of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to $\\sim200$ d. Extrapolating, one finds $5.7^{+1.7}_{-2.2}%$ of Sun-like s...

  19. Magnetic fields on young, moderately rotating Sun-like stars II. EK Draconis (HD 129333)

    CERN Document Server

    Waite, Ian; Carter, Brad; Petit, Pascal; Jeffers, Sandra; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline; Donati, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic fields, activity and dynamos of young solar-type stars can be empirically studied using time-series of spectropolarimetric observations and tomographic imaging techniques such as Doppler imaging and Zeeman Doppler imaging. In this paper we use these techniques to study the young Sun-like star EK Draconis (Sp-Type: G1.5V, HD 129333) using ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and NARVAL at the T\\`elescope Bernard Lyot. This multi-epoch study runs from late 2006 until early 2012. We measure high levels of chromospheric activity indicating an active, and varying, chromosphere. Surface brightness features were constructed for all available epochs. The 2006/7 and 2008 data show large spot features appearing at intermediate-latitudes. However, the 2012 data indicate a distinctive polar spot. We observe a strong, almost unipolar, azimuthal field during all epochs that is similar to that observed on other Sun-like stars. Using magnetic features, we determined an average equatorial rotational vel...

  20. Galaxy S-Stars Exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum Quantization per Unit Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost stars of our Galaxy, called S-stars, are in Keplerian orbits. Quantum celestial mechanics (QCM predicts orbital angular momentum quantization per unit mass for each of them. I determine the quantization integers for the 27 well-measured S-stars and the total angular momentum of this nearly isolated QCM system within the Galactic bulge.

  1. Delayed star formation in isolated dwarf galaxies: Hubble space telescope star formation history of the Aquarius dwarf irregular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Andrew A. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania, 7001 Australia (Australia); Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55441 (United States); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 Canada (Canada); Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Leaman, Ryan, E-mail: andrew.cole@utas.edu.au, E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: alan.mcconnachie@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: rleaman@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies.

  2. The sub-galactic and nuclear main sequences for local star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maragkoudakis, A; Ashby, M L N; Willner, S P

    2016-01-01

    We describe a sub-galactic main sequence (SGMS) relating star formation rate surface density ($\\Sigma_{\\textrm{SFR}}$) and stellar mass density ($\\Sigma_{\\star}$) for distinct regions within star forming galaxies, including their nuclei. We use a sample of 246 nearby star-forming galaxies from the "Star Formation Reference Survey" and demonstrate that the SGMS holds down to $ \\sim $1 kpc scales with a slope of $\\alpha=0.91$ and a dispersion of 0.31 dex, similar to the well-known main sequence (MS) measured for globally integrated star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses. The SGMS slope depends on galaxy morphology, with late-type galaxies (Sc$-$Irr) having $\\alpha = 0.97$ and early-type spirals (Sa$-$Sbc) having $\\alpha = 0.81$. The SGMS constructed from sub-regions of individual galaxies has on average the same characteristics as the composite SGMS from all galaxies. The SGMS for galaxy nuclei shows a dispersion similar to that seen for other sub-regions. Sampling a limited range of SFR$-$M$_{\\star} $ ...

  3. The growth of the central region by acquisition of counter-rotating gas in star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yan-Mei; Tremonti, Christy A; Bershady, Matt; Merrifield, Michael; Emsellem, Eric; Jin, Yi-Fei; Huang, Song; Fu, Hai; Wake, David A; Bundy, Kevin; Stark, David; Lin, Lihwai; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Bergmann, Thaisa Storchi; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel; Bureau, Martin; Chisholm, John; Drory, Niv; Guo, Qi; Hao, Lei; Hu, Jian; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Lopes, Alexandre Roman; Pan, Kai-Ke; Riffel, Rogemar A; Thomas, Daniel; Wang, Lan; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Ren-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies grow through both internal and external processes. In about 10% of nearby red galaxies with little star formation, gas and stars are counter-rotating, demonstrating the importance of external gas acquisition in these galaxies. However, systematic studies of such phenomena in blue, star-forming galaxies are rare, leaving uncertain the role of external gas acquisition in driving evolution of blue galaxies. Based on new measurements with integral field spectroscopy of a large representative galaxy sample, we find an appreciable fraction of counter-rotators among blue galaxies (9 out of 489 galaxies). The central regions of blue counter-rotators show younger stellar populations and more intense, ongoing star formation than their outer parts, indicating ongoing growth of the central regions. The result offers observational evidence that the acquisition of external gas in blue galaxies is possible; the interaction with pre-existing gas funnels the gas into nuclear regions (< 1 kpc) to form new stars.

  4. Star Cluster Complexes and the Host Galaxy in Three HII Galaxies: Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461

    CERN Document Server

    Lagos, Patricio; Nigoche-Netro, A; Carrasco, Eleazar Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    We present a stellar population study of three HII galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high resolution near-infrared J, H and Kp broad-band and Br narrow-band images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low luminosity HII galaxies is ~10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses > 10^4 Mo. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently an...

  5. Large gas reservoirs and free-free emission in two lensed star-forming galaxies at z=2.7

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, M; Aguirre, J E; Ashby, M L N; Benson, B A; Bothwell, M; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chapman, S C; Crawford, T M; de Breuck, C; Fassnacht, C D; Gonzalez, A H; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Keisler, R; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; McIntyre, V; Reichardt, C L; Sharon, K; Spilker, J S; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Vieira, J D; Weiss, A

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of CO(1-0) line emission in the bright, lensed star-forming galaxies SPT-S 233227-5358.5 (z=2.73) and SPT-S 053816-5030.8 (z=2.78), using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Both galaxies were discovered in a large-area millimeter survey with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and found to be gravitationally lensed by intervening structures. The measured CO intensities imply galaxies with molecular gas masses of (3.2 \\pm 0.5)x10^10 (mu/15)^{-1}(X_CO/0.8) M_sun and (1.7 \\pm 0.3)x10^10 (mu/20)^{-1}(X_CO/0.8) M_sun, and gas depletion timescales of 4.9x10^7 (X_CO/0.8) yr and 2.6x10^7 (X_CO/0.8) yr, respectively, where mu corresponds to the lens magnification and X_CO is the CO luminosity to gas mass conversion factor. In the case of SPT-S 053816-5030.8, we also obtained significant detections of the rest-frame 115.7 and 132.4 GHz radio continuum. Based on the radio to infrared spectral energy distribution and an assumed synchrotron spectral index, we find that 42 \\pm 10 % and 55 \\pm ...

  6. Environmental effects on stellar populations of star clusters and dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Cropper, Mark; Fujita, Yutaka; Chiosi, Cesare; Grebel, Eva K.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the competitive role of the different dissipative phenomena acting on the onset of star formation of gravitationally bound systems in an external environment. Ram pressure, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, and tidal forces are accounted for separately in an analytical framework and compared in their role in influencing the star forming regions. We present an analytical criterion to elucidate the dependence of star formation in a spherical stellar system on its surrounding environment. We consider the different signatures of these phenomena in synthetically realized colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the orbiting system thus investigating the detectability limits of these different effects for future observational projects and their relevance. The developed theoretical framework has direct applications to the cases of massive star clusters, dwarf galaxies in galaxy clusters and dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way system, as well as any primordial gas-rich cluster of stars orbiting within its host galaxy.

  7. PLAYING WITH POSITIVE FEEDBACK: EXTERNAL PRESSURE-TRIGGERING OF A STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieri, Rebekka; Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A., E-mail: bieri@iap.fr [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (UMR 7095: CNRS and UPMC—Sorbonne Universités), 98 bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2015-10-20

    In massive galaxies, the currently favored method for quenching star formation is via active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, which ejects gas from the galaxy using a central supermassive black hole. At high redshifts however, explanation of the huge rates of star formation often found in galaxies containing AGNs may require a more vigorous mode of star formation than is attainable by simply enriching the gas content of galaxies in the usual gravitationally driven mode that is associated with the nearby universe. Using idealized hydrodynamical simulations, we show that AGN-pressure-driven star formation potentially provides the positive feedback that may be required to generate the accelerated star formation rates observed in the distant universe.

  8. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in star formation, finding systematic variations in both the a

  9. Homogeneous Photometry for Star Clusters and Resolved Galaxies; 2, Photometric Standard Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stetson, P B

    2000-01-01

    Stars appearing in CCD images obtained over 224 nights during the course of 69 observing runs have been calibrated to the Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI photometric system defined by the equatorial standards of Landolt (1992, AJ, 104, 340). More than 15,000 stars suitable for use as photometric standards have been identified, where "suitable" means that the star has been observed five or more times during photometric conditions and has a standard error of the mean magnitude less than 0.02 mag in at least two of the four bandpasses, and shows no significant evidence of intrinsic variability. Many of these stars are in the same fields as Landolt's equatorial standards or Graham's (1982, PASP, 94, 244) southern E-region standards, but are considerably fainter. This enhances the value of those fields for the calibration of photometry obtained with large telescopes. Other standards have been defined in fields containing popular objects of astrophysical interest, such as star clusters and famous galaxies, extending Land...

  10. The Star Formation Efficiency in Nearby Galaxies: Measuring Where Gas Forms Stars Effectively

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; Brinks, Elias; Bigiel, Frank; De Blok, W J G; Madore, Barry; Thornley, M D

    2008-01-01

    We measure the star formation efficiency (SFE), the star formation rate per unit gas, in 23 nearby galaxies and compare it to expectations from proposed star formation laws and thresholds. We use HI maps from THINGS and derive H2 maps from HERACLES and BIMA SONG CO. We estimate the star formation rate by combining GALEX FUV maps and SINGS 24 micron maps, infer stellar surface density profiles from SINGS 3.6 micron data, and use kinematics from THINGS. We measure the SFE as a function of: the free-fall and orbital timescales; midplane gas pressure; stability of the gas disk to collapse (including the effects of stars); the ability of perturbations to grow despite shear; and the ability of a cold phase to form. In spirals, the SFE of H2 alone is nearly constant at 5.25 +/- 2.5 x 10^(-10) yr^(-1) (equivalent to an H2 depletion time of 1.9x10^9 yr) as a function of all of these variables at our 800 pc resolution. Where the ISM is mostly HI, on the other hand, the SFE decreases with increasing radius in both spira...

  11. Global Star Formation Rates and Dust Emission Over the Galaxy Interaction Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Lanz, Lauranne; Brassington, Nicola; Smith, Howard A; Ashby, Matthew L N; da Cunha, Elisabete; Fazio, Giovanni G; Hayward, Christopher C; Hernquist, Lars; Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    We measured and modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFR), specific star formation rates (sSFR), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increase...

  12. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Can we trust aperture corrections to predict star formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Samuel Nathan; Croom, Scott; Hopkins, Andrew; Schaefer, Adam; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Allen, James; Brough, Sarah; Cecil, Gerald; Cortese, Luca; Fogarty, Lisa; Gunawardhana, Madusha; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andrew; Ho, I-Ting; Kewley, Lisa; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Lawrence, Jon; Lorente, Nuria; Medling, Anne; Owers, Matt; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah; Taylor, Edward

    2015-01-01

    In the low redshift Universe (z<0.3), our view of galaxy evolution is primarily based on fibre optic spectroscopy surveys. Elaborate methods have been developed to address aperture effects when fixed aperture sizes only probe the inner regions for galaxies of ever decreasing redshift or increasing physical size. These aperture corrections rely on assumptions about the physical properties of galaxies. The adequacy of these aperture corrections can be tested with integral-field spectroscopic data. We use integral-field spectra drawn from 1212 galaxies observed as part of the SAMI Galaxy Survey to investigate the validity of two aperture correction methods that attempt to estimate a galaxy's total instantaneous star formation rate. We show that biases arise when assuming that instantaneous star formation is traced by broadband imaging, and when the aperture correction is built only from spectra of the nuclear region of galaxies. These biases may be significant depending on the selection criteria of a survey s...

  13. Intermittent Self-Sustaining Star Formation in Low-Redshift Galaxies Exhibiting a Peak Metallicity Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The decline of star formation in massive low-redshift galaxies, often referred to as quenching, has been attributed to a variety of factors. Some proposals suggest that erupting active galactic nuclei may strip galaxies of their interstellar medium, and thus the ability to form stars. Here, we note that, whereas star formation is universal in small, low-redshift galaxies, fractional duty cycles of star formation steadily decline in galaxies of increasing mass, although star formation may not cease entirely. We show that, when infall of gas from extragalactic space ceases, galaxies of high stellar mass appear to sustain star formation on gas liberated in mass loss from evolved low- and intermediate-mass stars admixed with occasional Type II supernova ejecta. This model quantitatively accounts for the universal limiting metallicity plateau at a ratio of oxygen to hydrogen atoms, Z(O) = n(O)/n(H) = 0.0013, characterizing high-mass intermittently star-forming galaxies. We show that, when fractional duty cycles ar...

  14. Distances to Galaxies from the Brightest Stars in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kudritzki, R -P

    2011-01-01

    Blue Supergiants (BSGs) are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light with absolute magnitudes up to Mv=-10 mag. They are ideal stellar objects for the determination of extragalactic distances, in particular, because the perennial uncertainties troubling most of the other stellar distance indicators, interstellar extinction and metallicity, do not affect them. The quantitative spectral analysis of low resolution spectra of individual BSGs provides accurate stellar parameters and chemical composition, which are then used to determine accurate reddening and extinction from photometry for each individual object. Accurate distances can be determined from stellar gravities and effective temperatures using the "Flux Weighted Gravity - Luminosity Relationship (FGLR)". Most recent results of the quantitative spectral analysis of BSGs in galaxies within and beyond the Local Group based on medium and low resolution spectra obtained with the ESO VLT and the Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea are presented and distan...

  15. Using boosted decision trees for star-galaxy separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etayo-Sotos, P.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.

    2013-05-01

    We present an application of a particular machine-learning method (Boosted Decision Trees, BDT) to separate stars and galaxies from their catalog characteristics. This application is based on the BDT implementation in the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA) for ROOT, a physics analysis package widely used in high energy physics. The main goal is to improve from simple thresholding cuts on standard separation variables that may be affected by local effects such as blending, badly calculated background levels or which do not include information in other bands. We explain the basics of decision trees and the training sets used for the cases that we analyze. The improvements are shown using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. With this method we have reached an efficiency of 99% with a contamination level of less than 0.45%.

  16. The formation and assembly of a typical star-forming galaxy at redshift z approximately 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Daniel P; Swinbank, A Mark; Ellis, Richard S; Dye, Simon; Smail, Ian R; Richard, Johan

    2008-10-09

    Recent studies of galaxies approximately 2-3 Gyr after the Big Bang have revealed large, rotating disks, similar to those of galaxies today. The existence of well-ordered rotation in galaxies during this peak epoch of cosmic star formation indicates that gas accretion is likely to be the dominant mode by which galaxies grow, because major mergers of galaxies would completely disrupt the observed velocity fields. But poor spatial resolution and sensitivity have hampered this interpretation; such studies have been limited to the largest and most luminous galaxies, which may have fundamentally different modes of assembly from those of more typical galaxies (which are thought to grow into the spheroidal components at the centres of galaxies similar to the Milky Way). Here we report observations of a typical star-forming galaxy at z = 3.07, with a linear resolution of approximately 100 parsecs. We find a well-ordered compact source in which molecular gas is being converted efficiently into stars, likely to be assembling a spheroidal bulge similar to those seen in spiral galaxies at the present day. The presence of undisrupted rotation may indicate that galaxies such as the Milky Way gain much of their mass by accretion rather than major mergers.

  17. Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun in 2015: Five Takeaways and Five Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    I present a highly biased and skewed summary of IAU Symposium 314, "Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun," held in Atlanta. This summary includes takeaway thoughts about the rapidly evolving state of the field, as well as crowd-sourced predictions for progress over the next ~10 years. We predict the elimination of 1-2 of the currently recognized young moving groups, the addition of 3 or more new moving groups within 100 pc, the continued lack of a predictive theory of stellar mass, robust measurements of the gas and dust content of circumstellar disks, and an ongoing struggle to achieve a consensus definition for a planet.

  18. Many skies alternative histories of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars

    CERN Document Server

    Upgren, Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Many Skies: Alternative Histories of the Sun, Moon, Planets, and Stars examines the changes in science that  alternative solar, stellar, and galactic arrangements would have brought, and explores the different theologies, astrologies, and methods of tracking time that would have developed to reflect them. Our perception of our surroundings, the number of gods we worship, the symbols we use in art and literature, even the way we form nations and empires are all closely tied to our particular (and accidental) placement in the universe.  Upgren also explores the actual ways tha

  19. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disk morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Kyle W; Simmons, Brooke D; Masters, Karen L; Skibba, Ramin A; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O Ivy; Nichol, Robert C; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate relation in star-forming disk galaxies at z1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  20. Estimating interstellar extinction toward to elliptical galaxies and star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, E. B.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to estimate interstellar extinction is essential for color corrections and distance calculations of all sorts of astronomical objects being fundamental for galactic structure studies. We performed comparisons of interstellar extinction models by Amores & Lépine ( 2005). These models are based on the hypothesis that gas and dust are homogeneously mixed, and make use of the dust-to gas ratio. The gas density distribution used in the models is obtained from the gas large scale surveys: Berkeley and Parkes HI surveys and from the Columbia University CO survey. In the present work, we compared these models with extinction predictions of elliptical galaxies (gE) and star clusters. We used the similar sample of gE galaxies proposed by Burstein for the comparison between the extinction calculation methods of Burstein & Heiles (1978, 1982) and of Schlegel et al. (1998) extending the comparison to our models. We found rms differences equal to 0.0179 and 0.0189 mag respectively, in the comparison of the predictions of our "model A" with the two methods mentioned. The comparison takes into account the "zero points" introduced by Burstein. The correlation coefficient obtained in the comparison is around 0.85. These results bring to light that our models can be safely used for the estimation of extinction in our Galaxy for extragalactic work, as an alternative method to the BH and SFD predictions. In the comparison with the globular clusters we found rms differences equal to 0.32 and 0.30 for our models A and S, respectively. For the open clusters we made comparisons using different samples and the rms differences were around 0.25.

  1. Estimating interstellar extinction towards elliptical galaxies and star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amôres, E. B.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    The ability to estimate interstellar extinction is essential for color corrections and distance calculations of all sorts of astronomical objects being fundamental for galactic structure studies. We performed comparisons of interstellar extinction models by Amores & Lépine (2005) that are available at: http://www.astro.iag.usp.br/\\symbol{126}amores. These models are based on the hypothesis that gas and dust are homogeneously mixed, and make use of the dust-to gas ratio. The gas density distribution used in the models is obtained from the gas large scale surveys: Berkeley and Parkes HI surveys and from the Columbia University CO survey. In the present work, we compared these models with extinction predictions of elliptical galaxies (gE) and star clusters. We used the similar sample of gE galaxies proposed by Burstein for the comparison between the extinction calculation methods of Burstein & Heiles (1978, 1982) and of Schlegel et al. (1998) extending the comparison to our models. We found rms differences equal to 0.0179 and 0.0189 mag respectively, in the comparison of the predictions of our "model A" with the two methods mentioned. The comparison takes into account the "zero points" introduced by Burstein. The correlation coefficient obtained in the comparison is around 0.85. These results bring to light that our models can be safely used for the estimation of extinction in our Galaxy for extragalactic work, as an alternative method to the BH and SFD predictions. In the comparison with the globular clusters we found rms differences equal to 0.32 and 0.30 for our models A and S, respectively. For the open clusters we made comparisons using different samples and the rms differences were around 0.25.

  2. Compact star forming galaxies as the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies: Clustering result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozhi; Fan, Lulu; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen

    2017-02-01

    We present a measurement of the spatial clustering of massive compact galaxies at 1.2 ≤ z ≤ 3 in CANDELS/3D-HST fields. We obtain the correlation length for compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at z ∼ 1.6 of r0 = 7.1-2.6+2.3 h-1 Mpc and compact star forming galaxies (cSFGs) at z ∼ 2.5 of r0 = 7.7-2.9+2.7 h-1 Mpc assuming a power-law slope γ = 1.8 . The characteristic dark matter halo masses MH of cQGs at z ∼ 1.6 and cSFGs at z ∼ 2.5 are ∼ 7.1 ×1012h-1M⊙ and ∼ 4.4 ×1012h-1M⊙ , respectively. Our clustering result suggests that cQGs at z ∼ 1.6 are possibly the progenitors of local luminous ETGs and the descendants of cSFGs and SMGs at z > 2. Thus an evolutionary connection involving SMGs, cSFGs, QSOs, cQGs and local luminous ETGs has been indicated by our clustering result.

  3. Metal Abundances of KISS Galaxies. V. Nebular Abundances of 15 Intermediate Luminosity Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Bresolin, Fabio; Saviane, Ivo; Yegorova, Irina

    2015-09-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy of 15 emission-line galaxies cataloged in the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey, selected for their possession of high equivalent width [O iii] lines. The primary goal of this study was to attempt to derive direct-method (Te) abundances for use in constraining the upper-metallicity branch of the {R}23 relation. The spectra cover the full optical region from [O ii]λλ3726,3729 to [S iii]λλ9069,9531 and include the measurement of [O iii]λ4363 in 13 objects. From these spectra, we determine abundance ratios of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon. We find these galaxies to predominantly possess oxygen abundances in the range of 8.0 ≲ 12+log(O/H) ≲ 8.3. We present a comparison of direct-method abundances with empirical strong-emission-line techniques, revealing several discrepancies. We also present a comparison of direct-method oxygen abundance calculations using electron temperatures determined from emission lines of O++ and S++, finding a small systematic shift to lower Te (∼1184 K) and higher metallicity (∼0.14 dex) for sulfur-derived Te compared to oxygen-derived Te. Finally, we explore in some detail the different spectral activity types of targets in our sample, including regular star-forming galaxies, those with suspected AGN contamination, and a local pair of low-metallicity, high-luminosity compact objects.

  4. Compact star forming galaxies as the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies: clustering result

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xiaozhi; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the spatial clustering of massive compact galaxies at $1.2\\le z \\le 3$ in CANDELS/3D-HST fields. We obtain the correlation length for compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z\\sim1.6$ of $r_{0}=7.1_{-2.6}^{+2.3}\\ h^{-1}Mpc$ and compact star forming galaxies (cSFGs) at $z\\sim2.5$ of $r_{0}=7.7_{-2.9}^{+2.7}\\ h^{-1}Mpc$ assuming a power-law slope $\\gamma =1.8$. The characteristic dark matter halo masses $M_H$ of cQGs at $z\\sim1.6$ and cSFGs at $z\\sim2.5$ are $\\sim7.1\\times 10^{12}\\ h^{-1} M_\\odot$ and $\\sim4.4\\times10^{12}\\ h^{-1} M_\\odot$, respectively. Our clustering result suggests that cQGs at $z\\sim1.6$ are possibly the progenitors of local luminous ETGs and the descendants of cSFGs and SMGs at $z>2$. Thus an evolutionary connection involving SMGs, cSFGs, QSOs, cQGs and local luminous ETGs has been indicated by our clustering result.

  5. Semi-automatic removal of foreground stars from images of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Frei, Z

    1996-01-01

    A new procedure, designed to remove foreground stars from galaxy profiles is presented. Although several programs exist for stellar and faint object photometry, none of them treat star removal from the images very carefully. I present my attempt to develop such a system, and briefly compare the performance of my software to one of the well known stellar photometry packages, DAOPhot. Major steps in my procedure are: (1) automatic construction of an empirical 2D point spread function from well separated stars that are situated off the galaxy; (2) automatic identification of those peaks that are likely to be foreground stars, scaling the PSF and removing these stars, and patching residuals (in the automatically determined smallest possible area where residuals are truly significant); and (3) cosmetic fix of remaining degradations in the image. The algorithm and software presented here is significantly better for automatic removal of foreground stars from images of galaxies than DAOPhot or similar packages, since...

  6. Disentangling Morphology, Star Formation, Stellar Mass, and Environment in Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Christlein, D; Christlein, Daniel; Zabludoff, Ann

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the spectroscopic and photometric properties of galaxies in six nearby clusters. We perform a partial correlation analysis on our dataset to investigate whether the correlation between star formation rates in galaxies and their environment is merely another aspect of correlations of morphology, stellar mass, or mean stellar age with environment, or whether star formation rates vary independently of these other correlations. We find a residual correlation of ongoing star formation with environment, indicating that even galaxies with similar morphologies, stellar masses, and mean stellar ages have lower star formation rates in denser environments. Thus, the current star formation gradient in clusters is not just another aspect of the morphology-density, stellar mass-density, or mean stellar age-density relations. Furthermore, the star formation gradient cannot be solely the result of initial conditions, but must partly be due to subsequent evolution through a mechanism (or mechanisms) sens...

  7. The sub-galactic and nuclear main sequences for local star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudakis, A.; Zezas, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    We describe a sub-galactic main sequence (SGMS) relating star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR) and stellar mass density (Σ⋆) for distinct regions within star-forming galaxies, including their nuclei. We use a sample of 246 nearby star-forming galaxies from the 'Star Formation Reference Survey and demonstrate that the SGMS holds down to ˜1 kpc scales with a slope of α = 0.91 and a dispersion of 0.31 dex, similar to the well-known main sequence (MS) measured for globally integrated SFRs and stellar masses. The SGMS slope depends on galaxy morphology, with late-type galaxies (Sc-Irr) having α = 0.97 and early-type spirals (Sa-Sbc) having α = 0.81. The SGMS constructed from subregions of individual galaxies has on average the same characteristics as the composite SGMS from all galaxies. The SGMS for galaxy nuclei shows a dispersion similar to that seen for other subregions. Sampling a limited range of SFR-M⋆ space may produce either sublinearity or superlinearity of the SGMS slope. For nearly all galaxies, both SFR and stellar mass peak in the nucleus, indicating that circumnuclear clusters are among the most actively star-forming regions in the galaxy and the most massive. The nuclear SFR also correlates with total galaxy mass, forming a distinct sequence from the standard MS of star formation. The nuclear MS will be useful for studying bulge growth and for characterizing feedback processes connecting AGN and star formation.

  8. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  9. The Schmidt-Kennicutt Law of Matched-Age Star Forming Regions; Pa-alpha Observations of the Early-Phase Interacting Galaxy Taffy I

    CERN Document Server

    Komugi, S; Motohara, K; Takagi, T; Iono, D; Kaneko, H; Ueda, J; Saitoh, T R; Kato, N; Konishi, M; Koshida, S; Morokuma, T; Takahashi, H; Tanabe, T; Yoshii, Y

    2012-01-01

    In order to test a recent hypothesis that the dispersion in the Schmidt-Kennicutt law arises from variations in the evolutionary stage of star forming molecular clouds, we compared molecular gas and recent star formation in an early-phase merger galaxy pair, Taffy I (UGC\\ 12915/UGC\\ 12914, VV\\ 254) which went thro