WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun radiation density

  1. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Your Eyes and the Sun Sections The Sun, UV Radiation ... Safety Infographic The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes Written by: David Turbert Aug. 28, 2014 Keep ...

  2. Sun and Other Types of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Causes Cancer? Sun and Other Types of Radiation Learn about the different types of radiation and ... other diseases. Learn more here. Other Types of Radiation Exposure Not all types of radiation have been ...

  3. The radiation belt of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    For a given solar magnetic field, the near-Sun (phase-space) density of cosmic ray electrons and positrons of energy above about 10GeV can be calculated from first principles, without any assumptions about the cosmic ray diffusion. This is because the sunlight Compton drag must be more important than diffusion. If the solar magnetic field has an appreciable dipole component, the electron/positron density should have a belt-like dent, perhaps extending to several solar radii. The belt structure appears because the quasi-bound orbits are depopulated by the sunlight Compton drag.

  4. The dynamics of the radiative zone of the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turck-Chieze, S; Mathis, S; Piau, L [IRFU/ CEA/ CE Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Couvidat, S [HEPL, Stanford (United States); Duez, V [Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Universitat Bonn (Germany); Marques, J [Observatoire de Meudon, Meudon (France); Palacios, A, E-mail: sylvaine.turck-chieze@cea.fr [GRAAL Montpellier (France)

    2011-01-01

    Helioseismology puts strong constraints on the internal sound speed and on the rotation profile in the radiative zone. Young stars of solar type are more active and faster rotators than the Sun. So we begin to build models which include different rotation histories and compare the results with all the solar observations. The profiles of the rotation we get have interesting consequence for the introduction of magnetic field in the radiative zone. We discuss also the impact of mass loss deduced from measured flux of young stars. We deduce from these comparisons some quantitative effect of the dynamical processes (rotation, magnetic field and mass loss) of these early stages on the present sound speed and density. We show finally how we can improve our present knowledge of the radiative zone with PICARD and GOLFNG.

  5. Early active sun - Radiation history of distinct components in fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozaz, G.; Taylor, G. J.; Walker, R. M.; Seitz, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    Plagioclase feldspars were separated from lunar soil samples and their compositions were determined by electron-microprobe analysis followed by etching and track counting in an effort to find effects of early solar activity. The feldspars were assigned on this basis to three major lithologies: mare basalts, anorthositic rocks, and KREEP rock. The results are in sharp contrast to Poupeau et al.'s (1973) observations on track densities in plagioclase crystals in the Luna 16 soil: no evidence is found for an early active sun, although the evidence does not preclude this possibility, either.

  6. Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sun Microsystems, Inc. is committed to open standards,a standardization system, and sharing within the information tech nology field, focusing not only on technical innovation, but also on new ideas, practices and future development.

  7. Tree Leaf Shadows to the Sun's Density: A Surprising Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Rays of sunlight that strike raindrops produce rainbows that provide information about the spectrum of sunlight. Rays of sunlight that strike airborne ice crystals produce halos, sun pillars, and many other patterns of light and color in the sky. Analysis of those patterns makes it possible to determine the types and orientations of the ice…

  8. Tree Leaf Shadows to the Sun's Density: A Surprising Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Rays of sunlight that strike raindrops produce rainbows that provide information about the spectrum of sunlight. Rays of sunlight that strike airborne ice crystals produce halos, sun pillars, and many other patterns of light and color in the sky. Analysis of those patterns makes it possible to determine the types and orientations of the ice…

  9. Effect of “Noisy” sun conditions on aircrew radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Bennett, L. G. I.

    2009-07-01

    In computer codes used to estimate the aircrew radiation exposure from galactic cosmic radiation, a quiet sun model is usually assumed. A revised computer code (PCAIRE ver. 8.0f) is used to calculate the impact of noisy sun conditions on aircrew radiation exposure. The revised code incorporates the effect of solar storm activity, which can perturb the geomagnetic field lines, altering cutoff rigidities and hence the shielding capability of the Earth's magnetic field. The effect of typical solar storm conditions on aircrew radiation exposure is shown to be minimal justifying the usual assumptions.

  10. Synchrotron radiation absorber for high density loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anashin, V. V.; Kuzminych, V. S.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Zholents, A. A.

    1991-10-01

    A design of a special synchrotron radiation absorber for the storage ring VEPP-4M is presented. The density of the synchrotron radiation power on the absorber surface is up to 500 W/mm 2. The absorber is made from a beryllium plate, brazed inside to the copper vacuum chamber, which is intensively water-cooled from outside.

  11. Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma: a study based on ultraviolet radiation measurements and sun diary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, L W; Datta, P; Heydenreich, J; Philipsen, P A; Wulf, H C

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a second primary melanoma by limiting recreational sun exposure. Previous studies based on questionnaires and objective surrogate measurements indicate that before their diagnosis, patients with CMM are exposed to higher ultraviolet radiation (UVR) doses than controls, followed by a reduction after diagnosis. In a prospective, observational case-control study, we aimed to assess sun exposure after diagnosis of CMM by objective measurements to substantiate advice about sun behaviour. The study population consisted of 24 patients recently diagnosed with CMM during the 7 months preceding the start of the study; 51 controls who matched these recently diagnosed patients in age, sex, occupation and constitutive skin type; and 29 patients diagnosed with CMM between 12 months and 6 years before the start of the study. During a summer season participants filled in sun exposure diaries daily and wore personal electronic UVR dosimeters in a wristwatch that continuously measured time-stamped UVR doses in standard erythema dose. The UVR dose of recently diagnosed patients on days with body exposure was one-third lower, and the number of days using sunscreen was double that of matched controls. However, in patients diagnosed more than 12 months earlier, the UVR dose on days with body exposure was one-third higher and the number of days using sunscreen was half that of recently diagnosed patients. Patients with CMM limited their UVR dose on days with body exposure, and by using sunscreen further reduced UVR reaching the skin, although only immediately after diagnosis. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Spectral variability of photospheric radiation due to faculae. I. The Sun and Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte M.; Beeck, Benjamin; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Solanki, Sami K.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Yeo, Kok Leng

    2017-09-01

    Context. Stellar spectral variability on timescales of a day and longer, arising from magnetic surface features such as dark spots and bright faculae, is an important noise source when characterising extra-solar planets. Current 1D models of faculae do not capture the geometric properties and fail to reproduce observed solar facular contrasts. Magnetoconvection simulations provide facular contrasts accounting for geometry. Aims: We calculate facular contrast spectra from magnetoconvection models of the solar photosphere with a view to improve (a) future parameter determinations for planets with early G type host stars and (b) reconstructions of solar spectral variability. Methods: Regions of a solar twin (G2, log g = 4.44) atmosphere with a range of initial average vertical magnetic fields (100 to 500 G) were simulated using a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code, MURaM, and synthetic intensity spectra were calculated from the ultraviolet (149.5 nm) to the far infrared (160 000 nm) with the ATLAS9 radiative transfer code. Nine viewing angles were investigated to account for facular positions across most of the stellar disc. Results: Contrasts of the radiation from simulation boxes with different levels of magnetic flux relative to an atmosphere with no magnetic field are a complicated function of position, wavelength and magnetic field strength that is not reproduced by 1D facular models. Generally, contrasts increase towards the limb, but at UV wavelengths a saturation and decrease are observed close to the limb. Contrasts also increase strongly from the visible to the UV; there is a rich spectral dependence, with marked peaks in molecular bands and strong spectral lines. At disc centre, a complex relationship with magnetic field was found and areas of strong magnetic field can appear either dark or bright, depending on wavelength. Spectra calculated for a wide variety of magnetic fluxes will also serve to improve total and spectral solar irradiance

  13. The radiative zone of the Sun and the tachocline: stability of baroclinic patterns of differential rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Caleo, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Barotropic rotation and radiative equilibrium are mutually incompatible in stars. The issue is often addressed by allowing for a meridional circulation, but this is not devoid of theoretical complications. Models of rotation in the Sun which maintain strict radiative equilibrium, making use of the observation that the Sun is not in a state of barotropic rotation, have recently been suggested. To investigate the dynamical behaviour of these solutions, we study the local stability of stratified, weakly magnetized, differentially rotating fluids to non-axisymmetric perturbations. Finite heat conductivity, kinematic viscosity, and resistivity are present. The evolution of local embedded perturbations is governed by a set of coupled, ordinary differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. Two baroclinic models of rotation for the upper radiative zone and tachocline are studied: (i) an interpolation based on helioseismology data, (ii) a theoretical solution directly compatible with radiative equilibrium. ...

  14. The Effect of Sun Radiation on the Course of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abas Azarian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sStudies have described immunomedulatory effects of sun exposure and ultraviolet radiation on infectious and neoplastic diseases. Here the effect of exposure to low potency radiation of sun on the course of leishmaniasis in mice was studied. Materials and MethodsFifteen BALB/c mice were exposed to suberythemogenic doses of sun (mean 180 mJ/cm2/day of UVB 2 months before and 4 months after Leishmania major inoculation to food pad. Control group was kept in the sun protected environment. From 2nd to 17th week after inoculation, size of the lesion was recorded in each group weekly and at last week the parasite burden in spleen was detected. Results were compared between two groups. ResultsSeven mice from case group and 9 mice from control group survived up to last week. The mean lesion size was 0.90±0.59 cm in exposed and 4.01±3.59 cm in unexposed mice (P= 0.037. Parasite burden in spleen of case and control groups were 5.5±4.61 and 106.94±279.76 respectively (P= 0.006.ConclusionChronic exposure of BALB/c mice to suberythemogenic doses of sun suppressed skin lesion and decreased the extension of L. major to spleen.

  15. Ultraviolet radiation, sun damage and preventing; Ultrafiolett straaling, solskader og forebygging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, B.; Christensen, T.; Nilsen, L.T.; Hannevik, M.

    2013-03-01

    The report focuses on the large impact of health damages due to excessive UV exposure from natural sun. The first part of the report gives background information on factors significantly affecting the intensity of UV radiation. The second part gives an overview of health effects related to UV exposure, with recommendations on how to avoid excessive UV exposure and still enjoy the positive sides of outdoor activity. The report is intended to contribute to informational activities about sun exposure as recommended by the World Health Organisation and the World Meteorology Organisation. (Author)

  16. Solar radiation pressure used for formation flying control around the Sun-Earth libration point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-ping GONG; Jun-feng LI; He-xi BAOYIN

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is used to control the formation flying around the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Formation flying control around a halo orbit requires a very small thrust that cannot be satisfied by the latest thrusters. The key contribution of this paper is that the continuous low thrust is produced by solar radiation pressure to achieve the tight formation flying around the libration point. However, only certain families of formation types can be controlled by solar radiation pressure since the direction of solar radiation pressure is restricted to a certain range. Two types of feasible formations using solar radiation pressure control are designed. The conditions of feasible formations are given analytically. Simulations are presented for each case, and the results show that the formations are well controlled by solar radiation pressure.

  17. Density matrix of black hole radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alberte, Lasma; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Medved, A J M

    2015-01-01

    Hawking's model of black hole evaporation is not unitary and leads to a mixed density matrix for the emitted radiation, while the Page model describes a unitary evaporation process in which the density matrix evolves from an almost thermal state to a pure state. We compare a recently proposed model of semiclassical black hole evaporation to the two established models. In particular, we study the density matrix of the outgoing radiation and determine how the magnitude of the off-diagonal corrections differs for the three frameworks. For Hawking's model, we find power-law corrections to the two-point functions that induce exponentially suppressed corrections to the off-diagonal elements of the full density matrix. This verifies that the Hawking result is correct to all orders in perturbation theory and also allows one to express the full density matrix in terms of the single-particle density matrix. We then consider the semiclassical theory for which the corrections, being non-perturbative from an effective fie...

  18. Efficient modeling of sun/shade canopy radiation dynamics explicitly accounting for scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bodin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The separation of global radiation (Rg into its direct (Rb and diffuse constituents (Rg is important when modeling plant photosynthesis because a high Rd:Rg ratio has been shown to enhance Gross Primary Production (GPP. To include this effect in vegetation models, the plant canopy must be separated into sunlit and shaded leaves. However, because such models are often too intractable and computationally expensive for theoretical or large scale studies, simpler sun-shade approaches are often preferred. A widely used and computationally efficient sun-shade model was developed by Goudriaan (1977 (GOU. However, compared to more complex models, this model's realism is limited by its lack of explicit treatment of radiation scattering.

    Here we present a new model based on the GOU model, but which in contrast explicitly simulates radiation scattering by sunlit leaves and the absorption of this radiation by the canopy layers above and below (2-stream approach. Compared to the GOU model our model predicts significantly different profiles of scattered radiation that are in better agreement with measured profiles of downwelling diffuse radiation. With respect to these data our model's performance is equal to a more complex and much slower iterative radiation model while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the GOU model.

  19. Efficient modeling of sun/shade canopy radiation dynamics explicitly accounting for scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bodin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The separation of global radiation (Rg into its direct (Rb and diffuse constituents (Rd is important when modeling plant photosynthesis because a high Rd:Rg ratio has been shown to enhance Gross Primary Production (GPP. To include this effect in vegetation models, the plant canopy must be separated into sunlit and shaded leaves, for example using an explicit 3-dimensional ray tracing model. However, because such models are often too intractable and computationally expensive for theoretical or large scale studies simpler sun-shade approaches are often preferred. A widely used and computationally efficient sun-shade model is a model originally developed by Goudriaan (1977 (GOU, which however does not explicitly account for radiation scattering.

    Here we present a new model based on the GOU model, but which in contrast explicitly simulates radiation scattering by sunlit leaves and the absorption of this radiation by the canopy layers above and below (2-stream approach. Compared to the GOU model our model predicts significantly different profiles of scattered radiation that are in better agreement with measured profiles of downwelling diffuse radiation. With respect to these data our model's performance is equal to a more complex and much slower iterative radiation model while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the GOU model.

  20. Evaluation of radiation interference in the Voyager Sun Sensor's cadmium sulfide detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, T. C.; Divita, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The simulation of radiation interference effects and the results of a radiation interference test on two Voyager Sun Sensor prototype detector assemblies are reported. The derivation of test levels and requirements are discussed and show that cobalt 60 gamma radiation is an effective and practical simulator of the ionization dose rate effects induced by high-energy electron flux incident on the spacecraft at a rate of 3.7 x 10 to the 8th e/sq cm-sec (10 rad(Si)/s) during closest approach to Jupiter. The test results provide information that is used to confirm an analytic correlation, and to predict satisfactory performance of a spacecraft sun sensing device having stringent angular resolution requirements. The measured detector response shows that at dose rates incident on the detector elements of 2 rad(Si)/sec, which is four times that expected during Jupiter encounter, the radiation-induced angle error is almost an order of magnitude less than that allowed by the acceptance criteria.

  1. The radiative zone of the Sun and the tachocline: stability of baroclinic patterns of differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleo, Andrea; Balbus, Steven A.

    2016-04-01

    Barotropic rotation and radiative equilibrium are mutually incompatible in stars. The issue is often addressed by allowing for a meridional circulation, but this is not devoid of theoretical complications. Models of rotation in the Sun which maintain strict radiative equilibrium, making use of the observation that the Sun is not in a state of barotropic rotation, have recently been suggested. To investigate the dynamical behaviour of these solutions, we study the local stability of stratified, weakly magnetized, differentially rotating fluids to non-axisymmetric perturbations. Finite heat conductivity, kinematic viscosity, and resistivity are present. The evolution of local embedded perturbations is governed by a set of coupled, ordinary differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. Two baroclinic models of rotation for the upper radiative zone and tachocline are studied: (i) an interpolation based on helioseismology data, (ii) a theoretical solution directly compatible with radiative equilibrium. The growth of the local Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability appears to be suppressed, largely because of the viscosity. An extensive exploration of wavenumber space is carried out, with and without a magnetic field. Although we easily find classical local instabilities when they ought formally to be present, for the Sun the analysis reveals neither unstable solutions, nor even solutions featuring a large transient growth. We have not ruled out larger scale or non-linear instabilities, nor have we rigorously proven local stability. But rotational configurations in close agreement with observations, generally thought to be vulnerable to the classic local Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability, do appear to be locally stable under rather general circumstances.

  2. Sunburn related to UV radiation exposure, age, sex, occupation, and sun bed use based on time-stamped personal dosimetry and sun behavior diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieden, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Peter A; Sandby-Møller, Jane; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2005-04-01

    To assess when sunburn occurs and who experiences sunburn by personal UV dosimetry and diaries. Open prospective observational study. University hospital. A convenience sample of 340 Danish volunteers: children, adolescents, indoor workers, sun worshippers, golfers, and gardeners (age range, 4-68 years). Subjects recorded sunburn and sun-exposure behavior in diaries and carried personal, electronic, wristwatch UV radiation (UVR) dosimeters that measured time-stamped UVR doses continuously for a median of 119 days covering 346 sun-years (1 sun-year equals 1 subject participating during 1 summer half-year). A typical sunburn day was a day off work (91%; odds ratio, 4.1) with risk behavior (sunbathing/exposing shoulders) (79%; odds ratio, 15.9) in May, June, or July (90%) for 6.4 exposure hours (interquartile range, 5-7.7 hours), of which 2.8 hours fell between noon and 3 pm. Subjects had a median of 1 sunburn per sun-year; adolescents, sun worshippers, and indoor workers had more than children, golfers, and gardeners (Ppersons had more risk-behavior days and lower skin type (Ppersons. The median UVR doses received were significantly higher on sunburn days than on nonsunburn days with risk behavior (P<.01). There was a significant correlation between sunburn size and severity; sunburn and sunscreen use; and sunburn and sun-bed use (P<.01 for all 3 comparisons). Sunburn was highly correlated with risk behavior. Reduction of risk-behavior days and/or exposure hours around noon can reduce sunburn. Sunburn was not found during breaks on normal full-time indoor work or school days.

  3. Sun meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younskevicius, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for measuring the radiation energy of the sun impinging on the device. The measurement of the energy over an extended period of time is accomplished without moving parts or tracking mechanisms.

  4. Achievements in creation of the space patrol apparatus of ionizing radiation of the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, S.V. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Afanas' ev, I.M. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: afanasy@pochta.ru; Kuvaldin, E.V. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Leonov, N.B. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Savushkin, A.V. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Serova, A.E. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Voronin, N.A. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birgevaya linia, 12, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the results and achievements of our work in the creation of optical-electronic instruments for space patrol apparatus of ionizing radiation of the Sun. At present, such monitoring of the most important solar irradiance in the spectral range of 0.8-119 nm does not exist anywhere in the world because of the methodological and technical difficulties. The main difficulty was overcome only after the creation of a 'solar-blind' detector-open secondary electron multiplier (SEM), which was produced by the S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute (SOI). Now all the space patrol instrumentation has been created and laboratory tested. The basic points of the work are presented here.

  5. Empirical Modeling of Radiative versus Magnetic Flux for the Sun-as-a-Star

    CERN Document Server

    Preminger, Dora; Chapman, Gary; Martens, Petrus C H; 10.1007/s11207-010-9560-1

    2010-01-01

    We study the relationship between full-disk solar radiative flux at different wavelengths and average solar photospheric magnetic-flux density, using daily measurements from the Kitt Peak magnetograph and other instruments extending over one or more solar cycles. We use two different statistical methods to determine the underlying nature of these flux-flux relationships. First, we use statistical correlation and regression analysis and show that the relationships are not monotonic for total solar irradiance and for continuum radiation from the photosphere, but are approximately linear for chromospheric and coronal radiation. Second, we use signal theory to examine the flux-flux relationships for a temporal component. We find that a well-defined temporal component exists and accounts for some of the variance in the data. This temporal component arises because active regions with high magnetic field strength evolve, breaking up into small-scale magnetic elements with low field strength, and radiative and magnet...

  6. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  7. Detection of dark-matter-radiation of stars during visible sun eclipses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkamer, Klaus E-mail: dr.volkamer@t-online.de

    2003-07-01

    Recently a so-far unknown form of quantized, cold dark matter was detected on a laboratory scale which shows a complementary structure as compared to known forms of matter. From the experiments results that the observed quanta of the new type of matter as integer multiples of the Planck mass (mp = n {center_dot} {radical}((h{center_dot}c)/((2 {center_dot} {pi} {center_dot} G))) = n 0 21.77 {mu}g, with n = 1, 2, 3 etc.) exhibit a spatially extended 'field-like' structure ranging over distances of centimetres or more, opposite to the 'point-like' structure of the known elementary particles of the standard model. Association of quanta of the new form of 'soft' (or subtle) matter to clusters was observed, as well as re-clustering after absorption. Thus, between such quanta a physical interaction must exist. In addition, the new form of matter shows at least two interactions with normal matter, a gravitational one due to its real mass content and a so-far unknown 'topological', i.e. form-specific, interaction at phase borders. Additional indications for a weak electromagnetic interaction exist. Furthermore, the experimental results reveal that some types of quanta of the new form of 'field-like' matter exhibit positive mass, as normal matter, but others exhibit a negative mass content, both in the order of magnitude of the Planck mass. Memory effects in normal matter were detected after absorption of quanta of the new form of soft matter. In general, the findings characterize the quanta of 'fieldlike' matter as WIMP candidates of a cosmic background radiation of cold dark matter (quanta with positive mass) as well as of a cosmic background radiation of dark energy (quanta with negative mass). During visible sun eclipses in 1989, 1996 and. 1999, as well as during full moon of 6 January 2001, a so-far unknown form of dark-matter-radiation ('dark radiation') was detected. The quanta of this &apos

  8. The effects of oblateness and solar radiation pressure on halo orbits in the photogravitational Sun-Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a third-order analytic approximate solution using the Lindstedt-Poincare method in the photogravitational circular restricted three body problem considering the Sun as a radiating source and the Earth as an oblate spheroid for computing halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Further, the well-known differential correction and continuation schemes are used to compute halo orbits and their families numerically. The effects of solar radiation pressure and oblateness on the orbit are studied around both Lagrangian points. From the study, it is noticed that time period of the halo orbit increases around L1 and L2 accounting oblateness of the Earth and solar radiation pressure of the Sun. It is also found that stability of halo orbits is a weak function of the out-of-plane amplitude and mass reduction factor.

  9. Simulation of distribution of radiation energy density in water balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shi-Biao; MA Qing-Li; YIN Ze-Jie; TANG Yu; HUANG Huan; RAO Nan-Xia; ZHU Da-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of energy deposition density in radiate region and its surrounding areas from γ-rays was simulated and analyzed for a water-ball model with Geant4 package ( Geant4.7.0,2005 ) developed by CERN (the Center of European Research of Nucleus). The results show that the distribution depends strongly on the collimating condition of radiation beam. A well-collimated beam would reduce radiation effects on surrounding areas.

  10. Metal-absorption column densities in fast radiative shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Gnat, Orly; Sternberg, Amiel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present computations of the integrated metal-ion column densities produced in the post-shock cooling layers behind fast, radiative shock-waves. For this purpose, we have constructed a new shock code that calculates the non-equilibrium ionization and cooling; follows the radiative transfer of the shock self-radiation through the post-shock cooling layers; takes into account the resulting photoionization and heating rates; follows the dynamics of the cooling gas; and self-consi...

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIATION CROSSLINKING DENSITY OF F-40

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wanxi; ZHANG Yuefang; SUN Jiazhen

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, radiation-induced crosslinking mechanism and characterization of the crosslinking density of F-40 and F-4 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been studied. The dose of gelation of F-40 obtained from XPS is 4.1 × 104 Gy. It is found that crosslinking density is the largest in the range of certain dose for F-40 and F-4.

  12. UV radiation from the young sun and oxygen and ozone levels in the prebiological palaeoatmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Levine, J. S.; Augustsson, T. R.; Imhoff, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    UV measurements of young T-Tauri stars, resembling the sun at an age of a few million years, have recently been made with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. They indicate that young stars emit up to 10,000 times more UV than the present sun. The implications for the origin and evolution of O2 and O3 in the prebiological palaeoatmosphere are presented here. The results of photochemical calculations indicate that the O2 surface mixing ratio was a factor 10,000-1,000,000 times greater than the standard value of 10 to the -15. This new value reconciles the simultaneous existence of oxidized iron and reduced uranium.

  13. Modeling the exchange of comets between the Sun and passing stars in a low stellar density environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stephen; Gosmeyer, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the importance of close encounters between our Sun and its Oort cloud and passing stars with similar Oort clouds in the low stellar density environment of the outer portion of our Galaxy. By constructing a set of interaction cross-sections that describe the interchange of material between the two passing Oort clouds, and then randomly computing sets of encounters that a star would have during its orbit in the Galaxy over a period of time equivalent to the life of the Sun after the dissolution of its birth cluster, we have examined how the ensemble of passing encounters could impact the evolution of our Oort cloud. From the set of 1,000 possible realizations of the interactions over a solar lifetime, we find that the resulting solar Oort cloud is likely to be significantly eroded as a result of the set of encounters, and is also likely today to contain a significant amount of material that was formed in passing extra-solar systems.

  14. Analysis of Self Similar Scaling in Kinetic and Magnetic Energy Density as a Function of Distance From Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, A.; Coplan, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data to study scaling properties of kinetic and magnetic energy density as a function of solar cycle and distance from the sun. In his original theory on turbulence, Kolmogorov predicted that in the inertial range the fluctuations in velocity differences should be self-similar. Analysis of solar wind data showed this not to be the case. On the other hand B. Hnat et.al.(Geophys. Res. Lett., 29 (10), 1446, 2002) and J.J Podesta (J. Geophys. Res., 111, A09105, 2006) showed that fluctuations in kinetic and magnetic energy density are approximately self-similar. We extend this analysis using data from the SWE and MFI experiments on the WIND spacecraft (at 1AU) during solar minimum (2006) and solar maximum (2001) and VHM/FGM experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft (1AU to 5AU). We calculate the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the time delayed differences in kinetic and magnetic energy density and present a method through which the scaling exponent can be reliably calculated from the CDFs, instead of using structure functions which are very sensitive to large fluctuations. We compare the scaling exponents derived from the CDFs to the ones calculated from structure functions and study the rescaling properties of CDFs.

  15. γ radiation caused graphene defects and increased carrier density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Mai-xing; Ji Zhuo-Yu; Shang Li-Wei; Chen Ying-Ping; Wang Hong; Liu Xin; Li Dong-Mei; Liu Ming

    2011-01-01

    We report on a micro-Raman investigation of inducing defects in mono-layer,bi-layer and tri-layer graphene by γ ray radiation.It is found that the radiation exposure results in two-dimensional(2D)and G band position evolution with the layer number increasing and D and D' bands rising,suggesting the presence of defects and related crystal lattice deformation in graphene.Bi-layer graphene is more stable than mono-and tri-layer graphene,indicating that the former is a better candidate in the application of radiation environments.Also,the DC electrical property of the mono-layer graphene device shows that the defects increase the carrier density.

  16. Sun energy, heat radiation and daylight on surfaces with different orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydinli, S.

    1981-05-01

    A calculation method is presented which allows to predetermine illuminances and irradiances incident on surfaces with any orientation originating from sun, clear sky, overcast sky, and the average sky which can be expected over a period of several years. The results of the calculations give the necessary data for the effective use of sun energy and daylight for interior lighting. A modified formula for the average sky may be applied for the calculation of the average irradiances evaluating the irradiances for the clear sky and the overcast sky conditions which can be expected according to the long term local sunshine duration (probability of sunshine) and local average values of the turbidity factor as a function of the day of the year and the hour of the day. In order to make the method applicable for any place the computed values are compared with measuring data available for surfaces with different orientations. Finally the annual radiant exposure on surfaces with different orientations is determined for Berlin.

  17. Knowledge and attitudes of UK university students in relation to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and their sun-related behaviours: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lucy; Greenfield, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether knowledge about the harms of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) influences UK university students' sun-related behaviours and examine in depth their attitudes towards: sun protection, natural and artificial tanning behaviours. Design Qualitative methodology with 15 semistructured, individual interviews. Thematic analysis using the Framework Method with analyst triangulation and member validation. Setting One university in the West Midlands, UK. Participants 15 Caucasian male (n=4) and female (n=11) students, aged 18–22 years, from a UK university. Participants were recruited using convenience sampling from the university's main campus followed by purposive sampling for: gender, course and sun-related behaviours. Results Five main themes emerged: (1) knowledge of UVR; (2) sun-protection practices; (3) attitudes towards tanning; (4) external influences and (5) internal influences. All students knew the associated skin cancer risks from the sun and sunbed use, but this did not appear an important influence in their sun-related behaviours. Body image strongly motivated sun-protection practices and the desire to tan naturally or artificially, across both genders. However, participants' final decision-making appeared to be influenced by their beliefs that practising known harmful sun-related behaviours would not affect them or the perceived susceptibility to sunburn. Beliefs about sunbathing and sunscreen use prompted improper use of sun protection and inadvertently caused more harmful practices. Participants' peers, family and the media had dual roles influencing the development of attitudes towards sun protection and tanning, which contributed to how participants behaved in the sun and their engagement in tanning methods. Conclusions Knowledge about the risk of skin cancer associated with UVR did not strongly influence sun-related behaviours, whereas body image appeared as a key motivator. Attitudes towards sun protection and tanning stemmed

  18. Exposure to sun radiation as a risk factor for the occurrence of basal cell carcinoma in the Montenegrian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound/aim: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most frequent form of carcinomas in the whites. Among the environmental factors, the most important risk factor for its occurrence is the exposure to sun radiation. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the sun radiation in the development of basal cell carcinoma BCC in the Montenegrian population. Methods. A case-control study was conducted in a period from 2002-2003. The study group included 100 histopatologically confirmed cases with BCC, while the control group included 100 patients from the same population, who did not present skin cancer and who were individually matched with the cases from the study group by sex and age (± 5 years. All the participants were interviewed using an epidemiological questionnaire. For statistical analysis, the χ2 test and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. Results. The risk for development of BCC was increased in the persons: that always had burns with no tan during the exposure to sunlight (OR = 1.75; 95% CI = 1.20-2.55; p = 0.003; that developed sunburns after two hours of the exposure to sunlight (OR = 3.72; 95% CI = 2.39-5.79; p < 0.001 that kept light tan or remained without changes in childhood and adolescence after the repeated exposures to sunlight (OR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.89-4.52; p < 0.001 that often had severe and painful sunburns (OR = 4.48; 95% CI = 2.74-7.33; p < 0.001. Conclusion. Our study confirmed the significance of sunlight exposure for the development of BCC.

  19. Three-dimensional simulation of the Ring effect in observations of scattered sun light using Monte Carlo radiative transfer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Deutschmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for the quantitative simulation of the "Ring effect" for scattered light observations from various platforms and under different atmospheric situations. The method is based on radiative transfer calculations at only one wavelength λ0 in the wavelength range under consideration, and is thus computationally fast. The strength of the Ring effect is calculated from statistical properties of the photon paths for a given situation, which makes Monte Carlo radiative transfer models in particular appropriate. We quantify the Ring effect by the so called rotational Raman scattering probability, the probability that an observed photon has undergone a rotational Raman scattering event. The Raman scattering probability is independent from the spectral resolution of the instrument and can easily be converted into various definitions used to characterise the strength of the Ring effect. We compare the results of our method to the results of previous studies and in general good quantitative agreement is found. In addition to the simulation of the Ring effect, we developed a detailed retrieval strategy for the analysis of the Ring effect based on DOAS retrievals, which allows the precise determination of the strength of the Ring effect for a specific wavelength while using the spectral information within a larger spectral interval around the selected wavelength. Using our technique, we simulated synthetic satellite observation of an atmospheric scenario with a finite cloud illuminated from different sun positions. The strength of the Ring effect depends systematically on the measurement geometry, and is strongest if the satellite points to the side of the cloud which lies in the shadow of the sun.

  20. Determinants of personal ultraviolet-radiation exposure doses on a sun holiday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Thieden, E; Philipsen, P A

    2013-01-01

    A great number of journeys to sunny destinations are sold to the Danish population every year. We suspect that this travel considerably increases personal annual ultraviolet-radiation (UVR) exposure doses. This is important because such exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, and studies have ...

  1. Spectrometer and Radiative Transfer Model Comparison using High Sun In-Situ Observations in Pretoria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, MD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Spec spectroradiometer and 2. to compare two radiative transfer models and provide clear-sky background data for the spectroradiometric measurements. The considered models are MODTRAN and LibRadtran. Metadata such as the spectral global solar irradiance from the above...

  2. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E., E-mail: Pokrovskiy-YE@nrcki.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  3. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-01

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory "Dulkyn" which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  4. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  5. Constraining the cosmic radiation density due to lepton number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Gianpiero [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Napoli Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Miele, Gennaro [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Napoli Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pastor, Sergio [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de València), Ed. Institutos de Investigación, Apdo. correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Pisanti, Ofelia [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Napoli Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sarikas, Srdjan [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) Föhringer Ring 6, 80802 München (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The cosmic energy density in the form of radiation before and during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is typically parameterized in terms of the effective number of neutrinos N{sub eff}, and it is a key parameters in cosmological models slightly more general than the successful minimal ΛCDM scenario. This quantity, in case of no extra degrees of freedom, depends upon the chemical potential and the temperature characterizing the three active neutrino distributions, as well as by their possible non-thermal features. We summarize here the results of a recent analysis to determine the BBN bound on N{sub eff} from primordial neutrino–antineutrino asymmetries, with a careful treatment of the dynamics of neutrino oscillations, and considering quite a wide range for the total lepton number in the neutrino sector, η{sub ν}=η{sub ν{sub e}}+η{sub ν{sub μ}}+η{sub ν{sub τ}} and the initial electron neutrino asymmetry η{sub ν{sub e}{sup in}}. Comparing these results with the forthcoming measurement of N{sub eff} by the Planck satellite will give insight on the nature of the radiation content of the universe.

  6. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  7. High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mano Misra

    2010-05-07

    Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 ºC. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011Ω-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 μCi), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the

  8. Sun Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you have unusual, bothersome skin reactions after exposure to sunlight. For severe or persistent symptoms, you may need ... m. when the sun is brightest. Avoid sudden exposure to lots of sunlight. Many people have sun allergy symptoms when they ...

  9. Self-generated clouds of micron-sized particles as a promising way of a Solar Probe shielding from intense thermal radiation of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Reviznikov, Dmitry L.; Kryukov, Alexei P.; Levashov, Vladimir Yu

    2017-10-01

    An effect of shielding of an intense solar radiation towards a solar probe with the use of micron-sized SiC particles generated during ablation of a composite thermal protection material is estimated on a basis of numerical solution to a combined radiative and heat transfer problem. The radiative properties of particles are calculated using the Mie theory, and the spectral two-flux model is employed in radiative transfer calculations for non-uniform particle clouds. A computational model for generation and evolution of the cloud is based on a conjugated heat transfer problem taking into account heating and thermal destruction of the matrix of thermal protection material and sublimation of SiC particles in the generated cloud. The effect of light pressure, which is especially important for small particles, is also taken into account. The computational data for mass loss due to the particle cloud sublimation showed the low value about 1 kg/m2 per hour at the distance between the vehicle and the Sun surface of about four radii of the Sun. This indicates that embedding of silicon carbide or other particles into a thermal protection layer and the resulting generation of a particle cloud can be considered as a promising way to improve the possibilities of space missions due to a significant decrease in the vehicle working distance from the solar photosphere.

  10. On the thermodynamic origin of the initial radiation energy density in warm inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Gim, Yongwan

    2016-01-01

    In warm inflation scenarios, radiation always exists, so that the radiation energy density is also assumed to be finite when inflation starts. To find out the origin of the non-vanishing initial radiation energy density, we revisit thermodynamic analysis for a warm inflation model and then derive an effective Stefan-Boltzmann law which is commensurate with the temperature-dependent effective potential by taking into account the non-vanishing trace of the total energy-momentum tensors. The effective Stefan-Boltzmann law shows that the zero energy density for radiation at the Grand Unification epoch increases until the inflation starts and it becomes eventually finite at the initial stage of warm inflation. By using the above effective Stefan-Boltzmann law, we also study the cosmological scalar perturbation, and obtain the sufficient radiation energy density in order for GUT baryogenesis at the end of inflation.

  11. Development of the radiation models of a BWR type reactor and it facility in the SUN-RAH; Desarrollo de modelos de radiacion de un reactor tipo BWR y su instalacion en el SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron A, I. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: isbarron@yahoo.com.mx

    2005-07-01

    This work about generation models, transport in processes and radioactive contamination of areas of a BWR central, is an amplification to the project developed in the UNAM to have a support tool in subjects or electric generation courses. It is planned about the implementation of models of radiation generation in a BWR type reactor for complement the functions developed in the University Simulator of Nucleo electric- Boiling water reactor (SUN-RAH) which it has been implemented in Simulink of MatLab and it has a model for the dynamics of one nucleo electric central that presents the main characteristics of the reactor vessel, the recirculation system, steam lines, turbines, generator, condensers and feeding water, defined by the main processes that intervene in the generation of energy of these plants. By this way the radiation monitoring systems for area and process, operate simultaneously with the processes of energy generation, with that is possible to observe the changes that present with respect to the operation conditions of the plant, and likewise to appreciate the radiation transport process through the components of the reactor, steam lines and turbines, for different operation conditions and possible faults that they could be presented during the reactor operation. (Author)

  12. The Sun Rises on the Solar Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Reyaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Energy from the sun is abundant and free. Solar energy is in essence electromagnetic radiation emitted from the sun. Earth's climate, hydrologic systems, and ecosystems all derive from the sun. Other forms of renewable power such as wind, wave, biomass, and hydro are an indirect function of solar radiation.

  13. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities c...

  14. Theory of density fluctuations in strongly radiative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. E.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.

    2016-03-01

    Derivation of the dynamic structure factor, an important parameter linking experimental and theoretical work in dense plasmas, is possible starting from hydrodynamic equations. Here we obtain, by modifying the governing hydrodynamic equations, a new form of the dynamic structure factor which includes radiative terms. The inclusion of such terms has an effect on the structure factor at high temperatures, which suggests that its effect must be taken into consideration in such regimes.

  15. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  16. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  17. Electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing in low density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.; Doreswamy, C. V.

    1996-01-01

    An unavoidable step in the process of space exploration is to use high-power, very large spacecraft launched into Earth orbit. Obviously, the spacecraft will need powerful energy sources. Previous experience has shown that electrical discharges occur on the surfaces of a high-voltage array, and these discharges (arcs) are undesirable in many respects. Moreover, any high voltage conductor will interact with the surrounding plasma, and that interaction may result in electrical discharges between the conductor and plasma (or between two conductors with different potentials, for example, during docking and extravehicular activity). One very important aspect is the generation of electromagnetic radiation by arcing. To prevent the negative influence of electromagnetic noise on the operation of spacecraft systems, it seems necessary to determine the spectra and absolute levels of the radiation, and to determine limitations on the solar array bias voltage that depend on the parameters of LEO plasma and the technical requirements of the spacecraft equipment. This report describes the results of an experimental study and computer simulation of the electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing on spacecraft surfaces. A large set of high quality data was obtained during the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE, flight STS-62) and ground test. These data include the amplitudes of current, pulse forms, duration of each arc, and spectra of plasma waves. A theoretical explanation of the observed features is presented in this report too. The elaborated model allows us to determine the parameters of the electromagnetic noise for different frequency ranges, distances from the arcing site, and distinct kinds of plasma waves.

  18. Condition of Retrieving Vertical Column Density of Atmospheric Pollution Gases by Using Scattered Solar Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Sao-Yi

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to monitor the vertical column density (VCD) of atmospheric pollution gases by using the scattered solar radiation. The necessary condition of capturing the useful scattered solar radiation is achieved. The condition is only dependent on the solar elevation angle, while independent of the solar azimuth angle, which could greatly simply the capturing equipment and procedure. Under the condition, the VCD of tropospheric NO2 in Chengdu, China is retrieved from the scattered solar radiation, which is dose to that from the direct solar radiation.

  19. Maximising the sun

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is blessed with some of the best quality solar radiation in the world. In the light of this many exciting opportunities exist to utilize the sun to its full potential in the design of energy efficient buildings. Passive solar buildings...

  20. Density matrix of radiation of a black hole with a fluctuating horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iofa, Mikhail Z.

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix of Hawking radiation is calculated in the model of a black hole with a fluctuating horizon. Quantum fluctuations smear the classical horizon of a black hole and modify the density matrix of radiation producing the off-diagonal elements. The off-diagonal elements may store information on correlations between the radiation and the black hole. The smeared density matrix was constructed by convolution of the density matrix calculated with the instantaneous horizon with the Gaussian distribution over the instantaneous horizons. The distribution has the extremum at the classical radius of the black hole and the width of order of the Planck length. Calculations were performed in the model of a black hole formed by the thin collapsing shell which follows a trajectory that is a solution of the matching equations connecting the interior and exterior geometries.

  1. Sun Savvy Students: Free Teaching Resources from EPA's SunWise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Jordan, Luke

    2008-01-01

    With summer in full swing and the sun is naturally on our minds, what better time to take advantage of a host of free materials provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Sun Wise program. Sun Wise aims to teach students and teachers about the stratospheric ozone layer, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and how to be safe while in the Sun.…

  2. High density THz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tammaro, S; Roy, P; Lampin, J -F; Ducournau, G; Cuisset, A; Hindle, F; Mouret, G

    2014-01-01

    Frequency combs (FC) have radically changed the landscape of frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy investigations extending tremendously the achievable resolution while increasing signal to noise ratio. Initially developed in the visible and near-IR spectral regions, the use of FC has been expanded to mid-IR, extreme ultra-violet and X-ray. Significant effort is presently dedicated to the generation of FC at THz frequencies. One solution based on converting a stabilized optical frequency comb using a photoconductive terahertz emitter, remains hampered by the low available THz power. Another approach is based on active mode locked THz quantum-cascade-lasers providing intense FC over a relatively limited spectral extension. Alternatively, here we show that dense powerful THz FC is generated over one decade of frequency by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). In this mode, the entire ring behaves in a similar fashion to a THz resonator wherein electron bunches emit powerful THz pulses quasi-synch...

  3. A Cherenkov Radiation Detector with High Density Aerogels

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaldi, Lucien; Sonnek, Peter; Summers, Donald J; Reidy, Jim

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a threshold Cherenkov detector at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory to identify muons with momenta between 230 and 350 MeV/c. We investigated the properties of three aerogels for the design. The nominal indexes of refraction were n = 1.03, 1.07, 1.12, respectively. Two of the samples are of high density aerogel not commonly used for Cherenkov light detection. We present results of an examination of some optical properties of the aerogel samples and present basic test beam results.

  4. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casali L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the “European road map” such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  5. Radiation activated CHK1/MEPE pathway may contribute to microgravity-induced bone density loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-01

    Bone density loss in astronauts on long-term space missions is a chief medical concern. Microgravity in space is the major cause of bone density loss (osteopenia), and it is believed that high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in space exacerbates microgravity-induced bone density loss; however, the mechanism remains unclear. It is known that acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) as a small peptide released by matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) promotes osteopenia. We previously discovered that MEPE interacted with checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) to protect CHK1 from ionizing radiation promoted degradation. In this study, we addressed whether the CHK1-MEPE pathway activated by radiation contributes to the effects of microgravity on bone density loss. We examined the CHK1, MEPE and secreted MEPE/ASARM levels in irradiated (1 Gy of X-ray) and rotated cultured human osteoblast cells. The results showed that radiation activated CHK1, decreased the levels of CHK1 and MEPE in human osteoblast cells and increased the release of MEPE/ASARM. These results suggest that the radiation-activated CHK1/MEPE pathway exacerbates the effects of microgravity on bone density loss, which may provide a novel targeting factor/pathway for a future countermeasure design that could contribute to reducing osteopenia in astronauts.

  6. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  7. Annihilation Radiation Gauge for Relative Density and Multiphase Fluid Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the multi-phase flow parameters are important for the petroleum industry, specifically during the transport in pipelines and network related to exploitation’s wells. Crude oil flow is studied by Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally to determine transient liquid phase in a laboratory system. Relative density and fluid phase time variation is monitored employing a fast nuclear data acquisition setup that includes two large volume BaF2 scintillator detectors coupled to an electronic chain and data display in a LabView® environment. Fluid parameters are determined by the difference in count rate of coincidence pulses. The operational characteristics of the equipment indicate that 2 % deviation in the CCR corresponds to a variation, on average, of 20 % in the fraction of liquid of the multiphase fluid.

  8. Interaction of high-power laser radiation with low-density polymer aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ch; Chaurasia, Sh; Borisenko, N. G.; Orekhov, A. S.; Leshma, P.; Pimenov, V. G.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Akunets, A. A.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with low-density targets of cellulose triacetate polymer is considered. An Nd-glass laser setup provides a focal spot intensity of over 1014 W cm-2. An investigation is made of absorption of laser radiation, laser-to-X-ray energy conversion, spectra of ions emitted from the plasma, transmission of laser radiation through the target and plasma, as well as volume heating of the target material. It is experimentally determined that the laser energy conversion efficiency to X-rays with photon energies of a few kiloelectronvolts decreases with increasing target material density. With the use of targets of density 10 mg cm-3 this efficiency is two times lower in comparison to 2 mg cm-3 density targets. The duration and amplitude of laser pulses transmitted through the target decreases with increasing column target density (the product of target material density and its thickness). The spectra of ions emitted from low-density target plasmas are recorded using ion collectors positioned at different angles relative to the direction of laser beam propagation as well as a high-resolution Thomson mass spectrometer. The ion flux and ion energies are found to increase with increasing target material density. The peak of the ion energy spectrum is shifted towards higher energies with increasing laser radiation intensity.

  9. Description of the Sun as a Star: General Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Theresa; Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    Numerical parameters characterizing the size and energy output of the sun are presented. These values are the standard yardstick by which other stars are measured. The large number of significant digits tabulated here serve mainly to illustrate the precision to which these parameters are known. Also listed are parameters characterizing the earth's orbit around the sun and the intensity of the sun's radiation at the mean orbital distance. The appearance of the sun depends critically on how it is observed. Each type of radiation observed carries specific information about the physical processes at work on the sun. Special types of instruments reveal aspects otherwise invisible. Coronagraphs reveal the dimmer outer regions of the sun's atmosphere otherwise visible only during total solar eclipses. Spectroscopy can reveal motions, magnetic field strengths, temperatures and densities. In situ measurements have revealed the characteristics of the solar wind and extended our knowledge of the solar magnetic field both near the earth and beyond the orbits of the planets. As an example, the sun's disk observed almost simultaneously in six different wavelengths of light is shown. In visible light we can see the white disk of the sun with the dark spots known as sunspots. By analyzing the spectral lines produced by the sun we can measure the strength of the sun's magnetic field at its surface, producing a magnetogram. This magnetogram reveals that the sunspots are regions of intense magnetic field. Further images of the sun reveal that the sunspot regions are just the bases of systems of hot loops which emit radio-waves, ultraviolet light and X-rays. The sun imaged in a spectral line of hydrogen known as "H alpha" is shown. In this line we also see the long dark "filaments". These filaments form in long channels between areas of opposing magnetic field. Such channels can be seen in the ultraviolet image. Data concerning the sun are obtained with many different kinds of

  10. The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Essential for life on earth and a major influence on our environment, the Sun is also the most fascinating object in the daytime sky. Every day we feel the effect of its coming and going – literally the difference between day and night. But figuring out what the Sun is, what it’s made of, why it glows so brightly, how old it is, how long it will last – all of these take thought and observation. Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of what scientists know about the Sun, and the history of these discoveries. Solar astronomers have studied the Sun over the centuries both for its intrinsic interest and in order to use it as a laboratory to reveal the secrets of other stars. The authors discuss the surface of the Sun, including sunspots and their eleven-year cycle, as well as the magnetism that causes them; the Sun’s insides, as studied mainly from seismic waves that astronomers record on its surface; the outer layers of the Sun that we see from Earth only at eclipses ...

  11. Inhomogeneous radiation degradation in polymers studied with a density gradient column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, K. T.; Clough, R. L.

    Radiation dose-rate effects are known to exist in many polymers and are typically caused by oxidation reactions. Since the buildup of oxidation products often leads to an increase in polymer density, a density gradient column was used in a novel way to study the mechanisms responsible for dose-rate effects in a commercial ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) electrical cable insulation material. After various aging conditions, density profiles of samples were obtained by measuring the density of small pieces cut successively from the outside to the inside of the approximately 1-mm thick insulation. By monitoring density profiles as a function of dose rate and total radiation dose, two inhomogeneous mechanisms were found to be responsible for the observed dose-rate effects in this EPR material. At high dose rates, oxygen-diffusion-limited degradation was identified, as evidenced by a density profile which showed increased density near the air-exposed surfaces of the insulation but little change in density in the interior of the sample. As the dose rate was lowered, the oxidation region spread inward until it encompassed the entire sample at dose rates below about 100 krad/hr. The second mechanism, responsible for continuing the dose-rate effects at lower dose rates, appears to involve copper-catalyzed oxidation. This mechanism is often found to be significant in thermal aging studies; evidence that it may also be significant under room-temperature, radiation-aging conditions came from the density profile results, which revealed large increases in density as the inside of the insulation (near the tinned-copper conductor) was approached. For the same total radiation dose, this increase became larger as the dose rate was lowered. Preliminary chemical analysis profiling techniques indicate significantly enhanced copper and tin concentrations as the inside of the insulation is approached, even for insulation stripped from the metallic conductor before aging. This implies that

  12. Characteristic parameters of diffusive supersonic radiation transport in low density materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Shao-En; Yang Jia-Min; Zheng Zhi-Jian; Ding Yong-Kun

    2007-01-01

    Diffusive heat waves play an important role in radiation hydrodynamics. In low density material, it may be possible that the radiative energy flux dominates the material energy flux and thus energy flow can be determined. In this paper by means of a simple algebraic method, the expressions characterizing the condition of diffusion approximation and supersonic transport of heat wave are found. In this case, the ratio of the radiative energy flux to the material energy flux is directly proportional to the product of Mach number M multiplied by optical depth τ. And it may also be expressed by radiation temperature heating material. The materiel density and length may be determined in order to aceve above-mentioned conditions when the driven temperature and duration are given.

  13. A High Temperature Liquid Plasma Model of the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a liquid model of the Sun is presented wherein the entire solar mass is viewed as a high density/high energy plasma. This model challenges our current understanding of the densities associated with the internal layers of the Sun, advocating a relatively constant density, almost independent of radial position. The incompressible nature of liquids is advanced to prevent solar collapse from gravitational forces. The liquid plasma model of the Sun is a non-equilibrium approach, where nuclear reactions occur throughout the solar mass. The primary means of addressing internal heat transfer are convection and conduction. As a result of the convective processes on the solar surface, the liquid model brings into question the established temperature of the solar photosphere by highlighting a violation of Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission. Along these lines, the model also emphasizes that radiative emission is a surface phenomenon. Evidence that the Sun is a high density/high energy plasma is based on our knowledge of Planckian thermal emission and condensed matter, including the existence of pressure ionization and liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures. Prior to introducing the liquid plasma model, the historic and scientific justifications for the gaseous model of the Sun are reviewed and the gaseous equations of state are also discussed.

  14. Stimulated Radiative Molecular Association in the Early Solar System. II. Orbital Radii of the Planets and Other Satellites of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, James C

    2015-01-01

    In a previous investigation, the orbital radii of regular satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn are shown to be directly related to photon energies in the spectra of atomic and molecular hydrogen. To explain these observations a model was developed involving stimulated radiative molecular association (SRMA) reactions among photons and atoms in the protosatellite disks of the planets. In the present investigation, the previously developed model is applied to the planets and important satellites of the Sun. A key component of the model involves resonance associated with SRMA. Through this resonance, thermal energy is extracted from the protosun's protoplanetary disk at specific distances from the protosun wherever there is a match between the local thermal energy of the disk and the energy of photons impinging on the disk. Orbital radii of the planets and satellites are related to photon energies ($E_P$ values) in the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. An expression determined previously is used to relat...

  15. Midnight sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunger, A.P.; Lambert, S.B.; Gagnon, M.P.

    1990-09-01

    Midnight Sun, the University of Waterloo's solar-electric car, was designed and built by about 30 engineering, kinesiology and physics students for the GM Sunrayce USA held in July 1990. The car measures 2 m by 4.2 m, weighs 224 kg, can collect about 1000 W of solar electricity in full sun, and had a top speed of 79 km/h. The race took 11 days to cover the 1644 miles from the Epcot Center in Lake Buena Vista, Florida to the GM Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. Thirty-two cars, powered only by solar energy, competed in this race. Midnight Sun showed its potential during the race qualifying runs by completing the required qualifying course with the 12th fastest time of 52.83 seconds, and the 6th fastest trap speed of 63 km/h. During the Sunrayce, Midnight Sun came in second on day 1 of the race, tenth on day 6, and eighth on day 7, and was one of only 17 solar cars that were able to make it up the toughest hill in the race on day 8. The most serious problems encountered by the car were a weak rear suspension, power losses, and failure of bypass diodes in the photovoltaic array. Midnight Sun was in 17th place overall at the end of day 9. At about 11:00 am on day 10 in Ohio, the Waterloo car was moving at 60 km/h when it was bumped off the road by an out of control pickup truck. The solar car driver was not hurt. Despite the difficulties, the next day Midnight Sun was repaired and driven across the finish line at the ceremonial finish. After receiving time penalties for not completing the last day and a half of the race, Midnight Sun was awarded 24th place with an official cumulative time of 114 h 37 min 15 s. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e. "sub-Larmor scales". Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation measurements at South African and Reunion Island Coastal Sites: An indicator of public sun protection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has the potential to cause biological harm to humans. Intensity of solar UVR at the Earth’s surface depends on several factors, such as total column ozone and cloud cover, and temporal trends are usually dependent...

  18. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Sun is enveloped by a hot, tenuous million-degree corona that expands to create a continuous solar wind that sweeps past all the planets and fills the heliosphere. The solar wind is modulated by strong gusts that are initiated by powerful explosions on the Sun, including solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This dynamic, invisible outer atmosphere of the Sun is currently under observation with the soft X-ray telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft, whose results are presented. We also show observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that is now passing over the solar pole, sampling the solar wind in this region for the first time. Two other spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have recently detected the outer edge of the invisible heliosphere, roughly halfway to the nearest star. Magnetic solar activity, the total radiative output from the Sun, and the Earth's mean global surface temperature all vary with the 11-year sunspot cycle in which the total number of sunspots varies from a maximum to a minimum and back to a maximum again in about 11 years. The terrestrial magnetic field hollows out a protective magnetic cavity, called the magnetosphere, within the solar wind. This protection is incomplete, however, so the Sun feeds an unseen world of high-speed particles and magnetic fields that encircle the Earth in space. These particles endanger spacecraft and astronauts, and also produce terrestrial aurorae. An international flotilla of spacecraft is now sampling the weak points in this magnetic defense. Similar spacecraft have also discovered a new radiation belt, in addition to the familiar Van Allen belts, except fed by interstellar ions instead of electrons and protons from the Sun.

  19. Little Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  20. Little sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  1. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  2. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  3. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-03-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities compared with the pure gravity case (i.e. the Chamberlain profiles), in particular at noon and midnight. We finally show the existence of an exopause that appears naturally as the external limit for bounded particles, above which all particles are escaping.

  4. Efficiency on the Use of Radiation and Corn Yield under Three Densities of Sowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Morales-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to evaluate sowing densities and efficiency of radiation use, six corn genotypes, three from open pollination (“Amarillo Almoloya,” “Cacahuacintle,” and “Jiquipilco” and three hybrids (“Z-60,” “Condor,” and “H-50”, were sown at densities of 6.9, 7.8, and 8.9 plants m−2, under a split plot design, within a factorial arrangement of treatments during three years (2008, 2009, and 2010. Evaluated variables were yield, harvest index, biomass production, attenuation coefficient, and radiation use efficiency. Results indicate that 2008 was the best year because yield, biomass, and radiation use efficiency were 1132.6, 3505 gm−2, and 0.79 g MJ−1, respectively. “Jiquipilco” was the genotype that exhibited the best adaptability to climatic conditions of the zone; thus, it is recommended to be grown on the studied zone.

  5. Hawking-like radiation and the density matrix for an infalling observer during gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Saini, Anshul

    2016-01-01

    We study time-dependant Hawking-like radiation as seen by an infalling observer during gravitational collapse of a thin shell. We calculate the occupation number of particles whose frequencies are measured in the proper time of an infalling observer in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. We solve the equations for the whole process from the beginning of the collapse till the moment when the collapsing shell reaches zero radius. The radiation distribution is not thermal in the whole frequency regime, but it is approximately thermal for the wavelengths of the order of the Schwarzschild radius of the collapsing shell. After the Schwarzschild radius is crossed, the temperature increases without limits as the singularity is approached. We also calculate the density matrix associated with this radiation. It turns out that the off-diagonal correlation terms to the diagonal Hawking's leading order terms are very important. While the trace of the diagonal (Hawking's) density matrix squared decreases during the evolutio...

  6. Sun Proof

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the harmful effects of the sun and how to protect yourself from it.  Created: 10/23/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/23/2012.

  7. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  8. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  9. Clustering of Sun Exposure Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2002-01-01

    In a medically motivated Sun-exposure study, questionnaires concerning Sun-habits were collected from a number of subjects together with UV radiation measurements. This paper focuses on identifying clusters in the heterogeneous set of data for the purpose of understanding possible relations between...... Sun-habits exposure and eventually assessing the risk of skin cancer. A general probabilistic framework originally developed for text and Web mining is demonstrated to be useful for clustering of behavioral data. The framework combines principal component subspace projection with probabilistic...

  10. Cell-density dependent effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on E. coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipov, E D; Shcheglov, V S; Sarimov, R M; Belyaev, I Ya

    2003-01-01

    The changes in genome conformational state (GCS) induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in E. coli cells were measured by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) in cellular lysates. Effects of X-rays at doses 0.1 cGy--1 Gy depended on post-irradiation time. Significant relaxation of DNA loops followed by a decrease in AVTD. The time of maximum relaxation was between 5-80 min depending on the dose of irradiation. U-shaped dose response was observed with increase of AVTD in the range of 0.1-4 Gy and decrease in AVTD at higher doses. No such increase in AVTD was seen upon irradiation of cells at the beginning of cell lysis while the AVTD decrease was the same. Significant differences in the effects of X-rays and gamma-rays at the same doses were observed suggesting a strong dependence of low-dose effects on LET. Effects of 0.01 cGy gamma-rays were studied at different cell densities during irradiation. We show that the radiation-induced changes in GCS lasted longer at higher cell density as compared to lower cell density. Only small amount of cells were hit at this dose and the data suggest cell-to-cell communication in response to low-dose ionizing radiation. This prolonged effect was also observed when cells were irradiated at high cell density and diluted to low cell density immediately after irradiation. These data suggest that cell-to-cell communication occur during irradiation or within 3 min post-irradiation. The cell-density dependent response to low-dose ionizing radiation was compared with previously reported data on exposure of E. coli cells to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency and extremely high frequency (millimeter waves). The body of our data show that cells can communicate in response to electromagnetic fields and ionizing radiation, presumably by reemission of secondary photons in infrared-submillimeter frequency range.

  11. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  12. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-07

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  13. The sun, our star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  14. Radiative corrections for the direct detection of neutralino dark matter and its relic density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steppeler, Patrick Norbert

    2016-07-01

    entering the Boltzmann equation in many scenarios of the MSSM. The Boltzmann equation allows to determine the neutralino relic density, i.e. to predict their present abundance. This prediction can be checked experimentally and is thus of great phenomenological relevance. Measurements of the temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background permit to determine the relic density precisely. Comparing the theoretical prediction with the experimental finding allows to exclude large fractions of the MSSM parameter space. In order to maximally benefit from the experimental precision, it is necessary to minimise theoretical uncertainties and to include the aforementioned radiative corrections. The radiative corrections to the elastic neutralino-nucleon scattering and the corresponding relic density have been implemented into the numerical package Dark matter at next-to-leading order. With the help of this program, we perform a phenomenological investigation and analyse the impact of the radiative corrections. It turns out that the neutralino relic density depends not on a single but a multitude of gaugino (co)annihilation processes in parallel quite often. The calculated radiative corrections lead to a relative shift of the relic density of up to 10%, which is significantly larger than the experimental uncertainty (±2% at the 1σ confidence level) and demonstrates that these corrections should be included when identifying the cosmologically preferred region of the MSSM. Moreover, we investigate the relation between the relic density and the neutralino-nucleon cross sections. In the spin-independent case, the inclusion of radiative corrections leads to a relative shift roughly +14% in comparison to a tree-level calculation. This shift is comparable to typical recent nuclear uncertainties, which influence the prediction as well. The spin-dependent cross section is subject to even larger shifts and modified by up to -50% by radiative corrections.

  15. Let the sun shine in: effects of ultraviolet radiation on invasive pneumococcal disease risk in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Caroline C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community acquired pneumonia and bacteremia. Excess wintertime mortality related to pneumonia has been noted for over a century, but the seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD has been described relatively recently and is poorly understood. Improved understanding of environmental influence on disease seasonality has taken on new urgency due to global climate change. Methods We evaluated 602 cases of IPD reported in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, from 2002 to 2007. Poisson regression models incorporating seasonal smoothers were used to identify associations between weekly weather patterns and case counts. Associations between acute (day-to-day environmental fluctuations and IPD occurrence were evaluated using a case-crossover approach. Effect modification across age and sex strata was explored, and meta-regression models were created using stratum-specific estimates for effect. Results IPD incidence was greatest in the wintertime, and spectral decomposition revealed a peak at 51.0 weeks, consistent with annual periodicity. After adjustment for seasonality, yearly increases in reporting, and temperature, weekly incidence was found to be associated with clear-sky UV index (IRR per unit increase in index: 0.70 [95% CI 0.54-0.91]. The effect of UV index was highest among young strata and decreased with age. At shorter time scales, only an association with increases in ambient sulphur oxides was linked to disease risk (OR for highest tertile of exposure 0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.93. Conclusion We confirmed the wintertime predominance of IPD in a major urban center. The major predictor of IPD in Philadelphia is extended periods of low UV radiation, which may explain observed wintertime seasonality. The mechanism of action of diminished light exposure on disease occurrence may be due to direct effects on pathogen survival or host immune function via altered 1,25-(OH2-vitamin

  16. SCIENCE OF SUN PHOTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan Toma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Typically, the total amount of gases and particles in a column of atmosphere cannot be determined from measurements just at Earth's surface, by a single measurement essentially at the bottom of the atmosphere column. Balloons, airplanes, and rockets are all used to perform direct measurements in the atmosphere at altitudes up to and beyond the stratosphere. Satellite-based instruments provide global views, but it is difficult to infer surface and column distributions from space-based measurements, so such measurements must still be supplemented by ground-based measurements. Sun photometry is an important way of probing the atmosphere from the ground to measure the effects of the atmosphere on Sun radiation crossing through the atmosphere to Earth's surface. These indirect technique provide information about the entire atmosphere above the observer, not just the atmosphere that can be sampled directly close to Earth's surface.

  17. Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasma with high density and high radiation loss operation in JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, H.; Asakura, N.; Kubo, H.; Higashijima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rensink, M. E.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Takizuka, T.; Kamada, Y.; Miura, Y.; JT-60 Team

    2005-12-01

    Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasmas with high density and high radiation loss has been investigated in both reversed shear (RS) plasmas and high βp H-mode plasmas with a weak positive shear on JT-60U. In the RS plasmas, the operating regime is extended to high density above the Greenwald density (nGW) with high confinement (HHy2 > 1) and high radiation loss fraction (frad > 0.9) by tailoring the internal transport barriers (ITBs). With a small plasma-wall gap, the radiation loss in the main plasma (inside the magnetic separatrix) reaches 80% of the heating power due to metal impurity accumulation. However, high confinement of HHy2 = 1.2 is sustained even with such a large radiation loss in the main plasma. By neon seeding, the divertor radiation loss is enhanced from 20% to 40% of the total radiation loss. In the high βp H-mode plasmas, high confinement (HHy2 = 0.96) is maintained at high density ( \\bar{n}_{\\rme}/n_GW=0.92 ) with high radiation loss fraction (frad ~ 1) by utilizing high-field-side pellets and argon (Ar) injection. The high \\bar{n}_{\\rme}/n_GW is attributed to the formation of strong density ITB. Strong core-edge parameter linkage for confinement improvement is observed, where the pedestal pressure and the core plasma confinement increase together. The measured radiation profile including contributions from all impurities in the main plasma is peaked, and the central radiation is ascribed to the contribution from Ar accumulated inside the ITB. Impurity transport analyses indicate that the Ar density profile, twice as peaked as the electron density profile, which is the same level as that observed in the high βp H-mode plasma, can yield an acceptable radiation profile even with a peaked density profile in a fusion reactor.

  18. Solar ultraviolet radiation in South Africa and sun-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours among South African adults: pilot study results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available While some sun exposure induces a sense of well-being and synthesis of vitamin D excess sun exposure has been associated with skin cancer, immune suppression and ocular cataracts. In South Africa, approximately 30% of all histologically...

  19. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Faust, I [MIT; Tritz, K [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21209, USA; Diallo, A [PPPL; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Kozub, T A [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Stratton, B C [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  20. Experimental investigation of supersonic radiation propagation in low-density plastic and copper-doped foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; Shaoen; XU; Yan; DING; Yongkun; LAI; Dongxian; ZHEN

    2005-01-01

    Eight beams of 0.35 μm laser with pulse duration of 1 ns and total energy of 2 kJ enter into a hohlraum to create intense X-ray radiation of 140 eV on the Shenguang Ⅱ laser facility. Plastic foam (C6H12) and copper-doped foam (C6H12Cu0.394) with a density of 50 mg/cm3 are heated by X-ray radiation emitted from the hohlraum. The breakout time of the radiation wave is measured by a tri-chromatic streaked X-ray spectrometer (TCS) that consists of a set of three imaging pinholes and an array of three transmission gratings coupled with an X-ray streak camera (XSC). At one shot, the simultaneous measurements of the delay of the drive source and the radiation transport at two energies (210 eV, 840 eV) through the foam have been made for the first time. The experimental results indicate that the time delays vary with photon energies. With a transmission grating spectrometer (TGS), the spectra transmitting foams were measured, and the lower limit of the optical depth was measured. The radiation at energy of 210 eV propagates through plastic foam at a faster velocity, compared with the radiation at energy of 840 eV; while the results of copper-doped foam are reverse. The optical depth in the plastic foam is less than 1, and in the doped foam it is more than 1.

  1. The impact of local stellar radiation on the HI column density distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmati, Alireza; Pawlik, Andreas H; Raičević, Milan

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that local sources of ionizing radiation have little impact on the distribution of HI in the post-reionization Universe. While this is a good assumption for the IGM, analytic arguments suggest that local sources may typically be more important than the background radiation for high column density absorbers (N_HI > 10^17 /cm^2). We post-process cosmological simulations with accurate radiation transport to investigate the impact of local stellar sources on the HI distribution. We demonstrate that the limited numerical resolution and the simplified treatment of the ISM that are typical of current cosmological simulations provide significant challenges, but that many of the problems can be overcome by taking two steps. First, using ISM particles rather than stellar particles as sources results in a much better sampling of the source distribution. Second, by rescaling the source luminosities so that the amount of radiation escaping into the IGM agrees with that required to produce the observed ...

  2. Experimental studies and modelling of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Livia

    2015-11-24

    Fusion plasmas contain impurities, either intrinsic originating from the wall, or injected willfully with the aim of reducing power loads on machine components by converting heat flux into radiation. The understanding and the prediction of the effects of these impurities and their radiation on plasma performances is crucial in order to retain good confinement. In addition, it is important to understand the impact of pellet injection on plasma performance since this technique allows higher core densities which are required to maximise the fusion power. This thesis contributes to these efforts through both experimental investigations and modelling. Experiments were conducted at ASDEX Upgrade which has a full-W wall. Impurity seeding was applied to H-modes by injecting nitrogen and also medium-Z impurities such as Kr and Ar to assess the impact of both edge and central radiation on confinement. A database of about 25 discharges has been collected and analysed. A wide range of plasma parameters was achieved up to ITER relevant values such as high Greenwald and high radiation fractions. Transport analyses taking into account the radiation distribution reveal that edge localised radiation losses do not significantly impact confinement as long as the H-mode pedestal is sustained. N seeding induces higher pedestal pressure which is propagated to the core via profile stiffness. Central radiation must be limited and controlled to avoid confinement degradation. This requires reliable control of the impurity concentration but also possibilities to act on the ELM frequency which must be kept high enough to avoid an irreversible impurity accumulation in the centre and the consequent radiation collapse. The key role of the f{sub ELM} is confirmed also by the analysis of N+He discharges. Non-coronal effects affect the radiation of low-Z impurities at the plasma edge. Due to the radial transport, the steep temperature gradients and the ELM flush out, a local equilibrium cannot be

  3. Experimental studies and modelling of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Livia

    2015-11-24

    Fusion plasmas contain impurities, either intrinsic originating from the wall, or injected willfully with the aim of reducing power loads on machine components by converting heat flux into radiation. The understanding and the prediction of the effects of these impurities and their radiation on plasma performances is crucial in order to retain good confinement. In addition, it is important to understand the impact of pellet injection on plasma performance since this technique allows higher core densities which are required to maximise the fusion power. This thesis contributes to these efforts through both experimental investigations and modelling. Experiments were conducted at ASDEX Upgrade which has a full-W wall. Impurity seeding was applied to H-modes by injecting nitrogen and also medium-Z impurities such as Kr and Ar to assess the impact of both edge and central radiation on confinement. A database of about 25 discharges has been collected and analysed. A wide range of plasma parameters was achieved up to ITER relevant values such as high Greenwald and high radiation fractions. Transport analyses taking into account the radiation distribution reveal that edge localised radiation losses do not significantly impact confinement as long as the H-mode pedestal is sustained. N seeding induces higher pedestal pressure which is propagated to the core via profile stiffness. Central radiation must be limited and controlled to avoid confinement degradation. This requires reliable control of the impurity concentration but also possibilities to act on the ELM frequency which must be kept high enough to avoid an irreversible impurity accumulation in the centre and the consequent radiation collapse. The key role of the f{sub ELM} is confirmed also by the analysis of N+He discharges. Non-coronal effects affect the radiation of low-Z impurities at the plasma edge. Due to the radial transport, the steep temperature gradients and the ELM flush out, a local equilibrium cannot be

  4. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 inner radiation belt (1.2 inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  5. Radiation synthesis of acrylamide/N,N-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate grafted onto low density polyethylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Ghaffar, A. M.

    2011-02-01

    Radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylamide/N,N-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (AAm/DMAEMA) onto low density polyethylene films was carried out. The effect of grafting conditions such as solvent type and comonomer composition were studied. Characterization of the prepared films was investigated by Fourier transform infrared. Some selected properties such as thermal stability and swelling behavior were determined. It was found that grafting efficiency, swelling behavior and thermal stability increased with increasing DMAEMA content. Scanning electron microscopy was used for predicting the change in surface morphology via the grafted films. The improvement in properties of the prepared films make it possible to use them in some practical applications.

  6. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messiaen, A. M.; Ongena, J.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; van Wassenhove, G.; Durodie, F.; R. Jaspers,; Tokar, M. Z.; Vandenplas, P. E.; Van Oost, G.; Winter, J.; Wolf, G. H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Dumortier, P.; Euringer, H.; Finken, K.H.; Fuchs, G.; Giesen, B.; Koch, R.; Konen, L.; Konigs, C.; Koslowski, H. R.; KramerFlecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Schoon, N.; Telesca, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Stationary high energy confinement is observed on TEXTOR-94 for times limited only by the flux swing of the transformer using strong edge radiation cooling. Necessary tools are the feedback control of the radiated power and of the plasma energy content. At the highest densities obtained (up to 1.2

  7. Exploring the electron density in plasmas induced by extreme ultraviolet radiation in argon

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Osorio, E A; Banine, V Y

    2015-01-01

    The new generation of lithography tools use high energy EUV radiation which ionizes the present background gas due to photoionization. To predict and understand the long term impact on the highly delicate mirrors It is essential to characterize these kinds of EUV-induced plasmas. We measured the electron density evolution in argon gas during and just after irradiation by a short pulse of EUV light at 13.5 nm by applying microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Dependencies on EUV pulse energy and gas pressure have been explored over a range relevant for industrial applications. Our experimental results show that the maximum reached electron density depends linearly on pulse energy. A quadratic dependence - caused by photoionization and subsequent electron impact ionization by free electrons - is found from experiments where the gas pressure is varied. This is demonstrated by our theoretical estimates presented in this manuscript as well.

  8. Effects of Radiation and a High Iron Load on Bone Mineral Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, E.; Morgan, J. L. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Gonzales, E.; Camp, K.; Smith, S. M.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts on long duration space flight missions to the moon or mars are exposed to radiation and have increase iron (Fe) stores, both of which can independently induce oxidative stress and may exacerbate bone mass loss and strength. We hypothesize a high Fe diet and a fractionated gamma radiation exposure would increase oxidative stress and lower bone mass. Three mo-old, SD rats (n=32) were randomized to receive an adequate Fe diet (45 mg Fe/kg diet) or a high Fe diet (650 mg Fe/kg diet) for 4 wks and either a cumulative 3 Gy dose (fractionated 8 x 0.375 Gy) of gamma radiation (Cs-137) or sham exposure starting on day 14. Elisa kit assessed serum catalase, clinical analyzer assessed serum Fe status and ex vivo pQCT scans measured bone parameters in the proximal/midshaft tibia and femoral neck. Mechanical strength was assessed by 3-pt bending and femoral neck test. There is a significant decrease in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) from radiation (p less than 0.05) and a trend in diet (p=0.05) at the proximal tibia. There is a significant interaction in cortical BMD from the combined treatments at the midshaft tibia (p less than 0.05). There is a trending decrease in total BMD from diet (p=0.07) at the femoral neck. In addition, high serum Fe was correlated to low trabecular BMD (p less than 0.05) and high serum catalase was correlated to low BMD at all 3 bone sites (p less than 0.05). There was no difference in the max load of the tibia or femoral neck. Radiation and a high iron diet increases iron status and catalase in the serum and decreases BMD.

  9. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  10. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  11. Variation of Fractional Electron Density Fluctuations Near 0.1 AU From the Sun Observed by Ulysses Dual-Frequency Ranging Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Bird, M. K.; Patzold, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of determining fractional density fluctuations, which requires the measurement of absolute electron density as provided by dual-frequency observations of time delay or ranging conducted by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment.

  12. Evaluation of the Anisotropic Radiative Conductivity of a Low-Density Carbon Fiber Material from Realistic Microscale Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Nima; Panerai, Francesco; Tagavi, Kaveh A.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Martin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The radiative heat transfer inside a low-density carbon fiber insulator is analyzed using a three-dimensional direct simulation model. A robust procedure is presented for the numerical calculation of the geometric configuration factor to compute the radiative energy exchange processes among the small discretized surface areas of the fibrous material. The methodology is applied to a polygonal mesh of a fibrous insulator obtained from three-dimensional microscale imaging of the real material. The anisotropic values of the radiative conductivity are calculated for that geometry. The results yield both directional and thermal dependence of the radiative conductivity.

  13. Plasmaspheric electron densities: the importance in modelling radiation belts and in SSA operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, János; Jorgensen, Anders; Koronczay, Dávid; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Dániel; Steinbach, Péter; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Juhász, Lilla; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet, Lichtenberger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet detects millions of whistlers in a year. The network operates since early 2002 with automatic whistler detector capability and it has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu, Lichtenberger et al., Space Weather Space Clim. 3 2013, A23 DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2013045.) Eu FP7-Space project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model (Lichtenberger, J. J. Geophys. Res., 114, 2009, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799), that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups. The network operates in quasi real-time mode since mid-2014, fifteen stations provide equatorial electron densities that are used as inputs for a data assimilative plasmasphere model but they can also be used directly in space weather research and models. We have started to process the archive data collected by AWDANet stations since 2002 and in this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time and off-line runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods. The equatorial electron densities obtained by whistler inversion are fed into the assimilative model of the plasmasphere providing a global view of the region for processed the periods

  14. Gravitational Lensing Characteristics of the Transparent Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Patla, Bijunath

    2007-01-01

    The transparent Sun is modeled as a spherically symmetric and centrally condensed gravitational lens using recent Standard Solar Model (SSM) data. The Sun's minimum focal length is computed to a refined accuracy of 23.5 +/- 0.1 AU, just beyond the orbit of Uranus. The Sun creates a single image of a distant point source visible to observers inside this minimum focal length and to observers sufficiently removed from the line connecting the source through the Sun's center. Regions of space are mapped where three images of a distant point source are created, along with their associated magnifications. Solar caustics, critical curves, and Einstein rings are computed and discussed. Extremely high gravitational lens magnifications exist for observers situated so that an angularly small, unlensed source appears near a three-image caustic. Types of radiations that might undergo significant solar lens magnifications as they can traverse the core of the Sun, including neutrinos and gravitational radiation, are discusse...

  15. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma radiation for oxides of lanthanides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Niranjan; B Rudraswamy; N Dhananjaya

    2012-03-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of lanthanides using mass attenuation coefficient from WinXCom and mass energy absorption coefficient from Hubbell and Seltzer. The values of these parameters have been found to change with energy for different oxides of lanthanides. The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology. Nano-oxides of lanthanide find applications in display and lighting industry.

  16. Radiation attenuation and nuclear properties of high density concrete made with steel aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashter, I. I.

    The fast neutron and gamma ray spectra measured behind different thickness of steel scrap concrete with density of 4 g/cm3 have been studied. The mix proportions by weight of this type of concrete were 1 cement: 6.89 steel scrap: 2.9 sand and 0.5 Water. Comparison with a standard ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm3 have been carried out. The measurements were made using a collimated beam of both gamma rays and neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channel of the Egyptian Research Reactor-1. A fast neutron and gamma ray spectrometer with a stilbene crystal was used to measure the spectra of fast neutrons and gamma rays. Pulse shape discrimination using the zero cross over technique was used to separate the photon pulses from the electron pulses. The equation due to Schmidt has been modified and applied for determining the neutron effective removal cross sections (˜R) for steel scrap, ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes. This equation gives results which are in good agreement with the measured values. The derived empirical equation in a previous work to calculate the neutron integral flux behind different thicknesses of different types of concretes, gives good results for steel scrap concrete under investigation comparing with the corresponding experimental data. Total neutron macroscopic cross sections, linear attenuation coefficients for gamma rays and the half-value layers for both radiations at different energies have been obtained for steel scrap concrete and comparing with the corresponding values of ordinary concrete. The results show that steel scrap concrete is better than ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes from the radiation shielding point of view.

  17. Effective radiation attenuation calibration for breast density: compression thickness influences and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jerry A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibrating mammograms to produce a standardized breast density measurement for breast cancer risk analysis requires an accurate spatial measure of the compressed breast thickness. Thickness inaccuracies due to the nominal system readout value and compression paddle orientation induce unacceptable errors in the calibration. Method A thickness correction was developed and evaluated using a fully specified two-component surrogate breast model. A previously developed calibration approach based on effective radiation attenuation coefficient measurements was used in the analysis. Water and oil were used to construct phantoms to replicate the deformable properties of the breast. Phantoms consisting of measured proportions of water and oil were used to estimate calibration errors without correction, evaluate the thickness correction, and investigate the reproducibility of the various calibration representations under compression thickness variations. Results The average thickness uncertainty due to compression paddle warp was characterized to within 0.5 mm. The relative calibration error was reduced to 7% from 48-68% with the correction. The normalized effective radiation attenuation coefficient (planar representation was reproducible under intra-sample compression thickness variations compared with calibrated volume measures. Conclusion Incorporating this thickness correction into the rigid breast tissue equivalent calibration method should improve the calibration accuracy of mammograms for risk assessments using the reproducible planar calibration measure.

  18. Whistler wave radiation from a pulsed loop antenna located in a cylindrical duct with enhanced plasma density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudrin, Alexander V.; Shkokova, Natalya M. [Department of Radiophysics, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Ave., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ferencz, Orsolya E. [MTA Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Csatkai E. u. 6–8, Sopron H-9400 (Hungary); Zaboronkova, Tatyana M. [Department of Radiophysics, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Ave., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Department of Nuclear Physics, R. E. Alekseev State Technical University of Nizhny Novgorod, 24 Minin St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Pulsed radiation from a loop antenna located in a cylindrical duct with enhanced plasma density is studied. The radiated energy and its distribution over the spatial and frequency spectra of the excited waves are derived and analyzed as functions of the antenna and duct parameters. Numerical results referring to the case where the frequency spectrum of the antenna current is concentrated in the whistler range are reported. It is shown that under ionospheric conditions, the presence of an artificial duct with enhanced density can lead to a significant increase in the energy radiated from a pulsed loop antenna compared with the case where the same source is immersed in the surrounding uniform magnetoplasma. The results obtained can be useful in planning active ionospheric experiments with pulsed electromagnetic sources operated in the presence of artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities that are capable of guiding whistler waves.

  19. Design and Fabrication of an Albedo Insensitive Analog Sun Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Leijtens, J.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    A sun sensor is usually included in a satellite for optically measuring the position relative to the sun. The accuracy of a conventional sun sensor is affected by reflected sunlight at the nearby earth atmosphere: the albedo radiation. The part of the spectrum at near IR (1.5 μm) is not included in

  20. Relationship between mass density, electron density, and elemental composition of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation in radiation treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, x-ray CT number of every system needs to be calibrated and converted to mass density and elemental composition. This study aims to formulate material properties of body tissues for practical two-step conversion from CT number. Methods: We used the latest compilation on body tissues that constitute reference adult male and female. We formulated the relations among mass, electron, and elemental densities into polylines to connect representative tissues, for which we took mass-weighted mean for the tissues in limited density regions. We compared the polyline functions of mass density with a bi-line for electron density and broken lines for elemental densities, which were derived from preceding studies. Results: There was generally high correlation between mass density and the other densities except of C, N, and O for light spongiosa tissues occupying 1% of body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues and were generally consistent with the bi-line an...

  1. Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 56FE and 57FE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavukcu, Emel [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2002-12-10

    Understanding nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions is important for pure and applied nuclear physics. Recently, the Oslo Cyclotron Group has developed an experimental method to extract level densities and radiative strength functions simultaneously from the primary γ rays after a light-ion reaction. A primary γ-ray spectrum represents the γ-decay probability distribution. The Oslo method is based on the Axel-Brink hypothesis, according to which the primary γ-ray spectrum is proportional to the product of the level density at the final energy and the radiative strength function. The level density and the radiative strength function are fit to the experimental primary γ-ray spectra, and then normalized to known data. The method works well for heavy nuclei. The present measurements extend the Oslo method to the lighter mass nuclei 56Fe and 57Fe. The experimental level densities in 56Fe and 57Fe reveal step structure. This step structure is a signature for nucleon pair breaking. The predicted pairing gap parameter is in good agreement with the step corresponding to the first pair breaking. Thermodynamic quantities for 56Fe and 57Fe are derived within the microcanonical and canonical ensembles using the experimental level densities. Energy-temperature relations are considered using caloric curves and probability density functions. The differences between the thermodynamics of small and large systems are emphasized. The experimental heat capacities are compared with the recent theoretical calculations obtained in the Shell Model Monte Carlo method. Radiative strength functions in 56Fe and 57Fe have surprisingly high values at low γ-ray energies. This behavior has not been observed for heavy nuclei, but has been observed in other light- and medium-mass nuclei. The origin of this low γ-ray energy effect remains unknown.

  2. Power spectral density and scaling exponent of high frequency global solar radiation sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calif, Rudy; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2013-04-01

    invariance: Iq(f) ~ f-?(q) , ?(q) is the scaling exponent. This allows to characterize the scaling behavior of a process: fractal or multifractal with intermittent properties. For q = 2, the Hilbert spectrum is defined. In this work, The data are collected at the University site of Guadeloupe, an island in the West Indies, located at 16°15 N latitude 60°30 W longitude. Our measurements sampled at 1 Hz were performed during one year period. The analyzed data present a power spectral density E(f) displaying a power law of the form E(f) ~ f-β with 1.6 ˜ β ˜ 2.2 for frequencies f ˜ 0.1 Hz, corresponding to time scales T × 10 s. Furthermore, global solar radiation data possesses multifractal properties. For comparison, other multifractal analysis techniques such as structure functions, MDFA, wavelet leaders are also used. This preliminary work set the basis for further investigation dedicated to simulate and forecast a sequence of solar energy fluctuation under different meteorological conditions, in the multifractal framework.

  3. Sun-protective Behaviors of Student Spectators at Inter-school Swimming Carnivals in a Tropical Region of High Ambient Solar Ultraviolet Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Turner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans and Australia (particularly in Queensland has the highest incidence globally. Sunlight is a known skin carcinogen and reflects off water, exacerbating the risk of sunburn. In 1988, the SunSmart Program was developed to promote sun-protection to Australian children. Within a decade, it evolved to include a voluntary national accreditation program for schools, known as the SunSmart Schools (SSS Program. Additionally, in 2008, it became compulsory for primary schoolchildren attending Queensland government-funded schools to wear a shirt during all water-based activities, except when competing. We observed the proportion of student spectators from 41 Townsville (latitude 19.3°S primary schools (65.9% SSS wearing hats at inter-school swimming carnivals in 2009-2011 and 2015 and the proportion wearing a shirt. Overall, a median of 30.7% student spectators from each school wore a hat (max 46.2% [2009]; min 18% [2015] and 77.3% wore a shirt (max 95.8% [2009]; min 74.5% [2015], suggesting that hats are under-utilized. Students from non-government (private schools were twice as likely as students from government schools to wear a hat (41% vs 18.2% p=0.003. Neither the hat nor the shirt-wearing behaviors of student spectators were significantly influenced by their school’s size (number of students, educational advantage, sun-protection policy score or SunSmart status, indicating that other socio-economic factors, not assessed here, may have influenced the results. Our findings suggest that the mandatory swim-shirt policy introduced in 2008 was very effective, especially initially. However, monitoring and feedback of results to schools may be needed to maintain high levels of compliance in the longer-term. Schoolchildren attending swimming carnivals should not rely on sunscreen or shade alone to protect against direct and reflected-sunlight, and need prompting to put a hat and shirt back on immediately after

  4. Degradation behavior of linear low density polyethylene by ultraviolet radiation exposition for agricultural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Patricia N.S.; Silva, Leonardo G.A., E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br, E-mail: patricianegrini@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ciro, Rosemeire, E-mail: rosemeireciro@msn.com [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz (FOC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, Hamilton M., E-mail: hmviana@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Fundacao de Santo Andre (FSA/FAENG), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Polyethylene is the most important polymer used in agricultural applications. Polymers are susceptible to changes in their chemical structures that affect their mechanical properties under weather condition. In Polyethylene, photo-oxidation can occur because of impurities or chromophore groups (catalytic residue, mineral fillers, some commercial additives as stabilizers, lubricants, plasticizers, etc.). The critical ageing factors for greenhouse built with LDPE film are: total solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, mechanical stress, agrochemicals, air pollution, and combinations of these factors. Exposure of plastics to UV radiation causes a loss in their mechanical properties and/or change in appearance, including reduced ductility, color changes, yellowing and cracking. Additives are added to plastics to enhance the durability of the final product. Today, there are several additive systems (light stabilizers) developed to work according to resin, final application, type of cultivation, and other characteristics. The main types of light stabilizers are: UV absorbers, quenchers and free radicals scavengers. In addition to the conventional organic additives, some inorganic additives were obtained recently with the development of nanotechnology. This study evaluates the different additive systems (HALS, NPCC, nZnO and nTiO{sub 2}), applied 0.25% (in weight) in LLDPE. The samples were mixed by high rotation homogenizer and extrusion. Later, the samples were molded by injection and aged in QUV-B simulating 6 months of exposure to weather. Tests of FT-IR and tensile strength comparing to the non-aged samples were carried out in order to evaluate the performance of several additive systems concerning the degradation behavior of linear low density polyethylene. (author)

  5. Sun and Sun Worship in Different Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Sun symbol is found in many cultures throughout history, it has played an important role in shaping our life on Earth since the dawn of time. Since the beginning of human existence, civilisations have established religious beliefs that involved the Sun's significance to some extent. As new civilisations and religions developed, many spiritual beliefs were based on those from the past so that there has been an evolution of the Sun's significance throughout cultural development. For comparing and finding the origin of the Sun we made a table of 66 languages and compared the roots of the words. For finding out from where these roots came from, we also made a table of 21 Sun Gods and Goddesses and proved the direct crossing of language and mythology.

  6. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  7. SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION X-RAY-DIFFRACTION OF MODULATED STRUCTURES IN CHARGE-DENSITY-WAVE MATERIALS - APPLICATION TO NBSE3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSMAALEN, S; DEBOER, JL; COPPENS, P

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction has been performed on niobium triselenide at 20K. The modulation parameters belonging to both Charge-Density-Waves (CDW's) have been determined. The high-temperature CDW is found to comprise of displacements on all atoms of column III, as well as on Se atoms o

  8. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Adam R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Rachel L. [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Bradley J. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brewster, Abeena [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  9. A high-resolution optical measurement system for rapid acquisition of radiation flux density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Martin; Raeder, Christian; Willsch, Christian; Dibowski, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    To identify the power and flux density of concentrated solar radiation the Institute of Solar Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt e. V.) has used the camera-based measurement system FATMES (Flux and Temperature Measurement System) since 1995. The disadvantages of low resolution, difficult handling and poor computing power required a revision of the existing measurement system. The measurement system FMAS (Flux Mapping Acquisition system) is equipped with state-of-the-art-hardware, is compatible with computers off-the-shelf and is programmed in LabView. The expenditure of time for an image evaluation is reduced by the factor 60 compared to FATMES. The new measurement system is no longer associated with the facilities Solar Furnace and High Flux Solar Simulator at the DLR in Cologne but is also applicable as a mobile system. The data and the algorithms are transparent throughout the complete process. The measurement accuracy of FMAS is determined to at most ±3 % until now. The error of measurement of FATMES is at least 2 % higher according to the conducted comparison tests.

  10. Sun's rap song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, M.; Lee, W.

    1995-07-01

    We present a rap song composed for the Sun, our star. This Sun's Rap Song can be utilized in classroom teaching to spark the students' interest and facilitate the students' learning of the relevant subjects.

  11. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  12. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  13. Radiation from particles moving in small-scale magnetic fields created in solid-density laser-plasma laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, Brett D., E-mail: bdkeenan@ku.edu; Medvedev, Mikhail V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., “sub-Larmor scales.” Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, this radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here, we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  14. Alpha slow-moving high-density-lipoprotein subfraction in serum of a patient with radiation enteritis and peritoneal carcinosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peynet, J.; Legrand, A.; Messing, B.; Thuillier, F.; Rousselet, F.

    1989-04-01

    An alpha slow-moving high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction was seen in a patient presenting with radiation enteritis and peritoneal carcinosis, who was given long-term cyclic parenteral nutrition. This subfraction, observed in addition to normal HDL, was precipitated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) by sodium phosphotungstate-magnesium chloride. The patient's serum lipoproteins were analyzed after fractionation by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The alpha slow-moving HDL floated in the ultracentrifugation subfractions with densities ranging from 1.028 to 1.084 kg/L, and their main apolipoproteins included apolipoprotein E in addition to apolipoprotein A-I. These HDL were larger than HDL2. The pathogenesis of this unusual HDL subfraction is hypothesized.

  15. Seasons by the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Meri-Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the Sun has challenged people since ancient times. Mythology from the Greek, Inuit, and Inca cultures attempted to explain the daily appearance and nightly disappearance of the Sun by relating it to a chariot being chased across the sky. While people no longer believe the Sun is a chariot racing across the sky, teachers are still…

  16. Personal, Seasonal Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an art project designed for upper-elementary students to (1) imagine visual differences in the sun's appearance during the four seasons; (2) develop ideas for visually translating their personal experiences regarding the seasons to their sun drawings; (3) create four distinctive seasonal suns using colors and imagery to…

  17. Image and Radiation Power Analysis Techniques for Determining Electron temperature, Liner Areal Density, and Radiated Energy in MagLIF Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Matthew; Knapp, Patrick; Gomez, Matthew; Hansen, Stephanie; McBride, Ryan; MacPherson, L. Armon; Gourdain, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We describe techniques developed to analyze filtered Time Integrated Pinhole Camera (TIPC) images to determine the axially resolved electron temperature and liner areal density at stagnation in MagLIF experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. X-ray power detectors are analyzed to determine the absolute radiated energy. The TIPC images are co-registered using intensity based similarities. This technique is shown to provide accurate registration without the use of fiducial markings. A filtered 6-channel PCD array was used to record the radiated power at photon energies >1 keV. A model for the x-ray emission is used with the data set to perform Bayesian parameter estimation to simultaneously determine the electron temperature, liner areal density and x-ray yield with uncertainties via χ2 minimization.

  18. Electron-radiation effects on the ac and dc electrical properties and unpaired electron densities of three aerospace polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Ries, Heidi R.; Harries, Wynford L.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of gigarad-level total absorbed doses from 1-MeV electrons on the post-irradiation alternating-current (ac) and direct-current (dc) electrical properties and the unpaired electron densities have been studied for Kapton, Ultem, and Mylar. The unpaired electron densities (determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) and the dc electrical conductivities of the irradiated materials were monitored as functions of time following the exposures to determine their decay characteristics at room temperature. The elevated-temperature ac electrical dissipations of the Ultem and Mylar were affected by the radiation. The dc conductivity of the Kapton increased by five orders of magnitude, while the dc conductivities of the Ultem and Mylar increased by less than an order of magnitude, due to the radiation. The observed radiation-generated changes in the ac electrical dissipations are explained in terms of known radiation-generated changes in the molecular structures of the three materials. A preliminary model relating the dc electrical conductivity and the unpaired electron density in the Kapton is proposed.

  19. Electron-radiation effects on the ac and dc electrical properties and unpaired electron densities of three aerospace polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Ries, Heidi R.; Harries, Wynford L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of gigarad-level total absorbed doses from 1-MeV electrons on the post-irradiation alternating-current (ac) and direct-current (dc) electrical properties and the unpaired electron densities have been studied for Kapton, Ultem, and Mylar. The unpaired electron densities (determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) and the dc electrical conductivities of the irradiated materials were monitored as functions of time following the exposures to determine their decay characteristics at room temperature. The elevated-temperature ac electrical dissipations of the Ultem and Mylar were affected by the radiation. The dc conductivity of the Kapton increased by five orders of magnitude, while the dc conductivities of the Ultem and Mylar increased by less than an order of magnitude, due to the radiation. The observed radiation-generated changes in the ac electrical dissipations are explained in terms of known radiation-generated changes in the molecular structures of the three materials. A preliminary model relating the dc electrical conductivity and the unpaired electron density in the Kapton is proposed.

  20. Study of electron densities of normal and neoplastic human breast tissues by Compton scattering using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica-Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica-Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Electron densities of 33 samples of normal (adipose and fibroglangular) and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissues were determined through Compton scattering data using a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source and an energy dispersive detector. The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of the samples. Adipose tissue exhibits the lowest values of electron density whereas malignant tissue the highest. The relationship with their histology was discussed. Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron density of normal and neoplastic breast tissues was measured using Compton scattering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to obtain the Compton scattering data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose tissue shows the lowest electron density values whereas the malignant tissue the highest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%.

  1. Coulomb correlation effects and density dependence of radiative recombination rates in polar AlGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Greg; Rudin, Sergey; Bertazzi, Francesco; Garrett, Gregory; Wraback, Michael

    2013-03-01

    AlGaN narrow quantum wells are important elements of deep-ultraviolet light emitting devices. The electron-hole radiative recombination rates are important characteristics of these nanostructures. In this work we evaluated their dependence on carrier density and lattice temperature and compared our theoretical results with the experimentally determined radiative lifetimes in the c-plane grown AlGaN quantum wells. The bands were determined in the k .p approximation for a strained c-plane wurtzite quantum well and polarization fields were included in the model. In order to account for Coulomb correlations at relatively high densities of photo-excited electron-hole plasma and arbitrary temperature, we employed real-time Green's function formalism with self-energies evaluated in the self-consistent T-matrix approximation. The luminescence spectrum was obtained from the susceptibility by summing over scattering in-plane directions and polarization states. The recombination coefficient was obtained from the integrated photo-luminescence. The density dependence of the radiative recombination rate shows effects of strong screening of the polarization electric field at high photo-excitation density.

  2. Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Uterine Cervical Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: syoshi@gunma-u.ac.jp; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Oike, Takahiro; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Sato, Hiro; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the changes in bone mineral density (BMD) after pelvic radiation therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Of 52 cervical cancer patients who received pelvic RT in our university hospital between 2009 and 2011, 46 patients without recurrence and who were followed up for more than 12 months were included in the study. The BMD of the irradiated region and nonirradiated regions, serum estradiol, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b, and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 were measured before, at 3 months after, and at 12 months after RT. The patient cohort was divided into 2 groups according to estradiol level before RT, and the groups were defined as postmenopausal (<40 pg/mL) and premenopausal (≥40 pg/mL). Results: The mean BMDs within the irradiation field (lumbar vertebra 5) in the postmenopausal and the premenopausal groups were 0.825 and 0.910 g/cm{sup 2} before RT and 0.746 and 0.841 g/cm{sup 2} 12 months after RT, respectively. Significant decreases were observed in both groups (P<.05 and P<.01, respectively). In addition, in the premenopausal group the mean BMDs of the nonirradiated regions at thoracic vertebrae 9-12 and lumbar vertebrae 2-4 were 0.753 and 0.958 g/cm{sup 2} before RT and were significantly decreased to 0.706 and 0.921 g/cm{sup 2} 12 months after RT (P<.01 and P<.05, respectively). Estradiol significantly decreased 3 months after RT, whereas tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 continued to increase over time in the premenopausal group. Conclusions: A decrease in BMD in the irradiated region after RT was observed within 1 year, regardless of menopausal status. Furthermore, in premenopausal patients, pelvic RT caused a decrease in systemic BMD.

  3. Saturation of Stellar Winds from Young Suns

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takeru K; Kataoka, Ryuho; Kato, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Takuma; Miyahara, Hiroko; Tsuneta, Saku

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged)We investigate mass losses via stellar winds from sun-like main sequence stars with a wide range of activity levels. We perform forward-type magnetohydrodynamical numerical experiments for Alfven wave-driven stellar winds with a wide range of the input Poynting flux from the photosphere. Increasing the magnetic field strength and the turbulent velocity at the stellar photosphere from the current solar level, the mass loss rate rapidly increases at first owing to the suppression of the reflection of the Alfven waves. The surface materials are lifted up by the magnetic pressure associated with the Alfven waves, and the cool dense chromosphere is intermittently extended to 10-20% of the stellar radius. The densities of the corona and transition region above the chromosphere is also high, which leads to efficient radiative losses. Eventually most of the input Poynting energy from the stellar surface escapes by the radiation. As a result, there is no more sufficient energy remained for the kinetic energy...

  4. Sun light European Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubielle, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    2015 has been declared the year of light. Sunlight plays a major role in the world. From the sunbeams that heat our planet and feed our plants to the optical analysis of the sun or the modern use of sun particles in technologies, sunlight is everywhere and it is vital. This project aims to understand better the light of the Sun in a variety of fields. The experiments are carried out by students aged 15 to 20 in order to share their discoveries with Italian students from primary and secondary schools. The experiments will also be presented to a group of Danish students visiting our school in January. All experiments are carried out in English and involve teams of teachers. This project is 3 folds: part 1: Biological project = what are the mechanisms of photosynthesis? part 2: Optical project= what are the components of sunlight and how to use it? part 3: Technical project= how to use the energy of sunlight for modern devices? Photosynthesis project Biology and English Context:Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy, normally from the Sun, into chemical energy that can later fuel the organisms' activities. This chemical energy is stored in molecules which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water. In most cases, oxygen is released as a waste product. Most plants perform photosynthesis. Photosynthesis maintains atmospheric oxygen levels and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. Outcome: Our project consists in understanding the various steps of photosynthesis. Students will shoot a DVD of the experiments presenting the equipments required, the steps of the experiments and the results they have obtained for a better understanding of photosynthesis Digital pen project Electricity, Optics and English Context: Sunlight is a complex source of light based on white light that can be decomposed to explain light radiations or colours. This light is a precious source to create

  5. Effect of ultraviolet radiation in the photo-oxidation of High Density Polyethylene and Biodegradable Polyethylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Romo, A.; González Mota, R.; Bernal, J. J. Soto; Frausto Reyes, C.; Rosales Candelas, I.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most widely used plastics in the world is the High density polyethylene (HDPE), it is a stable material due to its carbon-carbon bonds, causing their slow degradation; which is why we are looking for alternative ways to accelerate the degradation process of this polymer. An alternative is the addition of oxidized groups in its molecular structure, which results in the development of polymers susceptible to biodegradation (PE-BIO). In this paper, HDPE and PE-BIO films were exposed to UV-B radiation (320-280 nm) at different exposure times, 0-60 days. The effects of UV radiation in samples of HDPE and PE-BIO were characterized using infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). The results show that the exposed materials undergo changes in their molecular structure, due to the infrared bands formed which corresponds to the photo-oxidation of HDPE and PE films when submitted to UV-B radiation.

  6. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-11-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10/sup 10/ to 2.5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sup -2/ sec /sup -1/. In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation.

  7. Linear Theory Analysis of Self-Amplified Parametric X-ray Radiation from High Current Density Electron Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Lobach, Ihar; Feranchuk, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Linear theory of the parametric beam instability or the self-amplification of parametric x-ray radiation (PXR) from relativistic electrons in a crystal is considered taking into account finite emittance of the electron beam and absorption of the radiation. It is shown that these factors change essentially the estimation of threshold parameters of the electron bunches for the coherent X-ray generation. The boundary conditions for the linear theory of the effect is analyzed in details and it is shown that the grazing incidence diffraction geometry is optimal for the growth of instability. Numerical estimations of amplification and coherent photon yield in dependence on the electron current density are presented for the case of mm-thickness Si crystal and 100 MeV electrons. Possible improvements of the experimental scheme for optimization of the coherent radiation intensity are discussed.

  8. Possibilities to verify the level density and radiative strength functions, extracted from the two-step gamma-cascade intensities

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The direct determination of the excitation level density and radiative strength functions of their exciting gamma-transitions is impossible for the larger part of the stable and long-life radioactive target nuclei. This circumstance is uniquely determined by the fact, that the level spacing much less than the resolution of the existing spectrometers of gamma-rays and charged particles. The extraction of these parameters of nucleus in this situation can be executed by their only fitting to the...

  9. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  10. Control of the Earth's electric field intensity through solar wind modulation of galactic cosmic radiation: Support for a proposed atmospheric electrical sun-weather mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ionospheric potential and galactic cosmic radiation, found to be inversely correlated with the solar wind velocity are examined as being germane to weather modification. Since the ionospheric potential is proportional to the fair weather electric field intensity and cosmic radiation is the dominant source of atmospheric ionization, it is concluded that the Earth's overall electric field varies in phase with atmospheric ionization and that the latter is modulated by the solar wind. A proposed mechanism, in which solar control of ionizing radiation influences atmospheric electrification and thus possibly cloud physical processes is discussed. An experimental approach to critically test the proposed mechanism through comparison of the temporal variation of the Earth's electric field with conditions in the interplanetary medium is outlined.

  11. Highly biocompatible, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite synthesized in a solvothermal process driven by high energy density microwave radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolen D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dariusz Smolen1, Tadeusz Chudoba1, Iwona Malka1, Aleksandra Kedzierska1, Witold Lojkowski1, Wojciech Swieszkowski2, Krzysztof Jan Kurzydlowski2, Malgorzata Kolodziejczyk-Mierzynska3, Malgorzata Lewandowska-Szumiel31Polish Academy of Science, Institute of High Pressure Physics, Warsaw, Poland; 2Faculty of Materials Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department of Histology and Embryology, Center of Biostructure Research, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, PolandAbstract: A microwave, solvothermal synthesis of highly biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HAp nanopowder was developed. The process was conducted in a microwave radiation field having a high energy density of 5 W/mL and over a time less than 2 minutes. The sample measurements included: powder X-ray diffraction, density, specific surface area, and chemical composition. The morphology and structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The thermal behavior analysis was conducted using a simultaneous thermal analysis technique coupled with quadruple mass spectrometry. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests of heated samples were performed. A degradation test and a biocompatibility study in vitro using human osteoblast cells were also conducted. The developed method enables the synthesis of pure, fully crystalline hexagonal HAp nanopowder with a specific surface area close to 240 m2/g and a Ca/P molar ratio equal to 1.57. TEM measurements showed that this method results in particles with an average grain size below 6 nm. A 28-day degradation test conducted according to the ISO standard indicated a 22% loss of initial weight and a calcium ion concentration at 200 µmol/dm3 in the tris(hydroxymethylaminomethane hydrochloride test solution. The cytocompatibility of the obtained material was confirmed in a culture of human bone derived cells, both in an indirect test using the material

  12. Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, L W; Datta, P; Heydenreich, J

    2013-01-01

    Background  It has been reported that patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a second primary melanoma by limiting recreational sun exposure. Previous studies based on questionnaires and objective surrogate measurements indicate that before their diagnosis......, patients with CMM are exposed to higher ultraviolet radiation (UVR) doses than controls, followed by a reduction after diagnosis. Objectives  In a prospective, observational case-control study, we aimed to assess sun exposure after diagnosis of CMM by objective measurements to substantiate advice about sun...... months and 6 years before the start of the study. During a summer season participants filled in sun exposure diaries daily and wore personal electronic UVR dosimeters in a wristwatch that continuously measured time-stamped UVR doses in standard erythema dose. Results  The UVR dose of recently diagnosed...

  13. Multispectral Emission of the Sun during the First Whole Sun Month: Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the corona can model its global plasma density and temperature structure with sufficient accuracy to reproduce many of the multispectral properties of the corona observed in extreme ultraviolet (EW) and X-ray emission. The key ingredient to this new type of global MHD model is the inclusion of energy transport processes (coronal heating, anisotropic thermal conduction, and radiative losses) in the energy equation. The calculation of these processes has previously been confined to one-dimensional loop models, idealized two-dimensional computations, and three-dimensional active region models. We refer to this as the thermodynamic MHD model, and we apply it to the time period of Carrington rotation 1913 (1996 August 22 to September 18). The form of the coronal heating term strongly affects the plasma density and temperature of the solutions. We perform our calculation for three different empirical heating models: (1) a heating function exponentially decreasing in radius; (2) the model of Schrijver et al.; and (3) a model reproducing the heating properties of the quiet Sun and active regions. We produce synthetic emission images from the density and temperature calculated with these three heating functions and quantitatively compare them with observations from E W Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. Although none of the heating models provide a perfect match, heating models 2 and 3 provide a reasonable match to the observations.

  14. [Influence of light and electromagnetic radiation of Sun on circadian rhythms of the total antioxidant capacity of human saliva in the North].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenkov, M F; Perminova, E V; Kosova, A L

    2008-01-01

    The literature and results of own researches concerning the influence of climatic conditions of the North on human organism are analyzed in the paper. Experimental and clinical data are in accordance with a hypothesis of "circadian destruction" covering the mechanism of negative influence of factors of the North on human health. The model to describe the possible mechanism of action of electromagnetic radiations on circadian system of an organism is offered.

  15. Preparation of High Density Polyethylene/Waste Polyurethane Blends Compatibilized with Polyethylene-Graft-Maleic Anhydride by Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Seok Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane (PU is a very popular polymer that is used in a variety of applications due to its good mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties. However, PU recycling has received significant attention due to environmental issues. In this study, we developed a recycling method for waste PU that utilizes the radiation grafting technique. Grafting of waste PU was carried out using a radiation technique with polyethylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PE-g-MA. The PE-g-MA-grafted PU/high density polyethylene (HDPE composite was prepared by melt-blending at various concentrations (0–10 phr of PE-g-MA-grafted PU. The composites were characterized using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and their surface morphology and thermal/mechanical properties are reported. For 1 phr PU, the PU could be easily introduced to the HDPE during the melt processing in the blender after the radiation-induced grafting of PU with PE-g-MA. PE-g-MA was easily reacted with PU according to the increasing radiation dose and was located at the interface between the PU and the HDPE during the melt processing in the blender, which improved the interfacial interactions and the mechanical properties of the resultant composites. However, the elongation at break for a PU content >2 phr was drastically decreased.

  16. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation in the TEXTOR-94 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Durodie, F.; Jaspers, R.; Tokar, M.Z.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Winter, J.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Dumortier, P.; Euringer, H.; Finken, K.H.; Fuchs, G.; Giesen, B.; Koch, R.; Koenen, L.; Koenigs, C.; Koslowski, H.R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Schoon, N.; Telesca, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association ``EURATOM-Belgian State,`` Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1040 Brussels, Koninklijke Militaire School (Belgium)]|[Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, GmbH Association ``Euratom-KFA,`` D-52425 Juelich (Federal Republic of Germany)]|[FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie ``FOM-EURATOM,`` Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    Stationary high energy confinement is observed on TEXTOR-94 for times limited only by the flux swing of the transformer using strong edge radiation cooling. Necessary tools are the feedback control of the radiated power and of the plasma energy content. At the highest densities obtained (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit), energy confinement exceeds the edge-localized-mode-free {ital H}-mode scaling ITERH93-P by more than 20{percent}. {beta} limits of TEXTOR-94 are reached with {ital f}{sub H89}/{ital q}{sub {ital a}}{approx_equal}0.6. No detrimental effect of the seeded impurity is seen. These high confinement discharges meet many conditions necessary for a fusion reactor regime. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. The effect of UV light on the thermooxidative stability of linear low density polyethylene films crosslinked by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, M.; Basfar, A. A.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) light on the thermooxidative stability of Linear Low Density Polyethylene(LLDPE) films was studied. LLDPE was stabilized with phenolic type antioxidant known as Irganox 1010, hindered amine light stabilizer known as Chimmasorb 944 and phenolic type gamma stabilizer. The influence of these additives on the thermooxidative stability of gamma and UV irradiated LLDPE were investigated by isothermal Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The oxidation induction time (OIT) experiments indicate that antirad free LLDPE films which contains antioxidant and UV stabilizer are more sensitive to gamma and UV radiation. On the other hand, films which contain antirad and irradiated to different doses of γ-radiation demonstrated improved thermooxidative stability.

  18. The effect of UV light on the thermooxidative stability of linear low density polyethylene films crosslinked by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, M.; Basfar, A. A

    1998-06-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) light on the thermooxidative stability of Linear Low Density Polyethylene(LLDPE) films was studied. LLDPE was stabilized with phenolic type antioxidant known as Irganox 1010, hindered amine light stabilizer known as Chimmasorb 944 and phenolic type gamma stabilizer. The influence of these additives on the thermooxidative stability of gamma and UV irradiated LLDPE were investigated by isothermal Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The oxidation induction time (OIT) experiments indicate that antirad free LLDPE films which contains antioxidant and UV stabilizer are more sensitive to gamma and UV radiation. On the other hand, films which contain antirad and irradiated to different doses of {gamma}-radiation demonstrated improved thermooxidative stability.

  19. Constraints on the lepton asymmetry and radiation energy density: Implications for PLANCK

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Lucia Aurelia

    2008-01-01

    By using most of the present CMB and LSS measurements and the BBN constraints on the primordial helium abundance, Y_p, we set bounds on the radiation content of the Universe and neutrino properties. We consider lepton asymmetric cosmological models parametrized by the neutrino degeneracy parameter \\xi_{\

  20. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by

  1. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Maksimovic, Milan; Alibay, Farah; Amiri, Nikta; Bastian, Tim; Cohen, Christina; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward; Reinard, Alysha; Schwadron, Nathan; Cecconi, Baptiste; Hallinan, Gregg; Hegedus, Alex; Krupar, Vratislav; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 RS. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (ν ≳ 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (≲ 3RS). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Wien's Law and the Temperature of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Mark L.; Katz, Debora M.; Aho, Robert; Diaz-Barriga, James; Petron, Jerome

    2002-10-01

    A simple approach is used in an attempt to determine the temperature of the sun by modeling the sun as a blackbody radiator and applying Wein's Law. Apparently excellent results are obtained, but the results are false as a consequence of two corrections which cancel out.

  3. Sun Safety Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Beachgoing Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Julie Williams; Higgins, Sue; Rowan, Alan; Pragle, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Skin cancer rates are rising and could be reduced with better sun protection behaviors. Adolescent exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is damaging because it can lead to skin cancer. This descriptive study extends understanding of adolescent sun exposure attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors. Methods: A sample of 423 beachgoing…

  4. Relations between conspecific density and effects of ultraviolet-b radiation on tadpole size in the striped marsh frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Toby; Alton, Lesley A; White, Craig R; Franklin, Craig E

    2012-12-01

    Global increases in ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR) associated with stratospheric ozone depletion are potentially contributing to the decline of numerous amphibian species around the world. Exposure to UVBR alone reduces survival and induces a range of sublethal effects in embryonic and larval amphibians. When additional environmental stressors are present, UVBR can have compounding negative effects. Thus, examination of the effects of UVBR in the absence of other stressors may substantially underestimate its potential to affect amphibians in natural habitats. We examined the independent and interactive effects of increased UVBR and high conspecific density would have embryonic and larval striped marsh frogs (Limnodynastes peronii). We exposed individuals to a factorial combination of low and high UVBR levels and low, medium, and high densities of striped marsh frog tadpoles. The response variables were time to hatching, hatching success, posthatch survival, burst-swimming performance of tadpoles (maximum instantaneous swim speed following an escape response), and size and morphology of tadpoles. Consistent with results of previous studies, we found that exposure to UVBR alone increased the time to hatching of embryos and reduced the burst-swimming performance and size of tadpoles. Similarly, increasing conspecific density increased the time to hatching of embryos and reduced the size of tadpoles, but had no effect on burst-swimming performance. The negative effect of UVBR on tadpole size was not apparent at high densities of tadpoles. This result suggests that tadpoles living at higher densities may invest relatively less energy in growth and thus have more energy to repair UVBR-induced damage. Lower densities of conspecifics increased the negative effects of UVBR on developing amphibians. Thus, low-density populations, which may include declining populations, may be particularly susceptible to the detrimental effects of increased UVBR and thus may be driven toward

  5. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  6. Flammability of radiation cross-linked low density polyethylene as an insulating material for wire and cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basfar, A. A.

    2002-03-01

    Various formulations of low-density polyethylene blended with ethylene vinyl acetate were prepared to improve the flame retardancy for wire and cable applications. The prepared formulations were cross-linked by γ-rays to 50, 100, 150 and 200 kGy in the presence of trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA). The effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties of these formulations were investigated. In addition, the influence of various combinations of aluminum trihydroxide and zinc borate as flame retardant fillers on the flammability was explored. Limiting oxygen index (LOI) and average extent of burning were used to characterize the flammability of investigated formulations. An improved flame retardancy of low density polyethylene was achieved by various combinations of flame ratardant fillers and cross-linking by gamma radiation.

  7. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  8. Knowledge and Practice of Sun Protection in Schools in South Africa Where No National Sun Protection Programme Exists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Caradee Y.; Reeder, Anthony I.; Albers, Patricia N.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions in primary schools that increase sun-protective behaviours and decrease ultraviolet radiation exposure, sunburn incidence and skin cancer risk can be effective. SunSmart School Accreditation Programmes (SSAP) are recommended. Prior to SSAP implementation in South Africa, we explored the feasibility of obtaining national baseline…

  9. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  10. The equivalent layer density in case of dust radiation; Die gleichwertige Schichtdicke bei Staubstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenwetter, M.

    2000-07-01

    As in the case of the gas radiation, also the influence of geometry on the emissivity of isothermal scattering media can be reduced to an equivalent layer thickness. For this, the absorption and scattering terms of the radiation transfer equation are summed up by a factor K. This factor takes account of the fact that scattering will lengthen the absorption pathways relative to the emission pathways. Exact calculations of emissivity by a Monte Carlo method show good agreement with the approximation method. The new model can also take acount of transmissivity and backscattering. With the confined space method, radiation exchange between an isothermally scattering medium and its boundary surfaces can be calculated easily and in good approximation. [German] Analog zur Gasstrahlung laesst sich der Geometrieeinfluss auf den Emissionsgrad isothermer streuender Medien auf eine gleichwertige Schichtdicke zurueckfuehren. Hierzu werden die Absorptions- und Streuterme der Strahlungstransportgleichung durch einen Faktor K zusammengefasst. Dieser Faktor beruecksichtigt, dass durch die Streuung die Absorptionswege relativ zu den Emissionswegen verlaengert werden. Exakte Berechnungen der Emissionsgrade mit einem Monte-Carlo-Verfahren zeigten gute Uebereinstimmung mit dem entwickelten Naeherungsverfahren. Auch Transmissions- und Rueckstreugrade koennen mit dem neuen Modell bestimmt werden. Durch Anwendung der Methode des umschlossenen Raumes kann der Strahlungsaustausch zwischen einem isothermen streuenden Medium und seinen Begrenzungsflaechen leicht und in guter Naeherung berechnet werden. (orig.)

  11. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Sheet The Sun and Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Mona Z. Mofid, MD, FAAD, Diplomate, American Board of Dermatology, and Medical Director, American Melanoma Foundation, San Diego, California, ...

  12. Laser acceleration of protons from near critical density targets for application to radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Pirozhkov, A S; Thomas, A G R; Willingale, L; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A

    2010-01-01

    Laser accelerated protons can be a complimentary source for treatment of oncological diseases to the existing hadron therapy facilities. We demonstrate how the protons, accelerated from near-critical density plasmas by laser pulses having relatively small power, reach energies which may be of interest for medical applications. When an intense laser pulse interacts with near-critical density plasma it makes a channel both in the electron and then in the ion density. The propagation of a laser pulse through such a self-generated channel is connected with the acceleration of electrons in the wake of a laser pulse and generation of strong moving electric and magnetic fields in the propagation channel. Upon exiting the plasma the magnetic field generates a quasi-static electric field that accelerates and collimates ions from a thin filament formed in the propagation channel. Two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that a 100 TW laser pulse tightly focused on a near-critical density target is able to acce...

  13. Thin shell formation in radiative shocks. 1: Supernova remnants in low-density media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Jose; Miller, Walter Warren, III; Arthur, S. J.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Terlevich, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the onset of thin-shell formation in interstellar shocks associated with supernova explosions. We outline a simple but useful scheme that indicates the time at which thin shell formation begins for supernova remnants (SNRs) evolving in a range of interstellar environments, extending the previous analytical models to arbitrary power-law density media. The result depends on the gas cooling properties and the shock velocity and radius. This is then applied to the specific case of SNRs in low-density media. The procedure for defining the time for the onset of shell formation, t(sub sf), equates the value of the adiabat, kappa = p/rho(exp gamma), to zero using the known time dependence of the shock radius and velocity. For the case of a power-law density ambient medium of the form rho(r) = Br(exp -omega), it is found that shell formation can be prevented when the ambient density drops faster than a critical rate. For a cooling function of the form Lambda = Lambda(sub 0) tau(exp beta), with beta = -0.5 (appropriate for line cooling), shell formation never occurs for omega greater than or equal to 9/5. The shell formation time is then computed for spherical shocks in a power-law density medium. For omega = 0, the onset of shell formation is found to be at t(sub sf) approx. equal to 2.87 x 10(exp 4) E51(exp 3/14) n(sub 0 exp -4.7) yr, which agrees well with previous estimates derived by other means. We compare the analytical shell formation time with the results of detailed numerical models for omega = 0 and three different ambient densities and find good agreement. The extension of the criterion for the onset of thin shell formation using the ratio of cooling to swept-up column density is also described. This method provides a useful approximation for cases when the exact solution is not known.

  14. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  15. Why Study the Sun?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind Bhatnagar

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation we briefly describe the Sun through large number of illustrations and pictures of the Sun taken from early times to the present day space missions. The importance of the study of the Sun is emphasized as it is the nearest star which presents unparallelled views of surface details and numerous phenomena. Our Sun offers a unique celestial laboratory where a large variety of phenomena take place, ranging in temporal domain from a few milliseconds to several decades, in spatial domain from a few hundred kilometers to thousands of kilometers, and in the temperature domain from a few thousand degrees to several million degrees. Its mass motion ranges from thousandths to thousands of kilometers per second. Such an object provides us with a unique laboratory to study the state of matter in the Universe. The existing solar ground-based and space missions have already revealed several mysteries of the outer environment of our Sun and much more is going to come in the near future from planned new sophisticated ground-based solar telescopes and Space missions. The new technique of helioseismology has unravelled many secrets of the solar interior and has put the Standard Solar Model (SSM) on firm footing. The long-standing problem of solar neutrinos has been recently sorted out, and even the ‘back side’ view of the Sun can be seen using the technique of holographic helioseismology.

  16. Operational specification and forecasting advances for Dst, LEO thermospheric densities, and aviation radiation dose and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the magnetosphere, thermosphere, and even troposphere are key regions that are affected. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed and is producing innovative space weather applications. Key operational systems for providing timely information about the effects of space weather on these domains are SET’s Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), and Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) system. MAPS provides a forecast Dst index out to 6 days through the data-driven, redundant data stream Anemomilos algorithm. Anemomilos uses observational proxies for the magnitude, location, and velocity of solar ejecta events. This forecast index is used by satellite operations to characterize upcoming geomagnetic storms, for example. In addition, an ENLIL/Rice Dst prediction out to several days has also been developed and will be described. LAPS is the SET fully redundant operational system providing recent history, current epoch, and forecast solar and geomagnetic indices for use in operational versions of the JB2008 thermospheric density model. The thermospheric densities produced by that system, driven by the LAPS data, are forecast to 72-hours to provide the global mass densities for satellite operators. ARMAS is a project that has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on aircraft to capture the real-time radiation environment due to Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The dose and dose-rates are captured on aircraft, downlinked in real-time via the Iridium satellites, processed on the ground, incorporated into the most recent NAIRAS global radiation climatology data runs, and made available to end users via the web and

  17. Performance of water and hybrid stabilized electric arcs: the impact of dependence of radiation losses and plasma density on pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeništa, J.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    2006-10-01

    Processes in the worldwide unique type of thermal plasma generator with water vortex stabilization and combined stabilization of arc by argon flow and water vortex have been numerically studied. Two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical model assumes laminar and compressible plasma flow in the state of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation domain includes the arc discharge area between the near-cathode region and the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch. Radiation losses from the arc are calculated by the partial characteristics method for atmospheric pressure water and argon-water discharges. Thermal, electrical and fluid-dynamic characteristics of such arcs have been studied for the range of currents 150÷600 A under the assumption that radiation losses and plasma density depend linearly on pressure. It was proved that, taking this dependence into account, plasma velocity decrease while power losses from the arc by radiation and radial conduction increase with current. Outlet plasma temperature as well as electric potential drop remain practically unchanged.

  18. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güdel Manuel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have led to the escape of important amounts of atmospheric constituents. The present dry atmosphere of Venus and the thin atmosphere of Mars may be a product of early irradiation and heating by solar high-energy radiation. High levels of magnetic activity are also inferred for the pre-main sequence Sun. At those stages, interactions of high-energy radiation and particles with the circumsolar disk in which planets eventually formed were important. Traces left in meteorites by energetic particles and anomalous isotopic abundance ratios in meteoritic inclusions may provide evidence for a highly active pre-main sequence Sun. The present article reviews these various issues related to the magnetic activity of the young Sun and the consequent interactions with its environment. The emphasis is on the phenomenology related to the production of high-energy photons and particles. Apart from the activity on the young Sun, systematic trends applicable to the entire

  19. Magnetosheath density fluctuations from a simulation of auroral kilometric radiation radio propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, J.L.; Hoang, S. [Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    1993-08-01

    Here the authors use a ray tracing technique to map the appearance of the image of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), originating above the auroral zone, as seen by a distant observer between 0200 and 0800 LT, at distances of 50 to 250 R{sub E}. It has been suggested that distant imaging of AKR may provide a way of imaging structures in the earths magnetosphere. They use satellite measurements to constrain the size and characteristics of the AKR source region, and their projections provide results consistent with data recorded by the ISEE-3 satellite.

  20. Implicit filtered PN for high-energy density thermal radiation transport using discontinuous Galerkin finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboure, Vincent M.; McClarren, Ryan G.; Hauck, Cory D.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  1. Implicit Filtered PN for High-Energy Density Thermal Radiation Transport using Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Laboure, Vincent M; Hauck, Cory D

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system in the streaming limit, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte-Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  2. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in Adaptive Mesh Refinement codes Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Valdivia, Valeska

    2014-01-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims. Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods. We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results. We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the ...

  3. Radiation processed ethylene vinyl acetate-multiple walled carbon nanotube nano-composites: Effect of MWNT addition on the gel content and crosslinking density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Different compositions of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA/multiple walled carbon nanotube (MWNT nano-composites were prepared by melt mixing and subjected to different doses of gamma radiation. The efficiency of radiation vulcanization was analyzed by sol-gel analysis, Charlesby-Pinner parameter estimation and crosslinking density measurements. Gamma radiation induced crosslinking was found to increase with MWNT fraction in EVA-MWNT nano-composites (p0/q0 in the range: 1.15–0.98. These results ruled out the possibility of a significant neutralization of single ionization spurs by MWNT addition. The incorporation of MWNT also resulted in increased hardness and higher density of the nano-composite matrix. The efficiency of multifunctional acrylates as crosslinking aid in the radiation-induced vulcanization of EVA-MWNT nano-composites was also investigated. The results established lower efficiency of methacrylates than of acrylates in the radiation vulcanization process.

  4. Density convection near radiating ICRF antennas and its effect on the coupling of lower hybrid waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Mayoral, M.L.; Mailloux, J. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Noterdaeme, J.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Garching (Germany)]|[Gent University, EESA Dept. (Belgium); Tuccillo, A.A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, CR Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    Combined operation of lower hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore-Supra and Jet tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore-Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in Jet indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k{sub /} spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore-Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum. (authors)

  5. A transition radiation detector interleaved with low-density targets for the NOE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, K V; Bernardini, P; Brigida, M; Campana, D; Candela, A M; Caruso, R; Cassese, F; Ceres, A; D'Aquino, B; De Cataldo, G; De Mitri, I; Di Credico, A; Favuzzi, C; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Lamanna, E; Lauro, A; Leone, A; Loparco, F; Mancarella, G; Martello, D; Mazziotta, M N; Mikheyev, S P; Mongelli, M; Osteria, G; Palladino, Vittorio; Passeggio, G; Perchiazzi, M; Pontoniere, G; Rainó, A; Rocco, R; Romanucci, E; Rubizzo, U; Sacchetti, A; Scapparone, E; Spinelli, P; Tikhomirov, V; Vaccina, A; Vanzanella, E; Weber, M

    2001-01-01

    The NOE Collaboration has proposed a transition radiation detector (TRD) interleaved with marble targets to tag the electron decay channel of tau leptons produced by nu /sub tau /, eventually originated by nu /sub mu / oscillations in a long base line experiment. A reduced scale TRD detector prototype has been built and exposed to an electron/pion beam at the CERN PS. Discrimination capabilities between electrons and both charged and neutral pions, representing the main source of background for our measurement, have been determined obtaining rejection factors of the order of the tenth of percent for charged pions, and of a few percent for the neutral pion, matching the experiment requirements. The capabilities of this detector to measure the energy released by particles that start showering inside the targets are shown. A momentum resolution sigma /sub p//P

  6. Radiation-damped profiles of extremely high column density neutral hydrogen: implications of cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line of sight mainly affects the far off-centre region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line centre can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half-maximum) as an effective line width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N_{H I}≲ 10^{21} { cm^{-2}}, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7 per cent errors. However, as the local column density reaches N_{H I}˜ 10^{22.3} { cm^{-2}}, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10 per cent overestimation in the red wing and a 20 per cent underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  7. Radiation Damped Profiles of Extremely High Column Density Neutral Hydrogen : Implications of Cosmic Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2016-09-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line-of-sight mainly affects the far off-center region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line-center can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half maximum) as an effective line-width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N HI ≲ 1021 cm-2, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7% errors. However, as the local column density reaches N HI ˜ 1022.3 cm-2, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10% overestimation in the red wing and a 20% underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  8. Growth and morphogenesis of sun and shade plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    A number of species of sun and shade plants in the vegetative phase were grown in different light intensities, different light qualities (r/fr ratio) and different combinations of light intensity and nutrient supply. Sun and shade species were also grown at various plant densities and in interspecif

  9. Radiative Neutrino Mass with $Z_3$ Dark matter: From Relic Density to LHC Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Ran; Liao, Yi; Xie, Wan-Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this work we give a comprehensive analysis on the phenomenology of a specific $\\mathbb{Z}_3$ dark matter (DM) model in which neutrino mass is induced at two loops by interactions with a DM particle that can be a complex scalar or a Dirac fermion. Both the DM properties in relic density and direct detection and the LHC signatures are examined in great detail, and indirect detection for gamma-ray excess from the Galactic Center is also discussed briefly. On the DM side, both semi-annihilation and co-annihilation processes play a crucial role in alleviating the tension of parameter space between relic density and direct detection. On the collider side, new decay channels resulting from $\\mathbb{Z}_3$ particles lead to distinct signals at LHC. Currently the trilepton signal is expected to give the most stringent bound for both scalar and fermion DM candidates, and the signatures of fermion DM are very similar to those of electroweakinos in simplified supersymmetric models.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics of the Sun is a completely new up-to-date rewrite from scratch of the 1982 book Solar Magnetohydrodynamics, taking account of enormous advances in understanding since that date. It describes the subtle and complex interaction between the Sun's plasma atmosphere and its magnetic field, which is responsible for many fascinating dynamic phenomena. Chapters cover the generation of the Sun's magnetic field by dynamo action, magnetoconvection and the nature of photospheric flux tubes such as sunspots, the heating of the outer atmosphere by waves or reconnection, the structure of prominences, the nature of eruptive instability and magnetic reconnection in solar flares and coronal mass ejections, and the acceleration of the solar wind by reconnection or wave-turbulence. It is essential reading for graduate students and researchers in solar physics and related fields of astronomy, plasma physics and fluid dynamics. Problem sets and other resources are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521854719.

  11. The Sun's Supergranulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rieutord, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The Sun's supergranulation refers to a physical pattern covering the surface of the quiet Sun with a typical horizontal scale of approximately 30000km. Its most noticeable observable signature is as a fluctuating velocity field whose components are mostly horizontal. Supergranulation was discovered more than fifty years ago, however explaining why and how it originates still represents one of the main challenges of modern solar physics. A lot of work has been devoted to the subject over the years, but observational constraints, conceptual difficulties and numerical limitations have all concurred to prevent a detailed understanding of the supergranulation phenomenon so far. With the advent of 21st century supercomputing resources and the availability of unprecedented high-resolution observations of the Sun, the solar community has now reached a stage at which key progress can be made on this question. A unifying strategy between observations and modeling is more than ever required for this to be possible. The ...

  12. Enhanced terahertz radiation from high stacking fault density nonpolar GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Grace D.; Shen, Hongen; Wraback, Michael; Hirai, Asako; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.

    2008-06-01

    Terahertz emission from high stacking fault density m-GaN has been observed using ultrafast pulse excitation. The terahertz signal exhibits a 360° periodicity with sample rotation and a polarity flip at 180°, characteristic of real carrier transport in an in-plane electric field parallel to the c axis induced by stacking fault (SF)-terminated internal polarization at wurtzite domain boundaries. The terahertz emission can be enhanced by several times relative to that from a SF-free m-GaN sample, for which the terahertz signal emanates from surface surge currents and diffusion-driven carrier transport normal to the surface and is independent of the c-axis orientation.

  13. Possibilities to verify the level density and radiative strength functions, extracted from the two-step gamma-cascade intensities

    CERN Document Server

    Khitrov, V A; Khang, Pham Dinh; Tan, Vuong Huu; Hai, Nguyen Xuan

    2007-01-01

    The direct determination of the excitation level density and radiative strength functions of their exciting gamma-transitions is impossible for the larger part of the stable and long-life radioactive target nuclei. This circumstance is uniquely determined by the fact, that the level spacing much less than the resolution of the existing spectrometers of gamma-rays and charged particles. The extraction of these parameters of nucleus in this situation can be executed by their only fitting to the most probable values, reproducing the measured in the nuclear reactions spectra and sections. This inverse problem of mathematical analysis of its nature is principally ambiguous. Moreover, system of equations, those connecting the number of excitable levels and probability of the emission of charge particles are assigned usually within the framework of some assumptions about the mechanism of nuclear reaction and factors, determining the dynamics of the studied process. The verification of these parameters can be partial...

  14. Natural fibre high-density polyethylene and lead oxide composites for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed Abdo, A.; Ali, M. A. M.; Ismail, M. R.

    2003-03-01

    Study has been made of the radiation shielding provided by recycled agricultural fibre and industrial plastic wastes produced as composite materials. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra behind composites of fibre-plastic ( ρ = 1.373 g cm -3) and fibre-plastic-lead ( ρ = 2.756 g cm -3) have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating technique based on the zero-cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and BF 3 counter, leading to determination of the macroscopic cross-section ( Σ). The removal cross-sections ( ΣR) of fast neutrons have been determined from measured results and elemental composition of the composites. For gamma-rays, total linear attenuation coefficients ( μ) and total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ/ ρ) have been determined from use of the XCOM code and measured results. Reasonable agreement was found between measured and calculated results.

  15. Natural fibre high-density polyethylene and lead oxide composites for radiation shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Abdo, A. E-mail: attiaabdoll@hotmail.com; Ali, M.A.M.; Ismail, M.R

    2003-03-01

    Study has been made of the radiation shielding provided by recycled agricultural fibre and industrial plastic wastes produced as composite materials. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra behind composites of fibre-plastic ({rho} = 1.373 g cm{sup -3}) and fibre-plastic-lead ({rho} = 2.756 g cm{sup -3}) have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating technique based on the zero-cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and BF{sub 3} counter, leading to determination of the macroscopic cross-section ({sigma}). The removal cross-sections ({sigma}{sub R}) of fast neutrons have been determined from measured results and elemental composition of the composites. For gamma-rays, total linear attenuation coefficients ({mu}) and total mass attenuation coefficients ({mu}/{rho}) have been determined from use of the XCOM code and measured results. Reasonable agreement was found between measured and calculated results.

  16. Natural fibre high-density polyethylene and lead oxide composites for radiation shielding

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, A; Ismail, M R

    2003-01-01

    Study has been made of the radiation shielding provided by recycled agricultural fibre and industrial plastic wastes produced as composite materials. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra behind composites of fibre-plastic (rho = 1.373 g cm sup - sup 3) and fibre-plastic-lead (rho = 2.756 g cm sup - sup 3) have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating technique based on the zero-cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and BF sub 3 counter, leading to determination of the macroscopic cross-section (SIGMA). The removal cross-sections (SIGMA sub R) of fast neutrons have been determined from measured results and elemental composition of the composites. For gamma-rays, total linear attenuation coefficients (mu) and total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) have been determined from use of the XCOM code and me...

  17. Piece of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Wayne, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Our rapidly industrialising world has an insatiable hunger for energy, and conventional sources are struggling to meet demand. Oil is running out, coal is damaging our climate, many nations are abandoning nuclear, yet solar, wind and water will never be a complete replacement. The solution, says Daniel Clery in this deeply researched and revelatory book, is to be found in the original energy source: the Sun itself. There, at its centre, the fusion of 630 million tonnes of hydrogen every second generates an unfathomable amount of energy. By replicating even a tiny piece of the Sun's power

  18. Near-Sun asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    As follows from dynamical studies, in the course of evolution, most near-Earth objects reach orbits with small perihelion distances. Changes of the asteroids in the vicinity of the Sun should play a key role in forming the physical properties, size distribution, and dynamical features of the near-Earth objects. Only seven of the discovered asteroids are currently moving along orbits with perihelion distances q orbits farther from the Sun. In this study, we found asteroids that have been recently orbiting with perihelion distances q orbits for hundreds to tens of thousands of years. To carry out astrophysical observations of such objects is a high priority.

  19. The SUN S TRAVELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Louis; Stevenson

    2005-01-01

    The sun is not a-bed, when I At night upon my pillow lie; Stilt round the earth his Way he takes, And morning after morning makes. White here at home, in shining day, We round the sunny garden play, Each tittle Indian sleepy - head Is being kissed and put to bed. And When at eve I rise from tea, Day dawns beyond the Atlantic Sea; And all the children in the West Are getting up and being dressed.The SUN'S TRAVELS@Robert Louis Stevenson

  20. Global VTEC-modelling in near real-time based on space geodetic techniques, adapted B-spline expansions and Kalman-filtering including observations of the Sun's radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börger, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael; Dettmering, Denise; Limberger, Marco; Erdogan, Eren; Seitz, Florian; Brandert, Sylvia; Görres, Barbara; Kersten, Wilhelm; Bothmer, Volker; Hinrichs, Johannes; Venzmer, Malte; Mrotzek, Niclas

    2016-04-01

    Today, the observations of space geodetic techniques are usually available with a rather low latency which applies to space missions observing the solar terrestrial environment, too. Therefore, we can use all these measurements in near real-time to compute and to provide ionosphere information, e.g. the vertical total electron content (VTEC). GSSAC and BGIC support a project aiming at a service for providing ionosphere information. This project is called OPTIMAP, meaning "Operational Tool for Ionosphere Mapping and Prediction"; the scientific work is mainly done by the German Geodetic Research Institute of the Technical University Munich (DGFI-TUM) and the Institute for Astrophysics of the University of Goettingen (IAG). The OPTIMAP strategy for providing ionosphere target quantities of high quality, such as VTEC or the electron density, includes mathematical approaches and tools allowing for the model adaptation to the real observational scenario as a significant improvement w.r.t. the traditional well-established methods. For example, OPTIMAP combines different observation types such as GNSS (GPS, GLONASS), Satellite Altimetry (Jason-2), DORIS as well as radio-occultation measurements (FORMOSAT#3/COSMIC). All these observations run into a Kalman-filter to compute global ionosphere maps, i.e. VTEC, for the current instant of time and as a forecast for a couple of subsequent days. Mathematically, the global VTEC is set up as a series expansion in terms of two-dimensional basis functions defined as tensor products of trigonometric B-splines for longitude and polynomial B-splines for latitude. Compared to the classical spherical harmonics, B-splines have a localizing character and, therefore, can handle an inhomogeneous data distribution properly. Finally, B-splines enable a so-called multi-resolution-representation (MRR) enabling the combination of global and regional modelling approaches. In addition to the geodetic measurements, Sun observations are pre

  1. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Güdel, M

    2007-01-01

    (abridged) The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have...

  2. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities, and tissue equivalence of some gases and mixtures for dosimetry of radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mass attenuation coefficients, µm, effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Neff, of different gases - carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene, propane, butane, and pentane used in radiation detectors, have been calculated for the photon energy of 1 keV to 100 GeV. Each gas has constant Zeff values between 0.10 to 10 MeV photon energies; however, these values are way far away from ICRU tissue. Carbon dioxide gas shows the closest tissue equivalence in the entire photon energy spectrum. Relative tissue equivalences of the mixtures of gases with respect to ICRU tissue are in the range of 0.998-1.041 for air, argon (4.5% + methane (95.5%, argon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5%, and nitrogen (5% + methane (7% + carbon dioxide (88%. The gas composition of xenon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5% shows 1.605 times higher tissue equivalence compared to the ICRU tissue. The investigated photon interaction parameters are useful for exposure and energy absorption buildup factors calculation and design, and fabrication of gaseous detectors for ambient radiation measurement by the Geiger-Muller detector, ionization chambers and proportional counters.

  3. Radiation initiated graft copolymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone and acrylamide onto low density polyethylene films by individual and binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, N. H.; Dessuoki, A. M.; El-Arnaouty, M. B.

    1998-10-01

    A study has been made for the preparation of membranes by the direct radiation grafting of N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP), acrylamide (AAm) and its comonomer onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) films. The factors affecting the grafting process such as solvent, inhibitor, radiation dose, dose rate, monomer and comonomer concentrations on the grafting yield were studied. Dioxane was chosen as a diluent and the addition of any inhibitor failed in this grafting system. The optimum comonomer composition at which the highest grafting yield was obtained, was found to be (20/80 wt% of AAm/NVP) comonomer. The dependence of the grafting rate upon NVP, AAm and its comonomer concentration for comonomer composition (50/50 and 20/80 AAm/NVP) was found to be 1.7, 1.44, 1.9 and 1.7 order, respectively. Some selective properties of the graft copolymers such as, swelling behaviour, electrical and mechanical properties were investigated. On the other hand, the thermal stability of these membranes was measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). An improvement of these properties was observed which makes possible the use of these membranes in some practical applications such as the removal of some heavy metals from waste water.

  4. Radiation-grafted polymers for biomaterial applications. I. 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate: ethyl methacrylate grafting onto low density polyethylene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, D.; Hoffman, A.S.; Ratner, B.D.

    1984-08-01

    Studies were conducted on the radiation grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and ethyl methacrylate (EMA) by the mutual irradation technique onto low density polyethylene. Four different solution concentrations were used, and radiation doses ranged from 0.03 to 0.50 Mrad. Four copolymer compositions having different HEMA:EMA ratios were also studied using two total monomer concentrations. The kinetics of the grafting process demonstrated by the two monomers were basically different. While EMA showed a typical diffusion-controlled kinetic pattern, HEMA exhibited a more complex behavior, the main features of which were an induction period, a slight autoacceleration and a significant drop in graft level after a maximum is reached. The difference in behavior was interpreted in terms of partitioning of monomers into the polyethlene substrate. The surface topography of the grafted films was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. A mechanism based on osmotic cell formation was suggested for the HEMA graft system. The copolymer systems investigated showed that the graft reaction is faster in the initial stages for higher percentages of EMA in the monomer mixtures; as grafting proceeds the trend is reversed. 24 references, 16 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Perry, Kelvin, and the age of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    2013-04-01

    Lord Kelvin argued that the Sun had to be between 20 and 100 million years old, based on the assumption that the Sun's energy source was gravitational contraction. As everyone now knows, the Sun's actual power source is the thermonuclear fusion of hydrogen into helium. But Kelvin's number is based on a physical assumption for which he could give no justification: the Sun's density is approximately constant. Had Kelvin assumed instead that the Sun had a small core near a black hole radius - an assumption allowed by the knowledge of physicists at the end of the nineteenth century - he would have obtained an age for the Sun as long as 10 trillion years, completely consistent with the long time scale required for evolution. Conversely, had Kelvin accepted the geologists' time scale, he would have been forced to acknowledge the existence of very dense objects, making it easier for twentieth century astronomers to accept the existence of black holes and neutron stars.

  6. Sun Ultra 5

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    The Sun Ultra 5 is a 64-bit personal computer based on the UltraSPARC microprocessor line at a low price. The Ultra 5 has been declined in several variants: thus, some models have a processor with less cache memory to further decrease the price of the computer.

  7. The Toboggan Sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, WPS; van der Werf, SY

    2005-01-01

    Special variants of the Novaya Zemlya effect may arise from localized temperature inversions that follow the height profile of hills or mountains. Rather than following its natural path, the rising or setting Sun may, under such circumstances, appear to slide along a distant mountain slope. We found

  8. Go Sun Smart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara J.; Andersen, Peter A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Dignan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the story of Go Sun Smart, a worksite wellness program endorsed by the North American Ski Area Association and funded by the National Cancer Institute. Between 2000 and 2002 we designed and implemented a large-scale worksite intervention at over 300 ski resorts in North America with the objective of reducing ski area employees and guests…

  9. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  10. Our Explosive Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Sun's atmosphere is a highly structured but dynamic place, dominated by the solar magnetic field. Hot charged gas (plasma) is trapped on lines of magnetic force that can snap like an elastic band, propelling giant clouds of material out into space. A range of ground-based and space-based solar telescopes observe these eruptions, particularly…

  11. Radiation from Ag high energy density Z-pinch plasmas and applications to lasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, M. E., E-mail: mweller@unr.edu; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Petkov, E. E. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-15

    Silver (Ag) wire arrays were recently introduced as efficient x-ray radiators and have been shown to create L-shell plasmas that have the highest electron temperature (>1.8 keV) observed on the Zebra generator so far and upwards of 30 kJ of energy output. In this paper, results of single planar wire arrays and double planar wire arrays of Ag and mixed Ag and Al that were tested on the UNR Zebra generator are presented and compared. To further understand how L-shell Ag plasma evolves in time, a time-gated x-ray spectrometer was designed and fielded, which has a spectral range of approximately 3.5–5.0 Å. With this, L-shell Ag as well as cold L{sub α} and L{sub β} Ag lines was captured and analyzed along with photoconducting diode (PCD) signals (>0.8 keV). Along with PCD signals, other signals, such as filtered XRD (>0.2 keV) and Si-diodes (SiD) (>9 keV), are analyzed covering a broad range of energies from a few eV to greater than 53 keV. The observation and analysis of cold L{sub α} and L{sub β} lines show possible correlations with electron beams and SiD signals. Recently, an interesting issue regarding these Ag plasmas is whether lasing occurs in the Ne-like soft x-ray range, and if so, at what gains? To help answer this question, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) kinetic model was utilized to calculate theoretical lasing gains. It is shown that the Ag L-shell plasma conditions produced on the Zebra generator at 1.7 maximum current may be adequate to produce gains as high as 6 cm{sup −1} for various 3p → 3s transitions. Other potential lasing transitions, including higher Rydberg states, are also included in detail. The overall importance of Ag wire arrays and plasmas is discussed.

  12. The interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun: a new perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cécile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We offer a new, simpler picture of the local interstellar medium, made of a single continuous cloud enveloping the Sun. This new outlook enables the description of a diffuse cloud from within and brings to light some unexpected properties. Methods: We re-examine the kinematics and abundances of the local interstellar gas, as revealed by the published results for the ultraviolet absorption lines of Mg II, Fe II, and H I. Results: In contrast to previous representations, our new picture of the local interstellar medium consists of a single, monolithic cloud that surrounds the Sun in all directions and accounts for most of the matter present in the first 50 parsecs around the Sun. The cloud fills the space around us out to about 9 pc in most directions, although its boundary is very irregular with possibly a few extensions up to 20 pc. The cloud does not behave like a rigid body: gas within the cloud is being differentially decelerated in the direction of motion, and the cloud is expanding in directions perpendicular to this flow, much like a squashed balloon. Average H I volume densities inside the cloud vary between 0.03 and 0.1 cm-3 over different directions. Metals appear to be significantly depleted onto grains, and there is a steady increase in depletion from the rear of the cloud to the apex of motion. There is no evidence that changes in the ionizing radiation influence the apparent abundances. Secondary absorption components are detected in 60% of the sight lines. Almost all of them appear to be interior to the volume occupied by the main cloud. Half of the sight lines exhibit a secondary component moving at about -7.2 km s-1 with respect to the main component, which may be the signature of a shock propagating toward the cloud's interior.

  13. The Solar Dynamics Observatory, Studying the Sun and Its Influence on Other Bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The solar photon output, which was once thought to be constant, varies over all time scales from seconds during solar flares to years due to the solar cycle. These solar variations cause significant deviations in the Earth and space environments on similar time scales, such as affecting the atmospheric densities and composition of particular atoms, molecules, and ions in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Presented and discussed will be examples of unprecedented observations from NASA's new solar observatory, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using three specialized instruments, SDO measures the origins of solar activity from inside the Sun, though its atmosphere, then accurately measuring the Sun's radiative output in X-ray and EUV wavelengths (0.1-121 nm). Along with the visually appealing observations will be discussions of what these measurements can tell us about how the plasma motions in all layers of the Sun modifies and strengthens the weak solar dipole magnetic field to drive large energy releases in solar eruptions. Also presented will be examples of how the release of the Sun's energy, in the form of photons and high energy particles, physically influence other bodies in the solar system such as Earth, Mars, and the Moon, and how these changes drive changes in the technology that we are becoming dependent upon. The presentation will continuously emphasize how SDO, the first satellite in NASA's Living with a Star program, improving our understanding of the variable Sun and its Heliospheric influence.

  14. The optical gain and radiative current density of GaInNAs/GaAs/AlGaAs separate confinement heterostructure quantum well lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shudong; Cao, Yongge; Tomić, Stanko; Ishikawa, Fumitaro

    2010-01-01

    The optical gain and radiative current density of GaInNAs/GaAs/AlGaAs separate confinement heterostructure quantum well (QW) lasers with an emission wavelength of 1.3 μm have been theoretically investigated. The effect of carrier leakage from the GaInNAs QW to the GaAs waveguide layer is studied, and its influence on the optical gain and radiative current density is identified. The hole filling caused by an injected carrier has a strong impact on the optical gain and radiative current density, while the effect of electron filling is negligible, reflecting the smaller band-gap discontinuity in the valence band than in the conduction band. Hole occupation in the waveguide layer decreases the optical gain, and increases the radiative and threshold current densities of the laser. Our calculated threshold current density (659.6 A/cm2) at T=300 K is in good agreement with the experimental value (650.9 A/cm2) reported in literature [R. Fehse et al., IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 801 (2002)].

  15. Theoretical and experimental studies of the radiative properties of matter at high energy densities and their application to the problems of inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, O. B.; Orlov, N. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the radiative properties of plasmas produced by heating and compression of various materials to high energy densities. The specific features of the theoretical plasma model known as the ion model, which is used to calculate the radiative characteristics of plasmas of complex chemical composition, are discussed. The theoretical approach based on this model is applied to the plasma produced during the explosion of the X-pinch wires. The theoretical estimate of the radiation efficiency is compared with the experimental data on the total energy yield from an X-pinch made of two different wires (NiCr and Alloy 188). The radiative characteristics of (C12 H16 O8) and (C8 H12 O6) plasmas are calculated for the temperature diagnostics of plasmas produced from porous targets employed in inertial confinement fusion experiments with the use of laser radiation and heavy-ion beams.

  16. Stars resembling the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel de Strobel, G.

    This review is primarily directed to the question whether photometric solar analogues remain such when subjected to detailed spectroscopic analyses and interpreted with the help of internal stucture models. In other words, whether the physical parameters: mass, chemical composition, age (determining effective temperature and luminosity), chromospheric activity, equatorial rotation, lithium abundance, velocity fields etc., we derive from the spectral analysis of a photometric solar analogue, are really close to those of the Sun. We start from 109 photometric solar analogues extracted from different authors. The stars selected had to satisfy three conditions: i) their colour index (B-V) must be contained in the interval: Δ (B-V) = 0.59-0.69, ii) they must possess a trigonometric parallax, iii) they must have undergone a high resolution detailed spectroscopic analysis. First, this review presents photometric and spectrophotometric researches on solar analogues and recalls the pionneering work on these stars by the late Johannes Hardorp. After a brief discussion on low and high resolution spectroscopic researches, a comparison is made between effective temperatures as obtained, directly, from detailed spectral analyses and those obtained, indirectly, from different photometric relations. An interesting point in this review is the discussion on the tantalilizing value of the (B-V)solar of the Sun, and the presentation of a new reliable value of this index. A short restatement of the kinematic properties of the sample of solar analogues is also made. And, finally, the observational ( T eff, M bol) diagram, obtained with 99 of the initially presented 109 analogues, is compared to a theoretical ( T eff, M bol) diagram. This latter has been constructed with a grid of internal structure models for which, (very important for this investigation), the Sun was used as gauge. In analysing the position, with respect to the Sun, of each star we hoped to find a certain number of

  17. Comparison of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes for Patients From Multiple Institutions Receiving Conventional or Hypofractionated Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenbaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Lawrence, Michael V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Palma, David A. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess changes in computed tomography (CT)–defined normal lung tissue density after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The pre-RT and post-RT CT scans from 118 and 111 patients receiving conventional and hypofractionated RT, respectively, at 3 institutions were registered to each other and to the 3-dimensional dose distribution to quantify dose-dependent changes in normal lung tissue density. Dose-response curves (DRC) for groups of patients receiving conventional and hypofractionated RT were generated for each institution, and the frequency of density changes >80 Hounsfield Units (HU) was modeled depending on the fractionation type using a Probit model for different follow-up times. Results: For the pooled data from all institutions, there were significant differences in the DRC between the conventional and hypofractionated groups; the respective doses resulting in 50% complication risk (TD{sub 50}) were 62 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 57-67) versus 36 Gy (CI 33-39) at <6 months, 48 Gy (CI 46-51) versus 31 Gy (CI 28-33) at 6-12 months, and 47 Gy (CI 45-49) versus 35 Gy (32-37) at >12 months. The corresponding m values (slope of the DRC) were 0.52 (CI 0.46-0.59) versus 0.31 (CI 0.28-0.34) at <6 months, 0.46 (CI 0.42-0.51) versus 0.30 (CI 0.26-0.34) at 6-12 months, and 0.45 (CI 0.42-0.50) versus 0.31 (CI 0.27-0.35) at >12 months (P<.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Compared with conventional fractionation, hypofractionation has a lower TD{sub 50} and m value, both suggesting an increased degree of normal tissue density sensitivity with hypofractionation.

  18. How hot is the sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘超

    2001-01-01

    Do you know how hot thesun is? There are no solidsor liquids on the sun. Why not? The temperature onoutside the sun is more than 10, 000℃, and that at the centre is about 20, 000, 000℃.The sun is so hot that all thesolids and all the liquids havebeen turned into gases.

  19. The effect of different crop plant densities on radiation absorption and use efficiency by corn (Zea mays L. and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. intercropped canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rostami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determinate the effects of plant densities in intercropped corn (Zea mays L. and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. on radiation absorption and use efficiency, an experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during growing season of 2007-2008. This experiment was conducted in low input system. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Treatments were included bean intercropping with corn in normal density of bean plus 10%, 20% and 30% excess bean C (B+10%, C (B+20%, C (B+30%, increasing in density bean intercropping with corn in normal density of corn plus 10%, 20% and 30% excess corn B (C+10%, B (C+20%, B (C+30% and sole crops of corn (C and bean (B. Results indicated that leaf area index, radiation absorption, total dry matter and radiation use efficiency of corn increased in all intercropped treatments compared to sole cropping, but it reversed for bean. It seems that complementary and facilitative effects of intercropping were more for corn. Range of corn and bean radiation use efficiency was from 1.92 g.MJ-1 (in sole cropping and 0.72 g.MJ-1 {in (C+30% (B+30%} to 2.30 g.MJ-1 {in C (B+30%} and 1.45 g.MJ-1 (in sole cropping, respectively.

  20. Grand Challenges in the Physics of the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The study of stellar structure and evolution is one of the main building blocks of astrophysics, and the Sun has an importance both as the star that is most amenable to detailed study and as the star that has by far the biggest impact on the Earth and near-Earth environment through its radiative and particulate outputs. Over the past decades, studies of stars and of the Sun have become somewhat separate. But in recent years, the rapid advances in asteroseismology, as well as the quest to better understand solar and stellar dynamos, have emphasized once again the synergy between studies of the stars and the Sun. In this article I have selected two "grand challenges" both for their crucial importance and because I thnk that these two problems are tractable to significant progress in the next decade. They are (i) understanding how solar and stellar dynamos generate magnetic field, and (ii) improving the predictability of geo-effective space weather.

  1. EFFECT OF RADIATION ON HIGH-CHARGE-DENSITY POLYDIALLY-DIMETHYL AMMONIUM CHLORIDE IN DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-long Zhang; Min Yi; Jing Ren; Hong-fei Ha

    2003-01-01

    The effect of radiation on high-charge-density cationic polymer, polydiallyl-dimethyl ammonium chloride (polyDADMAC), in dilute aqueous solution was investigated. The irradiated samples were characterized in terms of reduced viscosity and electric conductivity. The crosslinking reaction of polyDADMAC chains occurs preferentially in the irradiated samples at a concentration of polyDADMAC higher than 1.3 g/100 mL that was induced indirectly by the OH radicals, one of the radiolysis products of water. In more dilute samples (less than 0.8 g/100 mL) the chain scission of macro radicals appears to be the main reaction. N2O atmosphere enhances the erosslinking due to the extra OH radicals produced by reaction between N2O and eaq, another radiolysis products of water. Methanol and some mineral salts such as KC1, KBr inhibit the crosslinking to a certain extent. The mechanism of sensitization and inhibition is discussed in detail.

  2. Effects of electromagnetic radiation exposure on bone mineral density, thyroid, and oxidative stress index in electrical workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunt H

    2016-02-01

    destruction and led to a decrease in OPG levels and an increase in RANK and RANKL levels. In line with the previous studies, long-term exposure to an electromagnetic field causes disorders in many organs and systems. Thus, it is considered that long-term exposure to an electromagnetic field affects bone and thyroid metabolism and also increases OSI by increasing the TOS and decreasing the antioxidant status. Keywords: bone mineral density, electromagnetic radiation, electrical workers, thyroid, RANK, RANKL

  3. SORCE: Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Rottman, Gary; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Understanding the Sun's influence on the Earth; How the Sun affect Earth's climate; By how much does the Sun's radiation very; Understanding Solar irradiance; History of Solar irradiance observations; The SORCE mission; How do the SORCE instruments measure solar radiation; Total irradiance monitor (TIM); Spectral irradiance monitor (SIM); Solar stellar irradiance comparison experiment (SOLSTICE); XUV photometer system (XPS).

  4. Evaluation of global, photosynthetically active radiation and diffuse radiation transmission of agricultural screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gamez, M.; Suarez-Rey, E. M.; Castilla, N.; Soriano, T.

    2012-11-01

    Transmittance of a material depends on the type of radiation impinging on the material (direct or diffuse), the angle of incidence of the sun's rays (in direct radiation conditions) and the structure and characteristics of the material itself. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of nine agricultural screens of different densities, colours, thread diameters and porosities. A simple metal frame was used to quantify global, diffuse and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) transmission to determine their transmittance values (as a function of the incidence angle of solar rays in direct radiation conditions) for global radiation and PAR, as well as the diffuse radiation transmitted characteristics of the screens (ratio of diffuse radiation to global radiation transmitted by screens). Non-coloured (translucent) screens contributed to a higher and more efficient proportion of diffuse radiation (Di/Gi {approx} 90%). The green screen behaved similarly to the non-coloured 20 × 10 type as far as global radiation was concerned, although the PAR transmittance values were lower (up to 12.4% at 15°). Variation in transmission according to diameter and density of the threads was greatest in the black screens. The non-coloured-thread screens may be the best option for maximising the transmission of diffuse radiation and the 6 × 6 green screen for vegetables cultivation during the summer in inland areas with latitudes close to 36degree N. (Author) 43 refs.

  5. Comparative study of different initiation methods in the functionalization of low-density polyethylene with diethyl maleate: Gamma radiation and ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albano, C. [Centro de Quimica, Laboratorio de Polimeros, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Caracas (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela, Facultad de Ingenieria, Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Caracas (Venezuela)], E-mail: calbano@ivic.ve; Perera, R. [Departamento de Mecanica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela)], E-mail: rperera@usb.ve; Sanchez, Y.; Karam, A. [Centro de Quimica, Laboratorio de Polimeros, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Caracas (Venezuela); Silva, P. [Centro de Fisica, Laboratorio de la Materia Condensada, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2007-12-15

    This work unfolds a comparative study of the grafting of a low-density polyethylene with diethyl maleate (DEM) using gamma irradiation and ultrasound as means of initiating the grafting reactions. The grafting degree was determined by FTIR using a reported calibration curve. The efficiency of both functionalization methodologies was calculated and the polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The results showed that the grafting degree increases with the radiation dose when the monomer is inserted by gamma radiation. When the ultrasound methodology was used, an additional initiator such as dicumyl peroxide had to be used in order for the grafting to take place. In this last case, changing the time of exposure to the ultrasound source did not induce significant changes in the obtained grafted degree. The use of ultrasonic radiation plus dicumyl peroxide as grafting initiators promoted more insertion than that when gamma radiation was employed.

  6. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  7. Power producing sun shades; Elproducerende solafskaermninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, K.; Soerensen, Henrik; Katic, I.; Schmidt-Petersen, H.; AAroe, D.

    2012-01-15

    Integrating photovoltaics into sun shades takes advantage of the best opportunities to capture and utilize solar energy when the shades are most needed to shield users from solar radiation. The report describes results of a development project for solar shading in the form of broad, horizontal and rotating lamellae with solar cells and an integrated control function that simultaneously is optimized based on energy consumption and thermal and visual indoor climate. The project idea was to meet the needs for effective sun protection in the present office, commercial and public buildings, where glass facades are dominant. The conclusion of the development project is that it rarely would be optimal to integrate solar cells into movable shades. This will normally only be relevant in cases where it is justified by architectural considerations. (LN)

  8. Neptune as a Mirror for the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    How would the Kepler mission see a star like the Sun? We now know the answer to this question due to a creative approach: a new study has used the Kepler K2 mission to detect signals from the Sun reflected off of the surface of Neptune.Asteroseismology uses different oscillation modes of a star to probe its internal structure and properties. [Tosaka]Information in OscillationsKeplers most glamorous work is in discovering new planets around other stars. To successfully do this, however, the spacecraft is also quietly doing a lot of very useful work in the background, characterizing the many stars in our vicinity that planets might be found around.One of the ways Kepler gets information about these stars is from oscillations of the stars intensities. In asteroseismology, we look at oscillatory modes that are caused by convection-driven pressure changes on the inside of the star. All stars with near-surface convection oscillate like this including the Sun and by measuring the oscillations in intensity of these stars, we can make inferences about the stars properties.A Planetary MirrorWe do this by first understanding our Suns oscillations especially well (made easier by the fact that its nearby!). Then we use asteroseimic scaling relations determined empirically that relate characteristics like mass and radius of other stars to those of the Sun, based on the relation between the stars oscillation properties to the Suns.The trouble is, those oscillation properties are difficult to measure, and different instruments often measure different values. For this reason, wed like to measure the Suns oscillations with the same instrument we use to measure other stars oscillations: Kepler.Top panel: Kepler K2 49-day light curve of Neptune. Bottom panel: power density spectrum as a function of frequency (grey). Neptunes rotation frequencies and harmonics appear toward the left side (blue); the excess power due to the solar modes is visible toward the bottom right. The green curve

  9. Review - The Sun Rises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bender

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Blackburn, Stuart H. 2010. The Sun Rises: A Shaman's Chant, Ritual Exchange and Fertility in the Apatani Valley. Leiden: Brill. xvii+401. Color and black and white photographs, maps. ISBN: 9789-0041-7578-5 (hardcover, 97USD. The Sun Rises is a model study contextualizing an oral narrative tradition in the social and ritual fabric of a remote community in northeast India. In many ways a companion volume to Himalayan Tribal Tales (Blackburn 2008, the text presents the first substantial translation of a key ritual text of the Apantani Valley dwellers in Arunachal Pradesh, located on the contested border between China (Tibet and India. The Apatani speak a Tibeto-Burman language, practice intensive rice agriculture in carefully terraced fields, and number about 35,000. Their clans populate several centuries-old villages. Until recently, they were separated from the lowlands of Assam and surrounded only by peoples practicing various forms of shifting agriculture. The valley dwellers have increasingly encountered modernization over the last few decades, including Indian and global popular culture, and Christianity. The heart of this book is a chant of nineteen segments.

  10. Eruptions from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  11. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, W. A.; Grall, R. R.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1996-07-01

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 Rsolar [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ``background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 Rsolar which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a ``Maltese Cross'' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 Rsolar, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 Rsolar

  12. The validated sun exposure questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, B; Søndergaard, J; Nielsen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Few questionnaires used in monitoring sun-related behavior have been tested for validity. We established criteria validity of a developed questionnaire for monitoring population sun-related behavior. During May-August 2013, 664 Danes wore a personal electronic UV-dosimeter for one week...... that measured the outdoor time and dose of erythemal UVR exposure. In the following week, they answered a questionnaire on their sun-related behavior in the measurement week. Outdoor time measured by dosimetry correlated strongly with both outdoor time and the developed exposure scale measured....... The weekly sunburn fraction correlated strongly with the number of ambient sun hours (r=0.73, p

  13. The Sun, Mercury, and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The Messenger mission to Mercury opened a new window into the inner solar system. In 2008, this mission began a number of years of flybys, culminating in an orbital insertion around Mercury and producing unparalleled observations about this mysterious innermost planet. Mercury orbits so close to the Sun, from the point of view of Earth, that seeing it from the Earth against the Sun's glare is a great challenge. At the same time, the huge gravitational force of the Sun makes it a challenge to put a mission on Mercury without losing it into the Sun. Now, with heightened understanding of Mercury,

  14. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  15. The Sun's Journey Through the Local Interstellar Medium: The PaleoLISM and Paleoheliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C

    2006-01-01

    Over the recent past, the galactic environment of the Sun has differed substantially from today. Sometime within the past ~130,000 years, and possibly as recent as ~56,000 years ago, the Sun entered the tenuous tepid partially ionized interstellar material now flowing past the Sun. Prior to that, the Sun was in the low density interior of the Local Bubble. As the Sun entered the local ISM flow, we passed briefly through an interface region of some type. The low column densities of the cloud now surrounding the solar system indicate that heliosphere boundary conditions will vary from opacity considerations alone as the Sun moves through the cloud. These variations in the interstellar material surrounding the Sun affected the paleoheliosphere.

  16. Gravitational Waves from Stellar Black Hole Binaries and the Impact on Nearby Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the impact of resonant gravitational waves on quadrupole acoustic modes of Sun-like stars located nearby stellar black hole binary systems (such as GW150914 and GW151226). We find that the stimulation of the low-overtone modes by gravitational radiation can lead to sizeable photometric amplitude variations, much larger than the predictions for amplitudes driven by turbulent convection, which in turn are consistent with the photometric amplitudes observed in most Sun-like stars. For accurate stellar evolution models, using up-to-date stellar physics, we predict photometric amplitude variations of 1-103 ppm for a solar mass star located at a distance between 1 au and 10 au from the black hole binary and belonging to the same multi-star system. The observation of such a phenomenon will be within the reach of the Plato mission because the telescope will observe several portions of the Milky Way, many of which are regions of high stellar density with a substantial mixed population of Sun-like stars and black hole binaries.

  17. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  18. Physics of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, Thomas; Mihalas, Dimitri; Ulrich, Roger

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with its two companion volumes, originated in a study commis­ sioned by the United States National Academy of Sciences on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A committee composed of Tom Holzer, Dimitri Mihalas, Roger Ulrich and myself was asked to prepare a comprehensive review of current knowledge concerning the physics of the sun. We were fortunate in being able to persuade many distinguished scientists to gather their forces for the preparation of 21 separate chapters covering not only solar physics but also relevant areas of astrophysics and solar-terrestrial relations. It proved necessary to divide the chapters into three separate volumes that cover three different aspects of solar physics. Volumes 1 and 2 are concerned with 'The Solar Interior' and with 'The Solar Atmosphere'. This volume, devoted to 'Astrophysics and Solar-Terrestrial Relations', focuses on problems of solar physics from these two different but complementary perspectives. The emphasis thr...

  19. Using Realistic MHD Simulations for Modeling and Interpretation of Quiet-Sun Observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, Irina N; Lagg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The solar atmosphere is extremely dynamic, and many important phenomena develop on small scales that are unresolved in observations with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). For correct calibration and interpretation, it is very important to investigate the effects of small-scale structures and dynamics on the HMI observables, such as Doppler shift, continuum intensity, spectral line depth, and width. We use 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and the atmosphere of the Sun, and a spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code to study observational characteristics of the Fe I 6173A line observed by HMI in quiet-Sun regions. We use the modeling results to investigate the sensitivity of the line Doppler shift to plasma velocity, and also sensitivities of the line parameters to plasma temperature and density, and determine effective line formation heights for observations of solar regions located at different dista...

  20. Why the sun sucks - Architects versus the sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, N.; Niesten, J.; Taminiau, P.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will show how not to design with the Sun. By showing examples how buildings have failed that have not taken the Sun and its effects in consideration, one should get a clearer picture of how you

  1. Why the sun sucks - Architects versus the sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, N.; Niesten, J.; Taminiau, P.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will show how not to design with the Sun. By showing examples how buildings have failed that have not taken the Sun and its effects in consideration, one should get a clearer picture of how you

  2. Determination of the Electron Density and Electron Temperature in A Magnetron Discharge Plasma Using Optical Spectroscopy and the Collisional-Radiative Model of Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimov, K. E.; Konishchev, M. E.; Pichugin, V. F.; Pustovalova, A. A.; Ivanova, N. M.; Sun', Ch.

    2017-09-01

    A method for determining the electron temperature and electron density in a plasma is proposed that is based on minimization of the difference between the experimental relative intensities of the spectral argon (Ar) lines and those same intensities calculated with the aid of the collisional-radiative model. The model describes the kinetics of the ground state and 40 excited states of the Ar atom and takes into account the following processes: excitation and deactivation of the states of the atom by electron impact, radiative decay of the excited states, self-absorption of radiation, ionization of excited states by electron impact, and quenching of metastable states as a consequence of collisions with the chamber walls. Using the given method, we have investigated the plasma of a magnetron discharge on a laboratory setup for intermediate-frequency magnetron sputtering for a few selected operating regimes.

  3. Generation of intense X-radiation and high-energy-density matter by laser-accelerated electrons; Erzeugung von intensiver Roentgenstrahlung und Materie hoher Energiedichte durch Laserbeschleunigte Elektronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Aim of this thesis was to study the processes of the interaction between highly intense short-pulse laser and matter. The focus lied thereby on the generation of intense X-radiation and warm dense matter. The studies performed for this thesis comprehend thereby the influence of laser parameters like energy, pulse length, focus size, and intensity as well as the influence of the target geometry on the interaction and generation of high-energy-density matter. In this thesis for this two selected experiments are presented. First a silver foil was used as target, in order to study the generation of radiation at 21 keV. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic X-radiation were used in order to characterize the interaction. For the second experiment freely standing titanium wires were used as target. Hereby the focus lied on the characterization of the heated matter.

  4. Unintended Sunburn: A Potential Target for Sun Protection Messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine F. H. McLeod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand (NZ has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world. Primary prevention efforts focus on reducing sunburn incidence and increasing sun protective practices in the population. However, sunburn from excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR remains common. To reduce sunburn incidence, it is important to examine those individuals who experience unintended sunburn. This study aims to use data from the NZ Triennial Sun Protection Survey to describe respondents who were not intending to tan but were sunburnt after outdoor UVR exposure. Information on sociodemographics, concurrent weather conditions, sun protection attitudes and knowledge, and outdoor behaviour was also collected. The results showed 13.5% of respondents’ experienced unintended sunburn during the survey weekend but had not attempted to obtain a tan that summer. Respondents who reported unintended sunburn were more likely than others to have been near water and in unshaded areas, used sunscreen, had higher SunSmart knowledge scores, had lower positive attitudes towards tanning, and were outdoors for a longer duration with less body coverage. As sunburn was unintended these respondents’ outdoor sun protective behaviours may be amenable to change. Future public health initiatives should focus on increasing sun protection (clothing and shade and reducing potential barriers to sun protection.

  5. Search for Neutrinos from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Raymond Jr.

    1968-09-01

    A solar neutrino detection system has been built to observe the neutrino radiation from the sun. The detector uses 3,900,000 liters of tetrachloroethylene as the neutrino capturing medium. Argon is removed from the liquid by sweeping with helium gas, and counted in a small low level proportional counter. The recovery efficiency of the system was tested with Ar{sup 36} by the isotope dilution method, and also with Ar{sup 37} produced in the liquid by fast neutrons. These tests demonstrate that Ar{sup 37} produced in the liquid by neutrino capture can be removed with a 95 percent efficiency by the procedure used.

  6. Thermal evaluation of a sun tracking solar cooker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif El-Tous, Omar. O. Badran, Anwar Al-Mofleh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is one of many important types of renewable energy. Jordan is of great needs for renewable energy systems applications since it depends totally in generation of its required energy on imported oil. This study is an experimental work of tracking system developed for enhancing the solar heating using solar cooker. An electronic sun tracking device was used for rotating the solar heater with the movement of the sun. A comparison between fixed and sun tracked cooker showed that the use of sun tracking increased the heating temperature by 36% due to the increase in radiation concentration and using internal mirror reflectors. The programming method used for tracking control works efficiently in all weather conditions regardless of the presence of clouds. It can be used as backup control circuit in which relays are the essential control devices.

  7. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some human tissues and dosimetric materials for mean energies of various radiation sources relevant to radiotherapy and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, neff, are convenient parameters used to characterise the radiation response of a multi-element material in many technical and medical applications. Accurate values of these physical parameters provide essential data in medical physics. In the present study, the effective atomic numbers and electron densities have been calculated for some human tissues and dosimetric materials such as Adipose Tissue (ICRU-44), Bone Cortical (ICRU-44), Brain Grey/White Matter (ICRU-44), Breast Tissue (ICRU-44), Lung Tissue (ICRU-44), Soft Tissue (ICRU-44), LiF TLD-100H, TLD-100, Water, Borosilicate Glass, PAG (Gel Dosimeter), Fricke (Gel Dosimeter) and OSL (Aluminium Oxide) using mean photon energies, Em, of various radiation sources. The used radiation sources are Pd-103, Tc-99, Ra-226, I-131, Ir-192, Co-60, 30 kVp, 40 kVp, 50 kVp (Intrabeam, Carl Zeiss Meditec) and 6 MV (Mohan-6 MV) sources. The Em values were then used to calculate Zeff and neff of the tissues and dosimetric materials for various radiation sources. Different calculation methods for Zeff such as the direct method, the interpolation method and Auto-Zeff computer program were used and agreements and disagreements between the used methods have been presented and discussed. It has been observed that at higher Em values agreement is quite satisfactory (Dif.<5%) between the adopted methods.

  8. Microscopic properties of xenon plasmas for density and temperature regimes of laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, R; Espinosa, G; Gil, J M; Stehlé, C; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Rubiano, J G; Martel, P; Mínguez, E

    2015-05-01

    This work is divided into two parts. In the first one, a study of radiative properties (such as monochromatic and the Rosseland and Planck mean opacities, monochromatic emissivities, and radiative power loss) and of the average ionization and charge state distribution of xenon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics and extreme ultraviolet lithography is performed. We have made a particular emphasis in the analysis of the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the influence of the atomic description in the calculation of the radiative properties. Using the results obtained in this study, in the second part of the work we have analyzed a radiative shock that propagated in xenon generated in an experiment carried out at the Prague Asterix Laser System. In particular, we have addressed the effect of plasma self-absorption in the radiative precursor, the influence of the radiation emitted from the shocked shell and the plasma self-emission in the radiative precursor, the cooling time in the cooling layer, and the possibility of thermal instabilities in the postshock region.

  9. Global Seismology of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Sarbani

    2016-01-01

    The seismic study of the Sun and other stars offers a unique window into the interior of these stars. Thanks to helioseismology, we know the structure of the Sun to admirable precision. In fact, our knowledge is good enough to use the Sun as a laboratory. We have also been able to study the dynamics of the Sun in great detail. Helioseismic data also allow us to probe the changes that take place in the Sun as solar activity waxes and wanes. The seismic study of stars other than the Sun is a fairly new endeavour, but we are making great strides in this field. In this review I discuss some of the techniques used in helioseismic analyses and the results obtained using those techniques. In this review I focus on results obtained with global helioseismology, i.e., the study of the Sun using its normal modes of oscillation. I also briefly touch upon asteroseismology, the seismic study of stars other than the Sun, and discuss how seismic data of others stars are interpreted.

  10. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  11. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity -- comparison with the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Shimanovskaya, E V

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycles, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of the chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with the low level of the chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by the minimum level of its coronal radiation and the minimum level of its variations of the photospheric flux.

  12. Measurement of ion density in an atmospheric pressure argon with pin-to-plate dielectric barrier discharge by resonance of plasma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Bing, E-mail: qibing@szu.edu.cn; Pan, Lizhu; Zhou, Qiujiao; Huang, Jianjun; Liu, Ying [Applied Low Temperature Plasma Laboratory, School of Physics, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2014-12-15

    The measurements of the ion densities in the atmospheric AC barrier corona argon discharge are carried out by receiving and analyzing the frequencies of the electromagnetic radiation emitted from the plasma. An auxiliary excitation source composed of a pin-to-pin discharge system is introduced to excite the oscillations of the main discharge. To analyze the resonance mechanism, a complemented model based on a one-dimensional description of forced vibrations is given. Calculations indicate that Ar{sub 2}{sup +} is the dominant ion (∼89% in number density). By analyzing resonance frequencies, the ion densities of Ar{sub 2}{sup +} are in the order of 10{sup 19}∼10{sup 20}m{sup −3} and increase slowly as the applied voltage increases.

  13. Measurement of ion density in an atmospheric pressure argon with pin-to-plate dielectric barrier discharge by resonance of plasma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bing; Pan, Lizhu; Zhou, Qiujiao; Huang, Jianjun; Liu, Ying

    2014-12-01

    The measurements of the ion densities in the atmospheric AC barrier corona argon discharge are carried out by receiving and analyzing the frequencies of the electromagnetic radiation emitted from the plasma. An auxiliary excitation source composed of a pin-to-pin discharge system is introduced to excite the oscillations of the main discharge. To analyze the resonance mechanism, a complemented model based on a one-dimensional description of forced vibrations is given. Calculations indicate that Ar2 + is the dominant ion ( ˜ 89 % in number density). By analyzing resonance frequencies, the ion densities of Ar2 + are in the order of 10 19 ˜ 10 20 m - 3 and increase slowly as the applied voltage increases.

  14. Reconnection on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Because the Sun is so close, it makes an excellent laboratory to study processes we cant examinein distant stars. One openquestion is that of how solar magnetic fields rearrange themselves, producing the tremendous releases of energy we observe as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).What is Magnetic Reconnection?Magnetic reconnection occurs when a magnetic field rearranges itself to move to a lower-energy state. As field lines of opposite polarity reconnect, magnetic energy is suddenly converted into thermal and kinetic energy.This processis believed to be behind the sudden releases of energy from the solar surface in the form of solar flares and CMEs. But there are many different models for how magnetic reconnection could occur in the magnetic field at the Suns surface, and we arent sure which one of these reconnection types is responsible for the events we see.Recently, however, several studies have been published presenting some of the first observational support of specific reconnection models. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are likely several different types of reconnection happening on the solar surface. Heres a closer look at two of these recent publications:A pre-eruption SDO image of a flaring region (b) looks remarkably similar to a 3D cartoon for typical breakout configuration (a). Click for a closer look! [Adapted from Chen et al. 2016]Study 1:Magnetic BreakoutLed by Yao Chen (Shandong University in China), a team of scientists has presented observations made by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) of a flare and CME event that appears to have been caused by magnetic breakout.In the magnetic breakout model, a series of loops in the Suns lower corona are confined by a surrounding larger loop structure called an arcade higher in the corona. As the lower loops push upward, reconnection occurs in the upper corona, removing the overlying, confining arcade. Without that extra confinement, the lower coronal loops expand upward

  15. Effect of mungbean (Vigna radiate) living mulch on density and dry weight of weeds in corn (Zea mays) field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, M Bakhtiari; Vazan, S; Darvishi, B; Golzardi, F; Farahani, M Esfini

    2011-01-01

    Living mulch is a suitable solution for weeds ecological management and is considered as an effective method in decreasing of weeds density and dry weight. In order to evaluate of mungbean living mulch effect on density and dry weight of weeds in corn field, an experiment was conducted as a split plot based on randomized complete block design with four blocks in Research Field of Department of Agronomy, Karaj Branch, Islamic Azad University in 2010. Main plots were time of mungbean suppression with 2,4-D herbicide in four levels (4, 6, 8 and 10 leaves stages of corn) and control without weeding and sub plots were densities of mungbean in three levels (50%, 100% and 150% more than optimum density). Density and dry weight of the weeds were measured in all plots with a quadrate (60 x 100 cm) in 10 days after tasseling. Totally, 9 species of weeds were identified in the field, which included 4 broad leave species that were existed in all plots. The results showed that the best time for suppression of mungbean is the 8 leaves stage of corn, which decreased density and dry weight of weeds, 53% and 51% in comparison with control, respectively. Increase of density of mungbean from 50% into 150% more than optimum density, decrease the density and dry weight of weeds, 27.5% and 22%, respectively. It is concluded that the best time and density for suppression mungbean was 8 leaves stage of corn, and 150% more than optimum density, which decreased density and dry weight of the weeds 69% and 63.5% in comparison with control, respectively.

  16. The Sun's dusty interstellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Veerle

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's dusty interstellar environment Interstellar dust from our immediate interstellar neighborhood travels through the solar system at speeds of ca. 26 km/s: the relative speed of the solar system with respect to the local interstellar cloud. On its way, its trajectories are altered by several forces like the solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz force. The latter is due to the charged dust particles that fly through the interplanetary magnetic field. These trajectories differ per particle type and size and lead to varying fluxes and directions of the flow inside of the solar system that depend on location but also on phase in the solar cycle. Hence, these fluxes and directions depend strongly on the configuration of the inner regions and outer regions of the heliosphere. Several missions have measured this dust in the solar system directly. The Ulysses dust detector data encompasses 16 years of intestellar dust fluxes and approximate directions, Stardust captured returned to Earth a few of these particles sucessfully, and finally the Cassini dust detector allowed for compositional information to be obtained from the impacts on the instrument. In this talk, we give an overview of the current status of interstellar dust research through the measurements made inside of the solar system, and we put them in perspective to the knowledge obtained from more classical astronomical means. In special, we focus on the interaction of the dust with the interplanetary magnetic field, and on what we learn about the dust (and the fields) by comparing the available dust data to computer simulations of dust trajectories. Finally, we synthesize the different methods of observation, their results, and give a preview on new research opportunities in the coming year(s).

  17. Calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue: power-density versus internal field-intensity dependencies at 50-MHz RF radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackman, C.F.; Benane, S.G.; Joines, W.T.; Hollis, M.A.; House, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    In previous experiments changes were found in calcium-ion efflux from chick-brain tissue that had been exposed in vitro to 147-MHz radiation across a specific range of power densities when the field was amplitude modulated at 16 Hz. In the present study, 50-MHz radiation, similarly modulated as a sinusoid, was found to produce changes in calcium-ion efflux from chick brains exposed in vitro in a Crawford cell. Exposure conditions were optimized to broaden any power-density window and to enhance the opportunity to detect changes in the calcium-ion efflux. The results of a power-density series demonstrated two effective ranges: One spanning a range from 1.44 to 1.67 mW/cm2, and the other including 3.64 mW/cm2, which were bracketed by no-effect results at 0.72, 2.17, and 4.32 mW/cm2. peaks of positive findings are associated with near-identical rates of energy absorption: 1.4 microW/g at 147 MHz, and 1.3 microW/g at 50 MHz, which indicates that the enhanced-efflux phenomenon is more dependent on the intensity of fields in the brain than on the power density of incident radiation. In addition, the phenomenon appears to occur at multiples of some, as yet unknown, rate of radiofrequency (RF) energy absorption. Because of the extremely small increments of temperature associated with positive findings (less than 4 X 10(-4) degrees C), and the existence of more than one productive absorption rate, a solely thermal explanation appears extremely unlikely.

  18. Totality eclipses of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Littmann, Mark; Willcox, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. - ;A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is the best guide and reference book on solar eclipses ever written. It explains: how to observe them; how to photograph and videotape them; why they occur; their history and mythology; and future eclipses - when and where to see them. Totality also tells the remarkable story of how eclipses shocked scientists, revealed the workings of the Sun, and made Einstein famous. And the book shares the experiences and advice of many veteran eclipse observers. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is profusely ill...

  19. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-01-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral

  20. DENSITY DETERMINATIONS OF THE CORONAE OF COOL STARS USING A NEWLY ASSIGNED PAIR OF Fe xiv LINES IN THE SPECTRA OF α CANIS MINOR, α CENTAURI, AND THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Hell, N. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lepson, J. K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Diaz, F.; Ishikawa, Y., E-mail: beiersdorfer@llnl.gov [Department of Chemistry and the Chemical Physics Program, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    We have identified a previously unassigned pair of lines between 169 and 170 Å in the coronae of cool stars. We attribute these lines to Fe xiv and show that their intensity ratio is sensitive to the electron density. Using observations taken with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer of the Chandra X-ray Observatory we infer a density of log(n{sub e}/cm{sup −3})  =  10.2 ± 0.7 and 10.3 ± 0.8 from the newly identified line pair in the coronae of Procyon and α Cen A, respectively.

  1. Measuring sun exposure in epidemiological studies: Matching the method to the research question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura; Xiang, Fan; Swaminathan, Ashwin; Lucas, Robyn M

    2015-12-01

    Sun exposure has risks and benefits for health. Testing these associations requires tools for measuring sun exposure that are feasible and relevant to the time-course of the health outcome. Recent sun exposure, e.g. the last week, is best captured by dosimeters and sun diaries. These can also be used for medium-term sun exposure e.g. over several weeks, but incur a high participant burden. Self-reported data on "typical time outdoors" for working and non-working days, is less detailed and not influenced by day-to-day variation. Over a longer period, e.g. the lifetime, or for particular life stages, proxies of sun exposure, such as latitude of residence or ambient ultraviolet (UV) radiation levels (from satellites or ground-level monitoring) can be used, with additional detail provided by lifetime sun exposure calendars that include locations of residence, usual time outdoors, and detail of sunburn episodes. Objective measures of lifetime sun exposure include microtopography of sun-exposed skin (e.g. using silicone casts) or conjunctival UV autofluorescence. Potential modifiers of the association between sun exposure and the health outcome, such as clothing coverage and skin colour, may also need to be measured. We provide a systematic approach to selecting sun exposure measures for use in epidemiological health research.

  2. Sun position calculator (SPC) for Landsat imagery with geodetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jeong C.

    2015-12-01

    Landsat imagery comes with sun position information such as azimuth and sun elevation, but they are available only at the center of a scene. To aid in the use of Landsat imagery for various solar radiation applications such as topographic correction, solar power, urban heat island, agriculture, climate and vegetation, it is necessary to calculate the sun position information at every pixel. This research developed a PC application that creates sun position data layers in ArcGIS at every pixel in a Landsat scene. The SPC program is composed of two major routines - converting universal transverse Mercator (UTM) projection coordinates to geographic longitudes and latitudes, and calculating sun position information based on the Meeus' routine. For the latter, an innovative method was also implemented to account for the Earth's flattening on an ellipsoid. The Meeus routine implemented in this research showed about 0.2‧ of mean absolute difference from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Position Algorithm (SPA) routine when solar zenith and azimuth angles were tested with every 30 min data at four city locations (Fairbanks, Atlanta, Sydney and Rio Grande) on June 30, 2014. The Meeus routine was about ten times faster than the SPA routine. Professionals who need the Sun's position information for Landsat imagery will benefit from the SPC application.

  3. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Koshelev, K N; Lopaev, D V; van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Osorio, E A; Bijkerk, F

    2016-01-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral amount of plasma in the cavity. However, in some regimes, the impact of the setup geometry, EUV spectrum, and EUV induced secondary emission should be taken into account. The influence of these parameters on the generated plasma and the measured electron density is discussed.

  4. Photometric Variations In The Sun And Solar-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark

    The rich array of solar magnetic field-related phenomena we see occurs not only on stellar counterparts of our Sun but in stars that represent significant departures in their fundamental parameters from those of the Sun. Though these phenomena appear energetically negligible when compared to the total luminosity of stars, they nevertheless govern the angular momentum evolution and modulate the radiative and particle output of the Sun and late-type stars. The term "The Solar-Stellar Connection" has been coined to describe the solar-stellar synergisms in the investigation of the generation, emergence and coupling of magnetic fields with the outer solar-stellar atmosphere to produce what we broadly refer to as magnetic activity. With the discovery of literally thousands of planets beyond our solar system, the Solar-Stellar-Planet Connection is quickly emerging as a new area of investigation of the impacts of magnetic activity on exoplanet atmospheres. In parallel with this rapid evolution in our perspectives is the advent of transformative facilities for the study of the Sun and the dynamic Universe. The primary focus of this invited talk will be on photometric variations in solar-type stars and the Sun. These brightness variations are associated with thermal homogeneities typically defined by magnetic structures that are also spatially coincident with key radiative proxies. Photometric variability in solar-type stars and the Sun includes transient brightening, rotational modulation by cool spots and cycle-related variability, each with a characteristic signature in time and wavelength. The emphasis of this presentation will be on the relationship between broadband photometric variations and magnetic field-related activity in solar-type stars and the Sun. Facets of this topic will be discussed both retrospectively and prospectively as we enter a revolutionary, new era for astronomy.

  5. Planning for a brighter future: a review of sun protection and barriers to behavioral change in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadlani, Chicky; Orlow, Seth J

    2008-09-15

    Skin cancer is one of the most preventable groups of malignancies; however, skin cancer incidence continues to rise in the United States. The relationship between skin cancer and ultraviolet (UV) radiation is well known. Many interventions to prevent skin cancer by reducing exposure to UV radiation have been employed throughout the United States. Studies show an increase in knowledge and awareness regarding sun exposure and skin cancer. Unfortunately, sun protection interventions are slow at effecting behavioral change. In this review, we examine current barriers facing youth today in regards to sun protection practices, appropriate age groups to target for intervention, proposed methods of sun protection, the influence of role models in changing sun protective behavior, the stages of behavioral change, and characteristics and techniques of sun protection programs that can not only increase knowledge but actually elicit changes in sun protection behavior.

  6. Prototype of sun projector device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan; Dermawan, B.

    2016-11-01

    One way to introduce astronomy to public, including students, can be handled by solar observation. The widely held device for this purpose is coelostat and heliostat. Besides using filter attached to a device such as telescope, it is safest to use indirect way for observing the Sun. The main principle of the indirect way is deflecting the sun light and projecting image of the sun on a screen. We design and build a simple and low-cost astronomical device, serving as a supplement to increase public service, especially for solar observation. Without using any digital and intricate supporting equipment, people can watch and relish image of the Sun in comfortable condition, i.e. in a sheltered or shady place. Here we describe a design and features of our prototype of the device, which still, of course, has some limitations. In the future, this prototype can be improved for more efficient and useful applications.

  7. USING REALISTIC MHD SIMULATIONS FOR THE MODELING AND INTERPRETATION OF QUIET-SUN OBSERVATIONS WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitiashvili, I. N. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States); Couvidat, S. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lagg, A. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen, D-37077 (Germany)

    2015-07-20

    The solar atmosphere is extremely dynamic, and many important phenomena develop on small scales that are unresolved in observations with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. For correct calibration and interpretation of the observations, it is very important to investigate the effects of small-scale structures and dynamics on the HMI observables, such as Doppler shift, continuum intensity, spectral line depth, and width. We use 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and the atmosphere of the Sun, and a spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code to study observational characteristics of the Fe i 6173 Å line observed by HMI in quiet-Sun regions. We use the modeling results to investigate the sensitivity of the line Doppler shift to plasma velocity, and also sensitivities of the line parameters to plasma temperature and density, and determine effective line formation heights for observations of solar regions located at different distances from the disk center. These estimates are important for the interpretation of helioseismology measurements. In addition, we consider various center-to-limb effects, such as convective blueshift, variations of helioseismic travel-times, and the “concave” Sun effect, and show that the simulations can qualitatively reproduce the observed phenomena, indicating that these effects are related to a complex interaction of the solar dynamics and radiative transfer.

  8. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, T. A.; Jóhannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ-rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ-ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  9. CONCEPTUAL STEPS TOWARDS EXPLORING THE FUNDAMENTAL NATURE OF OUR SUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Grandpierre

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic questions of solar research is the nature of the Sun. We show here how the plasma nature of the Sun leads to the self-generation of solar activity. The release of magnetic, rotational, gravitational, nuclear energies and that of the gravity mode oscillations deviate from uniformity and spherical symmetry. Through instabilities they lead to the emergence of sporadic and localized regions like flux tubes, electric filaments, magnetic elements and high temperature regions. A systematic approach exploring the solar collective degrees of freedom, extending to ordering phenomena of the magnetic features related to Higgs fields, is presented. Handling solar activity as transformations of energies from one form to another one presents a picture on the network of the energy levels of the Sun, showing that the Sun is neither a mere "ball of gas" nor a "quiescent steady-state fusion-reactor machine", but a complex self-organizing system. Since complex self-organizing systems are similar to living systems (and, by some opinion, identical with them, we also consider what arguments indicate the living nature of the Sun. Thermodynamic characteristics of the inequilibrium Sun are found important in this respect and numerical estimations of free energy rate densities and specific exergies are derived.

  10. NEW SUNS IN THE COSMOS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Freitas, D. B.; Leao, I. C.; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Paz-Chinchon, F.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Alves, S.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-20

    The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on the rotation period and position in the period-T{sub eff} diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with a similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated with photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these ''New Sun'' candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of 14 CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun itself in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior are concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.

  11. Sun behaviour and personal UVR exposure among Europeans on short term holidays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Maier, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is known to be the main cause of skin cancer, the incidence of which is rising with national differences across Europe. With this observation study we aimed to determine the impact of nationality on sun behaviour and personal UVR exposure on sun and ski holidays....... 25 Danish and 20 Spanish sun-seekers were observed during a sun holiday in Spain, and 26 Danish and 27 Austrian skiers were observed during a ski holiday in Austria. The participants recorded their location and clothing in diaries. Personal time-logged UVR data were recorded as standard erythema...... doses (SEDs) by an electronic UVR dosimeter worn on the wrist. Danish sun-seekers were outdoors for significantly longer, received significant higher percentages of ambient UVR, and received greater accumulated UVR doses than Spanish sun-seekers. Danish skiers were also outdoors for significantly longer...

  12. Space Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R.

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses three kinds of space radiation, cosmic rays, Van Allen Belts, and solar plasma. Cosmic rays are penetrating particles that we cannot see, hear or feel, which come from distant stars. Van Allen Belts, named after their discoverer are great belts of protons and electrons that the earth has captured in its magnetic trap. Solar plasma is a gaseous, electrically neutral mixture of positive and negative ions that the sun spews out from convulsed regions on its surface.

  13. SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2014-05-01

    The 2014 SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book outlines the progress towards the goals outlined in the SunShot Vision Study. Contents include overviews of each of SunShot’s five subprogram areas, as well as a description of every active project in the SunShot’s project portfolio as of May 2014.

  14. Determination of total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for different shielding materials used in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida J, A. T. [FUNDACENTRO, Centro Regional de Minas Gerais, Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, 30180-100 Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S. [Center of Development of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santos, M. A. P., E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br [Regional Center for Nuclear Science / CNEN, 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this paper, the interaction of X-rays with some shielding materials has been studied for materials containing different amounts of barite and aggregates. The total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub t}) for three shielding materials has been calculated by using WinXCOM program in the energy range from RQR qualities (RQR-4, RQR-6, RQR-9, and RQR-10). They were: cream barite (density 2.99 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Sao Paulo), purple barite (density 2.95 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Bahia) and white barite (density 3.10 g/cm{sup 3} collected in the State of Paraiba). The chemical analysis was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer model EDX-720, through dispersive energy. The six elements of the higher concentration found in the sample and analyzed by Spectrophotometry of Energy Dispersive X-ray for the samples were Ba(60.9% - white barite), Ca(17,92% - cream barite), Ce(3,60% - white barite), Fe(17,16% - purple barite), S(12,11% - white barite) and Si(29,61% - purple barite). Also, the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and the effective electron density (N{sub eff}) were calculated using the values of the total mass attenuation coefficient. The dependence of these parameters on the incident photon energy and the chemical composition has been examined. (Author)

  15. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; Jaspers, R.; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H.R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M.Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Ecole Royale Militaire-B-1000 Brussels, Koninklijke Militaire School (Belgium)]|[Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH Association Euratom-KFA, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]|[Fusion Energy Research Program, Mechanical Engineering Division, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)]|[FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen Associatie FOM-EURATOM, Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [{ital Proceedings of the 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering} (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p. 470] is given. This regime is obtained under quasistationary conditions with edge neon seeding in a pumped limiter tokamak with circular cross section. It combines high confinement and high {beta} (up to a normalized beta, {beta}{sub n}=2) with low edge q values (down to q{sub a}=2.8) and high density even above the Greenwald limit together with dominant edge radiative heat exhaust, and therefore shows promise for the future of fusion research. Bulk and edge properties of these discharges are described, and a detailed account is given of the energy and particle confinement and their scaling. Energy confinement scales linearly with density as for the nonsaturated Ohmic Neo-Alcator scaling, but the usual degradation with total power remains. No deleterious effects of the neon seeding on fusion reactivity and plasma stability have been observed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Interstellar Clouds Near the Sun, III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Priscilla C.

    We propose to continue a study of interstellar sight-lines with low total column densities in order to determine the nature (temperature, density, fractional ionization) of the low density gas near the Sun and within the interior of the local superbubble. IUE data, combined with previous Copernicus observations, can be used to delimit the filling factor of nearby low density warm gas, and by default restrict the filling factor of 10^6 K plasma. In the proposed program, observations of MgI and ZnII(and in one region CIV) are combined with cloud maps and ground-based NaI observations (from a separate program) to restrict gas temperature, spatial and electron densities. The Welty et al. (1986) technique for removing fixed pattern noise through observations of a template star (used to flat-field the target stars on a pixel-by-pixel basis) is used to enable 3sigma absorption line detections at the 6-9 mA level, depending on the number of exposures involved. The ultimate goal of both the IUE and ground-based program is to map out the local interstellar medium. Apart from the intrinsic interest of this problem, it will help define regions where ultraviolet sources can be observed with FUSE/Lyman at lambda<912 A.

  17. Study of effects gamma radiation linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) injected; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao gama no polietileno linear de baixa densidade (PEBLD) injetado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ana Claudia Feitoza de

    2014-09-01

    The use of package sterilization through gamma radiation aim to reduce the microbiological contamination. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) can be obtained by a process in solution, suspension or gaseous phase, depending on the type of the catalyzer used, that can be heterogeneous, or homogeneous, or metallocenes Ziegler-Natta. According to the literature, the gamma radiation presents a high penetration at polymeric materials causing the appearing of scissions, reticulation, and degradation when oxygen presence. This paper were irradiated with {sup 60}Co with 2000 kCi of activity, in presence of air, samples of LLDPE injected. Utilized doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy, and about 5 kGy.h{sup -1} dose rates, at room temperature. After irradiation, the samples were heated for 60 min at 100 deg C to promote recombination and annihilation of residual radicals. For characterization of PEBLD were used methods; Melt flow index, swelling, gel fraction, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-Ray Diffraction (DRX), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), rheological measurements, Scanning Electronic Microscopy and mechanical tests to identify the effects or gamma radiation in polyethylene. (author)

  18. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratorie de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research Inc., Bethesda, Maryland 20824 (United States); Velikovich, A. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100 ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  19. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Safronova, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Esaulov, A. A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100 ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  20. The Sun and the Earth's Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haigh Joanna D.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in solar activity, at least as observed in numbers of sunspots, have been apparent since ancient times but to what extent solar variability may affect global climate has been far more controversial. The subject had been in and out of fashion for at least two centuries but the current need to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change has brought it again to the forefront of meteorological research. The absolute radiometers carried by satellites since the late 1970s have produced indisputable evidence that total solar irradiance varies systematically over the 11-year sunspot cycle, relegating to history the term “solar constant”, but it is difficult to explain how the apparent response to the Sun, seen in many climate records, can be brought about by these rather small changes in radiation. This article reviews some of the evidence for a solar influence on the lower atmosphere and discusses some of the mechanisms whereby the Sun may produce more significant impacts than might be surmised from a consideration only of variations in total solar irradiance.

  1. Promoting sun safety among zoo visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, J A; Lewis, E C; Eckhardt, L; Slymen, D; Belch, G; Elder, J; Engelberg, M; Eichenfield, L; Achter, A; Nichols, T; Walker, K; Kwon, H; Talosig, M; Gearen, C

    2001-09-01

    Each year, millions of children visit zoological parks, where they are exposed to long bouts of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We conducted a study in the winter and replicated it in the summer to evaluate an intervention for reducing UVR exposure during the zoo visit. Each study used a nonequivalent control group design: one zoological site received the intervention and a second received evaluation only. Key outcome measures consisted of observed prevalence of hat use by exiting children (N = 8,721 and 8,524, respectively, in winter and summer studies) and purchase rates of sunscreen and hats in zoo gift shops. Intervention consisted of tip sheets for parents, children's activities, prompts, and discounts off the price of sunscreen and sun-protective hats. In the summer study, sales of both sunscreen and target hats increased significantly at the intervention site relative to the control site, whereas in the winter study, only sunscreen sales at the intervention site had a significant (relative) increase. Children's hat use increased significantly at the intervention site, but only in the winter study. The multicomponent program was effective in promoting purchases of sun-safe items, but its impact on children's hat use was inconclusive. Copyright 2001 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

  2. NASA's Space Radiation Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shelley Canright; 陈功

    2004-01-01

    @@ Imagine a human spacecraft crew voyaging through space. A satellite sends a warning; energetic particles are being accelerated from the Sun's corona①,sending dangerous radiation toward the spacecraft, but the crewmembers aren't worried. Long before their journey, researchers on Earth conducted experiments to accurately measure the hazards of space radiation and developed new materials and countermeasures to protect them.

  3. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2009-01-01

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

  4. Crosslinking of high density polyethylene under electron beam radiation%高密度聚乙烯电子束辐射交联的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟伟涛; 苑会林

    2011-01-01

    The authors studied the radiation crosslinking of high density polyethylene(HDPE) containing sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate(PETA) and antioxidant 4,4'-thiobis(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol) under high energy electron beam. The influences of radiation dose and mass contents of the sensitizer and antioxidant on the crosslinked HDPE were determined through testing crosslinking degree, tensile strength and tangential breaking strength of the samples. The crystallizability and heat stability of the crosslinked HDPE was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) and thermogravimetry(TG). PETA and radiation dose played key roles in increasing the crosslinking degree of HDPE, which could reach 63% with a rather low radiation dose like 13 kGy under the action of PETA.%用高能电子束辐射技术研究了添加敏化剂季戊四醇三丙烯酸酯(PETA)和抗氧剂300的高密度聚乙烯(HDPE)体系的辐射交联效应.通过测定试样辐射后交联度、拉伸强度、直角撕裂强度等性能,考察了辐射剂量、w(PETA)和 w(300)对 HDPE辐射交联的影响;并用差示扫描量热法和热重分析研究了HDPE辐射后的结晶性和热稳定性.PETA和辐射剂量对提高HDPE辐射交联度起关键作用.在PETA作用下,13 kGy的低辐射剂量可使HDPE的交联度达63%.

  5. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  6. Monitoring Holes in the Sun's Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Coronal holes are where the fast solar wind streams out of the Suns atmosphere, sending charged particles on rapid trajectories out into the solar system. A new study examines how the distribution of coronal holes has changed over the last 40 years.Coronal holes form where magnetic field lines open into space (B) instead of looping back to the solar surface (A). [Sebman81]Source of the Fast Solar WindAs a part of the Suns natural activity cycle, extremely low-density regions sometimes form in the solar corona. These coronal holes manifest themselves as dark patches in X-ray and extreme ultraviolet imaging, since the corona is much hotter than the solar surface that peeks through from underneath it.Coronal holes form when magnetic field lines open into space instead of looping back to the solar surface. In these regions, the solar atmosphere escapes via these field lines, rapidly streaming away from the Suns surface in whats known as the fast solar wind.Coronal Holes Over Space and TimeAutomated detection of coronal holes from image-based analysis is notoriously difficult. Recently, a team of scientists led by Kenichi Fujiki (ISEE, Nagoya University, Japan) has developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes that relies instead on magnetic-field data for the Sun, obtained at the National Solar Observatorys Kitt Peak between 1975 and 2014. The team used these data to produce a database of 3335 coronal hole predictions over nearly 40 years.Latitude distribution of 2870 coronal holes (each marked by an x; color indicates polarity), overlaid on the magnetic butterfly map of the Sun. The low-latitude coronal holes display a similar butterfly pattern, in which they move closer to the equator over the course of the solar cycle. Polar coronal holes are more frequent during solar minima. [Fujiki et al. 2016]Examining trends in the coronal holes distribution in latitude and time, Fujiki and collaborators find a strong correlation between the total area covered

  7. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  8. Was Lepenski Vir an ancient Sun or Pleiades observatory?

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan; Krmar, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider some old hypotheses according to which remarkable mesolithic village Lepenski Vir (9500 -- 5500 BC) at the right (nearly west) Danube riverside in the Iron gate in Serbia was an ancient (one of the oldest) Sun observatory. We use method recently suggested by A. C. Sparavigna, concretely we use "freely available software" or local Sun radiation direction simulation computer programs. In this way we obtain and discuss pictures of the sunrise in the Lepenski Vir during winter and summer solstice and spring and autumn equinox in relation to position of the mountains, especially Treskavac (Trescovat) and Kukuvija at left (nearly east) Danube riverside (in Romania). While mountain Kukuvija represents really the marker for the Sun in date of the winter solstice, mountain Treskavac, in despite to usual opinions, does not represent a real marker for the Sun in date of the summer solstice. Sun rises behind Treskavac, roughly speaking, between 22.April and 1. May. It corresponds to year period w...

  9. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Lambert, Jonathan [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Parker, Joel [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  10. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  11. The Quest to Understand Supergranulation and Large-Scale Convection in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2014-01-01

    Surface granulation of the Sun is primarily a consequence of thermal transport in the outer 1 % of the radius. Its typical scale of about 1 - 2 Mm is set by the balance between convection, free-streaming radiation, and the strong density stratification in the surface layers. The physics of granulation is well understood, as demonstrated by the close agreement between numerical simulation, theory, and observation. Superimposed on the energetic granular structure comprising high-speed flows, are larger scale long-lived flow systems (~ 300 m/s) called supergranules. Supergranulation has a typical scale of 24 - 36 Mm. It is not clear if supergranulation results from the interaction of granules or is causally linked to deep convection or a consequence of magneto-convection. Other outstanding questions remain: how deep are supergranules? How do they participate in global dynamics of the Sun? Further challenges are posed by our lack of insight into the dynamics of larger scales in the deep convection region. Recent ...

  12. Stochastic microhertz gravitational radiation from stellar convection

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, M F

    2014-01-01

    High-Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at $S(f_\\mathrm{peak}) = 5.2 \\times 10^{-52}$ Hz$^{-1}$ at frequency $f_\\mathrm{peak} = 2.3 \\times 10^{-7}$ Hz. However, at low observing frequencies $f < 3 \\times 10^{-4}$ Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to $S_\\mathrm{near}(f_\\mathrm{peak}) = 4.1 \\times 10^{-27}$ Hz$^{-1}$ because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance ($\\propto ...

  13. Day the sun went out

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A new british sci-fi movie envisages the death of the sun not in billions of years, but in decades. And, amazingly, the film's scientific adviser says this may not be so far from the truth..." (1/2 page)

  14. Effects of Early Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be harmful. It can lead to:Skin changes. Some skin cells with melanin can form a clump. This creates freckles and moles. Over time, these can develop cancer.Early aging. Time spent in the sun makes your skin age faster than normal. Signs of this are wrinkled, tight, or leathery ...

  15. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  16. How Bright Is the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  17. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  18. THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD CLOSE TO THE SUN. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, P. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Andersson, B-G [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, M.S. N232-12 Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku (Finland); DeMajistre, R. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States); Funsten, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B. [Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Schwadron, N. A. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Slavin, J. D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Wiktorowicz, S. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    ordered component and standard relations between polarization, color excess, and H{sup o} column density predict a reasonable increase of N(H) with distance in the local ISM. The similarity of the ISMF directions traced by the polarizations, the IBEX Ribbon, and pulsars inside the Local Bubble in the third galactic quadrant suggest that the ISMF is relatively uniform over spatial scales of 8-200 pc and is more similar to interarm than spiral-arm magnetic fields. The ISMF direction from the polarization data is also consistent with small-scale spatial asymmetries detected in GeV-TeV cosmic rays with a galactic origin. The peculiar geometrical relation found earlier between the cosmic microwave background dipole moment, the heliosphere nose, and the ISMF direction is supported by this study. The interstellar radiation field at {approx}975 A does not appear to play a role in grain alignment for the low-density ISM studied here.

  19. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — I: The Journey to a Gaseous Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available History has the power to expose the origin and evolution of scientific ideas. How did humanity come to visualize the Sun as a gaseous plasma? Why is its interior thought to contain blackbody radiation? Who were the first people to postulate that the density of the solar body varied greatly with depth? When did mankind first conceive that the solar surface was merely an illusion? What were the foundations of such thoughts? In this regard, a detailed review of the Sun’s thermodynamic history provides both a necessary exposition of the circumstance which accompanied the acceptance of the gaseous mod- els and a sound basis for discussing modern solar theories. It also becomes an invitation to reconsider the phase of the photosphere. As such, in this work, the contributions of Pierre Simon Laplace, Alexander Wilson, William Herschel, Hermann von Helmholtz, Herbert Spencer, Richard Christopher Carrington, John Frederick William Herschel, Father Pietro Angelo Secchi, Herv ́ e August Etienne Albans Faye, Edward Frankland, Joseph Norman Lockyer, Warren de la Rue, Balfour Stewart, Benjamin Loewy, and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, relative to the evolution of modern stellar models, will be discussed. Six great pillars created a gaseous Sun: 1 Laplace’s Nebular Hypothesis, 2 Helmholtz’ contraction theory of energy production, 3 Andrew’s elucidation of crit- ical temperatures, 4 Kirchhoff’s formulation of his law of thermal emission, 5 Pl ̈ ucker and Hittorf’s discovery of pressure broadening in gases, and 6 the evolution of the stel- lar equations of state. As these are reviewed, this work will venture to highlight not only the genesis of these revolutionary ideas, but also the forces which drove great men to advance a gaseous Sun.

  20. Chemistry, sun, energy and environment; Chimie, soleil, energie et environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchy, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Industries Chimiques (ENSIC), 54 - Villers-les-Nancy (France); Enea, O. [Poitiers Univ., 86 (France); Flamant, G. [IMP-Odeillo-CNRS (France)] (and others)

    2000-07-01

    This document provides the 35 papers presented at the 'Chemistry, Sun, Energy and Environment' meeting, held February 3-4, 2000 in Saint-Avold, France. The main studied topic was the use of solar radiation for water treatment, volatile organic compounds decomposition and in some thermochemical processes. These research subjects are tackled in a fundamental and practical point of view. (O.M.)

  1. Transmissividade a radiação solar do polietileno de baixa densidade utilizado em estufas Solar radiation transmissivity through low density polyethylene used in greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Adeli Buriol

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se a transmissividade à radiação solar do polietileno de baixa densidade utilizado em estufas. O experimento foi conduzido em uma estufa tipo Capela com dimensões de 10m x 25m, coberta com polietileno transparente de baixa densidade, com espessura de 100µm e aditivado com anti-UV, instalada no Departamento de Fitotecnia da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS - Brasil. A radiação solar global diária incidente no interior e exterior da estufa foi medida no período de julho de 1991 a janeiro de 1992 e também a fração difusa da radiação solar em dias com diferentes condições atmosféricas e de condensação no filme plástico durante o período de maio a julho de 1993. A transmissividade média da radiação solar global foi de 56,2% nas primeiras horas do dia e de 81,3% nas horas próximas ao meio-dia. A fração difusa da radiação solar global foi mais elevada no interior da estufa do que no exterior, evidenciando o efeito dispersante do plástico e da condensação do vapor d'água na superfície interna do filme.The transmissivity of the solar radiation by polyethylene cover used in plastic greenhouses was evaluated in the Central Region of the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The study was carried out inside a 10m x 25m greenhouse covered with low density transparent polyethylene with 100µm thickness, located at Federal University of Santa Maria. Incoming global solar radiation inside and outside was measured daily dunng July, 1991 to January, 1992. The effect of polyethylene cover on diffuse solar radiation was determined dunng 1993 year. The average transmissivity of global solar radiation was 56.2% early in the moming and 81.3% at near noonday. Diffuse solar radiation proportion was higher inside than outside the greenhouse and enhanced when water condenses on the inner surface of the film.

  2. Effect of voltage shape of electrical power supply on radiation and density of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sohbatzadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated generating argon cold plasma jet at atmospheric pressure based on dielectric barrier discharge configuration using three electrical power supplies of sinusoidal, pulsed and saw tooth high voltage shapes at 8 KHZ. At first; we describe the electronic circuit features for generating high voltage (HV wave forms including saw tooth, sinusoidal and pulsed forms. Then, we consider the effect of voltage shape on the electrical breakdown. Relative concentrations of chemical reactive species such as Oxygen, atomic Nitrogen and OH were measured using optical emission spectroscopy. Using a simple numerical model, we showed a HV with less rise time increases electron density, therefore a cold plasma jet can be produced with a minimal consumption electrical power

  3. Low-frequency heliographic observations of the quiet Sun corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results of heliographic observations of quiet-Sun radio emission fulfilled by the UTR-2 radio telescope. The solar corona investigations have been made close to the last solar minimum (Cycle 23) in the late August and early September of 2010 by means of the two-dimensional heliograph within 16.5-33 MHz. Moreover, the UTR-2 radio telescope was used also as an 1-D heliograph for one-dimensional scanning of the Sun at the beginning of September 2010 as well as in short-time observational campaigns in April and August of 2012. The average values of integral flux density of the undisturbed Sun continuum emission at different frequencies have been found. Using the data, we have determined the spectral index of quiet-Sun radio emission in the range 16.5-200 MHz. It is equal to -2.1±0.1. The brightness distribution maps of outer solar corona at frequencies 20.0 MHz and 26.0 MHz have been obtained. The angular sizes of radio Sun were estimated. It is found that the solar corona at these frequencies is stretched-out along equatorial direction. The coefficient of corona ellipticity varies slightly during above period. Its mean magnitudes are equal to ≈ 0.75 and ≈ 0.73 at 20.0 MHz and 26.0 MHz, respectively. The presented results for continuum emission of solar corona conform with being ones at higher frequencies.

  4. Radiation graft copolymerization of butyl methacrylate and acrylamide onto low density polyethylene and polypropylene films, and its application in wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Ghaffar, A. M.; El-Arnaouty, M. B.; Aboulfotouh, Maysara E.; Taher, N. H.; Taha, Ahmed A.

    2014-09-01

    Butyl methacrylate and acrylamide (BMA/AAm) comonomers were grafted onto low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polypropylene (PP) films using the mutual gamma radiation grafting technique. The influences of grafting conditions such as solvent, monomer concentration, monomer composition, and irradiation dose on the grafting yield were determined. It was found that using dimethyl formamide as a solvent enhanced the copolymerization process. The grafting yield increases as the comonomer concentration increases up to 60%. Also it was found that the degree of grafting of BMA/AAm onto both LDPE and PP films increases as the AAm content increases till an optimum value at 50:50 wt%. The grafting yield of the comonomers was found to increase with increase in the radiation dose. It was observed that the degree of grafting of polyethylene films is higher than that of polypropylene (PP) films at the same conditions. Some selected properties of the graft copolymers, such as water uptake and thermal properties, were determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology and structure of the grafted films were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, infra-red, and X-ray diffraction. Improvement in such properties of the prepared copolymers was observed which offers possible uses in some practical applications such as the removal of some heavy metals from wastewater. It was found that the maximum metal uptake by the copolymer followed the order Cu2+>Co2+>Ni2+ ions.

  5. Interstellar Dust Close to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Priscilla C

    2012-01-01

    The low density interstellar medium (ISM) close to the Sun and inside of the heliosphere provides a unique laboratory for studying interstellar dust grains. Grain characteristics in the nearby ISM are obtained from observations of interstellar gas and dust inside of the heliosphere and the interstellar gas towards nearby stars. Comparison between the gas composition and solar abundances suggests that grains are dominated by olivines and possibly some form of iron oxide. Measurements of the interstellar Ne/O ratio by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer spacecraft indicate that a high fraction of interstellar oxygen in the ISM must be depleted onto dust grains. Local interstellar abundances are consistent with grain destruction in ~150 km/s interstellar shocks, provided that the carbonaceous component is hydrogenated amorphous carbon and carbon abundances are correct. Variations in relative abundances of refractories in gas suggest variations in the history of grain destruction in nearby ISM. The large observed ...

  6. Could Ultracool Dwarfs Have Sun-Like Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Solar-like stars exhibit magnetic cycles; our Sun, for instance, displays an 11-year period in its activity, manifesting as cyclic changes in radiation levels, the number of sunspots and flares, and ejection of solar material. Over the span of two activity cycles, the Suns magnetic field flips polarity and then returns to its original state.An artists illustration comparing the Sun to TRAPPIST-1, an ultracool dwarf star known to host several planets. [ESO]But what about the magnetic behavior of objects near the cooler end of the stellar main sequence do they exhibit similar activity cycles?Effects of a Convecting InteriorDwarf stars have made headlines in recent years due to their potential to harbor exoplanets. Because these cooler stars have lower flux levels compared to the Sun, their habitable zones lie much closer to the stars. The magnetic behavior of these stars is therefore important to understand: could ultracool dwarfs exhibit solar-like activity cycles that would affect planets with close orbits?The differences in internal structure between different mass stars. Ultracool dwarfs have fully convective interiors. [www.sun.org]Theres a major difference between ultracool dwarfs (stars of spectral type higher than M7 and brown dwarfs) and Sun-like stars: their internal structures. Sun-like stars have a convective envelope that surrounds a radiative core. The interiors of cool, low-mass objects, on the other hand, are fully convective.Based on theoretical studies of how magnetism is generated in stars, its thought that the fully convective interiors of ultracool dwarfs cant support large-scale magnetic field formation. This should prevent these stars from exhibiting activity cycles like the Sun. But recent radio observations of dwarf stars have led scientist Matthew Route (ITaP Research Computing, Purdue University) to question these models.A Reversing Field?During observations of the brown dwarf star J1047+21 in 20102011, radio flares were detected with

  7. Patrol of the short wavelength activity and flares of Sun as star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, I.; Avakyan, S.; Leonov, N.; Serova, A.; Voronin, N.

    Monitoring of the spectral range which most affects solar-terrestrial relationship - soft X-ray and extreme UV-radiations allows to solve ? problem of solar activity influence on all aspects of the Sun - Earth ties and to select the most important precursors of solar flares and the solar events related with a flare (such as proton events, high-velocity plasma streams in the solar wind, shock waves, coronal mass ejection and, the most important, the beginning of principal magnetic storms). Solar activity is constantly monitored at present (in the USA) only in two sections of the spectrum of ionizing radiation: 115 (119) nm. However, so far there has been no monitoring of the flux in the most geoeffective region of the spectrum (0.8-115 nm) from the entire disk of the sun; this region completely monitors the main part of the ionosphere of the earth and the ionosphere of the other planets of the solar system, including the formation and status of the main ionospheric maxima. This occurs solely because of technical and methodological difficulties in performing the measurements and calibration in this spectral range on spacecraft, because it is necessity to use only windowless optics. At the present the solar the optical - electronic equipment (OEE) is testing and there are plans to launch OEE of Space Solar Patrol (SSP) consisting of solar radiometers and spectrometers at the Russian Module of the International Space Station. So the solving the problem of the permanent monitoring-patrol of ionizing radiation from the full disk of the Sun appears in the main tasks of fundamental scientific studies in space. The results of this monitoring can be contribution in development of simultaneous studies in several sciences, such as: - solar astrophysics (state of all solar atmospheric regions), - meteorology, physics of atmosphere (the influence of solar activity on global changes, climate and weather including the effects of atmo s pheric electricity), - aeronomy, astronautics

  8. The modified high-density survival assay is the useful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Mori, Miyuki; Oikawa, Toshiyuki; Shimura, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Yosuke; Mori, Shiro; Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    The high-density survival (HDS) assay was originally elaborated to assess cancer cell responses to therapeutic agents under the influence of intercellular communication. Here, we simplified the original HDS assay and studied its applicability for the detection of cellular radioresistance. We have recently defined clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells, which continue to proliferate with daily exposure to 2 gray (Gy) of X-rays for more than 30 days in vitro. We established human CRR cell lines, HepG2-8960-R from HepG2, and SAS-R1 and -R2 from SAS, respectively. In an attempt to apply the HDS assay to detect radioresistance with clinical relevance, we simplified the original HDS assay by scoring the total number of surviving cells after exposure to X-rays. The modified HDS assay successfully detected radioresistance with clinical relevance. The modified HDS assay detected CRR phenotype, which is not always detectable by clonogenic assay. Therefore, we believe that the modified HDS assay presented in this study is a powerful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy against malignant tumors.

  9. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  10. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  11. What the Sun Has Taught Us About Basic Properties of Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Sarbani [Yale University

    2012-03-07

    The Sun is an immensely large object formed out of many tons of gas. Yet the Sun can help us learn about some of the basic properties of matter. The structure of the Sun is governed not only by macrophysics such as hydrostatic equilibrium, convective and radiative heat transport, but also by microphysics such as nuclear reaction rates and the equation of state of the material that forms the Sun. Knowledge of the detailed structure of the Sun can therefore help us constrain the basic properties of matter. Helioseismology, the study of solar pulsations, has given us the means to get a detailed picture of the solar interior. In this talk I shall discuss how helioseismology has allowed us to determine details of solar structure, and in turn allowing us to study basic properties of matter.

  12. Caddo Sun Accounts across Time and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerona, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Billy Day, a Tunica/Biloxi, recently described the significance of the sun for Caddoan people. Day quoted an "old Caddo relative" of his who said: "I used to go outside and hold my hands up and bless myself with the sun--'a'hat.' Well, I can't do that anymore because they say we are sun worshipers. We didn't worship the sun. We worshiped what was…

  13. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  14. Total eclipses of the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirker, J B

    1980-12-19

    Total eclipses of the sun offer research opportunities in a variety of sciences. Some of the advances in solar physics resulting from eclipse observations are discussed. Experiments at the total eclipse of 16 February 1980 in India are also described. These included a test of general relativity, studies in coronal physics, investigations of solar prominences, diameter measurements, a search for interplanetary dust, a study of the gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere, and experiments on the biological effects on animals and humans.

  15. Revisiting SU(N) integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuber, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this note, I revisit integrals over $\\SU(N)$ of the form $ \\int DU\\, U_{i_1j_1}\\cdots U_{i_pj_p}\\Ud_{k_1l_1}\\cdots \\Ud_{k_nl_n}$. While the case $p=n$ is well known, it seems that explicit expressions for $p=n+N$ had not appeared in the literature. Similarities and differences, in particular in the large $N$ limit, between the two cases are discussed

  16. Coherent States with SU(N) Charges

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, M; Mathur, Manu; Paul, Samir K.

    2003-01-01

    We define coherent states carrying SU(N) charges by exploiting generalized Schwinger boson representation of SU(N) Lie algebra. These coherent states are defined on $2 (2^{N - 1} - 1)$ complex planes. They satisfy continuity property and provide resolution of identity. We also exploit this technique to construct the corresponding non-linear SU(N) coherent states.

  17. The Sun A User's Manual

    CERN Document Server

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The Sun is an account of the many ways in which our nearest star affects our planet, how its influence has changed over the last few centuries and millennia, and the extent to which we can predict its future impact. The Sun's rays foster the formation of Vitamin D by our bodies, but it can also promote skin cancer, cataracts, and mutations in our DNA. Besides providing the warmth and light essential to most animal and plant life, solar energy contributes substantially to global warming. Although the charged particles of the solar wind shield us from harmful cosmic rays, solar storms may damage artificial satellites and cripple communication systems and computer networks. The Sun is the ideal renewable energy source, but its exploitation is still bedevilled by the problems of storage and distribution. Our nearest star, in short, is a complex machine which needs to be treated with caution, and this book will equip every reader with the knowledge that is required to understand the benefits and dangers it can bri...

  18. The faint young Sun problem

    CERN Document Server

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    For more than four decades, scientists have been trying to find an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in paleoclimatology, the `faint young Sun problem'. For the early Earth, models of stellar evolution predict a solar energy input to the climate system which is about 25% lower than today. This would result in a completely frozen world over the first two billion years in the history of our planet, if all other parameters controlling Earth's climate had been the same. Yet there is ample evidence for the presence of liquid surface water and even life in the Archean (3.8 to 2.5 billion years before present), so some effect (or effects) must have been compensating for the faint young Sun. A wide range of possible solutions have been suggested and explored during the last four decades, with most studies focusing on higher concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane or ammonia. All of these solutions present considerable difficulties, however, so the faint young Sun prob...

  19. New technique for a simultaneous estimation of the level density and radiative strength functions of dipole transitions at E sub e sub x<=B sub n -0.5 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khitrov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The new, model-independent method to estimate simultaneously the level densities excited in the (n,gamma) reaction and the radiative strength functions of dipole transitions is developed. The method can be applied for any nucleus and reaction followed by cascade gamma-emission. It is just necessary to measure the intensities of two-step gamma-cascades depopulating one or several high-excited states and determine the quanta ordering in the main portion of the observed cascades. The method provides a sufficiently narrow interval of most probable densities of levels with given J suppi and radiative strength functions of dipole transitions populating them.

  20. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lugaz, Noe [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  1. Local Adaptation of Sun-Exposure-Dependent Gene Expression Regulation in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Ryosuke; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    Sun-exposure is a key environmental variable in the study of human evolution. Several skin-pigmentation genes serve as classical examples of positive selection, suggesting that sun-exposure has significantly shaped worldwide genomic variation. Here we investigate the interaction between genetic variation and sun-exposure, and how this impacts gene expression regulation. Using RNA-Seq data from 607 human skin samples, we identified thousands of transcripts that are differentially expressed between sun-exposed skin and non-sun-exposed skin. We then tested whether genetic variants may influence each individual’s gene expression response to sun-exposure. Our analysis revealed 10 sun-exposure-dependent gene expression quantitative trait loci (se-eQTLs), including genes involved in skin pigmentation (SLC45A2) and epidermal differentiation (RASSF9). The allele frequencies of the RASSF9 se-eQTL across diverse populations correlate with the magnitude of solar radiation experienced by these populations, suggesting local adaptation to varying levels of sunlight. These results provide the first examples of sun-exposure-dependent regulatory variation and suggest that this variation has contributed to recent human adaptation. PMID:27760139

  2. Program Calculates Current Densities Of Electronic Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian

    1996-01-01

    PDENSITY computer program calculates current densities for use in calculating power densities of electronic designs. Reads parts-list file for given design, file containing current required for each part, and file containing size of each part. For each part in design, program calculates current density in units of milliamperes per square inch. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Sun version of program (NPO-19588). PC version of program (NPO-19171).

  3. Micro technology based sun sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Pedersen, Martin; Fléron, René

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing interest among universities in the scientific and educational possibilities of picosatellites base on the CubeSat 5 concept. Due to sever mass and dimension constraints place on this type of satellites, new approaches and ideas regarding different systems arises to accommodate...... DTUsat sun sensors are needed along with a magnetometer to obtain unambiguous attitude determination for the ACDS and the payloads - an electrodynamic tether and a camera. The accuracy needed was not obtainable by employing conventional attitude sensors. Hence a linear slit sensor was designed...

  4. Gamma radiation effects on the polymers used as ion exchange resin imobilizers: Part I - properties of the low density polyethylene (LDPE); Efeito da radiacao gama em polimeros usados como imobilizadores de resinas de troca ionica. Parte 1: Propriedades do PEBD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Daniel Liu Chun; Riella, Humberto G. [Coordenadoria para Projetos Especiais (COPESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Guedes, Selma M.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-04-01

    In this work tests were realized to evaluate properties such as: density, Shore D hardness, tensile strength and rupture elongation of low density polyethylene (LDPE), which is used as resin solidification agent, in function of irradiation dose and ion exchange resin concentration incorporated. It also was observed LDPE color change, due to interaction between polymer and gamma radiation. The results showed the occurrence of phenyl radical formation, deriving from amine aromatic additive, introduced by polymer producer, which is responsible by color change. Up to studied dose of 5 MGy, the aromatic chain presence gave to LDPE the good resistance to radiation. Resin concentration provoked more variation on properties than radiation effect. It was possible to incorporate up to 60% wt of resin, resulting high reduction of final volume. (author) 13 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  6. Seismology of the Wounded Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Cally, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Active regions are open wounds in the Sun's surface. Seismic oscillations from the interior pass through them into the atmosphere, changing their nature in the process to fast and slow magneto-acoustic waves. The fast waves then partially reflect and partially mode convert to upgoing and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves. The reflected fast and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves then re-enter the interior through the active regions that spawned them, infecting the surface seismology with signatures of the atmosphere. Using numerical simulations of waves in uniform magnetic fields, we calculate the upward acoustic and Alfv\\'enic losses in the atmosphere as functions of field inclination and wave orientation as well as the Time-Distance `travel time' perturbations, and show that they are related. Travel time perturbations relative to quiet Sun can exceed 40 seconds in 1 kG magnetic field. It is concluded that active region seismology is indeed significantly infected by waves leaving and re-entering the interior through magnetic w...

  7. The Sun's New Exotic Neighbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, an international team of researchers [1] discovered a brown dwarf belonging to the 24th closest stellar system to the Sun. Brown dwarfs are intermediate objects that are neither stars nor planets. This object is the third closest brown dwarf to the Earth yet discovered, and one of the coolest, having a temperature of about 750 degrees Celsius. It orbits a very small star at about 4.5 times the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Its mass is estimated to be somewhere between 9 and 65 times the mass of Jupiter. At a time when astronomers are peering into the most distant Universe, looking at objects as far as 13 billion light-years away, one may think that our close neighbourhood would be very well known. Not so. Astronomers still find new star-like objects in our immediate vicinity. Using ESO's VLT, they just discovered a brown dwarf companion to the red star SCR 1845-6357, the 36th closest star to the Sun. ESO PR Photo 11/06 ESO PR Photo 11a/06 New Brown Dwarf in the Solar Neighbourhood (Artist's Impression) "This newly found brown dwarf is a valuable object because its distance is well known, allowing us to determine with precision its intrinsic brightness", said team member Markus Kasper (ESO). "Moreover, from its orbital motion, we should be able in a few years to estimate its mass. These properties are vital for understanding the nature of brown dwarfs." To discover this brown dwarf, the team used the high-contrast adaptive optics NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI [2]) on ESO's Very Large Telescope, an instrument specifically developed to search for extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. In particular, the SDI camera provides additional, often very useful spectral information which can be used to determine a rough temperature for the object without follow

  8. Effects of density distribution of scattering media on radiation transfer. Case of growing frost layer; Fukusha denpa ni ataeru sanransei baitai no mitsudo bunpu no eikyo. Seicho kateini aru shimoso no baai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, A.; Washio, S. [Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Haida, T. [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Matsumoto, E. [Oji Paper Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-25

    The main interest was taken in the effects of the density distribution on the radiation transfer in the scattering media. The frost layer in the early growth stage under the control of diffusion was chosen as the media. Numerical analysis of the radiation transfer was carried out by using a modified Monte Carlo method on the basis of the geometrical optics. A diffusion limited aggregation theory was introduced to simulate the growth of frost layer with treelike structure. The relation between the density distribution and the transmittance of the simulated model was made clear by the numerical analysis. On the basis of its result, the optical measurements in the visible wavelength region were utilized to evaluate the density distribution in the frost layer, which varied with the cooling condition, from the transmittance values. (author)

  9. Radiation Transport of Heliospheric Lyman-alpha from Combined Cassini and Voyager Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, W.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Sandel, B.; Forrester, T.; Quemerais, E.; Moebius, E.; Esposito, L.; Stewart, I.; McClintock, W.; Jouchoux, A.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Heliospheric neutral hydrogen scatters solar Lyman-alpha radiation from the Sun with '27-day' intensity modulations observed near Earth due to the Sun's rotation combined with Earth's orbital motion. These modulations are increasingly damped in amplitude at larger distances from the Sun due to multiple scattering in the heliosphere, providing a diagnostic of the interplanetary neutral hydrogen density independent of instrument calibration. This paper presents Cassini data from 2003-2004 obtained downwind near Saturn at approximately 10 AU that at times show undamped '27-day' waves in good agreement with the single-scattering models of Pryor et al., 1992. Simultaneous Voyager 1 data from 2003- 2004 obtained upwind at a distance of 88.8-92.6 AU from the Sun show waves damped by a factor of -0.21. The observed degree of damping is interpreted in terms of Monte Carlo multiple-scattering calculations (e.g., Keller et al., 1981) applied to two heliospheric hydrogen two-shock density distributions (discussed in Gangopadhyay et al., 2006) calculated in the frame of the Baranov-Malama model of the solar wind interaction with the two-component (neutral hydrogen and plasma) interstellar wind (Baranov and Malama 1993, Izmodenov et al., 2001, Baranov and Izmodenov, 2006). We conclude that multiple scattering is definitely occurring in the outer heliosphere. Both models compare favorably to the data, using heliospheric neutral H densities at the termination shock of 0.085 cm(exp -3) and 0.095 cm(exp -3). This work generally agrees with earlier discussions of Voyager data in Quemerais et al., 1996 showing the importance of multiple scattering but is based on Voyager data obtained at larger distances from the Sun (with larger damping) simultaneously with Cassini data obtained closer to the Sun.

  10. Effects of solar radiation on the orbits of small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A modification of the Robertson (1937) equations of particle motion in the presence of solar radiation is developed which allows for partial reflection of sunlight as a result of rapid and varying particle rotations caused by interaction with the solar wind. The coefficients and forces in earlier forms of the equations are compared with those in the present equations, and secular rates of change of particle orbital elements are determined. Orbital dimensions are calculated in terms of time, probable sizes and densities of meteoric and cometary particles are estimated, and times of infall to the sun are computed for a particle moving in an almost circular orbit and a particle moving in an elliptical orbit of high eccentricity. Changes in orbital elements are also determined for particles from a long-period sun-grazing comet. The results show that the time of infall to the sun from a highly eccentric orbit is substantially shorter than from a circular orbit with a radius equal to the mean distance in the eccentric orbit. The possibility is considered that the free orbital kinetic energy of particles drawn into the sun may be the energy source for the solar corona.

  11. Life under a black sun

    CERN Document Server

    Opatrný, Tomáš; Bakala, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Life is dependent on the income of energy with low entropy and the disposal of energy with high entropy. On Earth, the low-entropy energy is provided by solar radiation and the high-entropy energy is disposed as infrared radiation emitted into the cold space. Here we turn the situation around and assume cosmic background radiation as the low-entropy source of energy for a planet orbiting a black hole into which the high-entropy energy is disposed. We estimate the power that can be produced by thermodynamic processes on such a planet, with a particular interest in planets orbiting a fast rotating Kerr black hole as in the science fiction movie {\\em Interstellar}. We also briefly discuss a reverse Dyson sphere absorbing cosmic background radiation from the outside and dumping waste energy to a black hole inside.

  12. Life under a black sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, Tomáš; Richterek, Lukáš; Bakala, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Life is dependent on the income of energy with low entropy and the disposal of energy with high entropy. On Earth, the low-entropy energy is provided by solar radiation and the high-entropy energy is disposed of as infrared radiation emitted into cold space. Here, we turn the situation around and imagine the cosmic background radiation as the low-entropy source of energy for a planet orbiting a black hole into which the high-entropy energy is expelled. We estimate the power that can be produced by thermodynamic processes on such a planet, with a particular interest in planets orbiting a fast rotating Kerr black hole as in the science fiction movie Interstellar. We also briefly discuss a reverse Dyson sphere absorbing cosmic background radiation from the outside and dumping waste energy to a black hole inside.

  13. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 Wm-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth being at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduce the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a~forcing of +25 Wm-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 ...

  14. Here comes the sun...; Here comes the sun...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Robert [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    It sounds a bit strange that you can use solar energy to maintain or refrigerate products or spaces below the ambient temperature, because we know that something that makes the sun is heating; but yes indeed, the sun can produce cold, and in addition without polluting, and without consuming conventional energy. In this document are mentioned the various research projects on solar cooling that have been made in the Energy Research Center at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico such as the thermo-chemical intermittent refrigerator, the geothermal cooling demonstration system in Mexicali, B.C., the GAX system for air conditioning, the ice producer intermittent solar refrigerator, the continuous solar refrigerator, the refrigeration by ejection-compression. It also mentions the functioning of heat pumps and the process of solar drying applications in agricultural products. [Spanish] Suena un poco extrano que se pueda utilizar la energia solar para mantener o refrigerar productos o espacios por debajo de la temperatura ambiente, ya que sabemos que algo que hace el sol es calentar; pero si, el sol puede producir frio, y ademas sin contaminar y sin consumir energia convencional. En este documento se mencionan las diferentes investigaciones sobre refrigeracion solar que se han realizado en el Centro de Investigacion en Energia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico como el refrigerador termoquimico intermitente, el sistema demostrativo de refrigeracion geotermico en Mexicali, B.C., el sistema GAX para aire acondicionado, el refrigerador solar intermitente productor de hielo, el refrigerador continuo solar, la refrigeracion por eyecto-compresion. Tambien se menciona el funcionamiento de las bombas de calor y el proceso de secado solar de aplicacion en productos agropecuarios.

  15. The rate of stellar encounters along a migrating orbit of the Sun

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Barbosa, C. A.; Jílková, L.; Zwart, S. Portegies; A. G. A. Brown

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of Galactic stellar encounters the Solar system experienced depends on the local density and velocity dispersion along the orbit of the Sun in the Milky Way galaxy. We aim at determining the effect of the radial migration of the solar orbit on the rate of stellar encounters. As a first step we integrate the orbit of the Sun backwards in time in an analytical potential of the Milky Way. We use the present-day phase-space coordinates of the Sun, according to the measured uncertain...

  16. TRIGONOMETRIC SU(N) GAUDIN MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹俊鹏; 侯伯宇; 岳瑞宏

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the eigenstates and the eigenvalues of the Hamiltonians of the trigonometric SU(N) Gaudin model based on the quasi-classical limit of the trigonometric SU(N) chain with the periodic boundary condition.By using the quantum inverse scattering method, we also obtain the eigenvalues of the generating function of the trigonometric SU(N) Gaudin model.

  17. The summer sun shone round me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The summer sun shone round me, The folded valley lay In a stream of sun and odour, That sultry summer day. The tall trees stood in the sunlight As still as still could be, But the deep grass sighed and rustled And bowed and beckoned me. The deep grass moved and whispered And bowed and brushed my face. It whis pered in the sunshine: The winter comes apdce.”The summer sun shone round me

  18. Sun awareness in Maltese secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, S; Gauci, A Amato; Ellul, M; Scerri, L

    2004-11-01

    Studies indicate that reducing exposure to ultraviolet light during childhood and adolescence decreases the risk of skin cancer. From a young age, children need to be educated about the sun's harmful effects on the skin and how best to protect themselves. To help in the design of school-based interventions to raise sun awareness, a school survey was carried out to identify students' stereotypes and misconceptions. A total of 965 students attending Maltese secondary schools in forms 1, 2 and 3 were surveyed in May 2002, using a structured questionnaire designed to examine students' sun-related attitudes and knowledge. A high level of sun awareness among students was demonstrated, with high scores on knowledge of the effects of the sun on the skin, knowledge of skin cancer and knowledge of sun protection. Girls were clearly more knowledgeable than boys. However, of all the students surveyed, 55% thought that a suntan made them look better and 70% thought that their friends would desire a tan. These views were commoner among the older students. Skin type and hair or eye colour had no bearing on attitudes towards tanning or sun-related knowledge. The commonest misconceptions were that 'the sun is bad for your skin only when you get sunburnt' and that 'you cannot get too much sun on a cloudy day'. Deliberate suntanning was more frequently reported by girls than by boys and by students in the higher forms. Attitude change lags behind knowledge. Future school sun awareness interventions need to take into account gender and age differences in students' attitudes and perspectives. They should aim at motivating attitude change and preventive behaviour through consistent and repeated sun-education messages that are supported by a sun-conscious school environment.

  19. Sun Jingxia Devotes Herself to Nursing Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    "I really didn’t expect that at my advanced age, I would be awarded the highest honor in international nursing circles," said Mme. Sun Jingxia, 81, who had just returned from Beijing where she received the Nightingale Medal. Wearing a light yellow suit, with a collar bordered in red, Sun is inhigh spirits, reminding people of the beauty of the setting sun. It is clear that Sun Jingxia has deep feelings as she looks at the medal which shows a relief of Florence Nightingale’s head. She spoke in her usual soft voice but with some excitement, "President Jiang

  20. The Sun as you never saw it before

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    to the minimum count of sunspots, LASCO observes so many outbursts large and small - roughly one a day - that scientists are having to think again about how to define a coronal mass ejection. SOHO's continuing success Later LASCO images, on 6 January 1997, revealed a large mass ejection directed towards the Earth. As it swelled it appeared as a halo around the Sun. The mass ejection reached SOHO itself less than four days later, and the solar-wind analyser CELIAS detected an acceleration in the solar wind, from 350 to more than 500 kilometres per second. Soon afterwards, American, Russian and Japanese satellites operating closer to the Earth registered the event, which caused a magnetic storm and bright auroras. The failure of an American TV satellite on 11 January may have been directly related to this event. Mass ejections and other upheavals on the Sun will become even commoner during the coming years, as the count of sunspots increases towards the expected maximum of solar activity in 2000-01. Meanwhile, SOHO is seeking the fundamental reason for the cycle of sunspot activity, which is essentially a magnetic phenomenon. One of the helioseismic instruments probing the solar interior, SOI/MDI, has detected a likely source for the Sun's puzzling magnetism. There may be a natural dynamo operating at the base of the turbulent outer region of the Sun, called the convective zone. This rotates about 7 per cent faster than the underlying and more cohesive region of dense gas, the radiative zone. With the spacecraft in excellent condition and their instruments performing beyond expectations, SOHO's scientists are urging ESA and NASA to allow them to continue their work beyond April 1998, when the initial year of their scientific operations will have been completed.

  1. SOHO starts a revolution in the science of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Point No. 1 where the gravity of the Sun and the Earth are in balance. The spacecraft's engineering has proved to be excellent and no difficulty is anticipated in keeping it operational for at least six years. Early SOHO results were summarized in ESA's Information Note Nr 07-96, 2 May 1996. Here follow notes and comments on some further conclusions by SOHO's scientists. Fast action in the Sun's atmosphere The ultraviolet spectrometers aboard SOHO, called SUMER and CDS, were designed to analyse events in the solar atmosphere and discover temperatures, densities and speeds of motion in the gas. Their detailed results come in the spectra, which analyse the intensities at different wavelengths with high sensitivity, but the spectrometers also generate images by scanning selected regions of the Sun. When the SUMER instrument scans the whole Sun by the ultraviolet light of strongly ionized sulphur atoms (S VI at 933 angstroms) it picks out gas at 200,000 degrees C and reveals a vast number of bright regions created by magnetic field lines looping through the atmosphere. The brightness can change by a factor of ten in a distance of a few thousand kilometres or in a few seconds of time. SUMER has also shown that thick streaks called polar plumes, which climb far into space from the Sun's polar regions, are anchored in bright regions near the Sun's visible surface. The spectrometer CDS has observed fast action in the Sun's atmosphere. It can measure velocities along the line of sight by shifts in the wavelength of emissions from selected atoms, and contrary motions (turbulence) appear in a spreading of the wavelengths. In one high-velocity event, corresponding with a small streak of brightness in the scanned image, CDS detected vertical motions differing by 450 kilometres per second, and an overall motion of 65 kilometres per second downwards. "By taking the Sun's atmosphere to pieces we begin to understand how it influences our lives," says Richard Harrison of the UK

  2. Face-to-face Sun Protection Training and Text Messages Improve Sun Protection Behaviour in Adolescent Organ Transplant Recipients: HIPPOlino Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Michael M; Böttcher, Silke; Pape, Lars; Wagner, Gunnar; Mehls, Otto; Klaus, Günter; Laschewski, Gudrun; Barz, Mareike; Jahn, Ingeborg; Zeeb, Hajo

    2016-03-01

    Adolescent organ transplant recipients have an increased risk of developing skin cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and acceptability of short messaging service-based sun protection recommendations for adolescent patients. Sun-protective knowledge and behaviour were also evaluated using standardized questionnaires and telephone interviews. Twenty-six organ transplant recipients aged 13-22 years participated in face-to-face sun protection training. Subsequently, participants received sun protection reminders via text messages for 4 weeks. Of the participants 95% reported that they checked text messages on a regular basis. Of the 26 organ transplant recipients 19 completed questionnaires before sun protection training and 4 weeks later; 16% (3/19) knew the meaning of the UV-index before training. After training, 74% (14/19) remembered that the term UV-index describes the maximum daily level of local UV radiation. Text message-based sun protection recommendations are well accepted and technically feasible in adolescent organ transplant recipients.

  3. High Energy Electron Signals from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay; /New York U., CCPP

    2012-04-09

    In this paper we discuss two mechanisms by which high energy electrons resulting from dark matter annihilations in or near the Sun can arrive at the Earth. Specifically, electrons can escape the sun if DM annihilates into long-lived states, or if dark matter scatters inelastically, which would leave a halo of dark matter outside of the sun. Such a localized source of electrons may affect the spectra observed by experiments with narrower fields of view oriented towards the sun, such as ATIC, differently from those with larger fields of view such as Fermi. We suggest a simple test of these possibilities with existing Fermi data that is more sensitive than limits from final state radiation. If observed, such a signal will constitute an unequivocal signature of dark matter.

  4. Analysis of the Sun Tracking Systems to Optimize the Efficiency of Solar Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Xuan Cuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the ways to improve the efficiency of solar cells and reduce the price of solar electricity is the use of the tracking system of the sun. Daily and seasonal movement of the Earth affects the intensity of the radiation on the solar panels. The tracking system is the sun moves the solar panels to compensate for these movements, keeping the best orientation to the sun. For small solar panels it is not recommended to use the tracking system because of the high energy losses in the drive. It was found that the power consumption of the servo system is a few % of the increased energy. This article provides a classification system for tracking the sun, considered and their pluses and minuses.

  5. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  6. Efeitos da radiação solar crônica prolongada sobre o sistema imunológico de pescadores profissionais em Recife (PE, Brasil Effects of long-term chronic exposure to sun radiation in immunological system of commercial fishermen in Recife, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Maria de Fátima Martins de Carvalho Bezerra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Existe um consenso de que a exposição à radiação ultravioleta determina alterações n o sistema imunológico da pele, o que permite que se avente a hipótese de que a exposição prolongada e crônica ao Sol pode representar uma das maiores agressões ambientais à saúde humana. Entre as várias ocupações que requerem, necessariamente, exposição prolongada e crônica ao Sol está a de pescador. No entanto, a experiência clínica dermatológica, amealhada ao longo de vários anos de exercício da Medicina, não parece confirmar essa hipótese. OBJETIVO: Avaliar efeitos clínicos, histológicos e imunológicos da exposição crônica e prolongada à radiação ultravioleta em pescadores. MÉTODOS: Em estudo prospectivo, transversal, observacional, foram caracterizadas lesões dermatológicas, marcadores imunológicos e alterações histológicas de pescadores e subpopulações de linfócitos comparadas a grupo-controle. Empregaram-se testes de Mann-Whitney, exato de Fisher, Wilcoxon em nível de 0,05. RESULTADOS: Houve diferenças entre os grupos exposto e protegido em elastose (p = 0,03, ectasia de vasos dérmicos (p = 0,012 e número de células nas camadas epidérmicas entre os cones (p = 0,029. Foram mais comuns em pescadores CD45RO, CD68+ e mastócitos na pele (p = 0,040, p BACKGROUND: Among the various occupations which necessarily require long-term and chronic sun exposure is that of a fisherman. However, clinical experience in dermatology earned over several years of medical practice does not seem to confirm this hypothesis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical, histological and immunological effects of long-term and chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation in fishermen. METHODS: A prospective, cross-sectional and observational study characterized skin lesions, immunological markers and histological alterations in fishermen, as well as lymphocyte subpopulations compared to a control group. Mann-Whitney, Fisher's and

  7. Nine new open clusters within 500 pc from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Roeser, Siegfried; Goldman, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    One of the results of the Milky Way Star Clusters (MWSC) survey by Kharchenko et al. (2013) was the detection of a slight under-density of old (ca. 1 Gyr) clusters within the nearest kilo-parsec from the Sun. This under-density may be due to an ineffectiveness in the detection of larger structures with lower surface brightness. We report on our attempts to reveal such clusters. We derived proper motions from a combination of Tycho-2 with URAT1, and obtained a mean precision of about 1.4 mas/y per co-ordinate for 1.3 million stars north of -20 degree declination. We cut the sky into narrow proper motion slices and searched for spatial over-densities of stars in each slice. In optical and near-infrared colour-magnitude diagrams stars from over-densities were than examined to determine if they are compatible with isochrones of a cluster. We estimated the field star contamination using our data and the Besancon Galactic model.We detected 9 hitherto unknown open clusters in the vicinity of the Sun with ages betwee...

  8. MWA Observations of Solar Radio Bursts and the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, I.; Oberoi, D.; Morgan, J.; Bastian, T.; Bhatnagar, S.; Bisi, M.; Benkevitch, L.; Bowman, J.; Donea, A.; Giersch, O.; Jackson, B.; Chat, G. L.; Golub, L.; Hariharan, K.; Herne, D.; Kasper, J.; Kennewell, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Lobzin, V.; Matthews, L.; Mohan, A.; Padmanabhan, J.; Pankratius, V.; Pick, M.; Subramanian, P.; Ramesh, R.; Raymond, J.; Reeves, K.; Rogers, A.; Sharma, R.; Tingay, S.; Tremblay, S.; Tripathi, D.; Webb, D.; White, S.; Abidin, Z. B. Z.

    2017-01-01

    A hundred hours of observing time for solar observations is requested during the 2017-A observing semester. These data will be used to address science objectives for solar burst science (Goal A), studies of weak non-thermal radiation (Goal B) and quiet sun science (Goal C). Goal A will focus on detailed investigations of individual events seen in the MWA data, using the unsurpassed spectroscopic imaging ability of the MWA to address some key solar physics questions. Detailed observations of type II bursts, of which MWA has observed two, will be one focus, with MWA polarimetric imaging observations of type III bursts another focus. Goal B will address studies of the numerous short lived and narrow band emission features, significantly weaker than those seen by most other instruments revealed by the MWA. These emission features do not resemble any known types of solar bursts, but are possible signatures of "nanoflares" which have long been suspected to play a role in coronal heating. A large database of these events is needed to be able to reliably estimate their contribution to coronal heating. These observations will contribute to this database. Goal C will focus on characterizing the Sun's background thermal emission, their short and long term variability and looking for evidence of a scattering disc around the Sun.

  9. Poynting-Robertson-like Drag at the Sun's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnyngham, Ian; Emilio, Marcelo; Kuhn, Jeff; Scholl, Isabelle; Bush, Rock

    2017-02-01

    The Sun's internal rotation Ω (r ,Θ ) has previously been measured using helioseismology techniques and found to be a complex function of colatitude θ and radius r . From helioseismology and observations of apparently "rooted" solar magnetic tracers, we know that the surface rotates more slowly than much of the interior. The cause of this slow-down is not understood, but it is important for understanding stellar rotation generally and any plausible theory of the solar interior. A new analysis using 5-min solar p -mode limb oscillations as a rotation "tracer" finds an even larger velocity gradient in a thin region at the top of the photosphere. This shear occurs where the solar atmosphere radiates energy and angular momentum. We suggest that the net effect of the photospheric angular momentum loss is similar to Poynting-Robertson "photon braking" on, for example, Sun-orbiting dust. The resultant photospheric torque is readily computed and, over the Sun's lifetime, is found to be comparable to the apparent angular momentum deficit in the near-surface shear layer.

  10. The Faint Young Sun Paradox: A Simplified Thermodynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Angulo-Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical models of the Sun suggest that the energy output in the early stage of its evolution was 30 percent less than today. In this context, radiative balance alone between The Sun and the Earth was not sufficient to explain the early presence of liquid water on Earth’s surface. This difficulty is called the faint young Sun paradox. Many proposals have been published to solve this paradox. In the present work, we propose an oversimplified finite-time thermodynamic approach that describes the air convective cells in the Earth atmosphere. This model introduces two atmospheric modes of thermodynamic performance: a first mode consisting in the maximization of the power output of the convective cells (maximum power regime and a second mode that consists in maximizing a functional representing a good trade-off between power output and entropy production (the ecological regime. Within the assumptions of this oversimplified model, we present different scenarios of albedo and greenhouse effects that seem realistic to preserve liquid water on the Earth in the early stage of formation.

  11. Regina vs Hubbs: Determining the Sun's Position

    CERN Document Server

    Samra, Raminder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Here I determined the Sun's position as an expert witness for crown counsel. From my calculations I found the Sun's location in the sky was such that it could not impede the driver's vision, as a result it could not have been the reason for the accused to be involved in a motor vehicle accident.

  12. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA deletion percentage in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Julia M; Murphy, Gillian; Ralph, Nikki; O'Gorman, Susan M; Murphy, James E J

    2016-12-01

    The percentages of mitochondrial genomes carrying the mtDNA(3895) and the mtDNA(4977) (common) deletion were quantified in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin biopsies, for five cohorts of patients varying either in sun exposure profile, age or skin cancer status. Non-melanoma skin cancer diagnoses are rising in Ireland and worldwide [12] but most risk prediction is based on subjective visual estimations of sun exposure history. A quantitative objective test for pre-neoplastic markers may result in better adherence to sun protective behaviours. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to be subject to the loss of a significant proportion of specific sections of genetic code due to exposure to ultraviolet light in sunlight. Although one such deletion has been deemed more sensitive, another, called the mtDNA(4977) or common deletion, has proved to be a more useful indicator of possible risk in this study. Quantitative molecular analysis was carried out to determine the percentage of genomes carrying the deletion using non sun exposed and sun exposed skin biopsies in cohorts of patients with high or low sun exposure profiles and two high exposure groups undergoing treatment for NMSC. Results indicate that mtDNA deletions correlate to sun exposure; in groups with high sun exposure habits a significant increase in deletion number in exposed over non sun exposed skin occurred. An increase in deletion percentage was also seen in older cohorts compared to the younger group. The mtDNA(3895) deletion was detected in small amounts in exposed skin of many patients, the mtDNA(4977) common deletion, although present to some extent in non sun exposed skin, is suggested to be the more reliable and easily detected marker. In all cohorts except the younger group with relatively lower sun exposure, the mtDNA(4977) deletion was more frequent in sun exposed skin samples compared to non-sun exposed skin.

  14. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  15. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  16. Air Density And Wind Retrieval Using GOCE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Fritsche, B.; Visser, P.; Van Den IJssel, J.; Encarnacao, J. Teixeira; Kern, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the GOCE+ Theme 3 project, ion thruster activation data from GOCE telemetry has been combined with the accelerometer and star camera data products, to derive a new set of data products on thermosphere neutral density and wind speed. These products can be seen as an ex- tension of the successful accelerometer-derived thermosphere density data sets from CHAMP and GRACE. It is the first time that such data, spanning multiple years, is available at a fixed and very low altitude and at a near constant orientation of the orbit plane with respect to the Sun. The data processing is based on an analysis of the aerodynamic accelerations acting on the satellite, and makes use of data from all instruments onboard the satellite. The following steps are involved: 1) estimation of the bias in the gradiometer common-mode accelerations using GPS tracking data, 2) conversion of ion thruster activation data to accelerations, 3) modelling of radiation pressure accelerations based on orbit and attitude information, 4) removal of radiation pressure and ion thruster accelerations from the common-mode acceleration data, to arrive at the observed aerodynamic accelerations, 5) iterative adjustment of wind direction and density inputs of an aerodynamic model of the satellite, until the modelled aerodynamic accelerations match the observations. The resulting density and wind observations are made available in the form of time series and grids. These data can be applied in investigations of solar-terrestrial physics, as well as for the improvement and validation of models used in space operations.

  17. School Sun-Protection Policies: Measure Development and Assessments in 2 Regions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kim D.; Buller, David B.; French, Simone A.; Buller, Mary K.; Ashley, Jeff L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2002, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that schools adopt policies that reduce exposure of children to ultraviolet radiation to prevent skin cancer. We report here the development of a school sun-safety policy measure and baseline descriptive statistics from the assessment of written policies collected…

  18. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the sequence of processes that lead from some change in solar input to the earth to a change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Topics discussed include: inputs from the sun, the solar wind, and the magnetosphere; bremsstrahlung, ionizing radiation, cirrus clouds, thunderstorms, wave propagation, and gravity waves.

  19. School Sun-Protection Policies: Measure Development and Assessments in 2 Regions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kim D.; Buller, David B.; French, Simone A.; Buller, Mary K.; Ashley, Jeff L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2002, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that schools adopt policies that reduce exposure of children to ultraviolet radiation to prevent skin cancer. We report here the development of a school sun-safety policy measure and baseline descriptive statistics from the assessment of written policies collected…

  20. A Hands-On Activity to Raise Awareness about Healthy Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    João Fonseca, Maria; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes sunburn and has been consistently associated with increased susceptibility to melanoma and skin ageing. Acknowledging the need to promote healthy sun exposure habits, numerous educational initiatives have been developed to raise public awareness towards this issue. However, studies…

  1. Sun Exposure, Shade and Vitamin D: A Practical Activity for the Australian Climate and Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, David; Parisi, Alfio; Downs, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Australia has one of the highest rates of incidence and mortality due to skin cancer in the world. Exposure to the sun also has a beneficial side. The beneficial effects are relatively few, but they are essential to a person's well being. It is well known that exposure to small amounts of UV radiation are beneficial for the human body and…

  2. SynLight - the world's largest artificial sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieghardt, Kai; Funken, Karl-Heinz; Dibowski, Gerd; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard; Laaber, Dmitrij; Hilger, Patrick; Eßer, Kai-Peter

    2016-05-01

    High-flux solar simulators, providing predictable and reproducible solar radiation, have emerged to indispensable tools for efficient development of CSP components or solar chemical processes. In the last decade, a number of such facilities have been erected, however significantly below the typical scale of pilot plants. DLR started the construction of a large solar simulator in Jülich near its solar power tower. The facilities' modular design is novel and characterized by 149 individually controllable 7kW Xenon short-arc lamps. Solar radiant powers of up to 280kW and 2 x 220kW are expected to be available in three separately useable radiation chambers. In 2017, the large artificial sun shall be available for the global CSP and solar chemical community within cooperative research projects.

  3. Distinguishing radiation fibrosis from tumour recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer: A quantitative analysis of CT density changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Ward, Aaron D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Background. For patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) can be difficult to differentiate from recurrence. We measured the utility of CT image feature analysis in differentiating RILI from recurrence, compared to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST). Materials and methods. Twenty-two patients with 24 lesions treated with SABR were selected (11 with recurrence, 13 with substantial RILI). On each follow-up CT, consolidative changes and ground glass opacities (GGO) were contoured. For each lesion, contoured regions were analysed for mean and variation in Hounsfi eld units (HU), 3D volume, and RECIST size during follow-up. Results . One hundred and thirtysix CT scans were reviewed, with a median imaging follow-up of 26 months. The 3D volume and RECIST measures of consolidative changes could significantly distinguish recurrence from RILI, but not until 15 months post-SABR; mean volume at 15 months [all values {+-}95% confidence interval (CI)] of 30.1 {+-} 19.3 cm{sup 3} vs. 5.1 {+-} 3.6 cm{sup 3} (p 0.030) and mean RECIST size at 15 months of 4.34 {+-} 1.13 cm vs. 2.63 {+-} 0.84 cm (p =0.028) respectively for recurrence vs. RILI. At nine months post-SABR, patients with recurrence had significantly higher-density consolidative changes (mean at nine months of -96.4 {+-} 32.7 HU vs. -143.2 {+-} 28.4 HU for RILI; p =0.046). They also had increased variability of HU, an image texture metric, measured as the standard deviation (SD) of HU, in the GGO areas (SD at nine months of 210.6 {+-} 14.5 HU vs. 175.1 {+-} 18.7 HU for RILI; p =0.0078). Conclusions. Quantitative changes in mean HU and GGO textural analysis have the potential to distinguish RILI from recurrence as early as nine months post-SABR, compared to 15 months with RECIST and 3D volume. If validated, this approach could allow for earlier detection

  4. What is the sun's real potential?; Quelles sont les vraies ressources du soleil?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joliot, P

    2009-07-01

    The sun has colossal energy potential, yet it is barely exploited. It radiates 10,000 times more energy than man now uses. Plants only recover one thousandth of this immense energy source. A closer look at the potential of processes for using solar energy, from photovoltaics to biofuels and biomass to the 'promise' of artificial photosynthesis The sun represents an inexhaustible source of energy. It is the well from which most of the energy sources available on the earth's surface spring, excepting nuclear and geothermal energy. Among the methods capable of recovering solar energy directly, three of them are currently in use: - Producing hot water with solar collectors; - High-temperature thermal power plants (1,000 deg.C or more); - Photovoltaics. Photovoltaic electricity already represents a significant source of energy in areas with low population density. Generating such power can also help meet the basic needs of poor countries. The last two methods nevertheless require a means for storing the energy produced, a function provided by the hot water tank in the first method. What about photosynthetic reactions that convert solar energy into chemical energy? Photosynthesis not only synthesizes organic products, it also recycles carbon dioxide and regenerates oxygen, all of which are vital to maintaining life on earth. We currently expect to produce renewable energy - mainly biofuels - by converting biomass produced by photosynthesis. Plants generally store less than 1% of the sun's energy in their organic matter. This feeble energy balance can become negative when the energy spent for sowing, harvesting and processing is taken into account, especially if only a fraction of the organic matter is actually collected, as in the case of corn or rapeseed oil. The substantial amount of land and water needed to produce large quantities of biofuels would put too much strain on food crops, especially in light of the large and ever growing numbers of

  5. Dose dependent sun protective effect of topical melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Cecilie; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by sunlight results in an increasing number of skin conditions. Earlier studies have suggested a protective effect of topical treatment with the pineal hormone melatonin. However, this protective effect has never been evaluated in natural sunlight, and the ......BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by sunlight results in an increasing number of skin conditions. Earlier studies have suggested a protective effect of topical treatment with the pineal hormone melatonin. However, this protective effect has never been evaluated in natural sunlight......, and the optimal dosing has not been clarified. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the sun protective effect of topical treatment with three different doses of melatonin (0.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%) against erythema induced by natural sunlight. METHOD: The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double......-blind study in healthy volunteers. Twenty-three healthy volunteers, 8 male and 15 female, were enrolled. The protective effect of three different doses of melatonin cream (0.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%) against erythema induced by natural sunlight was tested. All participants had their backs exposed to sun from 1:22 PM...

  6. The Sun and How to Observe It

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2009-01-01

    Without the Sun, all life on Earth would perish. But what exactly do we know about this star that lights, heats, and powers Earth? Actually, we know quite a lot, thanks mainly to a host of eager solar observers. Looking directly at the Sun is EXTREMELY hazardous. But many astronomers, both professional and amateur, have found ways to view the Sun safely to learn about it. You, too, can view the Sun in all of its glorious detail. Some of the newest, most exciting telescopes on the market are affordable to amateur astronomers or even just curious sky watchers, and with this guide to what the Sun has to offer, including sunspots, prominences, and flares, plus reviews of the latest instruments for seeing and capturing images of the Sun, you can contribute to humankind’s knowledge of this immense ball of glowing gases that gives us all life. For a complete guide to Sun viewing, see also Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them (2007) by Martin Mobberley in this same series.

  7. Sun-synchronous satellite orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Zhai, Shen-You

    2004-02-01

    The linearized dynamic equations used for on-board orbit determination of Sun-synchronous satellite are derived. Sun-synchronous orbits are orbits with the secular rate of the right ascension of the ascending node equal to the right ascension rate of the mean sun. Therefore the orbit is no more a closed circle but a tight helix about the Earth. In the paper, instead of treating the orbit as a closed circle, the actual helix orbit is taken as nominal trajectory. The details of the linearized equations of motion for the satellite in the Sun-synchronous orbit are derived. The linearized equations are obtained by perturbing the Keplerian motion with the J2 correction and the effect of sun's attraction being neglected. Combined with the GPS navigation equations, the Kalman filter formulation is given. The particular application considered is the circular Sun-synchronous orbit with the altitude of 800 km and inclination of 98.6°. The numerical example simulated by MATLAB® shows that only the pseudo-range data used in the algorithm still gives acceptable results. Based on the simulation results, we can use the on-board GPS receivers' signal only as an alternative to determine the orbit of Sun-Synchronous satellite and therefore circumvents the need for extensive ground support.

  8. SunPy—Python for solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SunPy Community; Mumford, Stuart J.; Christe, Steven; Pérez-Suárez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew R.; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russell J.; Mayer, Florian; Hughitt, Keith; Freij, Nabil; Meszaros, Tomas; Bennett, Samuel M.; Malocha, Michael; Evans, John; Agrawal, Ankit; Leonard, Andrew J.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Mampaey, Benjamin; Campos-Rozo, Jose Iván; Kirk, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents SunPy (version 0.5), a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy is a data-analysis environment specializing in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric data in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from missions such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and PROBA2/LYRA, and radio spectra from e-Callisto and STEREO/SWAVES. We describe SunPy's functionality, provide examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy.

  9. Scaling laws for magnetic fields on the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, Jan O

    2012-01-01

    The Sun's magnetic field is structured over a range of scales that span approximately seven orders of magnitudes, four of which lie beyond the resolving power of current telescopes. Here we have used a Hinode SOT/SP deep mode data set for the quiet-sun disk center in combination with constraints from the Hanle effect to derive scaling laws that describe how the magnetic structuring varies from the resolved scales down to the magnetic diffusion limit, where the field ceases to be frozen-in. The focus of the analysis is a derivation of the magnetic energy spectrum, but we also discuss the scale dependence of the probability density function (PDF) for the flux densities and the role of the cancellation function for the average unsigned flux density. Analysis of the Hinode data set with the line-ratio method reveals a collapsed flux population in the form of flux tubes with a size distribution that is peaked in the 10-100 km range. Magnetic energy is injected into this scale range by the instability mechanism of ...

  10. Perspectives on the Interior of the Sun

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Μ. Chitre

    2000-09-01

    The interior of the Sun is not directly accessible to observations. Nonetheless, it is possible to infer the physical conditions inside the Sun with the help of structure equations governing its equilibrium and with the powerful observational tools provided by the neutrino fluxes and oscillation frequencies. The helioseismic data show that the internal constitution of the Sun can be adequately represented by a standard solar model. It turns out that a cooler solar core is not a viable solution for the measured deficit of neutrino fluxes, and the resolution of the solar neutrino puzzle should be sought in the realm of particle physics.

  11. The Jovian period in the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    The 41-year measurements of the Doppler effect of the photosphere performed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, discovered two periods of global oscillations of the Sun: 9600.606(12) s and 9597.929(15) s. Their beat period, 398.4(2.9) d, well agrees with a synodic orbital period of Jupiter, PJ = 398.9 d, raising a new problem for solar physics, cosmogony and cosmology. A hypothesis is advanced that the PJ beating of the Sun is induced by gravitation of Jupiter, revolving in a privileged reference system "the Sun - the Earth".

  12. Semiautomatic sun shots with the WIDIF DIflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasson, Jean L.; Hendrickx, Olivier; Marin, Jean-Luc

    2017-07-01

    The determination of magnetic declination angle entails finding two directions: geographic north and magnetic north. This paper deals with the former. The known way to do it by using the sun's calculable orientation in the sky is improved by using a device based on a WIDIF DIflux theodolite and split photocells positioned on its telescope ocular. Given the WIDIF accurate timing and location provided by the onboard GPS receiver, an astronomical computation can be effected to accurately and quickly determine the sun's azimuth and an auxiliary mark's azimuth. The precise sun's crossing of the split photocell, amplified by the telescope's magnification, allows azimuth accuracies of a few seconds of arc.

  13. Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of a theory-based online intervention to improve sun safety among Australian adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, Cathy M; White, Katherine M; Young, Ross McD; Hawkes, Anna L; Leske, Stuart; Starfelt, Louise C; Wihardjo, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation are a significant concern in Australia which has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world. Despite most skin cancers being preventable by encouraging consistent adoption of sun-protective behaviours, incidence rates are not decreasing. There is a dearth of research examining the factors involved in engaging in sun-protective behaviours. Further, online multi-behavioural theory-based interventions have yet to be explo...

  14. Drift-free solar sail formations in elliptical Sun-synchronous orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsay, Khashayar; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2017-10-01

    To study the spatial and temporal variations of plasma in the highly dynamic environment of the magnetosphere, multiple spacecraft must fly in a formation. The objective for this study is to investigate the feasibility of solar sail formation flying in the Earth-centered, Sun-synchronous orbit regime. The focus of this effort is to enable formation flying for a group of solar sails that maintain a nominally fixed Sun-pointing attitude during formation flight, solely for the purpose of precessing their orbit apse lines Sun-synchronously. A fixed-attitude solar sail formation is motivated by the difficulties in the simultaneous control of orbit and attitude in flying solar sails. First, the secular rates of the orbital elements resulting from the effects of solar radiation pressure (SRP) are determined using averaging theory for a Sun-pointing attitude sail. These averaged rates are used to analytically derive the first-order necessary conditions for a drift-free solar sail formation in Sun-synchronous orbits, assuming a fixed Sun-pointing orientation for each sail in formation. The validity of the first-order necessary conditions are illustrated by designing quasi-periodic relative motions. Next, nonlinear programming is applied to design truly drift-free two-craft solar sail formations. Lastly, analytic expressions are derived to determine the long-term dynamics and sensitivity of the formation with respect to constant attitude errors, uncertainty in orbital elements, and uncertainty in a sail's characteristic acceleration.

  15. Novel approach to analysing large data sets of personal sun exposure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesić, Suzana M; Stratimirović, Đorđe I; Ajtić, Jelena V; Wright, Caradee Y; Allen, Martin W

    2016-11-01

    Personal sun exposure measurements provide important information to guide the development of sun awareness and disease prevention campaigns. We assess the scaling properties of personal ultraviolet radiation (pUVR) sun exposure measurements using the wavelet transform (WT) spectral analysis to process long-range, high-frequency personal recordings collected by electronic UVR dosimeters designed to measure erythemal UVR exposure. We analysed the sun exposure recordings of school children, farmers, marathon runners and outdoor workers in South Africa, and construction workers and work site supervisors in New Zealand. We found scaling behaviour in all the analysed pUVR data sets. We found that the observed scaling changes from uncorrelated to long-range correlated with increasing duration of sun exposure. Peaks in the WT spectra that we found suggest the existence of characteristic times in sun exposure behaviour that were to some extent universal across our data set. Our study also showed that WT measures enable group classification, as well as distinction between individual UVR exposures, otherwise unattainable by conventional statistical methods.

  16. Supergranulation as the Largest Buoyantly Driven Convective Scale of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark P.

    2016-09-01

    The origin of solar supergranulation remains a mystery. Unlike granulation, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale-height in the photosphere, supergranulation does not reflect any obvious length scale of the solar convection zone. Moreover, recent observations of flows in the photosphere using Doppler imaging or correlation or feature tracking show a monotonic decrease in horizontal flow power at scales larger than supergranulation. Both local area and global spherical shell simulations of solar convection by contrast show the opposite, an increase in horizontal flow amplitudes to a low wavenumber. We examine these disparities and investigate how the solar supergranulation may arise as a consequence of nonlocal heat transport by cool diving plumes. Using three-dimensional anelastic simulations with surface driving, we show that the kinetic energy of the largest convective scales in the upper layers of a stratified domain reflects the depth of transition from strong buoyant driving to adiabatic stratification below caused by the dilution of the granular downflows. This depth is quite shallow because of the rapid increase of the mean density below the photosphere. We interpret the observed monotonic decrease in solar convective power at scales larger than supergranulation to be a consequence of this rapid transition, with the supergranular scale the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection in the Sun.

  17. Finding the lost siblings of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Feltzing, Sofia; Ruchti, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a spectral analysis on 18 stars solar sibling candidate. We found that only one one of the candidateshas solar metallicity and at the same time might have an age comparable to that of the Sun.

  18. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  19. Nilaja Sun's "No Child...": Reflections on Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nilaja; Alexander, Phillip; Huldeen, Branden; Russell, Ron; Friedman, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Nilaja Sun's groundbreaking one-woman show about a TA, her students, and her school, and includes interviews with the author/performer, an excerpt of the work, and a discussion of the organization behind it.

  20. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  1. Optimal control of sun tracking solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. O.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the modern control theory to derive an optimal sun tracking control for a point focusing solar concentrator is presented. A standard tracking problem converted to regulator problem using a sun rate input achieves an almost zero steady state tracking error with the optimal control formulation. However, these control techniques are costly because optimal type algorithms require large computing systems, thus they will be used mainly as comparison standards for other types of control algorithms and help in their development.

  2. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  3. How to Observe the Sun Safely

    CERN Document Server

    Macdonald, Lee

    2012-01-01

    How to Observe the Sun Safely, Second Edition gives all the basic information and advice the amateur astronomer needs to get started in observing our own ever-fascinating star. Unlike many other astronomical objects, you do not need a large telescope or expensive equipment to observe the Sun. And it is possible to take excellent pictures of the Sun with today's low-cost digital cameras! This book surveys what is visible on the Sun and then describes how to record solar features and measure solar activity levels. There is also an account of how to use H-alpha and Calcium-K filters to observe and record prominences and other features of the solar chromosphere, the Sun's inner atmosphere. Because we are just entering a period of high activity on the Sun, following a long, quiet period, this is a great time to get involved with solar observing. Still emphasizing safety first, this Second Edition reflects recent and exciting advances in solar observing equipment. Chapters 6 through 8 have been completely revised ...

  4. Orientation in birds. The sun compass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Koenig, K; Ganzhorn, J U; Ranvaud, R

    1991-01-01

    The sun compass was discovered by G. Kramer in caged birds showing migratory restlessness. Subsequent experiments with caged birds employing directional training and clock shifts, carried out by Hoffman and Schmidt-Koenig, showed that the sun azimuth is used, and the sun altitude ignored. In the laboratory, McDonald found the accuracy to be +/- 3 degrees(-)+/- 5 degrees. According to Hoffmann and Schmidt-Koenig, caged birds trained at medium northern latitudes were able to allow for the sun's apparent movement north of the arctic circle, but not in equatorial and trans-equatorial latitudes. In homing experiments, and employing clock shifts, Schmidt-Koenig demonstrated that the sun compass is used by homing pigeons during initial orientation. This finding is the principal evidence for the existence of a map-and-compass navigational system. Pigeons living in equatorial latitudes utilize the sun compass even under the extreme solar conditions of equinox, achieving angular resolution of about 3 degrees in homing experiments. According to preliminary analyses, the homing pigeons' ephemerides are retarded by several weeks (Ranvaud, Schmidt-Koenig, Ganzhorn et al.).

  5. SunPy: Solar Physics in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Mumford, Stuart; Perez Suarez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russel

    2015-04-01

    SunPy is a community-developed open-source software library for solar physics. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language which is being increasingly adopted throughout the scientific community as well as further afield. This has resulted in a wide array of software packages useful for scientific computing, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy, etc.), to machine learning (scifitlearn), to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy aims to provide required specialised software for analysing solar and heliospheric datasets in Python. The current version is 0.5 with 0.6 expected to be released later this year. SunPy provides solar data access through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It supports common data types from major solar missions such as images (SDO/AIA, STEREO, PROBA2/SWAP etc.), time series (GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, PROBA2/LYRA), and radio spectra (e-Callisto, STEREO/WAVES). SunPy’s code base is publicly available through github.com and can be contributed to by anyone. In this poster we demonstrate SunPy’s functionality and future goals of the project. We also encourage interested users to become involved in further developing SunPy.

  6. The use of webcam images to determine tourist-climate aptitude: favourable weather types for sun and beach tourism on the Alicante coast (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Emilio Martínez

    2011-05-01

    Climate has an obvious influence on tourism as a resource and as a location factor for tourist activities. Consequently, the tourist phenomenon in general is heavily controlled by meteorological conditions—in short, by the climate. In this article, the author proposes a set of weather types with which to establish the climate aptitude for sun and beach tourism. To determine these types, the density of use of one of the beaches with the lowest seasonality in continental Europe, the Levante Beach in Benidorm (Alicante, Spain), was analysed. Beach attendance was monitored using a webcam installed by the "Agencia Valenciana de Turismo". The relationship between the density of use of the lower and upper beach areas on the one hand, and meteorological variables on the other, allowed comfort (physiological equivalent temperature) and enjoyment (fractions of solar radiation) thresholds to be established. The appropriate hydric comfort values were obtained by comparing the ranges proposed by Besancenot in 1989 [Besancenot (1989) Clima et turismes. Massom, París] with numbers of visitors to the beach. The wind velocity and precipitation thresholds were selected following consultation with the literature and considering the climatic characteristics of the environment under analysis. Based on a combination of these thresholds, weather types suitable for this specific tourist activity are defined. Thus, this article presents a method for assessing the extent to which a day on the beach can be enjoyed. This has a number of applications, for planners, the tourism business and consumers alike. The use of this (filter) method in climate databases and meteorological forecasts could help determine the tourist season, the suitability of setting up a business associated with sun and beach tourism, as well as help plan holidays and program a day's leisure activities. Thus, the article seeks to improve our understanding of the climate preferences of that tourist activity par

  7. The use of webcam images to determine tourist-climate aptitude: favourable weather types for sun and beach tourism on the Alicante coast (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Emilio Martínez

    2011-05-01

    Climate has an obvious influence on tourism as a resource and as a location factor for tourist activities. Consequently, the tourist phenomenon in general is heavily controlled by meteorological conditions-in short, by the climate. In this article, the author proposes a set of weather types with which to establish the climate aptitude for sun and beach tourism. To determine these types, the density of use of one of the beaches with the lowest seasonality in continental Europe, the Levante Beach in Benidorm (Alicante, Spain), was analysed. Beach attendance was monitored using a webcam installed by the "Agencia Valenciana de Turismo". The relationship between the density of use of the lower and upper beach areas on the one hand, and meteorological variables on the other, allowed comfort (physiological equivalent temperature) and enjoyment (fractions of solar radiation) thresholds to be established. The appropriate hydric comfort values were obtained by comparing the ranges proposed by Besancenot in 1989 [Besancenot (1989) Clima et turismes. Massom, París] with numbers of visitors to the beach. The wind velocity and precipitation thresholds were selected following consultation with the literature and considering the climatic characteristics of the environment under analysis. Based on a combination of these thresholds, weather types suitable for this specific tourist activity are defined. Thus, this article presents a method for assessing the extent to which a day on the beach can be enjoyed. This has a number of applications, for planners, the tourism business and consumers alike. The use of this (filter) method in climate databases and meteorological forecasts could help determine the tourist season, the suitability of setting up a business associated with sun and beach tourism, as well as help plan holidays and program a day's leisure activities. Thus, the article seeks to improve our understanding of the climate preferences of that tourist activity par excellence

  8. Successful treatment of mandibular squamous cell carcinoma in a Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Manharth, Ann L; Clayton, Leigh Ann; Feinmehl, Rhonda; Robbins, Mitch

    2005-06-01

    An adult, female Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the rostral mandible. Initial treatment included bilateral mandibulectomy rostral to the lingual frenulum followed by intra- and perilesional cisplatin injections. Recovery after the procedure was uneventful and the Malayan sun bear adapted well to a shortened mandible. Histopathology indicated incomplete surgical excision of the tumor; therefore, radiation therapy was instituted weekly for four treatments at 2 Gy in parallel opposed fields (total 4 Gy each treatment) with one additional cisplatin treatment. Two years after initial presentation, the animal showed no recurrence of neoplasia.

  9. Calculation of the gain of a self-launched high-density free-electron laser by using a newly confirmed law stated as the impossibility of free-electron net stimulated radiation and modal analysis based on plasma hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.

    2017-05-01

    We reason based on the concept of stationary plasma fluctuation that in the free-electron laser (FEL), the Coulomb force from the surrounding electrons and the Ampérian force arising from the beam current do not disrupt the density-deviation mode driven by the laser field in cooperation with the magnetic wiggler. We adopt the synchronization principle that in the state of a stationary plasma density-wave and laser wave, all electrons arriving at the same position can emit laser photons all together only at t = NT + t o , where N is an integer and T is the laser period. We find that in the FEL, the incident laser radiation acts as a dummy field in net stimulated radiation. Using these findings and noticing a previously-recognized concept that the radiation power from an electron is given by Δ E/T, where Δ E is the amplitude of the net work done by the electron during T [1], we derive the laser gain of a self-launched FEL. The thusly derived gain is in excellent agreement with the measured gain.

  10. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C.; Gridley, Daila S.; Seykora, John T.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  11. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  12. Cáncer de piel y radiación solar: experiencia peruana en la prevención y detección temprana del cáncer de piel y melanoma Skin cancer and sun radiation: peruvian experience in the prevention and early detection of skin cancer and melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sordo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La excesiva exposición a la radiación solar, específicamente la ultravioleta (RUV, ha sido causa de diferentes enfermedades, en especial de cáncer de piel. En 1995 el Círculo Dermatológico del Perú realizó la primera “Campaña de Educación, Prevención y Detección Temprana de Cáncer de Piel y Melanoma” denominada el “Día del Lunar”. Fue oficializada por el Ministerio de Salud, y cuenta con la participación del Seguro Social de Salud (EsSalud. Es una campaña gratuita que se realiza cada año a nivel nacional, en ella, desde 1995 al 2011 se atendieron a 118 092 personas, en 76 sedes distribuidas en 18 ciudades de todo el país, en el 2,8% de estas se pudo identificar alguna lesión cutánea sospechosa de malignidad, de las cuales el 64,9% correspondió a carcinoma basocelular, 26,7% a melanoma cutáneo y 8,4% a carcinoma espinocelular. Estas campañas destacan en importancia no solo por la práctica asistencial en ellas realizada, sino por las actividades educativas orientadas a fomentar una cultura de prevención en favor de las poblaciones más vulnerables. Finalmente, consideramos que es fundamental seguir educando a la población en la prevención del cáncer de piel, crear conciencia en las autoridades para que participen activamente en la realización de estas actividades, además de solicitar a todos los médicos que se sumen coordinadamente a este esfuerzo para seguir avanzando y mejorar lo logrado en beneficio de nuestro paísThe excessive exposure to sun radiation, especially to ultraviolet radiation (UV, has led to various diseases, in particular to skin cancer. In 1995, the Peruvian Dermatological Association conducted the first “Campaign for Education, Prevention and Early Detection of Skin Cancer and Melanoma” called “Mole’s Day”. The Ministry of Health has turned it into an official event, and the Health Social Security (EsSalud also participates. This is a free campaign that takes place every year

  13. Detecting Asymmetric Dark Matter in the Sun with Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta

    2016-01-01

    Dark Matter (DM) may have a relic density that is in part determined by a particle/antiparticle asymmetry, much like baryons. If this is the case, it can accumulate in stars like the Sun to sizable number densities and annihilate to Standard Model (SM) particles including neutrinos. We show that the combination of neutrino telescope and direct detection data can be used in conjunction to determine or constrain the DM asymmetry from data. Depending on the DM mass, the current neutrino data from Super-K and IceCube give powerful constraints on asymmetric DM unless its fractional asymmetry is $\\lesssim 10^{-2}$. Future neutrino telescopes and detectors like Hyper-K and KM3NeT can search for the resulting signal of high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Sun. The observation of such a flux yields information on both the DM-nucleus cross section but also on the relative abundances of DM and anti-DM.

  14. Low Energy States in the $SU(N)$ Skyrme Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannidou, T A; Zakrzewski, W J

    1998-01-01

    We show that any solution of the SU(2) Skyrme model can be used to give a topologically trivial solution of the SU(4) one. In addition, we extend the method introduced by Houghton et al. and use harmonic maps from S2 to CP(N-1) to construct low energy configurations of the SU(N) Skyrme models. We show that one of such maps gives an exact, topologically trivial, solution of the SU(3) model. We study various properties of these maps and show that, in general, their energies are only marginally higher than the energies of the corresponding SU(2) embeddings. Moreover, we show that the baryon (and energy) densities of the SU(3) configurations with baryon number B=2-4 are more symmetrical than their SU(2) analogues. We also present the baryon densities for the B=5 and B=6 configurations and discuss their symmetries.

  15. Convective intensification of magnetic fields in the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bushby, P J; Proctor, M R E; Weiss, N O

    2008-01-01

    Kilogauss-strength magnetic fields are often observed in intergranular lanes at the photosphere in the quiet Sun. Such fields are stronger than the equipartition field $B_e$, corresponding to a magnetic energy density that matches the kinetic energy density of photospheric convection, and comparable with the field $B_p$ that exerts a magnetic pressure equal to the ambient gas pressure. We present an idealised numerical model of three-dimensional compressible magnetoconvection at the photosphere, for a range of values of the magnetic Reynolds number. In the absence of a magnetic field, the convection is highly supercritical and is characterised by a pattern of vigorous, time-dependent, ``granular'' motions. When a weak magnetic field is imposed upon the convection, magnetic flux is swept into the convective downflows where it forms localised concentrations. Unless this process is significantly inhibited by magnetic diffusion, the resulting fields are often much greater than $B_e$, and the high magnetic pressur...

  16. Long-Wavelength Observations of Jets from Polar Regions of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.

    1999-10-01

    We report radio observations of enhanced emission associated with the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets from polar coronal hole regions of the Sun, with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph (GRH). We have estimated the brightness temperature, electron density and mass of the ejected material. These jets were not accompanied by nonthermal radio bursts, particularly Type III events.

  17. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR-94)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messiaen, A. M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; R. Jaspers,; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H. R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P. E.; Van Oost, G.; van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R. R.; Wolf, G. H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; KramerFlecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; PostZwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M. Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [Proceedings of die 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p.

  18. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for `Super ACAR`. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.P. Jr. [Bell Labs. Murray Hill, NJ (United States); West, R.N.; Hyodo, Toshio

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  19. Is our Sun a singleton?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M B; Malmberg, D; Church, R P [Lund Observatory, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Chambers, J E [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Angeli, F De [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Mackey, D; Wilkinson, M I [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mbd@astro.lu.se

    2008-08-15

    All stars are formed in some form of cluster or association. These environments can have a much higher number density of stars than the field of the galaxy. Such crowded places are hostile environments: a large fraction of initially single stars will undergo close encounters with other stars or exchange into binaries. We describe how such close encounters and exchange encounters will affect the properties of a planetary system around a single star. We define singletons as single stars which have never suffered close encounters with other stars or spent time within a binary system. It may be that planetary systems similar to our own solar system can only survive around singletons. Close encounters or the presence of a stellar companion will perturb the planetary system, leading to strong planet-planet interactions, often leaving planets on tighter and more eccentric orbits. Thus, planetary systems which initially resembled our own solar system may later more closely resemble the observed exoplanetary systems.

  20. A 3-Year Follow-up of Sun Behavior in Patients With Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Luise Winkel; Datta, Pameli; Heydenreich, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING...... that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each...... suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays....

  1. Sound-speed inversion of the Sun using a nonlocal statistical convection theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chunguang; Xiong, Darun; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; 10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L14

    2012-01-01

    Helioseismic inversions reveal a major discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and the standard solar model just below the base of solar convection zone. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is caused by the inherent shortcomings of the local mixing-length theory adopted in the standard solar model. Using a self-consistent nonlocal convection theory, we construct an envelope model of the Sun for sound-speed inversion. Our solar model has a very smooth transition from the convective envelope to the radiative interior; and the convective energy flux changes sign crossing the boundaries of the convection zone. It shows evident improvement over the standard solar model, with a significant reduction in the discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and local convection models.

  2. Robust optimal sun-pointing control of a large solar power satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunan; Zhang, Kaiming; Peng, Haijun; Wu, Zhigang; Radice, Gianmarco

    2016-10-01

    The robust optimal sun-pointing control strategy for a large geostationary solar power satellite (SPS) is addressed in this paper. The SPS is considered as a huge rigid body, and the sun-pointing dynamics are firstly proposed in the state space representation. The perturbation effects caused by gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure and microwave reaction are investigated. To perform sun-pointing maneuvers, a periodically time-varying robust optimal LQR controller is designed to assess the pointing accuracy and the control inputs. It should be noted that, to reduce the pointing errors, the disturbance rejection technique is combined into the proposed LQR controller. A recursive algorithm is then proposed to solve the optimal LQR control gain. Simulation results are finally provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed closed-loop system.

  3. Using behavioral economics to promote healthy behavior toward sun exposure in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Romero, Maria T; Geller, Alan C; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer represents an important public health problem, and it is associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure, particularly at early ages. Unhealthy sun exposure and intentional tanning continue to be the trend among young people. Multiple interventions to raise awareness of the risks of sun exposure have been implemented, without necessarily translating into decreased unhealthy behaviors or skin cancer incidence rates. Behavioral economics adds a set of concepts and tools to potentially boost the efficacy of existing approaches to decrease unhealthy sun exposure. This paper reviews public health interventions that have been based in behavioral economics concepts and their results, and provides examples of new and creative ways physicians and health professionals can actively apply insights from behavioral economics to counsel teenagers and young adults about skin cancer prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oculocutaneous albinism in sub-Saharan Africa: adverse sun-associated health effects and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Caradee Y; Norval, Mary; Hertle, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a genetically inherited autosomal recessive condition. Individuals with OCA lack melanin and therefore are susceptible to the harmful effects of solar ultraviolet radiation, including extreme sun sensitivity, photophobia and skin cancer. OCA is a grave public health issue in sub-Saharan Africa with a prevalence as high as 1 in 1000 in some tribes. This article considers the characteristics and prevalence of OCA in sub-Saharan African countries. Sun-induced adverse health effects in the skin and eyes of OCA individuals are reviewed. Sun exposure behavior and the use of photoprotection for the skin and eyes are discussed to highlight the major challenges experienced by these at-risk individuals and how these might be best resolved. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. The sun and space weather Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    This second edition is a great enhancement of literature which will help the reader get deeper into the specific topics. There are new sections included such as space weather data sources and examples, new satellite missions, and the latest results. At the end a comprehensive index is given which will allow the reader to quickly find his topics of interest. The Sun and Space weather are two rapidly evolving topics. The importance of the Sun for the Earth, life on Earth, climate and weather processes was recognized long ago by the ancients. Now, for the first time there is a continuous surveillance of solar activity at nearly all wavelengths. These data can be used to improve our understanding of the complex Sun-Earth interaction. The first chapters of the book deal with the Sun as a star and its activity phenomena as well as its activity cycle in order to understand the complex physics of the Sun-Earth system. The reader will see that there are many phenomena but still no definite explanations and models exis...

  6. The Sun Sense Study: An Intervention to Improve Sun Protection in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Alice; Shaheen, Magda; Glenn, Beth A.; Bastani, Roshan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of a multicomponent intervention on parental knowledge, sun avoidance behaviors, and sun protection practices in children 3-10 years. Methods: A randomized trial at a pediatric clinic recruited 197 caregiver-child pairs (90% parents). Intervention included a brief presentation and brochure for the parent and…

  7. After the Bell: Developing Sun Sense--Learning about Protection from the Sun's Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Ness, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology (2008) reports that our students will experience 80% of their lifetime exposure to the Sun by the time they are 18. Further, research has demonstrated that continued exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet rays can lead to skin aging, sunburn, immune suppression, ocular melanoma, cataracts, corneal burns, and even…

  8. 77 FR 34122 - Application of Sun Air Express, LLC, d/b/a Sun Air International for Commuter Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Application of Sun Air Express, LLC, d/b/a Sun Air International for Commuter... to show cause why it should not issue an order finding Sun Air Express, LLC d/b/a Sun...

  9. Sun protection provided by regulation school uniforms in Australian schools: an opportunity to improve personal sun protection during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is linked to excessive pigmented mole development and melanoma risk. Clothing provides a physical barrier, protecting skin from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Extending sleeves to elbow length and shorts to knee length has been shown to significantly reduce mole acquisition in preschoolers from tropical Queensland. We used publicly available uniform images and guidelines from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.25°S, n = 43 schools), Cairns (16.87°S, n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.26°S, n = 23) in tropical Australia to objectively determine the body surface proportion covered by regulation school uniforms. Uniforms of nongovernment, large (≥800 students), urban, educationally advantaged schools with comprehensive sun protection policies covered more skin than those of government schools (63.2% vs 62.0%; P schools (63.4% vs 62.3%; P = 0.009), rural (62.7% vs 61.9%; P = 0.002) and educationally disadvantaged schools (62.8% vs 62.3%; P school uniforms covered identical body surface proportions (62.4%, P = 0.084). Although wearing regulation school uniforms is mandatory at most Australian primary schools, this opportunity to improve children's sun protection is largely overlooked. Recent evidence suggests that even encouraging minor alterations to school uniforms (e.g. slightly longer sleeves/dresses/skirts/shorts) to increase skin coverage may reduce mole acquisition and melanoma risk, especially in high-risk populations.

  10. Evidence from Helioradiology of an Inner Tachocline in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Bertello, L.; Fischbach, E.; Jenkins, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    One can make a good case that the Rieger and related solar oscillations may be understood as r-mode oscillations. The frequencies of these oscillations fit the formula 2*m*nu/(l*(l+1)), where l and m (two of the three spherical harmonic indices) take the values m = 1, l = 2,3,4,..., (the third index n does not affect the mode frequency), and the sidereal rotation frequency nu = 13.7 year-1. This value of the rotation frequency indicates that these oscillations occur in the tachocline, which separates the radiative zone from the convection zone. There is now strong evidence that beta decay rates are not constant, and there is a persuasive case that the Sun is responsible for variations in these rates. This new source of solar observational data, for which we propose the name "helioradiology," yields evidence that the solar core rotates more slowly than the radiative zone. This raises the possibility that there is a second, "inner," tachocline that separates the core from the radiative zone. This possibility in turn suggests that there may be a second group of "Rieger-like" oscillations that have their origin in this inner tachocline. We present evidence for such oscillations, derived from helioradiology data and also from the long-term diameter measurements acquired at the Mount Wilson Observatory.

  11. A sun holiday is a sunburn holiday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Thieden, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2013-01-01

    Many people take holidays in sunny locations with the express aim of sunbathing. This may result in sunburn, which is a risk factor for skin cancer. We investigated 25 Danish sun seekers during a week's holiday in the Canary Islands. The percentage of body surface area with sunburn was determined......-specific UVR doses after adjustment for sun protection factor. Remarkably, we found that all volunteers sunburned at some point. The risk of sunburn correlated significantly with the adjusted body site-specific UVR dose. Furthermore, there was also a significant relationship between the daily UVR dose...... and percentage of body surface area with sunburn. Our study shows that holiday UVR exposure results in a high risk of sunburn, which potentially increases the risk of skin cancer. Possible protection by melanogenesis is insufficient to protect against sunburn during a 1-week sun holiday. Finally, our data...

  12. Precise nuclear physics for the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemmerer, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    For many centuries, the study of the Sun has been an important testbed for understanding stars that are further away. One of the first astronomical observations Galileo Galilei made in 1612 with the newly invented telescope concerned the sunspots, and in 1814, Joseph von Fraunhofer employed his new spectroscope to discover the absorption lines in the solar spectrum that are now named after him. Even though more refined and new modes of observation are now available than in the days of Galileo and Fraunhofer, the study of the Sun is still high on the agenda of contemporary science, due to three guiding interests. The first is connected to the ages-old human striving to understand the structure of the larger world surrounding us. Modern telescopes, some of them even based outside the Earth's atmosphere in space, have succeeded in observing astronomical objects that are billions of light-years away. However, for practical reasons precision data that are important for understanding stars can still only be gained from the Sun. In a sense, the observations of far-away astronomical objects thus call for a more precise study of the closeby, of the Sun, for their interpretation. The second interest stems from the human desire to understand the essence of the world, in particular the elementary particles of which it consists. Large accelerators have been constructed to produce and collide these particles. However, man-made machines can never be as luminous as the Sun when it comes to producing particles. Solar neutrinos have thus served not only as an astronomical tool to understand the Sun's inner workings, but their behavior on the way from the Sun to the Earth is also being studied with the aim to understand their nature and interactions. The third interest is strictly connected to life on Earth. A multitude of research has shown that even relatively slight changes in the Earth's climate may strongly affect the living conditions in a number of densely

  13. The Spectrum of Darkonium in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaris, Chris; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter that gets captured in the Sun may form positronium-like bound states if it self-interacts via light dark photons. In this case, dark matter can either annihilate to dark photons or recombine in bound states which subsequently also decay to dark photons. The fraction of the dark photons that leave the Sun without decaying to Standard Model particles have a characteristic energy spectrum which is a mixture of the direct annihilation process, the decays of ortho- and para- bound states and the recombination process. The ultimate decay of these dark photons to positron-electron pairs (via kinetic mixing) outside the Sun creates a distinct signal that can either identify or set strict constraints on dark photon models.

  14. The spectrum of darkonium in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvaris, Chris; Langæble, Kasper; Grønlund Nielsen, Niklas

    2016-10-01

    Dark matter that gets captured in the Sun may form positronium-like bound states if it self-interacts via light dark photons. In this case, dark matter can either annihilate to dark photons or recombine in bound states which subsequently also decay to dark photons. The fraction of the dark photons that leave the Sun without decaying to Standard Model particles have a characteristic energy spectrum which is a mixture of the direct annihilation process, the decays of ortho- and para- bound states and the recombination process. The ultimate decay of these dark photons to positron-electron pairs (via kinetic mixing) outside the Sun creates a distinct signal that can either identify or set strict constraints on dark photon models.

  15. The sun since the Bronze Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the behavior of the sun during the last 7000 years. The C-14 content in carbonaceous fossil material can be used as an indicator regarding the level of solar activity at the time when the carbon was assimilated in the process of photosynthesis. Living trees, such as the bristlecone pine, provide a solar activity record to about 3000 B.C. The record can be extended with the aid of well-preserved dead wood to beyond 5000 B.C. The results of an analysis of solar activity levels as a function of time on the basis of C-14 contents are presented in a graph. Attention is given to the Maunder Minimum, a history of the sun in the last 5000 years, an interpretation of the major C-14 excursions, and the sun and climate history.

  16. 'My Sun' and 'Guided by the Moon'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Baillie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available My Sun and Guided by the Moon (2012 show the heavily pregnant artist with her swollen belly covered in gold and silver leaf. The work is suggestive that the connectivity experienced by an expectant mother, extends outwards, even as far as her relationship with the cosmos. The 'sun' portrait was taken on a bright September morning, and its partner image, the following October, on the night of a full moon. Female cycles and the importance of time passing during a pregnancy are referenced. Interestingly, bearing in mind that the artist gave birth to a son in November, creating the 'moon' portrait felt like a familiar, empowering and yet isolated expression of selfhood, whilst the 'sun/son' version exuded the energy of a collaboration, and stimulated feelings of joy, liberation and potentiality. By seeming contradiction, the boy was born on a full moon, exactly a month to the day that Guided by the Moon was taken.

  17. Semiautomatic sun shots with the WIDIF DIflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Rasson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The determination of magnetic declination angle entails finding two directions: geographic north and magnetic north. This paper deals with the former. The known way to do it by using the sun's calculable orientation in the sky is improved by using a device based on a WIDIF DIflux theodolite and split photocells positioned on its telescope ocular. Given the WIDIF accurate timing and location provided by the onboard GPS receiver, an astronomical computation can be effected to accurately and quickly determine the sun's azimuth and an auxiliary mark's azimuth. The precise sun's crossing of the split photocell, amplified by the telescope's magnification, allows azimuth accuracies of a few seconds of arc.

  18. Present and past neutrino luminosity of the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J K; Cleveland, B T; Davis, R Jr; Hampel, W; Kirsten, T

    1979-01-01

    The neutrino radiation from the sun can give direct information on the basic nuclear fusion processes that provide the solar energy. Results are reported which have been obtained over the last seven years with the Brookhaven solar neutrino detector that depends upon the neutrino capture reaction, /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/ Ar. These results do not agree with the predictions of the standard solar model. It is of great interest to know whether the lack of agreement between the measurements and theoretical expectation could possibly be explained by a secular variation in the rate of the fusion process. Two radiochemical neutrino detection techniques have been proposed previously that could in principle record the neutrino flux of the past. An analysis of the expected background processes for these experiments is given. These and other possible methods of recording the past solar neutrino luminosity are discussed in relation to variations expected from theoretical solar models. 2 figures, 6 tables, 36 references.

  19. Habitat of early life: Solar X-ray and UV radiation at Earth's surface 4-3.5 billion years ago

    CERN Document Server

    Cnossen, I; Favata, F; Witasse, O; Zegers, T; Arnold, N F

    2007-01-01

    Solar X-ray and UV radiation (0.1-320 nm) received at Earth's surface is an important aspect of the circumstances under which life formed on Earth. The quantity that is received depends on two main variables: the emission of radiation by the young Sun and its extinction through absorption and scattering by the Earth's early atmosphere. The spectrum emitted by the Sun when life formed, between 4 and 3.5 Ga, was modeled here, including the effects of flares and activity cycles, using a solar-like star that has the same age now as the Sun had 4-3.5 Ga. Atmospheric extinction was calculated using the Beer-Lambert law, assuming several density profiles for the atmosphere of the Archean Earth. We found that almost all radiation with a wavelength shorter than 200 nm is attenuated effectively, even by very tenuous atmospheres. Longer-wavelength radiation is progressively less well attenuated, and its extinction is more sensitive to atmospheric composition. Minor atmospheric components, such as methane, ozone, water v...

  20. The sun and heliosphere at solar maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E J; Marsden, R G; Balogh, A; Gloeckler, G; Geiss, J; McComas, D J; McKibben, R B; MacDowall, R J; Lanzerotti, L J; Krupp, N; Krueger, H; Landgraf, M

    2003-11-14

    Recent Ulysses observations from the Sun's equator to the poles reveal fundamental properties of the three-dimensional heliosphere at the maximum in solar activity. The heliospheric magnetic field originates from a magnetic dipole oriented nearly perpendicular to, instead of nearly parallel to, the Sun's rotation axis. Magnetic fields, solar wind, and energetic charged particles from low-latitude sources reach all latitudes, including the polar caps. The very fast high-latitude wind and polar coronal holes disappear and reappear together. Solar wind speed continues to be inversely correlated with coronal temperature. The cosmic ray flux is reduced symmetrically at all latitudes.

  1. Ra: The Sun for Science and Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    To guide the development of the Ra Strategic Framework, we defined scientific and applications objectives. For our primary areas of scientific interest, we choose the corona, the solar wind, the Sun's effect on the Earth, and solar theory and model development. For secondary areas of scientific interest, we selected sunspots, the solar constant, the Sun's gravitational field, helioseismology and the galactic cosmic rays. We stress the importance of stereoscopic imaging, observations at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions, as well as of long duration measurements. Further exploration of the Sun's polar regions is also important, as shown already by the Ulysses mission. From an applications perspective, we adopted three broad objectives that would derive complementary inputs for the Strategic Framework. These were to identify and investigate: possible application spin-offs from science missions, possible solar-terrestrial missions dedicated to a particular application, and possible future applications that require technology development. The Sun can be viewed as both a source of resources and of threats. Our principal applications focus was that of threat mitigation, by examining ways to improve solar threat monitoring and early warning systems. We compared these objectives to the mission objectives of past, current, and planned international solar missions. Past missions (1962-1980) seem to have been focused on improvement of scientific knowledge, using multiple instrument spacecraft. A ten year gap followed this period, during which the results from previous missions were analyzed and solar study programmes were prepared in international organizations. Current missions (1990-1996) focus on particular topics such as the corona, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections. In planned missions, Sun/Earth interactions and environmental effects of solar activity are becoming more important. The corona is the centre of interest of almost all planned missions

  2. Haloes around the Moon and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex; Gaina, Danielle A.

    2008-10-01

    The authors observations of the Haloes around the Moon and the Sun during few last years are reported. A Historical review of the phenomenon is given since the observations by Benvenuto Cellini and Gaston Tissandier is given. A photograph (from eight available) of the Halo around the Sun observed in Chisinau on 21 May 2007 is included. The Halo from 21 May 2007 occured after a very fast increasing of the air temperature during one day by more than 15 Deg. The authors consider, that the phenomenon is due to scattering of light on Cirri clouds(7 km altitude), present on the sky during that day. They formed due to very fast heating.

  3. SunShot Initiative Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort launched in 2011 that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy fully cost competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade. The SunShot fact sheet outlines goals and successes of the program as it works with private companies, universities, non-profit organizations, state and local governments, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, without incentives, by the year 2020.

  4. Radio emission of the sun and planets

    CERN Document Server

    Zheleznyakov, V V

    1970-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 25: Radio Emission of the Sun and Planets presents the origin of the radio emission of the planets. This book examines the outstanding triumphs achieved by radio astronomy of the solar system. Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the physical conditions in the upper layers of the Sun, the Moon, and the planets. This text then examines the three characteristics of radio emission, namely, the frequency spectrum, the polarization, and the angular spectrum. Other chapters consider the measurements of the i

  5. Solar-Terrestrial Relations: An Undergraduate-Level Introduction to the Sun, Space Weather, and the Sun-Climate Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Michigan offers a 300-level course entitled, "Solar-Terrestrial Relations," taken by all of the undergraduate students in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences department. This is the first class in the space physics courses leading to a concentration in Space Weather. The course provides an overview of the Sun and solar radiation, both photon and particle, and its variability on all time scales. The effects of this variability on the near-Earth space environment and the Earth's climate are then discussed. The class content is a mixture of conceptual, theoretical, and analytical techniques. The students spend one session a week in a computer lab visiting data websites, downloading and processing the numbers, and interpreting the results. In addition to homework sets and exams, the students also do two projects, both including written and oral reports. The first is a space weather event analysis in which each student is assigned a storm day and they must determine the solar source and whether there was aurora over Ann Arbor during the event. The second project is a group effort on some aspect of the Sun-climate relationship, in which they are given a hypothesis and must conduct a literature search and data analysis exercise to support or refute it.

  6. [Skin, sun exposure and vitamin D: facts and controversies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, M-T

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin D plays a clearly defined role in phosphorus, calcium and bone metabolism. In addition to its effects on cellular proliferation and differentiation, and on immunity, it appears to exert other action, poorly understood to date, on human physiology and disease. A number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated a protective role of sun exposure with regard to the incidence of certain immune diseases and cancer, and upon the related mortality rates. Furthermore, over the last 10 years, studies have purported to find levels judged "inadequate" in numerous populations, and, in the absence of any strict scientific arguments, a correlation was established by certain authors between supposedly "inadequate" levels, sun exposure and risk of cancer. However, analysis of the literature shows that there is in fact no precise and consensual definition of normal ranges and that the notion of inadequacy was created artificially using assay techniques lacking in sensitivity and reproducibility. Photosynthesis of vitamin D can in fact be considered perfectly adequate in the majority of populations. However, greater care is needed with elderly subjects and with subjects exposed very little to sunlight. Current studies show that the means of photoprotection used in everyday life do not adversely affect such photosynthesis. In the event of documented vitamin D deficiency, oral supplements should be given, and exposure to natural or artificial UV radiation should not be prescribed. Ultraviolet radiation has been shown to be carcinogenic and responsible for the onset of most skin cancers, and the population must be warned against misleading advertising from the tanning industry. Care should also be taken with regard to the potential harmful effects of inappropriate vitamin D supplementation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Le, Q; Mutaf, Y; Yi, B; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.

  8. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: Tissue Segmentation-Based MR Electron Density Mapping Method for MR-Only Radiation Treatment Planning of Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lee, Y [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ruschin, M [Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Karam, I [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Automatically derive electron density of tissues using MR images and generate a pseudo-CT for MR-only treatment planning of brain tumours. Methods: 20 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients’ T1-weighted MR images and CT images were retrospectively acquired. First, a semi-automated tissue segmentation algorithm was developed to differentiate tissues with similar MR intensities and large differences in electron densities. The method started with approximately 12 slices of manually contoured spatial regions containing sinuses and airways, then air, bone, brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and eyes were automatically segmented using edge detection and anatomical information including location, shape, tissue uniformity and relative intensity distribution. Next, soft tissues - muscle and fat were segmented based on their relative intensity histogram. Finally, intensities of voxels in each segmented tissue were mapped into their electron density range to generate pseudo-CT by linearly fitting their relative intensity histograms. Co-registered CT was used as a ground truth. The bone segmentations of pseudo-CT were compared with those of co-registered CT obtained by using a 300HU threshold. The average distances between voxels on external edges of the skull of pseudo-CT and CT in three axial, coronal and sagittal slices with the largest width of skull were calculated. The mean absolute electron density (in Hounsfield unit) difference of voxels in each segmented tissues was calculated. Results: The average of distances between voxels on external skull from pseudo-CT and CT were 0.6±1.1mm (mean±1SD). The mean absolute electron density differences for bone, brain, CSF, muscle and fat are 78±114 HU, and 21±8 HU, 14±29 HU, 57±37 HU, and 31±63 HU, respectively. Conclusion: The semi-automated MR electron density mapping technique was developed using T1-weighted MR images. The generated pseudo-CT is comparable to that of CT in terms of anatomical position of

  9. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  10. Natural radiative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R.

    1979-01-01

    Natural radiative cooling at night was measured based on the surface-radiation spectrum after the heat balance of the surface exposed to the sun had been reradiated. A concept equivalent to the sky temperature and a concept useful for obtaining the net heat flux are discussed. The highest possible equilibrium temperature of the selective surface can be lowered; however, how to apply this practically is not yet known. A simple radiator, completely enclosed by a transparent screen, can produce a significant and inexpensive cooling effect. The results of experiments carried out in an area such as Padua, Italy, where the climate is not suitable for cooling purposes can still be predicted theoretically. The possibility of using the collector for heat collection during the day and as a radiator at night is indicated.

  11. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz; Veronig, Astrid M.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of solar radiation measurements, for direct (DIR) and diffuse (DIF) radiation, depends significantly on the precision of the operational Sun-tracking device. Thus, rigid targets for instrument performance and operation have been specified for international monitoring networks, e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices that fulfill these accuracy requirements are available from various instrument manufacturers; however, none of the commercially available systems comprise an automatic accuracy control system allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system-independent, and cost-effective system for evaluating the pointing accuracy of Sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications, and the results from its application to the Sun-tracking system operated at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO) Austrian radiation monitoring network (ARAD) site. The results from an evaluation campaign from March to June 2015 show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies within BSRN specifications (i.e., 0.1° tracking accuracy) for the vast majority of observations (99.8 %). The evaluation of manufacturer-specified active-tracking accuracies (0.02°), during periods with direct solar radiation exceeding 300 W m-2, shows that these are satisfied in 72.9 % of observations. Tracking accuracies are highest during clear-sky conditions and on days where prevailing clear-sky conditions are interrupted by frontal movement; in these cases, we obtain the complete fulfillment of BSRN requirements and 76.4 % of observations within manufacturer-specified active-tracking accuracies. Limitations to tracking surveillance arise during overcast conditions and

  12. BcSUN1, a B. cinerea SUN-Family Protein, Is Involved in Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Hernández, Alicia; González, Mario; González, Celedonio; van Kan, Jan A. L.; Brito, Nélida

    2017-01-01

    BcSUN1 is a glycoprotein secreted by Botrytis cinerea, an important plant pathogen that causes severe losses in agriculture worldwide. In this work, the role of BcSUN1 in different aspects of the B. cinerea biology was studied by phenotypic analysis of Bcsun1 knockout strains. We identified BcSUN1 as the only member of the Group-I SUN family of proteins encoded in the B. cinerea genome, which is expressed both in axenic culture and during infection. BcSUN1 is also weakly attached to the cellular surface and is involved in maintaining the structure of the cell wall and/or the extracellular matrix. Disruption of the Bcsun1 gene produces different cell surface alterations affecting the production of reproductive structures and adhesion to plant surface, therefore reducing B. cinerea virulence. BcSUN1 is the first member of the SUN family reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of a filamentous fungus. PMID:28163701

  13. Sun exposure and sun protection practices of children and their parents.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiely, A D

    2009-05-01

    The primary aims of this study were: to estimate sun exposure in hours of children in Cork during the summer months; to examine sun protection measures used by children and their parents and to explore parental knowledge of sun exposure and protection. A cross-sectional study, using a semi-structured questionnaire, was conducted in June 2006 in primary schools, pre-schools and creches throughout Cork City and County. Parents of 250 children aged less than 12 years were sampled. Mean sun exposure of Cork children was 40.9 hours per week in the summer months, with 77 (46.1%) children developing sunburn. 59.3% of the studied children were of skin type 1 or 2. 95 (57%) children on weekdays and 137 (82%) children at weekends were exposed to the sun between 11 am and 3 pm. Sunscreen and hats\\/caps were the most common protection measures used. A minority used protective clothing, sunglasses or sought shade. Thirty one (30.5%) children had sunscreen reapplied every 2 hours. Knowledge of sun protection was considerable among Irish parents. However the frequency of sunburn among Irish children suggests we are not providing them with adequate sun protection.

  14. ALMA's view of the Sun's nearest neighbours: The submm/mm SEDs of the alpha Centauri binary and a new source

    CERN Document Server

    Liseau, R; O'Gorman, E; Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Tapia, F

    2016-01-01

    The precise mechanisms that provide the non-radiative energy for heating the chromosphere and the corona of the Sun and other stars are at the focus of intense contemporary research. Observations at submm/mm wavelengths are particularly useful to obtain information about the run of the temperature in the upper atmosphere of Sun-like stars. We used ALMA to study the chromospheric emission of the aCen binary system in all six available frequency bands during Cycle2 in 2014/15. Since ALMA is an interferometer, the multi-telescope array is particularly suited for the observation of point sources. With its large collecting area, the sensitivity is high enough to allow the observation of nearby main-sequence stars at submm/mm wavelengths for the first time. The comparison of the observed spectral energy distributions with theoretical model computations provides the chromospheric structure in terms of temperature and density above the stellar photosphere and the quantitative understanding of the primary emission pro...

  15. Nutritional approach to sun protection: a suggested complement to external strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Niva

    2010-02-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancer despite the use of externally applied sun protection strategies, alongside research showing that nutrients reduce photo-oxidative damage, suggest nutritional approaches could play a beneficial role in skin cancer prevention. Penetrating photo-oxidative ultraviolet A radiation reduces skin and blood antioxidants and damages cell components, including DNA. Dietary antioxidant vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals in addition to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, n-9 monounsaturated fatty acids, and low pro-inflammatory n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, have demonstrated protective properties. The presence of these elements in the traditional Greek-style Mediterranean diet may have contributed to the low rates of melanoma in the Mediterranean region despite high levels of solar radiation. This suggests a potentially relevant model for studying dietary/nutritional supplementation for lifelong internal support of sun-protection mechanisms, which could complement external strategies.

  16. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  17. Rational SU(N) Gaudin Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹俊鹏; 侯伯宇; 岳瑞宏

    2001-01-01

    We propose the eigenstates and eigenvalues of Hamiltonians of the rational SU(N) Gaudin model based onthe quasi-classical limit of the SU ( N) chain under the periodic boundary condition. Using the quantum inversescattering method, we also obtain the eigenvalues of the generation function of the rational SU ( N) Gaudin model.

  18. Asymmetric dark matter and the Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sarkar, Subir

    2010-01-01

    Cold dark matter particles with an intrinsic matter-antimatter asymmetry do not annihilate after gravitational capture by the Sun and can affect its interior structure. The rate of capture is exponentially enhanced when such particles have self-interactions of the right order to explain structure...

  19. SunPy - Python for Solar Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Community, The SunPy; Christe, Steven; Pérez-Suárez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y; Inglis, Andrew R; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russell J; Mayer, Florian; Hughitt, Keith; Freij, Nabil; Meszaros, Tomas; Bennett, Samuel M; Malocha, Michael; Evans, John; Agrawal, Ankit; Leonard, Andrew J; Robitaille, Thomas P; Mampaey, Benjamin; Campos-Rozo, Jose Iván; Kirk, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents SunPy (version 0.5), a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualisation and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy is a data-analysis environment specialising in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric data in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from mis...

  20. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ve Got Skin in the Game Anti-Aging Vitamin D Related: What Is Skin Cancer? | True Stories | Ask the Experts Blog Events ... Weekend Warriors expand/collapse Golf: You've Got Skin in the Game expand/collapse Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter ...

  1. Sino-Sun Architects & Engineers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Sino-Sun is an A-Class state architectural design company organized by a group of experts who have returned to China after studying abroad. In the 10 yearssince its establishment, it has grown into an outstanding andwell-known design team, which has influence in the national archi-tectural design field.

  2. Ulysses Passes South Pole of Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程林

    1995-01-01

    On the 14th of September,1994, the fastest scientific instrument in space passed the south pole of the Sun,a place where no human-made object has been before. A spaceprobe called Ulysses made the polar pass at about midday as it continued to collect data on the solar wind,a stream of high-energy sub-atomic

  3. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  4. Sun Baiqiu Fights for the Human Cause

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    SUN Baiqiu liked to read well known literature from all over the world when she was a little girl. She sympathized with the good-hearted characters and hated the greedy and the evil. She imagined that she would become like a fairy godmother, holding a magic wand and helping the poor but kind people in distress. In 1963 she graduated from Haerbin

  5. Detection of Planetary Transits Across a Sun-like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonneau, D; Latham, D W; Mayor, M; Charbonneau, David; Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Mayor, Michel

    1999-01-01

    We report high precision, high cadence photometric measurements of the star HD 209458, which is known from radial velocity measurements to have a planetary mass companion in a close orbit. We detect two separate transit events at times that are consistent with the radial velocity measurements. In both cases, the detailed shape of the transit curve due to both the limb darkening of the star and the finite size of the planet is clearly evident. Assuming stellar parameters of 1.1 R_Sun and 1.1 M_Sun, we find that the data are best interpreted as a gas giant with a radius of 1.27 +/- 0.02 R_Jup in an orbit with an inclination of 87.1 +/- 0.2 degrees. We present values for the planetary surface gravity, escape velocity, and average density, and discuss the numerous observations that are warranted now that a planet is known to transit the disk of its parent star.

  6. Solar radiation as a forest management tool: a primer of principles and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard G. Halverson; James L. Smith

    1979-01-01

    Forests are products of solar radiation use. The sun also drives the hydrologic cycle on forested watersheds. Some basic concepts of climatology and solar radiation are summarized in including earth-sun relations, polar tilt, solar energy, terrestrial energy, energy balance, and local energy. An example shows how these principles can be applied in resource management....

  7. Ultraviolet radiation, human health, and the urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon M. Heisler; Richard H. Grant

    2000-01-01

    Excess exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun, particularly the ultraviolet B (UVB) portion, has been linked with adverse effects on human health ranging from skin cancers to eye diseases such as cataracts. Trees may prevent even greater disease rates in humans by reducing UV exposure. Tree shade greatly reduces UV irradiance when both the sun and sky are...

  8. SU-E-J-122: The CBCT Dose Calculation Using a Patient Specific CBCT Number to Mass Density Conversion Curve Based On a Novel Image Registration and Organ Mapping Method in Head-And-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Bel Air, MD (United States); Lasio, G; Chen, S; Zhang, B; Langen, K; Prado, K; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yi, B [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huang, J [University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a CBCT HU correction method using a patient specific HU to mass density conversion curve based on a novel image registration and organ mapping method for head-and-neck radiation therapy. Methods: There are three steps to generate a patient specific CBCT HU to mass density conversion curve. First, we developed a novel robust image registration method based on sparseness analysis to register the planning CT (PCT) and the CBCT. Second, a novel organ mapping method was developed to transfer the organs at risk (OAR) contours from the PCT to the CBCT and corresponding mean HU values of each OAR were measured in both the PCT and CBCT volumes. Third, a set of PCT and CBCT HU to mass density conversion curves were created based on the mean HU values of OARs and the corresponding mass density of the OAR in the PCT. Then, we compared our proposed conversion curve with the traditional Catphan phantom based CBCT HU to mass density calibration curve. Both curves were input into the treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculation. Last, the PTV and OAR doses, DVH and dose distributions of CBCT plans are compared to the original treatment plan. Results: One head-and-neck cases which contained a pair of PCT and CBCT was used. The dose differences between the PCT and CBCT plans using the proposed method are −1.33% for the mean PTV, 0.06% for PTV D95%, and −0.56% for the left neck. The dose differences between plans of PCT and CBCT corrected using the CATPhan based method are −4.39% for mean PTV, 4.07% for PTV D95%, and −2.01% for the left neck. Conclusion: The proposed CBCT HU correction method achieves better agreement with the original treatment plan compared to the traditional CATPhan based calibration method.

  9. Comparative analysis of the quasi-similar structures on the dynamic spectra of the Sun and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, G.; Konovalenko, A.; Zakharenko, V.; Vinogradov, V.; Dorovsky, V.; Melnik, V.; Brazhenko, A.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Rucker, H. O.; Zarka, Ph.

    2014-04-01

    In many literary sources planet Jupiter called the Sun, which is not fully developed. It should be partially confirmed by the experimental fact that the quasisimilar in shape features appear in the dynamic spectra both in the Sun and the Jovian radio emission. The comparative analysis of the similar properties in the emission spectra of Jupiter and the Sun and analogy between the plasma processes in the solar corona and magnetosphere of Jupiter can allow also define the similar features in the radiation mechanisms of these cosmic objects. One of the promising approaches to investigating features of the Jovian DAM emission and the decameter solar radiation is application of novel experimental techniques with a further detailed analysis of the obtained data.

  10. Solar radiation and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Moan, Kristin; Moan, Johan [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Brekke, Paal [Norwegian Space Centre, PO Box 113, Skoeyen, N-0212 Oslo (Norway); Dahlback, Arne [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Reichrath, Joerg [Klinik fuer Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, D-66421 Homburg/Saar (Germany); Holick, Michael F [Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Nutrition and Diabetes, Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory, Boston University Medical Center, 85 E. Newton St., M-1013, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Grant, William B, E-mail: asta.juzeniene@rr-research.no, E-mail: kmoan@hotmail.com, E-mail: paal.brekke@spacecentre.no, E-mail: arne.dahlback@fys.uio.no, E-mail: j.e.moan@fys.uio.no, E-mail: stefan.andersson-engels@fysik.lth.se, E-mail: joerg.reichrath@uks.eu, E-mail: mfholick@bu.edu, E-mail: wbgrant@infionline.net [Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center (SUNARC), PO Box 641603, San Francisco, CA 94164-1603 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

  11. Solar radiation and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Brekke, Pål; Dahlback, Arne; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Reichrath, Jörg; Moan, Kristin; Holick, Michael F.; Grant, William B.; Moan, Johan

    2011-06-01

    The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

  12. The rate of stellar encounters along a migrating orbit of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Barbosa, C A; Zwart, S Portegies; Brown, A G A

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of Galactic stellar encounters the Solar system experienced depends on the local density and velocity dispersion along the orbit of the Sun in the Milky Way galaxy. We aim at determining the effect of the radial migration of the solar orbit on the rate of stellar encounters. As a first step we integrate the orbit of the Sun backwards in time in an analytical potential of the Milky Way. We use the present-day phase-space coordinates of the Sun, according to the measured uncertainties. The resulting orbits are inserted in an N-body simulation of the Galaxy, where the stellar velocity dispersion is calculated at each position along the orbit of the Sun. We compute the rate of Galactic stellar encounters by employing three different solar orbits ---migrating from the inner disk, without any substantial migration, and migrating from the outer disk. We find that the rate for encounters within $4\\times10^5$ AU from the Sun is approximately 21, 39 and 63 Myr$^{-1}$, respectively. The stronger encounters...

  13. Modeling the Young Sun's Solar Wind and its Interaction with Earth's Paleomagnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sterenborg, M Glenn; Drake, Jeremy J; Gombosi, Tamas I; 10.1029/2010JA016036

    2011-01-01

    We present a focused parameter study of solar wind - magnetosphere interaction for the young Sun and Earth, $~3.5$ Ga ago, that relies on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations for both the solar wind and the magnetosphere. By simulating the quiescent young Sun and its wind we are able to propagate the MHD simulations up to Earth's magnetosphere and obtain a physically realistic solar forcing of it. We assess how sensitive the young solar wind is to changes in the coronal base density, sunspot placement and magnetic field strength, dipole magnetic field strength and the Sun's rotation period. From this analysis we obtain a range of plausible solar wind conditions the paleomagnetosphere may have been subject to. Scaling relationships from the literature suggest that a young Sun would have had a mass flux different from the present Sun. We evaluate how the mass flux changes with the aforementioned factors and determine the importance of this and several other key solar and magnetospheric variables with respect t...

  14. Assessing the impacts of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimlin, Michael G; Guo, Yuming

    2012-05-15

    Ultraviolet radiation exposure during an individuals' lifetime is a known risk factor for the development of skin cancer. However, less evidence is available on assessing the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. This study aims to assess the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive measure of exposure. We recruited 180 participants (73 males, 107 females) aged 18-83 years. Digital imaging of skin hyperpigmentation (skin damage) and skin wrinkling (skin aging) on the facial region was measured. Lifetime sun exposure (presented as hours) was calculated from the participants' age multiplied by the estimated annual time outdoors for each year of life. We analyzed the effects of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging. We adjust for the influence of age, sex, occupation, history of skin cancer, eye color, hair color, and skin color. There were non-linear relationships between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Younger participant's skin is much more sensitive to sun exposure than those who were over 50 years of age. As such, there were negative interactions between lifetime sun exposure and age. Age had linear effects on skin damage and skin aging. The data presented showed that self reported lifetime sun exposure was positively associated with skin damage and skin aging, in particular, the younger people. Future health promotion for sun exposure needs to pay attention to this group for skin cancer prevention messaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. School Sun-Protection Policies--Does Being SunSmart Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L.; Buettner, Petra; Nowak, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the comprehensiveness of primary school sun-protection policies in tropical North Queensland, Australia. Pre-determined criteria were used to assess publicly available sun-protection policies from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.3°S; n = 43), Cairns (16.9°S; n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.3°S; n = 23) during 2009-2012.…

  16. Observing the Sun with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a space telescope primarily designed to detect high-energy X-rays from faint, distant astrophysical sources. Recently, however, its occasionally been pointing much closer to home, with the goal of solving a few longstanding mysteries about the Sun.Intensity maps from an observation of a quiet-Sun region near the north solar pole and an active region just below the solar limb. The quiet-Sun data will be searched for small flares that could be heating the solar corona, and the high-altitude emission above the limb may provide clues about particle acceleration. [Adapted from Grefenstette et al. 2016]An Unexpected TargetThough we have a small fleet of space telescopes designed to observe the Sun, theres an important gap: until recently, there was no focusing telescope making solar observations in the hard X-ray band (above ~3 keV). Conveniently, there is a tool capable of doing this: NuSTAR.Though NuSTARs primary mission is to observe faint astrophysical X-ray sources, a team of scientists has recently conducted a series of observations in which NuSTAR was temporarily repurposed and turned to focus on the Sun instead.These observations pose an interesting challenge precisely because of NuSTARs extreme sensitivity: pointing at such a nearby, bright source can quickly swamp the detectors. But though the instrument cant be used to observe the bright flares and outbursts from the Sun, its the perfect tool for examining the parts of the Sun weve been unable to explore in hard X-rays before now such as faint flares, or the quiet, inactive solar surface.In a recently published study led by Brian Grefenstette (California Institute of Technology), the team describes the purpose and initial results of NuSTARs first observations of the Sun.Solar MysteriesWhat is NuSTAR hoping to accomplish with its solar observations? There are two main questions that hard X-ray observations may help to answer.How are particles accelerated in

  17. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  18. Normalization Of Thermal-Radiation Form-Factor Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.

    1994-01-01

    Report describes algorithm that adjusts form-factor matrix in TRASYS computer program, which calculates intraspacecraft radiative interchange among various surfaces and environmental heat loading from sources such as sun.

  19. The SILCC project --- IV. Impact of dissociating and ionising radiation on the interstellar medium and Halpha emission as a tracer of the star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C O; Girichidis, Philipp; Pellegrini, Eric; Klessen, Ralf S; Wünsch, Richard; Gatto, Andrea; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the impact of stellar winds, photoelectric heating, photodissociating and photoionising radiation, and supernovae on the chemical composition and star formation in a stratified disc model. This is followed with a sink-based model for star clusters with populations of individual massive stars. Stellar winds and ionising radiation regulate the star formation rate at a factor of ~10 below the simulation with only supernova feedback due to their immediate impact on the ambient interstellar medium after star formation. Ionising radiation (with winds and supernovae) significantly reduces the ambient densities for most supernova explosions to rho = 30 M_sun) with short lifetimes are responsible for significant fluctuations in the Halpha luminosities. The corresponding inferred star formation rates can underestimate the true instantaneous star formation rate by factors of ~10.

  20. Neutrino Fluxes from NUHM LSP Annihilations in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olive, Keith

    2011-08-12

    We extend our previous studies of the neutrino fluxes expected from neutralino LSP annihilations inside the Sun to include variants of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with squark, slepton and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the GUT scale, but allowing one or two non-universal supersymmetry-breaking parameters contributing to the Higgs masses (NUHM1,2). As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM) with universal Higgs masses, there are large regions of the NUHM parameter space where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate, and there are also large regions where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering. The spectra possible in the NUHM are qualitatively similar to those in the CMSSM. We calculate neutrino-induced muon fluxes above a threshold energy of 10 GeV, appropriate for the IceCube/DeepCore detector, for points where the NUHM yields the correct cosmological relic density for representative choices of the NUHM parameters. We find that the IceCube/DeepCore detector can probe regions of the NUHM parameter space in addition to analogues of the focus-point strip and the tip of the coannihilation strip familiar from the CMSSM. These include regions with enhanced Higgsino-gaugino mixing in the LSP composition, that occurs where neutralino mass eigenstates cross over. On the other hand, rapid-annihilation funnel regions in general yield neutrino fluxes that are unobservably small.

  1. A Tracking Sun Photometer Without Moving Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is small, lightweight, and consumes very little electricity as it measures the solar energy attenuated by gases and aerosol particles in the atmosphere. A Sun photometer is commonly used on the Earth's surface, as well as on aircraft, to determine the solar energy attenuated by aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their distribution of sizes. This information is used to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, as well as their distribution sizes. The design for this Sun photometer uses a combination of unique optics and a charge coupled device (CCD) array to eliminate moving parts and make the instrument more reliable. It could be selfcalibrating throughout the year. Data products would be down-welling flux, the direct-diffuse flux ratio, column abundance of gas phase constituents, aerosol optical depth at multiple-wavelengths, phase functions, cloud statistics, and an estimate of the representative size of atmospheric particles. These measurements can be used to obtain an estimate of aerosol size distribution, refractive index, and particle shape. Incident light is received at a light-reflecting (inner) surface, which is a truncated paraboloid. Light arriving from a hemispheric field of view (solid angle 2 steradians) enters the reflecting optic at an entrance aperture at, or adjacent to, the focus of the paraboloid, and is captured by the optic. Most of this light is reflected from an inner surface. The light proceeds substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis, and is detected by an array detector located near an exit aperture. Each of the entrance and exit apertures is formed by the intersection of the paraboloid with a plane substantially perpendicular to the paraboloid axis. Incident (non-reflected) light from a source of limited extent (the Sun) illuminates a limited area on the detector array. Both direct and diffuse illumination may be reflected, or not reflected, before being received on

  2. Study of high energy (MeV) N{sup 6+} ion and gamma radiation induced modifications in low density polyethylene (LDPE) polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, Ramandeep Kaur [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, Paramjit [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India); Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India); Department of Physics, Aggarwal College, Ballabgarh 121004 Faridabad (India); Singh, Surinder [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshkumaripu@gmail.com [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi 110078 (India)

    2013-04-15

    The optical and structural response of low density polyethylene (LDPE) under the influence of 80 MeV N{sup 6+} ion at various fluences (5 × 10{sup 11} to 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) and gamma rays at doses 100 and 1000 kGy were studied using UV–Vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical absorption spectra of N{sup 6+} ion irradiated LDPE showed a shift in the absorption edge towards higher wavelength side, which indicated a significant decrease in the direct and indirect band gaps of the films. The optical data showed decrease in the calculated band gap with increasing gamma dose. The diffraction pattern of pristine sample showed the semi crystalline nature of the polymer. The decrease in peak intensity and hence increase in amorphous nature was observed in N{sup 6+} ion irradiated samples. The opposite behavior is seen in case of gamma ray exposed samples at 100 kGy dose. The crystallite size (L) decreased but the other factors like interchain separation (R), interplanar distance (d), micro strain (ε), dislocation density (δ) and distortion parameters (g) increased for N{sup 6+} ion irradiated samples.

  3. UV photography, masculinity, and college men's sun protection cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Laura A; Stock, Michelle L

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the impact of an ultraviolet (UV) photography intervention and masculinity on college men's sun protection cognitions, including: perceived vulnerability to skin damage, attitudes toward sun protection, willingness to engage in sun protection behaviors, and intentions to receive a skin cancer exam. After completing a baseline survey, participants (N = 152) viewed a black-and-white photo of their face. Half also viewed a photo showing their UV damage. Participants then completed a second survey assessing sun protection cognitions. Regressions revealed that masculinity predicted lower sun protection cognitions, and men in the UV photograph condition reported higher sun protection cognitions. Masculinity by condition interactions showed that the positive effect of UV photography was stronger among masculine men. Negative associations between masculinity and sun protection cognitions were significant only among men who did not receive the intervention. Findings suggest that UV photography is a promising sun protection intervention among masculine men.

  4. Neutrinos from WIMP annihilations in the Sun including neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, Mattias, E-mail: emb@kth.se [Department of Theoretical Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) - AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Edsjoe, Joakim, E-mail: edsjo@physto.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University - AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Ohlsson, Tommy, E-mail: tommy@theophys.kth.se [Department of Theoretical Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) - AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    The prospects to detect neutrinos from the Sun arising from dark matter annihilations in the core of the Sun are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on new work investigating the effects of neutrino oscillations on the expected neutrino fluxes.

  5. How Can I Protect My Children from the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Protect My Children from the Sun? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... other options to prevent UV damage. Too Much Sun Hurts Turning pink? Unprotected skin can be damaged ...

  6. Leaf color is fine-tuned on the solar spectra to avoid strand direct solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Atsushi; Akitsu, Tomoko; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distributions of light absorption rates by intact leaves are notably different from the incident solar radiation spectra, for reasons that remain elusive. Incident global radiation comprises two main components; direct radiation from the direction of the sun, and diffuse radiation, which is sunlight scattered by molecules, aerosols and clouds. Both irradiance and photon flux density spectra differ between direct and diffuse radiation in their magnitude and profile. However, most research has assumed that the spectra of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) can be averaged, without considering the radiation classes. We used paired spectroradiometers to sample direct and diffuse solar radiation, and obtained relationships between the PAR spectra and the absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments and organs. As monomers in solvent, the spectral absorbance of Chl a decreased with the increased spectral irradiance (W m(-2) nm(-1)) of global PAR at noon (R(2) = 0.76), and was suitable to avoid strong spectral irradiance (λmax = 480 nm) rather than absorb photon flux density (μmol m(-2) s(-1) nm(-1)) efficiently. The spectral absorption of photosystems and the intact thallus and leaves decreased linearly with the increased spectral irradiance of direct PAR at noon (I dir-max), where the wavelength was within the 450-650 nm range (R(2) = 0.81). The higher-order structure of photosystems systematically avoided the strong spectral irradiance of I dir-max. However, when whole leaves were considered, leaf anatomical structure and light scattering in leaf tissues made the leaves grey bodies for PAR and enabled high PAR use efficiency. Terrestrial green plants are fine-tuned to spectral dynamics of incident solar radiation and PAR absorption is increased in various structural hierarchies.

  7. Sun and shade leaves? Cuticle ultrastructure of Jurassic Komlopteris nordenskioeldii (Nathorst) Barbacka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, G; Bóka, K; Barbacka, M

    2001-04-01

    An ultrastructural transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of fossil leaf cuticles from the Jurassic pteridosperm Komlopteris nordenskioeldii (Nathorst) Barbacka from the Mecsek Mountains (South Hungary) was conducted. Remnants of cuticles of leaves originating from so-called "sun and shade" environments were sectioned with a diamond knife, transversally as well as longitudinally. Although the present study showed a simple type of cuticle in this pteridosperm, differences were observed in the occurrence of its components, such as electron lucent amorphous material and various densities of granules, which give rise to different zones. The included fibrilous elements appeared to be made of aggregated and aligned granules, equivalent in size and electron density to nearby non-fibrilous granular regions. The combinations of these ultrastructural features allow distinctions between four types of cuticle: sun upper, sun lower, shade upper and shade lower. Considering the distinction made earlier in two types of cuticle and supposed to be related to sun and shade on the basis of macroscopical and microscopical features, four types only on the basis of differences in thickness, the present study reinforces the distinctions with ultrastructural microcharacteristics. As this study shows the variations in ultrastructure of cuticle among the four types, the differences observed may reveal the great sensitivity of some plants to environment. At the same time, it points out the importance, in ultrastructural studies of cuticles, of studying a number of samples for one taxon.

  8. Gamma irradiation of sun-dried apricots (Prunus armeniaca L.) for quality maintenance and quarantine purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Peerzada R., E-mail: hussainpr@rediffmail.co [Astrophysical Science Division, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Zakura, Srinagar, Kashmir-190006 (India); Meena, Raghuveer S.; Dar, Mohd A.; Wani, Ali M. [Astrophysical Science Division, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Zakura, Srinagar, Kashmir-190006 (India)

    2011-07-15

    The study is aimed at the optimization of gamma irradiation treatment of sun-dried apricots for quality maintenance and quarantine purposes. Sun-dried apricots pre-treated with potassium meta-bisulphite (KMS) at 2.5% w/v were procured from progressive apricot grower of district Kargil, Ladakh region of Jammu and Kashmir state. The sun-dried apricots were packed in 250 gauge polyethylene packs and gamma irradiated in the dose range 1.0-3.0 kGy. The gamma irradiated fruit including control was stored under ambient (15{+-}2-25{+-}2 {sup o}C, RH 70-80%) conditions and periodically evaluated for physico-chemical, sensory and microbial quality parameters. Radiation treatment at dose levels of 2.5 and 3.0 kGy proved significantly (p{<=}0.05) beneficial in retention of higher levels of {beta}-carotene, ascorbic acid, total sugars and color values without impairing the taste as perceived by the sensory panel analysists. The above optimized doses retained the {beta}-carotene content of sun-dried apricots to the extent of 71.2% and 72.6% compared to 63.9% in control samples after 18 months of storage. Irradiation treatment facilitated the release of residual sulfur dioxide in KMS pre-treated sun-dried apricots significantly (p{<=}0.05) below the prescribed limit for dried products. During storage, two-fold decrease in sulfur dioxide content was recorded in irradiated samples (3.0 kGy) as compared to 16.9% in control. The above optimized doses besides maintaining the higher overall acceptability of sun-dried apricots resulted in 5 log reductions in microbial load just after irradiation and 1.0 and 1.3 log reductions in yeast and mold and bacterial count after 18 months of ambient storage.

  9. Outdoor workers and sun protection strategies: two case study examples in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendall, Marguerite C; Stoneham, Melissa; Crane, Phil; Fleming, MaryLou; Janda, Monika; Tenkate, Thomas; Youl, Philippa; Kimlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor workers are at risk of developing skin cancer because they are exposed to high levels of harmful ultraviolet radiation. The Outdoor Workers Sun Protection Project investigated sun protection strategies for high risk outdoor workers in rural and regional Australia. Fourteen workplaces (recruitment rate 37%) across four industries in rural and regional Queensland, Australia were recruited to the OWSPP. In 2011-2012, data were collected using pre- and post-intervention interviews and discussion groups. This article presents two workplaces as case study examples. The flat organisational structure of workplace 1 supported the implementation of the Sun Safety Action Plan (SSAP), whilst the hierarchical organisational nature of workplace 2 delayed implementation of the SSAP. Neither workplace had an existing sun protection policy but both workplaces adopted one. An effect related to the researchers' presence was seen in workplace 1 and to a lesser degree in workplace 2. Overt reciprocity was seen between management and workers in workplace 1 but this was not so evident in workplace 2. In both workplaces, the role of the workplace champion was pivotal to SSAP progression. These two case studies highlight a number of contextually bound workplace characteristics related to sun safety. These issues are (1) the structure of workplace, (2) policy, (3) an effect related to the researchers' presence, (4) the workplace champion and (5) reciprocity. There are several recommendations from this article. Workplace health promotion strategies for sun safety need to be contextualised to individual workplaces to take advantage of the strengths of the workplace and to build capacity.

  10. Blinded by the light the secret life of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    1991-01-01

    An investigation into the secrets and the new scientific developments which are changing our perceptions of the sun. The book tackles such questions as: does the sun breathe?; can it make sound?; is its centre ice-cold? The new research in sun science will alter our perception not only of the sun, but of the whole universe and add to the understanding of how the world works. The author has also written "Hothouse Earth" and "The Hole in the Sky".

  11. Observing the sun a pocket field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive solar observing guide for use at the telescope by amateur astronomers at all three levels: beginning, intermediate, and advanced. Users will find invaluable information for identifying features through photos, charts, diagrams in a logical, orderly fashion and then interpreting the observations. Because the Sun is a dynamic celestial body in constant flux, astronomers rarely know for certain what awaits them at the eyepiece. All features of the Sun are transient and sometimes rather fleeting. Given the number of features and the complex life cycles of some solar features, it can be a challenging hobby, and this guide provides all of the guidance necessary to inform observers about the sights and events unfolding before their eyes on the most active and powerful member of our Solar System.

  12. Hierarchical analysis of the quiet Sun magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio

    2014-01-01

    Standard statistical analysis of the magnetic properties of the quiet Sun rely on simple histograms of quantities inferred from maximum-likelihood estimations. Because of the inherent degeneracies, either intrinsic or induced by the noise, this approach is not optimal and can lead to highly biased results. We carry out a meta-analysis of the magnetism of the quiet Sun from Hinode observations using a hierarchical probabilistic method. This model allows us to infer the statistical properties of the magnetic field vector over the observed field-of-view consistently taking into account the uncertainties in each pixel due to noise and degeneracies. Our results point out that the magnetic fields are very weak, below 275 G with 95% credibility, with a slight preference for horizontal fields, although the distribution is not far from a quasi-isotropic distribution.

  13. A new perspective on quiet Sun magnetism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LITES; Bruce; William

    2009-01-01

    The Hinode mission has provided us with a new, quantitative view of the magnetism of the quiet Sun. It has revealed that the quiet internetwork areas are blanketed by horizontal fields that appear at first sight to have more flux than the vertical fields resolved on the same 0.3 size scale. These measurements point to the possibility that the horizontal fields might be the primary source of the "hidden turbulent flux" of the quiet Sun anticipated from Hanle effect depolarization. In this paper, evidence is presented suggesting that the "seething" horizontal fields observed by Harvey in 2007 and the horizontal fields revealed by Hinode are the same phenomenon. Because the seething fields appear to be of uniform fluctuation over the whole disk, the phenomenon is most likely not associated with the dynamo source of solar activity. Thus, the small-scale "hidden turbulent flux" lends support to the notion of a local solar dynamo acting on granular sizes and time scales.

  14. Under the Lens: Investigating the Sun's Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, William; Klotz, Irene

    2008-11-01

    Sometime around 2012, the waxing 11-year solar cycle once again will reach its peak. Between now and then, magnetically turbulent sunspots, spawned by some still mysterious process, will form near the poles in increasing numbers and migrate toward the Sun's faster-rotating equator in pairs of opposite polarity. Titanic magnetic storms will rage as immense flux tubes rise to the surface in active regions around sunspots and spread out in a boiling sea of electric charge. Magnetic field lines across an enormous range of scales will arc and undulate, rip apart and reconnect, heating the Sun's upper atmosphere and occasionally triggering brilliant flares and multibillion-megaton coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that travel through the solar wind and slam into Earth.

  15. Wreathes of Magnetism in Rapidly Rotating Suns

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Benjamin P; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2009-01-01

    When our Sun was young it rotated much more rapidly than now. Observations of young, rapidly rotating stars indicate that many possess substantial magnetic activity and strong axisymmetric magnetic fields. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the 3-D MHD anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore the complex coupling between rotation, convection and magnetism. Here we study dynamo action realized in the bulk of the convection zone for two systems, rotating at three and five times the current solar rate. We find that substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields are achieved by dynamo action in these systems. Striking wreathes of magnetism are built in the midst of the convection zone, coexisting with the turbulent convection. This is a great surprise, for many solar dynamo theories have suggested that a tachocline of penetration and shear at the base of the convection zone is a crucial ingredient for organized dynamo action, whereas these simulations do not includ...

  16. How plants LINC the SUN to KASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Linkers of the nucleoskeleton to the cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes formed by SUN and KASH proteins are conserved eukaryotic protein complexes that bridge the nuclear envelope (NE) via protein-protein interactions in the NE lumen. Revealed by opisthokont studies, LINC complexes are key players in multiple cellular processes, such as nuclear and chromosomal positioning and nuclear shape determination, which in turn influence the generation of gametes and several aspects of development. Although comparable processes have long been known in plants, the first plant nuclear envelope bridging complexes were only recently identified. WPP domain-interacting proteins at the outer NE have little homology to known opisthokont KASH proteins, but form complexes with SUN proteins at the inner NE that have plant-specific properties and functions. In this review, we will address the importance of LINC complex-regulated processes, describe the plant NE bridging complexes and compare them to opisthokont LINC complexes.

  17. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Series of three US satellites designed to study the solar wind and its interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere. ISEE-1 and 2 were placed into highly elliptical Earth orbits. ISEE-3 was placed in a halo orbit at the L1 Lagrangian point between the Sun and Earth. It gave advance warning of solar storms heading towards Earth. (See also INTERNATIONAL COMETARY EXPLORER and EXPLORER.)...

  18. Operational Art and the Rising Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-16

    shall run wild for the first six months or a year, but I have utterly no confidence for the second or third ’Potter, p. 46; Michael Slackman, Target...attack that no american carriers in 26Joseph K. Taussig , "A Tactical View of Pearl Harbor", Paul Stillwell, ed., Air Raid: Pearl Harbor! (Annapolis, MD...Weiner, 1991. Slackman, Michael . Target: Pearl Harbor. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1990. Stephan, John J. Hawaii Under the Rising Sun

  19. Complete Solution of Sun Tracking for Heliostat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying-Tian; LIM Boon-Han; LIM Chern-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A general solution of sun tracking for an arbitrarily oriented heliostat towards an arbitrarily located target on the earth is published. With the most general form of solar tracking formulae, it is seen that the used azimuthelevation, spinning-elevation tracking formulae etc. are the special cases of it. The possibilities of utilizing the general solution and its significance in solar energy engineering are discussed.

  20. Complete Solution of Sun Tracking for Heliostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Tian; Lim, Boon-Han; Lim, Chern-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A general solution of sun tracking for an arbitrarily oriented heliostat towards an arbitrarily located target on the earth is published. With the most general form of solar tracking formulae, it is seen that the used azimuth-elevation, spinning-elevation tracking formulae etc. are the special cases of it. The possibilities of utilizing the general solution and its significance in solar energy engineering are discussed.

  1. Outdoor Workers' Use of Sun Protection at Work and Leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl E. Peters

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This high-participation rate cohort helps characterize sun protection behaviors among outdoor workers. Workers practiced better sun protection at work than on weekends, suggesting that workplace policies supportive of sun protection could be useful for skin cancer prevention in the construction industry.

  2. ON FELICITOUS CHARACTER OF GENERALIZED SUN-GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Si-hua; YAO Bing; YAO Ming

    2015-01-01

    Felicitous character of some generalized sun-graphs is investigated in this note, and furthermore the exact felicitous labellings of two classes of generalized sun-graphs are obtained by analyzing the structures of the generalized sun-graphs. And the constructed graph theory models in coding theory, communication networks, logistics and other aspects have important applications.

  3. Exploring Young People's Beliefs and Images about Sun Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. M.; Robinson, N. G.; Young, R. McD.; Anderson, P. J.; Hyde, M. K.; Greenbank, S.; Keane, J.; Rolfe, T.; Vardon, P.; Baskerville, D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand young people's low levels of sun protection behaviour, 145 young people (aged 12 to 20 years) were recruited from Queensland, to participate in a one-hour focus group where they discussed issues related to sun protection and images of tanned and non-tanned people. Responses were content analysed to identify common sun protection…

  4. Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG core-shell nanoparticles: a low-toxic and efficient difunctional nanoplatform for chemo-photothermal therapy under near infrared light radiation with a safe power density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xijian; Wang, Qian; Li, Chun; Zou, Rujia; Li, Bo; Song, Guosheng; Xu, Kaibing; Zheng, Yun; Hu, Junqing

    2014-04-21

    A low-toxic difunctional nanoplatform integrating both photothermal therapy and chemotherapy for killing cancer cells using Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG core-shell nanoparticles is reported. Silica coating and further PEG modification improve the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of copper selenide nanoparticles. As-prepared Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG nanoparticles not only display strong near infrared (NIR) region absorption and good photothermal effect, but also exhibit excellent biocompatibility. The mesoporous silica shell is provided as the carrier for loading the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX). Moreover, the release of DOX from Cu₂-xSe@mSiO₂-PEG core-shell nanoparticles can be triggered by pH and NIR light, resulting in a synergistic effect for killing cancer cells. Importantly, the combination of photothermal therapy and chemotherapy driven by NIR radiation with safe power density significantly improves the therapeutic efficacy, and demonstrates better therapeutic effects for cancer treatment than individual therapy.

  5. In situ investigations of laser and thermally modified As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers: Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrat, O., E-mail: o.b.kondrat@gmail.com; Holomb, R.; Popovich, N.; Mitsa, V. [Institute of Solid State Physics and Chemistry, Uzhhorod National University, Pidhirna Str., 46, 88000 Uzhhorod (Ukraine); Veres, M. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Csik, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Feher, A. [Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Tsud, N.; Matolín, V. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vondráček, M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Prince, K. C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, in Area Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-12-14

    As-deposited, annealed, and in situ As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers, illuminated by blue (405 nm) and red (650 nm) laser light, were studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT electronic structure calculations. Changes in composition and local atomic coordination occurring in the irradiated region of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were monitored by analysis of As 3d and S 2p core levels. These studies show that both the thermal treatment and the red laser illumination of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers decrease the concentration of homopolar (As-As and S-S) bonds. From the other hand, an increasing concentration of As-rich structural units (s.u.) with a homopolar As-As bond was observed under in situ blue laser illumination of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers. Molecular orbital energies were calculated for different As- and S-centered s.u. and used for the interpretation of the core levels and valence band spectra. The surface local structure of the As{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanolayers and its photoinduced transformation are discussed in detail.

  6. Evolution of lithium abundance in the Sun and solar twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenin, F.; Oreshina, A. V.; Baturin, V. A.; Gorshkov, A. B.; Morel, P.; Provost, J.

    2017-02-01

    Evolution of the 7Li abundance in the convection zone of the Sun during different stages of its life time is considered to explain its low photospheric value in comparison with that of the solar system meteorites. Lithium is intensively and transiently burned in the early stages of evolution (pre-main sequence, pMS) when the radiative core arises, and then the Li abundance only slowly decreases during the main sequence (MS). We study the rates of lithium burning during these two stages. In a model of the Sun, computed ignoring pMS and without extra-convective mixing (overshooting) at the base of the convection zone, the lithium abundance does not decrease significantly during the MS life time of 4.6 Gyr. Analysis of helioseismic inversions together with post-model computations of chemical composition indicates the presence of the overshooting region and restricts its thickness. It is estimated to be approximately half of the local pressure scale height (0.5HP) which corresponds to 3.8% of the solar radius. Introducing this extra region does not noticeably deplete lithium during the MS stage. In contrast, at the pMS stage, an overshooting region with a value of approximately 0.18HP is enough to produce the observed lithium depletion. If we conclude that the dominant lithium burning takes place during the pMS stage, the dispersion of the lithium abundance in solar twins is explained by different physical conditions, primarily during the early stage of evolution before the MS.

  7. Towards label-free evaluation of oxidative stress in human skin exposed to sun filters (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Suita, Yusuke; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma, is the most common form of cancer in North America. Paradoxically, skin cancer incidence is steadily on the rise even despite the growing use of sunscreens over the past decades. One potential explanation for this discrepancy involves the sun filters in sunscreen, which are responsible for blocking harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is proposed that these agents may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the site of application, thereby generating oxidative stress in skin that gives rise to genetic mutations, which may explain the rising incidence of skin cancer. To test this hypothesis, ex vivo human skin was treated with five common chemical sun filters (avobenzone, octocrylene, homosalate, octisalate, and oxybenzone) as well as two physical sun filters (zinc oxide compounds), both with and without UV irradiation. To non-invasively evaluate oxidative stress, two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the skin samples were used to monitor levels of NADH and FAD, two key cofactors in cellular redox metabolism. The relative redox state of the skin was assessed based on the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of these endogenous cofactors. While the sun filters were indeed shown to have a protective effect from UV radiation, it was observed that they also generate oxidative stress in skin, even in the absence of UV light. These results suggest that sun filter induced ROS production requires more careful study, especially in how these reactive species impact the rise of skin cancer.

  8. Assessing the impacts of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimlin, Michael G., E-mail: m.kimlin@qut.edu.au; Guo, Yuming, E-mail: guoyuming@yahoo.cn

    2012-05-15

    Background: Ultraviolet radiation exposure during an individuals' lifetime is a known risk factor for the development of skin cancer. However, less evidence is available on assessing the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Objectives: This study aims to assess the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive measure of exposure. Methods: We recruited 180 participants (73 males, 107 females) aged 18-83 years. Digital imaging of skin hyperpigmentation (skin damage) and skin wrinkling (skin aging) on the facial region was measured. Lifetime sun exposure (presented as hours) was calculated from the participants' age multiplied by the estimated annual time outdoors for each year of life. We analyzed the effects of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging. We adjust for the influence of age, sex, occupation, history of skin cancer, eye color, hair color, and skin color. Results: There were non-linear relationships between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Younger participant's skin is much more sensitive to sun exposure than those who were over 50 years of age. As such, there were negative interactions between lifetime sun exposure and age. Age had linear effects on skin damage and skin aging. Conclusion: The data presented showed that self reported lifetime sun exposure was positively associated with skin damage and skin aging, in particular, the younger people. Future health promotion for sun exposure needs to pay attention to this group for skin cancer prevention messaging. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study finding the non-linear relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study finds there is negative interaction between lifetime sun exposure and age for skin damage and aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggests that future

  9. Evaluating sun-climate relationships since the Little Ice Age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lean, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States). E.O. Hulburt Center for Space Research; Rind, D. [Columbia University, GISS, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    From the coldest period of the Little Ice Age to the present time, the surface temperature of the Earth increased by perhaps 0.8{sup o}C. Solar variability may account for part of this warming which, during the past 350 years, generally tracks fluctuating solar activity levels. While increases in greenhouse gas concentrations are widely assumed to be the primary cause of recent climate change, surface temperatures nevertheless varied significantly during pre-industrial periods, under minimal levels of greenhouse gas variations. A climate forcing of 0.3 W m{sup -2} arising from a speculated 0.13% solar irradiance increase can account for the 0.3{sup o}C surface warming evident in the paleoclimate record from 1650 to 1790, assuming that climate sensitivity is 1{sup o}C W{sup -1} m{sup -2} (which is within the IPCC range). The empirical Sun-climate relationship defined by these pre-industrial data suggests that solar variability may have contributed 0.25{sup o}C of the 0.6{sup o}C subsequent warming from 1900 to 1990, a scenario which time dependent GCM simulations replicate when forced with reconstructed solar irradiance. Thus, while solar variability likely played a dominant role in modulating climate during the Little Ice Age prior to 1850, its influence since 1900 has become an increasingly less significant component of climate change in the industrial epoch. It is unlikely that Sun-climate relationships can account for much of the warming since 1970, notwithstanding recent attempts to deduce long term solar irradiance fluctuations from the observational data base, which has notable occurrences of instrumental drifts. Empirical evidence suggests that Sun-climate relationships exist on decadal as well as centennial time scales, but present sensitivities of the climate system are insufficient to explain these short-term relationships. Still to be simulated over the time scale of the Little Ice Age to the present is the combined effect of direct radiative forcing

  10. Superflares on Sun-Like Stars: Bane of Habitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T.

    2014-04-01

    A key aspect of planetary habitability is the existence of rare, but catastrophic events. One Earthly example is the attribution of several geological mass extinctions to asteroid collisions. Indeed, the Late Heavy Bombardment, during which the 600 Myr old Earth was pummeled persistently by impactors over a period of perhaps a hundred Myr, likely significantly delayed the permanent foothold of life on our planet. Another, less well known, example is the proposed existence of "superflares" on Sun-like stars. Although the quantity of energy in a superflare is negligible compared with the time-integrated X-ray dose from the quiescent multi-MK corona, the quality of the radiation (i.e., composition dominated by gamma rays) released from the transient, but extreme, outburst is what could be of concern to the survival of primitive lifeforms struggling for existence on a semi-habitable world. However, existing reports of superflares mainly involve interpretations of historical materials, such as long-term astronomical plate collections; there are very few concrete examples of such events observed by modern techniques at the most relevant wavelengths, namely ultraviolet or X-rays. The lack of good examples is mostly because these rare events are, well, rare. However, a recent HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph program to record the ultraviolet spectrum of young (~50 Myr) solar analog EK Draconis, fortuitously captured a giant, hour-long FUV transient, in hot lines like the C IV 155 nm doublet (T~100,000 K), and very toasty Fe XXI 124 nm coronal forbidden line (~10 MK). If translated into the equivalent GOES 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray fluence, the event would correspond to an X25000-class flare (most extreme observed on the Sun might reach as high as a mere X50). The EK Dra giant flare, as viewed with the excellent wavelength resolution, broad coverage, and high sensitivity of COS, provides the opportunity to deduce properties of such events to help inform possible impacts on planetary

  11. Keeping Cool Close to the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-13

    The germanium detector in the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft is only the size and weight of a can of peaches but will play a critical role in investigating Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft travels at about 38 kilometers per second and is named after the scientific goals of the mission. It is the first spacecraft to visit Mercury since 1975. MESSENGER must take an oblique route to approach Mercury so that it does not fly past the planet and fall directly into the Sun. The spacecraft will travel 7.9 billion kilometers, flying by Earth once, Venus twice, and Mercury three times before settling into orbit around this mysterious planet. Of all the terrestrial planets, which include Venus, Earth, and Mars, Mercury is the smallest and the densest; its days are 176 Earth days long, two complete orbits of the planet around the Sun. Temperatures range from a high of 450 C on the Sun side during its long day to a low of -185 C on its night side. By studying this extreme planet, scientists hope to better understand how Earth formed and evolved. The GRS, one of the seven lightweight scientific instruments on MESSENGER, will be used to help scientists determine the abundance of elements in Mercury's crust, including the materials that might be ice at its poles. Livermore engineer Norman Madden led the West Coast team effort to design and build the GRS in a collaboration led by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL). The team included Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories as well as University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL). The JHUAPL MESSENGER project is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery Mission. Because the detector needs to operate at very low temperatures and MESSENGER is close to the Sun, the thermal design to protect the detector was

  12. Nocturnal aerosol optical thickness measured with a sun/moon photometer developed by improving the Prede Sky-radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiobara, Masataka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hishida, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    Sun photometry to obtain the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) needs the sun. Since the moon must be another source of light instead of the sun during night-time, a moon photometer was developed by improving the Prede POM-02 Sky-radiometer to measure the spectral lunar irradiance. The original POM-02 model has an electric dynamic range of 109 to measure both of direct- and circum-solar radiation. The electronics of POM-02 was upgraded to include a 1011 dynamic range for better performance to measure the direct lunar irradiance at the visible range as well as the sun and sky measurements with a single instrument. A CCD-based position sensor was newly developed to track the moon as well as the sun continuously. The position of the moon/sun is determined with accuracy of better than 0.01° by a real-time processing system using the CCD imager. Test measurements with the improved POM-02 instrument were performed for the half to full moon conditions, and showed a good performance for lunar photometry to obtain the nocturnal AOTs.

  13. Cost-Risk Trade-off of Solar Radiation Management and Mitigation under Long-Tailed Climate Sensitivity Probability Density Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, E.; Mohammadi Khabbazan, M.; Held, H.

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) might be able to reduce the anthropogenic global mean temperature rise but unable to do so for other climate variables such as precipitation, particularly with respect to regional disparities due to changes in planetary energy budget. We apply cost-risk analysis (CRA), which is a decision analytic framework that trades off the expected welfare-loss from climate policies costs against the climate risks from exceeding an environmental target. Here, in both global- and `Giorgi'-regional-scale analyses, we study the optimal mix of SRM and mitigation under probabilistic knowledge about climate sensitivity, in our numerics ranging from 1.01°C to 7.17°C. To do so, we generalize CRA for the sake of including temperature risk, global and regional precipitation risks. Social welfare is maximized in three scenarios, considering a convex combination of climate risks: temperature-risk-only, precipitation-risk-only, and equally weighted both-risks. Our global results represent 100%, 65%, and 90% compliance with 2°C-temperature target and simultaneously 0%, 100%, and 100% compliance with 2°C-compatible-precipitation corridor respectively in temperature-risk-only, precipitation-risk-only, and both-risks scenarios. On the other hand, our regional results emphasize that SRM would alleviate the global mean temperature to be complied with 2°C-temperature target for about 100%, 95%, and 95% of climate sensitivities in temperature-risk-only, precipitation-risk-only, and both-risks scenarios, respectively. However, half of the regions suffer a very high precipitation risks when the society only cares about global temperature reduction in temperature-risk-only scenario. Our results indicate that although SRM might almost substitute for mitigation in the global analysis, it only saves about a half of the welfare-loss in a purely mitigation-based analysis (from economic costs and climate risks, in terms of BGE) when considering regional precipitation

  14. Watching the Sun to Improve Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Looking for stars that wobble is one of the key ways by which we detect exoplanets: the gravitational pull of planets cause tiny variations in stars radial velocities. But our ability to detect Earth twins is currently limited by our ability to distinguish between radial-velocity variations caused by exoplanets, and those caused by noise from the star itself. A team of scientists has recently proposed that the key to solving this problem may be to examine our own star.Precision Amid NoiseThe radial-velocity technique works well for detecting large planets on close orbits, but detecting an Earth twin requires being able to detect star motion on the order of 10 cm/s! This precision is hard to reach, because activity on the stellar surface i.e., sunspots, plages (bright spots), or granulation can also cause variations in the measured radial velocity for the star, obscuring the signature of a planet.Because the stars were examining arent resolved, we cant track the activity on their surfaces so how can we better understand the imprint that stellar activity has on radial-velocity measurements? A team of scientists has come up with a clever approach: examine the Sun as though it were a distant star.Wealth of InformationThe team, led by Xavier Dumusque (Branco-Weiss Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and David F. Phillips (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), has begun a project to observe the Sun with a ground-based solar telescope. The telescope observes the full disk of the Sun and feeds the data into the HARPS-N spectrograph in Spain, a spectrograph normally used for radial-velocity measurements of other stars in the hunt for exoplanets.But the team has access to other data about the Sun, too: information from satellites like the Solar Dynamics Observatory and SORCE about the solar activity and total irradiance during the time when the spectra were taken. Dumusque and collaborators have combined all of this information, during a week

  15. The Sun: the Earth light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  16. Sun protecting and sun exposing behaviors: testing their relationship simultaneously with indicators of ultraviolet exposure among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Melinda; Caputi, Peter; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to build on existing understanding of adolescent sun-related behavior by combining sun protecting and sun exposing behaviors and testing their relationship simultaneously with indicators of ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Data were collected for 692 adolescents aged between 12 and 18 years. General linear modeling was undertaken to test the relationship of sun-related behaviors with indicators of UV exposure. Overall, the combined sun protection and sun exposing behaviors accounted for 13.8% of the variance in the number of sunburns, 28.1% of the variance in current tan and 57.5% of the variance in desired tan, respectively. Results indicated that having a strong desire for a tan was significantly associated with spending time tanning, delaying the use of sun protection, wearing brief clothing and using no sun protection; whereas the number of sunburns was significantly associated with sunscreen use, avoiding peak hours and delaying sun protection. Current tan was significantly associated with wearing sunglasses, shade use and time spent tanning. In examining sun-related behaviors among adolescents, consideration needs to be given to both sun exposing and sun protecting behaviors. This research has important implications for conceptualizing outcomes in programs designed to reduce UV exposure.

  17. Conversion of commercial si solar cells to keep their efficient performance at 15 suns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coello, J. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Energias Renovables, Poligono Industrial de Granadilla, Tenerife (Spain); Castro, M.; Anton, I.; Sala, G. [Ciudad Univ., Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Energia Solar; Vazquez, M.A. [Isofoton, S.A., Poligono Industrial Santa Cruz, Malaga (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The screen-printing method is an economical metallization technique used by most manufacturers of conventional silicon solar cells. This method limits the cells' use under concentrated light owing to high series resistance losses caused, among other reasons, by low metal density in the fingers. This paper describes increasing the finger metal density by electrolytic deposition. The electrolytic deposition of silver is an economical, controllable and readily commercializable deposition method to reduce the front and back metallization series resistance contributions. With an optimized grid design, compatible with 1 sun silicon cell technology, and later electrolytic silver deposition we have obtained cells that maintain their efficiency up to 15 suns. In addition, an analysis of the performance of these cells under uniform and non-uniform illumination were carried out on n{sup +}p and n{sup +}pn{sup +} structures. (author)

  18. Sun-care product advertising in parenting magazines: what information does it provide about sun protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hannah; Walsh-Childers, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the content of sun-care product advertisements in five major U.S. parenting magazines with high circulation: Family Circle, Parents, Family Fun, Parenting (Early Years), and Parenting (School Years). The study examined what information sun-care product advertisements tell parents about skin cancer prevention and about sunscreen use for themselves or for their children based on the Health Belief Model concepts of perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Results showed that the most commonly mentioned benefit of the product was that it blocks ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. One-third of the ads promoted the product's effectiveness in overcoming four of the barriers that prevent people from using sunscreens: eye irritation, skin irritation, an unpleasant smell, and the need to reapply sunscreen too often or after physical activity. However, only a few of the ads provided information about the consequences of unprotected sun exposure or mentioned methods of sun protection or skin cancer prevention other than sunscreen use. We discuss the implications of these messages for parents' ability to understand correctly how to protect their children from damaging sun exposure.

  19. [Research on absolute calibration of sun channel of sun photometer using laser raster scanning method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Bin; Li, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a new calibration method of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of sun channel of sun photometer was developed. A tunable laser was used as source and a standard tranfer detector, calibrated against cryogenic absolute radiometer, was used to measure laser beam power. By raster scanning of a single collimated laser beam to generate the uniform irradiance field at the plane of effective aperture stop of sun photometer, the absolute irradiance responsivity of center wavelength of the 870 nm unpolarized sun channels of sun photometer was obtained accurately. The relative spectral irradiance responsivity of corresponding channel was obtained by using lamp-monochromator system and then used to acquire the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity in the laboratory. On the basis of the above results, the top-of-the-atmosphere responsive constant V0 was obtained by integration with extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance data. Comparing the calibration result with that from GSFC, NASA in 2009, the difference is only 3.75%. In the last, the uncertainties of calibration were evaluated and reached to 2.06%. The principle feasibility of the new method was validated.

  20. Linking density, productivity and trends of an endangered species: The Bonelli's eagle in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Luis M.; Seoane, Javier

    2009-05-01

    Whether regional population density is a good indicator of environmental quality according to demographic variables such as breeding success or short-term population trends is controversial. In this paper we analyze the interrelationships among regional population density, breeding success and recent population trends of an endangered species, Bonelli's eagle in the Iberian Peninsula. We also analyze the different influence of geographical, climatic, landscape structure and human impact variables on regional variation in those demographic variables. Breeding success was higher and population decrease was lower in those areas where the population density of Bonelli's eagle was greater. Breeding success, density and recent population trends of Bonelli's eagle were tightly related, increasing from northern to southern Iberian Peninsula (with highest figures at intermediate latitudes), and as sun radiation increased, and altitude decreased. Breeding success and population density were significantly lower in the periphery of the distribution range than in core areas in the Iberian Peninsula. Population trends between 2000 and 2005 were also more negative (decreasing) in the periphery. Overall, these results suggest that population density in this endangered species of large home-range is a good indicator of environmental quality and reproductive output, and that peripheral populations occupy low-suitability areas with lower breeding success, where negative short-term population trends are more likely.