WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun flares

  1. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  2. Evidence That Solar Flares Drive Global Oscillations in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    Solar flares are large explosions on the Sun's surface caused by a sudden release of magnetic energy. They are known to cause local short-lived oscillations traveling away from the explosion like water rings. Here we show that the energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is correlated with flares. This means that the flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. The correlation between flares and energy in the acoustic spectrum of disk-integrated sunlight is stronger for high-frequency waves than for ordinary p-modes which are excited by the turbulence in the near-surface convection zone immediately beneath the photosphere.

  3. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50° h-1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  4. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to 50 deg per hr) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related p...

  5. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-10

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h(-1)) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  6. The flare origin of Forbush decreases not associated with solar flares on the visible hemisphere of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations have shown that Forbush decreases (Fds) are produced by the propagation into the interplanetary space of a strong perturbation originating from a solar flare (Sf) accompanied by Type IV radioemission. As the front of the perturbation propagates into the interplanetary space, the region in which the galactic cosmic rays are modulated (Fd-modulated region) rotates westward with the Sun and is generally included between two boundary streams; therefore the Fds not associated with observed type IV Sfs (N.Ass.Fds) are likely to be produced by type IV Sfs occurred on the Sun's backside: these vents can be observed when the Earth crosses the corotating Western boundary of the modulated region.

  7. Dynamic Flaring Non-potential Fields on Quiet Sun Network Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the identification of dynamic flaring non-potential structures on quiet Sun (QS) supergranular network scales. Data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory allow for the high spatial and temporal resolution of this diverse class of compact structures. The rapidly evolving non-potential events presented here, with lifetimes 100″) and micro-sigmoids (>10″) with lifetimes on the order of hours to days. The photospheric magnetic field environment derived from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager shows a lack of evidence for these flaring non-potential fields being associated with significant concentrations of bipolar magnetic elements. Of much interest to our events is the possibility of establishing them as precursor signatures of eruptive dynamics, similar to notions for AR sigmoids and micro-sigmoids, but associated with uneventful magnetic network regions. We suggest that the mixed network flux of QS-like magnetic environments, though unresolved, can provide sufficient free magnetic energy for flaring non-potential plasma structuring. The appearance of non-potential magnetic fields could be a fundamental process leading to self-organized criticality in the QS-like supergranular network and contribute to coronal heating, as these events undergo rapid helicial and vortical relaxations.

  8. Observations of Magnetic Evolution and Network Flares Driven by Photospheric Flows in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attie, Raphael; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2017-08-01

    The quiet Sun may be the biggest laboratory to study physical elementary processes of fundamental importance to space plasma. The advantage is the continuous availability of small-scale events, carrying the hidden microphysics that is responsible for larger-scale phenomena. By small-scale events, we mean spatial dimensions of a few Mm at most, and durations of less than an hour. I present here an attempt to describe and understand the coupling between the photospheric flows, the photospheric magnetic flux, and small-scale energetic transient events. By adapting and improving the highly efficient Balltracking technique for Hinode/SOT data, we relate the fine structures of the supergranular flow fields with the magnetic flux evolution. For studying the dynamics of the latter, and more precisely, the magnetic flux cancellation at sites of energy releases, we applied a new feature tracking algorithm called "Magnetic Balltracking" -- which tracks photospheric magnetic elements -- to high-resolution magnetograms from Hinode/SOT.Using observations of the low corona in soft X-rays with Hinode/XRT, we analyse the triggering mechanism of small-scale network flares. By tracking both the flow fields on the one hand, and the magnetic motions on the other hand, we relate the flows with cancelling magnetic flux. We identify two patterns of horizontal flows that act as catalysts for efficient magnetic reconnection: (i) Funnel-shaped streamlines in which the magnetic flux is carried, and (ii) large-scale vortices (~10 Mm and above) at the network intersections, in which distant magnetic features of opposite polarities seem to be sucked in and ultimately vanish. The excess energy stored in the stressed magnetic field of the vortices is sufficient to power network flares.Prospects for determining the magnetic energy budget in the quiet sun are discussed.

  9. Patrol of the short wavelength activity and flares of Sun as star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, I.; Avakyan, S.; Leonov, N.; Serova, A.; Voronin, N.

    Monitoring of the spectral range which most affects solar-terrestrial relationship - soft X-ray and extreme UV-radiations allows to solve ? problem of solar activity influence on all aspects of the Sun - Earth ties and to select the most important precursors of solar flares and the solar events related with a flare (such as proton events, high-velocity plasma streams in the solar wind, shock waves, coronal mass ejection and, the most important, the beginning of principal magnetic storms). Solar activity is constantly monitored at present (in the USA) only in two sections of the spectrum of ionizing radiation: 115 (119) nm. However, so far there has been no monitoring of the flux in the most geoeffective region of the spectrum (0.8-115 nm) from the entire disk of the sun; this region completely monitors the main part of the ionosphere of the earth and the ionosphere of the other planets of the solar system, including the formation and status of the main ionospheric maxima. This occurs solely because of technical and methodological difficulties in performing the measurements and calibration in this spectral range on spacecraft, because it is necessity to use only windowless optics. At the present the solar the optical - electronic equipment (OEE) is testing and there are plans to launch OEE of Space Solar Patrol (SSP) consisting of solar radiometers and spectrometers at the Russian Module of the International Space Station. So the solving the problem of the permanent monitoring-patrol of ionizing radiation from the full disk of the Sun appears in the main tasks of fundamental scientific studies in space. The results of this monitoring can be contribution in development of simultaneous studies in several sciences, such as: - solar astrophysics (state of all solar atmospheric regions), - meteorology, physics of atmosphere (the influence of solar activity on global changes, climate and weather including the effects of atmo s pheric electricity), - aeronomy, astronautics

  10. Intense Flare-CME Event of the Year 2015: Propagation and Interaction Effects between Sun and Earth's Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Johri, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, We report the interplanetary effects of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with the intense X2.7 flare that occurred on 05 May 2015. The near-Sun signatures of the CME at low-coronal heights $<$2 {R$_{\\odot}$} are obtained from the EUV images at 171 {\\AA} and metric radio observations. The intensity and duration of the CME-driven radio bursts in the near-Sun and interplanetary medium indicate this CME event to be an energetic one. The interplanetary scintillation data, along with the low-frequency radio spectrum, played a crucial role in understanding the radial evolution of the speed and expansion of the CME in the inner heliosphere as well as its interaction with a preceding slow CME. The estimation of the speed of the CME at several points along the Sun to 1 AU shows shows that i) the CME went through a rapid acceleration as well as expansion up to a height of $\\approx$6 {R$_{\\odot}$}, and ii) the CME continued to propagate at speed $\\geq$800 kms$^{-1}$ between the Sun and 1 AU...

  11. Clusters of small eruptive flares produced by magnetic reconnection in the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Archontis, V

    2015-01-01

    We report on the formation of small solar flares produced by patchy magnetic reconnection between interacting magnetic loops. A three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical experiment was performed, where a uniform magnetic flux sheet was injected into a fully developed convective layer. The gradual emergence of the field into the solar atmosphere results in a network of magnetic loops, which interact dynamically forming current layers at their interfaces. The formation and ejection of plasmoids out of the current layers leads to patchy reconnection and the spontaneous formation of several small (size ? 1-2Mm) flares. We find that these flares are short-lived (30 s - 3 min) bursts of energy in the range O(10^25 - 10^27) ergs, which is basically the nanoflare-microflare range. Their persistent formation and co-operative action and evolution leads to recurrent emission of fast EUV/X-ray jets and considerable plasma heating in the active corona.

  12. Statistical characterization of Strong and Mid Solar Flares and Sun EUV rate monitoring with GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Beniguel, Yannick; Orus-Perez, Raul; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The global network of permanent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers has become an useful and affordable way of monitoring the Solar EUV flux rate, especially -for the time being- in the context of Major and Mid geoeffective intensity Solar Flares (M. Hernandez-Pajares et al., Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000826, 2012). In fact the maturity of this technique (GNSS Solar FLAre Indicator, GSFLAI) has allowed to incorporate it in operational real-time (RT) conditions, thanks to the availability of global GNSS datastreams from the RT International GNSS Network (M. Caissy et al, GPS World, June 1, 2012), and performed in the context of the MONITOR and MONITOR2 ESA-funded projects (Y. Beniguel et al., NAVITEC Proc., 978-1-4673-2011-5 IEEE, 2012). The main goal of this presentation is to summarize a detailed recent study of the statistical properties of Solar Flares (E. Monte and M. Hernandez-Pajares, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2014JA020206, 2014) by considering the GNSS proxy of EUV rate (GSFLAI parameter) computed independently each 30 seconds during the whole last solar cycle. An statistical model has been characterized that explains the empirical results such as (a) the persistence and presence of bursts of solar flares and (b) their long tail peak values of the solar flux variation, which can be characterized by: (1) A fractional Brownian model for the long-term dependence, and (2), a power law distribution for the time series extreme values. Finally, an update of the Solar Flares' occurrence during the recent months of Solar Activity, gathered in RT within MONITOR2 project, will close the paper.

  13. Flare onsets in hard and soft X-rays. [magnetic energy conversion in sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Orwig, Larry E.; Antonucci, Ester

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the onset of solar flares, within about 2 min or less before the impulsive peaks, is characterized by an increase in high-energy emission at E less than 100 keV, and strong broadening of soft X-ray lines characteristic of the 10-million-K plasma already present at this stage. The observations are interpreted in terms of the early signature of energy release, during a phase preceding the instability that leads to strong particle acceleration.

  14. Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sun Microsystems, Inc. is committed to open standards,a standardization system, and sharing within the information tech nology field, focusing not only on technical innovation, but also on new ideas, practices and future development.

  15. Energetic Phenomena on the Sun: The Solar Maximum Mission Flare Workshop. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, M.; Woodgate, B.

    1986-12-01

    The general objectives of the conference were as follows: (1) Synthesize flare studies after three years of Solar Maximum Mission (SSM) data analysis. Encourage a broader participation in the SMM data analysis and combine this more fully with theory and other data sources-data obtained with other spacecraft such as the HINOTORI, p78-1, and ISEE-3 spacecrafts, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) and many other ground-based instruments. Many coordinated data sets, unprecedented in their breadth of coverage and multiplicity of sources, had been obtained within the structure of the Solar Maximum Year (SMY). (2) Stimulate joint studies, and publication in the general scientific literature. The intended primary benefit was for informal collaborations to be started or broadened at the Workshops with subsequent publications. (3) Provide a special publication resulting from the Workshop.

  16. On Flare-CME Characteristics from Sun to Earth Combining Remote-Sensing Image Data with In Situ Measurements Supported by Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the well-observed flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from 1 October 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of effects - from Sun to Earth - to better understand the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere associated with the flare and CME using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based instruments. We also track the CME signature off-limb with combined extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white-light data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). By applying the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) reconstruction method and total mass to stereoscopic STEREO-SOHO ( Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in the interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the magnetic cloud (MC) from in situ measurements from Wind. This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results, as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We find that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are lower in the interplanetary space by ˜ 50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating an erosion process. A CME mass increase of 10% is observed over a range of {˜} 4 - 20 R_{⊙}. The temporal evolution of the CME

  17. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare in the Sun and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Longcope, D W; Ding, M D; Yang, K

    2016-01-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon which provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9. High-resolution slit-jaw 1330 A images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. Flare brightening in the upper chromosphere spreads along the ribbons toward the center of the "X" (the X-point), and then spreads outward in a direction more perpendicular to the ribbons. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons in the early stage therefore indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and reconnection proceeds downward along a section of vertical current sheet. Coronal loops are al...

  18. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare in the Sun and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Qiu, J.; Longcope, D. W.; Ding, M. D.; Yang, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon that provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9. High-resolution slit-jaw 1330 Å images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. Flare brightening in the upper chromosphere spreads along the ribbons toward the center of the “X” (the X-point), and then spreads outward in a direction more perpendicular to the ribbons. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons in the early stage therefore indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and reconnection proceeds downward along a section of vertical current sheet. Coronal loops are also observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory confirming the reconnection morphology illustrated by ribbon evolution.

  19. The "Sun-climate" relationship : III. The solar flares, north-south sunspot arrea asymmetry and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Komitov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    In this last Paper III additional evidences that the solar high energetic particles radiation with energies higher as 100 MeV (the solar cosmic rays SCR) is an very important component for the "Sun- climate" relationship are given (see also Paper I and II). The total solar irradiance (TSI) and the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) variations given an integral climate effect of cooling in sunspot minima and warming in the sunspot maxima. Unlike the both ones the powerful solar corpuscular events plays a cooling climate role during the epochs of their heigh levels. By this one subcenturial global and regional temperature quasi- cyclic changes by duration of approximately 60 years could be track during the last 150 years of instrumental climate observations . It has been also evided in the paper that this subcenturial oscilation is very important in the Group sunspot number (GSN) data series since the Maunder minimum up to the end of 20th century. Thus the solar erruptive activity effect make the total "Sun -climate" r...

  20. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Shibata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence, local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet, and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely, while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  1. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  2. Comparison between Major Confined and Eruptive Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Mäkelä, P.; Dennis, B. R.

    2012-05-01

    Statistical studies have shown that a large fraction of major solar flares (42% M-class and 15% X-class) are not associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The CME-less flares are confined flares as opposed to the eruptive flares associated with CMEs. Confined flares are certainly good particle accelerators as inferred from intense microwave, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray emissions. Note that a single acceleration mechanism operates in confined flares, whereas eruptive flares can have both flare-resident and shock accelerations (the shock acceleration is due to energetic CMEs). In this paper, we report on a statistical study of more than two dozen confined flares with soft X-ray flare size exceeding M5 in comparison with a control sample of eruptive flares with similar soft X-ray flare size. We compare the microwave and X-ray emission characteristics in the two populations; these emissions correspond to sunward energy flow. For a given X-ray flare size, the microwave flux is scattered over a wider range for the eruptive flares when compared to the confined flares. We also compare the metric and longer wavelength radio bursts between the two populations; these emissions correspond to the flow of nonthermal electrons away from the Sun. We find that almost all the confined flares lack metric radio bursts, suggesting that there is very little flow of energy into the interplanetary medium. On the other hand, there is high degree of association between eruptive flares and metric radio bursts. This suggests that in confined flares the accelerated electrons have no access to open magnetic field lines. Finally, we examined the association of EUV waves with the two flare populations. While we find EUV waves in most of the eruptive flares, there was no confined flare with EUV waves. This suggests that CMEs is a necessary condition for the generation of global waves.

  3. Fast electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    This review summarizes both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on the basic astrophysical process of particle acceleration in tenuous plasmas. We find that in many small solar flares, the nearly 5-100 keV electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. These electrons may produce the other flare electromagnetic emissions through their interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large proton flares these electrons may provide the energy to eject material from the sun and to create a shock wave which could accelerate nuclei and electrons to much higher energies.

  4. Flare physics at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  5. On Flare Driven Global Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Karoff, C.

    2008-01-01

    We recently presented evidence of a strong correlation between the energy in the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum of the Sun and the solar X-ray flux Karoff & Kjeldsen (2008). The discovery indicates that flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake, such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. If this indication turns out to be true we might be able to use the relation between flares ...

  6. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  7. Nasal flaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be caused by any of the following: Asthma flare-up Blocked airway (any cause) Swelling and mucus ... Tests that may be done include: Arterial blood gas analysis Complete blood count (CBC) ECG to check ...

  8. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamics of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics of the Sun is a completely new up-to-date rewrite from scratch of the 1982 book Solar Magnetohydrodynamics, taking account of enormous advances in understanding since that date. It describes the subtle and complex interaction between the Sun's plasma atmosphere and its magnetic field, which is responsible for many fascinating dynamic phenomena. Chapters cover the generation of the Sun's magnetic field by dynamo action, magnetoconvection and the nature of photospheric flux tubes such as sunspots, the heating of the outer atmosphere by waves or reconnection, the structure of prominences, the nature of eruptive instability and magnetic reconnection in solar flares and coronal mass ejections, and the acceleration of the solar wind by reconnection or wave-turbulence. It is essential reading for graduate students and researchers in solar physics and related fields of astronomy, plasma physics and fluid dynamics. Problem sets and other resources are available at www.cambridge.org/9780521854719.

  10. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  11. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2000-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law, for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instruments it is shown that 1. the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process, and 2. the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a non-stationary avalanche model for flares.

  12. Sun Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you have unusual, bothersome skin reactions after exposure to sunlight. For severe or persistent symptoms, you may need ... m. when the sun is brightest. Avoid sudden exposure to lots of sunlight. Many people have sun allergy symptoms when they ...

  13. Reconnection on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Because the Sun is so close, it makes an excellent laboratory to study processes we cant examinein distant stars. One openquestion is that of how solar magnetic fields rearrange themselves, producing the tremendous releases of energy we observe as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs).What is Magnetic Reconnection?Magnetic reconnection occurs when a magnetic field rearranges itself to move to a lower-energy state. As field lines of opposite polarity reconnect, magnetic energy is suddenly converted into thermal and kinetic energy.This processis believed to be behind the sudden releases of energy from the solar surface in the form of solar flares and CMEs. But there are many different models for how magnetic reconnection could occur in the magnetic field at the Suns surface, and we arent sure which one of these reconnection types is responsible for the events we see.Recently, however, several studies have been published presenting some of the first observational support of specific reconnection models. Taken together, these observations suggest that there are likely several different types of reconnection happening on the solar surface. Heres a closer look at two of these recent publications:A pre-eruption SDO image of a flaring region (b) looks remarkably similar to a 3D cartoon for typical breakout configuration (a). Click for a closer look! [Adapted from Chen et al. 2016]Study 1:Magnetic BreakoutLed by Yao Chen (Shandong University in China), a team of scientists has presented observations made by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) of a flare and CME event that appears to have been caused by magnetic breakout.In the magnetic breakout model, a series of loops in the Suns lower corona are confined by a surrounding larger loop structure called an arcade higher in the corona. As the lower loops push upward, reconnection occurs in the upper corona, removing the overlying, confining arcade. Without that extra confinement, the lower coronal loops expand upward

  14. On Flare-Driven Global Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.

    2009-12-01

    We recently presented evidence of a strong correlation between the energy in the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum of the Sun and the solar X-ray flux (Karoff & Kjeldsen 2008). The discovery indicates that flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake, such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. If this indication turns out to be true we might be able to use the relation between flares and the energy in the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum to detect e.g. flares on the far side of the Sun and flares on other solar-like stars. But, the discovery also opens many new questions such as why is it only the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum that is correlated with the X-ray flux? And, is there energy enough in solar flares to drive global oscillations?

  15. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Sun is enveloped by a hot, tenuous million-degree corona that expands to create a continuous solar wind that sweeps past all the planets and fills the heliosphere. The solar wind is modulated by strong gusts that are initiated by powerful explosions on the Sun, including solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This dynamic, invisible outer atmosphere of the Sun is currently under observation with the soft X-ray telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft, whose results are presented. We also show observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that is now passing over the solar pole, sampling the solar wind in this region for the first time. Two other spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have recently detected the outer edge of the invisible heliosphere, roughly halfway to the nearest star. Magnetic solar activity, the total radiative output from the Sun, and the Earth's mean global surface temperature all vary with the 11-year sunspot cycle in which the total number of sunspots varies from a maximum to a minimum and back to a maximum again in about 11 years. The terrestrial magnetic field hollows out a protective magnetic cavity, called the magnetosphere, within the solar wind. This protection is incomplete, however, so the Sun feeds an unseen world of high-speed particles and magnetic fields that encircle the Earth in space. These particles endanger spacecraft and astronauts, and also produce terrestrial aurorae. An international flotilla of spacecraft is now sampling the weak points in this magnetic defense. Similar spacecraft have also discovered a new radiation belt, in addition to the familiar Van Allen belts, except fed by interstellar ions instead of electrons and protons from the Sun.

  16. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Daniel F; Seaton, Dan; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) event list and LYRA (Large Yield RAdiometer) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasin...

  17. Further observations of protons resulting from the decay of neutrons ejected by solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P. A.; Kroeger, R.; Meyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The solar flare of 1984 April 24 produced a large gamma ray fluence with energy 2MeV. The time profile of the interplanetary flux from this flare indicates the presence of decaying solar neutrons. This makes a total of three neutron flares so far observed by this method. The three flares are used to place constraints on the fluence and spectra of neutrons emitted by the Sun.

  18. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  19. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  20. Whether solar flares can trigger earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.

    2007-05-01

    We present the study of 682 earthquakes of ¡Ý4.0 magnitude observed during January 1991 to January 2007 in the light of solar flares observed by GOES and SOXS missions in order to explore the possibility of any association between solar flares and earthquakes. Our investigation preliminarily shows that each earthquake under study was preceded by a solar flare of GOES importance B to X class by 10-100 hrs. However, each flare was not found followed by earthquake of magnitude ¡Ý4.0. We classified the earthquake events with respect to their magnitude and further attempted to look for their correlation with GOES importance class and delay time. We found that with the increasing importance of flares the delay in the onset of earthquake reduces. The critical X-ray intensity of the flare to be associated with earthquake is found to be ~10-6 Watts/m2. On the other hand no clear evidence could be established that higher importance flares precede high magnitude earthquakes. Our detailed study of 50 earthquakes associated with solar flares observed by SOXS mission and other wavebands revealed many interesting results such as the location of the flare on the Sun and the delay time in the earthquake and its magnitude. We propose a model explaining the charged particles accelerated during the solar flare and released in the space that undergone further acceleration by interplanetary shocks and produce the ring current in the earth's magnetosphere, which may enhance the process of tectonics plates motion abruptly at fault zones. It is further proposed that such sudden enhancement in the process of tectonic motion of plates in fault zones may increase abruptly the heat gradients on spatial (dT/dx) and temporal (dT/dt) scales responsible for earthquakes.

  1. Flare Characteristics from X-ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryciuk, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, B.; Mrozek, T.

    2017-06-01

    A new methodology is given to determine basic parameters of flares from their X-ray light curves. Algorithms are developed from the analysis of small X-ray flares occurring during the deep solar minimum of 2009, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24, observed by the Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) on the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon (CORONAS- Photon) spacecraft. One is a semi-automatic flare detection procedure that gives start, peak, and end times for single ("elementary") flare events under the assumption that the light curve is a simple convolution of a Gaussian and exponential decay functions. More complex flares with multiple peaks can generally be described by a sum of such elementary flares. Flare time profiles in the two energy ranges of SphinX (1.16 - 1.51 keV, 1.51 - 15 keV) are used to derive temperature and emission measure as a function of time during each flare. The result is a comprehensive catalogue - the SphinX Flare Catalogue - which contains 1600 flares or flare-like events and is made available for general use. The methods described here can be applied to observations made by Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and other broad-band spectrometers.

  2. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  3. Aztec Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The Aztec Sun Stone is a revered Mexican artifact. It is said to be perhaps the most famous symbol of Mexico, besides its flag. It primarily depicts the four great disasters that led to the migration of the Mexica people to modern-day Mexico City. The Aztec Sun Stone also contains pictographs depicting the way the Mexica measured time, and was…

  4. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  5. The sun, our star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  6. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  7. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  8. Sun meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younskevicius, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive device for measuring the radiation energy of the sun impinging on the device. The measurement of the energy over an extended period of time is accomplished without moving parts or tracking mechanisms.

  9. The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Essential for life on earth and a major influence on our environment, the Sun is also the most fascinating object in the daytime sky. Every day we feel the effect of its coming and going – literally the difference between day and night. But figuring out what the Sun is, what it’s made of, why it glows so brightly, how old it is, how long it will last – all of these take thought and observation. Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of what scientists know about the Sun, and the history of these discoveries. Solar astronomers have studied the Sun over the centuries both for its intrinsic interest and in order to use it as a laboratory to reveal the secrets of other stars. The authors discuss the surface of the Sun, including sunspots and their eleven-year cycle, as well as the magnetism that causes them; the Sun’s insides, as studied mainly from seismic waves that astronomers record on its surface; the outer layers of the Sun that we see from Earth only at eclipses ...

  10. Midnight sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunger, A.P.; Lambert, S.B.; Gagnon, M.P.

    1990-09-01

    Midnight Sun, the University of Waterloo's solar-electric car, was designed and built by about 30 engineering, kinesiology and physics students for the GM Sunrayce USA held in July 1990. The car measures 2 m by 4.2 m, weighs 224 kg, can collect about 1000 W of solar electricity in full sun, and had a top speed of 79 km/h. The race took 11 days to cover the 1644 miles from the Epcot Center in Lake Buena Vista, Florida to the GM Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. Thirty-two cars, powered only by solar energy, competed in this race. Midnight Sun showed its potential during the race qualifying runs by completing the required qualifying course with the 12th fastest time of 52.83 seconds, and the 6th fastest trap speed of 63 km/h. During the Sunrayce, Midnight Sun came in second on day 1 of the race, tenth on day 6, and eighth on day 7, and was one of only 17 solar cars that were able to make it up the toughest hill in the race on day 8. The most serious problems encountered by the car were a weak rear suspension, power losses, and failure of bypass diodes in the photovoltaic array. Midnight Sun was in 17th place overall at the end of day 9. At about 11:00 am on day 10 in Ohio, the Waterloo car was moving at 60 km/h when it was bumped off the road by an out of control pickup truck. The solar car driver was not hurt. Despite the difficulties, the next day Midnight Sun was repaired and driven across the finish line at the ceremonial finish. After receiving time penalties for not completing the last day and a half of the race, Midnight Sun was awarded 24th place with an official cumulative time of 114 h 37 min 15 s. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Little Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  12. Little sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  13. Remote Oscillatory responses to a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Andic, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between energy released caused by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at a different location, but not in the region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this is probably caused by a large scale magnetic connection between the regions, and not a globally propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer lived wave trains at short periods (P< 200s) at the time of a flare. This may be a mechanism by which flare energy can be redistributed throughout the solar atmosphere.

  14. Implications of RHESSI Flare Observations for Magnetic Reconnection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of the 2002 April 15 solar flare and related flares provide compelling evidence for the formation of a large-scale, reconnecting current sheet in at least some flares. We describe the observed evolution of the April 15 flare in terms of magnetic reconnection models. We argue that the flare most likely evolved through magnetic geometries associated with super-slow reconnection (early rise phase), fast reconnection (impulsive phase), and slow reconnection (gradual phase). We also provide evidence for X-ray brightenings within the evolving current sheet, possibly induced by the tearing mode instability. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Program and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Program. This work would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire RHESSI team.

  15. Sun Proof

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the harmful effects of the sun and how to protect yourself from it.  Created: 10/23/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/23/2012.

  16. Protection of Communication System From Solar Flares

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, K.(Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY, United States of America); Shirvram, B.

    2008-01-01

    Solar flares are enormous explosions on the surface of the sun and they release energy of the order of billion megatons of TNThis energy is in the form of electromagnetic radiations such as alpha, gamma, and ultraviolet rays. When exposed to high doses of radiation like 2-15 kilorad (Si), silicon integrated circuits in satellite communication systems fail to operate properly, thus affecting the performance of communication systems. Therefore, the major issue that needs to be addressed is the ...

  17. Modelling repeatedly flaring delta-sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Active regions (AR) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into $\\alpha$, $\\beta$, $\\gamma$, and $\\delta$ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the $\\delta$-sunspots are known to be super-active and produce the most X-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin sub-photospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux-tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic $\\delta$-sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  18. Multi-spectral observations of flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarello, F.

    2016-11-01

    Observations show that during solar flares radiation can be emitted across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, spanning from gamma rays to radio waves. These emissions, related to the conversion of magnetic energy into other forms of energy (kinetic, thermal, waves) through magnetic reconnection, are due to different physical processes that can occur in different layers of the Sun. This means that flare observations need to be carried out using instruments operating in different wave-bands in order to achieve a complete scenario of the processes going on. Taking into account that most of the radiative energy is emitted at optical and UV wavelengths, observations carried out from space, need to be complemented by observations carried out from ground-based telescopes. Nowadays, the possibility to carry on high temporal, spatial and spectral resolution from ground-based telescopes in coordinated campaigns with space-borne instruments (like, i.e., IRIS and HINODE) gives the opportunity to investigate the details of the flare emission at different wavelengths and can provide useful hints to understand these phenomena and compare observations with models. However, it is undoubted that sometimes the pointing to the flaring region is not an easy task, due to the necessity to provide the target coordinates to satellites with some hours in advance. Some problems arising from this issue will be discussed. Moreover, new projects related to flare catalogues and archives will be presented.

  19. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming, Yunnan 650091 (China); Reeves, K. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yuan, F., E-mail: mengy@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  20. Optical flares and flaring oscillations on the M-type eclipsing binary CU Cnc

    CERN Document Server

    -B., Qian S; Zhu, L -Y; Liu, L; Liao, W -P; Zhao, E -G; He, J -J; Li, L -J; Li, K; Dai, Z -B

    2012-01-01

    We report here the discovery of an optical flare observed in R band from the red-dwarf eclipsing binary CU Cnc whose component stars are at the upper boundary of full convection (M1=0.43 and M2=0.4M0, M0 is the solar mass). The amplitude of the flare is the largest among those detected in R band (~0.52mag) and the duration time is about 73 minutes. As those observed on the Sun, quasi-periodic oscillations were seen during and after the flare. Three more R-band flares were found by follow up monitoring. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically by using R filter for 79.9 hours, which reveals a R-band flare rate about 0.05 flares per hour. These detections together with other strong chromospheric and coronal activities, i.e., very strong H_alpha and H_beta emission features and an EUV and X-ray source, indicate that it has very strong magnetic activity. Therefore, the apparent faintness (~1.4 magnitude in V) of CU Cnc compared with other single red dwarfs of the same mass can be plausibly explained by...

  1. Investigation of relationships between parameters of solar nano-flares and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen; Kaki, Bardia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are one of the important coronal events which are originated in solar magnetic activity. They release lots of energy during the interstellar medium, right after the trigger. Flare prediction can play main role in avoiding eventual damages on the Earth. Here, to interpret solar large-scale events (e.g., flares), we investigate relationships between small-scale events (nano-flares) and large-scale events (e.g., flares). In our method, by using simulations of nano-flares based on Monte Carlo method, the intensity time series of nano-flares are simulated. Then, the solar full disk images taken at 171 angstrom recorded by SDO/AIA are employed. Some parts of the solar disk (quiet Sun (QS), coronal holes (CHs), and active regions (ARs)) are cropped and the time series of these regions are extracted. To compare the simulated intensity time series of nano-flares with the intensity time series of real data extracted from different parts of the Sun, the artificial neural networks is employed. Therefore, we are able to extract physical parameters of nano-flares like both kick and decay rate lifetime, and the power of their power-law distributions. The procedure of variations in the power value of power-law distributions within QS, CH is similar to AR. Thus, by observing the small part of the Sun, we can follow the procedure of solar activity.

  2. Predictability of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Peter; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2009-05-01

    Solar flares are significant drivers of space weather. With the availability of high cadence solar chromospheric and photospheric data from the USAF's Optical Solar PAtrol Network (OSPAN; photosphere and chromosphere imaging) Telescope and the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG; photosphere magnetic imaging), at the National Solar Observatory, we have gained insights into potential uses of the data for solar flare prediction. We apply the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to parameterize the flaring system and extract consistent observables at solar chromospheric and photospheric layers that indicate a viable recognition of flaring activity. Rather than limiting ourselves to a few known indicators of solar activity, PCA helps us to characterize the entire system using several tens of variables for each observed layer. The components of the Eigen vectors derived from PCA help us recognize and quantify innate characteristics of solar flares and compare them. We will present an analysis of these results to explore the viability of PCA to assist in predicting solar flares.

  3. New insight into Earth's weather through studies of Sun's magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  4. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  5. Spatial & Temporal Characteristics of Ha flares during the period 1975-2002 (comparison with SXR flares)

    CERN Document Server

    Gini, E; Hillaris, A; Preka-Papadema, P; Moussas, X; 10.1063/1.2347977

    2010-01-01

    Although the energetic phenomena of the Sun (flares, coronal mass injections etc.) exhibit intermittent stochastic behavior in their rate of occurrence, they are well correlated to the variations of the solar cycle. In this work we study the spatial and temporal characteristics of transient solar activity in an attempt to statistically interpret the evolution of these phenomena through the solar cycle, in terms of the self-organized criticality theory.

  6. The Flare-ona of EK Draconis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2015-07-01

    EK Draconis (HD 129333: G1.5 V) is a well-known young (50 Myr) solar analog. In 2012, Hubble Space Telescope returned to EK Dra to follow up a far-ultraviolet (FUV) SNAPshot visit by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) two years earlier. The brief SNAP pointing had found surprisingly redshifted, impulsively variable subcoronal “hot-line” emission of Si iv 1400 Å (T ˜ 8 × 104 K). Serendipitously, the 2012 follow-on program witnessed one of the largest FUV flares ever recorded on a sunlike star, which again displayed strong redshifts (downflows) of 30-40 km s-1, even after compensating for small systematics in the COS velocity scales, uncovered through a cross-calibration by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The (now reduced, but still substantial) ˜10 km s-1 hot-line redshifts outside the flaring interval did not vary with rotational phase, so cannot be caused by “Doppler imaging” (bright surface patches near a receding limb). Density diagnostic O iv] 1400 Å multiplet line ratios of EK Dra suggest ne ˜ 1011 cm-3, an order of magnitude larger than in low-activity solar twin α Centauri A, but typical of densities inferred in large stellar soft X-ray events. The self-similar FUV hot-line profiles between the flare decay and the subsequent more quiet periods, and the unchanging but high densities, reinforce a long-standing idea that the coronae of hyperactive dwarfs are flaring all the time, in a scale-free way; a flare-ona if you will. In this picture, the subsonic hot-line downflows probably are a byproduct of the post-flare cooling process, something like “coronal rain” on the Sun. All in all, the new STIS/COS program documents a complex, energetic, dynamic outer atmosphere of the young sunlike star.

  7. Stellar flares and the dark energy of CMEs

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Garraffo, Cecilia; Kashyap, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Flares we observe on stars in white light, UV or soft X-rays are probably harbingers of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). If we use the Sun as a guide, large stellar flares will dissipate two orders of magnitude less X-ray radiative energy than the kinetic energy in the associated CME. Since coronal emission on active stars appears to be dominated by flare activity, CMEs pose a quandary for understanding the fraction of their energy budget stars can spend on magnetic activity. One answer is magnetic suppression of CMEs, in which the strong large-scale fields of active stars entrap and prevent CMEs unless their free energy exceeds a critical value. The CME-less flaring active region NOAA 2192 presents a possible solar analogue of this. Monster CMEs will still exist, and have the potential to ravage planetary atmospheres.

  8. Obscuration of Flare Emission by an Eruptive Prominence

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-01-01

    We report on the eclipsing of microwave flare emission by an eruptive prominence from a neighboring region as observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. The obscuration of the flare emission appears as a dimming feature in the microwave flare light curve. We use the dimming feature to derive the temperature of the prominence and the distribution of heating along the length of the filament. We find that the prominence is heated to a temperature above the quiet Sun temperature at 17 GHz. The duration of the dimming is the time taken by the eruptive prominence in passing over the flaring region. We also find evidence for the obscuration in EUV images obtained by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission.

  9. Kepler super-flare stars: what are they?

    CERN Document Server

    Wichmann, R; Wolter, U; Nagel, E

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler mission has led to the serendipitous discovery of a significant number of `super flares' - white light flares with energies between 10^33 erg and 10^36 erg - on solar-type stars. It has been speculated that these could be `freak' events that might happen on the Sun, too. We have started a programme to study the nature of the stars on which these super flares have been observed. Here we present high-resolution spectroscopy of 11 of these stars and discuss our results. We find that several of these stars are very young, fast-rotating stars where high levels of stellar activity can be expected, but for some other stars we do not find a straightforward explanation for the occurrence of super flares.

  10. The Sun and How to Observe It

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2009-01-01

    Without the Sun, all life on Earth would perish. But what exactly do we know about this star that lights, heats, and powers Earth? Actually, we know quite a lot, thanks mainly to a host of eager solar observers. Looking directly at the Sun is EXTREMELY hazardous. But many astronomers, both professional and amateur, have found ways to view the Sun safely to learn about it. You, too, can view the Sun in all of its glorious detail. Some of the newest, most exciting telescopes on the market are affordable to amateur astronomers or even just curious sky watchers, and with this guide to what the Sun has to offer, including sunspots, prominences, and flares, plus reviews of the latest instruments for seeing and capturing images of the Sun, you can contribute to humankind’s knowledge of this immense ball of glowing gases that gives us all life. For a complete guide to Sun viewing, see also Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them (2007) by Martin Mobberley in this same series.

  11. Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA

    CERN Document Server

    Casadei, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

  12. High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The paper begins by describing the structure of the Sun, with emphasis on the corona. The Sun is a unique plasma laboratory, which can be probed by Sun-grazing comets, and is the driver of space weather. Energization and particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares is presented; magnetic reconnection is key is understanding stochastic acceleration mechanisms. Then coupling between kinetic and fluid aspects is taken up; the next step is feedback of atmospheric response to the acceleration process – rapid quenching of acceleration. Future challenges include applications of stochastic acceleration to solar energetic particles (SEPs), Fermi γ-rays observations, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains in a funnel-shaped wave guide associated with flare pulsations, and the new SMEX mission IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph),

  13. A ``perfect'' Late Phase Flare Loop: X-ray And Radio Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Hazel; Fletcher, L.

    2009-05-01

    We present observations of a GOES X3.1 class flare which occurred on the 24th August 2002. The event was observed by a number of instruments including RHESSI, TRACE and NoRH. This flare is particularly interesting due to its position and orientation on the west limb of the Sun. The flare appears to be perpendicular to the line of sight making it possible to ascertain the geometrical parameters of the post flare arcade loops. We investigate the decay phase of the flare by comparing X-ray and radio observations of the post flare arcade loops with models of soft x-ray and thermal gyrosynchrotron emission to characterise the electron distribution present within the loop. HMB gratefully acknowledges the support of an SPD and STFC studentship. LF gratefully acknowledges the support of an STFC Rolling Grant, and financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE Network (MTRN-CT_2006-035484)

  14. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  15. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  16. Observing the Sun with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a space telescope primarily designed to detect high-energy X-rays from faint, distant astrophysical sources. Recently, however, its occasionally been pointing much closer to home, with the goal of solving a few longstanding mysteries about the Sun.Intensity maps from an observation of a quiet-Sun region near the north solar pole and an active region just below the solar limb. The quiet-Sun data will be searched for small flares that could be heating the solar corona, and the high-altitude emission above the limb may provide clues about particle acceleration. [Adapted from Grefenstette et al. 2016]An Unexpected TargetThough we have a small fleet of space telescopes designed to observe the Sun, theres an important gap: until recently, there was no focusing telescope making solar observations in the hard X-ray band (above ~3 keV). Conveniently, there is a tool capable of doing this: NuSTAR.Though NuSTARs primary mission is to observe faint astrophysical X-ray sources, a team of scientists has recently conducted a series of observations in which NuSTAR was temporarily repurposed and turned to focus on the Sun instead.These observations pose an interesting challenge precisely because of NuSTARs extreme sensitivity: pointing at such a nearby, bright source can quickly swamp the detectors. But though the instrument cant be used to observe the bright flares and outbursts from the Sun, its the perfect tool for examining the parts of the Sun weve been unable to explore in hard X-rays before now such as faint flares, or the quiet, inactive solar surface.In a recently published study led by Brian Grefenstette (California Institute of Technology), the team describes the purpose and initial results of NuSTARs first observations of the Sun.Solar MysteriesWhat is NuSTAR hoping to accomplish with its solar observations? There are two main questions that hard X-ray observations may help to answer.How are particles accelerated in

  17. Filaments disappearances in relation to solar flares during the solar cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawad, R.; Shaltout, Mosalam; Ewaida, M.; Yousef, M.; Yousef, S.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the association between the filament disappearances and solar flares during 1996-2010; we listed 639 associated filament disappearances with solar flares under temporal and spatial condition, those particular 639 filament disappearance were associated with 1676 solar flares during the period 1996-2010. The best angular distance between filament disappearances and associated solar flares ranged between 30° and 60°. The number of the associated events increased with increasing solar activity and decreased with quiet sun. The location of filament disappearances ranges between latitude ±50° and longitude ±70°. We found that longer filament disappearances have activity and ability of contemporary association with flares more than shorter filament disappearance, filament disappearance powers the associated flares more than non-associated flares events. The associated flares have higher solar flux, longer duration, and higher importance compared to non-associated flares with filament disappearance. In addition the associated filament disappearance with flares have two types depending on their duration, short-lived (9 h).

  18. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    OpenAIRE

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework which can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into...

  19. Protons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in interplanetary space are observed which are interpreted as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1982 June 3 at 11:42 UT. Because of the particular geometry of this event the spectrum of neutrons escaping from the sun can be constructed with great accuracy in the kinetic energy range 10-100 MeV. The resulting spectrum places stringent constraints on the free parameters used in previously published calculations of neutron production in solar flares. An estimate is made of the diffusion mean free path of charged particles in the interplanetary medium in a new way.

  20. Continuous heating of a giant X-ray flare on Algol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Favata, F.

    1999-09-01

    Giant stellar flares can release large amounts of energy within a few days: X-ray emission alone can be up to ten per cent of the star's bolometric luminosity. These flares exceed the luminosities of the largest solar flares by many orders of magnitude, which suggests that the underlying physical mechanisms supplying the energy are different from those on the Sun. Magnetic coupling between the components in a binary system or between a young star and an accretion disk has been proposed as a prerequisite for giant flares. Here we report X-ray observations of a giant flare on Algol B, a giant star in an eclipsing binary system. We observed a total X-ray eclipse of the flare, which demonstrates that the plasma was confined to Algol B, and reached a maximum height of 0.6 stellar radii above its surface. The flare occurred around the south pole of Algol B, and energy must have been released continuously throughout its life. We conclude that a specific extrastellar environment is not required for the presence of a flare, and that the processes at work are therefore similar to those on the Sun.

  1. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...... to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...

  2. Modeling the Soft X-Ray During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaman, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar Radiation can effect our communication and navigation systems here on Earth. In particular, solar X-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is responsible for ionizing (charging) earth's upper atmosphere, and sudden changes in the ionosphere can disrupt high frequency communication systems (e.g. airplane-to-ground) and degrade the location accuracy for GPS navigation. New soft X-ray flare data are needed to study the sources for the SXR radiation and variability of the solar flares and thus help to answer questions if all flares follow the same trend or have different plasma characteristics? In December 2015, the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) launched from Cape Canaveral Florida to answer those questions. The MinXSS CubeSat is a miniature satellite that was designed to measure the soft X-ray spectra and study flares in the 1-15 Å wavelength range. So far, the CubeSat has observed more than ten flares. The MinXSS flare data are plotted in energy vs irradiance to display the soft X-ray spectra, and these spectra are compared with different types of CHIANTI models of the soft X-ray radiation. One comparison is for non-flaring spectra using AIA EUV images to identify solar features called active regions, coronal holes, and quiet sun, and then using the fractional area of each feature to calculate a CHIANTI-based spectrum. This comparison reveals how important the active region radiation is for the SXR spectra. A second comparison is for flare spectra to several isothermal models that were created using CHIANTI. The isothermal model comparisons were done with both the raw count spectra from MinXSS and the derived irradiance spectra. This dual comparison helps to validate the irradiance conversion algorithm for MinXSS. Comparisons of the MinXSS data to the models show that flares tend to follow a temperature pattern. Analysis of the MinXSS data can help us understand our sun better, could lead to better forecasts of solar flares, and thus

  3. Safe and efficient flare gas recovery; Safety flaring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Petersen, Joergen; Wills, Martin; Johnston, Ian

    2010-07-01

    Flaring of gas in connection with the production of hydrocarbons represents both an undesirable emission to the atmosphere and a loss of valuable resource. As part of the efforts further to reduce flaring Maersk Oil consider installation of Flare Gas Recovery (FGR) where appropriate, significant efforts have therefor been made by Maersk Oil as operator for Danish Underground Consortium (DUC) to reduce the flaring from the facilities operated in the Danish North Sea. (Author)

  4. Flaring variability of Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, Sergei A; Nizhelskij, Nikolaj A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss flaring variability of radio emission of microquasars, measured in monitoring programs with the RATAN-600 radio telescope. We carried out a multi-frequency (1-30 GHz) daily monitoring of the radio flux variability of the microquasars SS433, GRS1915+105, and Cyg X-3 during the recent sets in 2005-2007. A lot of bright short-time flares were detected from GRS 1915+105 and they could be associated with active X-ray events. In January 2006 we detected a drop down of the quiescent fluxes from Cyg X-3 (from 100 to $\\sim$20 mJy), then the 1 Jy-flare was detected on 2 February 2006 after 18 days of quenched radio emission. The daily spectra of the flare in the maximum were flat from 2 to 110 GHz, using the quasi-simultaneous observations at 110 GHz with the RT45m telescope and the NMA millimeter array of NRO in Japan. Several bright radio flaring events (1-15 Jy) followed during the continuing state of very variable and intensive 1-12 keV X-ray emission ($\\sim$0.5 Crab), which was monitored in the RXTE ASM...

  5. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  6. Magnetic Topology of the 29 October 2003 X10 flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jardins, Angela C.; Canfield, R.; Longcope, D.

    2006-06-01

    In order to improve the understanding of both flare initiation and evolution, we take advantage of powerful new topological methods and the high spatial resolution of RHESSI to examine where magnetic reconnection takes place in flare-producing solar active regions. Up to this time, such studies have been carried out on a very small number of active regions. According to present ideas, reconnection is expected to occur at either a separatrix or separator topological feature. We use the powerful X10 flare on 29 October 2003 (peak: 20:49 UT, location: (80'', 275'')) as a test of the ability to interpret the topological location of reconnection. The 29 October 2003 flare was well observed by RHESSI and MDI, occurred near the sun's central meridian, and thus is thus a prime candidate for a study on the topological location of magnetic reconnection. In this flare study, we use the MPOLE (http://solar.physics.montana.edu/dana/mpole/) software to extrapolate from the photospheric magnetic field, as observed by MDI, to a coronal field. MPOLE is a suite of IDL programs implementing the Minimum Current Corona Model (Longcope 1996) and currently includes a new method that uses a hierarchy of topological features (Beveridge 2006). The extrapolation gives the location of topological features such as poles, nulls, separatricies, separators, and spine lines. We examine the flare emission observed by RHESSI in the context of these topological features. In the case of the 29 October 2003 flare, we find a relationship between the spine lines and the temporal evolution of the HXR flare footpoints. In this poster, we present observations supporting the relationship, explore uncertainties in the consistency between MPOLE and RHESSI data, and survey possible results.This work is supported by NASA.

  7. Precursor flares in OJ 287

    OpenAIRE

    Pihajoki, P.; Valtonen, M.; Zola, S.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Provencal, J.; Nilsson, K.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpää, A.; Takalo, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black...

  8. Three Solar Gamma-Ray Flares Observed by Yohkoh In Autumn of 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam

    The Japanese mission Yohkoh (sun-beam) observed three solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991, on the declining phase of solar cycle 22. Each flare has different spectral characteristics, strong narrow line flare, broad line flare and continuum gamma-ray flare.The solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991 are produced from the three solar active regions NOAA/USAF 6891, 6919 and 6952 respectively. The aim of the present work is to study the general characteristics of these three active regions, and perform an evolution for the sunspots and their magnetic fields which lead to releasing highly energetic impulsive flares associated with gamma-ray emissions.The method of cumulative summation curves for X-ray bursts and Hα flares produced from the active regions and also, cumulative summation curves for sunspots area and count number for the same active regions are applied to show any steep increase in the trend in the curves for few days prior to the γ-ray flare occurrences

  9. Investigation of possible sun-weather relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Businger, S

    1978-01-01

    Statistical correlations between anomalous solar activity (as denoted by large solar flares, active plages, and interplanetary magnetic sector boundaries) and the circulation of the troposphere are reviewed. Two indices (measuring atmospheric vorticity and mean zonal geostrophic flow in the northern hemisphere) are analyzed in an effort to reveal possible sun-weather relationships. The result of this analysis provides no additional statistical evidence for a connection between solar activity and the weather. Finally, physical mechanisms that have been suggested to explain the claimed correlations are discussed.

  10. Revisiting 154-day periodicity in the occurrence of hard flares. A planetary influence?

    CERN Document Server

    Edmonds, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Rieger et al (1984) reported observations of a 154 day periodicity in flares during solar cycle 21. This paper discusses the observations in the light of a simple empirical planetary model of sunspot emergence. The planetary model predicts sunspot emergence when Mercury and Earth approach conjunction and Mercury approaches the Sun. We show that the reported times of flare activity are coherent with the planetary model. While the base period of the model is 170 days, the average model period, over the interval of flare recordings, is 157 days due to a 180 degree phase change in the planetary forcing near the middle of the record interval. We conclude that the periodicity at 154 days arises when the phase change in planetary forcing and the resulting progressive phase change in total sunspot area emergence and flare occurrence shifts the major peak in the flare spectrum from the planetary forcing period, 170 days, to 154 days.

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  12. Sun and Sun Worship in Different Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Sun symbol is found in many cultures throughout history, it has played an important role in shaping our life on Earth since the dawn of time. Since the beginning of human existence, civilisations have established religious beliefs that involved the Sun's significance to some extent. As new civilisations and religions developed, many spiritual beliefs were based on those from the past so that there has been an evolution of the Sun's significance throughout cultural development. For comparing and finding the origin of the Sun we made a table of 66 languages and compared the roots of the words. For finding out from where these roots came from, we also made a table of 21 Sun Gods and Goddesses and proved the direct crossing of language and mythology.

  13. High-energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi Large Area Telescope Detections and Analysis of Two M-class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  14. Doppler speeds of the hydrogen Lyman lines in solar flares from EVE

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Stephen A; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen Lyman lines provide important diagnostic information about the dynamics of the chromosphere, but there have been few systematic studies of their variability during flares. We investigate Doppler shifts in these lines in several flares, and use these to calculate plasma speeds. We use spectral data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph B (MEGS-B) detector of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. MEGS-B obtains full-disk spectra of the Sun at a resolution of 0.1nm in the range 37-105 nm, which we analyse using three independent methods. The first method performs Gaussian fits to the lines, and compares the quiet-Sun centroids with the flaring ones to obtain the Doppler shifts. The second method uses cross-correlation to detect wavelength shifts between the quiet-Sun and flaring line profiles. The final method calculates the "center-of-mass" of the line profile, and compares the quiet-Sun and flaring centroids to obtain the shift. In ...

  15. Continuous heating of a giant X-ray flare on Algol

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Favata, F.

    1999-01-01

    Giant flares can release large amounts of energy within a few days: X-ray emission alone can be up to ten percent of the star's bolometric luminosity. These flares exceed the luminosities of the largest solar flares by many orders of magnitude, which suggests that the underlying physical mechanisms supplying the energy are different from those on the Sun. Magnetic coupling between the components in a binary system or between a young star and an accretion disk has been proposed as a prerequisi...

  16. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  17. Sun's rap song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, M.; Lee, W.

    1995-07-01

    We present a rap song composed for the Sun, our star. This Sun's Rap Song can be utilized in classroom teaching to spark the students' interest and facilitate the students' learning of the relevant subjects.

  18. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  19. MedSun Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002. The primary goal for MedSun is to work collaboratively with the...

  20. Under the Lens: Investigating the Sun's Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, William; Klotz, Irene

    2008-11-01

    Sometime around 2012, the waxing 11-year solar cycle once again will reach its peak. Between now and then, magnetically turbulent sunspots, spawned by some still mysterious process, will form near the poles in increasing numbers and migrate toward the Sun's faster-rotating equator in pairs of opposite polarity. Titanic magnetic storms will rage as immense flux tubes rise to the surface in active regions around sunspots and spread out in a boiling sea of electric charge. Magnetic field lines across an enormous range of scales will arc and undulate, rip apart and reconnect, heating the Sun's upper atmosphere and occasionally triggering brilliant flares and multibillion-megaton coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that travel through the solar wind and slam into Earth.

  1. Flare Heating in Stellar Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, V L; Güdel, M; Audard, M; Kashyap, Vinay; Drake, Jeremy; Guedel, Manuel; Audard, Marc

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of very weak flares to the coronal luminosity of low-mass active stars. We analyze EUVE/DS events data from FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo and conclude that in all these cases the coronal emission is dominated by flares to such an extent that in some cases the entire emission may be ascribed to flare heating. We have developed a new method to directly model for the first time stochastically produced flare emission, including undetectable flares, and their effects on the observed photon arrival times. We find that the index of the power-law distribution of flare energies (dN/dE ~ E^{-alpha}) is 2.6+-0.34, 2.74+-0.35, and 2.03-2.32 for FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo respectively. We also find that the flare component accounts for a large fraction (generally >50 percent) of the total flux.

  2. Seasons by the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Meri-Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the Sun has challenged people since ancient times. Mythology from the Greek, Inuit, and Inca cultures attempted to explain the daily appearance and nightly disappearance of the Sun by relating it to a chariot being chased across the sky. While people no longer believe the Sun is a chariot racing across the sky, teachers are still…

  3. Personal, Seasonal Suns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an art project designed for upper-elementary students to (1) imagine visual differences in the sun's appearance during the four seasons; (2) develop ideas for visually translating their personal experiences regarding the seasons to their sun drawings; (3) create four distinctive seasonal suns using colors and imagery to…

  4. A Quantitative Analysis of Solar Flare Characteristics as Observed in the Solar Observing Optical Network and the Global Oscillation Network Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    suppress the underlying convection. 4 During a solar flare, the plasma is heated to tens of millions of degrees and elementary particles are...seen in the Sun on September 1, 1859, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20, 13-15. Foukal, P. V. (2004). Solar Astrophysics . Wiley...Flares, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Temmer, M, et al. (2001). Statistical Analysis of Solar Hα Flares, Astronomy and Astrophysics , 375

  5. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  6. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Allred, Joel C; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework which can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and...

  7. The Sun as a star: empirical estimates of stellar coronal mass ejection rates and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    Our nearest star provides exquisite, up-close views of the physical processes driving energetic phenomena we observe on stars and cannot yet spatially resolve. Stars provide a statistical ensemble of solar analogs spanning a range of ages representing snapshots along our Sun's full life cycle. In this talk, I will share a project bringing the astronomer's large scale statistical approach to bear on solar data. Combining a decades' worth of solar flare and CME data, we characterize for the first time a relationship between flare and CME properties in order to extend analogy to readily observable stellar flares. We aim to better understand the properties and evolution of magnetic activity on Sun-like stars and exoweather on planets about distant Suns.

  8. Automatic prediction of solar flares and super geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui

    Space weather is the response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun. As the new technology advances, mankind has become more and more dependent on space system, satellite-based services. A geomagnetic storm, a disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, may produce many harmful effects on Earth. Solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are believed to be the major causes of geomagnetic storms. Thus, establishing a real time forecasting method for them is very important in space weather study. The topics covered in this dissertation are: the relationship between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of solar active regions; the relationship between solar flare index and magnetic features of solar active regions; based on these relationships a statistical ordinal logistic regression model is developed to predict the probability of solar flare occurrences in the next 24 hours; and finally the relationship between magnetic structures of CME source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the D st index decreases below -200 nT is studied and proved to be able to predict those super storms. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of active region. Furthermore, compared with magnetic shear, magnetic gradient might be a better proxy to locate where a large flare occurs. It appears to be more accurate in identification of sources of X-class flares than M-class flares; (2) Flare index, defined by weighting the SXR flares, is proved to have positive correlation with three magnetic features of active region; (3) A statistical ordinal logistic regression model is proposed for solar flare prediction. The results are much better than those data published in the NASA/SDAC service, and comparable to the data provided by the NOAA/SEC complicated expert system. To our knowledge, this is the first time that logistic regression model has been applied

  9. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  10. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Güdel, M

    2007-01-01

    (abridged) The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have...

  11. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis revolves around flares on main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars. We use observations in different wavelength ranges with the aim of analysing the effects of flares at different layers of stellar atmospheres. In particular, optical and X-ray observations are used so that we can study how flares affect, respectively, the chromosphere and the corona of stars. In the optical range we carry out a high temporal resolution spectroscopic monitoring of UV Ceti-type stars aimed at detecting non-white-light flares (the most typical kind of solar flares) in stars other than the Sun. With these data we confirm that non-white-light flares are a frequent phenomenon in UV Ceti-type stars, as observed in the Sun. We study and interpret the behaviour of different chromospheric lines during the flares detected on AD Leo. By using a simplified slab model of flares (Jevremović et al. 1998), we are able to determine the physical parameters of the chromospheric flaring plasma (electron density and electron temperature), the temperature of the underlying source, and the surface area covered by the flaring plasma. We also search for possible relationships between the physical parameters of the flaring plasma and other properties such as the flare duration, area, maximum flux and released energy. This work considerably extends the existing sample of stellar flares analysed with good quality spectroscopy in the optical range. In X-rays we take advantage of the great sensitivity, wide energy range, high energy resolution, and continuous time coverage of the EPIC detectors - on-board the XMMNewton satellite - in order to perform time-resolved spectral analysis of coronal flares. In particular, in the UV Ceti-type star CC Eri we study two flares that are weaker than those typically reported in the literature (allowing us to speculate about the role of flares as heating agents of stellar atmospheres); while in the pre-main-sequence M-type star TWA 11B (with no signatures of

  12. Continuous heating of a giant X-ray flare on Algol

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, J H M M

    1999-01-01

    Giant flares can release large amounts of energy within a few days: X-ray emission alone can be up to ten percent of the star's bolometric luminosity. These flares exceed the luminosities of the largest solar flares by many orders of magnitude, which suggests that the underlying physical mechanisms supplying the energy are different from those on the Sun. Magnetic coupling between the components in a binary system or between a young star and an accretion disk has been proposed as a prerequisite for giant flares. Here we report X-ray observations of a giant flare on Algol B, a giant star in an eclipsing binary system. We observed a total X-ray eclipse of the flare, which demonstrates that the plasma was confined to Algol B, and reached a maximum height of 0.6 stellar radii above its surface. The flare occurred around the south pole of Algol B, and energy must have been released continously throughout its life. We conclude that a specific extrastellar environment is not required for the presence of a flare, and...

  13. Magnetic vector rotation in response to the energetic electron beam during a flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Kwangsu, Ahn; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Chae, Jongchul; Huang, Nengyi; Deng, Na; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    As one of the most violent forms of eruption on the Sun, flares are believed to be powered by magnetic reconnection, by which stored magnetic energy is released. The fundamental physical processes involving the release, transfer and deposition of energy in multiple layers of the solar atmosphere have been studied extensively with significant progress. Taking advantage of recent developments in observing facilities, new phenomena are continually revealed, bringing new understanding of solar flares. Here we report the discovery of a transient rotation of vector magnetic fields associated with a flare observed by the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. After ruling out the possibility that the rotation is caused by line profile changes due to flare heating, our observation shows that the transverse field rotateded by about 12-20 degrees counterclockwise, and returned quickly to previous values after the flare ribbons swept through. More importantly, as a consequence of the rotation, the flare loops untwisted and became more potential. The vector magnetograms were obtained in the near infrared at 1560 nm, which is minimally affected by flare emission and no intensity profile change was detected. Therefore, we believe that these transient changes are real, and conclude the high energy electron beams play an crucial role in the field changes. A straightforward and instructive explanation is that the induced magnetic field of the electron beam superimposed on the pre-flare field leads to a transient rotation of the overall field.

  14. Boundary conditions on the early Sun from ancient cosmogenic neon in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberg, C. M.; Caffee, M. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of neon from individual grains of the meteorites Murchison (CM) and Kapoeta (howardite) shows large enrichments of cosmogenic neon in grains with solar flare tracks. The quantity of this component is incompatible with galactic cosmic ray or solar cosmic ray irradiation under present conditions and is attributed to irradiation by energetic flares from an early active Sun. Handpicked grains from each meteorite were grouped according to the presence or absence of solar flare heavy ion tracks, and these four samples were analyzed with an ion counting noble gas mass spectrometer.

  15. Gamma-ray Burst Flares: X-ray Flaring. II

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 497 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online XRT GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. The method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional `breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 310 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10^5 s. Only ~50% of the detected flares follow the `classical' definition of \\Delta t/t << 1, with many of the largest ...

  16. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Liakos, A. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W. [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland); Provencal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Santangelo, M. M. M. [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy); Salo, H. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S., E-mail: popiha@utu.fi [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  17. A Yohkoh search for `black-light flares'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Hudson, Hugh S.; Anwar, Bachtiar; Hiei, Eijiro

    1994-01-01

    Calculations which predict that a phenomenon analogous to stellar negative pre-flares could also exist on the Sun were published by Henoux et al. (1990), and Aboudarham et al., (1990), who showed at the beginning of a solar white-light flare (WLF) event an electron beam can cause a transient darkening before the WLF emission starts, under certain conditions. They named this event a `black light flare' (BLF). Such a BLF event should appear as diffuse dark patches lasting for about 20 seconds preceding the WLF emission, which would coincide with intense and impulsive hard X-ray bursts. The BLF location would be at (or in the vicinity of ) the forthcoming bright patches. Their predicted contrast depends on the position of the flare on the solar disk and on the wavelength band of the observation. The Yohkoh satellite provided white-light data from the aspect camera of the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) instrument (Tsuneta et al., 1991), at 431 nm and with a typical image interval of 10 - 12 s. We have studied nine white-light flares observed with this instrument, with X-ray class larger than M6. We have found a few interesting episodes, but no unambiguous example of the predicted BLF event. This study, although the best survey to date, was not ideal from the observational point of view. We therefore encourage further searches. Successful observations of this phenomenon on the Sun would greatly strengthen our knowledge of the lower solar atmosphere and its effects on solar luminosity variations.

  18. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  19. GRB Flares: UV/Optical Flaring (Paper I)

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A; De Pasquale, M; Oates, S R

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this algorithm to detect flares in the UV/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional `breaks' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T_start, T_stop, and T_peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 seconds of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10...

  20. EUV Irradiance Observations from SDO/EVE as a Diagnostic of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2016-01-01

    For the past six years, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has been monitoring changes in the Sun's extreme ultraviolet output over a range of timescales. Its primary function is to provide measurements of the solar spectral irradiance that is responsible for driving fluctuations in Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. However, despite its modest spectral resolution and lack of spatial information, the EVE spectral range contains many lines and continua that have become invaluable for diagnosing the response of the lower solar atmosphere itself to an injection of energy, particularly during a flare's impulsive phase. In addition, high temperature emission lines can also be used to track changes in temperature and density of flaring plasma in the corona. The high precision of EVE observations are therefore crucial in helping us understand particle acceleration and energy transport mechanisms during solar flares, as well as the origins of the Sun's most geoeffective emis...

  1. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güdel Manuel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have led to the escape of important amounts of atmospheric constituents. The present dry atmosphere of Venus and the thin atmosphere of Mars may be a product of early irradiation and heating by solar high-energy radiation. High levels of magnetic activity are also inferred for the pre-main sequence Sun. At those stages, interactions of high-energy radiation and particles with the circumsolar disk in which planets eventually formed were important. Traces left in meteorites by energetic particles and anomalous isotopic abundance ratios in meteoritic inclusions may provide evidence for a highly active pre-main sequence Sun. The present article reviews these various issues related to the magnetic activity of the young Sun and the consequent interactions with its environment. The emphasis is on the phenomenology related to the production of high-energy photons and particles. Apart from the activity on the young Sun, systematic trends applicable to the entire

  2. Ra: The Sun for Science and Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    To guide the development of the Ra Strategic Framework, we defined scientific and applications objectives. For our primary areas of scientific interest, we choose the corona, the solar wind, the Sun's effect on the Earth, and solar theory and model development. For secondary areas of scientific interest, we selected sunspots, the solar constant, the Sun's gravitational field, helioseismology and the galactic cosmic rays. We stress the importance of stereoscopic imaging, observations at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions, as well as of long duration measurements. Further exploration of the Sun's polar regions is also important, as shown already by the Ulysses mission. From an applications perspective, we adopted three broad objectives that would derive complementary inputs for the Strategic Framework. These were to identify and investigate: possible application spin-offs from science missions, possible solar-terrestrial missions dedicated to a particular application, and possible future applications that require technology development. The Sun can be viewed as both a source of resources and of threats. Our principal applications focus was that of threat mitigation, by examining ways to improve solar threat monitoring and early warning systems. We compared these objectives to the mission objectives of past, current, and planned international solar missions. Past missions (1962-1980) seem to have been focused on improvement of scientific knowledge, using multiple instrument spacecraft. A ten year gap followed this period, during which the results from previous missions were analyzed and solar study programmes were prepared in international organizations. Current missions (1990-1996) focus on particular topics such as the corona, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections. In planned missions, Sun/Earth interactions and environmental effects of solar activity are becoming more important. The corona is the centre of interest of almost all planned missions

  3. Where are the mid-sized flares of ultracool M dwarfs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2013-10-01

    We propose to observe the M8.5 dwarf SCR J1845-6357 with XMM-Newton EPIC for 60 ks. Very low-mass M dwarfs show a distinct drop in X-ray luminosity compared to slightly more massive M dwarfs. Surprisingly, this does not happen at the mass threshold where M dwarfs become fully convective (M4), but at significantly lower masses (M8). These very low mass stars seem to have a flaring behaviour different from earlier type stars: they display either occasional large flares or a very low-level "flickering" in their X-ray light curves, but not the canonical power-law flare-energy distribution observed for the Sun and other cool stars. Our aim is to collect a long-duration light curve for one of the most nearby ultracool dwarfs to quantify how its flare-energy distribution differs from earlier type stars.

  4. Probabilistic forecasting of solar flares from vector magnetogram data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Schumer, E. A.; Della-Rose, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    Discriminant analysis is a statistical approach for assigning a measurement to one of several mutually exclusive groups. Presented here is an application of the approach to solar flare forecasting, adapted to provide the probability that a measurement belongs to either group, the groups in this case being solar active regions which produced a flare within 24 hours and those that remained flare quiet. The technique is demonstrated for a large database of vector magnetic field measurements obtained by the University of Hawai'i Imaging Vector Magnetograph. For a large combination of variables characterizing the photospheric magnetic field, the results are compared to a Bayesian approach for solar flare prediction, and to the method employed by the U.S. Space Environment Center (SEC). Although quantitative comparison is difficult as the present application provides active region (rather than whole-Sun) forecasts, and the present database covers only part of one solar cycle, the performance of the method appears comparable to the other approaches.

  5. The COMPTEL solar flare catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.; Varendorff, M.; McConnell, M.; Forrest, D.; Schoenfelder, V.; Lichti, G.; Diehl, R.; Rank, G.; Bennett, K.; Hanlon, L.; Winkler, W.; Swanenburg, B.; Bloemen, H. Hermsen, W.

    1993-01-01

    COMPTEL, the Imaging Compton Telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, has registered many solar gamma ray flares during its two years on orbit. It detects and measures gamma rays from flares by two methods: (1) utilizing two independent large NaI gamma ray spectrometers operating from 0.2 to 2 MeV and 0.6 to 10 MeV and (2) using the telescope and imaging capabilities to acquire spectra from 0.75 to 30 MeV. Solar neutrons can also be measured in the telescope mode. The authors report here the solar gamma ray flare list compiled from COMPTEL data in the two modes of operation. They also describe the methods of searching for flares in the COMPTEL data and the qualitative nature of the flares detected.

  6. Two sun-like superflare stars rotating as slow as the Sun*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Daisaku; Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-04-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two "superflare stars," KIC 9766237 and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have recently been discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 d on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have rotation periods of 21.8 d and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairly high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not detect any hint of binarity in our spectra, although more data are needed to firmly rule out the presence of an unseen low-mass companion. These results claim that the spectroscopic properties of these superflare stars are very close to those of the Sun, and support the hypothesis that the Sun might cause a superflare.

  7. Modulation of solar flare particles and track density profiles in gas-rich meteorite grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    A solution is presented to the problem concerning the time-averaged solar flare particle flux as a function of kinetic energy and distance from the sun for a given particle injection spectrum at the sun within the framework of standard diffusion-convection-adiabatic deceleration theory with the diffusion coefficient independent of distance from the sun. Results of the calculations which give best agreement with observations at 1 AU are presented and discussed, with particular reference to their implications for gas-rich meteorites. Normalization at the orbit of earth is achieved via observed track density versus depth profiles in lunar vug crystals. It is shown that if gas-rich meteorite grains were irradiated in the asteroid belt and if source and modulation parameters have changed little since irradiation, the track density should be 'harder' than the lunar vug profile by about 0.2-0.3 in the index. Quantitative estimation of solar flare particle exposure ages is discussed.

  8. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  9. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  10. The solar active region No. 10486 and its production of high energetic flares at October-November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hady, Ahmed; Shaltout, M. A.

    The solar active region No. 10486 can be considered as one of the very large and powerful active regions since 1976. This region has produced the most important two solar flares during the period (1976-2003). The first flare released at 12:15UT on 28 October 2003 with importance X17/4B, and the second flare released at 22:25UT on 4 November 2003 with importance X28/3B. Both flares are the highest level in x-ray production since 1976, when different detectors, onboard various spacecrafts, have taken the data, and since 1996, when SOHO was launched to space. The first flare on 28 October 2003 produced protons events at 6:15UT on 29 Oct. 2003 with energies > 10 MeV. The maximum solar wind speed is 1905 and 1986 km/sec at 29 and 30 October 2003 respectively. The same region after its rotation across the sun was appeared again on the sun's edge at 18 November 2003, and produced high energetic flare at 19 November 2003, which led to increase the solar wind speed to 947 km/sec at 20 November 2003. The evaluation of the active region No. 10486 is very important for understanding the high energetic proton flares. The aim of this study is to follow the morphological and magnetic changes of the active region before, during, and after the high energetic flares were produced. Also, applying the cumulative summation curves method for the different index of the active region to predict the flare of high energy has been carried out. The results are promising and can be used for proton flares and Geomagnetic storms prediction, few days before their occurrence.

  11. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Sheet The Sun and Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Mona Z. Mofid, MD, FAAD, Diplomate, American Board of Dermatology, and Medical Director, American Melanoma Foundation, San Diego, California, ...

  12. Use of simulation in flare countermeasure development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Delport, JP

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ● Assume enough flare energy ● Questions addressed ● Timing ● Geometry ● Dispense logic ● Obscuration ● Physics based, spectrally correct ● Question addressed ● Flare spectrum ● Environmental influences © CSIR 2008 AOC Conference – 12 November... November 2008 Slide 12 Engagement Scenarios & Simulations ● Aircraft with flares versus missile ● Flight conditions ● Flare dispense logic ● Flare pod placement, angles ● Multitude of simulated launches ● Visualisation...

  13. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  14. Why Study the Sun?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind Bhatnagar

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation we briefly describe the Sun through large number of illustrations and pictures of the Sun taken from early times to the present day space missions. The importance of the study of the Sun is emphasized as it is the nearest star which presents unparallelled views of surface details and numerous phenomena. Our Sun offers a unique celestial laboratory where a large variety of phenomena take place, ranging in temporal domain from a few milliseconds to several decades, in spatial domain from a few hundred kilometers to thousands of kilometers, and in the temperature domain from a few thousand degrees to several million degrees. Its mass motion ranges from thousandths to thousands of kilometers per second. Such an object provides us with a unique laboratory to study the state of matter in the Universe. The existing solar ground-based and space missions have already revealed several mysteries of the outer environment of our Sun and much more is going to come in the near future from planned new sophisticated ground-based solar telescopes and Space missions. The new technique of helioseismology has unravelled many secrets of the solar interior and has put the Standard Solar Model (SSM) on firm footing. The long-standing problem of solar neutrinos has been recently sorted out, and even the ‘back side’ view of the Sun can be seen using the technique of holographic helioseismology.

  15. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how......Using kappa Ceti as a proxy for the young Sun we show that not only was the young Sun much more effective in protecting the Earth environment from galactic cosmic rays than the present day Sun; it also had flare and corona mass ejection rates up to three orders of magnitude larger than the present...

  16. Could Ultracool Dwarfs Have Sun-Like Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Solar-like stars exhibit magnetic cycles; our Sun, for instance, displays an 11-year period in its activity, manifesting as cyclic changes in radiation levels, the number of sunspots and flares, and ejection of solar material. Over the span of two activity cycles, the Suns magnetic field flips polarity and then returns to its original state.An artists illustration comparing the Sun to TRAPPIST-1, an ultracool dwarf star known to host several planets. [ESO]But what about the magnetic behavior of objects near the cooler end of the stellar main sequence do they exhibit similar activity cycles?Effects of a Convecting InteriorDwarf stars have made headlines in recent years due to their potential to harbor exoplanets. Because these cooler stars have lower flux levels compared to the Sun, their habitable zones lie much closer to the stars. The magnetic behavior of these stars is therefore important to understand: could ultracool dwarfs exhibit solar-like activity cycles that would affect planets with close orbits?The differences in internal structure between different mass stars. Ultracool dwarfs have fully convective interiors. [www.sun.org]Theres a major difference between ultracool dwarfs (stars of spectral type higher than M7 and brown dwarfs) and Sun-like stars: their internal structures. Sun-like stars have a convective envelope that surrounds a radiative core. The interiors of cool, low-mass objects, on the other hand, are fully convective.Based on theoretical studies of how magnetism is generated in stars, its thought that the fully convective interiors of ultracool dwarfs cant support large-scale magnetic field formation. This should prevent these stars from exhibiting activity cycles like the Sun. But recent radio observations of dwarf stars have led scientist Matthew Route (ITaP Research Computing, Purdue University) to question these models.A Reversing Field?During observations of the brown dwarf star J1047+21 in 20102011, radio flares were detected with

  17. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  18. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  19. The correlation between expansion speed and magnetic field in solar flare ribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the correlation between the expansion speed of two-ribbon flares and the magnetic field measured in the ribbon location, and compare such correlation for two events with different magnetic configurations. These two events are: an M1.0 flare in the quiet sun on September 12, 2000 and an X2.3 flare in Active Region NOAA 9415 on April 10, 2001. The magnetic configuration of the M1.0 flare is simple, while that of X2.3 event is complex. We have derived a power-law correlation between the ribbon expansion speed (V r) and the longitudinal magnetic field (Bz) with an empirical relationship V r = A×Bz-δ, where A is a constant and δ is the index of the power-law correlation. We have found that δ for the M1.0 flare in the simple magnetic configuration is larger than that for the X2.3 flare in the complex magnetic configuration.

  20. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L. Chupp; James M. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emis-sions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the acceler-ator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decaygamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowl-edge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare ca-pabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  1. The correlation between expansion speed and magnetic field in solar flare ribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE WenBin; WANG HaiMin; JING Ju; BAO XingMing; ZHANG HongQi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the correlation between the expansion speed of two-ribbon flares and the mag-netic field measured in the ribbon location, and compare such correlation for two events with different magnetic configurations. These two events are: an M1.0 flare in the quiet sun on September 12, 2000 and an X2.3 flare in Active Region NOAA 9415 on April 10, 2001. The magnetic configuration of the M1.0 flare is simple, while that of X2.3 event is complex. We have derived a power-law correlation between the ribbon expansion speed (V_r) and the longitudinal magnetic field (B_z) with an empirical relationship V_r=A×B_(z~(-δ)), where A is a constant and δ is the index of the power-law correlation. We have found that δ for the M1.0 flare in the simple magnetic configuration is larger than that for the X2.3 flare in the complex magnetic configuration.

  2. Fe K alpha and hydrodynamic loop model diagnostics for a large flare on II Peg

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, Barbara; Reale, Fabio; Testa, Paola; Miller, Jon M

    2008-01-01

    The observation by the Swift X-ray Telescope of the Fe K alpha_1, alpha_2 doublet during a large flare on the RS CVn binary system II Peg represents one of only two firm detections to date of photospheric Fe K alpha from a star other than our Sun. We present models of the Fe K alpha equivalent widths reported in the literature for the II Peg observations and show that they are most probably due to fluorescence following inner shell photoionisation of quasi-neutral Fe by the flare X-rays. Our models constrain the maximum height of flare the to 0.15 R_* assuming solar abundances for the photospheric material, and 0.1 R_* and 0.06 R_* assuming depleted photospheric abundances ([M/H]=-0.2 and [M/H]=-0.4, respectively). Accounting for an extended loop geometry has the effect of increasing the estimated flare heights by a factor of ~3. These predictions are consistent with those derived using results of flaring loop models, which are also used to estimate the flaring loop properties and energetics. From loop models...

  3. Solar X-ray Flare Hazards on the Surface of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D S; Smith, David S.; Scalo, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Putative organisms on the Martian surface would be exposed to potentially high doses of ionizing radiation during strong solar X-ray flares. We extrapolate the observed flare frequency-energy release scaling relation to releases much larger than seen so far for the sun, an assumption supported by observations of flares on other solar- and subsolar-mass main sequence stars. We calculate the surficial reprocessed X-ray spectra using a Monte Carlo code we have developed. Biological doses from indirect genome damage are calculated for each parameterized flare spectrum by integration over the X-ray opacity of water. We estimate the mean waiting time for solar flares producing a given biological dose of ionizing radiation on Mars and compare with lethal dose data for a wide range of terrestrial organisms. These timescales range from decades for significant human health risk to 0.5 Myr for D. radiodurans lethality. Such doses require total flare energies of 10^33--10^38 erg, the lower range of which has been observe...

  4. The energetic relationship among geoeffective solar flares,associated CMEs and SEPs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nipa J Bhatt; Rajmal Jain; Arun Kumar Awasthi

    2013-01-01

    Major solar eruptions (flares,coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs)) strongly influence geospace and space weather.Currently,the mechanism of their influence on space weather is not well understood and requires a detailed study of the energetic relationship among these eruptive phenomena.From this perspective,we investigate 30 flares (observed by RHESSI),followed by weak to strong geomagnetic storms.Spectral analysis of these flares suggests a new power-law relationship (r ~ 0.79) between the hard X-ray (HXR) spectral index (before flarepeak) and linear speed of the associated CME observed by LASCO/SOHO.For 12 flares which were followed by SEP enhancement near Earth,HXR and SEP spectral analysis reveals a new scaling law (r ~ 0.9) between the hardest X-ray flare spectrum and the hardest SEP spectrum.Furthermore,a strong correlation is obtained between the linear speed of the CME and the hardest spectrum of the corresponding SEP event (r ~ 0.96).We propose that the potentially geoeffective flare and associated CME and SEP are well-connected through a possible feedback mechanism,and should be regarded within the framework of a solar eruption.Owing to their space weather effects,these new results will help improve our current understanding of the Sun-Earth relationship,which is a major goal of research programs in heliophysics.

  5. Selections from 2016: A Connection Between Solar Explosions and Dimming on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2016, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.The Nature of CME-Flare-Associated Coronal DimmingPublished June2016Main takeaway:The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed a large solar eruption at the end of December 2011. Scientists Jianxia Cheng (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Jiong Qiu (Montana State University) studied this coronal mass ejection and the associated flaring on the Suns surface. They found that this activity was accompanied by dimming in the Suns corona near the ends of the flare ribbons.Why its interesting:The process of coronal dimming isnt fully understood, but Cheng and Qius observations provide a clear link between coronal dimming and eruptions of plasma and energy from the Sun. The locations of the dimming the footpoints of the two flare ribbons and the timing relative to the eruption suggests that coronal dimming is caused by the ejection of hot plasma from the Suns surface.How this process was studied:There are a number of satellites dedicated to observing the Sun, and several of them were used to study this explosion. Data from SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (which images in extreme ultraviolet) and its Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (which measures magnetic fields) were used as well as observations from STEREO, the pair of satellites orbiting the Sun at 90 from SDO.CitationJ. X. Cheng and J. Qiu 2016 ApJ 825 37. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/825/1/37

  6. The Sun's Supergranulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rieutord, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The Sun's supergranulation refers to a physical pattern covering the surface of the quiet Sun with a typical horizontal scale of approximately 30000km. Its most noticeable observable signature is as a fluctuating velocity field whose components are mostly horizontal. Supergranulation was discovered more than fifty years ago, however explaining why and how it originates still represents one of the main challenges of modern solar physics. A lot of work has been devoted to the subject over the years, but observational constraints, conceptual difficulties and numerical limitations have all concurred to prevent a detailed understanding of the supergranulation phenomenon so far. With the advent of 21st century supercomputing resources and the availability of unprecedented high-resolution observations of the Sun, the solar community has now reached a stage at which key progress can be made on this question. A unifying strategy between observations and modeling is more than ever required for this to be possible. The ...

  7. The Sun and its Planets as detector for invisible matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Hofmann, Sebastian; Maroudas, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational lensing / deflection of invisible streaming matter towards the Sun could explain the puzzling solar flares and the unexplained solar emission in the EUV. Assuming that this invisible matter has some form of interaction with normal matter and that there exist preferred directions in its flow, then one would expect a more pronounced solar activity at certain planetary heliocentric longitudes. This is best demonstrated in the case of the 3 inner planets, considering their relatively short revolution time in comparison to a solar cycle of about 11 years. We have analyzed the solar flares as well as the EUV emission. We observe statistically significant signals when one or more planets have heliocentric longitudes mainly between 230o and 300o. The broad velocity spectrum of the assumed constituents makes it at this stage difficult to identify its source(s) in space. More refined future analyses might increase the precision of the determination of the stream direction and some properties of its consti...

  8. Piece of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Wayne, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Our rapidly industrialising world has an insatiable hunger for energy, and conventional sources are struggling to meet demand. Oil is running out, coal is damaging our climate, many nations are abandoning nuclear, yet solar, wind and water will never be a complete replacement. The solution, says Daniel Clery in this deeply researched and revelatory book, is to be found in the original energy source: the Sun itself. There, at its centre, the fusion of 630 million tonnes of hydrogen every second generates an unfathomable amount of energy. By replicating even a tiny piece of the Sun's power

  9. Near-Sun asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanenko, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    As follows from dynamical studies, in the course of evolution, most near-Earth objects reach orbits with small perihelion distances. Changes of the asteroids in the vicinity of the Sun should play a key role in forming the physical properties, size distribution, and dynamical features of the near-Earth objects. Only seven of the discovered asteroids are currently moving along orbits with perihelion distances q orbits farther from the Sun. In this study, we found asteroids that have been recently orbiting with perihelion distances q orbits for hundreds to tens of thousands of years. To carry out astrophysical observations of such objects is a high priority.

  10. The SUN S TRAVELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Louis; Stevenson

    2005-01-01

    The sun is not a-bed, when I At night upon my pillow lie; Stilt round the earth his Way he takes, And morning after morning makes. White here at home, in shining day, We round the sunny garden play, Each tittle Indian sleepy - head Is being kissed and put to bed. And When at eve I rise from tea, Day dawns beyond the Atlantic Sea; And all the children in the West Are getting up and being dressed.The SUN'S TRAVELS@Robert Louis Stevenson

  11. Neutron-decay Protons from Solar Flares as Seed Particles for CME-shock Acceleration in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ronald J.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen

    2017-09-01

    The protons in large solar energetic particle events are accelerated in the inner heliosphere by fast shocks produced by coronal mass ejections. Unless there are other sources, the protons these shocks act upon would be those of the solar wind (SW). The efficiency of the acceleration depends on the kinetic energy of the protons. For a 2000 km s‑1 shock, the most effective proton energies would be 30–100 keV; i.e., within the suprathermal tail component of the SW. We investigate one possible additional source of such protons: those resulting from the decay of solar-flare-produced neutrons that escape from the Sun into the low corona. The neutrons are produced by interactions of flare-accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. We discuss the production of low-energy neutrons in flares and their decay on a interplanetary magnetic field line near the Sun. We find that even when the flaring conditions are optimal, the 30–100 keV neutron-decay proton density produced by even a very large solar flare would be only about 10% of that of the 30–100 keV SW suprathermal tail. We discuss the implication of a seed-particle source of more frequent, small flares.

  12. North–South Distribution of Solar Flares during Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhuwan Joshi; P. Pant; P. K. Manoharan

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spatial distribution of solar flares in the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun that occurred during the period 1996 to 2003. This period of investigation includes the ascending phase, the maximum and part of the descending phase of solar cycle 23. It is revealed that the flare activity during this cycle is low compared to the previous solar cycle, indicating the violation of Gnevyshev–Ohl rule. The distribution of flares with respect to heliographic latitudes shows a significant asymmetry between northern and southern hemisphere which is maximum during the minimum phase of the solar cycle. The present study indicates that the activity dominates the northern hemisphere in general during the rising phase of the cycle (1997–2000). The dominance of northern hemisphere shifted towards the southern hemisphere after the solar maximum in 2000 and remained there in the successive years. Although the annual variations in the asymmetry time series during cycle 23 are quite different from cycle 22, they are comparable to cycle 21.

  13. Understanding Problem Forecasts of ISEST Campaign Flare-CME Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, David; Nitta, Nariaki

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the International Study of Earth-affecting Solar Transients (ISEST) project as part of the Variability of the Sun and Its Terrestrial Impact (VarSITI) program is to understand the origin, evolution, and propagation of solar transients through the space between the Sun and Earth, and to improve our prediction capability for space weather. A goal of ISEST Working Group 4 (Campaign Events) is to study a set of well-observed Sun-to-Earth events to develop an understanding of why some events are successfully forecast (textbook cases), whereas others become problem or failed forecasts. In this article we study six cases during the rise of Solar Cycle 24 that highlight forecasting problems. Likely source coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were identified in all six cases, but the related solar surface activity ranged from uncertain or weak to X-class flares. The geoeffects ranged from none to severe as in the two Sun-Earth events in 2015 that caused severe storms. These events were chosen to illustrate some key problems in understanding the chain from cause to geoeffect.

  14. From GHz to mHz: A Multiwavelength Study of the Acoustically Active 14 August 2004 M7.4 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Oliveros, J C; Besliu-Ionescu, D; Donea, A -C; Cally, P S; Lindsey, C

    2007-01-01

    We carried out an electromagnetic acoustic analysis of the solar flare of 14 August 2004 in active region AR10656 from the radio to the hard X-ray spectrum. The flare was a GOES soft X-ray class M7.4 and produced a detectable sun quake, confirming earlier inferences that relatively low-energy flares may be able to generate sun quakes. We introduce the hypothesis that the seismicity of the active region is closely related to the heights of coronal magnetic loops that conduct high-energy particles from the flare. In the case of relatively short magnetic loops, chromospheric evaporation populates the loop interior with ionized gas relatively rapidly, expediting the scattering of remaining trapped high-energy electrons into the magnetic loss cone and their rapid precipitation into the chromosphere. This increases both the intensity and suddenness of the chromospheric heating, satisfying the basic conditions for an acoustic emission that penetrates into the solar interior.

  15. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  16. Global Properties of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    This article broadly reviews our knowledge of solar flares. There is a particular focus on their global properties, as opposed to the microphysics such as that needed for magnetic reconnection or particle acceleration as such. Indeed solar flares will always remain in the domain of remote sensing, so we cannot observe the microscales directly and must understand the basic physics entirely via the global properties plus theoretical inference. The global observables include the general energetics -radiation in flares and mass loss in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - and the formation of different kinds of ejection and global wave disturbance: the type II radio-burst exciter, the Moreton wave, the EIT "wave," and the "sunquake" acoustic waves in the solar interior. Flare radiation and CME kinetic energy can have comparable magnitudes, of order 10^32 erg each for an X-class event, with the bulk of the radiant energy in the visible-UV continuum. We argue that the impulsive phase of the flare dominates the energetic...

  17. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ji, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO.} {About 96 minutes before the onset of flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8$-$9 Mm) nearly kept constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fanlike ...

  18. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  19. Maximising the sun

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is blessed with some of the best quality solar radiation in the world. In the light of this many exciting opportunities exist to utilize the sun to its full potential in the design of energy efficient buildings. Passive solar buildings...

  20. Sun Ultra 5

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    The Sun Ultra 5 is a 64-bit personal computer based on the UltraSPARC microprocessor line at a low price. The Ultra 5 has been declined in several variants: thus, some models have a processor with less cache memory to further decrease the price of the computer.

  1. The Toboggan Sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, WPS; van der Werf, SY

    2005-01-01

    Special variants of the Novaya Zemlya effect may arise from localized temperature inversions that follow the height profile of hills or mountains. Rather than following its natural path, the rising or setting Sun may, under such circumstances, appear to slide along a distant mountain slope. We found

  2. Go Sun Smart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara J.; Andersen, Peter A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Dignan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the story of Go Sun Smart, a worksite wellness program endorsed by the North American Ski Area Association and funded by the National Cancer Institute. Between 2000 and 2002 we designed and implemented a large-scale worksite intervention at over 300 ski resorts in North America with the objective of reducing ski area employees and guests…

  3. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  4. Our Explosive Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Sun's atmosphere is a highly structured but dynamic place, dominated by the solar magnetic field. Hot charged gas (plasma) is trapped on lines of magnetic force that can snap like an elastic band, propelling giant clouds of material out into space. A range of ground-based and space-based solar telescopes observe these eruptions, particularly…

  5. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  6. Cycle 23 Variation in Solar Flare Productivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh; McTiernan, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The NOAA listings of solar flares in cycles 21-24, including the GOES soft X-ray magnitudes, enable a simple determination of the number of flares each flaring active region produces over its lifetime. We have studied this measure of flare productivity over the interval 1975-2012. The annual averages of flare productivity remained approximately constant during cycles 21 and 22, at about two reported M or X flares per region, but then increased significantly in the declining phase of cycle 23 (the years 2004-2005). We have confirmed this by using the independent RHESSI flare catalog to check the NOAA events listings where possible. We note that this measure of solar activity does not correlate with the solar cycle. The anomalous peak in flare productivity immediately preceded the long solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24.

  7. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  8. Large X-ray flares on stars detected with MAXI/GSC: A universal correlation between the duration of a flare and its X-ray luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Yohko; Yamazaki, Kyohei; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Kawagoe, Atsushi; Kaneto, Soichiro; Iizuka, Ryo; Matsumura, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Higa, Masaya; Matsuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Morii, Mikio; Serino, Motoko; Mihara, Tatehiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Negoro, Hitoshi; Daikyuji, Arata; Ebisawa, Ken; Eguchi, Satoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Masaki; Isobe, Naoki; Kawasaki, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Kitayama, Hiroki; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Kotani, Taro; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakajima, Motoki; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sootome, Tetsuya; Sugimori, Kousuke; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yoshida, Atsumasa

    2016-10-01

    Twenty-three giant flares from thirteen active stars (eight RS CVn systems, one Algol system, three dMe stars, and one young stellar object) were detected during the first two years of our all-sky X-ray monitoring with the gas propotional counters (GSC) of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). The observed parameters of all these MAXI/GSC flares are found to be at the upper ends for stellar flares with the luminosity of 1031-34 erg s-1 in the 2-20 keV band, the emission measure of 1054-57 cm-3, the e-folding time of 1 hr to 1.5 d, and the total radiative energy released during the flare of 1034-39 erg. Notably, the peak X-ray luminosity of 5^{+4}_{-2} × 10^{33}erg s-1 in the 2-20 keV band was detected in one of the flares on II Peg, which is one of the, or potentially the, largest-ever-observed in stellar flares. X-ray flares were detected from GT Mus, V841 Cen, SZ Psc, and TWA-7 for the first time in this survey. Whereas most of our detected sources are multiple-star systems, two of them are single stars (YZ CMi and TWA-7). Among the stellar sources within 100 pc distance, the MAXI/GSC sources have larger rotation velocities than the other sources. This suggests that the rapid rotation velocity may play a key role in generating large flares. Combining the X-ray flare data of nearby stars and the sun, taken from literature and our own data, we discovered a universal correlation of τ ∝ L_X^{0.2} for the flare duration τ and the intrinsic X-ray luminosity LX in the 0.1-100 keV band, which holds for 5 and 12 orders of magnitude in τ and LX, respectively. The MAXI/GSC sample is located at the highest ends of the correlation.

  9. Chasing White-Light Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  10. Turbulence, Complexity, and Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    McAteer, R T James; Conlon, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    The issue of predicting solar flares is one of the most fundamental in physics, addressing issues of plasma physics, high-energy physics, and modelling of complex systems. It also poses societal consequences, with our ever-increasing need for accurate space weather forecasts. Solar flares arise naturally as a competition between an input (flux emergence and rearrangement) in the photosphere and an output (electrical current build up and resistive dissipation) in the corona. Although initially localised, this redistribution affects neighbouring regions and an avalanche occurs resulting in large scale eruptions of plasma, particles, and magnetic field. As flares are powered from the stressed field rooted in the photosphere, a study of the photospheric magnetic complexity can be used to both predict activity and understand the physics of the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum and multifractal spectrum are highlighted as two possible approaches to this.

  11. Ultra-Narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830 Å Using the1.6m New Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He I 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in solar flares.

  12. Fermi-LAT View of Bright Flaring Gamma-Ray Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Bastieri; S. Ciprini; D. Gasparrini

    2011-03-01

    The Fermi LAT provides a continuous and uniform monitoring of the Universe in the gamma-ray band. During the first year many gamma-ray blazar flares, some unidentified transients and emission by the Sun while in a quiet state were promptly detected. This is mainly due to the design of the mission, featuring a detector, the LAT with a wide field of view, and to the operation of the spacecraft itself, that can cover every region of the sky every 3 hours. Nevertheless, the scientific exploitation of this monitoring is more fruitful when early information about transients reaches a broader community. In this respect, the indefatigable activity of flare advocates, who worked on weekly shifts to validate the results and quickly broadcast information about flares and new detections, was the key to most scientific results.

  13. Solar-flare-induced Forbush decreases - Dependence on shock wave geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B. T.; Gall, R.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that the principal mechanism for the association of Forbush decreases with the passage of a solar flare shock wave is prolonged containment of cosmic ray particles behind the flare compression region, which acts as a semipermeable obstacle to particle motion along the field lines, leading to additional adiabatic cooling of the particles. Liouville's theorem is used to calculate the instantaneous distribution function at 1 AU for each particle arriving at the earth. By averaging over a large number of individual estimates, a representative estimate of the omnidirectional phase space density and the corresponding particle intensity is obtained. The energy change of individual particles at the shocks is found to be small in comparison to the energy lost by adiabatic cooling of the cosmic rays between the shock wave and the sun. The effects of particle rigidity, diffusion coefficient, and flare longitude on the magnitude of the Forbush decrease are quantitatively investigated.

  14. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection and its application to solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Miho

    2017-02-01

    Solar flares are powerful radiations occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. They are powered by magnetic reconnection, a phenomenon that can convert magnetic energy into other forms of energy such as heat and kinetic energy, and which is believed to be ubiquitous in the universe. With the ever increasing spatial and temporal resolutions of solar observations, as well as numerical simulations benefiting from increasing computer power, we can now probe into the nature and the characteristics of magnetic reconnection in three dimensions to better understand the phenomenon's consequences during eruptive flares in our star's atmosphere. We review in the following the efforts made on different fronts to approach the problem of magnetic reconnection. In particular, we will see how understanding the magnetic topology in three dimensions helps in locating the most probable regions for reconnection to occur, how the current layer evolves in three dimensions and how reconnection leads to the formation of flux ropes, plasmoids and flaring loops.

  15. FLARE FLAME INSTABILITY AND BURNER COMBUSTION CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    БОНДАРЕНКО А.В.; В. Э. Волков; Максимов, М. В.

    2014-01-01

    Research of the flare instability development and the laminar-to-turbulent transition for the flares was executed. It was proved that the effects of viscosity and compressibility have the stabilizing influence on the gas flame. The study of the individual flare stability makes the theoretical basis of the fuel burning technology in combustion chambers and for the burner combustion control.

  16. Stars resembling the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrel de Strobel, G.

    This review is primarily directed to the question whether photometric solar analogues remain such when subjected to detailed spectroscopic analyses and interpreted with the help of internal stucture models. In other words, whether the physical parameters: mass, chemical composition, age (determining effective temperature and luminosity), chromospheric activity, equatorial rotation, lithium abundance, velocity fields etc., we derive from the spectral analysis of a photometric solar analogue, are really close to those of the Sun. We start from 109 photometric solar analogues extracted from different authors. The stars selected had to satisfy three conditions: i) their colour index (B-V) must be contained in the interval: Δ (B-V) = 0.59-0.69, ii) they must possess a trigonometric parallax, iii) they must have undergone a high resolution detailed spectroscopic analysis. First, this review presents photometric and spectrophotometric researches on solar analogues and recalls the pionneering work on these stars by the late Johannes Hardorp. After a brief discussion on low and high resolution spectroscopic researches, a comparison is made between effective temperatures as obtained, directly, from detailed spectral analyses and those obtained, indirectly, from different photometric relations. An interesting point in this review is the discussion on the tantalilizing value of the (B-V)solar of the Sun, and the presentation of a new reliable value of this index. A short restatement of the kinematic properties of the sample of solar analogues is also made. And, finally, the observational ( T eff, M bol) diagram, obtained with 99 of the initially presented 109 analogues, is compared to a theoretical ( T eff, M bol) diagram. This latter has been constructed with a grid of internal structure models for which, (very important for this investigation), the Sun was used as gauge. In analysing the position, with respect to the Sun, of each star we hoped to find a certain number of

  17. Instant CloudFlare starter

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Written as a practical guide, CloudFlare Starter will show you all you need to know in order to effectively improve your online presence in a multitude of different ways. ""Instant CloudFlare Starter"" is a practical yet accessible guide for website owners looking to optimize their site for optimum security and maximum performance.

  18. How the Dynamics of Flare Ribbons Can Help Us Understand the Three-dimensional Structure of Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in magnetized plasmas in space and astrophysical environment and fusion experiments. It rapidly changes magnetic field converting magnetic energy into other forms. Energy release in solar flares is believed to be governed by reconnection taking place in the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona. However, the corona is not always the easiest place to measure magnetic field and its change. During a flare, we also observe what happens at the boundary between the Sun's corona and interior, the chromosphere, to learn about reconnection process in the corona. Magnetic field in the Sun's outer atmosphere is line-tied at this boundary; energy flux is largely streamlined by magnetic field to where the field is rooted at this boundary, and quickly heats up the chromosphere, in a way similar to how auroras are produced by charged particles reaching the Earth's atmosphere at geomagnetic poles. Therefore, observing the impacted chromosphere during the flare allows us to track how much and how quickly magnetic flux is reconnected. Whereas probes in fusion experiments or spacecrafts in the Earth's magnetosphere usually sample multiple points for direct in-situ measurements, all reconnection events in the Sun's corona resulting in significant atmosphere heating can be mapped at the boundary with imaging observations of the Sun. From this mapping, we seek to reconstruct the geometry and evolution of reconnection, to understand the dual property of reconnection that is both sporadic and organizable in a flare, and to find out how much energy is released by each burst of reconnection. This talk will discuss recent results and challenges in this practice, inspired by observations of ribbons and loops of solar flares obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  20. The Dependence of Solar Flare Limb Darkening on Emission Peak Formation Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward; Epp, Luke; Eparvier, Francis; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2017-08-01

    Solar limb effects are local brightening or darkening of an emission that depend on where in the Sun's atmosphere it forms. Near the solar limb, optically thick (thin) emissions will darken (brighten) as the column of absorbers (emitters) along the line-of-sight increases. Note that in limb brightening, emission sources are re-arranged whereas in limb darkening they are obscured. Thus, only limb darkening is expected to occur in disk integrated observations. Limb darkening also results in center-to-limb variations of disk-integrated solar flare spectra, with important consequences for how planetary atmospheres are affected by flares. Flares are typically characterized by their flux in the optically thin 0.1-0.8 nm band measured by the X-ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). On the other hand, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) line emissions can limb darken because they are sensitive to resonant scattering, resulting in a flare's location on the solar disk controlling the amount of ionizing radiation that reaches a planet. For example, an X-class flare originating from disk center may significantly heat a planet's thermosphere, whereas the same flare originating near the limb may have no effect because much of the effective emissions are scattered in the solar corona.To advance the relatively poor understanding of flare limb darkening, we use over 300 M-class or larger flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to characterize limb darkening as a function of emission peak formation temperature, Tf. For hot coronal emissions (Tf>2 MK), these results show a linear relationship between the degree of limb darkening and Tf where lines with Tf=2 MK darken approximately 7 times more than lines with Tf=16 MK. Because the extent of limb darkening is dependent on the height of the source plasma, we use simple Beer-Lambert radiative transfer analysis to interpret these results

  1. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.

  2. Radio emission of the sun at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Piotrovich, V. V.

    This review article deals with the radio emission originating from different solar atmospheric regions - the quiet solar atmosphere, active regions and solar flares. All experimental data of the quiet Sun brightness temperature at the region of 0.1 - 20 mm wavelength are summarized. The quiet Sun brightness distributions across the disk and values of the solar radio radius are reviewed. The properties of the sources of sunspot-associated active region emission and radio brightness depression associated with Hα-filaments are considered in comparison with observations at centimetre and optical domains. The observational properties of millimetre wave bursts and their correlations with similar phenomena at other domains are reviewed. Special reference is devoted to nearly 100% correlation impulsive radio bursts with hard X-ray bursts. Existence of the fine temporal structure containing many spikes with time scales up to 10 ms as well as observations of quasi-periodic millisecond oscillations are discussed.

  3. SCIENCE OF SUN PHOTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan Toma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Typically, the total amount of gases and particles in a column of atmosphere cannot be determined from measurements just at Earth's surface, by a single measurement essentially at the bottom of the atmosphere column. Balloons, airplanes, and rockets are all used to perform direct measurements in the atmosphere at altitudes up to and beyond the stratosphere. Satellite-based instruments provide global views, but it is difficult to infer surface and column distributions from space-based measurements, so such measurements must still be supplemented by ground-based measurements. Sun photometry is an important way of probing the atmosphere from the ground to measure the effects of the atmosphere on Sun radiation crossing through the atmosphere to Earth's surface. These indirect technique provide information about the entire atmosphere above the observer, not just the atmosphere that can be sampled directly close to Earth's surface.

  4. How hot is the sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘超

    2001-01-01

    Do you know how hot thesun is? There are no solidsor liquids on the sun. Why not? The temperature onoutside the sun is more than 10, 000℃, and that at the centre is about 20, 000, 000℃.The sun is so hot that all thesolids and all the liquids havebeen turned into gases.

  5. Reconnection in Solar Flares: Outstanding Questions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hiroaki Isobe; Kazunari Shibata

    2009-06-01

    Space observations of solar flares such as those from Yohkoh, SOHO,TRACE, and RHESSI have revealed a lot of observational evidence of magnetic reconnection in solar flares: cusp-shaped arcades, reconnection inflows, plasmoids, etc. Thus it has been established, at least phenomenologically, that magnetic reconnection does occur in solar flares. However, a number of fundamental questions and puzzles still remain in the physics of reconnection in solar flares. In this paper, we discuss the recent progresses and future prospects in the study of magnetic reconnection in solar flares from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  6. Impulsivity Parameter for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W G; Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Calvo-Mozo, B

    2016-01-01

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30-40 keV and 25-50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify...

  7. Flare emission from Sagittarius A*

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, A; Vogel, S N; Teuben, P; Morris, M R; Baganoff, F; Dexter, J; Schoedel, R; Witzel, G; Valencia-S., M; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D; Bremer, M; Straubmeier, C; Moser, L; Sabha, N; Buchholz, R; Zamaninasab, M; Muzic, K; Moultaka, J; Zensus, J A

    2012-01-01

    Based on Bremer et al. (2011) and Eckart et al. (2012) we report on simultaneous observations and modeling of the millimeter, near-infrared, and X-ray flare emission of the source Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) associated with the super-massive black hole at the Galactic Center. We study physical processes giving rise to the variable emission of SgrA* from the radio to the X-ray domain. To explain the statistics of the observed variability of the (sub-)mm spectrum of SgrA*, we use a sample of simultaneous NIR/X-ray flare peaks and model the flares using a synchrotron and SSC mechanism. The observations reveal flaring activity in all wavelength bands that can be modeled as the signal from adiabatically expanding synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) components. The model parameters suggest that either the adiabatically expanding source components have a bulk motion larger than v_exp or the expanding material contributes to a corona or disk, confined to the immediate surroundings of SgrA*. For the bulk of the synchrotron and ...

  8. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Montani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼1015 cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼109, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  9. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montani, G., E-mail: giovanni.montani@frascati.enea.it [ENEA – C.R, UTFUS-MAG, via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “Sapienza”, p.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Bernardini, M.G. [INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-12-12

    The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼10{sup 15} cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼10{sup 9}, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  10. CUNY Sun-Earth Research, Space Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, D. E.; Cheung, T. D.; Marchese, P. J.; Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S.; Tremberger, G.

    2007-05-01

    Faculty and students at Queensborough Community College and Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York (CUNY) have, over several years now, employed simple software familiar to most undergraduate students to perform useful calculations, including statistical analyses, regarding various geophysical phenomena. Topics have included Space Weather, Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction and strength fluctuations, geomagnetic and ionospheric responses to solar flares, and Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) events. Our statistical analyses have utilized second-order measures of fluctuation of the IMF strength, especially what we now call the Cheung number: the number of times that the value of Sigma-B, as provided by the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data, has exceeded 0.5nT during a 6 hour interval. We have also utilized the Higuchi fractal dimension of various somewhat random fluctuations, including Sigma-B and the brightness or strength of adjacent pixels or data points in somewhat random data sequences in time or spatial dimension, including IMF fluctuations and SOHO (Solar Heliographic Observer) images of the Sun. These we have correlated with each other and with such variables as SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) peak flux, TEC (Total Electron Content) of the ionosphere, and Dst (Disturbance storm-time) in the geomagnetic field. Recent results indicate that the IMF fluctuation measures are well correlated with the SEP peak flux, the Dst, and TEC. Higuchi fractal analysis of SOHO photospheric ultraviolet brightness indicates, consistent with concomitant increased chaos or randomness of photospheric brightness, an increased likelihood of solar flare events or CME affecting interplanetary space and the earth's magnetosphere/ionosphere/atmosphere.

  11. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  12. Exceptions to the rule: the X-flares of AR 2192 Lacking Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    NOAA Active region (AR) 2192, that was present on the Sun in October 2014, was the largest region which occurred since November 1990 (see Figure 1). The huge size accompanied by a very high activity level, was quite unexpected as it appeared during the unusually weak solar cycle 24. Nevertheless, the AR turned out to be one of the most prolific flaring ARs of cycle 24. It produced in total 6 X, 29 M, 79 C flares during its disk passage from October 18-29, 2014 (see Figure 2). Surprisingly, all flares greater than GOES class M5 and X were confined, i.e. had no coronal mass ejections (CME) associated. All the flare events had some obvious similarity in morphology, as they were located in the core of the AR and revealed only minor separation motion away from the neutral line but a large initial separation of the conjugate flare ribbons. In the paper by Thalmann et al. (2015) we describe the series of flares and give details about the confined X1.6 flare event from October 22, 2014 as well as the single eruptive M4.0 flare event from October 24, 2014. The study of the X1.6 flare revealed a large initial separation of flare ribbons together with recurrent flare brightenings, which were related to two episodes of enhanced hard X-ray emission as derived from RHESSI observations. This suggests that magnetic field structures connected to specific regions were repeatedly involved in the process of reconnection and energy release. Opposite to the central location of the sequence of confined events within the AR, a single eruptive (M4.0) event occurred on the outskirt of the AR in the vicinity of open magnetic fields. Our investigations revealed a predominantly north-south oriented magnetic system of arcade fields overlying the AR that could have preserved the magnetic arcade to erupt, and consequently kept the energy release trapped in a localized volume of magnetic field high up in the corona (as supported by the absence of a lateral motion of the flare ribbons and the

  13. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R. [HL Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hilton, Eric J., E-mail: jrad@astro.washington.edu [Universe Sandbox, 911 E. Pike Street #333, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  14. IRIS Observations of the Mg II h & k Lines During a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Qiu, Jiong; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg II h & k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26km/s, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare....

  15. Prior Flaring as a Complement to Free Magnetic Energy for Forecasting Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    From a large database of (1) 40,000 SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms covering the passage of 1,300 sunspot active regions across the 30 deg radius central disk of the Sun, (2) a proxy of each active region's free magnetic energy measured from each of the active region's central-disk-passage magnetograms, and (3) each active region's full-disk-passage history of production of major flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find new statistical evidence that (1) there are aspects of an active region's magnetic field other than the free energy that are strong determinants of the active region's productivity of major flares and fast CMEs in the coming few days, (2) an active region's recent productivity of major flares, in addition to reflecting the amount of free energy in the active region, also reflects these other determinants of coming productivity of major eruptions, and (3) consequently, the knowledge of whether an active region has recently had a major flare, used in combination with the active region's free-energy proxy measured from a magnetogram, can greatly alter the forecast chance that the active region will have a major eruption in the next few days after the time of the magnetogram. The active-region magnetic conditions that, in addition to the free energy, are reflected by recent major flaring are presumably the complexity and evolution of the field.

  16. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  17. Two Sun-like Superflare Stars Rotating as Slow as the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nogami, Daisaku; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of high dispersion spectroscopy of two `superflare stars', KIC 9766237, and KIC 9944137 with Subaru/HDS. Superflare stars are G-type main sequence stars, but show gigantic flares compared to the Sun, which have been recently discovered in the data obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Though most of these stars are thought to have a rotation period shorter than 10 days on the basis of photometric variabilities, the two targets of the present paper are estimated to have a rotation period of 21.8 d, and 25.3 d. Our spectroscopic results clarified that these stars have stellar parameters similar to those of the Sun in terms of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The projected rotational velocities derived by us are consistent with the photometric rotation period, indicating a fairy high inclination angle. The average strength of the magnetic field on the surface of these stars are estimated to be 1-20 G, by using the absorption line of Ca II 8542. We could not det...

  18. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Karoff, C

    2010-01-01

    Using kappa Ceti as a proxy for the young Sun we show that not only was the young Sun much more effective in protecting the Earth environment from galactic cosmic rays than the present day Sun; it also had flare and corona mass ejection rates up to three orders of magnitude larger than the present day Sun. The reduction in the galactic cosmic ray influx caused by the young Sun's enhanced shielding capability has been suggested as a solution to what is known as the faint young Sun paradox, i.e. the fact that the luminosity of the young Sun was only around 75% of its present value when life started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how the larger corona mass ejection rates of the young Sun would have had an effect on the climate with a magnitude similar to...

  19. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  20. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  1. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  2. Review - The Sun Rises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bender

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Blackburn, Stuart H. 2010. The Sun Rises: A Shaman's Chant, Ritual Exchange and Fertility in the Apatani Valley. Leiden: Brill. xvii+401. Color and black and white photographs, maps. ISBN: 9789-0041-7578-5 (hardcover, 97USD. The Sun Rises is a model study contextualizing an oral narrative tradition in the social and ritual fabric of a remote community in northeast India. In many ways a companion volume to Himalayan Tribal Tales (Blackburn 2008, the text presents the first substantial translation of a key ritual text of the Apantani Valley dwellers in Arunachal Pradesh, located on the contested border between China (Tibet and India. The Apatani speak a Tibeto-Burman language, practice intensive rice agriculture in carefully terraced fields, and number about 35,000. Their clans populate several centuries-old villages. Until recently, they were separated from the lowlands of Assam and surrounded only by peoples practicing various forms of shifting agriculture. The valley dwellers have increasingly encountered modernization over the last few decades, including Indian and global popular culture, and Christianity. The heart of this book is a chant of nineteen segments.

  3. Eruptions from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  4. Pre-Flare Dynamics of Sunspot Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Korsos, M B; Ludmany, A

    2014-01-01

    Several papers provide evidences that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare producing areas the present work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms, it follows the behaviour of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalogue. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of the gradient variation: i) steep increase, ii) high maximum, iii) significant fluctuation and iv) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset which can be related to the "pull mode" of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the next 8-10 hours.

  5. Pre-flare dynamics of sunspot groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsós, M. B.; Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A., E-mail: korsos.marianna@csfk.mta.hu, E-mail: baranyi.tunde@csfk.mta.hu, E-mail: ludmany.andras@csfk.mta.hu [Heliophysical Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 30 (Hungary)

    2014-07-10

    Several papers provide evidence that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare-producing areas, this work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms and follows the behavior of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalog. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of gradient variation: (1) steep increase, (2) high maximum, (3) significant fluctuation, and (4) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset that can be related to the 'pull mode' of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the following 8-10 hr.

  6. The Height of a White-Light Flare and its Hard X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Juan-Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Kriucker, Saem; Lin, R. P.; Lindsey, Charles; Couvidat, Sebastien; Schou, Jesper; Thompson, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    We describe observations of a white-light (WL) flare (SOL2011-02-24T07:35:00, M3.5) close to the limb of the Sun, from which we obtain estimates of the heights of the optical continuum sources and those of the associated hard X-ray (HXR) sources. For this purpose, we use HXR images from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager and optical images at 6173 Ang. from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.We find that the centroids of the impulsive-phase emissions in WL and HXRs (30 -80 keV) match closely in central distance (angular displacement from Sun center), within uncertainties of order 0".2. This directly implies a common source height for these radiations, strengthening the connection between visible flare continuum formation and the accelerated electrons. We also estimate the absolute heights of these emissions as vertical distances from Sun center. Such a direct estimation has not been done previously, to our knowledge. Using a simultaneous 195 Ang. image from the Solar-Terrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft to identify the heliographic coordinates of the flare footpoints, we determine mean heights above the photosphere (as normally defined; tau = 1 at 5000 Ang.) of 305 +/- 170 km and 195 +/- 70 km, respectively, for the centroids of the HXR and WL footpoint sources of the flare. These heights are unexpectedly low in the atmosphere, and are consistent with the expected locations of tau = 1 for the 6173 Ang and the approx 40 keV photons observed, respectively.

  7. Observing the Sun with Coronado telescopes telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The Sun provides amateur astronomers with one of the few opportunities for daytime astronomy. In order to see the major features of our nearest star, special telescopes that have a very narrow visible bandwidth are essential. The bandwidth has to be as narrow as 1 A- 10-10 m (1 Angstrom) and centred on the absorption line of neutral hydrogen. This makes many major features of the Suna (TM)s chromosphere visible to the observer. Such narrow-band "Fabry-Perot etalon filters" are high technology, and until the introduction of the Coronado range of solar telescopes, were too expensive for amateur use. The entry-level Coronado telescope, the PST (Personal Solar Telescope) costs under 500. Solar prominences (vast columns of plasma, best seen at the edge of the solar disk), filaments, flares, sunspots, plage and active regions are all visible and can be imaged to produce spectacular solar photographs. Philip Pugh has assembled a team of contributors who show just how much solar work can be done with Coronado telesco...

  8. Monitoring of FR Cnc Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, A; Pavlenko, E; Kuznyetsova, Yu; Krushevska, V; Sergeev, A

    2007-01-01

    Being excited by the detection of the first ever-observed optical flare in FR Cnc, we decided to continue photometrical monitoring of this object. The observations were carried out at Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine; CrAO - hereafter) and at the Terskol Observatory (Russia, Northern Caucasus). The obtained lightcurves are presented and discussed. No distinguishable flares were detected that could imply that flares on FR Cnc are very rare event.

  9. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  10. Long Fading Mid-Infrared Emission in Transient Coronal Line Emitters: Dust Echo of Tidal Disruption Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Dou, Liming; Jiang, Ning; Yang, Chenwei; Lyu, Jianwei; Zhou, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The sporadic accretion followed the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a bright UV and soft X-ray flare in the galactic nucleus. The gas and dust surrounding the black hole responses to such a flare with an echo in emission lines and infrared emission. In this paper, we report the detection of long fading mid-IR emission lasting up to 14 years after the flare in four TDE candidates with transient coronal lines using the WISE public data release. We estimate reprocessed mid-IR luminosities are in the range between $4\\times 10^{42}$ to $2\\times 10^{43}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ and dust temperature in the range of 570-800K when WISE first detected these sources 3-5 years after the flare. Both luminosity and dust temperature decreases with time. We interpret the mid-IR emission as the infrared echo of the tidal disruption flare. We estimate the UV luminosity at the peak flare to be one to thirty times of $10^{44}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ and warm dust mass in the range of 0.05 to 2.2 M_{\\sun} within a few...

  11. Comparison between Hinode/SOT and SDO/HMI, AIA Data for the Study of the Solar Flare Trigger Process

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Yumi; Imada, Shinsuke; Iida, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the flare trigger mechanism, we have analyzed several flare events which were observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), in our previous study. Because of the limitation of SOT field of view, however, only four events in the Hinode data sets have been utilizable. Therefore, increasing the number of events is required for evaluating the flare trigger models. We investigated the applicability of data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to increase the data sample for a statistical analysis of the flare trigger process. SDO regularly observes the full disk of the sun and all flares although its spatial resolution is lower than that of Hinode. We investigated the M6.6 flare which occurred on 13 February 2011 and compared the analyzed data of SDO with the results of our previous study using Hinode/SOT data. Filter and vector magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and filtergrams from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 1600A were employed. From the c...

  12. The validated sun exposure questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, B; Søndergaard, J; Nielsen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Few questionnaires used in monitoring sun-related behavior have been tested for validity. We established criteria validity of a developed questionnaire for monitoring population sun-related behavior. During May-August 2013, 664 Danes wore a personal electronic UV-dosimeter for one week...... that measured the outdoor time and dose of erythemal UVR exposure. In the following week, they answered a questionnaire on their sun-related behavior in the measurement week. Outdoor time measured by dosimetry correlated strongly with both outdoor time and the developed exposure scale measured....... The weekly sunburn fraction correlated strongly with the number of ambient sun hours (r=0.73, p

  13. The Sun, Mercury, and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The Messenger mission to Mercury opened a new window into the inner solar system. In 2008, this mission began a number of years of flybys, culminating in an orbital insertion around Mercury and producing unparalleled observations about this mysterious innermost planet. Mercury orbits so close to the Sun, from the point of view of Earth, that seeing it from the Earth against the Sun's glare is a great challenge. At the same time, the huge gravitational force of the Sun makes it a challenge to put a mission on Mercury without losing it into the Sun. Now, with heightened understanding of Mercury,

  14. The Statistical Analyses of the White-Light Flares: Two Main Results About Flare Behaviours

    CERN Document Server

    Dal, H A

    2012-01-01

    We present two main results, based on the models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviours of the white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with the flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti type stars, we examine the behaviour of optical flare processes along the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data,to analyse the flare time-scales in respect to some results obtained from the X-ray observations. Using the SPSS V17.0 and the GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function and analysed with t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of the white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that the white-light flares behave in a similar way as th...

  15. Relationship of Non-potentiality and Flaring: Intercomparison for an M-class Flare

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha; Shibu K. Mathew

    2000-09-01

    We have made an attempt to obtain relationship of magnetic shear and vertical currents in NOAA AR7321. Intercomparison of changes observed at several flaring and non-flaring sites associated with an M4/2B flare observed on October 26, 1992 is reported.

  16. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  17. Sun light European Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubielle, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    2015 has been declared the year of light. Sunlight plays a major role in the world. From the sunbeams that heat our planet and feed our plants to the optical analysis of the sun or the modern use of sun particles in technologies, sunlight is everywhere and it is vital. This project aims to understand better the light of the Sun in a variety of fields. The experiments are carried out by students aged 15 to 20 in order to share their discoveries with Italian students from primary and secondary schools. The experiments will also be presented to a group of Danish students visiting our school in January. All experiments are carried out in English and involve teams of teachers. This project is 3 folds: part 1: Biological project = what are the mechanisms of photosynthesis? part 2: Optical project= what are the components of sunlight and how to use it? part 3: Technical project= how to use the energy of sunlight for modern devices? Photosynthesis project Biology and English Context:Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy, normally from the Sun, into chemical energy that can later fuel the organisms' activities. This chemical energy is stored in molecules which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water. In most cases, oxygen is released as a waste product. Most plants perform photosynthesis. Photosynthesis maintains atmospheric oxygen levels and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. Outcome: Our project consists in understanding the various steps of photosynthesis. Students will shoot a DVD of the experiments presenting the equipments required, the steps of the experiments and the results they have obtained for a better understanding of photosynthesis Digital pen project Electricity, Optics and English Context: Sunlight is a complex source of light based on white light that can be decomposed to explain light radiations or colours. This light is a precious source to create

  18. Physics of the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, Thomas; Mihalas, Dimitri; Ulrich, Roger

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with its two companion volumes, originated in a study commis­ sioned by the United States National Academy of Sciences on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A committee composed of Tom Holzer, Dimitri Mihalas, Roger Ulrich and myself was asked to prepare a comprehensive review of current knowledge concerning the physics of the sun. We were fortunate in being able to persuade many distinguished scientists to gather their forces for the preparation of 21 separate chapters covering not only solar physics but also relevant areas of astrophysics and solar-terrestrial relations. It proved necessary to divide the chapters into three separate volumes that cover three different aspects of solar physics. Volumes 1 and 2 are concerned with 'The Solar Interior' and with 'The Solar Atmosphere'. This volume, devoted to 'Astrophysics and Solar-Terrestrial Relations', focuses on problems of solar physics from these two different but complementary perspectives. The emphasis thr...

  19. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A

    2016-01-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ~$10^{35}$ erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with $g-i$ color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ~0.03 is found. A power...

  20. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauas, P.J.D. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents spectral observations of the continuum as well as the profiles of 29 selected atomic lines for the two continuum-emitting kernels of the June 15 1982 white-light flare, and for the neighboring quiet sun. It is found that one of the kernels does not show enhanced emission in chromospheric lines, particularly in H-alpha, although it presents the same level of white-light emission as the other kernel. This suggests that both kernels have the same thermal structure in the continuum-emitting region, but a different structure in the chromosphere, thus supporting the hypothesis that the continuum emission is of photospheric origin, and due to H(-). 11 refs.

  1. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents spectral observations of the continuum as well as the profiles of 29 selected atomic lines for the two continuum-emitting kernels of the June 15 1982 white-light flare, and for the neighboring quiet sun. It is found that one of the kernels does not show enhanced emission in chromospheric lines, particularly in H-alpha, although it presents the same level of white-light emission as the other kernel. This suggests that both kernels have the same thermal structure in the continuum-emitting region, but a different structure in the chromosphere, thus supporting the hypothesis that the continuum emission is of photospheric origin, and due to H(-).

  2. Why the sun sucks - Architects versus the sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, N.; Niesten, J.; Taminiau, P.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will show how not to design with the Sun. By showing examples how buildings have failed that have not taken the Sun and its effects in consideration, one should get a clearer picture of how you

  3. Why the sun sucks - Architects versus the sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, N.; Niesten, J.; Taminiau, P.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will show how not to design with the Sun. By showing examples how buildings have failed that have not taken the Sun and its effects in consideration, one should get a clearer picture of how you

  4. Hard x-ray spectroscopy for proton flare prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Howard A.; Farnik, Frantisek; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1998-11-01

    High energy interplanetary proton events can jeopardize vital military and civilian spacecraft by disrupting logical circuits and by actually damaging spacecraft electronic components. Studies of solar hard x-rays indicate that high-energy proton events observed near Earth are highly associated with an uncommon type of solar flare exhibiting temporal progressively hardening hard x-ray spectra. A hard x-ray spectrometer is being developed by the Czech Astronomical Institute to provide a test bed for evaluating this phenomenon as a possible proton-storm prediction method. The instrument is designed to measure hard x-ray spectra in a high fluence, high-energy particle background environment such as that found at geosynchronous altitude. This experiment has been selected for space flight by the DoD Space Test Program and will fly aboard the Department of Energy satellite, Multi-spectral thermal Imager, scheduled for a three year mission, beginning in late 1999. The timing of this mission, fortuitously, coincides with the experiment are: 1) to evaluate the efficacy of this type of solar instrument in predicting interplanetary proton storms; 2) to study the high-energy physics of solar flares in concert with the premier flight of the NOAA soft x-ray imaging telescope, SXI, on the GOES 12 weather satellite and other solar mission. If the first goal is demonstrated by this mission, continuous monitoring of the Sun for proton events could become operational from geo-synchronous orbit during solar cycle 24.

  5. Our Dynamic Sun (Hannes Alfvén Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Eric

    2017-04-01

    The Sun, an object of worship for early civilisations, is the main source of light and life on Earth and of our space weather, with many subtle effects on our environment. The lecture will introduce you to the Sun and its dynamic phenomena, and will aim to show how our understanding of many aspects of the Sun has been revolutionized over the past few years by current spacecraft observations and models. Much of the dynamic behaviour is driven by the magnetic field since, in the outer atmosphere (or corona), it represents by far the largest source of energy. The interior of the Sun, revealed by solar seismology, possesses a strong shear layer at the base of the convection zone, where sunspot magnetic fields are generated. But a small-scale dynamo is also operating near the surface of the Sun, generating magnetic fields that thread the lowest layer of the solar atmosphere, the photosphere, in a turbulent convective state. Above the photosphere lies the highly dynamic fine-scale chromosphere and beyond that the rare corona at high temperatures exceeding one million degrees K. Magnetic mechanisms for heating the corona (an intriguing puzzle) will be described. Other puzzles include the structure of giant flux ropes, known as prominences, which have complex fine structure. Occasionally, they erupt and produce huge ejections of mass and magnetic field (coronal mass ejections), which can disrupt the space environment of the Earth. When such eruptions originate in active regions around sunspots, they are also associated with solar flares, where magnetic energy is converted to kinetic, heat and fast particle energy. A new theory will be presented for the origin of the twist that is observed in erupting prominences.

  6. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lugaz, Noe [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  7. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  8. Global Seismology of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Sarbani

    2016-01-01

    The seismic study of the Sun and other stars offers a unique window into the interior of these stars. Thanks to helioseismology, we know the structure of the Sun to admirable precision. In fact, our knowledge is good enough to use the Sun as a laboratory. We have also been able to study the dynamics of the Sun in great detail. Helioseismic data also allow us to probe the changes that take place in the Sun as solar activity waxes and wanes. The seismic study of stars other than the Sun is a fairly new endeavour, but we are making great strides in this field. In this review I discuss some of the techniques used in helioseismic analyses and the results obtained using those techniques. In this review I focus on results obtained with global helioseismology, i.e., the study of the Sun using its normal modes of oscillation. I also briefly touch upon asteroseismology, the seismic study of stars other than the Sun, and discuss how seismic data of others stars are interpreted.

  9. Kepler Flares II: The Temporal Morphology of White-Light Flares on GJ 1243

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John P; Kowalski, Adam F; Johnson, Emily C; Malatesta, Michael; Peraza, Jesus; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M; Jansen, Tiffany C; Scheffler, Matthew S; Berdis, Jodi R; Larsen, Daniel M; Hilton, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from $10^{29}$ to $10^{33}$ erg, are found in 11 months of 1-minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a dur...

  10. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheron, Laura E; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a \\emph{geostationary operational environmental satellite} (\\emph{GOES}) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately 3/4 a \\emph{GOES} class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity fe...

  11. Diagnostics of solar flare reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karlický

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new diagnostics of the solar flare reconnection, mainly based on the plasma radio emission. We propose that the high-frequency (600-2000 MHz slowly drifting pulsating structures map the flare magnetic field reconnection. These structures correspond to the radio emission from plasmoids which are formed in the extended current sheet due to tearing and coalescence processes. An increase of the frequency drift of the drifting structures is interpreted as an increase of the reconnection rate. Using this model, time scales of slowly drifting pulsating structure observed during the 12 April 2001 flare by the Trieste radiopolarimeter with high time resolution (1 ms are interpreted as a radio manifestation of electron beams accelerated in the multi-scale reconnection process. For short periods Fourier spectra of the observed structure have a power-law form with power-law indices in the 1.3-1.6 range. For comparison the 2-D MHD numerical modeling of the multi-scale reconnection is made and it is shown that Fourier spectrum of the reconnection dissipation power has also a power-law form, but with power-law index 2. Furthermore, we compute a time evolution of plasma parameters (density, magnetic field etc in the 2-D MHD model of the reconnection. Then assuming a plasma radio emission from locations, where the 'double-resonance' instability generates the upper-hybrid waves due to unstable distribution function of suprathermal electrons, we model radio spectra. Effects of the MHD turbulence are included. The resulting spectra are compared with those observed. It is found, that depending on model parameters the lace bursts and the decimetric spikes can be reproduced. Thus, it is shown that the model can be used for diagnostics of the flare reconnection process. We also point out possible radio signatures of reconnection outflow termination shocks. They are detected as type II-like herringbone structures in the 200-700 MHz frequency range. Finally

  12. Offshore production flares: a PETROBRAS review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagot, Paulo R.; Burmann, Clovis P.; Araujo, Paulo Bento de; Motomura, Tsukasa [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to briefly present the offshore flare system technological evolution and the main design criteria for flare and its supporting structure. In order to perform the aimed task, this work was divided into two parts: the first part presents the technological evolution of the offshore production flares and the second one discusses the flare system designing criteria. The evolution of the technology associated to the offshore production flares is organized by the authors just dividing the history in four chronological phases. Each phase is defined by the predominant use of the, by the time, most up-to-date technological alternative and it will be described with the help of sketches, drawings, photographs, data and information about the platforms where such technologies were applied. The second part of the present work discusses the dimensional criteria, interesting aspects and flaws of the offshore flare systems in two different fields, which are: definition of the flare system capacity; and flow and thermal design of the flare system. (author)

  13. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  14. Ultra-narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830~\\AA\\ using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yan; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyungsuk; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles which have adverse effects in the near Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6~m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, here we show a striking "negative" flare with a narrow, but unambiguous "dark" moving front observed in He I 10830 \\AA, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in H-alpha and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 \\AA\\ can be produced under special circumstances, by nonthermal-electron collisions, or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomi...

  15. Electron acceleration at slow-mode shocks in the magnetic reconnection region in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henry; Önel, Hakan; Warmuth, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    A solar flare appears as an sudden enhancement of the emission of electromagnetic radiation of the Sun covering a broad range of the spectrum from the radio up to the gamma-ray range. That indicates the generation of energetic electrons during flares, which are considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere, as for instance by NASA's MMS mission, have shown that electrons can efficiently accelerated at the slow-mode shocks occuring in the magnetic reconnection region. This mechanism is applied to solar flares. The electrons are accelerated by the cross-shock potential at slow-mode shocks resulting in magnetic field aligned beams of energetic electrons in the downstream region. The interaction of this electron beam with the plasma leads to the excitation of whistler waves and, subsequently, to a strong heating of the electrons in the downstream region. Considering this process under coronal circumstances, enough electrons with energies >30keV are generated in the magnetic reconnection region as required for the hard X-ray radiation during solar flares as observed by NASA's RHESSI mission.

  16. Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The Sun offers a convenient nearby laboratory to study the physical processes of particle acceleration and impulsive energy release in magnetized plasmas that occur throughout the universe, from planetary magnetospheres to black hole accretion disks. Solar flares are the most powerful explosions in the solar system, releasing up to 10^32-10^33 ergs over only 100-1,000 seconds, accelerating electrons up to hundreds of MeV and heating plasma to tens of MK. The accelerated electrons and the hot plasma each contain tens of percent of the total flare energy, indicating an intimate link between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and flare energy release. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observes the X-ray emission from these processes from ~3 keV to ~17 MeV with unprecedented spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. RHESSI observations show that "super-hot" (>30 MK) plasma temperatures are achieved almost exclusively by intense, GOES X-class flares and appear to be strictly a...

  17. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lindsey, Charles [North West Research Associates, CORA Division, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Bogart, Rick; Couvidat, Sebastien; Scherrer, Phil [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Schou, Jesper [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    We report observations of white-light ejecta in the low corona, for two X-class flares on 2013 May 13, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. At least two distinct kinds of sources appeared (chromospheric and coronal), in the early and later phases of flare development, in addition to the white-light footpoint sources commonly observed in the lower atmosphere. The gradual emissions have a clear identification with the classical loop-prominence system, but are brighter than expected and possibly seen here in the continuum rather than line emission. We find the HMI flux exceeds the radio/X-ray interpolation of the bremsstrahlung produced in the flare soft X-ray sources by at least one order of magnitude. This implies the participation of cooler sources that can produce free-bound continua and possibly line emission detectable by HMI. One of the early sources dynamically resembles {sup c}oronal rain{sup ,} appearing at a maximum apparent height and moving toward the photosphere at an apparent constant projected speed of 134 ± 8 km s{sup –1}. Not much literature exists on the detection of optical continuum sources above the limb of the Sun by non-coronagraphic instruments and these observations have potential implications for our basic understanding of flare development, since visible observations can in principle provide high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. 3D Simulation Study of the Spreading/Elongation of Ribbons in Two-Ribbon Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Milton; Cassak, Paul; Qiu, Jiong; Longscope, Dana; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-08-01

    Two-ribbon solar flares are characterized by the appearance in pairs of bright ribbons on the surface of the Sun. The ribbons separate from each other in time, which has been cited as one of many pieces of evidence that magnetic reconnection participates in the release of magnetic energy in solar flares. In addition to moving apart from each other, observations have revealed that ribbons also elongate (or spread) in time along the polarity inversion line. This is likely related to the spreading of the magnetic reconnection process in the corona. Recent observations have shown ribbons can elongate either unidirectionally or bidirectionally. We investigate the physics of reconnection spreading and its potential relation to two-ribbon flares via a parametric study using 3D numerical simulations with the two-fluid (MHD + Hall effect + electron inertia) model. We study how anti-parallel reconnection spreads in current sheets with a non-uniform thickness in the out-of-plane direction. Previous numerical work on spreading in current sheets of uniform thickness revealed that anti-parallel reconnection spreads at a speed given by the current carriers, but it is not obvious how the spreading occurs in a current sheet with non-uniform thickness. We compare spreading in this system with spreading in current sheets of uniform thickness that are thicker than the dissipation scale. The results may be useful not just for solar flares, but also for Earth’s magnetotail, laboratory reconnection experiments, and reconnection in the solar wind.

  19. Statistical Properties of Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in White-Light Flares Observed With Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, C E; Nakariakov, V M; Broomhall, A -M

    2016-01-01

    We embark on a study of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the decay phase of white-light stellar flares observed by Kepler. Out of the 1439 flares on 216 different stars detected in the short-cadence data using an automated search, 56 flares are found to have pronounced QPP-like signatures in the light curve, of which 11 have stable decaying oscillations. No correlation is found between the QPP period and the stellar temperature, radius, rotation period and surface gravity, suggesting that the QPPs are independent of global stellar parameters. Hence they are likely to be the result of processes occurring in the local environment. There is also no significant correlation between the QPP period and flare energy, however there is evidence that the period scales with the QPP decay time for the Gaussian damping scenario, but not to a significant degree for the exponentially damped case. This same scaling has been observed for MHD oscillations on the Sun, suggesting that they could be the cause of the QPPs in tho...

  20. Flare Ribbon Expansion and Energy Release

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ayumi Asai; Takaaki Yokoyama; Masumi Shimojo; Satoshi Masuda; Kazunari Shibata

    2006-06-01

    We report a detailed examination about the relationship between the evolution of the H flare ribbons and the released magnetic energy during the April 10 2001 flare. In the H images, several bright kernels are observed in the flare ribbons. We identified the conjugated footpoints, by analyzing the lightcurves at each H kernels, and showed their connectivities during the flare. Then, based on the magnetic reconnection model, we calculated quantitatively the released energy by using the photospheric magnetic field strengths and separation speeds of the H flare ribbons. Finally, we examined the downward motions which are observed at the H kernels. We found that the stronger the red-asymmetry tends to be associated with the brighter the H kernel.

  1. The local Poisson hypothesis for solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2001-01-01

    The question of whether flares occur as a Poisson process has important consequences for flare physics. Recently Lepreti et al. presented evidence for local departure from Poisson statistics in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray flare catalog. Here it is argued that this effect arises from a selection effect inherent in the soft X-ray observations; namely that the slow decay of enhanced flux following a large flare makes detection of subsequent flares less likely. It is also shown that the power-law tail of the GOES waiting-time distribution varies with the solar cycle. This counts against any intrinsic significance to the appearance of a power law, or to the value of its index.

  2. Totality eclipses of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Littmann, Mark; Willcox, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. - ;A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is the best guide and reference book on solar eclipses ever written. It explains: how to observe them; how to photograph and videotape them; why they occur; their history and mythology; and future eclipses - when and where to see them. Totality also tells the remarkable story of how eclipses shocked scientists, revealed the workings of the Sun, and made Einstein famous. And the book shares the experiences and advice of many veteran eclipse observers. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is profusely ill...

  3. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Your Eyes and the Sun Sections The Sun, UV Radiation ... Safety Infographic The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes Written by: David Turbert Aug. 28, 2014 Keep ...

  4. Clustering of Sun Exposure Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2002-01-01

    In a medically motivated Sun-exposure study, questionnaires concerning Sun-habits were collected from a number of subjects together with UV radiation measurements. This paper focuses on identifying clusters in the heterogeneous set of data for the purpose of understanding possible relations between...... Sun-habits exposure and eventually assessing the risk of skin cancer. A general probabilistic framework originally developed for text and Web mining is demonstrated to be useful for clustering of behavioral data. The framework combines principal component subspace projection with probabilistic...

  5. Study of the effect of solar flares on VLF signals during D-layer preparation or disappearance time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    "Very Low Frequency" (VLF) is one of the bands of the Radio waves having frequency 3-30 KHz, which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In relation to propagation of radio waves through ionosphere, low mass and high mobility cause electrons to play a vital role. Electrons are not distributed uniformly in the ionosphere and depending on this factor, ionosphere has different layers namely D, E and F. Different ionospheric layers generally exist during day and night time. During day-time when the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere is Sun, the lower most layer of ionosphere is D-layer. But during the night-time when Sun is absent and cosmic ray is the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere, this D-layer disappears and E-layer becomes the lower most region of the ionosphere. Normally, patterns of VLF signal depend on regular solar flux variations. However, during solar flares extra energetic particles are released from Sun, which makes the changes in the ionization of the ionosphere and these changes can perturb VLF signal amplitude. Usually if a solar flare occurs during any time of day, it only affects the amplitude and phase of the VLF signals. But in the present work, we found the if the flare occurs during D-layer preparation / disappearance time, then it will not only affect to amplitude and phase of the VLF signals but also to terminator times of VLF signals. We have observed that the sun set terminator time of the VLF signals shifted towards night time due to the effect of a M-class solar flare which occurred during the D-layer disappearance time. The shift is so high that it crossed 5σ level. We are now trying to a make model using the ion-chemistry and LWPC code to explain this observed effect.

  6. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  7. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  8. IUE spectra of a flare in the RS Canum Venaticorum-type system UX Arietis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1980-01-01

    IUE spectra of UX Ari obtained during the large flare of 1979 January 1 exhibit chromospheric and transition-region emission-line fluxes about 2.5 and 5.5 times brighter than quiescent fluxes, respectively, and up to 1400 times brighter than the quiet sun. A high-dispersion spectrum of the 2000-3000 A region exhibits enhanced Fe II emission, which is probably associated mainly with the K0 IV star, and enhanced Mg II emission with asymmetric wings extending to +475 km/s. These line wings are interpreted as evidence for mass flow from the K0 IV star to the G5 V star. A speculative scenario of major long-lived RS CVn flares is proposed in which the component stars have very large corotating flux tubes, which occasionally interact. Magnetic reconnection results in flux tubes that temporarily connect the two stars.

  9. Type III events, flares and CMEs, in the extremely active period October-November 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsakou, E; Preka-Papadema, P; Moussas, X; Hillaris, A; Caroubalos, C; Alissandrakis, C E; Tsitsipis, P; Kontogeorgos, A; Bougeret, J -L; Dumas, G; 10.1063/1.2347984

    2010-01-01

    The type III observations trace the propagation of energetic electron populations through the Solar Corona which, more often than not, precede or are associated with energy release on the Sun. A sample of Type III bursts in the range 20-650 MHz during the period of extraordinary solar activity (20 October to 4 November 2003) recorded by the ARTEMIS-IV1 radio spectrograph is analysed; its parameters are compared with characteristics of associated flares (Ha and GOES SXR) and CMEs, observed in the same period and reported in the SGR and the LASCO archives respectively. In this report we attempt to establish a correlation between energetic particles and major manifestations of solar activity such as flares and CMEs.

  10. Recent Voyager Evidence for Rapid Transport of Flare-Generated Disturbances by Polar Coronal Hole Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Miller, W. D.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W.; Sun, W.; Detman, T.; Dryer, M.; Deehr, C.

    2017-09-01

    Disturbances observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 during the past five years or more may have been transported by plasma emitted from polar coronal holes, thereby having travelled much faster from the Sun to the termination shock than previously recognized. Estimating the average speed to the shock as 750 km/s has produced consistently good associations between solar flares, or groups of them, and dynamic pressure increases at Voyager 2 and plasma wave events at Voyager 1. Furthermore, magnetograph observations confirm that polar coronal holes were present around the times of the flares to which the events at the Voyagers have been attributed. These calculations also provide revised estimates of the transport of heliospheric current sheet fluctuations. We discuss the possibilities that extrapolations from past observations and simulations based on them may provide insight into currently challenging issues and possible future developments.

  11. Unusual Stokes V profiles during flaring activity of a delta sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C. E.; Keller, C. U.; Snik, F.; Fletcher, L.; Socas-Navarro, H.

    2012-11-01

    Aims: We analyze a set of full Stokes profile observations of the flaring active region NOAA 10808. The region was recorded with the Vector-Spectromagnetograph of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun facility. The active region produced several successive X-class flares between 19:00 UT and 24:00 UT on September 13, 2005 and we aim to quantify transient and permanent changes in the magnetic field and velocity field during one of the flares, which has been fully captured. Methods: The Stokes profiles were inverted using the height-dependent inversion code LILIA to analyze magnetic field vector changes at the flaring site. We report multilobed asymmetric Stokes V profiles found in the δ-sunspot umbra. We fit the asymmetric Stokes V profiles assuming an atmosphere consisting of two components (SIR inversions) to interpret the profile shape. The results are put in context with Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetograms and reconstructed X-ray images from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Results: We obtain the magnetic field vector and find signs of restructuring of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare close to the polarity inversion line at the flaring site. At two locations in the umbra we encounter strong fields (~3 kG), as inferred from the Stokes I profiles, which, however, exhibit a low polarization signal. During the flare we observe in addition asymmetric Stokes V profiles at one of these sites. The asymmetric Stokes V profiles appear co-spatial and co-temporal with a strong apparent polarity reversal observed in MDI-magnetograms and a chromospheric hard X-ray source. The two-component atmosphere fits of the asymmetric Stokes profiles result in line-of-sight velocity differences in the range of ~12 km s-1 to 14 km s-1 between the two components in the photosphere. Another possibility is that local atmospheric heating is causing the observed asymmetric Stokes V profile shape. In either case our analysis

  12. Identifying core domains to assess flare in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, Susan J; Hewlett, Sarah; Bingham, Clifton O

    2012-01-01

    For rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is no consensus on how to define and assess flare. Variability in flare definitions impairs understanding of findings across studies and limits ability to pool results. The OMERACT RA Flare Group sought to identify domains to define RA flares from patient...

  13. Prototype of sun projector device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan; Dermawan, B.

    2016-11-01

    One way to introduce astronomy to public, including students, can be handled by solar observation. The widely held device for this purpose is coelostat and heliostat. Besides using filter attached to a device such as telescope, it is safest to use indirect way for observing the Sun. The main principle of the indirect way is deflecting the sun light and projecting image of the sun on a screen. We design and build a simple and low-cost astronomical device, serving as a supplement to increase public service, especially for solar observation. Without using any digital and intricate supporting equipment, people can watch and relish image of the Sun in comfortable condition, i.e. in a sheltered or shady place. Here we describe a design and features of our prototype of the device, which still, of course, has some limitations. In the future, this prototype can be improved for more efficient and useful applications.

  14. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  15. Diurnal Variation of Anterior Chamber Flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Adam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the ideal time and reproducibility of anterior chamber flare measurements. Materials and Methods: Anterior chamber flare measurements were performed with laser flaremetre device at 8 am to 45 volunteers and these measurements were repeated on the same day at 12 pm and 4 pm. Results: Twenty-five (55.5% of the volunteers were women and 20 (44.5% were men; mean age was 28.67±7.40 (18-49 years. The mean anterior chamber flare measurements taken following the ophthalmologic examination were 5.94±1.41 foton/msn at 8 am, 5.65±1.45 foton/msn at 12 pm, and 5.79±1.20 foton/msn at 4 pm. No statistical difference was found between the measurements (p=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to eye color, revealed no significant difference between flare measurements in brown, hazel, and green eyes (p=0.21. Correlation analysis demonstrated association between age and all flare measurements within the day (r=0.24, p=0.03; r=0.41, p=0.01, r=0.27, p=0.01. Conclusion: No significant diurnal change was detected in the flare measurements of our study subjects but positive correlation with age was observed. Hence, all flare measurements within a day are reliable and have high repeatability in healthy subjects. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 52-5

  16. Numerical simulations of fast transient events in the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas-Perez, G. A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Perez-Enriquez, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fast transients are dynamical phenomena that show up as high brightness temperature increments over a duration of less than a second. In the Sun these events have been observed in the radio band in various forms, such as radio spikes for example, often seen accompanying other phenomena like normal radio bursts and solar flares. The study of solar fast radio transients is important to understand the physical processes occurring in the solar corona and its possible relation to other solar phenomena where large amounts of energy are released. In this work, we report a code developed to study the evolution of an electron beam pulse injected into the solar corona. We show the tests to validate the code and some results that have been obtained from the numerical simulations that were carried out using this code.

  17. Reading The Sun: A Three Dimensional Visual Model of The Solar Environment During Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-fulmer, T. L.; Moldwin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The sun is a powerful force that has proven to our society that it has a large impact on our lives. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of awareness on how the sun is capable of affecting Earth. The over all idea of "Reading The Sun" installation is to help demonstrate how the sun impacts the Earth, by compiling various data sources from satellites (SOHO, SDO, and STERO) with solar and solar wind models (MAS and ENLIL) to create a comprehensive three dimensional display of the solar environment. It focuses on the current solar maximum of solar cycle 24 and a CME that impacted Earth's magnetic field on February 27, 2014, which triggered geomagnetic storms around the Earth's poles. The CME was an after-effect of a class X4.9 solar flare, which was released from the sun on February 25, 2014. "Reading The Sun" is a 48" x 48" x 48" hanging model of the sun with color coded open opposing magnetic field lines along with various layers of the solar atmosphere, the heliospheric current sheet, and the inner planets. At the center of the xyz axis is the sun with the open magnetic field lines and the heliospheric current sheet permeating inner planetary space. The xyz axes are color coded to represent various types of information with corresponding visual images for the viewer to be able to read the model. Along the z-axis are three colors (yellow, orange, and green) that represent the different layers of the solar atmosphere (photosphere, chromosphere, and corona) that correspond to three satellite images in various spectrums related to a CME and Solar Flare and the xy-plane shows where the inner planets are in relation to the sun. The exhibit in which "Reading The Sun "is being displayed is called, The Rotation of Language at the Wheather Again Gallery in Rockaway, New York. The intent of the exhibit is to both celebrate as well as present a cautionary tale on the ability of human language to spark and ignite the individual and collective imagination towards an experience

  18. Investigation of Energy Release from X-ray Flares on Young Stellar Objects with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David M.

    2017-08-01

    Young stellar objects (YSOs), which tend to flare more frequently and at higher temperatures than what is typically observed on Sun-like stars, are excellent targets for studying the nature of energy release and transport in large flaring events. Multiple star-forming regions have been observed in the past by soft x-ray missions such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, but the energy ranges of these missions fall off prior to the hard x-ray regime, where it would be possible to search for a crossover from thermal to nonthermal emission. To investigate this hard x-ray emission, three 50ks observations of the star-forming region rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the current spectral and timing analyses of the brightest of the these events, exploring the way energy is released as well as the effects of these large flares on the surrounding environment. We compare these results to what is typically observed for solar flares.

  19. The Effects Od Solar Protons Flares On The Navigation Systems of Aircrafts and Resulting Accents During 20th Cencury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Hady, A.

    In early study for the authors, from the analysis of 802 important accents of the air- craft's which occurred during the period (1920-2000) all over the world. It is found that the number of occurrence of the accents increases at the solar maximum activity, and decrease with decreasing the solar activity on the annual scale. There is a doubt the geomagnetic storms due to the charged particles, which come from the sun as a cloud after two or three days from the high energetic flares occurrence. Which affected on the navigation system of the aircraft's, especially for aircraft's which pass through the polar regions of the earth, at the high latitudes. The aim of the present study is to analysis more than one handed solar protons flares (1970-2000) of energies more than 10 MeV observed by the artificial satellites GOES and published in solar Geophysical Data, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA. A com- parison studies between the proton flares occurrence and the important accents of the aircraft's, which occur after two days to one week, from the high energetic proton flares occurrence, or case by case, in an attempt to confirm the relation between the solar activities and aircraft accents due to disturbance in the Navigation systems. Also, we not Ignore in our study the effects of the geomagnetic field on the flying staff, due to the occurrence of the solar proton flares , as indicated by other authors in early studies.

  20. Energetic Particles: From Sun to Heliosphere - and vice versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.; Boden, S.; Boettcher, S. I.; Cernuda, I.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Droege, W.; Elftmann, R.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Ho, G. C.; Klassen, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mann, G. J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Mason, G. M.; Panitzsch, L.; Prieto, M.; Sanchez, S.; Steinhagen, J.; Tammen, J.; Terasa, C.; Yu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Energetic particles in the heliosphere can be measured at their elevated energetic status after three processes: injection, acceleration, and transport. Suprathermal seed particles have speeds well above the fast magnetosonic speed in the solar wind frame of reference and can vary from location to location and within the solar activity cycle. Acceleration sites include reconnecting current sheets in solar flares or magnetspheric boundaries, shocks in the solar corona, heliosphere and a planetary obstacles, as well as planetary magnetospheres. Once accelerated, particles are transported from the acceleration site into and through the heliosphere. Thus, by investigating properties of energetic particles such as their composition, energy spectra, pitch-angle distribution, etc. one can attempt to distinguish their origin or injection and acceleration site. This in turn allows us to better understand transport effects whose underlying microphysics is also a key ingredient in the acceleration of particles. In this presentation we will present some clear examples which link energetic particles from their observing site to their source locations. These include Jupiter electrons, singly-charged He ions from CIRs, and 3He from solar flares. We will compare these examples with the measurement capabilities of the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on Solar Orbiter and consider implications for the key science goal of Solar Orbiter and Solar Proble Plus - How the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere.

  1. Flaring down project for Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienek, S. [Joh. Heinr. Bornemann GmbH, Obernkirchen (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Multiphase boosting as a production scenario for lowering wellhead backpressure, avoiding field separation stations, and achieving longer flow distances is widely accepted by major oil companies. Flaring down of gas is no longer necessary and therefore the use of multiphase pumps has a positive impact on a healthy environment. The twin-screw pump plays a major role when selecting the equipment. Due to its volumetric character heavy slugging, varying water content and other typical multiphase operating challenges, this pump type is well suited for this purpose. With its low speed the fluid is treated very sensitively, so as to widely avoid emulsifying oil and water - a definite advantage for the later separation of the phases. (orig.)

  2. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  3. Solar Flare Five-Day Predictions from Quantum Detectors of Dynamical Space Fractal Flow Turbulence: Gravitational Wave Diminution and Earth Climate Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Space speed fluctuations, which have a 1 / f spectrum, are shown to be the cause of solar flares. The direction and magnitude of the space flow has been detected from numer- ous different experimental techniques, and is close to the normal to the plane of the ecliptic. Zener diode data shows that the fluctuations in the space speed closely match the Sun Solar Cycle 23 flare count, and reveal that major solar flares follow major space speed fluctuations by some 6 days. This implies that a warning period of some 5 days in predicting major solar flares is possible using such detectors. This has significant conse- quences in being able to protect various spacecraft and Earth located electrical systems from the subsequent arrival of ejected plasma from a solar flare. These space speed fluctuations are the actual gravitational waves, and have a significant magnitude. This discovery is a significant application of the dynamical space phenomenon and theory. We also show that space flow turbulence impacts on the Earth’s climate, as such tur- bulence can input energy into systems, which is the basis of the Zener Diode Quantum Detector. Large scale space fluctuations impact on both the sun and the Earth, and as well explain temperature correlations with solar activity, but that the Earth temperatures are not caused by such solar activity. This implies that the Earth climate debate has been missing a key physical process. Observed diminishing gravitational waves imply a cooling epoch for the Earth for the next 30 years.

  4. NEW SUNS IN THE COSMOS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Freitas, D. B.; Leao, I. C.; Lopes, C. E. Ferreira; Paz-Chinchon, F.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Alves, S.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Catelan, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-20

    The present work reports on the discovery of three stars that we have identified to be rotating Sun-like stars, based on rotational modulation signatures inferred from light curves from the CoRoT mission's Public Archives. In our analysis, we performed an initial selection based on the rotation period and position in the period-T{sub eff} diagram. This revealed that the stars CoRoT IDs 100746852, 102709980, and 105693572 provide potentially good matches to the Sun with a similar rotation period. To refine our analysis, we applied a novel procedure, taking into account the fluctuations of the features associated with photometric modulation at different time intervals and the fractality traces that are present in the light curves of the Sun and of these ''New Sun'' candidates alike. In this sense, we computed the so-called Hurst exponent for the referred stars, for a sample of 14 CoRoT stars with sub- and super-solar rotational periods, and for the Sun itself in its active and quiet phases. We found that the Hurst exponent can provide a strong discriminant of Sun-like behavior, going beyond what can be achieved with solely the rotation period itself. In particular, we find that CoRoT ID 105693572 is the star that most closely matches the solar rotation properties as far as the latter's imprints on light curve behavior are concerned. The stars CoRoT IDs 100746852 and 102709980 have significant smaller Hurst exponents than the Sun, notwithstanding their similarity in rotation periods.

  5. New solar flare evidence may solve mystery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An international group of scientists led by the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL), University College London, has discovered important new evidence that points to the cataclysmic events that trigger a solar flare and the mechanisms that drive its subsequent evolution.

  6. Active Longitude and Solar Flare Occurrences

    CERN Document Server

    Gyenge, N; Baranyi, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to specify the spatio-temporal characteristics of flare activity observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites in connection with the behaviour of the longitudinal domain of enhanced sunspot activity known as active longitude (AL). By using our method developed for this purpose, we identified the AL in every Carrington Rotation provided by the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD). The spatial probability of flare occurrence has been estimated depending on the longitudinal distance from AL in the northern and southern hemispheres separately. We have found that more than the 60\\% of the RHESSI and GOES flares is located within $\\pm 36^{\\circ}$ from the active longitude. Hence, the most flare-productive active regions tend to be located in or close to the active longitudinal belt. This observed feature may allow predicting the geo-effective position of the domain of enhanced fla...

  7. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  8. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenPengfei; FangCheng; DingMingde; TangYuhua

    1999-01-01

    We performed 2.5 - dimensional numerical simulation for two cases, one with the the reconnection point at a high altitude, the other with the reconnection point at a low altitude, in the high-altitude case, the bright loop appears to rise for a long time, with its two footpoints separating and the field lines below the bright loop shrinking,which are all typical features of two - ribbon flares. In the low- altitude case, the bright loops cease rising only a short time after the impulsive phase of the reconnection and then become rather stable, which shows a large similarity to the compact flares. The results imply that the two types of solar flares, i. e., the two - ribbon flares and the compact ones, might be unified into the same magnetic reconnection model, where the height of the reconnection point leads to the bifurcation.

  9. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  10. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... submission of the notice specified in § 65.167(a). Upon implementing the change, a flare compliance... standard cubic meter; where the net enthalpy per mole of offgas is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760...

  11. SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2014-05-01

    The 2014 SunShot Initiative Portfolio Book outlines the progress towards the goals outlined in the SunShot Vision Study. Contents include overviews of each of SunShot’s five subprogram areas, as well as a description of every active project in the SunShot’s project portfolio as of May 2014.

  12. Modelling emissions from natural gas flaring

    OpenAIRE

    G. Ezaina Umukoro; O. Saheed Ismail

    2017-01-01

    The world today recognizes the significance of environmental sustainability to the development of nations. Hence, the role oil and gas industry plays in environmental degrading activities such as gas flaring is of global concern. This study presents material balance equations and predicts results for non-hydrocarbon emissions such as CO2, CO, NO, NO2, and SO2 etc. from flaring (combustion) of 12 natural gas samples representing composition of natural gas of global origin. Gaseous emission est...

  13. Modelling emissions from natural gas flaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ezaina Umukoro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The world today recognizes the significance of environmental sustainability to the development of nations. Hence, the role oil and gas industry plays in environmental degrading activities such as gas flaring is of global concern. This study presents material balance equations and predicts results for non-hydrocarbon emissions such as CO2, CO, NO, NO2, and SO2 etc. from flaring (combustion of 12 natural gas samples representing composition of natural gas of global origin. Gaseous emission estimates and pattern were modelled by coding material balance equations for six reaction types and combustion conditions with a computer program. On the average, anticipated gaseous emissions from flaring natural gas with an average annual global flaring rate 126 bcm per year (between 2000 and 2011 in million metric tonnes (mmt are 560 mmt, 48 mmt, 91 mmt, 93 mmt and 50 mmt for CO2, CO, NO, NO2 and SO2 respectively. This model predicted gaseous emissions based on the possible individual combustion types and conditions anticipated in gas flaring operation. It will assist in the effort by environmental agencies and all concerned to track and measure the extent of environmental pollution caused by gas flaring operations in the oil and gas industry.

  14. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  15. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  16. Multithread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as a sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper, we present a method for computing multithread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the GOES and Yohkoh satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating timescale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating timescales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by Yohkoh.

  17. Physics of Transient Seismic Emission from Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Charles A.; Donea, A.; Malanushenko, A.

    2012-05-01

    We consider the physics of seismic activity in solar flares, i.e., the release of powerful seismic transients into the solar interior during the impulsive phases of some flares. Recent work by Hudson, Fisher, Welsch and Bercik has attracted a great deal of positive attention to the possible role of Lorentz-force transients in driving seismic transient emission in flares. The implications of direct involvement by magnetic forces in seismic transient emission, if this could be confirmed, would be major, since magnetic fields are thought to hold the energy source of the flares themselves. The energy invested into acoustic transients is a small fraction of the total released by the flare, but requires a massive impulse many times that required to accelerate high-energy electrons into which the energy is initially thought to be invested. What does this say about a flare mechanism that sometimes does both? We discuss some of the outstanding diagnostic questions that confront the recognition of magnetic-field transients associated with Lorentz force transients based on resources HMI, Hinode, AIA and other facilities offer us.

  18. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  19. The Shape of M Dwarf Flares in Kepler Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precise light curves from Kepler provide the best opportunity to determine rates and statistical properties of stellar flares. From 11 months of data on the active M4 dwarf, GJ 1243, we have built the largest catalog of flares for a single star: over 6100 events. Combining 885 of our most pristine flares, we generated an empirical white-light flare template. This high-fidelity template shows a rapid initial rise, and two distinct exponential cooling phases. This template is useful in constraining flare energies and for improved flare detection in many surveys. Complex, multi-peaked events are more common for higher energy flares in this sample. Using our flare template we characterize the structure of complex events. In this contributed talk, I presented results from our boutique study of GJ 1243, and described an expanded investigation of the structure of complex flares and their connection to solar events.

  20. Statistical and theoretical studies of flares from Sagittarius A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Q. Daniel; Chen, P. F.; Neilsen, Joseph; Fang, Taotao; Zhang, Shuo; Dexter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength flares have routinely been observed from the supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), at our Galactic center. The nature of these flares remains largely unclear, despite many theoretical models. We study the statistical properties of the Sgr A* X-ray flares and find that they are consistent with the theoretical prediction of the self-organized criticality system with the spatial dimension S = 3. We suggest that the X-ray flares represent plasmoid ejections driven by magnetic reconnection (similar to solar flares) in the accretion flow onto the black hole. Motivated by the statistical results, we further develop a time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model for the multi-band flares from Sgr A* by analogy with models of solar flares/coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We calculate the X-ray, infrared flare light curves, and the spectra, and find that our model can explain the main features of the flares.

  1. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2009-01-01

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

  2. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  3. X-ray Observations of the Sun: Solar Flares and their Impact on the Geophysical Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Michele Piana Universita’ di Genova Dipartimento Di Matematica Via Dodecaneso 35 Genova, Italy 16146 EOARD Grant 09-3050 Report...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Universita’ di Genova Dipartimento Di Matematica Via Dodecaneso 35 Genova, Italy 16146 8. PERFORMING...Piana, DIpartimento di Matematica , Universita’ di Genova Scientific Report The aim of the present project was to apply computational tools based on

  4. Destruction and Observational Signatures of Sun-Impacting Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, John C; Toner, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent data on comets in the low corona, we discuss destruction of sun impacting comets in the dense lower solar atmosphere. Perihelion distances q less than the solar radius and incident masses Mo much greater than 1E12 g are required to reach such depths. Extending earlier work on planetary atmosphere impacts to solar conditions, we evaluate the mechanisms and spatial distribution of nucleus mass and energy loss as functions of Mo and q, and of parameter X = 2Q/CHvovo. Q is the total specific energy for ablative mass loss, CH the bow shock heat transfer efficiency, and vo the solar escape speed (619 km/s). We discuss factors affecting Q and CH and conclude that, for solar vo, X is most likely less than 1 so that solar impactors are mostly ablated before decelerating. Sun impacting comets have kinetic energies 2E30 erg x(Mo/1E15 g), comparable with the energies of magnetic flares. This is released as a localised explosive airburst within a few scale heights H around 200 km of the photosphere, de...

  5. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Another giant solar explosion follows Tuesday's enormous solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The activity started on Tuesday with a giant solar flare - the second biggest ever seen by SOHO, the ESA-NASA solar observatory that maintains a constant watch on the Sun, monitoring these events as they happen. A few minutes later, spacecraft circling the Earth began to detect high levels of energetic radiation, capable of blinding satellites and causing increased radiation levels down to normal aircraft cruising altitudes. About 24 hours after the solar flare was observed, an accompanying coronal mass ejection - a giant cloud of magnetised plasma - reached the Earth, causing rapid changes in the Earth's magnetic field and what is known as a geomagnetic storm. This storm caused widespread disruption to communications; both satellite-based and HF radio. These events are truly sporadic and extremely difficult to predict. On Wednesday it appeared that radiation levels were decreasing. However, a second flare overnight has caused a further sharp increase in radiation levels. Here on Earth, the disruption continues today with a further coronal mass ejection expected to reach the Earth tomorrow in time for Halloween. Solar eruptions of this type together with the associated increased radiation levels and electromagnetic disturbances around the Earth have real immediate and long-term economic impacts. During the last few days, space weather related problems have been detected on spacecraft operated by a range of agencies across the globe and operations teams are on alert. On Earth, telecommunication links have been disrupted and steps have been taken to safeguard aircraft, which including some changes in scheduling. Effects have also been detected in high latitude power grids and are being carefully monitored. The increased dependency of our society on systems which are directly or indirectly influenced by solar and other events seen in space raises concerns about our ability to monitor and anticipate these events and the resulting changes collectively referred to as

  7. Flare energetics: analysis of a large flare on YZ Canis Minoris observed simultaneously in the ultraviolet, optical and radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oord, G. H. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Rodono, M.; Gary, D. E.; Henry, G. W.; Byrne, P. B.; Linsky, J. L.; Haisch, B. M.; Pagano, I.; Leto, G.

    1996-06-01

    The results of coordinated observations of the dMe star YZ CMi at optical, UV and radio wavelengths during 3-7 February 1983 are presented. YZ CMi showed repeated optical flaring with the largest flare having a magnitude of 3.8 in the U-band. This flare coincided with an IUE exposure which permits a comparison of the emission measure curves of YZ CMi in its flaring and quiescent state. During the flare a downward shift of the transition zone is observed while the radiative losses in the range 10^4^-10^7^K strongly increase. The optical flare is accompanied with a radio flare at 6cm, while at 20cm no emission is detected. The flare is interpreted in terms of optically thick synchrotron emission. We present a combined interpretation of the optical/radio flare and show that the flare can be interpreted within the context of solar two-ribbon/white-light flares. Special attention is paid to the bombardment of dMe atmospheres by particle beams. We show that the characteristic temperature of the heated atmosphere is almost independent of the beam flux and lies within the range of solar white-light flare temperatures. We also show that it is unlikely that stellar flares emit black-body spectra. The fraction of accelerated particles, as follows from our combined optical/radio interpretation is in good agreement with the fraction determined by two-ribbon flare reconnection models.

  8. Superflares on Sun-Like Stars: Bane of Habitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T.

    2014-04-01

    A key aspect of planetary habitability is the existence of rare, but catastrophic events. One Earthly example is the attribution of several geological mass extinctions to asteroid collisions. Indeed, the Late Heavy Bombardment, during which the 600 Myr old Earth was pummeled persistently by impactors over a period of perhaps a hundred Myr, likely significantly delayed the permanent foothold of life on our planet. Another, less well known, example is the proposed existence of "superflares" on Sun-like stars. Although the quantity of energy in a superflare is negligible compared with the time-integrated X-ray dose from the quiescent multi-MK corona, the quality of the radiation (i.e., composition dominated by gamma rays) released from the transient, but extreme, outburst is what could be of concern to the survival of primitive lifeforms struggling for existence on a semi-habitable world. However, existing reports of superflares mainly involve interpretations of historical materials, such as long-term astronomical plate collections; there are very few concrete examples of such events observed by modern techniques at the most relevant wavelengths, namely ultraviolet or X-rays. The lack of good examples is mostly because these rare events are, well, rare. However, a recent HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph program to record the ultraviolet spectrum of young (~50 Myr) solar analog EK Draconis, fortuitously captured a giant, hour-long FUV transient, in hot lines like the C IV 155 nm doublet (T~100,000 K), and very toasty Fe XXI 124 nm coronal forbidden line (~10 MK). If translated into the equivalent GOES 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray fluence, the event would correspond to an X25000-class flare (most extreme observed on the Sun might reach as high as a mere X50). The EK Dra giant flare, as viewed with the excellent wavelength resolution, broad coverage, and high sensitivity of COS, provides the opportunity to deduce properties of such events to help inform possible impacts on planetary

  9. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  10. Day the sun went out

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A new british sci-fi movie envisages the death of the sun not in billions of years, but in decades. And, amazingly, the film's scientific adviser says this may not be so far from the truth..." (1/2 page)

  11. Effects of Early Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be harmful. It can lead to:Skin changes. Some skin cells with melanin can form a clump. This creates freckles and moles. Over time, these can develop cancer.Early aging. Time spent in the sun makes your skin age faster than normal. Signs of this are wrinkled, tight, or leathery ...

  12. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  13. How Bright Is the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  14. Tracking Planets around the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2008-01-01

    In earlier columns, the celestial coordinate system of hour circles of right ascension and degrees of declination was introduced along with the use of an equatorial star chart (see SFA Star Charts in Resources). This system shows the planets' motion relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path the Sun follows during the year. An alternate system,…

  15. Determining the solar-flare photospheric scale height from SMM gamma-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A connected series of Monte Carlo programs was developed to make systematic calculations of the energy, temporal and angular dependences of the gamma-ray line and neutron emission resulting from such accelerated ion interactions. Comparing the results of these calculations with the Solar Maximum Mission/Gamma Ray Spectrometer (SMM/GRS) measurements of gamma-ray line and neutron fluxes, the total number and energy spectrum of the flare-accelerated ions trapped on magnetic loops at the Sun were determined and the angular distribution, pitch angle scattering, and mirroring of the ions on loop fields were constrained. Comparing the calculations with measurements of the time dependence of the neutron capture line emission, a determination of the He-3/H ratio in the photosphere was also made. The diagnostic capabilities of the SMM/GRS measurements were extended by developing a new technique to directly determine the effective photospheric scale height in solar flares from the neutron capture gamma-ray line measurements, and critically test current atmospheric models in the flare region.

  16. Non-planar MHD model for solar flare-generated disturbances in the heliospheric equatorial plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.; Han, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis, with a representative (canonical) example of solar-flare-generated equatorial disturbances, is made for the temporal and spatial changes in the solar wind plasma and magnetic field environment between the sun and 1 AU. The goal is to search for first-order global consequences rather than to make a parametric study. The analysis treats all three plasma velocity and magnetic field components in any convenient heliospheric plane of symmetry. The representative disturbance is examined for the canonical case in which the temporal and spatial changes in a homogeneous solar wind caused by a solar-flare-generated shock wave are described. All plasma and field parameters at three radial locations are examined. These are the central meridian and 33 deg W and 90 deg W of the flare's central meridian. It is found that the incorporation of a small meridional magnetic field in the ambient magnetic spiral field has negligible effect on the results. The magnetic field exhibits strong kinking within the interplanetary shocked flow, even reversed polarity that, coupled with low temperature and low density, suggests a plausible explanation for magnetic clouds' with accompanying double-streaming of electrons observed at directions approximately 90 deg to the heliocentric radius.

  17. Constraints on the halo density profile using HI flaring in the outer Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, C A; Jog, C J

    2005-01-01

    The observed flaring of HI disk in the outer region of galaxies has been used in the past to determine the shape of the dark matter halo. Previous studies based on this concept suggest a slightly oblate halo (axis ratio ~ 0.8) for our Galaxy. We reinvestigate this problem by calculating the HI scaleheight in the outer Galaxy to a larger radial distance, and by studying its dependence on the shape and the density profile of the halo. We find that a simple isothermal infinite halo of any shape- oblate or prolate, is not able to account for the observed flaring. Instead we show that a spherical halo with density falling faster than isothermal halo in the outer region provides a better fit to the observed HI flaring as well as the observed rotation curve of our Galaxy. These halos have about 95% of their mass within a few hundreds of kpc. For R_solar = 8.5 kpc and \\Theta_solar = 220 km/s, the central density and core radius can be constrained to the range \\rho_0 = 0.035 - 0.06 M_sun/pc^3 and R_c = 8 - 10 kpc. Our...

  18. Formation of Sunquakes in Hydrodynamic Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Zharkov, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams and investigate their effects on the solar interior beneath the photosphere for production of acoustic waves, or sunquakes. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations are calculated as functions of both column and linear depths for different mixed beams revealing strong sweeping of a flaring atmosphere under the quiet photosphere level (QFL). This results in subsequent plasma evaporation into the upper atmosphere and formation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior and terminating at depths of 300-5000 km beneath the QFL. The shocks deposited at different depths below the photosphere are found to define the parameters of seismic responses in the interior and their observation as sunquakes, according to the hydrodynamic model of wave propagation (Zharkov, 2013). In addition, we compare temporal and spatial distributions of HXR and optical emission in a few acoustically active flares with those produced by the complex simulations above, in attempt to resolve the puzzle of co-spatial formation of HXR and WL emission reported by Martinez-Oliveros et al. (2012).

  19. Gamma-ray radiation of solar flares in October-November 2003 according to the data obtained with the AVS-F instrument onboard the CORONAS-F satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelsky, A. I.; Kotov, Yu. D.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Glyanenko, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty active regions were observed on the Sun during the period from October 19 to November 20, 2003. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray radiation was detected from four active regions (10484, 10486, 10488, and 10490): 14 solar flares stronger than M5.0 according to the GOES classification were recorded duri

  20. Short-term predictions of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    A review of present-day theoretical investigations of the problem of the accumulation and release of energy in solar flares permits advancing the opinion that only individual flare events are described by a concrete model and that a single model alone does not describe the entire diversity of flares. Consideration of the observational data does not permit claiming the existence of a single universal mechanism known today of flare events. It appears possible to treat the problem of prediction in terms of the algebra of logic (Boolean logic) and to compare the truth table with the often-used contingency table. The introduction of a number of very general assumptions permits forming a general approach to the development of predictive schemes and selection of the individual elements of the models and informative criteria. Experimental results are given on the testing of some prediction procedures. The author's procedure of routine short-term prediction of flares on the basis of the methods of instruction on pattern recognition implemented in the form of a set of programs is outlined. The results of the application of this procedure in 1986 - 1988 are presented.

  1. Radio-flaring Ultracool Dwarf Population Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Route, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    Over a dozen ultracool dwarfs (UCDs), low-mass objects of spectral types ≥M7, are known to be sources of radio flares. These typically several-minutes-long radio bursts can be up to 100% circularly polarized and have high brightness temperatures, consistent with coherent emission via the electron cyclotron maser operating in approximately kilogauss magnetic fields. Recently, the statistical properties of the bulk physical parameters that describe these UCDs have become described adequately enough to permit synthesis of the population of radio-flaring objects. For the first time, I construct a Monte Carlo simulator to model the population of these radio-flaring UCDs. This simulator is powered by Intel Secure Key (ISK), a new processor technology that uses a local entropy source to improve random number generation that has heretofore been used to improve cryptography. The results from this simulator indicate that only ∼5% of radio-flaring UCDs within the local interstellar neighborhood (radio-flaring fraction and suggest that the observed behavior is likely a result of several factors. The performance of ISK as compared to other pseudorandom number generators is also evaluated, and its potential utility for other astrophysical codes is briefly described.

  2. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  3. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    CERN Document Server

    van Putten, T; Baring, M G; Wijers, R A M J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  4. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  5. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  6. Flare forecasting based on sunspot-groups characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Contarino, Lidia; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Spadaro, Daniele; Guglielmino, Salvatore L; Battiato, Viviana

    2009-01-01

    ... accurate flare forecasting. In order to give a contribution to this aspect, we focused our attention on the characteristics that must be fulfilled by sunspot-groups in order to be flare-productive...

  7. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Maksimovic, Milan; Alibay, Farah; Amiri, Nikta; Bastian, Tim; Cohen, Christina; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward; Reinard, Alysha; Schwadron, Nathan; Cecconi, Baptiste; Hallinan, Gregg; Hegedus, Alex; Krupar, Vratislav; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 RS. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (ν ≳ 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (≲ 3RS). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie, E-mail: slhawley@uw.edu [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  9. Analysis of the 9th November 1990 flare

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Joshi; Wahab Uddin

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we present complete two-dimensional measurements of the observed brightness of the 9th November 1990 flare, using a PDS microdensitometer scanner and image processing software MIDAS. The resulting isophotal contour maps, were used to describe morphological-cum-temporal behaviour of the flare and also the kernels of the flare. Correlation of the flare with SXR and MW radiations were also studied.

  10. Microwave View on Particle Acceleration in Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    The thermal-to-nonthermal partition was found to vary greatly from one flare to another resulting in a broad variety of cases from 'heating without acceleration' to 'acceleration without heating'. Recent analysis of microwave data of these differing cases suggests that a similar acceleration mechanism, forming a power-law nonthermal tail up to a few MeV or even higher, operates in all the cases. However, the level of this nonthermal spectrum compared to the original thermal distribution differs significantly from one case to another, implying a highly different thermal-to-nonthermal energy partition in various cases. This further requires a specific mechanism capable of extracting the charged particles from the thermal pool and supplying them to a bulk acceleration process to operate in flares \\textit{in addition} to the bulk acceleration process itself, which, in contrast, efficiently accelerates the seed particles, while cannot accelerate the thermal particles. Within this 'microwave' view on the flare ener...

  11. Image watermarking against lens flare effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotikawanid, Piyanart; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat

    2017-02-01

    Lens flare effects in various photo and camera software nowadays can partially or fully damage the watermark information within the watermarked image. We propose in this paper a spatial domain based image watermarking against lens flare effects. The watermark embedding is based on the modification of the saturation color component in HSV color space of a host image. For watermark extraction, a homomorphic filter is used to predict the original embedding component from the watermarked component, and the watermark is blindly recovered by differentiating both components. The watermarked image's quality is evaluated by wPSNR, while the extracted watermark's accuracy is evaluated by NC. The experimental results against various types of lens flare effects from both computer software and mobile application showed that our proposed method outperformed the previous methods.

  12. High Energy Neutrinos from Recent Blazar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The energy density of cosmic neutrinos measured by IceCube matches the one observed by Fermi in extragalactic photons that predominantly originate in blazars. This has inspired attempts to match Fermi sources with IceCube neutrinos. A spatial association combined with a coincidence in time with a flaring source may represent a smoking gun for the origin of the IceCube flux. In June 2015, the Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an intense flare from blazar 3C 279 that exceeded the steady flux of the source by a factor of forty for the duration of a day. We show that IceCube is likely to observe neutrinos, if indeed hadronic in origin, in data that are still blinded at this time. We also discuss other opportunities for coincident observations that include a recent flare from blazar 1ES 1959+650 that previously produced an intriguing coincidence with AMANDA observations.

  13. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias ($f$). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is $...

  14. Magnetic Field Amplification and Blazar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Fossati, Giovanni; Pohl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Recent multiwavelength observations of PKS 0208-512 by SMARTS, Fermi, and Swift revealed that gamma-ray and optical light curves of this flat spectrum radio quasars are highly correlated, but with an exception of one large optical flare having no corresponding gamma-ray activity or even detection. On the other hand, recent advances in SNRs observations and plasma simulations both reveal that magnetic field downstream of astrophysical shocks can be largely amplified beyond simple shock compression. These amplifications, along with their associated particle acceleration, might contribute to blazar flares, including the peculiar flare of PKS 0208-512. Using our time dependent multizone blazar emission code, we evaluate several scenarios that may represent such phenomena. This code combines Monte Carlo method that tracks the radiative processes including inverse Compton scattering, and Fokker-Planck equation that follows the cooling and acceleration of particles. It is a comprehensive time dependent code that ful...

  15. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  16. Tanel Padar & The Sun veab õhukitarri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Õhukitarri Eesti meistrivõistlustest 19. apr. Tallinnas Rock Cafés (võistluste eestvedajaks on ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun, kes samas esitleb oma esimest ingliskeelset albumit "Here Comes The Sun")

  17. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  18. Flares in the X-ray source EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparao, Krishna M. V.

    1991-01-01

    Six X-ray flares were observed in the source EXO 2030 + 375 with an average time interval of about 4 hr between the flares. It is shown here that the flares can be due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities near the magnetospheric boundary of the neutron star when it reaches the equilibrium period.

  19. MWA targeted campaign of nearby, flaring M dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Flaring activity is a common characteristic of magnetically active stellar systems. Flare events produce emission throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, implying a range of physical processes. Early 100 - 200 MHz observations of M dwarf flare stars detected bright (>100 mJy) flares with occurrence rates between 0.06 - 0.8 flares per hour. These rates imply that observing 100 - 200 MHz flares from M dwarf stars is fairly easy with many detections expected for modern low-frequency telescopes. However, long observational campaigns using these modern telescopes have not reproduced these early detections. This could be because the rates are over estimated and contaminated by radio frequency interference. Recently Lynch et al. (submitted) detected four flares from UV Ceti at 154 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array. The flares have flux densities between 10-65 mJy -- a factor of 100 fainter than most flares in the literature at these frequencies -- and are only detected in circular polarization. The flare rates for these newly detected flares are roughly consistent with earlier rates however the uncertainties are large. Building off this result we propose a 102 hour survey of the closet six M dwarf stars with observed magnetic activity traced in X-rays and 100 - 200 MHz emission. The rates measured from this survey would inform the duration required for future blind surveys for flares from M dwarf stars.

  20. Soft X-ray Fluxes of Major Flares Far Behind the Limb as Estimated Using STEREO EUV Images

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, N V; Boerner, P F; Freeland, S L; Lemen, J R; Wuelser, J -P; 10.1007/s11207-013-0307-7

    2013-01-01

    With increasing solar activity since 2010, many flares from the backside of the Sun have been observed by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on either of the twin STEREO spacecraft. Our objective is to estimate their X-ray peak fluxes from EUVI data by finding a relation of the EUVI with GOES X-ray fluxes. Because of the presence of the Fe xxiv line at 192 A, the response of the EUVI 195 A channel has a secondary broad peak around 15 MK, and its fluxes closely trace X-ray fluxes during the rise phase of flares. If the flare plasma is isothermal, the EUVI flux should be directly proportional to the GOES flux. In reality, the multithermal nature of the flare and other factors complicate the estimation of the X-ray fluxes from EUVI observations. We discuss the uncer- tainties, by comparing GOES fluxes with the high cadence EUV data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We conclude that the EUVI 195 A data can provide estimates of the X-ray peak fluxes of in...

  1. Estimates of the neutron emission during large solar flares in the rising and maximum period of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, D.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.

    2016-03-01

    We searched for solar neutrons using the data collected by six detectors from the International Network of Solar Neutron Telescopes and one Neutron Monitor between January 2010 and December 2014. We considered the peak time of the X-ray intensity of thirty five ≥ X1.0 class flares detected by GOES satellite as the most probable production time of solar neutrons. We prepared a light-curve of the solar neutron telescopes and the neutron monitor for each flare, spanning ± 3 h from the peak time of GOES. Based on these light curves, we performed a statistical analysis for each flare. Setting a significance level at greater than 3σ, we report that no statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found. Therefore, upper limits are determined by the background level and solar angle of these thirty five solar flares. Our calculation assumed a power-law neutron energy spectrum and an impulsive emission profile at the Sun. The estimated upper limits of the neutron emission are consistent within the order of magnitude of the successful detections of solar neutrons made in solar cycle 23.

  2. Global Forces in Eruptive Solar Flares: The Lorentz Force Acting on the Solar Atmosphere and the Solar Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; Bercik, D. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Hudson, H. S.

    2012-05-01

    We compute the change in the Lorentz force integrated over the outer solar atmosphere implied by observed changes in vector magnetograms that occur during large, eruptive solar flares. This force perturbation should be balanced by an equal and opposite force perturbation acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior. The resulting expression for the estimated force change in the solar interior generalizes the earlier expression presented by Hudson, Fisher, and Welsch, providing horizontal as well as vertical force components, and provides a more accurate result for the vertical component of the perturbed force. We show that magnetic eruptions should result in the magnetic field at the photosphere becoming more horizontal, and hence should result in a downward (toward the solar interior) force change acting on the photosphere and solar interior, as recently argued from an analysis of magnetogram data by Wang and Liu. We suggest the existence of an observational relationship between the force change computed from changes in the vector magnetograms, the outward momentum carried by the ejecta from the flare, and the properties of the helioseismic disturbance driven by the downward force change. We use the impulse driven by the Lorentz-force change in the outer solar atmosphere to derive an upper limit to the mass of erupting plasma that can escape from the Sun. Finally, we compare the expected Lorentz-force change at the photosphere with simple estimates from flare-driven gasdynamic disturbances and from an estimate of the perturbed pressure from radiative backwarming of the photosphere in flaring conditions.

  3. Caddo Sun Accounts across Time and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerona, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Billy Day, a Tunica/Biloxi, recently described the significance of the sun for Caddoan people. Day quoted an "old Caddo relative" of his who said: "I used to go outside and hold my hands up and bless myself with the sun--'a'hat.' Well, I can't do that anymore because they say we are sun worshipers. We didn't worship the sun. We worshiped what was…

  4. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  5. Absorption events associated with solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    During the upward period of solar cycle 23, the imaging riometer at Zhongshan, Antarctica (geomag. lat. 74.5°S) was used to study the solar proton events and the X-ray solar flares which are associated with the absorption events. In our study, the relationship between the absorption intensity and X-ray flux is found in a power form which is consistent with the theoretical result. The imaging riometer absorption data at Ny-?lesund, Svalbard reconfirm the above relationship. We also argue that only M-class flares can generate a significant daytime absorption.

  6. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E; Nicodemi, M

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  7. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  8. The timing of relativistic proton acceleration in the 20 January 2005 flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simnett, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the energy budget in large solar flares requires a good knowledge of how and where the energetic charged particles are accelerated. If they are mainly accelerated by a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME)-driven shock, then they do not have to derive their energy from the flare region. Conversely, if the CME does not accelerate the particles, then the energy must be provided from elsewhere. Resolution of this controversial issue may be aided if we can study events where the timing of the energetic charged particle acceleration may be tightly constrained by the data. We report here on high resolution observations of such an event. The intense ground level solar proton event of 20 January, 2005 had a rise to maximum at the South Pole of around 5 min, with a similar decay time to 1/3 maximum. This suggests that the magnetic connection from the Sun to the Earth was good and that the proton injection was impulsive on the timescale of a few minutes or less. Comparison of the proton onset time with the solar electromagnetic emissions which accompany large flares, together with observations of the coronal mass ejection seen around the injection time suggests that the CME was not responsible for the relativistic ion acceleration. The near-relativistic (~250 keV) electron intensity onset was some 8 min later than the proton onset. Implications of this on the relative injection time of the particles are discussed. It is concluded that while the relativistic protons were not accelerated by the CME-driven shock, the CME may have influenced the release of both flare-accelerated protons and electrons into the interplanetary medium.

  9. Total eclipses of the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirker, J B

    1980-12-19

    Total eclipses of the sun offer research opportunities in a variety of sciences. Some of the advances in solar physics resulting from eclipse observations are discussed. Experiments at the total eclipse of 16 February 1980 in India are also described. These included a test of general relativity, studies in coronal physics, investigations of solar prominences, diameter measurements, a search for interplanetary dust, a study of the gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere, and experiments on the biological effects on animals and humans.

  10. Revisiting SU(N) integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuber, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this note, I revisit integrals over $\\SU(N)$ of the form $ \\int DU\\, U_{i_1j_1}\\cdots U_{i_pj_p}\\Ud_{k_1l_1}\\cdots \\Ud_{k_nl_n}$. While the case $p=n$ is well known, it seems that explicit expressions for $p=n+N$ had not appeared in the literature. Similarities and differences, in particular in the large $N$ limit, between the two cases are discussed

  11. Coherent States with SU(N) Charges

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, M; Mathur, Manu; Paul, Samir K.

    2003-01-01

    We define coherent states carrying SU(N) charges by exploiting generalized Schwinger boson representation of SU(N) Lie algebra. These coherent states are defined on $2 (2^{N - 1} - 1)$ complex planes. They satisfy continuity property and provide resolution of identity. We also exploit this technique to construct the corresponding non-linear SU(N) coherent states.

  12. The Sun Rises on the Solar Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Reyaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Energy from the sun is abundant and free. Solar energy is in essence electromagnetic radiation emitted from the sun. Earth's climate, hydrologic systems, and ecosystems all derive from the sun. Other forms of renewable power such as wind, wave, biomass, and hydro are an indirect function of solar radiation.

  13. The Sun A User's Manual

    CERN Document Server

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The Sun is an account of the many ways in which our nearest star affects our planet, how its influence has changed over the last few centuries and millennia, and the extent to which we can predict its future impact. The Sun's rays foster the formation of Vitamin D by our bodies, but it can also promote skin cancer, cataracts, and mutations in our DNA. Besides providing the warmth and light essential to most animal and plant life, solar energy contributes substantially to global warming. Although the charged particles of the solar wind shield us from harmful cosmic rays, solar storms may damage artificial satellites and cripple communication systems and computer networks. The Sun is the ideal renewable energy source, but its exploitation is still bedevilled by the problems of storage and distribution. Our nearest star, in short, is a complex machine which needs to be treated with caution, and this book will equip every reader with the knowledge that is required to understand the benefits and dangers it can bri...

  14. The faint young Sun problem

    CERN Document Server

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    For more than four decades, scientists have been trying to find an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in paleoclimatology, the `faint young Sun problem'. For the early Earth, models of stellar evolution predict a solar energy input to the climate system which is about 25% lower than today. This would result in a completely frozen world over the first two billion years in the history of our planet, if all other parameters controlling Earth's climate had been the same. Yet there is ample evidence for the presence of liquid surface water and even life in the Archean (3.8 to 2.5 billion years before present), so some effect (or effects) must have been compensating for the faint young Sun. A wide range of possible solutions have been suggested and explored during the last four decades, with most studies focusing on higher concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane or ammonia. All of these solutions present considerable difficulties, however, so the faint young Sun prob...

  15. Our dynamic sun: 2017 Hannes Alfvén Medal lecture at the EGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Eric

    2017-07-01

    This lecture summarises how our understanding of many aspects of the Sun has been revolutionised over the past few years by new observations and models. Much of the dynamic behaviour of the Sun is driven by the magnetic field since, in the outer atmosphere, it represents the largest source of energy by far. The interior of the Sun possesses a strong shear layer at the base of the convection zone, where sunspot magnetic fields are generated. A small-scale dynamo may also be operating near the surface of the Sun, generating magnetic fields that thread the lowest layer of the solar atmosphere, the turbulent photosphere. Above the photosphere lies the highly dynamic fine-scale chromosphere, and beyond that is the rare corona at high temperatures exceeding 1 million degrees K. Possible magnetic mechanisms for heating the corona and driving the solar wind (two intriguing and unsolved puzzles) are described. Other puzzles include the structure of giant flux ropes, known as prominences, which have complex fine structure. Occasionally, they erupt and produce huge ejections of mass and magnetic fields (coronal mass ejections), which can disrupt the space environment of the Earth. When such eruptions originate in active regions around sunspots, they are also associated with solar flares, in which magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, heat and fast-particle energy. A new theory will be presented for the origin of the twist that is observed in erupting prominences and for the nature of reconnection in the rise phase of an eruptive flare or coronal mass ejection.

  16. The Sun and its Planets as detectors for invisible matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Zioutas, Konstantin; Hofmann, Sebastian; Maroudas, Marios

    2017-09-01

    Gravitational lensing of invisible streaming matter towards the Sun with speeds around 10-4 to 10-3 c could be the explanation of the puzzling solar flares and the unexplained solar emission in the EUV. Assuming that this invisible massive matter has some form of interaction with normal matter and that preferred directions exist in its flow, then one would expect a more pronounced solar activity at certain planetary heliocentric longitudes. This is best demonstrated in the case of the Earth and the two inner planets, considering their relatively short revolution time (365, 225 and 88 days) in comparison to a solar cycle of about 11 years. We have analyzed the solar flares as well as the EUV emission in the periods 1976-2015 and 1999-2015, respectively. The results derived from each data set mutually exclude systematics as the cause of the observed planetary correlations. We observe statistically significant signals when one or more planets have heliocentric longitudes mainly between 230° and 300°. We also analyzed daily data of the global ionization degree of the dynamic Earth atmosphere taken in the period 1995-2012. Again here, we observe a correlation between the total atmospheric electron content (TEC) and the orbital position of the inner three planets. Remarkably, the strongest correlation appears with the phase of the Moon. The broad velocity spectrum of the assumed constituents makes it difficult at this stage to identify its source(s) in space. More refined analyses might in the future increase the precision in the determination of the stream(s) direction and possibly allow to infer some properties of its constituents. Presently, no firmly established model of massive streaming particles exists, although in the literature there are abundant examples of hypotheses. Among them, the anti-quark nuggets model for dark matter seems the better suited to explain our observations and deserves further study.

  17. Sun Savvy Students: Free Teaching Resources from EPA's SunWise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Jordan, Luke

    2008-01-01

    With summer in full swing and the sun is naturally on our minds, what better time to take advantage of a host of free materials provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Sun Wise program. Sun Wise aims to teach students and teachers about the stratospheric ozone layer, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and how to be safe while in the Sun.…

  18. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  19. Thermo-hydraulic modeling of flow in flare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Meindinyo, Remi-Erempagamo T.

    2012-01-01

    Flare systems play a major role in the safety of Oil and Gas installations by serving as outlets for emergency pressure relief in case of process upsets. Accurate and reliable estimation of system thermo-hydraulic parameters, especially system back-pressure is critical to the integrity of a flare design. FlareNet (Aspen Flare System Analyzer Version 7) is a steady state simulation tool tailored for flare system design and has found common use today. But design based on steady state modelin...

  20. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    CERN Document Server

    Panesar, N K; Tiwari, S K; Low, B C

    2012-01-01

    Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures mainly observed as a prominence activity. We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303), and their EUV waves, with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195\\AA\\ are analyzed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171\\AA. Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within 10 hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with acceleration of tornado motion after the ...

  1. Do all Flares have White Light Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Crockett, P J; Keenan, F P

    2008-01-01

    High-cadence, multiwavelength optical observations of a solar active region (NOAA 10969), obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Difference imaging of white light continuum data reveals a white light brightening, 2 min in duration, linked to a co-temporal and co-spatial C2.0 flare event. The flare kernel observed in the white light images has a diameter of 300 km, thus rendering it below the resolution limit of most space-based telescopes. Continuum emission is present only during the impulsive stage of the flare, with the effects of chromospheric emission subsequently delayed by approximately 2 min. The localized flare emission peaks at 300% above the quiescent flux. This large, yet tightly confined, increase in emission is only resolvable due to the high spatial resolution of the Swedish Solar Telescope. An investigation of the line-of-sight magnetic field derived from simultaneous MDI data shows that the continuum brightening is located very close to a magnetic polarity inversion line. A...

  2. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  3. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features I: Flare Ribbons

    CERN Document Server

    Savcheva, A; McKillop, S; McCauley, P; Hanson, E; Su, Y; Werner, E; DeLuca, E E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and SDO. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux...

  4. GRB Flares: A New Detection Algorithm, Previously Undetected Flares, and Implications on GRB Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A

    2013-01-01

    Flares in GRB light curves have been observed since shortly after the discovery of the first GRB afterglow. However, it was not until the launch of the Swift satellite that it was realized how common flares are, appearing in nearly 50% of all X-ray afterglows as observed by the XRT instrument. The majority of these observed X-ray flares are easily distinguishable by eye and have been measured to have up to as much fluence as the original prompt emission. Through studying large numbers of these X-ray flares it has been determined that they likely result from a distinct emission source different than that powering the GRB afterglow. These findings could be confirmed if similar results were found using flares in other energy ranges. However, until now, the UVOT instrument on Swift seemed to have observed far fewer flares in the UV/optical than were seen in the X-ray. This was primarily due to poor sampling and data being spread across multiple filters, but a new optimal co-addition and normalization of the UVOT ...

  5. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  6. MOST Observations of Our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Kipping, David M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Cameron, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of white-light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite Microvariability and Oscillations of STars. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 to 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white-light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from 1029 to 1031.5 erg. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of a similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given its slow rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to 1028 erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of 1033 erg occur ∼8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the recently announced 1.27 M ⊕ Proxima b, while frequent large flares could have significant impact on the planetary atmosphere.

  7. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  8. Solar flare prediction using highly stressed longitudinal magnetic field parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Huang; Hua-Ning Wang

    2013-01-01

    Three new longitudinal magnetic field parameters are extracted from SOHO/MDI magnetograms to characterize properties of the stressed magnetic field in active regions,and their flare productivities are calculated for 1055 active regions.We find that the proposed parameters can be used to distinguish flaring samples from non-flaring samples.Using the long-term accumulated MDI data,we build the solar flare prediction model by using a data mining method.Furthermore,the decision boundary,which is used to divide flaring from non-flaring samples,is determined by the decision tree algorithm.Finally,the performance of the prediction model is evaluated by 10-fold cross validation technology.We conclude that an efficient solar flare prediction model can be built by the proposed longitudinal magnetic field parameters with the data mining method.

  9. X-ray Flares of EV Lac: Statistics, Spectra, Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Huenemoerder, David P; Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J; Osten, Rachel A; Reale, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    We study the spectral and temporal behavior of X-ray flares from the active M-dwarf EV Lac in 200 ks of exposure with the Chandra/HETGS. We derive flare parameters by fitting an empirical function which characterizes the amplitude, shape, and scale. The flares range from very short (<1 ks) to long (10 ks) duration events with a range of shapes and amplitudes for all durations. We extract spectra for composite flares to study their mean evolution and to compare flares of different lengths. Evolution of spectral features in the density-temperature plane shows probable sustained heating. The short flares are significantly hotter than the longer flares. We determined an upper limit to the Fe K fluorescent flux, the best fit value being close to what is expected for compact loops.

  10. Study of sunspot group morphological variations leading to flaring events

    CERN Document Server

    Korsos, M B; Ludmany, A

    2014-01-01

    It is widely assumed that the most probable sites of flare occurrences are the locations of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in the active regions. Instead of magnetograms the present work checks this assumption by using sunspot data, the targeted phenomenon is the pre-flare behaviour of the strong horizontal gradients of the magnetic field at the location of the flare. The empirical basis of the work is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen sunspot Data) sunspot catalogue. Case studies of two active regions and five X-flares have been carried out to find possible candidates for pre-flare signatures. It has been found that the following properties of the temporal variations of horizontal magnetic field gradient are promising for flare forecast: the speed of its growth, its maximal value, its decrease after the maximum until the flare and the rate of its fluctuation.

  11. The CME - Flare Relationship During The Present Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Mahrous, A.; Youssef, M.; Mawad, R.; El-Naway, M.

    The relation between the Coronal mass Ejection CME and the solar flare is statistically studied More than ten thousand CME events observed by SOHO LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed The soft x-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GEOS recorded more than twenty thousand flares in the same time period The data have been filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events The results show that the lift-off time of CME-flare associated events having a time interval within the range 0 4 sim 0 6 hour after the occurrence time of associated flares The CME events have been classified into a certain categories according to its energy E CME and the classes of the associated flares In addition we found a good linear correlation between the E CME and the x-ray flux of associated flare events

  12. On the Temperature of the Photosphere: Energy Partition in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this note, energy partition within the Sun is briefly addressed. It is argued that the laws of thermal emission cannot be directly applied to the Sun, as the continuous solar spectrum ( T app 6 ; 000K reveals but a small fraction of the true solar energy profile. Without considering the energy linked to fusion itself, it is hypothesized that most of the photospheric energy remains trapped in the Sun’s translational degrees of freedom and associated convection currents. The Sun is known to support both convective granules and differential rotation on its surface. The emission of X-rays in association with eruptive flares and the elevated temperatures of the corona might provide some measure of these energies. At the same time, it is expected that a fraction of the solar energy remains tied to the filling of conduction bands by electrons especially within sunspots. This constitutes a degree of freedom whose importance cannot be easily assessed. The discussion highlights how little is truly understood about energy partition in the Sun.

  13. POlarization Emission of Millimeter Activity at the Sun (POEMAS): New Circular Polarization Solar Telescopes at Two Millimeter Wavelength Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valio, Adriana; Kaufmann, P.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Raulin, J.-P.; Fernandes, L. O. T.; Marun, A.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new system of two circular polarization solar radio telescopes, POEMAS, for observations of the Sun at 45 and 90 GHz. The novel characteristic of these instruments is the capability to measure circular right- and left-hand polarizations at these high frequencies. The two frequencies were chosen so as to bridge the gap at radio frequencies between 20 and 200 GHz of solar flare spectra. The telescopes, installed at CASLEO Observatory (Argentina), observe the full disk of the Sun with a half power beam width of 1.4∘, a time resolution of 10 ms at both frequencies, a sensitivity of 2 - 4 K that corresponds to 4 and 20 solar flux unit (=104 Jy), considering aperture efficiencies of 50±5 % and 75±8 % at 45 and 90 GHz, respectively. The telescope system saw first light in November 2011 and is satisfactorily operating daily since then. A few flares were observed and are presented here. The millimeter spectra of some flares are seen to rise toward higher frequencies, indicating the presence of a new spectral component distinct from the microwave one.

  14. Stellar Activity on the Young Suns of Orion: COUP Observations of K5-7 Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wolk, S J; Micela, G; Favata, F; Glassgold, A E; Shang, H; Feigelson, E D

    2005-01-01

    In January 2003, the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) detected about 1400 young stars during a 13.2 day observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). This paper studies a well-defined sample of 28 solar-mass COUP sources to characterize the magnetic activity of analogs of the young Sun and thereby to improve understanding of the effects of solar X-rays on the solar nebula during the era of planet formation. We find that active young Suns spend 70% of their time in a characteristic state with relatively constant flux and magnetically confined plasma with temperatures kT_2 = 2.1 * kT_1. During characteristic periods, the 0.5-8 keV X-ray luminosity is about 0.03% of the bolometric luminosity. One or two powerful flares per week with peak luminosities logL_x ~ 30-32 erg/s are typically superposed on this characteristic emission accompanied by heating of the hot plasma component from ~2.4 keV to ~7 keV at the flare peak. The energy distribution of flares superposed on the characteristic emission level follo...

  15. Micro technology based sun sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Pedersen, Martin; Fléron, René

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing interest among universities in the scientific and educational possibilities of picosatellites base on the CubeSat 5 concept. Due to sever mass and dimension constraints place on this type of satellites, new approaches and ideas regarding different systems arises to accommodate...... DTUsat sun sensors are needed along with a magnetometer to obtain unambiguous attitude determination for the ACDS and the payloads - an electrodynamic tether and a camera. The accuracy needed was not obtainable by employing conventional attitude sensors. Hence a linear slit sensor was designed...

  16. Five years of gas flaring by country, oil field or flare observed by the Suomi NPP satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhizhin, M. N.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F. C.

    2016-12-01

    We will present a new methodology and the resulting interactive map and statistical estimates of flared gas volumes in 2012-2016 using multispectral infrared images from VIIRS radiometer at the Suomi NPP satellite. The high temperature gas flares are detected at the night side of the Earth with the Nightfire algorithm. Gas flares are distinct from biomass burning and industrial heat sources because they have higher temperatures. Sums of the radiative heat from the detected flares are calibrated with country-level flared volumes reported by CEDIGAZ. Statistical analysis of the database with accumulated 5 years of the Nightfire detections makes it possible to estimate instant flow rate for an individual flare, as well as integral flared volumes and long term trends for all the countries or oil and gas fields.

  17. Sun-to-Earth Analysis of a Major Geoeffective Solar Eruption within the Framework of the

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Vlahos, L.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Nindos, A.; Podladchikova, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Daglis, I.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Sarris, M.; Sarris, T.

    2013-09-01

    Transient expulsions of gigantic clouds of solar coronal plasma into the interplanetary space in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and sudden, intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation, solar flares, are well-established drivers of the variable Space Weather. Given the innate, intricate links and connections between the solar drivers and their geomagnetic effects, synergistic efforts assembling all pieces of the puzzle along the Sun-Earth line are required to advance our understanding of the physics of Space Weather. This is precisely the focal point of the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) under the THALIS Programme. Within the HNSWRN framework, we present here the first results from a coordinated multi-instrument case study of a major solar eruption (X5.4 and X1.3 flares associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km/s) CMEs) which were launched early on 7 March 2012 and triggered an intense geomagnetic storm (min Dst =-147 nT) approximately two days afterwards. Several elements of the associated phenomena, such as the flare and CME, EUV wave, WL shock, proton and electron event, interplanetary type II radio burst, ICME and magnetic cloud and their spatiotemporal relationships and connections are studied all way from Sun to Earth. To this end, we make use of satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions and monitors (e.g., SDO, STEREO, WIND, ACE, Herschel, Planck and INTEGRAL). We also present our first steps toward formulating a cohesive physical scenario to explain the string of the observables and to assess the various physical mechanisms than enabled and gave rise to the significant geoeffectiveness of the eruption.

  18. Seismology of the Wounded Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Cally, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Active regions are open wounds in the Sun's surface. Seismic oscillations from the interior pass through them into the atmosphere, changing their nature in the process to fast and slow magneto-acoustic waves. The fast waves then partially reflect and partially mode convert to upgoing and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves. The reflected fast and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves then re-enter the interior through the active regions that spawned them, infecting the surface seismology with signatures of the atmosphere. Using numerical simulations of waves in uniform magnetic fields, we calculate the upward acoustic and Alfv\\'enic losses in the atmosphere as functions of field inclination and wave orientation as well as the Time-Distance `travel time' perturbations, and show that they are related. Travel time perturbations relative to quiet Sun can exceed 40 seconds in 1 kG magnetic field. It is concluded that active region seismology is indeed significantly infected by waves leaving and re-entering the interior through magnetic w...

  19. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude ≳ 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  20. The Sun's New Exotic Neighbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, an international team of researchers [1] discovered a brown dwarf belonging to the 24th closest stellar system to the Sun. Brown dwarfs are intermediate objects that are neither stars nor planets. This object is the third closest brown dwarf to the Earth yet discovered, and one of the coolest, having a temperature of about 750 degrees Celsius. It orbits a very small star at about 4.5 times the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Its mass is estimated to be somewhere between 9 and 65 times the mass of Jupiter. At a time when astronomers are peering into the most distant Universe, looking at objects as far as 13 billion light-years away, one may think that our close neighbourhood would be very well known. Not so. Astronomers still find new star-like objects in our immediate vicinity. Using ESO's VLT, they just discovered a brown dwarf companion to the red star SCR 1845-6357, the 36th closest star to the Sun. ESO PR Photo 11/06 ESO PR Photo 11a/06 New Brown Dwarf in the Solar Neighbourhood (Artist's Impression) "This newly found brown dwarf is a valuable object because its distance is well known, allowing us to determine with precision its intrinsic brightness", said team member Markus Kasper (ESO). "Moreover, from its orbital motion, we should be able in a few years to estimate its mass. These properties are vital for understanding the nature of brown dwarfs." To discover this brown dwarf, the team used the high-contrast adaptive optics NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI [2]) on ESO's Very Large Telescope, an instrument specifically developed to search for extrasolar planets. The SDI camera enhances the ability of the VLT and its adaptive optics system to detect faint companions that would normally be lost in the glare of the primary star. In particular, the SDI camera provides additional, often very useful spectral information which can be used to determine a rough temperature for the object without follow

  1. Precursors of the solar X flare on march 29, 2014, in the active region NOAA 12017 based on microwave radiation and magnetographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov-Maximov, V. E.; Borovik, V. N.; Opeikina, L. V.; Tlatov, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Precursors of the strong solar flare X1.0 (according to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) classification) recorded on March 29, 2014, in the active region (AR) 12017 are investigated. The precursors manifested themselves in the AR microwave radiation and its magnetographic characteristics. This work was carried out as part of the development of an observational database of precursors of large flares (those more powerful than class M5 according to the GOES classification) in different ARs based on an analysis of the microwave radiation and magnetographic characteristics of ARs. Further generalization and systematization of the identified precursors of strong solar flares makes it possible to move on to the development of methods for their forecasting. According to data from Solar Dynamics Observatory Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI), two days before the X flare a new magnetic flux emerged in the analyzed AR 12017 near the main spot of the group with a magnetic field sign opposite that of main spot field (formation of the δ configuration). The study of the evolution of the magnetic field gradient in the AR showed a sharp increase before the X flare, which reached its peak 8 h before the flare with a subsequent decrease before the flare. Analysis of the AR microwave radiation, which was carried out based on the results of multiwavelength multiazimuth (31 daily observations for 4 h with 8-minute intervals) spectral polarization observations of the Sun by the RATAN-600 in the range 1.65-6.0 cm for a few days before the flare, revealed the emergence and development of a microwave source over the region with the δ configuration two days before the X flare. The parameters of the radio-frequency radiation of this source make it possible to classify it as a "peculiar" microwave source that was discovered earlier by the RATAN-600 in a number of eruptive events 1-2 days before large X flares. It was found for the first time that the time

  2. MOST Observations of our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M; Cameron, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of white light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite MOST. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 and 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from $10^{29}$-$10^{31.5}$ erg, with complex, multi-peaked structure found in 22% of these events. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given the slow reported rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to $10^{28}$ erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of $10^{33}$ erg occur ~8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the rec...

  3. Here comes the sun...; Here comes the sun...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Robert [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    It sounds a bit strange that you can use solar energy to maintain or refrigerate products or spaces below the ambient temperature, because we know that something that makes the sun is heating; but yes indeed, the sun can produce cold, and in addition without polluting, and without consuming conventional energy. In this document are mentioned the various research projects on solar cooling that have been made in the Energy Research Center at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico such as the thermo-chemical intermittent refrigerator, the geothermal cooling demonstration system in Mexicali, B.C., the GAX system for air conditioning, the ice producer intermittent solar refrigerator, the continuous solar refrigerator, the refrigeration by ejection-compression. It also mentions the functioning of heat pumps and the process of solar drying applications in agricultural products. [Spanish] Suena un poco extrano que se pueda utilizar la energia solar para mantener o refrigerar productos o espacios por debajo de la temperatura ambiente, ya que sabemos que algo que hace el sol es calentar; pero si, el sol puede producir frio, y ademas sin contaminar y sin consumir energia convencional. En este documento se mencionan las diferentes investigaciones sobre refrigeracion solar que se han realizado en el Centro de Investigacion en Energia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico como el refrigerador termoquimico intermitente, el sistema demostrativo de refrigeracion geotermico en Mexicali, B.C., el sistema GAX para aire acondicionado, el refrigerador solar intermitente productor de hielo, el refrigerador continuo solar, la refrigeracion por eyecto-compresion. Tambien se menciona el funcionamiento de las bombas de calor y el proceso de secado solar de aplicacion en productos agropecuarios.

  4. Characteristics of the Polarity Inversion Line and Solar Flare Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Studying connection between solar flares and properties of magnetic field in active regions is very important for understanding the flare physics and developing space weather forecasts. In this work, we analyze relationship between the flare X-ray peak flux from the GOES satellite, and characteristics of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained by the SDO/HMI instrument during the period of April, 2010 - June, 2016. We try to answer two questions: 1) What characteristics of the LOS magnetic field are most important for the flare initiation and magnitude? 2) Is it possible to construct a reliable forecast of ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 class flares based only on the LOS magnetic field characteristics? To answer these questions, we apply a Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) detection algorithm, and derive various properties of the PIL and the corresponding Active Regions (AR). The importance of these properties for flare forecasting is determined by their ability to separate flaring cases from non-flaring, and their Fisher ranking score. It is found that the PIL characteristics are of special importance for the forecasts of both ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 flares, while the global AR characteristics become comparably discriminative only for ≥ X1.0 flares. We use the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and train it on the six characteristics of the most importance for each case. The obtained True Skill Statistics (TSS) values of 0.70 for ≥ M1.0 flares and 0.64 for ≥ X1.0 flares are better than the currently-known expert-based predictions. Therefore, the results confirm the importance of the LOS magnetic field data and, in particular, the PIL region characteristics for flare forecasts.

  5. TRIGONOMETRIC SU(N) GAUDIN MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹俊鹏; 侯伯宇; 岳瑞宏

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the eigenstates and the eigenvalues of the Hamiltonians of the trigonometric SU(N) Gaudin model based on the quasi-classical limit of the trigonometric SU(N) chain with the periodic boundary condition.By using the quantum inverse scattering method, we also obtain the eigenvalues of the generating function of the trigonometric SU(N) Gaudin model.

  6. The summer sun shone round me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The summer sun shone round me, The folded valley lay In a stream of sun and odour, That sultry summer day. The tall trees stood in the sunlight As still as still could be, But the deep grass sighed and rustled And bowed and beckoned me. The deep grass moved and whispered And bowed and brushed my face. It whis pered in the sunshine: The winter comes apdce.”The summer sun shone round me

  7. Sun awareness in Maltese secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, S; Gauci, A Amato; Ellul, M; Scerri, L

    2004-11-01

    Studies indicate that reducing exposure to ultraviolet light during childhood and adolescence decreases the risk of skin cancer. From a young age, children need to be educated about the sun's harmful effects on the skin and how best to protect themselves. To help in the design of school-based interventions to raise sun awareness, a school survey was carried out to identify students' stereotypes and misconceptions. A total of 965 students attending Maltese secondary schools in forms 1, 2 and 3 were surveyed in May 2002, using a structured questionnaire designed to examine students' sun-related attitudes and knowledge. A high level of sun awareness among students was demonstrated, with high scores on knowledge of the effects of the sun on the skin, knowledge of skin cancer and knowledge of sun protection. Girls were clearly more knowledgeable than boys. However, of all the students surveyed, 55% thought that a suntan made them look better and 70% thought that their friends would desire a tan. These views were commoner among the older students. Skin type and hair or eye colour had no bearing on attitudes towards tanning or sun-related knowledge. The commonest misconceptions were that 'the sun is bad for your skin only when you get sunburnt' and that 'you cannot get too much sun on a cloudy day'. Deliberate suntanning was more frequently reported by girls than by boys and by students in the higher forms. Attitude change lags behind knowledge. Future school sun awareness interventions need to take into account gender and age differences in students' attitudes and perspectives. They should aim at motivating attitude change and preventive behaviour through consistent and repeated sun-education messages that are supported by a sun-conscious school environment.

  8. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  9. Slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons during an X-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and there appeared three FRs. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edge, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in 3D standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that complex structures of the flare is likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least...

  10. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of white-light flare kernels in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kawate, Tomoko; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and H$\\alpha$ with a frame rate of about 30~Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the lightcurve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of th...

  11. The Power-Law Distribution of Flare Kernels and Fractal Current Sheets in a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizuka, N; Takasaki, H; Kurokawa, H; Shibata, K; 10.1088/0004-637X/694/1/L74

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed examination of the fine structure inside flare ribbons and the temporal evolution of this fine structure during the X2.5 solar flare that occurred on 2004 November 10. We examine elementary bursts of the C IV (1550{\\AA}) emission lines seen as local transient brightenings inside the flare ribbons in the ultraviolet (1600{\\AA}) images taken with Transition Region and Coronal Explorer, and we call them C IV kernels. This flare was also observed in Ha with the Sartorius 18 cm Refractor telescope at Kwasan observatory, Kyoto University, and in hard X-rays (HXR) with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Many C IV kernels, whose sizes were comparable to or less than 2", were found to brighten successively during the evolution of the flare ribbon. The majority of them were well correlated with the Ha kernels in both space and time, while some of them were associated with the HXR emission. These kernels were thought to be caused by the precipitation of nonthermal particles at the...

  12. The Sun as a Library for High-Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M.

    2017-08-01

    Our maternal G dwarf star gives us life, light, warmth, and a surprisingly well-stocked library of high-energy phenomena to study and compare to more distant, violent objects. I will give a survey of what we see from the Sun -- X-rays, gamma-rays, radio emission, energetic neutral atoms, neutrinos, and particles accelerated in the low and high corona -- and of the physical processes and emission mechanisms thought to be involved, including magnetic reconnection, Fermi acceleration, thermal and nonthermal bremsstrahlung, coherent and incoherent radio emission, and gamma-ray line mechanisms: nuclear de-excitation, pion decay, neutron capture, and positron annihilation. I will outline the range of transient coronal behaviors from hypothetical nanoflares below the limit of individual detection to coronal mass ejections and the largest flares, comparing the latter to what is observed from other stars. Throughout the presentation, I will look for parallels with a variety of cosmic objects and observations, with no guarantee that any particular comparison is quantitatively appropriate. Finally, I will advertise the recent contributions of focusing hard X-ray observations with NuSTAR and the FOXSI rockets.

  13. The Suns Halloween Scare and the Media Frenzy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, P.

    2004-05-01

    SOHO appeared to be in everyone's focus this fall as the Sun turned from an almost spotless orb into an ominously scarred source of mighty fireworks in just a few days. Over two weeks, it featured three unusually large sunspot groups (including the largest one of this solar cycle), 11 X-class flares (including the strongest ever recorded), numerous halo CMEs (two with near-record speeds) and two significant proton storms which lasted for a combined five days. Satellites, power grids, radio communication and navigation systems were significantly affected in this period. The events caused unprecedented attention from the media and the public. Images from SOHO as well as quotes from SOHO scientists appeared in nearly every major news outlet (CNN, BBC, Associated Press, Reuters, to mention a few). Stories including SOHO images made the front page of newspapers and were featured prominently on including USA Today and The Washington Post. NASA estimated that the story reached "all" US newspapers and 2000 US TV channels. Media coverage in Europe was also impressive. The attention wiped out all existing SOHO web traffic records

  14. Ensemble Forecasting of Major Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, J A; Uritsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from the first ensemble prediction model for major solar flares (M and X classes). Using the probabilistic forecasts from three models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (NASA-GSFC) and the NOAA forecasts, we developed an ensemble forecast by linearly combining the flaring probabilities from all four methods. Performance-based combination weights were calculated using a Monte Carlo-type algorithm by applying a decision threshold $P_{th}$ to the combined probabilities and maximizing the Heidke Skill Score (HSS). Using the probabilities and events time series from 13 recent solar active regions (2012 - 2014), we found that a linear combination of probabilities can improve both probabilistic and categorical forecasts. Combination weights vary with the applied threshold and none of the tested individual forecasting models seem to provide more accurate predictions than the others for all values of $P_{th}$. According to the maximum values of HSS, a performance-based weights ...

  15. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  16. Heavy Ion Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2002-01-01

    The abundance enhancements of heavy ions Ne, Mg, Si and Fe in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) eventsare explained by a plasma acceleration mechanism. In consideration of the fact that the coronal plasma is mainlycomposed of hydrogen and helium ions, we think that theion-ion hybrid wave and quasi-perpendicular wave can.be excited by the energetic electron beam in impulsive solar flares. These waves may resonantly be absorbed byheavy ions when the frequencies of these waves are close to the second-harmonic gyrofrequencies of these heavyions. This requires the coronal plasma temperature to be located in the range ofT ~ (5 - 9) × 106 K in impulsivesolar flares and makes the average ionic charge state of these heavy ions in impulsive SEP events higher than theaverage ionic charge state of these heavy ions in gradual SEP events. These pre-heated and enhanced heavy ionsin impulsive SEP events.

  17. High energy flare physics group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  18. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  19. Search for neutrinos from flaring blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreter, Michael [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Eberl, Thomas; James, Clancy [ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kadler, Matthias [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are among the best candidates for the recently detected extraterrestrial neutrino flux. Hadronic AGN jet-emission models predict a tight correlation between the neutrino flux and the time-variable gamma-ray emission. At the same time, the atmospheric-background (noise) signal, which often dominates in neutrino-astronomical observations, can be substantially reduced by rejecting long-lasting periods of low flux. For these reasons, short high-amplitude gamma-ray flares, as often observed in blazars, can be used to substantially increase the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes in point-source searches. We develop a strategy to search for TeV neutrinos from flaring blazar jets from the TANAMI sample using the ANTARES telescope and Fermi gamma-ray light curves. An unbinned maximum-likelihood method is applied to optimize the probability of a neutrino detection from TANAMI sources.

  20. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Devore, C. Richard

    1987-01-01

    A flaring solar atmosphere is modeled assuming classical thermal transport, locally limited thermal transport, and nonlocal thermal transport. The classical, local, and nonlocal expressions for the heat flux yield significantly different temperature, density, and velocity profiles throughout the rise phase of the flare. Evaporation of chromospheric material begins earlier in the nonlocal case than in the classical or local calculations, but reaches much lower upward velocities. Much higher coronal temperatures are achieved in the nonlocal calculations owing to the combined effects of delocalization and flux limiting. The peak velocity and momentum are roughly the same in all three cases. A more impulsive energy release influences the evolution of the nonlocal model more than the classical and locally limited cases.

  1. Selective Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2001-01-01

    A plasma acceleration mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancement in the ratio of 3 He/4He, (enhancement factor 102 - 103) observed in solar 3He-rich flares. Considering that coronal plasma is mainly composed of hydrogen and helium ions, the hydrogen ion-helium ion hybrid waves and quasi-perpendicular waves can be excited by energetic electron beam during the impulsive solarflares. The frequencies of these waves are close to the 3He++ ion gyrofrequency, but far from the 4He++ ion gyrofrequency. Most of these waves are selectively absorbed by 3He ions. These preheated 3He ions can be successively stochastic accelerated by Alfvén turbulence, when their velocities are larger than the local Alfvén velocity. It makes the ratio of 3He/4He dramatically enhanced and the acceleration energy spectrum of 3He ions forms a power-law distribution during the impulsive solar flares.

  2. Monitoring and modeling radio flares from microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, S A; Bursov, N N

    2000-01-01

    We present results of long-term daily monitoring of a sample of Galactic radio-emitting X-ray binaries showing relativistic jets (RJXRB): SS433, Cyg X-3, and GRS 1915+105, with the RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 0.6-22 GHz range. We carried out the modeling calculations to understand the temporal (1--100 days) and spectral (1-22 GHz) dependence. We tested the finite jet segment models and we found that the geometry of the conical hollow jets is responsible for either a power law or an exponential decay of the flares. SS433 was monitored for 100 days in 1997 and 120 days in 1999. From the quiescent radio light curves, we obtained clear evidence of a 6.04-day 10-15% modulation. Three powerful flares (up to 13 Jy) from Cyg X-3 were detected in April 2000.

  3. Sun Jingxia Devotes Herself to Nursing Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    "I really didn’t expect that at my advanced age, I would be awarded the highest honor in international nursing circles," said Mme. Sun Jingxia, 81, who had just returned from Beijing where she received the Nightingale Medal. Wearing a light yellow suit, with a collar bordered in red, Sun is inhigh spirits, reminding people of the beauty of the setting sun. It is clear that Sun Jingxia has deep feelings as she looks at the medal which shows a relief of Florence Nightingale’s head. She spoke in her usual soft voice but with some excitement, "President Jiang

  4. Cyclical Variability of Prominences, CMEs and Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. L. Ballester

    2000-09-01

    Solar flares, prominences and CMEs are well known manifestations of solar activity. For many years, qualitative studies were made about the cyclical behaviour of such phenomena. Nowadays, more quantitative studies have been undertaken with the aim to understand the solar cycle dependence of such phenomena as well as peculiar behaviour, such as asymmetries and periodicities, occurring within the solar cycle. Here, we plan to review the more recent research concerning all these topics.

  5. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    de Arcangelis, L.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analysing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, inter-occurrence times and the same temporal clustering: we find afterflare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for...

  6. The Discriminant Analysis Flare Forecasting System (DAFFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric; Hill, Frank; Marble, Andrew R.

    2016-05-01

    The Discriminant Analysis Flare Forecasting System (DAFFS) has been developed under NOAA/Small Business Innovative Research funds to quantitatively improve upon the NOAA/SWPC flare prediction. In the Phase-I of this project, it was demonstrated that DAFFS could indeed improve by the requested 25% most of the standard flare prediction data products from NOAA/SWPC. In the Phase-II of this project, a prototype has been developed and is presently running autonomously at NWRA.DAFFS uses near-real-time data from NOAA/GOES, SDO/HMI, and the NSO/GONG network to issue both region- and full-disk forecasts of solar flares, based on multi-variable non-parametric Discriminant Analysis. Presently, DAFFS provides forecasts which match those provided by NOAA/SWPC in terms of thresholds and validity periods (including 1-, 2-, and 3- day forecasts), although issued twice daily. Of particular note regarding DAFFS capabilities are the redundant system design, automatically-generated validation statistics and the large range of customizable options available. As part of this poster, a description of the data used, algorithm, performance and customizable options will be presented, as well as a demonstration of the DAFFS prototype.DAFFS development at NWRA is supported by NOAA/SBIR contracts WC-133R-13-CN-0079 and WC-133R-14-CN-0103, with additional support from NASA contract NNH12CG10C, plus acknowledgment to the SDO/HMI and NSO/GONG facilities and NOAA/SWPC personnel for data products, support, and feedback. DAFFS is presently ready for Phase-III development.

  7. The CORONAS-Photon/TESIS experiment on EUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S.; Zhitnik, I.; Bogachev, S.; Bugaenko, O.; Ignat'ev, A.; Mitrofanov, A.; Perzov, A.; Shestov, S.; Slemzin, V.; Suhodrev, N.

    The new experiment TESIS is developent for russian CORONAS-Photon mission launch is planned on the end of 2007 The experiment is aimed on the study of activity of the Sun in the phases of minimum rise and maximum of 24 th cycle of Solar activity by the method of XUV imaging spectroscopy The method is based on the registration full-Sun monochromatic images with high spatial and temporal resolution The scientific tasks of the experiment are i Investigation dynamic processes in corona flares CME etc with high spatial up to 1 and temporal up to 1 second resolution ii determination of the main plasma parameters like plasma electron and ion density and temperature differential emission measure etc iii study of the processes of appearance and development large scale long-life magnetic structures in the solar corona study of the fluency of this structures on the global activity of the corona iv study of the mechanisms of energy accumulation and release in the solar flares and mechanisms of transformation of this energy into the heating of the plasma and kinematics energy To get the information for this studies the TESIS will register full-Sun images in narrow spectral intervals and the monochromatic lines of HeII SiXI FeXXI-FeXXIII MgXII ions The instrument includes 5 independent channels 2 telescopes for 304 and 132 A wide-field 2 5 degrees coronograph 280-330A and 8 42 A spectroheliographs The detailed description of the TESIS experiment and the instrument is presented

  8. Sunspot waves and flare energy release

    CERN Document Server

    Sych, R; Altyntsev, A; Dudík, J; Kashapova, L

    2014-01-01

    We address a possibility of the flare process initiation and further maintenance of its energy release due to a transformation of sunspot longitudinal waves into transverse magnetic loop oscillations with initiation of reconnection. This leads to heating maintaining after the energy release peak and formation of a flat stage on the X-ray profile. We applied the time-distance plots and pixel wavelet filtration (PWF) methods to obtain spatio-temporal distribution of wave power variations in SDO/AIA data. To find magnetic waveguides, we used magnetic field extrapolation of SDO/HMI magnetograms. The propagation velocity of wave fronts was measured from their spatial locations at specific times. In correlation curves of the 17 GHz (NoRH) radio emission we found a monotonous energy amplification of 3-min waves in the sunspot umbra before the 2012 June 7 flare. This dynamics agrees with an increase in the wave-train length in coronal loops (SDO/AIA, 171 {\\AA}) reaching the maximum 30 minutes prior to the flare onset...

  9. Fine structure of flare ribbons and evolution of electric currents

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N

    2014-01-01

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains the flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of C2.1 flare of August 15, 2013, observed with New Solar Telescope (NST) of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), GOES and FERMI spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of the flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe red-blue asymmetry of H alpha flare ribbons with a width as small as 100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be r...

  10. Investigation of the Relationship between Solar Flares and Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, S.; Kilcik, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the relationship between X-Ray flare numbers (C, M, and, X class flares) and sunspot counts in four categories (Simple (A + B), Medium (C), Large (D + E + F), and End (H)). All data sets cover the whole Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending and maximum phases of Cycle 24 (1996-2014). Pearson correlation analysis method was used to investigate the degree of relationship between monthly solar flare numbers and sunspot counts observed in different sunspot categories. We found that the C, M, and X class flares have highest correlation with the large group sunspot counts, while the small category does not any meaningful correlation. Obtained correlation coefficients between large groups and C, M, and X class flare numbers are 0.79, 0.74, and 0.4, respectively. Thus, we conclude that the main sources of X-Ray solar flares are the complex/large sunspot groups.

  11. CME-flare association during the 23rd solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, A.; Shaltout, M.; Beheary, M. M.; Mawad, R.; Youssef, M.

    2009-04-01

    The relation between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are statistically studied. More than 10,000 CME events observed by SOHO/LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed. The soft X-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), recorded more than 20,000 flares in the same time period. The data is filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events. The results show that CME-flare associated events are triggered with a lift-off time within the range 0.4-1.0 h. We list a set of 41 CME-flare associated events satisfying the temporal and spatial conditions. The listed events show a good correlation between the CME energy and the X-ray flux of the CME-flare associated events with correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  12. The Telemachus mission: dynamics of the polar sun and heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelof, E.

    Telemachus in Greek mythology was the faithful son of Ulysses. The Telemachus mission is envisioned as the next logical step in the exploration of the polar regions of the Sun and heliosphere so excitingly initiated by the ESA/NASA Ulysses mission. Telemachus is a polar solar-heliospheric mission described in the current NASA Sun-Earth Connections Roadmap (2003-2028) that has successfully undergone two Team X studies by NASA/JPL. The pioneering observations from Ulysses transformed our perception of the structure and dynamics of these polar regions through which flow the solar wind, magnetic fields and energetic particles that eventually populate most of the volume of the heliosphere. Ulysses carried only fields and particles detectors. Telemachus, in addition to modern versions of such essential in situ instruments, will carry imagers that will give solar astronomers a new viewpoint on coronal mass ejections and solar flares, as well as their first purely polar views of the photospheric magnetic field, thereby providing new helioseismology to probe the interior of the Sun. Unlike the RTG-powered Ulysses, the power for Telemachus will come simply from solar panels. Gravity assist encounters with Venus and Earth (twice) will yield ˜5 years of continuous in-ecliptic cruise science between 0.7 AU and 3.3 AU that will powerfully complement other contemporary solar-heliospheric missions. The Jupiter gravity assist, followed by a perihelion burn ˜8 years after launch, will place Telemachus in a permanent ˜0.2 AU by 2.5 AU heliographic polar orbit (inclination >80 deg) whose period will be 1.5 years. Telemachus will then pass over the solar poles at ˜0.4 AU (compared to 1.4 AU for Ulysses) and spend ˜2 weeks above 60 deg on each polar pass (alternating perihelions between east and west limbs as viewed from Earth). In 14 polar passes during a 10.5 year solar cycle, Telemachus would accumulate over half a year of polar science data. During the remainder of the time, it

  13. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malini Aggarwal; Rajmal Jain; A. P. Mishra; P. G. Kulkarni; Chintan Vyas; R. Sharma; Meera Gupta

    2008-03-01

    We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by ``Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteristics of solar flares and their relationship with the dynamics of CMEs have been presented.We found that the fast moving CMEs, i.e., positive acceleration are better associated with short rise time (< 150 s) flares. However, the velocity of CMEs increases as a function of duration of the flares in both 4.1–10 and 10–20 keV bands. This indicates that the possibility of association of CMEs with larger speeds exists with long duration flare events. We observed that CMEs decelerate with increasing rise time, decay time and duration of the associated X-ray flares. A total 10 out of 20 CMEs under current investigation showed positive acceleration, and 5 of them whose speed did not exceed 589 km/s were associated with short rise time (< 150 s) and short duration (< 1300 s) flares. The other 5 CMEs were associated with long duration or large rise time flare events. The unusual feature of all these positive accelerating CMEs was their low linear speed ranging between 176 and 775 km/s. We do not find any significant correlation between X-ray peak intensity of the flares with linear speed as well as acceleration of the associated CMEs. Based on the onset time of flares and associated CMEs within the observing cadence of CMEs by LASCO, we found that in 16 cases CME preceded the flare by 23 to 1786 s, while in 4 cases flare occurred before the CME by 47 to 685 s. We argue that both events are closely associated with each other and are integral parts of one energy release system.

  14. Observing the formation of flare-driven coronal rain

    OpenAIRE

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Antolin, P.; Wedemeyer, S.; Vissers, G.; E. P. Kontar; Gallagher, P

    2016-01-01

    PA. GV are funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement nr. 291058 Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop-tops in thermally unstable post-flare arcades. We detect 5 phases that characterise the post-flare decay:heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ~120 s, radiative/ enthalpy cooling dominance for ~4700 s and finally catastrophic ...

  15. H$\\mathbf{\\alpha}$ Intensity Oscillations in Large Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Ajor Maurya; Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    We reinvestigate the problem of Hα intensity oscillations in large flares, particularly those classified as X-class flares. We have used high spatial and temporal resolution digital observations obtained from Udaipur Solar Observatory during the period 1998–2006 and selected several events. Normalized Lomb–Scargle periodogram method for spectral analysis was used to study the oscillatory power in quiet and active chromospheric locations, including the flare ribbons.

  16. The Study of Flare Stars in Byurakan Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikian, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    A brief description of the observations and the study of flare stars in Byurakan observatory is presented. In particular it is shown that there is a real dependence between flare activity and the distance between components of UV Ceti. The spectral study of a flare on WX Uma indicated on strong influence of the continuous emission, which is operated from 6000Å and rapidly growing to the short wavelength.

  17. Gas flaring from a rural landowner's perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, P. [Farmers' Advocate of Alberta, Three Hills, AB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    The public perception of flaring by the petroleum and natural gas industry was discussed. Flaring has never been embraced by the rural community in Alberta. Flaring is seen as an infringement on health and a contributing source of air pollution. While several studies have been undertaken to determine the effects of flaring, it seems that any conclusive information has not been made available to the public. The author suggested that some rural residents suspect that only favourable information is released or that it has been influenced by the energy sector. They also firmly believe that an increase in animal and health concerns is directly associated with emissions from flaring. Studies have identified about 250 different compounds in flare emissions, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other toxic and carcinogenic compounds such as toluene, benzene, and xylene. Some rural residents are sceptical that scientists know the full extent of the effects from the 250 compounds produced by flaring. Also, since emissions from all flares are not the same, this would require an individual study for each flare for a thorough analysis. Studies have also shown that some flares have a combustion efficiency of only 64 per cent. Other studies do not support complaints that health problems stem from nearby wells. Other major perceptions are that flaring adds to the greenhouse effect, it contributes to climatic change and damages soils and vegetation. The author emphasized that the energy sector has to make an effort to reduce the number of flares and most importantly communicate with the rural community more effectively.

  18. Spots and White Light Flares in an L Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Program GN-2012A-Q-37) GMOS spectrograph (Hook et al. 2004) when a series of flares occurred. A spectrum of the most powerful flare in its impulsive...10:14 Hα HeI HeI HeI OI Fig. 4. Gemini-North GMOS spectra of W1906+40 in quiescence (below) and in flare. Note the broad Hα, atomic emission lines

  19. Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements during the X2.6 flare on 2005 January 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Matthews, Sarah; Ming-DeDing; Zhao, Hui; Jin, Chun-Lan

    2009-07-01

    Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements which were manifested as apparent polarity reversal in magnetograms have been reported since 1981. We are motivated to further quantify the phenomenon by asking two questions: can we distinguish the flare-induced signals from real magnetic changes during flares, and what we can learn about flare energy release from the flare-induced signals? We select the X2.6 flare that occurred on 2005 January 15, for further study. The flare took place in NOAA active region (AR) 10720 at approximately the central meridian, which makes the interpretation of the vector magnetograms less ambiguous. We have identified that flare-induced signals during this flare appeared in six zones. The zones are located within an average distance of 5 Mm from their weight center to the main magnetic neutral line, have an average size of (0.6±0.4)×1017 cm2, duration of 13±4 min, and flux density change of 181±125 G in the area of reversed polarity. The following new facts have been revealed by this study: (1) the flare-induced signal is also seen in the transverse magnetograms but with smaller magnitude, e.g., about 50 G; (2) the flare-induced signal mainly manifests itself as apparent polarity reversal, but the signal starts and ends as a weakening of flux density; (3) The flare-induced signals appear in phase with the peaks of hard X-ray emission as observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and mostly trace the position of RHESSI hard X-ray footpoint sources. (4) in four zones, it takes place co-temporally with real magnetic changes which persist after the flare. Only for the other two zones does the flux density recover to the pre-flare level immediately after the flare. The physical implications of the flare-induced signal are discussed in view of its relevance to the non-thermal electron precipitation and primary energy release in the flare.

  20. Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements during the X2.6 flare on 2005 January 15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Zhao; Jing-Xiu Wang; Sarah Matthews; Ming-De Ding; Hui Zhao; Chun-Lan Jin

    2009-01-01

    Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements which were manifested as apparent polarity reversal in magnetograms have been reported since 1981. We are motivated to further quantify the phenomenon by asking two questions: can we distinguish the flare-induced signals from real magnetic changes during flares, and what we can learn about flare energy release from the flare-induced signals? We select the X2.6 flare that occurred on 2005 January 15, for further study. The flare took place in NOAA active re-gion (AR) 10720 at approximately the central meridian, which makes the interpretation of the vector magnetograms less ambiguous. We have identified that flare-induced signals during this flare appeared in six zones. The zones are located within an average distance of 5 Mm from their weight center to the main magnetic neutral line, have an average size of (0.6±0.4)×1017 cm2, duration of 13±4 min, and flux density change of 181±125 G in the area of reversed polarity. The following new facts have been revealed by this study: (1) the flare-induced signal is also seen in the transverse magnetograms but with smaller magnitude, e.g., about 50 G; (2) the flare-induced signal mainly manifests itself as apparent polarity reversal, but the signal starts and ends as a weakening of flux density; (3) The flare-induced signals appear in phase with the peaks of hard X-ray emission as observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic lmager (RHESSI), and mostly trace the position of RHESSI hard X-ray footpoint sources. (4) in four zones, it takes place cotemporally with real magnetic changes which persist after the flare. Only for the other two zones does the flux density recover to the pre-flare level immediately after the flare.The physical implications of the flare-induced signal are discussed in view of its relevance to the non-thermal electron precipitation and primary energy release in the flare.

  1. The Solar Dynamics Observatory, Studying the Sun and Its Influence on Other Bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The solar photon output, which was once thought to be constant, varies over all time scales from seconds during solar flares to years due to the solar cycle. These solar variations cause significant deviations in the Earth and space environments on similar time scales, such as affecting the atmospheric densities and composition of particular atoms, molecules, and ions in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Presented and discussed will be examples of unprecedented observations from NASA's new solar observatory, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using three specialized instruments, SDO measures the origins of solar activity from inside the Sun, though its atmosphere, then accurately measuring the Sun's radiative output in X-ray and EUV wavelengths (0.1-121 nm). Along with the visually appealing observations will be discussions of what these measurements can tell us about how the plasma motions in all layers of the Sun modifies and strengthens the weak solar dipole magnetic field to drive large energy releases in solar eruptions. Also presented will be examples of how the release of the Sun's energy, in the form of photons and high energy particles, physically influence other bodies in the solar system such as Earth, Mars, and the Moon, and how these changes drive changes in the technology that we are becoming dependent upon. The presentation will continuously emphasize how SDO, the first satellite in NASA's Living with a Star program, improving our understanding of the variable Sun and its Heliospheric influence.

  2. A swirling flare-related EUV jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Ji, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We report our observations of a swirling flare-related extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet on 2011 October 15 at the edge of NOAA active region 11314. Methods: We used the multiwavelength observations in the EUV passbands from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We extracted a wide slit along the jet axis and 12 thin slits across its axis to investigate the longitudinal motion and transverse rotation. We also used data from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) aboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the jet. Ground-based Hα images from the El Teide Observatory, a member of the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG), provide a good opportunity to explore the relationship between the cool surge and the hot jet. Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO enable us to study the magnetic evolution of the flare/jet event. We carried out potential-field extrapolation to calculate the magnetic configuration associated with the jet. Results: The onset of jet eruption coincided with the start time of the C1.6 flare impulsive phase. The initial velocity and acceleration of the longitudinal motion were 254 ± 10 km s-1 and -97 ± 5 m s-2, respectively. The jet presented helical structure and transverse swirling motion at the beginning of its eruption. The counter-clockwise rotation slowed down from an average velocity of ~122 km s-1 to ~80 km s-1. The interwinding thick threads of the jet untwisted into multiple thin threads during the rotation that lasted for one cycle with a period of ~7 min and an amplitude that increases from ~3.2 Mm at the bottom to ~11 Mm at the upper part. Afterwards, the curtain-like leading edge of the jet continued rising without rotation, leaving a dimming region behind, before falling back to the solar surface. The appearance/disappearance of dimming corresponded to the

  3. A characterization of solution gas flaring in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M R; Kostiuk, L W; Spangelo, J L

    2001-08-01

    Information reported here is the result of a detailed analysis of data on flared and vented solution gas in the Province of Alberta in 1999. A goal of characterizing these flares was to aid in the improved management of solution gas flaring. In total, 4499 oil and bitumen batteries reported flaring or venting with a combined gas volume of 1.42 billion m3. There was significant site-to-site variation in volumes of gas flared or vented, gas composition, and flare design. Approximately 5% of physical batteries generate 35.7% of the gas flared and vented from oil and bitumen batteries. Therefore, if one were to attempt to mitigate flaring, significant progress could be made by starting with only the largest sites. The monthly variability of gas volumes was considered because high variability could affect implementation of alternative technologies. It was found that slightly more than 40% of the sites were reasonably steady and had monthly deviations of 100% or less from the average flared volume. The variability in monthly volumes was less for the larger batteries. Data from individual well sites show significant variability in the relative concentrations of each of the major species contained in solution gas.

  4. A statistical study of post-flare-associated CME events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, M.; Mawad, R.; shaltout, Mosalam

    2013-04-01

    We present a statistical study of post-flare-associated CMEs (PFA-CMEs) during the period from 1996 to 2010. By investigating all CMEs and X-ray flares, respectively, in the LASCO and GOES archives, we found 15875 CMEs of which masses are well measured and 25112 X-ray flares of which positions are determined from their optical counterparts. Under certain temporal and spatial criteria of these CMEs and solar flare events, 291PFA-CMEs events have been selected. Linking the flare fluxes with CME speeds of these paired events, we found that there is a reasonable positive linear relation between the CME linear speed and associated flare flux. The results show also the CME width increases as the flux of its associated solar flare increases. Besides we found that there is a fine positive linear relation between the CME mass and its width. Matching the flare fluxes with CME masses of these paired events, we find the CME mass increases as the flux of its associated solar flare increases. Finally we find the PFA-CME events are in regular more decelerated than the other CMEs.

  5. Nuclear processes and neutrino production in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of flare neutrino flux is approached from the standpoint of recent observations and theoretical results on the nuclear processes in solar flares. Attention is given to the energy spectra and total numbers of accelerated particles in flares, as well as their resulting production of beta(+)-emitting radionuclei and pions; these should be the primary sources of neutrinos. The observed 0.511 MeV line flux for the June 21, 1980 flare is compared with the expected from the number and spectrum of accelerated particles.

  6. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. V. Energy Closure in Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Caspi, Amir; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Holman, Gordon; Jing, Ju; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Kontar, Eduard P.; McTiernan, James M.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; O’Flannagain, Aidan; Richardson, Ian G.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry P.; Xu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this study we synthesize the results of four previous studies on the global energetics of solar flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which include magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies in 399 solar M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yr of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. Our findings are as follows. (1) The sum of the mean nonthermal energy of flare-accelerated particles ({E}{nt}), the energy of direct heating ({E}{dir}), and the energy in CMEs ({E}{CME}), which are the primary energy dissipation processes in a flare, is found to have a ratio of ({E}{nt}+{E}{dir}+{E}{CME})/{E}{mag}=0.87+/- 0.18, compared with the dissipated magnetic free energy {E}{mag}, which confirms energy closure within the measurement uncertainties and corroborates the magnetic origin of flares and CMEs. (2) The energy partition of the dissipated magnetic free energy is: 0.51 ± 0.17 in nonthermal energy of ≥slant 6 {keV} electrons, 0.17 ± 0.17 in nonthermal ≥slant 1 {MeV} ions, 0.07 ± 0.14 in CMEs, and 0.07 ± 0.17 in direct heating. (3) The thermal energy is almost always less than the nonthermal energy, which is consistent with the thick-target model. (4) The bolometric luminosity in white-light flares is comparable to the thermal energy in soft X-rays (SXR). (5) Solar energetic particle events carry a fraction ≈ 0.03 of the CME energy, which is consistent with CME-driven shock acceleration. (6) The warm-target model predicts a lower limit of the low-energy cutoff at {e}c≈ 6 {keV}, based on the mean peak temperature of the differential emission measure of T e = 8.6 MK during flares. This work represents the first statistical study that establishes energy closure in solar flare/CME events.

  7. The Tidal Disruption of Giant Stars and Their Contribution to the Flaring Supermassive Black Hole Population

    CERN Document Server

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Sun-like stars are thought to be regularly disrupted by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) within galactic nuclei. Yet, as stars evolve off the main sequence their vulnerability to tidal disruption increases drastically as they develop a bifurcated structure consisting of a dense core and a tenuous envelope. Here we present the first hydrodynamic simulations of the tidal disruption of giant stars and show that the core has a substantial influence on the star's ability to survive the encounter. Stars with more massive cores retain large fractions of their envelope mass, even in deep encounters. Accretion flares resulting from the disruption of giant stars should last for tens to hundreds of years. Their characteristic signature in transient searches would not be the $t^{-5/3}$ decay typically associated with tidal disruption events, but a correlated rise over many orders of magnitude in brightness on months to years timescales. We calculate the relative disruption rates of stars of varying evolutionary stages in...

  8. Effect of restoration technique on stress distribution in roots with flared canals: an FEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Sema; Eraslan, Öznur; Eraslan, Oğuz; Eskitaşcıoğlu, Gürcan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this finite element analysis (FEA) study was to test the effect of different restorative techniques on stress distribution in roots with flared canals. Five three-dimensional (3D) FEA models that simulated a maxillary incisor with excessive structure loss and flared root canals were created and restored with the following techniques/materials: 1) a prefabricated post: 2) one main and two accessory posts; 3) i-TFC post-core (Sun Medical); 4) the thickness of the root was increased by using composite resin and the root was then restored using a prefabricated post; 5) an anatomic post was created by using composite resin and a prefabricated glass-fiber post. Composite cores and ceramic crowns were created. A 300-N static load was applied at the center of the palatal surface of the tooth to calculate stress distributions. SolidWorks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FEA analysis. The analysis of the von Mises and tensile stress values revealed that prefabricated post, accessory post, and i-TFC post systems showed similar stress distributions. They all showed high stress areas at the buccal side of the root (3.67 MPa) and in the cervical region of the root (> 3.67 MPa) as well as low stress accumulation within the post space (0 to 1 MPa). The anatomic post kept the stress within its body and directed less stress towards the remaining tooth structure. The creation of an anatomic post may save the remaining tooth structure in roots with flared canals by reducing the stress levels.

  9. Regina vs Hubbs: Determining the Sun's Position

    CERN Document Server

    Samra, Raminder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Here I determined the Sun's position as an expert witness for crown counsel. From my calculations I found the Sun's location in the sky was such that it could not impede the driver's vision, as a result it could not have been the reason for the accused to be involved in a motor vehicle accident.

  10. SDO and STEREO Observations of Prominence Dynamics During a Series of Eight Homologous Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Innes, Davina E.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous flares are eruptive events that occur repetitively in the same active region, with similar structure and morphology. A series of at least eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 16 - 17 June 2011. A filament is rooted in the active region with an overlying coronal cavity. The active region appears on the southeast solar limb as seen from SDO/AIA, and on the disk as viewed from STEREO-B/EUVI; the dual perspective allows us to study in detail behavior of prominence/filament material entrained in the magnetic field of the repeatedly-erupting system. Each of the eruptions was mainly confined, with active-region prominence material being ejected from the core of the erupting region onto outer-lobe loops of the active region. The eruption series repeatedly disrupted material of a quiet-Sun extension of the prominence, and that material became suspended at progressively higher heights above the surface. Two final eruptions from the core region destabilized the field holding that material, instigating a coronal mass ejection (CME).

  11. Flares, wind and nebulae: the 2015 December mini-outburst of V404 Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Darias, T.; Casares, J.; Mata Sánchez, D.; Fender, R. P.; Armas Padilla, M.; Mooley, K.; Hardy, L.; Charles, P. A.; Ponti, G.; Motta, S. E.; Dhillon, V. S.; Gandhi, P.; Jiménez-Ibarra, F.; Butterley, T.; Carey, S.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Hickish, J.; Littlefair, S. P.; Perrott, Y. C.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Rumsey, C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Scott, P. F.; Titterington, D. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    After more than 26 years in quiescence, the black hole transient V404 Cyg went into a luminous outburst in June 2015, and additional activity was detected in late December of the same year. Here, we present an optical spectroscopic follow-up of the December mini-outburst, together with X-ray, optical and radio monitoring that spanned more than a month. Strong flares with gradually increasing intensity are detected in the three spectral ranges during the ~10 days following the Swift trigger. Our optical spectra reveal the presence of a fast outflowing wind, as implied by the detection of a P-Cyg profile (He I - 5876 A) with a terminal velocity of ~2500 km/s. Nebular-like spectra -- with an H_alpha equivalent width of ~500 A -- are also observed. All these features are similar to those seen during the main June 2015 outburst. Thus, the fast optical wind simultaneous with the radio jet is most likely present in every V404 Cyg outburst. Finally, we report on the detection of a strong radio flare in late January 2016, when X-ray and optical monitoring had stopped due to Sun constraints.

  12. The Second NWRA Flare-Forecasting Comparison Workshop: Methods Compared and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.; the Flare Forecasting Comparison Group

    2013-07-01

    The Second NWRA Workshop to compare methods of solar flare forecasting was held 2-4 April 2013 in Boulder, CO. This is a follow-on to the First NWRA Workshop on Flare Forecasting Comparison, also known as the ``All-Clear Forecasting Workshop'', held in 2009 jointly with NASA/SRAG and NOAA/SWPC. For this most recent workshop, many researchers who are active in the field participated, and diverse methods were represented in terms of both the characterization of the Sun and the statistical approaches used to create a forecast. A standard dataset was created for this investigation, using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) vector magnetic field HARP series. For each HARP on each day, 6 hours of data were used, allowing for nominal time-series analysis to be included in the forecasts. We present here a summary of the forecasting methods that participated and the standardized dataset that was used. Funding for the workshop and the data analysis was provided by NASA/Living with a Star contract NNH09CE72C and NASA/Guest Investigator contract NNH12CG10C.

  13. The CHAIN-Project and Installation of Flare Monitoring Telescopes in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S UeNo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Flare Monitoring Telescope (FMT was constructed in 1992 at Hida Observatory in Japan to investigate the long-term variation of solar activity and explosive events. It has five solar imaging telescopes that simultaneously observe the full-disk Sun at different wavelengths around the H-alpha absorption line or in different modes. Therefore, the FMT can measure the three-dimensional velocity field of moving structures on the full solar disk. The science target of the FMT is to monitor solar flares and erupting filaments continuously all over the solar disk and to investigate correlation between the characteristics of the erupting phenomena and the geoeffectiveness of the corresponding coronal mass ejections (CMEs. We are planning to start up a new worldwide project, the Continuous H-alpha Imaging Network (CHAIN project, as an important IHY project of our observatories. As part of this project, we are examining the possibility of installing telescopes similar to the FMT in developing countries. We have selected Peru and Algeria as the countries where the first and second overseas FMTs will be installed, and we are aiming to start operation of these FMTs by the end of 2010 before the maximum phase of solar cycle 24. To create such an international network, it will be necessary to improve the information technologies applied in our observation-system. In this paper, we explain the current status and future areas of work regarding our system.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA deletion percentage in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Julia M; Murphy, Gillian; Ralph, Nikki; O'Gorman, Susan M; Murphy, James E J

    2016-12-01

    The percentages of mitochondrial genomes carrying the mtDNA(3895) and the mtDNA(4977) (common) deletion were quantified in sun exposed and non sun exposed skin biopsies, for five cohorts of patients varying either in sun exposure profile, age or skin cancer status. Non-melanoma skin cancer diagnoses are rising in Ireland and worldwide [12] but most risk prediction is based on subjective visual estimations of sun exposure history. A quantitative objective test for pre-neoplastic markers may result in better adherence to sun protective behaviours. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to be subject to the loss of a significant proportion of specific sections of genetic code due to exposure to ultraviolet light in sunlight. Although one such deletion has been deemed more sensitive, another, called the mtDNA(4977) or common deletion, has proved to be a more useful indicator of possible risk in this study. Quantitative molecular analysis was carried out to determine the percentage of genomes carrying the deletion using non sun exposed and sun exposed skin biopsies in cohorts of patients with high or low sun exposure profiles and two high exposure groups undergoing treatment for NMSC. Results indicate that mtDNA deletions correlate to sun exposure; in groups with high sun exposure habits a significant increase in deletion number in exposed over non sun exposed skin occurred. An increase in deletion percentage was also seen in older cohorts compared to the younger group. The mtDNA(3895) deletion was detected in small amounts in exposed skin of many patients, the mtDNA(4977) common deletion, although present to some extent in non sun exposed skin, is suggested to be the more reliable and easily detected marker. In all cohorts except the younger group with relatively lower sun exposure, the mtDNA(4977) deletion was more frequent in sun exposed skin samples compared to non-sun exposed skin.

  15. Gravitational Lensing Characteristics of the Transparent Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Patla, Bijunath

    2007-01-01

    The transparent Sun is modeled as a spherically symmetric and centrally condensed gravitational lens using recent Standard Solar Model (SSM) data. The Sun's minimum focal length is computed to a refined accuracy of 23.5 +/- 0.1 AU, just beyond the orbit of Uranus. The Sun creates a single image of a distant point source visible to observers inside this minimum focal length and to observers sufficiently removed from the line connecting the source through the Sun's center. Regions of space are mapped where three images of a distant point source are created, along with their associated magnifications. Solar caustics, critical curves, and Einstein rings are computed and discussed. Extremely high gravitational lens magnifications exist for observers situated so that an angularly small, unlensed source appears near a three-image caustic. Types of radiations that might undergo significant solar lens magnifications as they can traverse the core of the Sun, including neutrinos and gravitational radiation, are discusse...

  16. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  17. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  18. A comparison between magnetic shear and flare shear in a well-observed M-class flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan-Hui Zhou; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2009-01-01

    We give an extensive multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive M1.0/1N class solar flare, which occurred in the active region NOAA 10044 on 2002 July 26. Our empha-sis is on the relationship between magnetic shear and flare shear. Flare shear is defined as the angle formed between the line connecting the centroids of the two ribbons of the flare and the line perpendicular to the magnetic neutral line. The magnetic shear is computed from vector magnetograms observed at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), while the flare shear is computed from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 1700A images. By a detailed comparison, we find that: 1) The magnetic shear and the flare shear of this event are basically consistent, as judged from the directions of the transverse mag-netic field and the line connecting the two ribbons' centroids. 2) During the period of the enhancement of magnetic shear, flare shear had a fast increase followed by a fluctuated decrease. 3) When the magnetic shear stopped its enhancement, the fluctuated decreasing behavior of the flare shear became very smooth. 4) Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes are well correlated with the unshearing peaks on the time profile of the rate of change of the flare shear. We give a discussion of the above phenomena.

  19. Quantitative modeling of multiwavelength observations of the behind the limb solar flares observed by Fermi and other instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2017-08-01

    During the current solar cycle of the Sun the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected more than 40 flares up to GeV energies, some lasting many hours contemporaneous with Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) and three that originate from active regions (AR) located behind the limb (BTL) as viewed from the Earth and detected by STEREO observations. Almost all are associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). I will give a brief overview of the observations with focus on two of the three BTL flares that show RHESSI hard X-ray and SDO EUV emission coming from the top of a relatively large flare loop peeking over the limb. Radio emission with similar light curves is also attributed to this looptop source, while the centroids of the LAT gamma-rays are some distances away. This multiwavelength coverage of the well isolated looptop (presumably near the coronal acceleration site) combined with Fermi observations provides a unique opportunity to investigate possible mechanisms and sites of acceleration of particles (corona and/or CME shock), their transport and radiative signatures (leptonic or hadronic). I will present some quantitative result on accelerated particle spectra, magnetic field values at the looptop and its structure connecting the AR to the CME and back to the LAT source.

  20. ULTRA-NARROW NEGATIVE FLARE FRONT OBSERVED IN HELIUM-10830 Å USING THE 1.6 m NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Cao, Wenda; Gary, Dale [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Ding, Mingde [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Kleint, Lucia [Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (FHNW), Institute of 4D technologies Bahnhofstr. 6, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Su, Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ji, Haisheng [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 Beijing Xi Lu, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Chae, Jongchul; Cho, Kyuhyoun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyungsuk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdae-ro 776, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He i 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg ii lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He i 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomical objects.

  1. Solar Demon – an approach to detecting flares, dimmings, and EUV waves on SDO/AIA images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraaikamp Emil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flares, dimmings, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV waves are three types of eruptive phenomena on the Sun, which are main drivers of space weather. Fast and reliable detection of these phenomena helps augment space weather predictions. In the current paper, we introduce Solar Demon, the first software that detects all three phenomena, using a modular design to exploit synergies. While Solar Demon runs in near real-time on SDO/AIA synoptic quick-look images to provide fast detections of flares, dimmings, and EUV waves for space weather purposes, it also processes new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA synoptic science images on a regular basis to build dedicated science quality catalogs. An overview of Solar Demon is given, with a focus on the algorithms for EUV wave detection and characterization. Several first results, such as flare and dimming butterfly diagrams for the rising part of Solar Cycle 24, are presented. The main advantages, challenges, and future prospects for Solar Demon are outlined in the Section 5.

  2. High Precision Full Stokes Spectropolarimetry of the Sun as a star-Instrument design aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Souvik

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field plays a major role in governing the dynamics of the sun. Many interesting features like sunspots, flares, prominences, and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) occur on its surface due to the dynamics associated with the magnetic fields. The magnetic activity exhibits spatial scales ranging from very fine scale (below the resolution limit of the current largest telescope) to large scale such as sunspots, active regions and the spatial scales as large as the sun itself. While the major efforts in building large telescopes is going on towards the goal of resolving smallest structure possible we propose here to measure the magnetic field on the global scale. For this purpose we propose an instrument to carryout high precision and high accurate spectropolarimetry of sun-as-a-star. In this thesis, we explore various instrumental design aspects that are necessary to make such observations. As part of the design consideration we have analysed a major noise source i.e. seeing induced cross-talk through si...

  3. The First Focused Hard X-ray Images of the Sun with NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Grefenstette, Brian W; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Hannah, Iain G; Smith, David M; Vogel, Julia K; White, Stephen M; Madsen, Kristin K; Marsh, Andrew J; Caspi, Amir; Chen, Bin; Shih, Albert; Kuhar, Matej; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the \\textit{Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray} ({\\em NuSTAR}) hard X-ray telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, {\\em NuSTAR} nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at hard X-ray energies ($>$3~keV) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where \\textit{NuSTAR} will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with \\textit{NuSTAR}, their limitations and complications, and the procedures developed to optimize solar data quality derived from our experience with the initial solar observations. These first observations are briefly described, including the measurement of the Fe K-shell lines in a decaying X-class flare, hard X-ray emission from high in the solar corona, and full-disk hard X-ray images of the Sun.

  4. Data-driven Simulations of Magnetic Connectivity in Behind-the-Limb Gamma-ray Flares and Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Omodei, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Recent Fermi detection of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares pose a puzzle on the particle acceleration and transport mechanisms in such events. Due to the large separation between the flare site and the location of gamma-ray emission, it is believed that the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) play an important role in accelerating and subsequently transporting particles back to the Sun to produce obseved gamma-rays. We explore this scenario by simulating the CME associated with a well-observed flare on 2014 September 1 about 40 degrees behind the east solar limb and by comparing the simulation and observational results. We utilize a data-driven global magnetohydrodynamics model (AWSoM: Alfven-wave Solar Model) to track the dynamical evolution of the global magnetic field during the event and investigate the magnetic connectivity between the CME/CME-driven shock and the Fermi emission region. Moreover, we derive the time-varying shock parameters (e.g., compression ratio, Alfven Mach number, and ThetaBN) over the area that is magnetically connected to the visible solar disk where Fermi gamma-ray emission originates. Our simulation shows that the visible solar disk develops connections both to the flare region and to the CME-driven shock during the eruption, which indicate that the CME’s interaction with the global solar corona is critical for understanding such Fermi BTL events and gamma-ray flares in general. We discuss the causes and implications of Fermi BTL events, in the framework of a potential shift of paradigm on particle acceleration in solar flares/CMEs.

  5. Optical flare observed in the flaring gamma-ray blazar S5 1044+71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Blay, Pere; Telting, John; Ojha, Roopesh

    2017-01-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar S5 1044+71, obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma, to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux (ATel#9928).

  6. Flare Ribbons In The Early Phase Of An SDO Flare: Emission Measure And Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.; Innes, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the M1.0 flare of 7th August 2010, which displayed extended early phase chromospheric ribbons, well observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI. Most large flares saturate rapidly in the high-temperature AIA channels, however this event could be followed in unsaturated AIA images for ten minutes in the build-up to and first few minutes of the impulsive phase. Analysis of GOES, RHESSI and SDO/AIA demonstrates the presence of high temperature ( 10MK), compact plasma volumes in the chromospheric flare ribbons, with a column emission measure of on average 3-7 x 1028 cm-5. We construct a time-resolved energy budget for the ribbon plasma, including also SDO/EVE data, and discuss the implications of the observed ribbon properties for flare energisation. This work was supported by the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council (ST/1001801), and by the European Commission through the FP7 HESPE project (FP7-2010-SPACE-263086).

  7. Gas flare characterisation with Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ruecker, Gernot; Tiemann, Joachim; Leimbach, David

    2017-04-01

    Gas Flaring (GF) is the process of burning waste gases at the tip of a stack. It is widely used in the upstream oil and gas industry. It is a contributor to the imbalance of the greenhouse gases (GHG) concentration in the earth's atmosphere, which prompts global warming. Besides GHG, GF also emits black carbon (BC), a known carcinogen and climate active species. At higher latitudes, GF has been estimated as the main input of atmospheric BC, alongside vegetation fires. The consideration of GF as a source to global budgets has been hindered by technical difficulties of in-situ measurements and the inexistence of a systematic reporting system. Remote sensing offers the possibility of a continuous, global and systematic monitoring of GF over extended periods. Being a high temperature process, GF can be detected from space using measurements at appropriate wavelengths. Considering 1800K as a typical GF temperature and Wien's displacement law, the peak emission will be in the short-wave infrared region. This spectral region is observed by two channels (S5 and S6) of the SLSTR instrument aboard ESA's newly launched Sentinel-3 satellite. Because of solar contamination, only night-time observations are used. In order to characterise the identified gas flares in terms of temperature and area, two Planck curves are fitted to SLSTR radiance observations in five spectral channels (S5 through S9, with F1 and F2). In this work, we present the methodology in detail as well as results for known flaring regions around the world. A comparison with VIIRS on Suomi-NPP and with HSRS on TET-1 over known GF locations is also considered.

  8. Sun-synchronous satellite orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Zhai, Shen-You

    2004-02-01

    The linearized dynamic equations used for on-board orbit determination of Sun-synchronous satellite are derived. Sun-synchronous orbits are orbits with the secular rate of the right ascension of the ascending node equal to the right ascension rate of the mean sun. Therefore the orbit is no more a closed circle but a tight helix about the Earth. In the paper, instead of treating the orbit as a closed circle, the actual helix orbit is taken as nominal trajectory. The details of the linearized equations of motion for the satellite in the Sun-synchronous orbit are derived. The linearized equations are obtained by perturbing the Keplerian motion with the J2 correction and the effect of sun's attraction being neglected. Combined with the GPS navigation equations, the Kalman filter formulation is given. The particular application considered is the circular Sun-synchronous orbit with the altitude of 800 km and inclination of 98.6°. The numerical example simulated by MATLAB® shows that only the pseudo-range data used in the algorithm still gives acceptable results. Based on the simulation results, we can use the on-board GPS receivers' signal only as an alternative to determine the orbit of Sun-Synchronous satellite and therefore circumvents the need for extensive ground support.

  9. SunPy—Python for solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SunPy Community; Mumford, Stuart J.; Christe, Steven; Pérez-Suárez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew R.; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russell J.; Mayer, Florian; Hughitt, Keith; Freij, Nabil; Meszaros, Tomas; Bennett, Samuel M.; Malocha, Michael; Evans, John; Agrawal, Ankit; Leonard, Andrew J.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Mampaey, Benjamin; Campos-Rozo, Jose Iván; Kirk, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents SunPy (version 0.5), a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy is a data-analysis environment specializing in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric data in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from missions such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and PROBA2/LYRA, and radio spectra from e-Callisto and STEREO/SWAVES. We describe SunPy's functionality, provide examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy.

  10. Searching for Missing Pieces for Solar Flare Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to uniquely predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as estimates of the magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their short-term temporal behavior, in the context of predicting flares at various thresholds. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores. This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  11. Exergy analysis of waste emissions from gas flaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Saheed ISMAIL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas flaring produces a stream of waste gases at high temperature and pressure which contains carbon monoxide, Hydrogen Sulphide etc. The resultant effect of which is detrimental to our planet and, consequently, to the life of both the living and the non-living things. It’s well known that gas flaring contributes in no small measure to the global warming. Exergy analysis is applied in this work to analyze waste emissions from gas flaring so as to have a model through which impact of gas flaring can be measured. The study considers both the thermo-mechanical exergy and the chemical exergy of these gases. Relevant data on gas flaring activities in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria between the periods of fifteen (15 years was obtained from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC. A computer program (Exergy Calculator was developed based on the equations generated in the Model. Exergy associated with gas flaring activities in Nigeria between the periods of 1998 through 2012 was calculated. The results show that 1 mscf (in thousand cubic feet of flared gases generate 0.000041 MWh of energy leading to a value of 440158.607 MWh of energy for the period under review.The analysis provides important conclusions and recommendations for improving oil platforms operationsin in order to safeguard the environment, health of the populace, and maximize recovered exergy from gas flaring.

  12. Sgr A* flares: tidal disruption of asteroids and planets?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zubovas, K.; Nayakshin, S.; Markoff, S.

    2012-01-01

    It is theoretically expected that a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the centre of a typical nearby galaxy disrupts a solar-type star every ∼105 yr, resulting in a bright flare lasting for months. Sgr A*, the resident SMBH of the Milky Way, produces (by comparison) tiny flares that last only hours

  13. Blazar Alerts with the HAWC Online Flare Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory monitors the gamma-ray sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range with > 95% uptime and unprecedented sensitivity for a survey instrument. The HAWC Collaboration has implemented an online flare monitor that detects episodes of rapid flaring activity from extragalactic very high energy (VHE) sources in the declination band from -26 to 64 degrees. This allows timely alerts to be sent to multiwavelength instruments without human intervention. The preliminary configuration of the online flare monitor achieves sensitivity to flares of at least 1 hour duration that attain an average flux of 10 times that of the Crab Nebula. While flares of this magnitude are not common, several flares reaching the level of 10 Crab have been observed in the VHE band within the past decade. With its survey capabilities and high duty cycle, HAWC will expand the observational data set on these particularly extreme flares. We characterize the sensitivity of the online flare monitor an...

  14. Kepler Flares I. Active and Inactive M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Hawley, Suzanne L; Kowalski, Adam F; Wisniewski, John P; Hebb, Leslie; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the ARC 3.5m telescope identify magnetically active (H$\\alpha$ in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early-M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of H$\\alpha$. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy dist...

  15. Development and Optimization of Flow-Cast Magnesium Flare Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-06-01

    unsaturated olefins. Resins were studied of ethylene glycol (EG) (52 percent oxgyen) and MA (49 percent); hydroxy- ethyl acrylate...CUttification LINK A I Illumination flares Flares Magnesium Sodium Nitrate Binders Epoxy resins Castable pyrotechnics Flow casting Polyester Vinyl ester UNCLASSTFTFn Security Classification ^^^. ...Lane. Major contributions were made by Erwin M. Jankowiak and Keith Roberson. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved.

  16. Hα Line Profile Asymmetries and the Chromospheric Flare Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Simões, P. J. A.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Kennedy, M.; Fletcher, L.; Graham, D.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  17. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Nita, Gelu M.; Oria, Vincent; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares represent a complicated physical phenomenon observed in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radiowaves to gamma-rays. For a complete understanding of the flares it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For efficient data search, integration of different flare lists and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely-identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and availability of observations of a particular set of instruments. Currently, data from three primary flare lists (GOES, RHESSI and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-Wind, OVSA flare catalogs, CACTus CME catalog, Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage), are integrated. An additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) along with observing summary, data links and multi-wavelength light curves is provided for each flare event since January 2002. Results of an initial statistical analysis will be presented.

  18. Type II Shocks Characteristics: Comparison with associated CMEs and Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pothitakis, G; Preka-Papadema, P; Moussas, X; Caroubalos, C; Alissandrakis, C E; Hillaris, A; Tsitsipis, P; Kontogeorgos, A; Bougeret, J -L; Dumas, G; 10.1063/1.2347985

    2010-01-01

    A number of metric (100-650 MHz) typeII bursts was recorded by the ARTEMIS-IV radiospectrograph in the 1998-2000 period; the sample includes both CME driven shocks and shocks originating from flare blasts. We study their characteristics in comparison with characteristics of associated CMEs and flares.

  19. Relationships of a growing magnetic flux region to flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadee, A.; Martin, S.F.; Bentley, R.D.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezs, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K.L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S.H.B.; Wang, J.

    1984-01-01

    Some sites for solar flares are known to develop where new magnetic flux emerges and becomes abutted against opposite polarity pre-existing magnetic flux (review by Galzauskas/1/). We have identified and analyzed the evolution of such flare sites at the boundaries of a major new and growing magnetic

  20. Flare activity on low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmelcer, L.; Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Bílek, F.; Dubovský, P.; Hoňková, K.; Vraštil, J.

    2017-04-01

    We report the discovery of optical flares on the very low-mass red-dwarf eclipsing binary GJ 3236 and the results of our 2014-2016 photometric campaign. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically in all filters for about 900 h, which has revealed a flare rate of about 0.06 flares per hour. The amplitude of its flares is the largest among those detected in the V band (∼1.3 mag), R band (∼0.8 mag), I band (∼0.2 mag) and clear band (∼0.5 mag). The light curves of GJ 3236 were analysed and the statistics of detected flare events are presented. The energy released during individual flares was calculated as up to 2.4 × 1027 J and compared with other known active stars. The cumulative distribution of flare energies appears to follow a broken power law. The flare activity of this binary also plays an important role in the precise determination of its physical parameters and evolutionary status.

  1. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 117.68 Section 117.68 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... AND ARRANGEMENTS Emergency Communications § 117.68 Distress flares and smoke signals. (a)...

  2. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 180.68 Section 180.68... signals. (a) Oceans, coastwise, limited coastwise, and Great Lakes routes. A vessel on an oceans, coastwise, limited coastwise, or Great Lakes route must carry— (1) Six hand red flare distress signals...

  3. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M.

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ-rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, RHESSI, and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-W IND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  4. Anisotropic microstructure near the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, W. A.; Grall, R. R.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1996-07-01

    Radio scattering observations provide a means of measuring a two-dimensional projection of the three-dimensional spatial spectrum of electron density, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. Earlier observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 10 Rsolar [Armstrong et al., 1990]. Earlier work has also shown that density fluctuations at scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ``background'' [Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new observations made during 1990 and 1992. These confirm the earlier work, which was restricted to one source on a few days, but they suggest that the anisotropy changes abruptly near 6 Rsolar which was not clear in the earlier data. The axial ratio measurements are shown on Figure 1 below. The new observations were made with a more uniform sampling of the spatial plane. They show that contours of constant correlation are elliptical. This is apparently inconsistent with the spatial correlation of the ISEE-3 magnetic field which shows a ``Maltese Cross'' shape [Matthaeus et al., 1990]. However this inconsistency may be only apparent: the magnetic field and density correlations need not have the same shape; the scale of the magnetic field correlations is at least 4 orders of magnitude larger; they are much further from the sun; and they are point measurements whereas ours are path-integrated. We also made two simultaneous measurements, at 10 Rsolar, of the anisotropy on scales of 200 to 4000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales, but the larger scale structure was essentially isotropic. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is independent of the larger scale isotropic turbulence. It is then tempting to speculate that the damping of this anisotropic process inside of 6 Rsolar

  5. The Sun's dusty interstellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Veerle

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's dusty interstellar environment Interstellar dust from our immediate interstellar neighborhood travels through the solar system at speeds of ca. 26 km/s: the relative speed of the solar system with respect to the local interstellar cloud. On its way, its trajectories are altered by several forces like the solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz force. The latter is due to the charged dust particles that fly through the interplanetary magnetic field. These trajectories differ per particle type and size and lead to varying fluxes and directions of the flow inside of the solar system that depend on location but also on phase in the solar cycle. Hence, these fluxes and directions depend strongly on the configuration of the inner regions and outer regions of the heliosphere. Several missions have measured this dust in the solar system directly. The Ulysses dust detector data encompasses 16 years of intestellar dust fluxes and approximate directions, Stardust captured returned to Earth a few of these particles sucessfully, and finally the Cassini dust detector allowed for compositional information to be obtained from the impacts on the instrument. In this talk, we give an overview of the current status of interstellar dust research through the measurements made inside of the solar system, and we put them in perspective to the knowledge obtained from more classical astronomical means. In special, we focus on the interaction of the dust with the interplanetary magnetic field, and on what we learn about the dust (and the fields) by comparing the available dust data to computer simulations of dust trajectories. Finally, we synthesize the different methods of observation, their results, and give a preview on new research opportunities in the coming year(s).

  6. Perspectives on the Interior of the Sun

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Μ. Chitre

    2000-09-01

    The interior of the Sun is not directly accessible to observations. Nonetheless, it is possible to infer the physical conditions inside the Sun with the help of structure equations governing its equilibrium and with the powerful observational tools provided by the neutrino fluxes and oscillation frequencies. The helioseismic data show that the internal constitution of the Sun can be adequately represented by a standard solar model. It turns out that a cooler solar core is not a viable solution for the measured deficit of neutrino fluxes, and the resolution of the solar neutrino puzzle should be sought in the realm of particle physics.

  7. The Jovian period in the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    The 41-year measurements of the Doppler effect of the photosphere performed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, discovered two periods of global oscillations of the Sun: 9600.606(12) s and 9597.929(15) s. Their beat period, 398.4(2.9) d, well agrees with a synodic orbital period of Jupiter, PJ = 398.9 d, raising a new problem for solar physics, cosmogony and cosmology. A hypothesis is advanced that the PJ beating of the Sun is induced by gravitation of Jupiter, revolving in a privileged reference system "the Sun - the Earth".

  8. Semiautomatic sun shots with the WIDIF DIflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasson, Jean L.; Hendrickx, Olivier; Marin, Jean-Luc

    2017-07-01

    The determination of magnetic declination angle entails finding two directions: geographic north and magnetic north. This paper deals with the former. The known way to do it by using the sun's calculable orientation in the sky is improved by using a device based on a WIDIF DIflux theodolite and split photocells positioned on its telescope ocular. Given the WIDIF accurate timing and location provided by the onboard GPS receiver, an astronomical computation can be effected to accurately and quickly determine the sun's azimuth and an auxiliary mark's azimuth. The precise sun's crossing of the split photocell, amplified by the telescope's magnification, allows azimuth accuracies of a few seconds of arc.

  9. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  10. EUV Flare Activity in Late-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Drake, J J; Kashyap, V L; Audard, Marc; Guedel, Manuel; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2000-01-01

    \\textit{Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer} Deep Survey observations of cool stars (spectral type F to M) have been used to investigate the distribution of coronal flare rates in energy and its relation to activity indicators and rotation parameters. Cumulative and differential flare rate distributions were constructed and fitted with different methods. Power laws are found to approximately describe the distributions. A trend toward flatter distributions for later-type stars is suggested in our sample. Assuming that the power laws continue below the detection limit, we have estimated that the superposition of flares with radiated energies of about $10^{29}-10^{31}$ergs could explain the observed radiative power loss of these coronae, while the detected flares are contributing only $\\approx 10$%. While the power-law index is not correlated with rotation parameters (rotation period, projected rotational velocity, Rossby number) and only marginally with the X-ray luminosity, the flare occurrence rate is correlated wit...

  11. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, NM 88003 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Alexander, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, TX 77005 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: czhu@nmsu.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  12. Modeling High Resolution Flare Spectra Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, G.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic response of the solar atmosphere to the release of energy during a flare has been a long standing problem in solar physics. Early time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations were able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities observed in solar flares, but were not able to model the observations in any detail. For example, these simulations could not account for the relatively slow decay of the observed emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles at flare onset. We have found that by representing the flare as a succession of independently heated filaments it is possible to reproduce both the evolution of line intensity and the shape of the line profile using hydrodynamic simulations. Here we present detailed comparisons between our simulation results and several flares observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Comparisons with 3D MHD simulations will also be discussed.

  13. The investigation of the Neupert effect in two solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Neupert effect suggests a flare model in which the nonthermal emissions are produced by energetic electrons which heat lower corona and chromosphere to produce the thermal emissions. Based on this concept, we investigate the Neupert effect to test the correlation between the hard X-ray spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area at 1600 or 171 . Using the T RACE and RHESSI observations, we explore these quantities for two solar flares, one on March 14, 2002 and the other on November 1, 2003. The negative dependence between the spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area is found, especially during the hard X-ray sub-peaks. This finding indicates that the electron-beam-driven heating plays a prominent role in the UV emission of these two flares.

  14. On the Generation of Hydrodynamic Shocks by Mixed Beams and Occurrence of Sunquakes in Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    Observations of solar flares with sunquakes by space- and ground-based instruments reveal essentially different dynamics of seismic events in different flares. Some sunquakes are found to be closely associated with the locations of hard X-ray (HXR) and white-light (WL) emission, while others are located outside either of them. In this article we investigate possible sources causing a seismic response in a form of hydrodynamic shocks produced by the injection of mixed (electron plus proton) beams, discuss the velocities of these shocks, and the depths where they deposit the bulk of their energy and momentum. The simulation of hydrodynamic shocks in flaring atmospheres induced by electron-rich and proton-rich beams reveals that the linear depth of the shock termination is shifted beneath the level of the quiet solar photosphere on a distance from 200 to 5000 km. The parameters of these atmospheric hydrodynamic shocks are used as initial condition for another hydrodynamic model developed for acoustic-wave propagation in the solar interior (Zharkov, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 431, 3414, 2013). The model reveals that the depth of energy and momentum deposition by the atmospheric shocks strongly affects the propagation velocity of the acoustic-wave packet in the interior. The locations of the first bounces from the photosphere of acoustic waves generated in the vicinity of a flare are seen as ripples on the solar surface, or sunquakes. Mixed proton-dominated beams are found to produce a strong supersonic shock at depths 200 - 300 km under the level of the quiet-Sun photosphere and in this way produce well-observable acoustic waves, while electron-dominated beams create a slightly supersonic shock propagating down to 5000 km under the photosphere. This shock can only generate acoustic waves at the top layers beneath the photosphere since the shock velocity very quickly drops below the local sound speed. The distance Δ of the first bounce of the generated acoustic waves

  15. Observations and Modelling of the Pre-flare Period of the 29 March 2014 X1 Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M. M.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Mackay, D. H.; Dacie, S.; Long, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    On 29 March 2014, NOAA Active Region (AR) 12017 produced an X1 flare that was simultaneously observed by an unprecedented number of observatories. We have investigated the pre-flare period of this flare from 14:00 UT until 19:00 UT using joint observations made by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Spectral lines providing coverage of the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona were analysed to investigate pre-flare activity within the AR. The results of the investigation have revealed evidence of strongly blue-shifted plasma flows, with velocities up to 200 km s^{-1}, being observed 40 minutes prior to flaring. These flows are located along the filament present in the active region and are both spatially discrete and transient. In order to constrain the possible explanations for this activity, we undertake non-potential magnetic field modelling of the active region. This modelling indicates the existence of a weakly twisted flux rope along the polarity inversion line in the region where a filament and the strong pre-flare flows are observed. We then discuss how these observations relate to the current models of flare triggering. We conclude that the most likely drivers of the observed activity are internal reconnection in the flux rope, early onset of the flare reconnection, or tether-cutting reconnection along the filament.

  16. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, Antoine; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-01-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick--slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global st...

  17. Magnetic Energy Release in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares are the result of a rapid release of magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. An ideal-MHD process, such as a loss of magnetic equilibrium, most likely initiates the flare, but the non-ideal process of magnetic reconnection quickly becomes the dominant mechanism by which energy is released. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of magnetic reconnection. Relatively cool plasma is observed moving slowly into the reconnection region where it is transformed into two high-temperature, high-speed outflow jets moving in opposite directions. Observations of the flow in these jets suggest that they are accelerated to the ambient Alfvén speed in a manner that resembles the reconnection process first proposed by H. E. Petschek in 1964. This result is somewhat surprising because Petschek-type reconnection does not occur in most numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection. The apparent contradiction between the observations and the simulations can be understood by the fact that most simulations assume a uniform resistivity model that is unlikely to occur in reality. Recently, we have developed a theory that shows how the type of reconnection is related to the plasma resistivity. The theory is based on a form of the time-dependent, MHD-nozzle equations that incorporate the plasma resistivity. These equations are very similar to the equations used to describe magnetized plasma flow in astrophysical jets.

  18. The Flare-ona of EK Draconis

    CERN Document Server

    Ayres, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    EK Draconis (HD 129333: G1.5 V) is a well-known young (50 Myr) solar analog. In 2012, Hubble Space Telescope returned to EK Dra to follow up a far-ultraviolet (FUV) SNAPshot visit by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) two years earlier. The brief SNAP pointing had found surprisingly redshifted, impulsively variable subcoronal "hot-line" emission of Si IV 140 nm (T~ 80,000 K). Serendipitously, the 2012 follow-on program witnessed one of the largest FUV flares ever recorded on a sunlike star, which again displayed strong redshifts (downflows) of 30-40 km/s, even after compensating for small systematics in the COS velocity scales, uncovered through a cross-calibration by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The (now reduced, but still substantial) ~10 km/s hot-line redshifts outside the flaring interval did not vary with rotational phase, so cannot be caused by "Doppler Imaging" (bright surface patches near a receding limb). Density diagnostic O IV] 140 nm multiplet line ratios of EK Dra suggest log(Ne)~ ...

  19. Finding the lost siblings of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Feltzing, Sofia; Ruchti, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a spectral analysis on 18 stars solar sibling candidate. We found that only one one of the candidateshas solar metallicity and at the same time might have an age comparable to that of the Sun.

  20. Sun and Other Types of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Causes Cancer? Sun and Other Types of Radiation Learn about the different types of radiation and ... other diseases. Learn more here. Other Types of Radiation Exposure Not all types of radiation have been ...

  1. Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, L W; Datta, P; Heydenreich, J

    2013-01-01

    Background  It has been reported that patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a second primary melanoma by limiting recreational sun exposure. Previous studies based on questionnaires and objective surrogate measurements indicate that before their diagnosis......, patients with CMM are exposed to higher ultraviolet radiation (UVR) doses than controls, followed by a reduction after diagnosis. Objectives  In a prospective, observational case-control study, we aimed to assess sun exposure after diagnosis of CMM by objective measurements to substantiate advice about sun...... months and 6 years before the start of the study. During a summer season participants filled in sun exposure diaries daily and wore personal electronic UVR dosimeters in a wristwatch that continuously measured time-stamped UVR doses in standard erythema dose. Results  The UVR dose of recently diagnosed...

  2. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  3. Nilaja Sun's "No Child...": Reflections on Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nilaja; Alexander, Phillip; Huldeen, Branden; Russell, Ron; Friedman, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Nilaja Sun's groundbreaking one-woman show about a TA, her students, and her school, and includes interviews with the author/performer, an excerpt of the work, and a discussion of the organization behind it.

  4. Developing a Construct to Evaluate Flares in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Conceptual Report of the OMERACT RA Flare Definition Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alten, Rieke; Choy, Ernest H; Christensen, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthcare professionals (HCP) recognize that episodic worsening disease activity, often described as a "flare," is a common feature of RA that can contribute to impaired function and disability. However, there is no standard definition to enable measurement...... of its intensity and impact. The conceptual framework of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Definition Working Group includes an anchoring statement, developed at OMERACT 9 in 2008: "flare in RA" is defined as worsening of signs and symptoms of sufficient intensity...... is intended to enhance patient-HCP communication. This article describes the conceptual framework being used by the OMERACT RA Flare Definition Working Group in developing a standardized method for description and measurement of "flare in RA" to guide individual patient treatment....

  5. New Views of the Sun: STEREO and Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Tsuneta, Saku; Bougeret, J.-L.; Galvin, Antoinette; Howard, R. A.; Kaiser, Michael; Thompson, W. T.

    telescopes: a visible light telescope, an X-ray telescope, and an extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer. The optical telescope has a large primary mirror measuring 50 centimeters in diameter, and is the world's largest space telescope for observing the sun and its vector magnetic fields. The impact of the Hinode optical telescope on solar physics is comparable to that of the Hubble Space Telescope on optical astronomy. Its X-ray telescope captures coronal structures in exceptional detail. The EUV imaging spectrometer possesses about ten times the sensitivity and four times the resolution of similar instruments on previous satellites. With the synergy of Hinode and STEREO, we are able to witness the entire life cycle of the solar magnetic field; namely helio-seismic observations of the subsurface flux tubes, vector magnetic observations of flux emergence and evolution by the optical telescope, flaring activity on various scales and eventual eruption in the inner corona observed by the X-ray telescope and the EUV imaging spectrometer, and their consequences in the heliosphere observed with the STEREO instruments. We look forward to the upcoming solar maximum with great expectations for a much improved understanding of how the Sun works and how it influences Earth's environment in the solar system.

  6. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  7. Optimal control of sun tracking solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. O.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the modern control theory to derive an optimal sun tracking control for a point focusing solar concentrator is presented. A standard tracking problem converted to regulator problem using a sun rate input achieves an almost zero steady state tracking error with the optimal control formulation. However, these control techniques are costly because optimal type algorithms require large computing systems, thus they will be used mainly as comparison standards for other types of control algorithms and help in their development.

  8. The Sun murrab Baltimaadesse ja Soome

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Aprillis andis ansambel Tanel Padar & The Sun Soomes, Lätis, Leedus ja Eestis üksteist kontserti. Heliplaadi "Here Gomes The Sun" lugu "Hopelessness You" on Soome raadiote tipp 300s neljakümnendal kohal, lugu "Learn the game" on Leedu FM99 raadios 33 enim mängitava loo seas, laul "One of those days" saavutas Läti raadio SWH rokkmuusika edetabelis teise koha.

  9. Study of white-light flares observed by Hinode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Min Wang

    2009-01-01

    White-light flares are considered to be the most energetic flaring events that are observable in the optical broad-band continuum of the solar spectrum. They have not been commonly observed. Observations of white-light flares with sub-arcsecond resolution have been very rare. The continuous high resolution observations of Hinode provide a unique opportunity to systematically study the white-light flares with a spatial resolution around 0.2 arcsec. We surveyed all the flares above GOES magnitude C5.0 since the launch of Hinode in 2006 October. 13 of these kinds of flares were covered by the Hinode G-band observations. We analyzed the peak contrasts and equivalent areas (calculated via integrated excess emission contrast) of these flares as a function of the GOES X-ray flux, and found that the cut-off visibility is likely around M1 flares under the observing limit of Hinode. Many other observational and physical factors should affect the visibility of white-light flares; as the observing conditions are improved, smaller flares are likely to have detectable white-light emissions. We are cautious that this limiting visibility is an overestimate, because G-band observations contain emissions from the upper atmosphere.Among the 13 events analyzed, only the M8.7 flare of 2007 June 4 had near-simultaneous observations in both the G-band and the blue continuum. The blue continuum had a peak contrast of 94% vs. 175% in G-band for this event. The equivalent area in the blue continuum is an order of magnitude lower than that in the G-band. Very recently, Jess et al.studied a C2.0 flare with a peak contrast of 300% in the blue continuum. Compared to the events presented in this letter, that event is probably an unusual white-light flare: a very small kernel with a large contrast that can be detected in high resolution observations.

  10. How to Observe the Sun Safely

    CERN Document Server

    Macdonald, Lee

    2012-01-01

    How to Observe the Sun Safely, Second Edition gives all the basic information and advice the amateur astronomer needs to get started in observing our own ever-fascinating star. Unlike many other astronomical objects, you do not need a large telescope or expensive equipment to observe the Sun. And it is possible to take excellent pictures of the Sun with today's low-cost digital cameras! This book surveys what is visible on the Sun and then describes how to record solar features and measure solar activity levels. There is also an account of how to use H-alpha and Calcium-K filters to observe and record prominences and other features of the solar chromosphere, the Sun's inner atmosphere. Because we are just entering a period of high activity on the Sun, following a long, quiet period, this is a great time to get involved with solar observing. Still emphasizing safety first, this Second Edition reflects recent and exciting advances in solar observing equipment. Chapters 6 through 8 have been completely revised ...

  11. Orientation in birds. The sun compass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Koenig, K; Ganzhorn, J U; Ranvaud, R

    1991-01-01

    The sun compass was discovered by G. Kramer in caged birds showing migratory restlessness. Subsequent experiments with caged birds employing directional training and clock shifts, carried out by Hoffman and Schmidt-Koenig, showed that the sun azimuth is used, and the sun altitude ignored. In the laboratory, McDonald found the accuracy to be +/- 3 degrees(-)+/- 5 degrees. According to Hoffmann and Schmidt-Koenig, caged birds trained at medium northern latitudes were able to allow for the sun's apparent movement north of the arctic circle, but not in equatorial and trans-equatorial latitudes. In homing experiments, and employing clock shifts, Schmidt-Koenig demonstrated that the sun compass is used by homing pigeons during initial orientation. This finding is the principal evidence for the existence of a map-and-compass navigational system. Pigeons living in equatorial latitudes utilize the sun compass even under the extreme solar conditions of equinox, achieving angular resolution of about 3 degrees in homing experiments. According to preliminary analyses, the homing pigeons' ephemerides are retarded by several weeks (Ranvaud, Schmidt-Koenig, Ganzhorn et al.).

  12. SunPy: Solar Physics in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Mumford, Stuart; Perez Suarez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russel

    2015-04-01

    SunPy is a community-developed open-source software library for solar physics. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language which is being increasingly adopted throughout the scientific community as well as further afield. This has resulted in a wide array of software packages useful for scientific computing, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy, etc.), to machine learning (scifitlearn), to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy aims to provide required specialised software for analysing solar and heliospheric datasets in Python. The current version is 0.5 with 0.6 expected to be released later this year. SunPy provides solar data access through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It supports common data types from major solar missions such as images (SDO/AIA, STEREO, PROBA2/SWAP etc.), time series (GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, PROBA2/LYRA), and radio spectra (e-Callisto, STEREO/WAVES). SunPy’s code base is publicly available through github.com and can be contributed to by anyone. In this poster we demonstrate SunPy’s functionality and future goals of the project. We also encourage interested users to become involved in further developing SunPy.

  13. TESIS experiment on EUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Bogachev, S. A.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Pertsov, A. A.; Ignatiev, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Sukhodrev, N. K.; Bugaenko, O. I.

    2009-03-01

    TESIS is a set of solar imaging instruments in development by the Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, to be launched aboard the Russian spacecraft CORONAS-PHOTON in December 2008. The main goal of TESIS is to provide complex observations of solar active phenomena from the transition region to the inner and outer solar corona with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution in the EUV and Soft X-ray spectral bands. TESIS includes five unique space instruments: the MgXII Imaging Spectroheliometer (MISH) with spherical bent crystal mirror, for observations of the Sun in the monochromatic MgXII 8.42 Å line; the EUV Spectoheliometer (EUSH) with grazing incidence difraction grating, for the registration of the full solar disc in monochromatic lines of the spectral band 280-330 Å; two Full-disk EUV Telescopes (FET) with multilayer mirrors covering the band 130-136 and 290-320 Å; and the Solar EUV Coronagraph (SEC), based on the Ritchey-Chretien scheme, to observe the inner and outer solar corona from 0.2 to 4 solar radii in spectral band 290-320 Å. TESIS experiment will start at the rising phase of the 24th cycle of solar activity. With the advanced capabilities of its instruments, TESIS will help better understand the physics of solar flares and high-energy phenomena and provide new data on parameters of solar plasma in the temperature range 10-10K. This paper gives a brief description of the experiment, its equipment, and its scientific objectives.

  14. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Crosby

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc. describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC, also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988, to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  15. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, N. B.

    2011-11-01

    The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events) where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc.) describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC), also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988), to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  16. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  17. Modelling combustion reactions for gas flaring and its resulting emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saheed Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flaring of associated petroleum gas is an age long environmental concern which remains unabated. Flaring of gas maybe a very efficient combustion process especially steam/air assisted flare and more economical than utilization in some oil fields. However, it has serious implications for the environment. This study considered different reaction types and operating conditions for gas flaring. Six combustion equations were generated using the mass balance concept with varying air and combustion efficiency. These equations were coded with a computer program using 12 natural gas samples of different chemical composition and origin to predict the pattern of emission species from gas flaring. The effect of key parameters on the emission output is also shown. CO2, CO, NO, NO2 and SO2 are the anticipated non-hydrocarbon emissions of environmental concern. Results show that the quantity and pattern of these chemical species depended on percentage excess/deficiency of stoichiometric air, natural gas type, reaction type, carbon mass content, impurities, combustion efficiency of the flare system etc. These emissions degrade the environment and human life, so knowing the emission types, pattern and flaring conditions that this study predicts is of paramount importance to governments, environmental agencies and the oil and gas industry.

  18. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  19. Halpha line profile asymmetries and the chromospheric flare velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Simões, P J A; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Carlsson, M; Jafarzadeh, S; Allred, J C; Kowalski, A F; Kennedy, M; Fletcher, L; Graham, D; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Halpha and Ca II 8542 {\\AA} lines are studied using high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Halpha line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum, and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesise spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Halpha is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, w...

  20. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  1. Ending emissions: Industry targets venting, while flaring progress lauded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, N.

    2003-06-01

    The progress achieved by the multi-stakeholder solution gas flaring reduction program in Alberta is discussed. The program was initiated in 1999 by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB); within the first three years upstream flaring of solution gas was reduced by 53 per cent. Progress has also been made in reducing volumes of solution gas venting: between 1996 and 2001, there has been a 32 per cent reduction in combined flared and vented volumes of solution gas. Well test flaring has also been reduced by reduced test durations and volumes, to wit: there has been a 3 per cent reduction in flaring volumes while well tests have increased by 23 per cent. At gas plants, the decrease in flaring and venting amounted to 19 per cent, attributed mostly to industry response to the EUB's Guide 60, which incorporates many of the recommendations of the 2002 report and recommendations of the Flaring/Venting Project Team of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA).

  2. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  3. Differential rotation, flares and coronae in A to M stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balona, L. A.; Švanda, M.; Karlický, M.

    2016-08-01

    Kepler data are used to investigate flares in stars of all spectral types. There is a strong tendency across all spectral types for the most energetic flares to occur among the most rapidly rotating stars. Differential rotation could conceivably play an important role in enhancing flare energies. This idea was investigated, but no correlation could be found between rotational shear and the incidence of flares. Inspection of Kepler light curves shows that rotational modulation is very common over the whole spectral type range. Using the rotational light amplitude, the size distribution of starspots was investigated. Our analysis suggests that stars with detectable flares have spots significantly larger than non-flare stars, indicating that flare energies are correlated with the size of the active region. Further evidence of the existence of spots on A stars is shown by the correlation between the photometric period and the projected rotational velocity. The existence of spots indicates the presence of magnetic fields, but the fact that A stars lack coronae implies that surface convection is a necessary condition for the formation of the corona.

  4. Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-01-01

    The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

  5. Evolution of flare ribbons, electric currents, and quasi-separatrix layers during an X-class flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, M.; Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; Tassev, S.; Millholland, S.; Bommier, V.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.; Dougan, F.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The standard model for eruptive flares has been extended to three dimensions (3D) in the past few years. This model predicts typical J-shaped photospheric footprints of the coronal current layer, forming at similar locations as the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). Such a morphology is also found for flare ribbons observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) band, and in nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic field extrapolations and models. Aims: We study the evolution of the photospheric traces of the current density and flare ribbons, both obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory instruments. We aim to compare their morphology and their time evolution, before and during the flare, with the topological features found in a NLFFF model. Methods: We investigated the photospheric current evolution during the 06 September 2011 X-class flare (SOL2011-09-06T22:20) occurring in NOAA AR 11283 from observational data of the magnetic field obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compared this evolution with that of the flare ribbons observed in the EUV filters of the Atmospheric Imager Assembly. We also compared the observed electric current density and the flare ribbon morphology with that of the QSLs computed from the flux rope insertion method-NLFFF model. Results: The NLFFF model shows the presence of a fan-spine configuration of overlying field lines, due to the presence of a parasitic polarity, embedding an elongated flux rope that appears in the observations as two parts of a filament. The QSL signatures of the fan configuration appear as a circular flare ribbon that encircles the J-shaped ribbons related to the filament ejection. The QSLs, evolved via a magnetofrictional method, also show similar morphology and evolution as both the current ribbons and the EUV flare ribbons obtained several times during the flare. Conclusions: For the first time, we propose a combined analysis of the photospheric

  6. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  7. Patient-self assessment of flare in rheumatoid arthritis: translation and reliability of the Flare instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maribo, Thomas; de Thurah, Annette; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    The Flare instrument (FI) is a French self-administrated questionnaire used to identify flares in disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In addition to a total score, the FI has two subscales: one relating to joint symptoms and one relating to general symptoms. The objective of this study was to translate and adapt the French FI into Danish and to determine the reliability of the FI in a consecutive cohort of patients with RA. The FI was translated according to international guidelines, tested among 10 patients and 5 health professionals, and adapted. Test-retest reliability was determined by the standard error of the measurement (SEM) and the intra class correlation coefficients (ICC). The FI was administered to 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis from an outpatient clinic of a university hospital and re-administered after 10 days. The patients had a mean age of 65.3 years (SD 12.0) and mean disease duration of 18.1 years (range 2-47 years). We found an excellent reliability with ICC higher than 0.95 and SEM between 0.44 and 0.63. Best reliability was found in the total FI score. Thus, the results of the present study show that the FI is a feasible and reliable tool for evaluation of flares in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. A model for the recurrent flares in EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Brown, D. A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that nonsteady hydrodynamical flows associated with mass and angular momentum capture by a neutron star during a mass ejection phase from a Be star can produce flares with remarkable resemblance to those observed during an outburst from the X-ray transient pulsar EXO 2030 + 375. To reproduce the recurrent time scale of the flares, the velocity of the outflowing matter is estimated to be about 550 km/s. Since the theoretical model requires that a transient disk circulating in one direction is followed by a transient disk circulating in the opposite direction, the time derivative of the pulse period is expected to change sign after each flare event.

  9. Numerical RHD simulations of flaring chromosphere with Flarix

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzel, P; Varady, M; Karlicky, M; Moravec, Z

    2016-01-01

    Flarix is a radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) code for modeling of the response of the chromosphere to a beam bombardment during solar flares. It solves the set of hydrodynamic conservation equations coupled with non-LTE equations of radiative transfer. The simulations are driven by high energy electron beams. We present results of the Flarix simulations of a flaring loop relevant to the problem of continuum radiation during flares. In particular we focus on properties of the hydrogen Balmer continuum which was recently detected by IRIS.

  10. Automated flare prediction using the AdaBoost algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Shi Lan; Yong Jiang; Liu-Guan Ding; Jian-Wei Yang

    2012-01-01

    We propose a flare prediction method based on the AdaBoost algorithm,which constructs a strong prediction model from a combination of several basic models.Three predictors,extracted from the photospheric magnetograms,are applied as features to predict the occurrence of flares with a certain level over 24 hours following the time when the magnetogram is recorded.To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method,comparisons of experimental results with respect to some existing methods are given.The results show that an improvement is achieved in predicting the occurrences of large flares.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare triggered by a spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Nares, Eduardo; López Iñiguez, Alvaro; Ontiveros Mercado, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with a relapsing and remitting course characterized by disease flares. Flares are a major cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Some triggers for these exacerbations have been identified, including infections, vaccines, pregnancy, environmental factors such as weather, stress and drugs. We report a patient who presented with a lupus flare with predominantly mucocutaneous, serosal and cardiac involvement after being bitten by a spider and we present the possible mechanisms by which the venom elicited such a reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature.

  12. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares. II - Spectroscopic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Doschek, George A.; Devore, C. Richard

    1989-01-01

    Physical parameters obtained for a flaring solar atmosphere in an earlier paper are used here to predict time-dependent emission-line profiles and integrated intensities as a function of position for two spectral lines commonly observed during solar flares: the X-ray resonance lines of Ca XIX and Mg XI. Considerations of ionization nonequilibrium during the rise phase of the flare are addressed, and the effects on the predicted spectral-line characteristics are discussed. It is concluded that some spectroscopic diagnostics favor the nonlocal model, but other long-standing discrepancies between the numerical models and the observations remain unresolved.

  13. A Review of Flaring and Venting at UK Offshore Oilfields

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jamie R

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to re-address the issue of flaring and venting of reproduced gases in carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2EOR) projects. Whilst a number of studies have not recognised the impact of flaring/venting in CO2EOR developments, a study completed at Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (SCCS) “Carbon Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery” highlighted the significant control that flaring/venting of reproduced gases may have on a projects life cycle greenhouse gas emi...

  14. On the triggering of a spotless double-ribbon flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausaria, R. R.; Aleem, S. M.; Sundara Raman, K.

    1992-11-01

    We have studied the evolution of the double-ribbon, spotless flare of 21 February, 1992, using Kodaikanal H-alpha and Kfl observations. The analysis of the data shows that the H-alpha filament underwent a large change in shear prior to the day of the onset of the flare. We find considerable rotation of the plage region before the emergence of a small magnetic pore. It is concluded that shear plays an important role in the triggering of a spotless flare.

  15. Plasma Astrophysics, part II Reconnection and Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Somov, Boris V

    2007-01-01

    This well-illustrated monograph is devoted to classic fundamentals, current practice, and perspectives of modern plasma astrophysics. The first part is unique in covering all the basic principles and practical tools required for understanding and working in plasma astrophysics. The second part presents the physics of magnetic reconnection and flares of electromagnetic origin in space plasmas within the solar system; single and double stars, relativistic objects, accretion disks, and their coronae are also covered. This book is designed mainly for professional researchers in astrophysics. However, it will also be interesting and useful to graduate students in space sciences, geophysics, as well as advanced students in applied physics and mathematics seeking a unified view of plasma physics and fluid mechanics.

  16. On the energy release in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pustil'nik, L A; Beskrovnaya, N G; 10.1063/1.3701351

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution observations show the fine structure of the global equilibrium magnetic field configuration in solar atmosphere to be essentially different from that assumed in the traditional 'potential + force-free' field scenarios. The interacting large-scale structures of fine field elements are separated by numerous non-force-free elements (tangential discontinuities) which are neglected in the traditional field picture. An incorporation of these elements into the model implies a dynamical rather than statical character of equilibrium of the field configuration. A transition of the system into flaring can be triggered by the ballooning mode of flute instability of prominences or/and coronal condensations. Tearing-mode and MHD instabilities as well as the effects of overheating of the turbulent current sheet prevent the field from stationary reconnection as it is adopted in the traditional scenario. We speculate around the assumption that the energy release in active regions is governed by the same scenar...

  17. Modern observations and models of Solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    As well known, that fast particles propagating along flare loop generate bremsstrahlung hard x-ray emission and gyro-synchrotron microwave emission. We present the self-consistent kinetic description of propagation accelerated particles. The key point of this approach is taking into account the effect of reverse current. In our two-dimensional model the electric field of reverse current has the strong influence to the beam of accelerated particles. It decelerates part of the electrons in the beam and turns back other part of them without significant energy loss. The exact analytical solution for the appropriate kinetic equation with Landau collision integral was found. Using derived distribution function of electrons we’ve calculated evolution of their energy spectrum and plasma heating, coronal microwave emission and characteristics of hard x-ray emission in the corona and in the chromosphere. All results were compared with modern high precision space observations.

  18. Simultaneous optical and radio observations of flare stars in the Pleiades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovmassian, H.M.; Haro, G.; Webber, J.C.; Swenson, G.W. Jr.; Yang, K.S.; Yoss, K.M.; Deming, D.; Green, R.F.

    1974-01-01

    Simultaneous optical (at Tonantzintla, Palomar, and Prairie Observatories) and radio (at the Vermilion River and Owens Valley Radio Observatories) observations of the flare stars in the Pleiades cluster were made from October 1 to 6, 1972. Eleven optical flare-ups were detected. One large flare-up (greater than 8/sup m/ in U) was accompanied by radio flare at 170 MHz. The ratio of optical to radio energy output of this flare is about 6 . 10/sup 2/.

  19. Identifying Preliminary Domains to Detect and Measure Rheumatoid Arthritis Flares: Report of the OMERACT 10 RA Flare Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Clifton O; Alten, Rieke; Bartlett, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    Background. While disease flares in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are a recognized aspect of the disease process, there is limited formative research to describe them. METHODS: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Definition Working Group is conducting an internatio......Background. While disease flares in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are a recognized aspect of the disease process, there is limited formative research to describe them. METHODS: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Definition Working Group is conducting...... an international research project to understand the specific characteristics and impact of episodic disease worsening, or "flare," so that outcome measures can be developed or modified to reflect this uncommonly measured, but very real and sometimes disabling RA disease feature. Patient research partners provided...... was identified as a component of the research agenda needed to establish criterion validity for a flare definition; this can be used in prospective studies to further evaluate the Discrimination and Feasibility components of the OMERACT filter for a flare outcome measure. CONCLUSION: Our work to date has...

  20. The first observed stellar X-ray flare oscillation: Constraints on the flare loop length and the magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra-Kraev, U; Williams, D R; Kraev, E

    2005-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observation of an oscillation during a stellar flare. The flare occurred on the active M-type dwarf AT Mic and was observed with XMM-Newton. The soft X-ray light curve (0.2-12 keV) is investigated with wavelet analysis. The flare's extended, flat peak shows clear evidence for a damped oscillation with a period of around 750 s, an exponential damping time of around 2000 s, and an initial, relative peak-to-peak amplitude of around 15%. We suggest that the oscillation is a standing magneto-acoustic wave tied to the flare loop, and find that the most likely interpretation is a longitudinal, slow-mode wave, with a resulting loop length of (2.5 +- 0.2) e10 cm. The local magnetic field strength is found to be (105 +- 50) G. These values are consistent with (oscillation-independent) flare cooling time models and pressure balance scaling laws. Such a flare oscillation provides an excellent opportunity to obtain coronal properties like the size of a flare loop or the local magnetic field stre...