WorldWideScience

Sample records for sun earth solar

  1. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): a mission at the Sun-Earth L5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, Joseph M.; Auchère, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    . The Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO) is a proposed mission to be located at the Sun-Earth L5 that overcomes these deficiencies. The mission concept was recently studied at the Mission Design Laboratory (MDL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, to see how the mission can be implemented...

  2. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  3. The Sun to the Earth - and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The sun is the source of energy for life on earth and is the strongest modulator of the human physical environment. In fact, the Sun's influence extends throughout the solar system, both through photons, which provide heat, light, and ionization, and through the continuous outflow of a magnetized, supersonic ionized gas known as the solar wind. While the accomplishments of the past decade have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. The Sun to the Earth--and Beyond organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond. While the accomplishments of the past decades have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. This report organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond: Challenge 1: Understanding the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior, the generation of solar magnetic fields, the origin of the solar cycle, the causes of solar activity, and the structure and dynamics of the corona. Challenge 2: Understanding heliospheric structure, the distribution of magnetic fields and matter throughout the solar system, and the interaction of the solar atmosphere with the local interstellar medium. Challenge 3: Understanding the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies and their dynamical response to external and internal influences. Challenge 4: Understanding the basic physical principles manifest

  4. Modeling the Young Sun's Solar Wind and its Interaction with Earth's Paleomagnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sterenborg, M Glenn; Drake, Jeremy J; Gombosi, Tamas I; 10.1029/2010JA016036

    2011-01-01

    We present a focused parameter study of solar wind - magnetosphere interaction for the young Sun and Earth, $~3.5$ Ga ago, that relies on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations for both the solar wind and the magnetosphere. By simulating the quiescent young Sun and its wind we are able to propagate the MHD simulations up to Earth's magnetosphere and obtain a physically realistic solar forcing of it. We assess how sensitive the young solar wind is to changes in the coronal base density, sunspot placement and magnetic field strength, dipole magnetic field strength and the Sun's rotation period. From this analysis we obtain a range of plausible solar wind conditions the paleomagnetosphere may have been subject to. Scaling relationships from the literature suggest that a young Sun would have had a mass flux different from the present Sun. We evaluate how the mass flux changes with the aforementioned factors and determine the importance of this and several other key solar and magnetospheric variables with respect t...

  5. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Sun is enveloped by a hot, tenuous million-degree corona that expands to create a continuous solar wind that sweeps past all the planets and fills the heliosphere. The solar wind is modulated by strong gusts that are initiated by powerful explosions on the Sun, including solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This dynamic, invisible outer atmosphere of the Sun is currently under observation with the soft X-ray telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft, whose results are presented. We also show observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that is now passing over the solar pole, sampling the solar wind in this region for the first time. Two other spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have recently detected the outer edge of the invisible heliosphere, roughly halfway to the nearest star. Magnetic solar activity, the total radiative output from the Sun, and the Earth's mean global surface temperature all vary with the 11-year sunspot cycle in which the total number of sunspots varies from a maximum to a minimum and back to a maximum again in about 11 years. The terrestrial magnetic field hollows out a protective magnetic cavity, called the magnetosphere, within the solar wind. This protection is incomplete, however, so the Sun feeds an unseen world of high-speed particles and magnetic fields that encircle the Earth in space. These particles endanger spacecraft and astronauts, and also produce terrestrial aurorae. An international flotilla of spacecraft is now sampling the weak points in this magnetic defense. Similar spacecraft have also discovered a new radiation belt, in addition to the familiar Van Allen belts, except fed by interstellar ions instead of electrons and protons from the Sun.

  6. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2009-01-01

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

  7. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  8. Solar radiation pressure used for formation flying control around the Sun-Earth libration point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-ping GONG; Jun-feng LI; He-xi BAOYIN

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is used to control the formation flying around the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Formation flying control around a halo orbit requires a very small thrust that cannot be satisfied by the latest thrusters. The key contribution of this paper is that the continuous low thrust is produced by solar radiation pressure to achieve the tight formation flying around the libration point. However, only certain families of formation types can be controlled by solar radiation pressure since the direction of solar radiation pressure is restricted to a certain range. Two types of feasible formations using solar radiation pressure control are designed. The conditions of feasible formations are given analytically. Simulations are presented for each case, and the results show that the formations are well controlled by solar radiation pressure.

  9. Rieger-type periodicities on the Sun and the Earth during solar cycles 21 and 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H. G.; Lopes, I.

    2017-03-01

    Rieger-type periods of the magnetic sunspot area time series have been found in two atmospheric time-series variables: neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric potential gradient. The data considered comprises two solar cycles (21, 22) and spans from 1978 to 1990. The study reveals the existence of similar and correlated features in sunspot area as well as neutron counts and atmospheric electric potential gradient, favoring the possibility that the Sun's activity affects the Earth's atmosphere and weather at a time scale between 150-300 days. Moreover, five different Rieger-type periods in the sunspot area time series are found, four of which are detected in the neutron monitor count rate, and three in the atmospheric electric potential gradient. These values are consistent with the periods predicted for stationary solar Rossby waves existing inside the Sun. The possibility is discussed that instabilities on the solar magnetic field caused by solar Rossby waves in the Sun's interior might indirectly be affecting the activity of the heliosphere and the Earth's atmosphere.

  10. THE MAJOR GEOEFFECTIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS OF 2012 MARCH 7: COMPREHENSIVE SUN-TO-EARTH ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patsourakos, S.; Nindos, A.; Kouloumvakos, A. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, Section of Astrogeophysics, Ioannina (Greece); Georgoulis, M. K.; Gontikakis, C.; Moraitis, K.; Syntelis, P. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Vourlidas, A. [Space Physics Division, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD (United States); Sarris, T.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Pavlos, G.; Sarafopoulos, D. [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Xanthi (Greece); Anastasiadis, A.; Tsironis, C. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Chintzoglou, G. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Daglis, I. A.; Katsavrias, C. [Department of Physics, University of Athens (Greece); Hatzigeorgiu, N. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Nieves-Chinchilla, T. [IACS/CUA at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Heliospheric Physics Lab, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2016-01-20

    During the interval 2012 March 7–11 the geospace experienced a barrage of intense space weather phenomena including the second largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far. Significant ultra-low-frequency wave enhancements and relativistic-electron dropouts in the radiation belts, as well as strong energetic-electron injection events in the magnetosphere were observed. These phenomena were ultimately associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km s{sup −1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), linked to two X-class flares launched on early 2012 March 7. Given that both powerful events originated from solar active region NOAA 11429 and their onsets were separated by less than an hour, the analysis of the two events and the determination of solar causes and geospace effects are rather challenging. Using satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions a synergistic Sun-to-Earth study of diverse observational solar, interplanetary and magnetospheric data sets was performed. It was found that only the second CME was Earth-directed. Using a novel method, we estimated its near-Sun magnetic field at 13 R{sub ⊙} to be in the range [0.01, 0.16] G. Steep radial fall-offs of the near-Sun CME magnetic field are required to match the magnetic fields of the corresponding interplanetary CME (ICME) at 1 AU. Perturbed upstream solar-wind conditions, as resulting from the shock associated with the Earth-directed CME, offer a decent description of its kinematics. The magnetospheric compression caused by the arrival at 1 AU of the shock associated with the ICME was a key factor for radiation-belt dynamics.

  11. Minimum time solar sailing from geosynchronous orbit to the sun-earth L2 point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Sun H.; Bryson, Arthur E., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    An approximate time-optimal of a solar sail from a geosynchronous orbit to the sun-earth L2 libration point is found using a combined method of local optimization and single shooting. The local optimization strategy is based on maximizing the time rate of change of an energy variable at each time. This strategy overcomes the numerical difficulties associated with solving optimal control problems of long duration like the solar sail transfer problem. The single shooting portion of the method is employed to meet the terminal constraints. The combined method can be applied to other optimal low thrust transfer problems of long duration.

  12. Solar power satellites: our next generation of satellites will deliver the sun's energy to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flournoy, Don M.

    2009-12-01

    The paper addresses the means for gathering energy from sunlight in space and transmitting it to Earth via Solar Power Satellites. The motivating factor is that the output of our sun is the largest potential energy source available, with the capability of providing inexhaustible quantities of clean electrical energy to every location on Earth. The challenge is that considerable financial, intellectual and diplomatic resources must be focused on designing and implementing new types of energy infrastructures in space and on the ground. These include: 1) next-generation space platforms, arrays, and power transmission systems; 2) more flexible and powerful launch vehicles for delivering materials to space; 3) specialized receivers, converters and storage systems on earth, and the in-orbit position allocations, spectrum and software that make these systems work together efficiently and safely.

  13. Sun-to-Earth Analysis of a Major Geoeffective Solar Eruption within the Framework of the

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Vlahos, L.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Nindos, A.; Podladchikova, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Daglis, I.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Sarris, M.; Sarris, T.

    2013-09-01

    Transient expulsions of gigantic clouds of solar coronal plasma into the interplanetary space in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and sudden, intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation, solar flares, are well-established drivers of the variable Space Weather. Given the innate, intricate links and connections between the solar drivers and their geomagnetic effects, synergistic efforts assembling all pieces of the puzzle along the Sun-Earth line are required to advance our understanding of the physics of Space Weather. This is precisely the focal point of the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) under the THALIS Programme. Within the HNSWRN framework, we present here the first results from a coordinated multi-instrument case study of a major solar eruption (X5.4 and X1.3 flares associated with two ultra-fast (>2000 km/s) CMEs) which were launched early on 7 March 2012 and triggered an intense geomagnetic storm (min Dst =-147 nT) approximately two days afterwards. Several elements of the associated phenomena, such as the flare and CME, EUV wave, WL shock, proton and electron event, interplanetary type II radio burst, ICME and magnetic cloud and their spatiotemporal relationships and connections are studied all way from Sun to Earth. To this end, we make use of satellite data from a flotilla of solar, heliospheric and magnetospheric missions and monitors (e.g., SDO, STEREO, WIND, ACE, Herschel, Planck and INTEGRAL). We also present our first steps toward formulating a cohesive physical scenario to explain the string of the observables and to assess the various physical mechanisms than enabled and gave rise to the significant geoeffectiveness of the eruption.

  14. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  15. Transfer orbits to L4 with a solar sail in the Earth-Sun system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrés, Ariadna

    2017-08-01

    Solar sails are enablers for long interplanetary transfers, but also offer many advantages in Libration Point Orbits missions. The extra effect of the Solar Radiation Pressure allows a space vehicle, by changing the sail orientation, to be artificially displaced from the classical Lagrangian equilibrium points, L1 , … ,L5 , as well perturbed from the Lyapunov, Halo and Lissajous orbits that appear around them. Most of these equilibrium points are linearly unstable and have stable and unstable invariant manifolds associated with them. In this paper we explore the possibilities that these invariant manifolds offer to navigate in a natural way around a circular, restricted, three-body system. We take the Earth-Sun Restricted Three Body Problem as a model and, for different fixed sail orientations, we compute the stable and unstable manifolds associated with the equilibrium points of the system. We find natural trajectories that allow the vehicle to move around the family of equilibria in a controlled way and to go from a region close to L1 or L2 to a region close to L4.

  16. The effects of oblateness and solar radiation pressure on halo orbits in the photogravitational Sun-Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a third-order analytic approximate solution using the Lindstedt-Poincare method in the photogravitational circular restricted three body problem considering the Sun as a radiating source and the Earth as an oblate spheroid for computing halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Further, the well-known differential correction and continuation schemes are used to compute halo orbits and their families numerically. The effects of solar radiation pressure and oblateness on the orbit are studied around both Lagrangian points. From the study, it is noticed that time period of the halo orbit increases around L1 and L2 accounting oblateness of the Earth and solar radiation pressure of the Sun. It is also found that stability of halo orbits is a weak function of the out-of-plane amplitude and mass reduction factor.

  17. The Sun Rises on the Solar Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Reyaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Energy from the sun is abundant and free. Solar energy is in essence electromagnetic radiation emitted from the sun. Earth's climate, hydrologic systems, and ecosystems all derive from the sun. Other forms of renewable power such as wind, wave, biomass, and hydro are an indirect function of solar radiation.

  18. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  19. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Series of three US satellites designed to study the solar wind and its interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere. ISEE-1 and 2 were placed into highly elliptical Earth orbits. ISEE-3 was placed in a halo orbit at the L1 Lagrangian point between the Sun and Earth. It gave advance warning of solar storms heading towards Earth. (See also INTERNATIONAL COMETARY EXPLORER and EXPLORER.)...

  20. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A Potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.; Sittler, E. C.; Auchere, F.; Duvall, Jr. T. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Maksimovic, M.; MacDowall, R. J.; Szabo, A.; Collier, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific rationale for an L5 mission and a partial list of key scientific instruments the mission should carry. The L5 vantage point provides an unprecedented view of the solar disturbances and their solar sources that can greatly advance the science behind space weather. A coronagraph and a heliospheric imager at L5 will be able to view CMEs broadsided, so space speed of the Earth-directed CMEs can be measured accurately and their radial structure discerned. In addition, an inner coronal imager and a magnetograph from L5 can give advance information on active regions and coronal holes that will soon rotate on to the solar disk. Radio remote sensing at low frequencies can provide information on shock-driving CMEs, the most dangerous of all CMEs. Coordinated helioseismic measurements from the Sun Earth line and L5 provide information on the physical conditions at the base of the convection zone, where solar magnetism originates. Finally, in situ measurements at L5 can provide information on the large-scale solar wind structures (corotating interaction regions (CIRs)) heading towards Earth that potentially result in adverse space weather.

  1. A small mission concept to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavraud, B.; Liu, Y.; Segura, K.; He, J.; Qin, G.; Temmer, M.; Vial, J.-C.; Xiong, M.; Davies, J. A.; Rouillard, A. P.; Pinto, R.; Auchère, F.; Harrison, R. A.; Eyles, C.; Gan, W.; Lamy, P.; Xia, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kong, L.; Wang, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zhang, S.; Zong, Q.; Soucek, J.; An, J.; Prech, L.; Zhang, A.; Rochus, P.; Bothmer, V.; Janvier, M.; Maksimovic, M.; Escoubet, C. P.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Tappin, J.; Vainio, R.; Poedts, S.; Dunlop, M. W.; Savani, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Bale, S. D.; Li, G.; Howard, T.; DeForest, C.; Webb, D.; Lugaz, N.; Fuselier, S. A.; Dalmasse, K.; Tallineau, J.; Vranken, D.; Fernández, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a concept for a small mission to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather science. The proposed INvestigation of Solar-Terrestrial Activity aNd Transients (INSTANT) mission is designed to identify how solar coronal magnetic fields drive eruptions, mass transport and particle acceleration that impact the Earth and the heliosphere. INSTANT is the first mission designed to (1) obtain measurements of coronal magnetic fields from space and (2) determine coronal mass ejection (CME) kinematics with unparalleled accuracy. Thanks to innovative instrumentation at a vantage point that provides the most suitable perspective view of the Sun-Earth system, INSTANT would uniquely track the whole chain of fundamental processes driving space weather at Earth. We present the science requirements, payload and mission profile that fulfill ambitious science objectives within small mission programmatic boundary conditions.

  2. Sun-Earth Day Connects History, Culture and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.; Thieman, J.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education forum annually promotes and event called Sun-Earth Day: a national celebration of the Sun, the space around the Earth (geospace), and how all of it affects life on our planet. For the past 3 years this event has provided a venue by which classrooms, museums, planetaria, and at NASA centers have had a sensational time sharing stories, images, and activities related to the Sun-Earth connections and the views o fthe Sun from Earth. Each year we select a different theme by which NASA Space Science can be further related to cross-curricular activities. Sun-Earth Day 2002, "Celebrate the Equinox", drew parallels between Native American Cultures and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection research via cultural stories, interviews, web links, activities and Native American participation. Sun-Earth Day 2003, "Live From the Aurora", shared the beauty of the Aurora through a variety of activities and stories related to perspectives of Northern Peoples. Sun-Earth Day 2004 will share the excitement of the transit of Venus through comparisons of Venus with Earth and Mars, calculations of the distances to nearby stars, and the use of transits to identify extra-solar planets. Finally, Sun-Earth Day 2005 will bring several of these themes together by turning our focus to the history and culture surrounding ancient observatories such as Chaco Canyon, Machu Picchu, and Chichen Itza.

  3. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  4. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  5. Sun-Earth Day 2005: Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J. R.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.; Hawkins, I.; Odenwald, S.; Mayo, L.

    2005-05-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) annually promotes an event called Sun-Earth Day. For Sun-Earth Day 2005 SECEF has selected a theme called "Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge. This year's Sun-Earth Day theme is your ticket to a fascinating journey through time as we explore centuries of sun watching by a great variety of cultures. From ancient solar motion tracking to modern solar activity monitoring the Sun has always occupied an important spot in mankind's quest to understand the Universe. Sun-Earth Day events usually are centered on the spring equinox around March 21, but this year there has already been a webcast from the San Francisco Exploratorium and the Native American ruins at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico on the day of winter solstice 2004. There will be another webcast on March 20 live from Chichen Itza, Mexico highlighting the solar alignment that makes a serpent appear on one of the ancient pyramids. The website http://sunearthday.nasa.gov has been developed to provide the necessary resources and opportunities for participation by scientists and educators in giving school or general public programs about Sun-Earth Day. The goal is to involve as much of the student population and the public in this event as possible and to help them understand the importance of the Sun for ancient and modern peoples. Through engaging activities available on the website, classrooms and museums can create their own event or participate in one of the opportunities we make available. Scientists, educators, amateur astronomers, and museums are invited to register on the website to receive a free packet of materials about Sun-Earth Day for use in making presentations or programs about the event. Past and future Sun-Earth Days will be discussed as well.

  6. The Sun: the Earth light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  7. New insight into Earth's weather through studies of Sun's magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  8. Evolution of the solar activity over time and effects on planetary atmospheres. II. kappa^1 Ceti, an analog of the Sun when life arose on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, I; Ferreira, L D; Hebrard, E; Selsis, F; Catalan, S; Garces, A; Nascimento, J D do; de Medeiros, J R

    2010-01-01

    The early evolution of Earth's atmosphere and the origin of life took place at a time when physical conditions at the Earth where radically different from its present state. The radiative input from the Sun was much enhanced in the high-energy spectral domain, and in order to model early planetary atmospheres in detail, a knowledge of the solar radiative input is needed. We present an investigation of the atmospheric parameters, state of evolution and high-energy fluxes of the nearby star kap^1 Cet, previously thought to have properties resembling those of the early Sun. Atmospheric parameters were derived from the excitation/ionization equilibrium of Fe I and Fe II, profile fitting of Halpha and the spectral energy distribution. The UV irradiance was derived from FUSE and HST data, and the absolute chromospheric flux from the Halpha line core. From careful spectral analysis and the comparison of different methods we propose for kap^1 Cet the following atmospheric parameters: Teff = 5665+/-30 K (Halpha profil...

  9. Sun-Earth Day - Teaching Heliophysics Through Education Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.

    2010-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day (SED) is an Education and Outreach program supported by the U.S, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The intent of the program is to teach students and the general public about Heliophysics (the science of the study of the Sun, how it varies, and how solar dynamics affect the rest of the solar system, especially the Earth). The program was begun ten years ago. Each year since that time a particular day has been designated as "Sun-Earth Day ,,. Usually the day of the spring equinox (March 20 or 21) is Sun-Earth Day, but other days have been used as well. Each year a theme is chosen relating to Heliophysics and events reflecting that theme are planned not only for Sun-Earth Day, but for the entire year. From the very beginning educational technology was emphasized in the events in order to effectively reach wide audiences with the SED message. The main approach has been to have a "webcast" related to each year's theme, often from a location that supports the theme as well. For example, a webcast took place from the Mayan pyramids at Chichen Itza, Mexico to highlight the theme of "Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge". Webcasts were not the only technology employed, however. Many of the themes centered on the dynamic nature of the Sun and the effects that solar storms can have on interplanetary space and in our day-to-day life on Earth. Activities for tracking when solar storms happen and how they affect the Earth were developed and brought together in an educational package called Space Weather Action Centers. This project is explained in more detail in another presentation in this session being given by Norma Teresinha Oliveira Reis. Recent Sun-Earth Days have utilized "social networking" technologies to reach widespread groups on the internet. Podcasts, Vodcasts, Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life are the types of network technologies being employed now. The NASA Distance learning Network is another method for bringing Sun-Earth

  10. Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Schroder, Klaus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the distant future of the Sun and the solar system, based on stellar models computed with a thoroughly tested evolution code. For the solar giant stages, mass-loss by the cool (but not dust-driven) wind is considered in detail. Using the new and well-calibrated mass-loss formula of Schroder & Cuntz (2005, 2007), we find that the mass lost by the Sun as an RGB giant (0.332 M_Sun, 7.59 Gy from now) potentially gives planet Earth a significant orbital expansion, inversely proportional to the remaining solar mass. According to these solar evolution models, the closest encounter of planet Earth with the solar cool giant photosphere will occur during the tip-RGB phase. During this critical episode, for each time-step of the evolution model, we consider the loss of orbital angular momentum suffered by planet Earth from tidal interaction with the giant Sun, as well as dynamical drag in the lower chromosphere. We find that planet Earth will not be able to escape engulfment, despite the positive effect o...

  11. CUNY Sun-Earth Research, Space Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, D. E.; Cheung, T. D.; Marchese, P. J.; Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S.; Tremberger, G.

    2007-05-01

    Faculty and students at Queensborough Community College and Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York (CUNY) have, over several years now, employed simple software familiar to most undergraduate students to perform useful calculations, including statistical analyses, regarding various geophysical phenomena. Topics have included Space Weather, Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction and strength fluctuations, geomagnetic and ionospheric responses to solar flares, and Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) events. Our statistical analyses have utilized second-order measures of fluctuation of the IMF strength, especially what we now call the Cheung number: the number of times that the value of Sigma-B, as provided by the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data, has exceeded 0.5nT during a 6 hour interval. We have also utilized the Higuchi fractal dimension of various somewhat random fluctuations, including Sigma-B and the brightness or strength of adjacent pixels or data points in somewhat random data sequences in time or spatial dimension, including IMF fluctuations and SOHO (Solar Heliographic Observer) images of the Sun. These we have correlated with each other and with such variables as SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) peak flux, TEC (Total Electron Content) of the ionosphere, and Dst (Disturbance storm-time) in the geomagnetic field. Recent results indicate that the IMF fluctuation measures are well correlated with the SEP peak flux, the Dst, and TEC. Higuchi fractal analysis of SOHO photospheric ultraviolet brightness indicates, consistent with concomitant increased chaos or randomness of photospheric brightness, an increased likelihood of solar flare events or CME affecting interplanetary space and the earth's magnetosphere/ionosphere/atmosphere.

  12. Understanding New Elements of Acceleration and Transport of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) from the Sun to the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Longitudinal Separations...............................6 6. RHESSI Dynamic Plots of the 2003 May 29 SHH Hard X-ray Burst...The Kiplinger effect is an observed association of solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events with a “soft-hard-harder" ( SHH ) spectral...and then examined recent evidence from the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectrometric Imager (RHESSI) supporting the association of SHH HXR flares with

  13. Improving solar wind persistence forecasts: Removing transient space weather events, and using observations away from the Sun-Earth line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohutova, Petra; Bocquet, François-Xavier; Henley, Edmund M.; Owens, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates two significant ways of improving persistence forecasts of the solar wind, which exploit the relatively unchanging nature of the ambient solar wind to provide 27 day forecasts, when using data from the Lagrangian L1 point. Such forecasts are useful as a prediction tool for the ambient wind, and for benchmarking of solar wind models. We show that solar wind persistence forecasts can be improved by removing transient solar wind features such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using CME indicators to automatically identify CME-contaminated periods in ACE data from 1998 to 2011, and replacing these with solar wind from a previous synodic rotation, persistence forecasts improve (relative to a baseline): skill scores for Bz, a crucial parameter for determining solar wind geoeffectiveness, improve by 7.7 percentage points when using a proton temperature-based indicator with good operational potential. We also show that persistence forecasts can be improved by using measurements away from L1, to reduce the requirement on coronal stability for an entire synodic period, at the cost of reduced lead time. Using STEREO-B data from 2007 to 2013 to create such a reduced lead time persistence forecast, we show that Bz skill scores improve by 17.1 percentage points relative to ACE. Finally, we report on implications for persistence forecasts from any future missions to the L5 Lagrangian point and on the successful operational implementation (in spring 2015) of the normal (ACE-based) and reduced lead time (STEREO-based) persistence forecasts in the Met Office's Space Weather Operations Centre, as well as plans for future improvements.

  14. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lugaz, Noe [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  15. SunPy—Python for solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SunPy Community; Mumford, Stuart J.; Christe, Steven; Pérez-Suárez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew R.; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russell J.; Mayer, Florian; Hughitt, Keith; Freij, Nabil; Meszaros, Tomas; Bennett, Samuel M.; Malocha, Michael; Evans, John; Agrawal, Ankit; Leonard, Andrew J.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Mampaey, Benjamin; Campos-Rozo, Jose Iván; Kirk, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents SunPy (version 0.5), a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy is a data-analysis environment specializing in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric data in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from missions such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and PROBA2/LYRA, and radio spectra from e-Callisto and STEREO/SWAVES. We describe SunPy's functionality, provide examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy.

  16. The Sun and the Earth's Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haigh Joanna D.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in solar activity, at least as observed in numbers of sunspots, have been apparent since ancient times but to what extent solar variability may affect global climate has been far more controversial. The subject had been in and out of fashion for at least two centuries but the current need to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change has brought it again to the forefront of meteorological research. The absolute radiometers carried by satellites since the late 1970s have produced indisputable evidence that total solar irradiance varies systematically over the 11-year sunspot cycle, relegating to history the term “solar constant”, but it is difficult to explain how the apparent response to the Sun, seen in many climate records, can be brought about by these rather small changes in radiation. This article reviews some of the evidence for a solar influence on the lower atmosphere and discusses some of the mechanisms whereby the Sun may produce more significant impacts than might be surmised from a consideration only of variations in total solar irradiance.

  17. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines between the Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Cairns, Iver; Gosling, J. T.; Lobzin, Vasili; Steward, Graham; Neudegg, Dave; Owens, Mathew

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic field topologies between the Sun and Earth are important for the connectivity to Earth of solar suprathermal particles, e.g., solar energetic particles and the electrons in type III solar radio bursts. An approach is developed for mapping large-scale magnetic field lines in the solar equatorial plane, using near-Earth observations and a solar wind model with nonzero azimuthal magnetic field at the source surface. The predicted field line maps show that near both minimal and maximal solar activity the field lines are typically open and that loops with both ends either connected to or disconnected from the Sun occur sometimes. The open field lines, nonetheless, often do not closely follow the Parker spiral, being less or more tightly wound, or strongly azimuthally or radially oriented, or inverted. Assessments of the mapped field line configurations using time-varying suprathermal electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) observed by Wind show that the mapping predictions agree quantitatively (˜90%) with the PAD observations and outperform (by ˜20%) the predictions using the standard Parker spiral model. Application to a type III radio burst observed by Ulysses and Wind shows that the mapping prediction agrees well with the local magnetic field line traced by the type III source path, which covers heliocentric distances of ˜0.1--0.4 AU. Furthermore, applications to local field structures inferred from ACE observations demonstrate that the mapping can predict the majority (65-75%) of the local field line inversions for the multiple phases of the solar cycle.

  18. SunPy: Solar Physics in Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Mumford, Stuart; Perez Suarez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russel

    2015-04-01

    SunPy is a community-developed open-source software library for solar physics. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language which is being increasingly adopted throughout the scientific community as well as further afield. This has resulted in a wide array of software packages useful for scientific computing, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy, etc.), to machine learning (scifitlearn), to visualization and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy aims to provide required specialised software for analysing solar and heliospheric datasets in Python. The current version is 0.5 with 0.6 expected to be released later this year. SunPy provides solar data access through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It supports common data types from major solar missions such as images (SDO/AIA, STEREO, PROBA2/SWAP etc.), time series (GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, PROBA2/LYRA), and radio spectra (e-Callisto, STEREO/WAVES). SunPy’s code base is publicly available through github.com and can be contributed to by anyone. In this poster we demonstrate SunPy’s functionality and future goals of the project. We also encourage interested users to become involved in further developing SunPy.

  19. Sun-earth connection education through modern views of ancient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J. R.

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) has the responsibility of using the latest science results from the study of solar physics, space physics, and aeronomy to inspire students in the classroom and to inform the public in general. SECEF works with NASA's Sun-Earth Connection spaceflight missions to accomplish this goal. Each year the missions and SECEF combine to promote their science through a major event designed to attract the attention of all. In late 2004 and 2005 the event will be the study of solar observatories created by ancient peoples and a comparison of their knowledge and culture to present understanding. Two solar observatory sites will be featured, Chaco Canyon in the U.S. and Chichen Itza in Mexico. There are many other places throughout the world that could also be featured as solar observatories and some of these may be described on the SECEF web site or used in future occurrences. Special emphasis is placed on events associated with the solstice and equinox dates. It is hoped that there will be happenings around the world on these days and SECEF will work with many museums, science centers, and other groups to help make this happen. Plans for the 2005 Ancient Observatories event and possible future events on the same subject will be described.

  20. The sun and heliosphere at solar maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E J; Marsden, R G; Balogh, A; Gloeckler, G; Geiss, J; McComas, D J; McKibben, R B; MacDowall, R J; Lanzerotti, L J; Krupp, N; Krueger, H; Landgraf, M

    2003-11-14

    Recent Ulysses observations from the Sun's equator to the poles reveal fundamental properties of the three-dimensional heliosphere at the maximum in solar activity. The heliospheric magnetic field originates from a magnetic dipole oriented nearly perpendicular to, instead of nearly parallel to, the Sun's rotation axis. Magnetic fields, solar wind, and energetic charged particles from low-latitude sources reach all latitudes, including the polar caps. The very fast high-latitude wind and polar coronal holes disappear and reappear together. Solar wind speed continues to be inversely correlated with coronal temperature. The cosmic ray flux is reduced symmetrically at all latitudes.

  1. Sun, the Earth, and Near-Earth Space: A Guide to the Sun-Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In a world of warmth and light and living things we soon forget that we are surrounded by a vast universe that is cold and dark and deadly dangerous, just beyond our door. On a starry night, when we look out into the darkness that lies around us, the view can be misleading in yet another way: for the brightness and sheer number of stars, and their chance groupings into familiar constellations, make them seem much nearer to each other, and to us, that in truth they are. And every one of them--each twinkling, like a diamond in the sky--is a white-hot sun, much like our own. The nearest stars in our own galaxy--the Milky Way-- are more than a million times further away from us than our star, the Sun. We could make a telephone call to the Moon and expect to wait but a few seconds between pieces of a conversation, or but a few hours in calling any planet in our solar system.

  2. Preface to the Special Issue on "Connection of Solar and Heliospheric Activities with Near-Earth Space Weather: Sun-Earth Connection"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chun Wu Sunny W. Y. Tam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (TAO presents a small collection of the materials presented at the 2011 International Space Plasma Symposium (ISPS, held at National Cheng-Kung University (NCKU in Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China (ROC, from August 15 - 19, 2011. The purpose of the Symposium was to bring space physicists together to present their recent research results and discuss some outstanding questions in, but not limited to, the solar corona, interplanetary medium, planetary magnetosphere and ionospheres. A total number of 59 papers were presented at the Symposium by scientists from 11 countries and regions.

  3. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... data, showing significant improvement in the Earth albedo induced current estimates. Additionally an algorithm for utilizing the Earth albedo model in obtaining a vector observation pair which is superior to the solar line of sight vector pair. It is concluded that the Earth albedo model is valid...

  4. Control of the Earth's electric field intensity through solar wind modulation of galactic cosmic radiation: Support for a proposed atmospheric electrical sun-weather mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ionospheric potential and galactic cosmic radiation, found to be inversely correlated with the solar wind velocity are examined as being germane to weather modification. Since the ionospheric potential is proportional to the fair weather electric field intensity and cosmic radiation is the dominant source of atmospheric ionization, it is concluded that the Earth's overall electric field varies in phase with atmospheric ionization and that the latter is modulated by the solar wind. A proposed mechanism, in which solar control of ionizing radiation influences atmospheric electrification and thus possibly cloud physical processes is discussed. An experimental approach to critically test the proposed mechanism through comparison of the temporal variation of the Earth's electric field with conditions in the interplanetary medium is outlined.

  5. Earth, Moon, Sun, and CV Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2009-01-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting Cataclysmic Variable (CV) Dwarf Novae systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar and black hole systems. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our a...

  6. Optimal control of sun tracking solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. O.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the modern control theory to derive an optimal sun tracking control for a point focusing solar concentrator is presented. A standard tracking problem converted to regulator problem using a sun rate input achieves an almost zero steady state tracking error with the optimal control formulation. However, these control techniques are costly because optimal type algorithms require large computing systems, thus they will be used mainly as comparison standards for other types of control algorithms and help in their development.

  7. The Apsidal Precession for Low Earth Sun Synchronized Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkelzen Cakaj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By nodal regression and apsidal precession, the Earth flattering at satellite low Earth orbits (LEO is manifested. Nodal regression refers to the shift of the orbit’s line of nodes over time as Earth revolves around the Sun. Nodal regression is orbit feature utilized for circular orbits to be Sun synchronized. A sun¬-synchronized orbit lies in a plane that maintains a fixed angle with respect to the Earth-Sun direction. In the low Earth Sun synchronized circular orbits are suited the satellites that accomplish their photo imagery missions. Nodal regression depends on orbital altitude and orbital inclination angle. For the respective orbital altitudes the inclination window for the Sun synchronization to be attained is determined. The apsidal precession represents major axis shift, respectively the argument of perigee deviation. The apsidal precession simulation, for inclination window of sun synchronized orbital altitudes, is provided through this paper.

  8. SunPy - Python for Solar Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Community, The SunPy; Christe, Steven; Pérez-Suárez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y; Inglis, Andrew R; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russell J; Mayer, Florian; Hughitt, Keith; Freij, Nabil; Meszaros, Tomas; Bennett, Samuel M; Malocha, Michael; Evans, John; Agrawal, Ankit; Leonard, Andrew J; Robitaille, Thomas P; Mampaey, Benjamin; Campos-Rozo, Jose Iván; Kirk, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents SunPy (version 0.5), a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualisation and plotting (matplotlib). SunPy is a data-analysis environment specialising in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric data in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from mis...

  9. Reading The Sun: A Three Dimensional Visual Model of The Solar Environment During Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-fulmer, T. L.; Moldwin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The sun is a powerful force that has proven to our society that it has a large impact on our lives. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of awareness on how the sun is capable of affecting Earth. The over all idea of "Reading The Sun" installation is to help demonstrate how the sun impacts the Earth, by compiling various data sources from satellites (SOHO, SDO, and STERO) with solar and solar wind models (MAS and ENLIL) to create a comprehensive three dimensional display of the solar environment. It focuses on the current solar maximum of solar cycle 24 and a CME that impacted Earth's magnetic field on February 27, 2014, which triggered geomagnetic storms around the Earth's poles. The CME was an after-effect of a class X4.9 solar flare, which was released from the sun on February 25, 2014. "Reading The Sun" is a 48" x 48" x 48" hanging model of the sun with color coded open opposing magnetic field lines along with various layers of the solar atmosphere, the heliospheric current sheet, and the inner planets. At the center of the xyz axis is the sun with the open magnetic field lines and the heliospheric current sheet permeating inner planetary space. The xyz axes are color coded to represent various types of information with corresponding visual images for the viewer to be able to read the model. Along the z-axis are three colors (yellow, orange, and green) that represent the different layers of the solar atmosphere (photosphere, chromosphere, and corona) that correspond to three satellite images in various spectrums related to a CME and Solar Flare and the xy-plane shows where the inner planets are in relation to the sun. The exhibit in which "Reading The Sun "is being displayed is called, The Rotation of Language at the Wheather Again Gallery in Rockaway, New York. The intent of the exhibit is to both celebrate as well as present a cautionary tale on the ability of human language to spark and ignite the individual and collective imagination towards an experience

  10. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... for modeling Sun sensor output by incorporating the Earth albedo model is presented. This model utilizes the directional information of in the Earth albedo model, which is achieved by Earth surface partitioning. This allows accurate simulation of the Sun sensor output and the results are consistent with Ørsted...... and useful for space environment simulations, and may be utilized to improve attitude estimation algorithms applying Sun sensor vector observations....

  11. Spacecraft Attitude Determination with Earth Albedo Corrected Sun Sensor Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    This thesis focuses on advanced modeling of the Earth albedo experienced by satellites in Earth orbit. The model of the Earth albedo maintains directional information of the Earth albedo irradiance from each partition on the Earth surface. This allows enhanced modeling of Sun sensor current outputs......-Method, Extended Kalman Filter, and Unscented Kalman Filter algorithms are presented and the results are compared. Combining the Unscented Kalman Filter with Earth albedo and enhanced Sun sensor modeling allows for three-axis attitude determination from Sun sensor only, which previously has been perceived...

  12. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the sequence of processes that lead from some change in solar input to the earth to a change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Topics discussed include: inputs from the sun, the solar wind, and the magnetosphere; bremsstrahlung, ionizing radiation, cirrus clouds, thunderstorms, wave propagation, and gravity waves.

  13. Tidal effects on Earth, Planets, Sun by far visiting moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Earth has been formed by a huge mini-planet collision forming our Earth surface and our Moon today. Such a central collision hit was statistically rare. A much probable skimming or nearby encounter by other moons or planets had to occur. Indeed Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past in the geological records. For instance a ten times a terrestrial radius nearby impact scattering by a peripherical encounter by a small moon-like object will force huge tidal waves (hundred meter height), able to lead to huge tsunami and Earth-quake. Moreover the historical cumulative planet hits in larger and wider planets as Juppiter, Saturn, Uranus will leave a trace, as observed, in their tilted spin axis. Finally a large fraction of counter rotating moons in our solar system probe and test such a visiting mini-planet captur origination. In addition the Earth day duration variability in the early past did show a rare discountinuity, very probably indebt to such a visiting planet crossing event. These far planets in rare trajectory to our Sun may, in thousands event capture, also explain sudden historical and recent temperature changes.

  14. Sun-Earth Connection EPO's with Multiple Uses and Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Russell, R.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Haller, D.; Conery, C.; Bintner, G.; Kiessling, D.; Hughes, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    The three-year life of an EPO grant can be a journey guided by clear goals and enriched by collaborative and outreach opportunities connecting Space sciences to Earth sciences for both K-12 and public audiences. This point is illustrated by two EPO projects funded by NASA Sun-Earth Connection research grants to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. They are entering their final year coordinated by the Office of Education and Outreach at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The content focus of both projects is well aligned with HAO's research mission and the expertise of our scientists, addressing solar dynamics, space weather, and the impacts of solar events on the magnetosphere, as well as societies inhabiting Earth's surface. The first project (Gang Lu, PI) develops presentation resources, inquiry activities, and tips that will help HAO scientists be better prepared to visit K-12 classrooms. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous development of a Teachers' Guide to NCAR's new Climate Discovery exhibit, which takes an Earth system approach to climate and global change, has created a niche for this EPO resource to be revised and repurposed for a needed unit in the guide about the exhibit's graphic panels on Sun-Earth connections. The second project (Art Richmond, PI) engages two high school "Teachers in Residence" to develop resources they can utilize with their students. Excited by exceptional educational graphics and animations in the new Physics of the Aurora: Earth Systems module co-produced by HAO and the COMET Program for advanced undergraduate courses, they chose to adapt appropriate sections of the module to enrich Earth science and math concepts addressed in their 9th and 10th grade astronomy and general physics classes. Simultaneously, the Windows to the Universe web site, which continuously updates space science content and is now developing a new Space Weather section with support from the Center for

  15. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    day Sun. The reduction in the galactic cosmic ray influx caused by the young Sun's enhanced shielding capability has been suggested as a solution to what is known as the faint young Sun paradox, i.e. the fact that the luminosity of the young Sun was only around 75% of its present value when life...... started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how...

  16. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how......Using kappa Ceti as a proxy for the young Sun we show that not only was the young Sun much more effective in protecting the Earth environment from galactic cosmic rays than the present day Sun; it also had flare and corona mass ejection rates up to three orders of magnitude larger than the present...

  17. Evidence That Solar Flares Drive Global Oscillations in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    Solar flares are large explosions on the Sun's surface caused by a sudden release of magnetic energy. They are known to cause local short-lived oscillations traveling away from the explosion like water rings. Here we show that the energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is correlated with flares. This means that the flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. The correlation between flares and energy in the acoustic spectrum of disk-integrated sunlight is stronger for high-frequency waves than for ordinary p-modes which are excited by the turbulence in the near-surface convection zone immediately beneath the photosphere.

  18. The Solar Dynamics Observatory, Studying the Sun and Its Influence on Other Bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The solar photon output, which was once thought to be constant, varies over all time scales from seconds during solar flares to years due to the solar cycle. These solar variations cause significant deviations in the Earth and space environments on similar time scales, such as affecting the atmospheric densities and composition of particular atoms, molecules, and ions in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Presented and discussed will be examples of unprecedented observations from NASA's new solar observatory, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using three specialized instruments, SDO measures the origins of solar activity from inside the Sun, though its atmosphere, then accurately measuring the Sun's radiative output in X-ray and EUV wavelengths (0.1-121 nm). Along with the visually appealing observations will be discussions of what these measurements can tell us about how the plasma motions in all layers of the Sun modifies and strengthens the weak solar dipole magnetic field to drive large energy releases in solar eruptions. Also presented will be examples of how the release of the Sun's energy, in the form of photons and high energy particles, physically influence other bodies in the solar system such as Earth, Mars, and the Moon, and how these changes drive changes in the technology that we are becoming dependent upon. The presentation will continuously emphasize how SDO, the first satellite in NASA's Living with a Star program, improving our understanding of the variable Sun and its Heliospheric influence.

  19. The Sun's interior structure and dynamics, and the solar cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Broomhall, A -M; Howe, R; Norton, A A; Thompson, M J

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's internal structure and dynamics can be studied with helioseismology, which uses the Sun's natural acoustic oscillations to build up a profile of the solar interior. We discuss how solar acoustic oscillations are affected by the Sun's magnetic field. Careful observations of these effects can be inverted to determine the variations in the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior as the solar cycle progresses. Observed variations in the structure and dynamics can then be used to inform models of the solar dynamo, which are crucial to our understanding of how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and maintained.

  20. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for earth science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    A teaching manual is provided to aid teachers in introducing renewable energy topics to earth science students. The main emphasis is placed on solar energy. Activities for the student include a study of the greenhouse effect, solar gain for home heating, measuring solar radiation, and the construction of a model solar still to obtain fresh water. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate a solar still, the greenhouse effect and measurement of the altitude and azimuth of the sun are included. (BCS)

  1. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Lugaz, Noé; Möstl, Christian; Davies, Jackie A; Bale, Stuart D; Lin, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) also has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations. Future CME observations and space weather forecasting are discussed based on these results. See detail in the PDF.

  2. Analysis of the Sun Tracking Systems to Optimize the Efficiency of Solar Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Xuan Cuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the ways to improve the efficiency of solar cells and reduce the price of solar electricity is the use of the tracking system of the sun. Daily and seasonal movement of the Earth affects the intensity of the radiation on the solar panels. The tracking system is the sun moves the solar panels to compensate for these movements, keeping the best orientation to the sun. For small solar panels it is not recommended to use the tracking system because of the high energy losses in the drive. It was found that the power consumption of the servo system is a few % of the increased energy. This article provides a classification system for tracking the sun, considered and their pluses and minuses.

  3. The Maunder minimum and the variable sun-earth connection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Hock Soon, Willie

    2003-01-01

    This book takes an excursion through solar science, science history, and geoclimate with a husband and wife team who revealed some of our sun's most stubborn secrets. E Walter and Annie S D Maunder's work helped in understanding our sun's chemical, electromagnetic and plasma properties. They knew the sun's sunspot migration patterns and its variable, climate-affecting, inactive and active states in short and long time frames. An inactive solar period starting in the mid-seventeenth century lasted approximately seventy years, one that E Walter Maunder worked hard to make us understand: the Maun

  4. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  5. Our Sun. V. A Bright Young Sun Consistent with Helioseismology and Warm Temperatures on Ancient Earth and Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Sackmann, I J; Boothroyd, Arnold I.

    2003-01-01

    The relatively warm temperatures required on early Earth and Mars have been difficult to account for via warming from greenhouse gases. We tested whether this problem can be resolved for both Earth and Mars by a young Sun that is brighter than predicted by the standard solar model. We computed high-precision solar evolutionary models with slightly increased initial masses of M_i = 1.01 to 1.07 M_sun; for each mass, we considered three different mass loss scenarios. We then tested whether these models were consistent with the current high-precision helioseismic observations. The relatively modest mass loss rates in these models are consistent with observational limits from young stars and estimates of the past solar wind obtained from lunar rocks, and do not significantly affect the solar lithium depletion. For appropriate initial masses, all three mass loss scenarios are capable of yielding a solar flux 3.8 Gyr ago high enough to be consistent with water on ancient Mars. We find that all of our mass-losing so...

  6. Sun-Earth Day: Growth and Impact of NASA E/PO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.; Thieman, J.

    2004-12-01

    Over the past six years, the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum has sponsored and coordinated education public outreach events to highlight NASA Sun-Earth Connection research and discoveries. Our strategy involves using celestial phenomena, such as total solar eclipses and the Transit of Venus to celebrate Sun-Earth Day, a popular Education and Public Outreach international program. Sun-Earth Day also focuses attention on Equinoxes and Solstices to engage K-12 schools and the general public in space science activities, demonstrations, and interactions with space scientists. In collaboration with partners that include the Exploratorium, Maryland Science Center, NASA Connect, Sun-Earth Connection missions, Ideum, and others, we produce webcasts, other multi-media, and print resources for use by school and informal educators nation-wide. We provide training and professional development to K-12 educators, museum personnel, amateur astronomers, Girl Scout leaders, etc., so they can implement their own outreach programs taking advantage of our resources. A coordinated approach promotes multiple programs occurring each year under a common theme. We will report lessons learned from several years of experience, and strategies for growth and sustainability. We will also share our plans for "Ancient Observatories - Timeless Knowledge" our theme for Sun-Earth Day 2005, which will feature solar alignments at ancient sites that mark the equinoxes and/or solstices. The video and webcast programming will feature several sites including: Chaco Canyon (New Mexico), Hovenweep (Utah), and Chichen Itza (Mexico). Many of these sites present unique opportunities to develop authentic cultural connections to Native Americans, highlighting the importance of the Sun across the ages.

  7. Lissajous Orbit Control for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sarah; Reagoso, John

    2015-01-01

    DSCOVR Lissajous Orbit sized such that orbit track never extends beyond 15 degrees from Earth-Sun line (as seen from Earth). Requiring delta-V maneuvers, control orbit to obey a Solar Exclusion Zone (SEZ) cone of half-angle 4 degrees about the Earth-Sun line. Spacecraft should never be less than 4 degrees from solar center as seen from Earth. Following Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI), DSCOVR should be in an opening phase that just skirts the 4-degree SEZ. Maximizes time to the point where a closing Lissajous will require avoidance maneuvers to keep it out of the SEZ. Station keeping maneuvers should take no more than 15 minutes.

  8. Assessing the massive young Sun hypothesis to solve the warm young Earth puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Minton, David A.; Malhotra, Renu

    2006-01-01

    A moderately massive early Sun has been proposed to resolve the so-called faint early Sun paradox. We calculate the time-evolution of the solar mass that would be required by this hypothesis, using a simple parametrized energy-balance model for Earth's climate. Our calculations show that the solar mass loss rate would need to have been 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than present for a time on the order of ~2 Gy. Such a mass loss history is significantly at variance (both in timescale and in t...

  9. The Early Years: The Earth-Sun System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    We all experience firsthand many of the phenomena caused by Earth's Place in the Universe (Next Generation Science Standard 5-ESS1; NGSS Lead States 2013) and the relative motion of the Earth, Sun, and Moon. Young children can investigate phenomena such as changes in times of sunrise and sunset (number of daylight hours), Moon phases, seasonal…

  10. How did the Sun affect the climate when life evolved on the Earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Karoff, C

    2010-01-01

    Using kappa Ceti as a proxy for the young Sun we show that not only was the young Sun much more effective in protecting the Earth environment from galactic cosmic rays than the present day Sun; it also had flare and corona mass ejection rates up to three orders of magnitude larger than the present day Sun. The reduction in the galactic cosmic ray influx caused by the young Sun's enhanced shielding capability has been suggested as a solution to what is known as the faint young Sun paradox, i.e. the fact that the luminosity of the young Sun was only around 75% of its present value when life started to evolve on our planet around four billion years ago. This suggestion relies on the hypothesis that the changing solar activity results in a changing influx of galactic cosmic rays to the Earth, which results in a changing low-altitude cloud coverage and thus a changing climate. Here we show how the larger corona mass ejection rates of the young Sun would have had an effect on the climate with a magnitude similar to...

  11. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Crosby

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc. describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC, also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988, to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  12. Frequency distributions: from the sun to the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, N. B.

    2011-11-01

    The space environment is forever changing on all spatial and temporal scales. Energy releases are observed in numerous dynamic phenomena (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar energetic particle events) where measurements provide signatures of the dynamics. Parameters (e.g. peak count rate, total energy released, etc.) describing these phenomena are found to have frequency size distributions that follow power-law behavior. Natural phenomena on Earth, such as earthquakes and landslides, display similar power-law behavior. This suggests an underlying universality in nature and poses the question of whether the distribution of energy is the same for all these phenomena. Frequency distributions provide constraints for models that aim to simulate the physics and statistics observed in the individual phenomenon. The concept of self-organized criticality (SOC), also known as the "avalanche concept", was introduced by Bak et al. (1987, 1988), to characterize the behavior of dissipative systems that contain a large number of elements interacting over a short range. The systems evolve to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect any number of elements in the system. It is found that frequency distributions of the output parameters from the chain reaction taken over a period of time can be represented by power-laws. During the last decades SOC has been debated from all angles. New SOC models, as well as non-SOC models have been proposed to explain the power-law behavior that is observed. Furthermore, since Bak's pioneering work in 1987, people have searched for signatures of SOC everywhere. This paper will review how SOC behavior has become one way of interpreting the power-law behavior observed in natural occurring phenomenon in the Sun down to the Earth.

  13. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  14. Capturing small asteroids into a Sun-Earth Lagrangian point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Neus; Ren, Yuan; Masdemont, Josep J.; Gómez, Gerard

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we address the feasibility of capturing small Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) into the vicinity of the Sun-Earth L2 libration point using a continuous-thrust propulsion system assumed to be attached to the asteroid. The vicinity of this libration point is a gateway to the Earth-Moon neighborhood and using it for capture, or for transit, small NEAs could be interesting for mining or science purposes.

  15. Solar influence on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that variations in solar activity have had a significant influence on Earth's climate. However, the mechanisms responsible for a solar influence are still not known. One possibility is that atmospheric transparency is influenced by changing cloud properties...... and thereby influence the radiative properties of clouds. If the GCR-Cloud link is confirmed variations in galactic cosmic ray flux, caused by changes in solar activity and the space environment, could influence Earth's radiation budget....

  16. Drift-free solar sail formations in elliptical Sun-synchronous orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsay, Khashayar; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2017-10-01

    To study the spatial and temporal variations of plasma in the highly dynamic environment of the magnetosphere, multiple spacecraft must fly in a formation. The objective for this study is to investigate the feasibility of solar sail formation flying in the Earth-centered, Sun-synchronous orbit regime. The focus of this effort is to enable formation flying for a group of solar sails that maintain a nominally fixed Sun-pointing attitude during formation flight, solely for the purpose of precessing their orbit apse lines Sun-synchronously. A fixed-attitude solar sail formation is motivated by the difficulties in the simultaneous control of orbit and attitude in flying solar sails. First, the secular rates of the orbital elements resulting from the effects of solar radiation pressure (SRP) are determined using averaging theory for a Sun-pointing attitude sail. These averaged rates are used to analytically derive the first-order necessary conditions for a drift-free solar sail formation in Sun-synchronous orbits, assuming a fixed Sun-pointing orientation for each sail in formation. The validity of the first-order necessary conditions are illustrated by designing quasi-periodic relative motions. Next, nonlinear programming is applied to design truly drift-free two-craft solar sail formations. Lastly, analytic expressions are derived to determine the long-term dynamics and sensitivity of the formation with respect to constant attitude errors, uncertainty in orbital elements, and uncertainty in a sail's characteristic acceleration.

  17. The Real Reasons for Seasons--Sun-Earth Connections: Unraveling Misconceptions about the Earth and Sun. Grades 6-8. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Alan; Willard, Carolyn; Pompea, Stephen

    This guide is aimed at helping students arrive at a clear understanding of seasons as they investigate the connections between the sun and the earth. Activities include: (1) "Name the Season"; (2) "Sun-Earth Survey"; (3) "Trip to the Sun"; (4) "What Shape is Earth's Orbit?"; (5) "Temperatures around the…

  18. Sun-Earth Connections: How the Sun Knocks Out My Cell Phone from 150 Million Kilometers Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Large solar particle events (SPE) threaten many elements of critical infrastructure. A 2013 study by Lloyds of London and Atmospheric and Environmental Research recently found that if a worst-case solar event like the 1859 Carrington Event struck our planet now, it could result on $0.6-$2.36 trillion in damages to the economy. In March 2014, researchers Y. D. Liu et al. revealed that just such an event had narrowly missed Earth in July 2012. The event was observed by the STEREO A spacecraft. In this presentation, we examine how the sun can pack such a punch from 150 million km away, the threats such solar particle events pose, their mechanisms and the efforts NASA and other space agencies are carrying out to understand and mitigate such risks.

  19. The Solar Dynamics Observatory: Your eye on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, William

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11, 2010 into partly cloudy skies over Cape Canaveral, Florida. SDO has since moved into a 28 degree inclined geosyn-chronous orbit over the longitude of the ground station in New Mexico. SDO is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand and predict those solar variations that influence life on Earth and our technological systems. The SDO science investigations will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. The SDO mission consists of three scientific investigations (AIA, EVE, and HMI), a spacecraft bus, and a ded-icated Ka-band ground station to handle the 150 Mbps data flow. Science teams at LMSAL, LASP, and Stanford are responsible for processing, analyzing, distributing, and archiving the science data. We will talk about the building of SDO, its launch, and the data and science it will provide to NASA.

  20. Detrimental Effects of Extreme Solar Activity on Life on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Glocer, Alex; Jackman, Charles

    2015-07-01

    Solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), the most energetic eruptions in the Solar System, represent large-scale disturbances forming with the solar corona and are associated with solar flares and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) events. Current Kepler data from solar-like stars suggest that the frequency of occurrence of energetic flares and associated CMEs from the Sun can be as high as 1 per 1500 years. What effects would CME and associated SEPs have on Earth's habitability? We have performed a three-dimensional time-dependent global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetic interaction of such a CME cloud with the Earth's magnetosphere. We calculated the global structure of the perturbed magnetosphere and derive the latitude of the open-closed magnetic field boundary. We used a 2D GSFC atmospheric code to calculate the efficiency of ozone depletion in the Earth's atmosphere due to SEP events and its effects on our society and life on Earth.

  1. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  2. Here Comes the Sun! Residential Solar Systems Add up to Savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the planet with millions of times more energy that its people use. The only problem is that the energy is spread out over the entire earth's surface and thus must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. A well-designed solar system can last for 20 years…

  3. Science Experimenter: Observing the Sun and Solar Eclipses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of simple optical aids that allow the amateur scientist to safely observe sunspots and solar eclipses and also to measure the sun's rotation. (five references) (JJK)

  4. Thermal evaluation of a sun tracking solar cooker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif El-Tous, Omar. O. Badran, Anwar Al-Mofleh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is one of many important types of renewable energy. Jordan is of great needs for renewable energy systems applications since it depends totally in generation of its required energy on imported oil. This study is an experimental work of tracking system developed for enhancing the solar heating using solar cooker. An electronic sun tracking device was used for rotating the solar heater with the movement of the sun. A comparison between fixed and sun tracked cooker showed that the use of sun tracking increased the heating temperature by 36% due to the increase in radiation concentration and using internal mirror reflectors. The programming method used for tracking control works efficiently in all weather conditions regardless of the presence of clouds. It can be used as backup control circuit in which relays are the essential control devices.

  5. Does The Sun Rotate Around The Earth Or Does The Earth Rotate Around the Sun? An Important Key to Evaluating Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, S.

    2006-08-01

    The Japan Spaceguard Association, Tokyo, Japan Sciences are continuously developing. This is a good situation for the sciences, but when one tries to teach scientific results, it is hard to decide which levels of science should be taught in schools. The point to evaluate is not only the quality of scientific accuracy, but also the method with which school students of different scientific abilities study scientific results. In astronomy, an important question, which is "Does the Sun rotate around the Earth or does the Earth rotate around the Sun?" can be used to evaluate student abilities. Scientifically, it is obvious that the latter choice is the better answer, but it is not so obvious for the lower-grade students and also for the lower-ability students even in the higher grades. If one sees daily the sky without scientific knowledge, one has an impression of "the Sun rotates around the Earth," and for his rest of his life he will not see any problem. If one wants to be a scientist, though, he should know that "the Earth rotates around the Sun" before reaching university level. If he will become a physical scientist, he should understand that it is not correct to say "the Earth rotates around the Sun," but he should know that the Earth rotates around the center of gravity of the solar system. A similar type of question is "has the Earth the shape of a sphere, or a pear, or a geoid?" There are many teachers with varying ranges of students who do not understand the proper level of science instruction. When students of lower capacity are instructed to understand concepts with the higher degrees of sophistication, they can easily lose their interest in the sciences. This happens in many countries, especially in Japan, where there are many different types of people with different jobs. We, as educators, should appreciate that the students can be interested in any given scientific idea, no matter what level of sophistication it is.

  6. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A collection of magazine articles which focus on solar energy is presented. This is the final book of the four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. The articles include brief discussions on energy topics such as the sun, ocean energy, methane gas from cow manure, and solar homes. Instructions for constructing a sundial and a solar stove are also included. A glossary of energy related terms is provided. (BCS)

  7. Photometric Variations In The Sun And Solar-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark

    The rich array of solar magnetic field-related phenomena we see occurs not only on stellar counterparts of our Sun but in stars that represent significant departures in their fundamental parameters from those of the Sun. Though these phenomena appear energetically negligible when compared to the total luminosity of stars, they nevertheless govern the angular momentum evolution and modulate the radiative and particle output of the Sun and late-type stars. The term "The Solar-Stellar Connection" has been coined to describe the solar-stellar synergisms in the investigation of the generation, emergence and coupling of magnetic fields with the outer solar-stellar atmosphere to produce what we broadly refer to as magnetic activity. With the discovery of literally thousands of planets beyond our solar system, the Solar-Stellar-Planet Connection is quickly emerging as a new area of investigation of the impacts of magnetic activity on exoplanet atmospheres. In parallel with this rapid evolution in our perspectives is the advent of transformative facilities for the study of the Sun and the dynamic Universe. The primary focus of this invited talk will be on photometric variations in solar-type stars and the Sun. These brightness variations are associated with thermal homogeneities typically defined by magnetic structures that are also spatially coincident with key radiative proxies. Photometric variability in solar-type stars and the Sun includes transient brightening, rotational modulation by cool spots and cycle-related variability, each with a characteristic signature in time and wavelength. The emphasis of this presentation will be on the relationship between broadband photometric variations and magnetic field-related activity in solar-type stars and the Sun. Facets of this topic will be discussed both retrospectively and prospectively as we enter a revolutionary, new era for astronomy.

  8. JPSS-1 VIIRS solar diffuser stability monitor response versus sun angle of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgai, Vijay; Yu, Kristie; Nelson, Neil; McCarthy, James

    2015-09-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite in orbit as well as for the upcoming Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). VIIRS collects Earth radiometry and imagery in 22 spectral from 0.4 to 12.5 μm. Radiometric calibration of the reflective bands in the 0.4 to 2.5 μm wavelength range is performed by measuring the sunlight reflectance from Solar Diffuser Assembly (diffuser is Spectralon®). Spectralon® is known to solarize due to sun UV exposure at the blue end of the spectrum (~0.4 - 0.6+ μm) as seen by laboratory tests as well as on orbit data from MODIS and NPP. VIIRS uses a Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM) to monitor the change in the Solar Diffuser reflectance in the 0.4 - 0.94 μm wavelength range to correct the calibration constants. The SDSM measures the ratio of sun light reflecting from the Solar Diffuser to a direct view of the sun. As the intensity of the light reaching the SDSM in both Solar Diffuser view and sun view is a function of the sun's angle of incidence (AOI), the SDSM response to sun AOI has to be characterized. This paper presents details of the test setup including an extended collimated source simulating the sun across all SDSM bands. The prelaunch characterization results for the JPSS-1 (J1) VIIRS SDSM are presented. Comparison with NPP on orbit yaw maneuver SDSM results shows similar behavior demonstrating that the J1 test successfully characterized the SDSM response to sun AOI.

  9. The Sun. A typical star in the solar neighborhood?

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Sun is used as the fundamental standard in chemical abundance studies, thus it is important to know whether the solar abundance pattern is representative of the solar neighborhood. Albeit at low precision (0.05 - 0.10 dex) the Sun seems to be a typical solar-metallicity disk star, at high precision (0.01 dex) its abundance pattern seems abnormal when compared to solar twins. The Sun shows a deficiency of refractory elements that could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets. The formation of giant planets may also introduce a signature in the chemical composition of stars. We discuss both planet signatures and also the enhancement of neutron-capture elements in the solar twin 18 Sco.

  10. Climate and weather of the Sun-Earth system (CAWSES) highlights from a priority program

    CERN Document Server

    Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System) is the most important scientific program of SCOSTEP (Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics). CAWSES has triggered a scientific priority program within the German Research Foundation for a period of 6 years. Approximately 30 scientific institutes and 120 scientists were involved in Germany with strong links to international partners. The priority program focuses on solar influence on climate, atmospheric coupling processes, and space climatology. This book summarizes the most important results from this program covering some impor

  11. Solar influence on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that variations in solar activity have had a significant influence on Earth's climate. However, the mechanisms responsible for a solar influence are still not known. One possibility is that atmospheric transparency is influenced by changing cloud properties...... via cosmic ray ionisation (the latter being modulated by solar activity). Support for this idea is found from satellite observations of cloud cover. Such data have revealed a striking correlation between the intensity of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and low liquid clouds (... and thereby influence the radiative properties of clouds. If the GCR-Cloud link is confirmed variations in galactic cosmic ray flux, caused by changes in solar activity and the space environment, could influence Earth's radiation budget....

  12. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: II. SLOW EVENTS AND COMPARISON WITH OTHERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Chi; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D., E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25, and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of Liu et al. to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20–30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level; (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration; (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have speeds comparable to the average solar wind level before reaching 1 au; (4) slow CMEs have a high potential to interact with other solar wind structures in the Sun–Earth space due to their slow motion, providing critical ingredients to enhance space weather; and (5) the slow CMEs studied here lack strong magnetic fields at the Earth but tend to preserve a flux-rope structure with an axis generally perpendicular to the radial direction from the Sun. We also suggest a “best” strategy for the application of a triangulation concept in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, which helps to clarify confusions about CME geometry assumptions in the triangulation and to improve CME analysis and observations.

  13. Full-Sun observations for identifying the source of the slow solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P

    2015-01-06

    Fast (>700 km s(-1)) and slow (~400 km s(-1)) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full-disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Our map provides a full-Sun observation that combines three key ingredients for identifying the sources: velocity, plasma composition and magnetic topology and shows them as solar wind composition plasma outflowing on open magnetic field lines. The area coverage of the identified sources is large enough that the sum of their mass contributions can explain a significant fraction of the mass loss rate of the solar wind.

  14. Full-Sun observations for identifying the source of the slow solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, David H; Warren, Harry P

    2016-01-01

    Fast (>700 km/s) and slow (~400 km/s) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full- disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Our map provides a full-Sun observation that combines three key ingredients for identifying the sources: velocity, plasma composition and magnetic topology and shows them as solar wind composition plasma outflowing on open magnetic field lines. The area coverage of the identified sources is large enough that the sum of their mass contributions can explain a significant fraction of the mass loss rate of the solar wind.

  15. Design of solar cell lighting and sun tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaing, A.A. [Mandalay Technological Univ., Mandalay (Myanmar); Ministry of Science, Yangon (Myanmar)

    2008-07-01

    A solar cell lighting and sun tracking system was discussed and the characteristics of solar cells were studied. An SM50H solar module was analyzed with a maximum power rating of 50 W and a current rate of 3.15 A. The main components of the system include solar cells, charged controllers, and a sun tracking system. The solar tracker is an automatic control system designed to track the solar modules in relation to the sun's direction. A linear drive actuator was used to track the modules with an energy consumption rate between 24 and 36 DC voltages. Power output solar cell equations were presented along with a review of batteries used for stationary and portable solar energy equipment. Issues related to cost of tracking systems were discussed. System sizing recommendations were provided, and solar cell design requirements were reviewed. A comparison of tracking and fixed solar energy systems was presented for a day in Yangon, Myanmar. It was concluded that solar tracking systems can be used to provide energy in rural and remote areas. 18 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. A Community Python Library for Solar Physics (SunPy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, A. Y.; Ireland, J.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Mumford, S.; Hughitt, V. K.; Hewett, R.; Mayer, F.; SunPy Dev Team

    2013-07-01

    Python, a free, cross platform, general purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community resulting in the availability of a large range of software, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning to spectral analysis and visualization (Matplotlib). SunPy is a data analysis toolkit specializing in providing the software necessary to analyze solar and heliospheric datasets in Python. It aims to provide a free and open-source alternative to the IDL-based SolarSoft (SSW) solar data analysis environment. We present the latest release of SunPy (0.3). This release includes a major refactor of the main SunPy code to improve ease of use for the user as well as a more consistent interface. SunPy provides downloading capability through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) and the the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK). It can open image fits files from major solar missions (SDO/AIA, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO) into WCS-aware maps. SunPy provides advanced time-series tools for data from mission such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and Proba2/LYRA as well as support for radio spectra (e.g. e-Callisto). We present examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing data analysis tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy.

  17. Successful Heliophysical Programs Emphasizing the Relation of Earth and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. A.; Reiff, P.; Sumners, C.; McKay, G. A.

    2007-05-01

    Heliophysical is defined as the interconnectedness of the entire solar-heliospheric-planetary system. Our goals are to introduce easily accessible programs that introduce the Sun and other solar system processes to the public. The programs emphasize the impact of these processes on Earth and its inhabitants over geological time. These types of programs are important as these topics as generally taught as a secondary concept rather than an integrated approach. Space Weather is an excellent mechanism for integrating Earth and space science. Heliophysics, which includes Space Weather, is traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand the effect of the Sun's atmosphere on Earth or the intense effects energetic particles can have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include effects on Earth's magnetosphere which, in turn, affect radio transmission, GPS accuracy, and on occasion spacecraft loss and terrestrial power outages. Meteoritic impacts are another topic. Impacts on planetary bodies without strong plate tectonic activities provide ample evidence of their occurrence over geological time. As an analog, impacts have also had an extensive record on Earth, but plate tectonics have been responsible for obliterating most of the evidence. We have developed effective and engaging venues for teaching heliophysics, via the internet, CD-Rom's, museum kiosks, and planetarium shows. We have organized workshops for teachers; "NASA Days" and "Sally Ride Festivals" for students, and "Sun-Earth Day" events for the public. Our goals are both to increase k-16 and public literacy on heliophysical processes and to inspire the next generation to enhance the workforce. We will be offering examples of these programs, as well as distributing CD's and DVD's of some of the creative works.

  18. Solar-Terrestrial Relations: An Undergraduate-Level Introduction to the Sun, Space Weather, and the Sun-Climate Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Michigan offers a 300-level course entitled, "Solar-Terrestrial Relations," taken by all of the undergraduate students in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences department. This is the first class in the space physics courses leading to a concentration in Space Weather. The course provides an overview of the Sun and solar radiation, both photon and particle, and its variability on all time scales. The effects of this variability on the near-Earth space environment and the Earth's climate are then discussed. The class content is a mixture of conceptual, theoretical, and analytical techniques. The students spend one session a week in a computer lab visiting data websites, downloading and processing the numbers, and interpreting the results. In addition to homework sets and exams, the students also do two projects, both including written and oral reports. The first is a space weather event analysis in which each student is assigned a storm day and they must determine the solar source and whether there was aurora over Ann Arbor during the event. The second project is a group effort on some aspect of the Sun-climate relationship, in which they are given a hypothesis and must conduct a literature search and data analysis exercise to support or refute it.

  19. The oxygen isotopic composition of the Sun inferred from captured solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeegan, K D; Kallio, A P A; Heber, V S; Jarzebinski, G; Mao, P H; Coath, C D; Kunihiro, T; Wiens, R C; Nordholt, J E; Moses, R W; Reisenfeld, D B; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    All planetary materials sampled thus far vary in their relative abundance of the major isotope of oxygen, (16)O, such that it has not been possible to define a primordial solar system composition. We measured the oxygen isotopic composition of solar wind captured and returned to Earth by NASA's Genesis mission. Our results demonstrate that the Sun is highly enriched in (16)O relative to the Earth, Moon, Mars, and bulk meteorites. Because the solar photosphere preserves the average isotopic composition of the solar system for elements heavier than lithium, we conclude that essentially all rocky materials in the inner solar system were enriched in (17)O and (18)O, relative to (16)O, by ~7%, probably via non-mass-dependent chemistry before accretion of the first planetesimals.

  20. Axion mechanism of the Sun luminosity and solar dynamo - geodynamo connection

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Kudela, K; Mavrodiev, S Cht; Sharph, I V; Zelentsova, T N; Smolyar, V P; Merkotan, K K

    2010-01-01

    We show existence of strong negative correlation between the temporal varia-tions of magnetic field toroidal component of the solar tachocline (the bottom of convective zone) and the Earth magnetic field (Y-component). The possibility that hypothetical solar axions, which can transform into photons in external electric or magnetic fields (the inverse Primakoff effect), can be the instrument by which the magnetic field of convective zone of the Sun modulates the magnetic field of the Earth is considered. We propose the axion mechanism of Sun luminosity and "solar dynamo - geodynamo" connection, where an energy of solar axions emitted in M1 transition in 57Fe nuclei is modulated at first by the magnetic field of the solar tachocline zone (due to the inverse coherent Primakoff effect) and after that is resonance absorbed in the core of the Earth, thereby playing the role of an energy source and a modulator of the Earth magnetic field. Within the framework of this mechanism estimations of the strength of an axion...

  1. Circuits in the Sun: Solar Panel Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfroerer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Typical commercial solar panels consist of approximately 60 individual photovoltaic cells connected in series. Since the usual Kirchhoff rules apply, the current is uniform throughout the circuit, while the electric potential of the individual devices is cumulative. Hence, a solar panel is a good analog of a simple resistive series circuit, except…

  2. Circuits in the Sun: Solar Panel Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfroerer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Typical commercial solar panels consist of approximately 60 individual photovoltaic cells connected in series. Since the usual Kirchhoff rules apply, the current is uniform throughout the circuit, while the electric potential of the individual devices is cumulative. Hence, a solar panel is a good analog of a simple resistive series circuit, except…

  3. The solar chimney. Electricity from the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiel, W. [Schlaich, Bergermann und Partner, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Current energy production from coal and oil is damaging to the environment and non-renewable. Many developing countries cannot afford these energy sources, and nuclear power stations are an unacceptable risk in many locations. Inadequate energy supplies can lead to high energy costs as well as to proverty, which commonly results in population explosions. Sensible technology for the use of solar power must be simple and reliable, accessible to the technologically less developed countries that are sunny and often have limited raw materials resources, should not need cooling water or produce waste heat and should be based on environmentally sound production from renewable materials. The solar chimney meets these conditions and makes it possible to take the crucial step towards a global solar energy economy. Large scale solar chimneys can be built now without any technical problems and at defined costs. (orig.)

  4. Solar journey: The significance of our galactic environment for the heliosphere and earth

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Priscilla C

    2006-01-01

    Humans evolved when the Sun was in the great void of the Local Bubble. The Sun entered the present environment of interstellar clouds only during the late Quaternary. Astronomical data reveal these long and short term changes in our galactic environment. Theoretical models then tell us how these changes affect interplanetary particles, planetary magnetospheres, and the Earth itself. Cosmic rays leave an isotopic signature in the paleoclimate record that helps trace the solar journey through space. "Solar Journey: The Significance of Our Galactic Environment for the Heliosphere and Earth" lays the foundation for an interdisciplinary study of the influence of interstellar material on the solar system and Earth as we travel through the Milky Way Galaxy. The solar wind bubble responds dynamically to interstellar material flowing past the Sun, regulating interstellar gas, dust, and cosmic particle fluxes in the interplanetary medium and the Earth. Cones of interstellar gas and dust focused by solar gravity, the ma...

  5. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  6. Solar wind induced magnetic field around the unmagnetized Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Birk, G T; Konz, C

    2004-01-01

    The Earth is a planet with a dipolar magnetic field which is agitated by a magnetized plasma wind streaming from the Sun. The magnetic field shields the Earth's surface from penetrating high energy solar wind particles, as well as interstellar cosmic rays. The magnetic dipole has reversed sign some hundreds of times over the last 400 million years. These polarity reversals correspond to drastic breakdowns of the dynamo action. The question arises what the consequences for the Earth's atmosphere, climate, and, in particular, biosphere are. It is shown by kinematic estimates and three-dimensional plasma-neutral gas simulations that the solar wind can induce very fast a magnetic field in the previously completely unmagnetized Earth's ionosphere that is strong enough to protect Earth from cosmic radiations comparable to the case of an intact magnetic dynamo.

  7. Hybrid solar cells : Perovskites under the Sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loi, Maria Antonietta; Hummelen, Jan C.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed-halide organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites are reported to display electron–hole diffusion lengths over 1 μm. This observation provides important insight into the charge-carrier dynamics of this class of semiconductors and increases the expectations for highly efficient and cheap solar cells.

  8. Signals from the planets, via the Sun to the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, J.-E.

    2013-12-01

    The best method for identification of planetary forcing of the Earth's climate is to investigate periodic variations in climate time series. Some natural frequencies in the Earth climate system seem to be synchronized to planetary cycles, and amplified to a level of detection. The response by the Earth depends on location, and in global averaged series, some planetary signals may be below detection. Comparing sea level rise with sunspot variations, we find phase variations, and even a phase reversal. A periodogram of the global temperature shows that the Earth amplifies other periods than observed in sunspots. A particular case is that the Earth amplifies the 22 yr Hale period, and not the 11 yr Schwabe period. This may be explained by alternating peak or plateau appearance of cosmic ray counts. Among longer periods, the Earth amplifies the 60 yr planetary period and keeps the phase during centennials. The recent global warming may be interpreted as a rising branch of a millennium cycle, identified in ice cores and sediments and also recorded in history. This cycle peaks in the second half of this century, and then a 500 yr cooling trend will start. An expected solar grand minimum due to a 200 yr cycle will introduce additional cooling in the first part of this century.

  9. Sun-earth environment study to understand earthquake prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Earthquake prediction is possible by looking into the location of active sunspots before it harbours energy towards earth. Earth is a restless planet the restlessness turns deadly occasionally. Of all natural hazards, earthquakes are the most feared. For centuries scientists working in seismically active regions have noted premonitory signals. Changes in thermosphere, Ionosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere are noted before the changes in geosphere. The historical records talk of changes of the water level in wells, of strange weather, of ground-hugging fog, of unusual behaviour of animals (due to change in magnetic field of the earth) that seem to feel the approach of a major earthquake. With the advent of modern science and technology the understanding of these pre-earthquake signals has become stronger enough to develop a methodology of earthquake prediction. A correlation of earth directed coronal mass ejection (CME) from the active sunspots has been possible to develop as a precursor of the earthquake. Occasional local magnetic field and planetary indices (Kp values) changes in the lower atmosphere that is accompanied by the formation of haze and a reduction of moisture in the air. Large patches, often tens to hundreds of thousands of square kilometres in size, seen in night-time infrared satellite images where the land surface temperature seems to fluctuate rapidly. Perturbations in the ionosphere at 90 - 120 km altitude have been observed before the occurrence of earthquakes. These changes affect the transmission of radio waves and a radio black out has been observed due to CME. Another heliophysical parameter Electron flux (Eflux) has been monitored before the occurrence of the earthquakes. More than hundreds of case studies show that before the occurrence of the earthquakes the atmospheric temperature increases and suddenly drops before the occurrence of the earthquakes. These changes are being monitored by using Sun Observatory Heliospheric observatory

  10. Solar probe mission: close encounter with the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Stdt Team

    The Solar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) recently completed a detailed study of the Solar Probe Mission based on an earliest launch date of October 2014. Solar Probe, when implemented, will be the first close encounter by a spacecraft with a star (i.e., 3 RS above the Sun's photosphere). The report and its executive summary were published by NASA (NASA/TM-2005-212786) in September 2005 and can be found at the website http://solarprobe.gsfc.nasa.gov/. A description of the science will appear in Reviews of Geophysics article led by D. J. McComas. For this talk, we presented the consensus view of the STDT including a brief description of the scientific goals, a description of the overall mission, including trajectory scenarios, spacecraft description and proposed scientific payload. We will discuss all these topics and the importance of flying the Solar Probe mission both with regard to understanding fundamental issues of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating near the Sun and Solar Probe's unique role in understanding the acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), which is critical to future Human Exploration.

  11. Planetary influence on the young Sun's evolution: the solar neutrino probe

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, Ilidio

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations of solar twin stars with planetary systems like the Sun, have uncovered that these present a peculiar surface chemical composition. This is believed to be related to the formation of earth-like planets. This suggests that twin stars have a radiative interior that is richer in heavy elements than their envelopes. Moreover, the current standard solar model does not fully agree with the helioseismology data and solar neutrino flux measurements. In this work, we find that this agreement can improve if the Sun has mass loss during the pre-main sequence, as was previously shown by other groups. Despite this better agreement, the internal composition of the Sun is still uncertain, especially for elements heavier than helium. With the goal of inferring the chemical abundance of the solar interior, we tested several chemical compositions. We found that heavy element abundances influence the sound speed and solar neutrinos equally. Nevertheless, the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO;13N, 15O and 17F) neut...

  12. SunPy 0.8 - Python for Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Andrew; Bobra, Monica; Christe, Steven; Hewett, Russell; Ireland, Jack; Mumford, Stuart; Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Perez-Suarez, David; Reardon, Kevin P.; Savage, Sabrina; Shih, Albert Y.; Ryan, Daniel; Sipocz, Brigitta; Freij, Nabil

    2017-08-01

    SunPy is a community-developed open-source software library for solar physics. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language which is being increasingly adopted throughout the scientific community. Python is one of the top ten most often used programming languages, as such it provides a wide array of software packages, such as numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy), machine learning (scikit-learn), signal processing (scikit-image, statsmodels) to visualization and plotting (matplotlib, mayavi). SunPy aims to provide the software for obtaining and analyzing solar and heliospheric data. This poster introduces a new major release of SunPy (0.8). This release includes two major new functionalities, as well as a number of bug fixes. It is based on 1120 contributions from 34 unique contributors. Fido is the new primary interface to download data. It provides a consistent and powerful search interface to all major data sources provides including VSO, JSOC, as well as individual data sources such as GOES XRS time series and and is fully pluggable to add new data sources, i.e. DKIST. In anticipation of Solar Orbiter and the Parker Solar Probe, SunPy now provides a powerful way of representing coordinates, allowing conversion between coordinate systems and viewpoints of different instruments, including preliminary reprojection capabilities. Other new features including new timeseries capabilities with better support for concatenation and metadata, updated documentation and example gallery. SunPy is distributed through pip and conda and all of its code is publicly available (sunpy.org).

  13. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: 2. Slow Events and Comparison with Others

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Chi; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25 and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of \\citet{liu13} to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20-30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level, (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration, (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have a speed comparable to the a...

  14. Sun-Earth Day: Reaching the Education Audience by Informal Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-01-01

    For ten years the Sun-Earth Day program has promoted Heliophysics education to ever larger audiences through events centered on attractive annual themes. What originally started out as a one day event quickly evolved into a series of programs and events that occur throughout the year culminating with a celebration on or near the Spring Equinox. The events are often formal broadcasts or webcasts seeking to convey the science behind the latest solar-terrestrial mission discoveries. This has been quite successful, but it is clear that the younger generation increasingly depends on social networking approaches and informal news transmission for learning what is happening in the world around them. For 2010, the Sun-Earth Day team put emphasis on using informal approaches to bring the theme to the audience. The main event, a webcast from the NASA booth at the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) annual meeting by the NASA EDGE group, took a lighthearted and offbeat approach to interviewing scientists and educators about Heliophysics news. NASA EDGE programs are unscripted and unpredictable, and that represents a different approach to getting the message across. The webcast was supplemented by a number of social networking avenues. The Sun-Earth Day program explored a wide range of social media applications including Facebook, Twitter, NING, podcasting, iPhone apps, etc. Each of these offers unique and effective methods to promote Heliophysics content and mission related highlights. The facebook site was quite popular and message posting there told the Sun-Earth Day story piece by piece. The same could be said of twittering and the tweetup held at the NSTA site. Has all of this been effective? Results are still being gathered, but anecdotal responses from the world seem very positive. What other methods might be used in the future to bring the science to a personal hands-on, interactive experience? Outcomes: Participants will: (1) Be introduced to the Sun-Earth

  15. MWA Observations of Solar Radio Bursts and the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, I.; Oberoi, D.; Morgan, J.; Bastian, T.; Bhatnagar, S.; Bisi, M.; Benkevitch, L.; Bowman, J.; Donea, A.; Giersch, O.; Jackson, B.; Chat, G. L.; Golub, L.; Hariharan, K.; Herne, D.; Kasper, J.; Kennewell, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Lobzin, V.; Matthews, L.; Mohan, A.; Padmanabhan, J.; Pankratius, V.; Pick, M.; Subramanian, P.; Ramesh, R.; Raymond, J.; Reeves, K.; Rogers, A.; Sharma, R.; Tingay, S.; Tremblay, S.; Tripathi, D.; Webb, D.; White, S.; Abidin, Z. B. Z.

    2017-01-01

    A hundred hours of observing time for solar observations is requested during the 2017-A observing semester. These data will be used to address science objectives for solar burst science (Goal A), studies of weak non-thermal radiation (Goal B) and quiet sun science (Goal C). Goal A will focus on detailed investigations of individual events seen in the MWA data, using the unsurpassed spectroscopic imaging ability of the MWA to address some key solar physics questions. Detailed observations of type II bursts, of which MWA has observed two, will be one focus, with MWA polarimetric imaging observations of type III bursts another focus. Goal B will address studies of the numerous short lived and narrow band emission features, significantly weaker than those seen by most other instruments revealed by the MWA. These emission features do not resemble any known types of solar bursts, but are possible signatures of "nanoflares" which have long been suspected to play a role in coronal heating. A large database of these events is needed to be able to reliably estimate their contribution to coronal heating. These observations will contribute to this database. Goal C will focus on characterizing the Sun's background thermal emission, their short and long term variability and looking for evidence of a scattering disc around the Sun.

  16. Neutrino measurements from the Sun and Earth: Results from Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; D’Angelo, D.; Giammarchi, M.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Ranucci, G., E-mail: gioacchino.ranucci@mi.infn.it; Re, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi e INFN, 20133 Milano (Italy); Benziger, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Bick, D.; Hagner, C.; Meyer, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Bonfini, G.; Cavalcante, P.; Gabriele, F.; Gazzana, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Laubenstein, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, 67100 Assergi (Italy); and others

    2015-07-15

    Important neutrino results came recently from Borexino, a massive, calorimetric liquid scintillator detector installed at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. With its unprecedented radiopurity levels achieved in the core of the detection medium, it is the only experiment in operation able to study in real time solar neutrino interactions in the challenging sub-MeV energy region. The recently achieved breakthrough observation of the fundamental pp flux, the precise measurement of the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux, and the results concerning the pep, {sup 8}B and CNO fluxes, together with their physics implications, are described in this work. Moreover, the detector has also provided a clean detection of terrestrial neutrinos, from which they emerge as a new probe of the interior of the Earth.

  17. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  18. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Given a solar luminosity LAr = 0.75L0 at the beginning of the Archean 3.8 Ga ago, where L0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance, r, of the Earth was rAr = 0.956r0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as IAr = 0.82I0. It would have allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface, which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3.8 to 2.5 Ga ago, a relative recession per year as large as r˙/r ≈3.4 × 10−11 a−1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3.8 Ga ago HAr = 1.192H0 = 8.2 × 10−11 a−1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth’s recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of gravitation with nonminimal coupling between the matter and the metric naturally predicts a secular variation of the relative distance of a localized two-body system, thus yielding a potentially viable candidate to explain the putative recession of the Earth’s orbit. Another competing mechanism of classical origin that could, in principle, allow for the desired effect is the mass loss, which either the Sun or the Earth itself may have experienced during the Archean. On the one hand, this implies that our planet should have lost 2% of its present mass in the form of eroded/evaporated hydrosphere. On the other hand, it is widely believed that the Sun could have lost mass at an enhanced rate, due to a stronger solar wind in the past for not more than ≈ 0.2–0.3 Ga.

  19. Solar Energy Cell with Rare Earth Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Baojun; Yang Tao; Zhou Yao; Zhou Meng; Fu Xiliang; Fu Li

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic of the solar energy cell with the rare earth film according to theory of molecular structure was introduced.When sunlight shines, the molecules of the rare earth film can absorb energy of the photon and jump to the excited state from the basic state, and play a role in storing solar energy.When sunlight do not shine, the electron of the excited state returns to the basic state, the rare earth film can automatically give out light and shine to surface of the solar cell, which can make solar cell continuously generate electric current.The rare earth film can absorb direct,scattering sunlight, and increase density of solar energy to reach surface of the solar cell, and play focusing function.The rare earth film can bear 350 ~ 500 ℃, which make the solar cell be able to utilize the focusing function system.Because after luminescence of the rare earth film, it can release again the absorbed solar energy through 1 ~ 8 h, and play a role in storing solar energy; The solar cell with the rare-earth film can generate electricity during night and cloudy days, and remarkably increase efficiency of the solar cell.

  20. Optimal sun-alignment techniques of large solar arrays in electric propulsion spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissinger, H. F.; Dailey, C. L.; Valgora, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Optimum sun-alignment of large solar arrays in electric propulsion spacecraft operating in earth orbit requires periodic roll motions around the thrust axis, synchronized with the apparent conical motion of the sun line. This oscillation is sustained effectively with the aid of gravity gradient torques while only a small share of the total torque is being contributed by the attitude control system. Tuning the system for resonance requires an appropriate choice of moment-of-inertia characteristics. To minimize atmospheric drag at low orbital altitudes the solar array is oriented parallel, or nearly parallel, to the flight direction. This can increase the thrust-to-drag ratio by as much as an order of magnitude. Coupled with optimal roll orientation, this feathering technique will permit use of electric propulsion effectively at low altitudes in support of space shuttle or space station activities and in spiral ascent missions.

  1. Mission to the Sun-Earth L5 Lagrangian Point: An Optimal Platform for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-04-01

    The Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point is a uniquely advantageous location for space weather research and monitoring. It covers the "birth-to-impact" travel of solar transients; it enables imaging of solar activity at least 3 days prior to a terrestrial viewpoint and measures the solar wind conditions 4-5 days ahead of Earth impact. These observations, especially behind east limb magnetograms, will be a boon for background solar wind models, which are essential for coronal mass ejection (CME) and shock propagation forecasting. From an operational perspective, the L5 orbit is the space weather equivalent to the geosynchronous orbit for weather satellites. Optimal for both research and monitoring, an L5 mission is ideal for developing a Research-to-Operations capability in Heliophysics.

  2. Short term Variability of the Sun Earth System: An Overview of Progress Made during the CAWSES II Period

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yan, Yihua

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of results obtained during the CAWSES II period on the short term variability of the Sun and how it affects the near Earth space environment. CAWSES II was planned to examine the behavior of the solar terrestrial system as the solar activity climbed to its maximum phase in solar cycle 24. After a deep minimum following cycle 23, the Sun climbed to a very weak maximum in terms of the sunspot number in cycle 24 (MiniMax24), so many of the results presented here refer to this weak activity in comparison with cycle 23. The short term variability that has immediate consequence to Earth and geospace manifests as solar eruptions from closed field regions and high speed streams from coronal holes. Both electromagnetic (flares) and mass emissions (coronal mass ejections, CMEs) are involved in solar eruptions, while coronal holes result in high speed streams that collide with slow wind forming the so called corotating interaction regions (CIRs). Fast CMEs affect Earth via leading shocks ...

  3. Magnetic field and wind of Kappa Ceti: towards the planetary habitability of the young Sun when life arose on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, J -D do; Folsom, P Petit C; Castro, M; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; de Mello, G F Porto; Meibom, S; Jeffers, S V; Guinan, E; Ribas, I

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetic field measurements for Kappa1~Cet, a proxy of the young Sun when life arose on Earth. We carry out an analysis of the magnetic properties determined from spectropolarimetric observations and reconstruct its large-scale surface magnetic field to derive the magnetic environment, stellar winds and particle flux permeating the interplanetary medium around Kappa1~Cet. Our results show a closer magnetosphere and mass-loss rate of Mdot = 9.7 x 10^{-13} Msol/yr, i.e., a factor 50 times larger than the current solar wind mass-loss rate, resulting in a larger interaction via space weather disturbances between the stellar wind and a hypothetical young-Earth analogue, potentially affecting the planet's habitability. Interaction of the wind from the young Sun with the planetary ancient magnetic field may have affected the young Earth and its life conditions

  4. Solar sketching a comprehensive guide to drawing the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Rix, Erika; Russell, Sally; Handy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    From the authors of Sketching the Moon comes a comprehensive guide filled with richly illustrated, detailed drawing tutorials that cover a variety of solar phenomena. Time-honored, traditional methods and media are described in tandem with innovative techniques developed and shared by contemporary astronomical sketchers. Explanations of what to expect visually from white light, Hydrogen-alpha and Calcium K filters are provided for those new to solar observing, along with essential tips on equipment, observing techniques and the practicalities of drawing at the eyepiece. For the technically minded, detailed descriptions are given on how to use image manipulation software to bring your sketches to life through animation.   The Sun is the most visually dynamic object in our solar system and offers compelling, spectacular views. Knotted magnetic field lines give rise to powerful eruptions and form the intricate sunspots and arching prominences that make our nearest star one of the most exciting, yet challenging,...

  5. Earth-moon Trajectory Optimization Using Solar Electric Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The optimization of the Earth-moon trajectory using solar electric propulsion is presented. A feasible method is proposed to optimize the transfer trajectory starting from a low Earth circular orbit (500 km altitude) to a low lunar circular orbit (200 km altitude). Due to the use of low-thrust solar electric propulsion, the entire transfer trajectory consists of hundreds or even thousands of orbital revolutions around the Earth and the moon. The Earth-orbit ascending (from low Earth orbit to high Earth orbit) and lunar descending (from high lunar orbit to low lunar orbit) trajectories in the presence of J2 perturbations and shadowing effect are computed by an analytic orbital averaging technique. A direct/indirect method is used to optimize the control steering for the trans-lunar trajectory segment, a segment fiom a high Earth orbit to a high lunar orbit, with a fixed thrust-coast-thrust engine sequence. For the trans-lunar trajectory segment, the equations of motion are expressed in the inertial coordinates about the Earth and the moon using a set of nonsingular equinoctial elements inclusive of the gravitational forces of the sun, the Earth, and the moon. By way of the analytic orbital averaging technique and the direct/indirect method, the Earth-moon transfer problem is converted to a parameter optimization problem, and the entire transfer trajectory is formulated and optimized in the form of a single nonlinear optimization problem with a small number of variables and constraints. Finally, an example of an Earth-moon transfer trajectory using solar electric propulsion is demonstrated.

  6. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  7. Long Term Missions at the Sun-Earth Libration Point L1: ACE, SOHO, and WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Three heliophysics missions -- the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Global Geoscience WIND -- have been orbiting the Sun-Earth interior libration point L1 continuously since 1997, 1996, and 2004, respectively. ACE and WIND (both NASA missions) and SOHO (an ESA-NASA joint mission) are all operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). While ACE and SOHO have been dedicated libration point orbiters since their launches, WIND has had also a remarkable 10-year career flying a deep-space, multiple lunar-flyby trajectory prior to 2004. That era featured 36 targeted lunar flybys with excursions to both L1 and L2 before its final insertion in L1 orbit. A figure depicts the orbits of the three spacecraft, showing projections of the orbits onto the orthographic planes of a solar rotating ecliptic frame of reference. The SOHO orbit is a quasi-periodic halo orbit, where the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are practically equal. Such an orbit is seen to repeat itself with a period of approximately 178 days. For ACE and WIND, the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are unequal, giving rise to the characteristic Lissajous motion. ACE's orbit is of moderately small amplitude, whereas WIND's orbit is a large-amplitude Lissajous of dimensions close to those of the SOHO halo orbit. As motion about the collinear points is inherently unstable, stationkeeping maneuvers are necessary to prevent orbital decay and eventual escape from the L1 region. Though the three spacecraft are dissimilar (SOHO is a 3-axis stabilized Sun pointer, WIND is a spin-stabilized ecliptic pole pointer, and ACE is also spin-stabilized with its spin axis maintained between 4 and 20 degrees of the Sun), the stationkeeping technique for the three is fundamentally the same. The technique consists of correcting the energy of the orbit via a delta-V directed parallel or anti-parallel to the Spacecraft-to-Sun line. SOHO

  8. The Suess-Urey mission (return of solar matter to Earth).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, D; Naderi, F; Neugebauer, M; Sevilla, D; Sweetnam, D; Burnett, D; Wiens, R; Smith, N; Clark, B; McComas, D; Stansbery, E

    1996-01-01

    The Suess-Urey (S-U) mission has been proposed as a NASA Discovery mission to return samples of matter from the Sun to the Earth for isotopic and chemical analyses in terrestrial laboratories to provide a major improvement in our knowledge of the average chemical and isotopic composition of the solar system. The S-U spacecraft and sample return capsule will be placed in a halo orbit around the L1 Sun-Earth libration point for two years to collect solar wind ions which implant into large passive collectors made of ultra-pure materials. Constant Spacecraft-Sun-Earth geometries enable simple spin stabilized attitude control, simple passive thermal control, and a fixed medium gain antenna. Low data requirements and the safety of a Sun-pointed spinner, result in extremely low mission operations costs.

  9. Searching for Earth-like planets in this solar system and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth sits in a narrow habitable zone, and its future habitability depends on the actions of those who inhabit the planet today. Earth's complex climate reflects interactions between its interior, surface, oceans, biosphere, atmosphere and its star - our sun. Studying the climates of other planets around our sun - Mars, Venus and Titan - can help us better understand the processes that control climate here on Earth. These three bodies provide compelling targets for future study as we explore beyond our solar system to find Earth-like worlds around other stars.

  10. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence in Earth's Solar Transit Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, astronomers have detected thousands of planets and planet candidates by observing their periodic transits in front of their host stars. A related transit method, called transit spectroscopy, might soon allow studies of the chemical imprints of life in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. We here address the reciprocal question, namely, from where is Earth detectable by extrasolar observers using similar methods. Thus, we explore the Earth's transit zone (ETZ), the projection of a band around the Earth's ecliptic onto the celestial plane, where observers can detect Earth transits across the Sun. The ETZ is between $0.520^\\circ$ and $0.537^\\circ$ wide due to the non-circular Earth orbit. The restricted ETZ (rETZ), where the Earth transits the Sun less than 0.5 solar radii from its center, is about $0.262^\\circ$ wide. We compile a target list of 45 K and 37 G dwarf stars inside the rETZ and within 1 kiloparsec (about 3260 lightyears). We construct an analytic galactic disk model and find th...

  11. Evidence for Correlations Between Nuclear Decay Rates and Earth-Sun Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jere H; Buncher, John B; Gruenwald, John T; Krause, Dennis E; Mattes, Joshua J

    2008-01-01

    Unexplained periodic fluctuations in the decay rates of Si-32 and Ra-226 have been reported by groups at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Si-32), and at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesandstalt in Germany (Ra-226). We show from an analysis of the raw data in these experiments that the observed fluctuations are strongly correlated in time, not only with each other, but also with the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Some implications of these results are also discussed, including the suggestion that discrepancies in published half-life determinations for these and other nuclides may be attributable in part to differences in solar activity during the course of the various experiments, or to seasonal variations in fundamental constants.

  12. Challenges of modeling solar disturbances' arrival times at the Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. T. WU; Ai-Hua WANG; C. D. FRY; XueShang FENG; Chin-Chun WU; Murray DRYER

    2008-01-01

    In recent years remarkable advances have been made in the development of phys-ics based models of various parts of the solar-terrestrial system (see JASTP special issues, October, November 2004; February 2007). In this paper, we focus our dis-cussions in a specific region of the Sun to the Earth's environment (i.e. 1 AU). It is well-known that geomagnetic storms are caused by solar eruptions. The conse-quences of these storms include particle acceleration, solar wind impact on the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere, UV-EUV radiation effects on the lower at-mosphere, etc. One of the main challenges is to predict the arrival time at 1 AU of the solar disturbance. The prospects look good for an accurate, real-time forecast scheme built on the acquisition of solar, heliosphere and the near-Earth data and large-scale models. However, the accuracy of these models still needs improve-ment. We will discuss the present status of the models and challenges to improve the simulation models.

  13. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part I. Energy, Society, and the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A collection of magazine articles which were selected for information on solar energy is presented in this booklet. This booklet is the first of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. The articles provide brief discussions on topics such as the power of the sun, solar energy developments for homes, solar energy versus power plants, solar access laws, and the role of utilities with respect to the sun's energy. (BCS)

  14. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  15. New Frontiers/Hale Prize Lecture: Coronal Mass Ejections, the Most Powerful Drivers of the Sun-Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-05-01

    A large Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) can consist of billions of tonnes of matter, along with entangled magnetic field, erupting from the Sun at speeds well over 1,000 km/s. These giant disruptions of the solar atmosphere drive the most destructive space weather at Earth and throughout the solar system. Furthermore, CMEs are the most dramatic example of how slowly-evolving processes on the Sun can conspire to produce explosive activity. Understanding their origin has long been a central objective for space physics research. This talk will present some of the latest observations and theories for CMEs and discuss the outstanding challenges to modeling and predicting their initiation. This work was supported in part by NASA and ONR.

  16. Young Sun, Early Earth and the Origins of Life Lessons for Astrobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    - How did the Sun come into existence? - How was the Earth formed? - How long has Earth been the way it is now, with its combination of oceans and continents? - How do you define “life”? - How did the first life forms emerge? - What conditions made it possible for living things to evolve? All these questions are answered in this colourful textbook addressing undergraduate students in "Origins of Life" courses and the scientifically interested public. The authors take the reader on an amazing voyage through time, beginning five thousand million years ago in a cloud of interstellar dust and ending five hundred million years ago, when the living world that we see today was finally formed. A chapter on exoplanets provides an overview of the search for planets outside the solar system, especially for habitable ones. The appendix closes the book with a glossary, a bibliography of further readings and a summary of the Origins of the Earth and life in fourteen boxes.

  17. Chemical Impact of Solar Energetic Particle Event From The Young Sun: Implications for the Origin of Prebiotic Chemistry and the Fain Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, V.; Gronoff, G.; Hébrard, E.; Danchi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how the simple molecules present on the early Earth and possibly Mars may have set a path for complex biological molecules, the building blocks of life, represents one of greatest unsolved questions. Here we present a new model of the rise of the abiotic nitrogen fixation and associated pre-biotic chemistry in the early Earth and Mars atmosphere mediated by solar eruptive events. Our physical models of interaction of magnetic clouds ejected from the young Sun with magnetospheres of the early Earth show significant perturbations of geomagnetic fields that produce extended polar caps. These polar caps provide pathways for energetic particles associated with magnetic clouds to penetrate into the nitrogen-rich weakly reducing atmosphere and initiate the reactive chemistry by breaking molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, methane and producing hydrogen cyanide, the essential compound for life. The model also shows that contrary to the current models of warming of early Earth and Mars, major atmospheric constituents, CO2 and CH4 will be destroyed due to collisional dissociation with energetic particles. Instead, efficient formation of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide, as a by-product of these processes is expected. This mechanism can consistently explain the Faint Young Sun's paradox for the early atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Our new model provides insight into how life may have initiated on Earth and Mars and how to search for the spectral signatures on planets "pregnant" with the potential for life.

  18. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interactive Data Language (IDL) is a standard tool used by many researchers in observational fields. Present day Sun-Earth Connection missions like SOHO, or...

  19. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  20. Thermal design of solar observer at L1 Lagrangian point in Sun-Earth system%日-地系拉格朗日 L1点太阳观测器热设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祥; 李义; 杨献伟

    2013-01-01

    对将运行于日-地L1点的太阳观测器进行了热设计,重点论述了日-地L1点的轨道外热流计算和Lyman α日冕仪(LACI)反射镜M2光阱、Lyman α日冕成像仪(LADI)滤光片组件、CCD组件、电箱、观测器主体等部分的热设计方案。通过在探测器对日面设置集热板,将观测器的主动加热功耗降低了73%;选用预埋热管的设计方案解决了对日定向观测导致的框架温差问题。仿真分析结果表明,在对日高温工作、对日低温工作、低温存储、轨道转移等4个极端工况下,观测器各组件温度均满足指标要求。该热设计方案以较低的加热功耗,解决了太阳观测器在轨工作阶段的散热、轨道转移阶段的保温等问题,满足CCD焦面工作温度<-50℃的要求。%To ensure the temperature requirements of the solar observer working at L 1 Lagrangian point , the thermal design for Lyman αCoronagraphy Imager(LACI) and Lyman αDisk Image(LADI) was carried out, and the heat flux of the orbit was calculated .The thermal designs of light trap , filter components , detector com-ponents, electric box, and entirety of the observer were discussed in details .By using collector panels settled in the side facing to the Sun , the active heating power could be reduced by 73%.In order to reduce the tem-perature gradient caused by long-term observation facing to the sun , a heat pipe was embedded in the frame . Simulation results show that all conditions meet the temperature indicator in 4 typical cases .The thermal de-sign system with a low active power solves many problems , such as the cooling of the observer in orbit , insula-tion during orbital transfer phase , and meets the working temperature requirement of below -50℃for a CCD plane .

  1. Studying the Sun's Nuclear Furnace with a Neutrino Detector Spacecraft in Close Solar Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomey, Nickolas

    2016-05-01

    A neutrino based detector in close solar orbit would have a neutrino flux 10,000x or more larger flux than on Earth and a smaller detector able to handle high rates with exception energy resolution could be used. We have studied the idea of operating such an experiment in close solar orbits that takes it off the ecliptic plane and in a solar orbit where the distance from the Sun will change distance. This neutrino detector on a space craft could do Solar Astrophysics studying the Solar nuclear furnace, basic nuclear physics and elementary particle physics; some of these ideas are new unique science that can only be preformed from a spacecraft. The harsh environment provides many challenges but if such a detector could be made to work it can be the next major step in this science study. How a small segmented detector can operate and preform in this environment to detect solar neutrinos will be elaborated upon using a combination of signal strength, fast signal timing, shielding and segmentation.

  2. Evolution of lithium abundance in the Sun and solar twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenin, F.; Oreshina, A. V.; Baturin, V. A.; Gorshkov, A. B.; Morel, P.; Provost, J.

    2017-02-01

    Evolution of the 7Li abundance in the convection zone of the Sun during different stages of its life time is considered to explain its low photospheric value in comparison with that of the solar system meteorites. Lithium is intensively and transiently burned in the early stages of evolution (pre-main sequence, pMS) when the radiative core arises, and then the Li abundance only slowly decreases during the main sequence (MS). We study the rates of lithium burning during these two stages. In a model of the Sun, computed ignoring pMS and without extra-convective mixing (overshooting) at the base of the convection zone, the lithium abundance does not decrease significantly during the MS life time of 4.6 Gyr. Analysis of helioseismic inversions together with post-model computations of chemical composition indicates the presence of the overshooting region and restricts its thickness. It is estimated to be approximately half of the local pressure scale height (0.5HP) which corresponds to 3.8% of the solar radius. Introducing this extra region does not noticeably deplete lithium during the MS stage. In contrast, at the pMS stage, an overshooting region with a value of approximately 0.18HP is enough to produce the observed lithium depletion. If we conclude that the dominant lithium burning takes place during the pMS stage, the dispersion of the lithium abundance in solar twins is explained by different physical conditions, primarily during the early stage of evolution before the MS.

  3. Possible measurements of J sub 2 and the sun's angular momentum with the solar probe. [covariance analysis of solar quadrupole moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtvedt, K.

    1978-01-01

    The metric tensor is given for describing the dynamical effects of the sun on a solar probe and the gravitational redshift of a probe-based clock in a covariance analysis for the detectability of the solar quadrupole moment and the solar angular momentum. Unknown parameters were determined by least squares fit to the probe tracking data. A polar orbit was assumed with perihelion at 5 solar radii and with an earth-sun-probe angle of 135 deg at perihelion. Tracking was assumed to be Doppler only, with a basic uncertainity of .1 mm/sec in the radial velocity. A drag-free system which could reduce nongravitational forces below the level of 2 times 10 to the minus 12th power was found necessary to preserve this same level of accuracy. Both one way and two way Doppler were supposed in order to determine the gravitational redshift as well as the pure spacecraft dynamics.

  4. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life On Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, S. R.; Lanz, T.; Hubeny, I.; Gaidos, E.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We have obtained ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun We are making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. Once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to other metallicities and to unobserved spectral regions.

  5. The Sun: A Star at the Center of Our Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi L.

    2016-01-01

    There is a star at the center of our solar system! But what is a star? How do stars work? What are the characteristics of our Sun and how are these traits different from other stars? How does the Sun compare to stars such as Betelgeuse and Rigel? "Will the Sun end its life with a bang or a whimper?"

  6. Influence of Sudden Change of Solar Mass in the PN Stage on the Orbit of Earth-Like Planet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yunfeng Zhu; Caijuan Pan; Dasheng Pan; Hongqiang Huang; Zhi-Fu Chen

    2014-09-01

    Assuming that the terminated mass is confined within the range 0.4551-0.5813⊙ when the sun is going to evolve into a white dwarf, the velocity of the sun projecting the shell in the PN stage is much greater than the revolving velocity of the earth-like planet, therefore, we think that the solar mass change is instantaneous.

  7. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan-Pau Sánchez

    Full Text Available Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth's natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth's radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth's climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes.

  8. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Joan-Pau; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth's natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth's radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth's climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes.

  9. Solar Neutrons and the Earth's Radiation Belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R E; Flamm, E J

    1964-04-17

    The intensity and spectrum of solar neutrons in the vicinity of the earth are calculated on the assumption that the low-energy protons recently detected in balloon and satellite flights are products of solar neutron decay. The solar-neutron flux thus obtained exceeds the global average cosmic-ray neutron leakage above 10 Mev, indicating that it may be an important source of both the inner and outer radiation belts. Neutron measurements in the atmosphere are reviewed and several features of the data are found to be consistent with the estimated solar neutron spectrum.

  10. Tracing the journey of the sun and the solar siblings through the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Barbosa C.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is focused on studying the motion of the Sun and the Solar siblings through the Galaxy. The Solar siblings are stars that were born with the Sun in the same molecular cloud 4.6 Gyr ago. In the first part of the thesis, we present an efficient method to calculate the evolution of small

  11. Towards a Solution to the Early Faint Sun Paradox: A Lower Cosmic Ray Flux from a Stronger Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Shaviv, N J

    2003-01-01

    The solar luminosity obtained in standard solar models should have gradually increased by about 30% over the past 4.5 billion years. Under the faint sun, Earth should have been frozen solid for most of its existence. Yet, running water is observed to have been present since very early in Earth's history. This enigma is known as the faint sun paradox. We show here that it can be significantly extenuated once we consider the cooling effect that cosmic rays are suspected to have on the global climate and that the younger sun must have had a stronger solar wind, such that it was more effective at stopping cosmic rays from reaching Earth. We therefore find that even modest greenhouse warming in sufficient to completely resolve the paradox. When coupled to the variable star formation rate in the Milky Way, we recover that the past Eon and the Eon between 2 and 3 Gyr before present should have had glaciations, while others not. As to the future, we find that without human intervention, the average global temperature...

  12. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1--4x Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1-4x the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R_e planets with orbital periods under 100 days, and 11% have 1-2 R_e planets that receive 1-4x the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 AU, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R_e show that the smallest of them, R < 1.5 R_e, have the density expected for rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: rho = 2.32 + 3.19 R/R_e [g/cc]. ...

  13. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1-4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W; Weiss, Lauren M; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W; Buchhave, Lars A

    2014-09-02

    Small planets, 1-4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1-2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1-2 R⊕ planets that receive 1-4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth-Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1-4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ = 2:32 + 3:19 R=R ⊕ [g cm(-3)]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5-4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ''mini-Neptunes.'' The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life's biochemical origins.

  14. Solar Dynamics and Its Effects on the Heliosphere and Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D. N; Schwartz, S. J; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2007-01-01

    The SOHO and Cluster missions form a single ESA cornerstone. Yet they observe very different regions in our solar system: the solar atmosphere on one hand and the Earth’s magnetosphere on the other. At the same time the Ulysses mission provides observations in the third dimension of the heliosphere, and many others add to the picture from the Lagrangian point L1 to the edge of the heliosphere. It is the aim of this ISSI volume to tie these observations together in addressing the topic of Solar Dynamics and its Effects on the Heliosphere and Earth, thus contributing to the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. The volume starts out with an assessment and description of the reasons for solar dynamics and how it couples into the heliosphere. The three subsequent sections are each devoted to following one chain of events from the Sun all the way to the Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere: The normal solar wind chain, the chain associated with coronal mass ejections, and the solar energetic particl...

  15. Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-04-14

    Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

  16. The Sun, Its Extended Corona, the Interplanetary Space, the Earth's Magnetosphere, Ionosphere, Middle and Low Atmosphere, are All Parts of a Complex System - the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    Various manifestations of solar activity cause disturbances known as space weather effects in the interplanetary space, near-Earth environment, and all the Earth's "spheres. Longterm variations in the frequency, intensity and relative importance of the manifestations of solar activity are due to the slow changes in the output of the solar dynamo, and they define space climate. Space climate governs long-term variations in geomagnetic activity and is the primary natural driver of terrestrial climate. To understand how the variable solar activity affects the Earth's environment, geomagnetic activity and climate on both short and long time scales, we need to understand the origins of solar activity itself and its different manifestations, as well as the sequence of coupling processes linking various parts of the system. This session provides a forum to discuss the chain of processes and relations from the Sun to the Earth's surface: the origin and long-term and short-term evolution of solar activity, initiation and temporal variations in solar flares, CMEs, coronal holes, the solar wind and its interaction with the terrestrial magnetosphere, the ionosphere and its connection to the neutral dominated regions below and the plasma dominated regions above, the stratosphere, its variations due to the changing solar activity and its interactions with the underlying troposphere, and the mechanisms of solar influences on the lower atmosphere on different time-scales. Particularly welcome are papers highlighting the coupling processes between the different domains in this complex system.

  17. Near-Earth Solar Wind Flows and Related Geomagnetic Activity During more than Four Solar Cycles (1963-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian G.; Cane, Hilary V.

    2012-01-01

    In past studies, we classified the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types based on inspection of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters in the OMNI database and additional data (e.g., geomagnetic indices, energetic particle, and cosmic ray observations). These flow types are: (1) High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun, (2) Slow, interstream solar wind, and (3) Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections at the Sun, including interplanetary coronal mass ejections and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions. The solar wind classification in these previous studies commenced with observations in 1972. In the present study, as well as updating this classification to the end of 2011, we have extended the classification back to 1963, the beginning of near-Earth solar wind observations, thereby encompassing the complete solar cycles 20 to 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. We discuss the cycle-to-cycle variations in near-Earth solar wind structures and l1e related geomagnetic activity over more than four solar cycles, updating some of the results of our earlier studies.

  18. Near-earth solar wind flows and related geomagnetic activity during more than four solar cycles (1963–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Ian G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In past studies, we classified the near-Earth solar wind into three basic flow types based on inspection of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters in the OMNI database and additional data (e.g., geomagnetic indices, energetic particle, and cosmic ray observations. These flow types are: (1 High-speed streams associated with coronal holes at the Sun, (2 Slow, interstream solar wind, and (3 Transient flows originating with coronal mass ejections at the Sun, including interplanetary coronal mass ejections and the associated upstream shocks and post-shock regions. The solar wind classification in these previous studies commenced with observations in 1972. In the present study, as well as updating this classification to the end of 2011, we have extended the classification back to 1963, the beginning of near-Earth solar wind observations, thereby encompassing the complete solar cycles 20 to 23 and the ascending phase of cycle 24. We discuss the cycle-to-cycle variations in near-Earth solar wind structures and the related geomagnetic activity over more than four solar cycles, updating some of the results of our earlier studies.

  19. Visualizing Sun-Earth-Moon Relationships through Hands-On Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Abby

    2013-04-01

    "Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin Understanding the spatial relationships between the sun, Earth and Moon is fundamental to any basic earth science education. Since both of the following concepts involve shadows on three-dimensional spheres, seeing them on paper is not often conducive to understanding. In the first activity, students use five Styrofoam balls painted to look like the sun and the four positions of the earth in each season. Students position the Earth-balls in their correct order around the sun and translate what they are seeing onto paper. In the second activity, students hold up a Styrofoam ball painted half white, half black. A picture of the sun is projected at the front of the classroom. They move the ball around their heads as if they were the Earth, keeping the lit side of the moon always facing the sun. They then draw the phases of the moon as they see them.

  20. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0035 Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project 140200 Steven Sembay UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER Final Report 10/28/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...To) 01 Sep 2014 to 31 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP) 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1...0200 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven Sembay 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER 5f.   WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  1. Solar Mosaic Inc. Mosaic Home Solar Loan SunShot 9 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Colin James [Solar Mosaic Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    2017-02-09

    The 6686 Mosaic SunShot award has helped Solar Mosaic Inc to progress from an early stage startup focused on commercial crowdfunding to a leading multi-state residential solar lender. The software platform is now used by the majority of the nation's top solar installers and offers a variety of simple home solar loans. Mosaic is has originated approximately $1Bil in solar loans to date to put solar on over 35k rooftops. The company now lends to homeowners with a wide range of credit scores across multiple states and mitigates boundaries preventing them from profiting from ownership of a home solar system. The project included milestones in 5 main categories: 1. Lending to homeowners outside of CA 2. Lending to homeowners with FICO scores under 700 3. Packaging O&M with the home solar loan 4. Allowing residential installers to process home solar loans via API 5. Lowering customer acquisition costs below $1500 This report includes a detailed review of the final results achieved and key findings.

  2. The Spanish Space Weather Service SeNMEs. A Case Study on the Sun-Earth Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.; Rodríguez-Bouza, M.; Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Herraiz, M.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.

    2016-04-01

    The Spanish Space Weather Service SeNMEs, www.senmes.es, is a portal created by the SRG-SW of the Universidad de Alcalá, Spain, to meet societal needs of near real-time space weather services. This webpage-portal is divided in different sections to fulfill users needs about space weather effects: radio blackouts, solar energetic particle events, geomagnetic storms and presence of geomagnetically induced currents. In less than one year of activity, this service has released a daily report concerning the solar current status and interplanetary medium, informing about the chances of a solar perturbation to hit the Earth's environment. There are also two different forecasting tools for geomagnetic storms, and a daily ionospheric map. These tools allow us to nowcast a variety of solar eruptive events and forecast geomagnetic storms and their recovery, including a new local geomagnetic index, LDiñ, along with some specific new scaling. In this paper we also include a case study analysed by SeNMEs. Using different high resolution and cadence data from space-borne solar telescopes SDO, SOHO and GOES, along with ionospheric and geomagnetic data, we describe the Sun-Earth feature chain for the event.

  3. Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sun Microsystems, Inc. is committed to open standards,a standardization system, and sharing within the information tech nology field, focusing not only on technical innovation, but also on new ideas, practices and future development.

  4. Vertical InGaN-based green-band solar cells operating under high solar concentration up to 300 suns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Chen, Fu-Bang; Wu, Shou-Hung; Lee, Ming-Lun; Chen, Po-Cheng; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang

    2014-08-25

    InGaN/GaN-based solar cells with vertical-conduction feature on silicon substrates were fabricated by wafer bonding technique. The vertical solar cells with a metal reflector sandwiched between the GaN-based epitaxial layers and the Si substrate could increase the effective thickness of the absorption layer. Given that the thermally resistive sapphire substrates were replaced by the Si substrate with high thermal conductivity, the solar cells did not show degradation in power conversion efficiency (PCE) even when the solar concentrations were increased to 300 suns. The open circuit voltage increased from 1.90 V to 2.15 V and the fill factor increased from 0.55 to 0.58 when the concentrations were increased from 1 sun to 300 suns. With the 300-sun illumination, the PCE was enhanced by approximately 33% compared with the 1-sun illumination.

  5. Ulysses and IMP-8 Observations of Cosmic Rays and So-lar Energetic Particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun near Solar Maximum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Zhang, M.

    2001-12-01

    The High Energy Telescope (HET) of the Ulysses COSPIN experiment measures intensities of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles (SEPs) with good energy and charge resolution at energies above about 30 MeV/n. Since passing over the South Polar regions of the Sun near solar maximum in late 2000 Ulysses has been rapidly traversing solar latitude in its so-called Fast Latitude Scan (FLS), passing through perihelion near the sun's equator in May 2001. Maximum northern latitude (80.2 deg N) will be reached in October 2001. HET observations since the onset of solar activity, including the South Polar pass and the first part of the FLS, show that SEPs from large events were commonly observed at both Ulysses and Earth (IMP-8) regardless of the radial, latitudinal, or longitudinal separations between Ulysses and Earth. During the decay phases of the events intensities were often almost equal at Ulysses and IMP, even when Ulysses was over the Sun's South Pole and the associated flare site was in the northern hemisphere. This suggests that propagation of particles across the average interplanetary magnetic field in the inner heliosphere is effective enough to relax longitudinal and latitudinal particle intensity gradients within a few days. For galactic cosmic rays, observations from the FLS so far show that latitudinal gradients resulting from solar modulation at solar maximum are sun's North Polar Regions, and discuss the significance of the results for models of energetic charged particle propagation through the heliosphere. * This work was supported in part by NASA Contract JPL-955432 and by NASA Grant NAG5-8032.

  6. Solar irradiance, total and spectral; Irradiancia solar, total e espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraidenraich, Naum [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Energia Nuclear; Lyra, Francisco [Companhia Hidroeletrica do Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    In this chapter some important characteristics concerning solar irradiance are presented, such as: solar constant; spectral irradiance for a zeroed mass of air; solar constant variation according to Earth-Sun distance; solar energy variation on Earth`s surface; atmospheric attenuation of solar energy; and total radiation and spectral irradiation on Earth`s surface. 3 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. SunPy - Python for Solar Physics, Version 0.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven; Mumford, Stuart; Perez-Suarez, David; Ireland, Jack; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew; Liedtke, Simon; Hewett, Russel

    2014-06-01

    We presents version 0.4 of SunPy, a community-developed Python package for solar physics. Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community, resulting in the availability of a large number of software packages, from numerical computation NumPy, SciPy and machine learning (scikit-learn) to visualisation and plotting (matplotlib).SunPy is a data-analysis environment specialising in providing the software necessary to analyse solar and heliospheric datasets in Python. SunPy is open-source software (BSD licence) and has an open and transparent development workflow that anyone can contribute to. SunPy provides access to solar data through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO), the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK), and the HELiophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO) webservices. It currently supports image data from major solar missions (e.g., SDO, SOHO, STEREO, and IRIS), time-series data from missions such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and PROBA2/LYRA, and radio spectra from e-Callisto and STEREO/SWAVES. We describe SunPy's functionality, provide examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy.

  8. Occurrence and core-envelope structure of 1–4× Earth-size planets around Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2014-01-01

    Small planets, 1–4× the size of Earth, are extremely common around Sun-like stars, and surprisingly so, as they are missing in our solar system. Recent detections have yielded enough information about this class of exoplanets to begin characterizing their occurrence rates, orbits, masses, densities, and internal structures. The Kepler mission finds the smallest planets to be most common, as 26% of Sun-like stars have small, 1–2 R⊕ planets with orbital periods under 100 d, and 11% have 1–2 R⊕ planets that receive 1–4× the incident stellar flux that warms our Earth. These Earth-size planets are sprinkled uniformly with orbital distance (logarithmically) out to 0.4 the Earth–Sun distance, and probably beyond. Mass measurements for 33 transiting planets of 1–4 R⊕ show that the smallest of them, R rocky planets. Their densities increase with increasing radius, likely caused by gravitational compression. Including solar system planets yields a relation: ρ=2.32+3.19R/R⊕ [g cm−3]. Larger planets, in the radius range 1.5–4.0 R⊕, have densities that decline with increasing radius, revealing increasing amounts of low-density material (H and He or ices) in an envelope surrounding a rocky core, befitting the appellation ‘‘mini-Neptunes.’’ The gas giant planets occur preferentially around stars that are rich in heavy elements, while rocky planets occur around stars having a range of heavy element abundances. Defining habitable zones remains difficult, without benefit of either detections of life elsewhere or an understanding of life’s biochemical origins. PMID:24912169

  9. Challenges of modeling solar disturbances’ arrival times at the Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.; D.; FRY; Chin-Chun; WU; Murray; DRYER

    2008-01-01

    In recent years remarkable advances have been made in the development of phys-ics based models of various parts of the solar-terrestrial system (see JASTP special issues, October, November 2004; February 2007). In this paper, we focus our dis-cussions in a specific region of the Sun to the Earth’s environment (i.e. 1 AU). It is well-known that geomagnetic storms are caused by solar eruptions. The conse-quences of these storms include particle acceleration, solar wind impact on the Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere, UV-EUV radiation effects on the lower at-mosphere, etc. One of the main challenges is to predict the arrival time at 1 AU of the solar disturbance. The prospects look good for an accurate, real-time forecast scheme built on the acquisition of solar, heliosphere and the near-Earth data and large-scale models. However, the accuracy of these models still needs improve-ment. We will discuss the present status of the models and challenges to improve the simulation models.

  10. Do radioactive half-lives vary with the Earth-to-Sun distance?

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, J C; Iacob, V E

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Jenkins, Fischbach and collaborators have claimed evidence that radioactive half-lives vary systematically over a +/- 0.1% range as a function of the oscillating distance between the Earth and the Sun, based on multi-year activity measurements. We have avoided the time-dependent instabilities to which such measurements are susceptible by directly measuring the half-life of 198Au (t1/2 = 2.695 d) on seven occasions spread out in time to cover the complete range of Earth-Sun distances. We observe no systematic oscillations in half-life and can set an upper limit on their amplitude of +/- 0.02%.

  11. Destruction of Sun-Grazing Comet C-2011 N3 (SOHO) Within the Low Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Brown, J. C.; Battams, K.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Liu, W.; Hudson, H.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of comets in Sun-grazing orbits that survive solar insolation long enough to penetrate into the Suns inner corona provide information on the solar atmosphere and magnetic field as well as on the makeup of the comet. On 6 July 2011, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the demise of comet C2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona in five wavelength bands in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The comet penetrated to within 0.146 solarradius (100,000 kilometers) of the solar surface before its EUV signal disappeared.

  12. Systems and methods for concentrating solar energy without tracking the sun

    OpenAIRE

    Kornfield, Julia A.; Flagan, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for concentrating solar energy without tracking the sun are provided. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a solar collector assembly for collecting and concentrating light for solar cell assemblies, the collector assembly including an array of solar collectors, each including a funnel shaped collector including a side wall defining a tapered opening having a base aperture and an upper aperture, the side wall including an outer surface, and a solar cell assembly pos...

  13. How the inclination of Earth's orbit affects incoming solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L. E. A.; Norton, A.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Kretzschmar, M.; Schmidt, G. A.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2012-08-01

    The variability in solar irradiance, the main external energy source of the Earth's system, must be critically studied in order to place the effects of human-driven climate change into perspective and allow plausible predictions of the evolution of climate. Accurate measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability by instruments onboard space platforms during the last three solar cycles indicate changes of approximately 0.1% over the sunspot cycle. Physics-based models also suggest variations of the same magnitude on centennial to millennia time-scales. Additionally, long-term changes in Earth's orbit modulate the solar irradiance reaching the top of the atmosphere. Variations of orbital inclination in relation to the Sun's equator could potentially impact incoming solar irradiance as a result of the anisotropy of the distribution of active regions. Due to a lack of quantitative estimates, this effect has never been assessed. Here, we show that although observers with different orbital inclinations experience various levels of irradiance, modulations in TSI are not sufficient to drive observed 100 kyr climate variations. Based on our model we find that, due to orbital inclination alone, the maximum change in the average TSI over timescales of kyrs is ˜0.003 Wm-2, much smaller than the ˜1.5 Wm-2 annually integrated change related to orbital eccentricity variations, or the 1-8 Wm-2 variability due to solar magnetic activity. Here, we stress that out-of-ecliptic measurements are needed in order to constrain models for the long-term evolution of TSI and its impact on climate.

  14. Hot water from the sun: a consumer guide to solar water heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Beth

    2005-02-15

    The following topics are discussed: how solar water heaters work, making good use of the sun, estimating costs and savings, choosing the right dealer/installer, choosing the right system, warranties and contracts, getting a good installation, and living with your solar energy system. The appendices discuss system performance and durability, and provide sources of additional information on solar energy and its applications. (MHR)

  15. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  16. Ulysses COSPIN observations of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun during solar maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. McKibben

    Full Text Available In 2000–2001 Ulysses passed from the south to the north polar regions of the Sun in the inner heliosphere, providing a snapshot of the latitudinal structure of cosmic ray modulation and solar energetic particle populations during a period near solar maximum.  Observations from the COSPIN suite of energetic charged particle telescopes show that latitude variations in the cosmic ray intensity in the inner heliosphere are nearly non-existent near solar maximum, whereas small but clear latitude gradients were observed during the similar phase of Ulysses’ orbit near the 1994–95 solar minimum. At proton energies above ~10 MeV and extending up to >70 MeV, the intensities are often dominated by Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs accelerated near the Sun in association with intense solar flares and large Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs. At lower energies the particle intensities are almost constantly enhanced above background, most likely as a result of a mix of SEPs and particles accelerated by interplanetary shocks. Simultaneous high-latitude Ulysses and near-Earth observations show that most events that produce large flux increases near Earth also produce flux increases at Ulysses, even at the highest latitudes attained. Particle anisotropies during particle onsets at Ulysses are typically directed outwards from the Sun, suggesting either acceleration extending to high latitudes or efficient cross-field propagation somewhere inside the orbit of Ulysses. Both cosmic ray and SEP observations are consistent with highly efficient transport of energetic charged particles between the equatorial and polar regions and across the mean interplanetary magnetic fields in the inner heliosphere.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (cosmic rays – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections

  17. Probing Solar Magnetic Field with the "Cosmic-Ray Shadow" of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Chen, T L; Chen, W Y; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; Hakamada, K; He, H H; He, Z T; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H J; Li, W J; Liu, C; Liu, J S; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ozawa, S; Qian, X L; Qu, X B; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shao, J; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, H; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yang, Z; Yasue, S; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhai, L M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2013-01-01

    We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun's shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun's shadow, using the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model and the Current Sheet Source Surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun's shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun's shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun's shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux.

  18. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  19. A Solar cycle correlation of coronal element abundances in Sun-as-a-star observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H.; Baker, Deborah; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The elemental composition in the coronae of low-activity solar-like stars appears to be related to fundamental stellar properties such as rotation, surface gravity, and spectral type. Here we use full-Sun observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, to show that when the Sun is observed as a star, the variation of coronal composition is highly correlated with a proxy for solar activity, the F10.7 cm radio flux, and therefore with the solar cycle phase. Similar cyclic variations should therefore be detectable spectroscopically in X-ray observations of solar analogs. The plasma composition in full-disk observations of the Sun is related to the evolution of coronal magnetic field activity. Our observations therefore introduce an uncertainty into the nature of any relationship between coronal composition and fixed stellar properties. The results highlight the importance of systematic full-cycle observations for understanding the elemental composition of solar-like stellar coronae.

  20. Seguidor Solar de Dos Ejes para un Horno Solar Two-Axis Sun Tracking System for a Solar Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Villeda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el diseño y fabricación de un seguidor solar de dos ejes (rotación-elevación, el cual controla un helióstato de un horno solar para la cocción de tabiques de arcilla. El sistema trabaja con motores controlados desde una computadora personal. El algoritmo para el seguidor solar se desarrolló en un lenguaje de programación visual, calcula los ángulos de seguimiento primario y secundario del helióstato y los despliega en una pantalla. El microcontrolador está programado para controlar el funcionamiento de los motores a pasos, los cuales mueven el helióstato del horno solar. El seguimiento primario y secundario es el mismo para los equinoccios, mientras que para los solsticios son diferentes debido a que durante el verano en el hemisferio norte existe mayor altura solar que en invierno. El seguidor solar permite una captación más eficiente de la radiación solar debido a que sigue minuto a minuto el movimiento aparente del Sol.The design and manufacture of a two-axis sun tracking system (rotation-elevation, which controls a heliostat of a solar furnace for clay brick firing is presented. The system works with motors controlled through a personal computen The algorithm for the sun tracking system was developed in a visual programming language, calculates the primary and secondary tracking angles of the heliostat and shows them in a screen. The microcontroller is programmed to control the step driver engines, which move the heliostat of the solar furnace. The primary and secondary tracking is the same for the equinoxes, whereas for the solstices are different because the solar altitude is greater in summer than in winter in the northern hemisphere. The sun tracking system permits a more efficient capture of the solar radiation since it continuously follows the apparent movement of the Sun.

  1. Pigment developed to protect spacecraft/solar cells from Sun's harmful rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A pigment (phthalocyanine) is studied at the Marshall Materials and Processes Lab. The pigment has the ability to protect spacecraft against the harmful effects of the Sun's ultraviolet rays, and to increase the efficiency and life of solar cells.

  2. The fantastic voyage of Nino the neutrino, from the Sun to the Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Flore per 21Lab

    2012-01-01

    Useful to learn what is a neutrino. Nino the neutrino travels from the Sun to the Earth with his friends (like a proton and a photon). But not everyone arrives to the INFN Lab's of Gran Sasso in Italy. And someone even can't stop there! This funny cartoon shows the properties of the neutrinos. (It's in Italian with English subtitles).

  3. "Earth, Sun and Moon": Computer Assisted Instruction in Secondary School Science--Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Orhan; Bilen, Kadir; Ural, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a web-based teaching method on students' academic achievement and attitudes in the elementary education fifth grade Science and Technology unit, "System of Earth, Sun and Moon". The study was a quasi-experimental study with experimental and control groups comprising 54 fifth grade students attending…

  4. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models…

  5. A comparative study of Solar-Heliospheric Observations during very active Sun intervals in the 21st and 23rd solar cycles (April 1979 and March-April, 2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Farrugia, C. J.; Lepping, R. P.; Richardson, I. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Schwenn, R.; Reames, D. V.

    2002-05-01

    On March 24, 2001, the largest sun spot group in 10 years, consisting of three or more active regions (ARs) centered near AR 9393, emerged from behind the eastern limb of the Sun and began a 2-week passage across the visible hemisphere. During the same time, the Sun showed several other ARs so this period constituted a phase of unusually intense solar activity that continued almost 18 days beyond the disk passage of the largest sun spot group and included possibly the most energetic solar flare event in modern records (a > X20 flare in soft X-rays). We shall present an overview of the associated solar energetic particle events and an analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of the shocks observed in the Earth's vicinity. The investigation includes cross-correlation analysis of interplanetary plasma and magnetic field observations at ACE (SWEPAM/MAG level-2 data) situated 250 Re upstream of Earth and at Wind (SWE/MFI data), which was ahead of Earth and executing a distant prograde orbit with large Y-coordinate. The interval under study bears a close resemblance to a similar active period during April 1979 (i.e., 2 solar cycles earlier) observed by the Helios 1/2 probes and Earth solar wind monitors (ISEE-3, IMP). The similarities and differences between the two intervals are examined further.

  6. Coupling of the Matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields of the Sun with Jupiter and its Moons Together in Nearest Portion of Jupiter's Orbit to the Sun as the Main Cause of the Peak of Approximately 11 Yearly Solar Cycles and Hazards from Solar Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Kazem; Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    On March 13, 1989 the entire province of Quebec Blackout by solar storm during solar cycle 22. The solar storm of 1859, also known as the Carrington event, was a powerful geomagnetic solar storm during solar cycle 10. The solar storm of 2012 during solar cycle 24 was of similar magnitude, but it passed Earth's orbit without striking the plane. All of these solar storms occurred in the peak of 11 yearly solar cycles. In this way, the White House in its project which is focusing on hazards from solar system, in a new strategy and action plan to increase protection from damaging solar emissions, should focus on coupling of the matched Gravity and Electromagnetic Fields)GEFs) of the Sun with Jupiter and its moons together. On the other hand, in solar system, the Jupiter's gravity has largest effect to the Sun's core and its dislocation, because the gravity force between the Jupiter and the Sun is 11.834 times, In addition overlapping of the solar cycles with the Jupiter's orbit period is 11.856 years. These observable factors lead us to the effect of the Jupiter and Sun gravity fields coupling as the main cause of the approximately 11 years duration for solar cycles. Its peak in each cycle is when the Jupiter is in nearest portion to the Sun in its orbit. In this way, the other planets in their coupling with Sun help to the variations and strengthening solar cycles. [Gholibeigian, 7/24/2015http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGU]. In other words, the both matched GEFs are generating by the large scale forced convection system inside the stars and planets [Gholibeigian et. al, AGU Fall Meeting 2015]. These two fields are couple and strengthening each other. The Jupiter with its 67 moons generate the largest coupled and matched GEFs in its core and consequently strongest effect on the Sun's core. Generation and coupling of the Jupiter's GEFs with its moons like Europa, Io and Ganymede make this planet of thousands of times brighter and many times bigger than Earth as the

  7. Orbit Determination Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, G.

    2003-01-01

    Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana Sun-Earth L1 libration point mission and for the science data collection phase of a future Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission. The Triana spacecraft was nominally to be released by the Space Shuttle in a low Earth orbit, and this analysis focuses on that scenario. From the release orbit a transfer trajectory insertion (TTI) maneuver performed using a solid stage would increase the velocity be approximately 3.1 km/sec sending Triana on a direct trajectory to its mission orbit. The Triana mission orbit is a Sun-Earth L1 Lissajous orbit with a Sun-Earth-vehicle (SEV) angle between 4.0 and 15.0 degrees, which would be achieved after a Lissajous orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver at approximately launch plus 6 months. Because Triana was to be launched by the Space Shuttle, TTI could potentially occur over a 16 orbit range from low Earth orbit. This analysis was performed assuming TTI was performed from a low Earth orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees and assuming support from a combination of three Deep Space Network (DSN) stations, Goldstone, Canberra, and Madrid and four commercial Universal Space Network (USN) stations, Alaska, Hawaii, Perth, and Santiago. These ground stations would provide coherent two-way range and range rate tracking data usable for orbit determination. Larger range and range rate errors were assumed for the USN stations. Nominally, DSN support would end at TTI+144 hours assuming there were no USN problems. Post-TTI coverage for a range of TTI longitudes for a given nominal trajectory case were analyzed. The orbit determination error analysis after the first correction maneuver would be generally applicable to any libration point mission utilizing a direct trajectory.

  8. Solar Journey: The Significance of our Galactic Environment for the Heliosphere and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Priscilla C.

    2006-09-01

    Humans evolved when the Sun was in the great void of the Local Bubble . The Sun entered the present environment of interstellar clouds only during the late Quaternary. Astronomical data reveal these long and short term changes in our galactic environment. Theoretical models then tell us how these changes affect interplanetary particles, planetary magnetospheres, and the Earth itself. Cosmic rays leave an isotopic signature in the paleoclimate record that helps trace the solar journey through space. "Solar Journey: The Significance of Our Galactic Environment for the Heliosphere and Earth" lays the foundation for an interdisciplinary study of the influence of interstellar material on the solar system and Earth as we travel through the Milky Way Galaxy. The solar wind bubble responds dynamically to interstellar material flowing past the Sun, regulating interstellar gas, dust, and cosmic particle fluxes in the interplanetary medium and the Earth. Cones of interstellar gas and dust focused by solar gravity, the magnetospheres of the outer planets, and cosmic rays at Earth all might yield the first hints of changes in our galactic environment. Twelve articles from leading experts in diverse fields discuss the physical changes expected as the heliosphere adjusts to its galactic environment. Topics include the interaction between the solar wind and interstellar dust and gas, cosmic ray modulation, magnetospheres, temporal variations in the solar environment, and the cosmic ray isotoperecord preserved in paleoclimate data. The breadth of processes discussed in this book make it a valuable resource for scientists and students doing research in the fields of Space Physics, Astronomy and the Paleoclimate. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-144940498-0&changeHeader=true

  9. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size (1-2 Earth-radii) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (within a factor of four). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that $11\\pm4%$ of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to $\\sim200$ d. Extrapolating, one finds $5.7^{+1.7}_{-2.2}%$ of Sun-like s...

  10. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  11. Ulysses COSPIN observations of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun during solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Zhang, M.; Anglin, J. D.; Balogh, A.; dalla, S.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Hofer, M. Y.; Kunow, H.; Posner, A.; Heber, B.

    2003-06-01

    In 2000-2001 Ulysses passed from the south to the north polar regions of the Sun in the inner heliosphere, providing a snapshot of the latitudinal structure of cosmic ray modulation and solar energetic particle populations during a period near solar maximum. Observations from the COSPIN suite of energetic charged particle telescopes show that latitude variations in the cosmic ray intensity in the inner heliosphere are nearly non-existent near solar maximum, whereas small but clear latitude gradients were observed during the similar phase of Ulysses' orbit near the 1994-95 solar minimum. At proton energies above ~10 MeV and extending up to >70 MeV, the intensities are often dominated by Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) accelerated near the Sun in association with intense solar flares and large Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). At lower energies the particle intensities are almost constantly enhanced above background, most likely as a result of a mix of SEPs and particles accelerated by interplanetary shocks. Simultaneous high-latitude Ulysses and near-Earth observations show that most events that produce large flux increases near Earth also produce flux increases at Ulysses, even at the highest latitudes attained. Particle anisotropies during particle onsets at Ulysses are typically directed outwards from the Sun, suggesting either acceleration extending to high latitudes or efficient cross-field propagation somewhere inside the orbit of Ulysses. Both cosmic ray and SEP observations are consistent with highly efficient transport of energetic charged particles between the equatorial and polar regions and across the mean interplanetary magnetic fields in the inner heliosphere.

  12. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence in Earth's Solar Transit Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Pudritz, Ralph E

    2016-04-01

    Over the past few years, astronomers have detected thousands of planets and candidate planets by observing their periodic transits in front of their host stars. A related method, called transit spectroscopy, might soon allow studies of the chemical imprints of life in extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Here, we address the reciprocal question, namely, from where is Earth detectable by extrasolar observers using similar methods. We explore Earth's transit zone (ETZ), the projection of a band around Earth's ecliptic onto the celestial plane, where observers can detect Earth transits across the Sun. ETZ is between 0.520° and 0.537° wide due to the noncircular Earth orbit. The restricted Earth transit zone (rETZ), where Earth transits the Sun less than 0.5 solar radii from its center, is about 0.262° wide. We first compile a target list of 45 K and 37 G dwarf stars inside the rETZ and within 1 kpc (about 3260 light-years) using the Hipparcos catalogue. We then greatly enlarge the number of potential targets by constructing an analytic galactic disk model and find that about 10(5) K and G dwarf stars should reside within the rETZ. The ongoing Gaia space mission can potentially discover all G dwarfs among them (several 10(4)) within the next 5 years. Many more potentially habitable planets orbit dim, unknown M stars in ETZ and other stars that traversed ETZ thousands of years ago. If any of these planets host intelligent observers, they could have identified Earth as a habitable, or even as a living, world long ago, and we could be receiving their broadcasts today. The K2 mission, the Allen Telescope Array, the upcoming Square Kilometer Array, or the Green Bank Telescope might detect such deliberate extraterrestrial messages. Ultimately, ETZ would be an ideal region to be monitored by the Breakthrough Listen Initiatives, an upcoming survey that will constitute the most comprehensive search for extraterrestrial intelligence so far.

  13. The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Essential for life on earth and a major influence on our environment, the Sun is also the most fascinating object in the daytime sky. Every day we feel the effect of its coming and going – literally the difference between day and night. But figuring out what the Sun is, what it’s made of, why it glows so brightly, how old it is, how long it will last – all of these take thought and observation. Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of what scientists know about the Sun, and the history of these discoveries. Solar astronomers have studied the Sun over the centuries both for its intrinsic interest and in order to use it as a laboratory to reveal the secrets of other stars. The authors discuss the surface of the Sun, including sunspots and their eleven-year cycle, as well as the magnetism that causes them; the Sun’s insides, as studied mainly from seismic waves that astronomers record on its surface; the outer layers of the Sun that we see from Earth only at eclipses ...

  14. On the Path to SunShot: Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Financing Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report analyzes solar financing strategies and their role in achieving the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot goals. Financing is critical to solar deployment, because the costs of solar technologies are paid up front, while their benefits are realized over decades. Solar financing has been shaped by government solar incentives, particularly federal tax incentives, which have spawned complex tax-equity structures that monetize tax benefits for project sponsors who otherwise could not use them efficiently. Although these structures have helped expand solar deployment, they are relatively costly and inefficient. This has spurred solar stakeholders to develop lower-cost financing solutions such as securitization of solar project portfolios, solar-specific loan products, and methods for incorporating residential solar's value into home values. To move solar further toward an unsubsidized SunShot future, additional financial innovation must occur. Development of a larger, more mature U.S. solar industry will likely increase financial transparency and investor confidence, which in turn will enable simpler, lower-cost financing methods. Utility-scale solar might be financed more like conventional generation assets are today, non-residential solar might be financed more like a new roof, and residential solar might be financed more like an expensive appliance. Assuming a constant, SunShot-level installed photovoltaic (PV) system price, such financing innovations could reduce PV's levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) by an estimated 25%-50% compared with historical financing approaches. These results suggest that financing can adapt to changing conditions and might ease the transition away from a reliance on tax incentives while driving solar's LCOE toward the SunShot goals.

  15. SORCE: Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Rottman, Gary; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Understanding the Sun's influence on the Earth; How the Sun affect Earth's climate; By how much does the Sun's radiation very; Understanding Solar irradiance; History of Solar irradiance observations; The SORCE mission; How do the SORCE instruments measure solar radiation; Total irradiance monitor (TIM); Spectral irradiance monitor (SIM); Solar stellar irradiance comparison experiment (SOLSTICE); XUV photometer system (XPS).

  16. Capturing small asteroids into Sun-Earth Lagrangian points for mining purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Lladó, Neus; Ren, Yuan; Masdemont Soler, Josep; Gomez Muntaner, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the capture of small Near Earth Objects (NEOs) into the Sun-Earth L2 using low-thrust propulsion for mining or science purposes. As it is well known, the vicinity of these points is inside a net of dynamical channels suitable for the transport in the Earth-Moon neighborhood, so different final destinations from here could be easily considered. Asteroids with very small mass and not representing a potential hazard are analyzed. An initial pruning o...

  17. A role of the variable sun in the Earth's climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronova, N.

    2008-05-01

    Thirty years of satellite observations show that solar irradiance changes are of the order of a few tenths of a percent during 11-year solar cycles. Estimates made using a simple climate model indicate that such small changes in the Sun's luminosity are unlikely to significantly influence global temperature change. However, our earlier simulations of hemispheric-mean surface-air temperature changes since 1856 using our simple climate model showed that if the TSI varied before 1978 as has been reconstructed, the climate sensitivity is reduced by about 50 percent compared to the value required if there was no variation in solar forcing. Thus, there is a factor of two uncertainty in the value of climate sensitivity due to the uncertainty in solar forcing. In this paper we update our estimates of the climate sensitivity due to solar forcing and review results of similar estimations made by other researches.

  18. A knowledge discovery approach to explore some Sun/Earth's climate relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pou, A.; Valdes, J.

    2009-09-01

    Recent developments in data driven modeling and analysis including computational intelligence techniques may throw new light on the exploration of possible solar activity/Earth's climate relationships. Here we present three different examples of methodologies under development and some preliminary results. a) Multivariate Time Series Model Mining (MVTSMM) analysis [1] and Genetic Programming were applied to Greenland's CRETE Site-E ice core Delta O18/16 values (1721-1983, one year interval sampling) and with sunspots activity (International Sunspots Number) during the same time span [2]. According to the results (1771 to 1933 period) indicated by the lag importance spectrum obtained with MVTSMM analysis, the sun's activity itself shows high internal variability and is inhomogeneous. The Dalton minimum, a low activity period usually considered to occur between 1790 and 1830, is shown to be a complex structure beginning about 1778 and ending in 1840. Apparently, the system entered a new state in 1912. In the joint analysis, the analytical tool uses extensively the solar activity data to explain the Delta O18/16 data, showing areas of stable patterns, lag drifts and abrupt pattern disruptions, indicating changes of state in the solar processes of several kinds at different times. b) A similar MVTSMM analysis was conducted on Central England Temperature (CET) and solar activity data using Group Sunspots Number (GSN) with a useful interpretive span of time from 1771 to 1916. The joint analysis involved large amounts of solar activity variables, except for the 1843-1862 and 1877-1889 periods where the discovered models used much less information from GSN data. As with the Crete-E/ISN analysis the lag importance spectrum of CET/GSN shows a number of clear discontinuities. A quarter of them are present in both (1778-1779, 1806, 1860-1862, 1912-1913). These experiments were designed for testing methodologies and not for specific hypothesis testing. However, it seems that

  19. Minimal Magnetic States of the Sun and the Solar Wind: Implications for the Origin of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; von Steiger, R.

    2017-09-01

    During the last decade it has been proposed that both the Sun and the solar wind have minimum magnetic states, lowest order levels of magnetism that underlie the 11-yr cycle as well as longer-term variability. Here we review the literature on basal magnetic states at the Sun and in the heliosphere and draw a connection between the two based on the recent deep 2008-2009 minimum between cycles 23 and 24. In particular, we consider the implications of the low solar activity during the recent minimum for the origin of the slow solar wind.

  20. Four identical satellites investigating the Earth's turbulent relationship with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Once in space, the four satellites will manoeuvre to an eccentric polar trajectory along which they will fly in tetrahedral formation for the next two years. They will take highly precise and, for the first time, three- dimensional measurements of the extraordinarily dynamic phenomena that occur where the solar wind meets the near- Earth environment. They will gather an unprecedented volume of very high- quality information on the magnetic storms, electric currents and particle accelerations that take place in the space surrounding our planet, which give rise to all manner of events, such as the aurorae in the polar regions, power cuts, breakdowns in telecommunication systems, or satellite malfunctions, and perhaps even changes in climate. The Cluster mission will also gather a host of fundamental information on the ionised gases whose behaviour physicists are trying to reproduce under laboratory conditions with the ultimate aim of generating thermonuclear energy. A cosmic battlefield The Sun's flames are lapping at the Earth's doorstep. In its constant state of effervescence/evaporation, it emits into space a wind charged with ions, electrons and protons which reach Earth at speeds of 1.5 to 3 million kph. Fortunately, our planet is armed with a natural shield against this onslaught: the magnetosphere, a distant magnetic, ionised extension of our atmosphere which slows and deflects the bulk of the stream of particles emitted by the Sun. This shield does not provide complete protection, however. Under constant buffeting from the interplanetary wind, the "fluid" magnetic screen is buckled, distorted and occasionally torn, causing small holes. When this happens, intense electric currents, magnetic storms and particle accelerations immediately develop. The overall interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere is so violent that the energy transferred can be as much as 1013 watts - equivalent to worldwide power consumption - and the currents induced run to

  1. The flare origin of Forbush decreases not associated with solar flares on the visible hemisphere of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations have shown that Forbush decreases (Fds) are produced by the propagation into the interplanetary space of a strong perturbation originating from a solar flare (Sf) accompanied by Type IV radioemission. As the front of the perturbation propagates into the interplanetary space, the region in which the galactic cosmic rays are modulated (Fd-modulated region) rotates westward with the Sun and is generally included between two boundary streams; therefore the Fds not associated with observed type IV Sfs (N.Ass.Fds) are likely to be produced by type IV Sfs occurred on the Sun's backside: these vents can be observed when the Earth crosses the corotating Western boundary of the modulated region.

  2. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-02-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models which young people use and how they theorise in the process of acquiring more scientific conceptions. In this article, the relevant published research is reviewed critically and in-depth in order to frame a series of investigations using semi-structured interviews carried out with 248 participants aged 3-18 years from China and New Zealand. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data concerning the reasoning of these subjects (involving cognitive categorisations and their rank ordering) confirmed that (a) concepts of Earth shape and size are embedded in a 'super-concept' or 'Earth notion' embracing ideas of physical shape, 'ground' and 'sky', habitation of and identity with Earth; (b) conceptual development is similar in cultures where teachers hold a scientific world view and (c) children's concepts of shape and size of the Earth, Sun and Moon can be usefully explored within an ethnological approach using multi-media interviews combined with observational astronomy. For these young people, concepts of the shape and size of the Moon and Sun were closely correlated with their Earth notion concepts and there were few differences between the cultures despite their contrasts. Analysis of the statistical data used Kolmogorov-Smirnov Two-Sample Tests with hypotheses confirmed at K-S alpha level 0.05; rs : p < 0.01.

  3. Heating of near-Earth objects and meteoroids due to close approaches to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Marchi, S; Morbidelli, A; Paolicchi, P; Lazzarin, M

    2009-01-01

    It is known that near-Earth objects (NEOs) during their orbital evolution may often undergo close approaches to the Sun. Indeed it is estimated that up to ~70% of them end their orbital evolution colliding with the Sun. Starting from the present orbital properties, it is possible to compute the most likely past evolution for every NEO, and to trace its distance from the Sun. We find that a large fraction of the population may have experienced in the past frequent close approaches, and thus, as a consequence, a considerable Sun-driven heating, not trivially correlated to the present orbits. The detailed dynamical behaviour, the rotational and the thermal properties of NEOs determine the exact amount of the resulting heating due to the Sun. In the present paper we discuss the general features of the process, providing estimates of the surface temperature reached by NEOs during their evolution. Moreover, we investigate the effects of this process on meteor-size bodies, analyzing possible differences with the NEO...

  4. Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our Sun has confronted humanity with overwhelming evidence that it is comprised of condensed matter. Dismissing this reality, the standard solar models continue to be anchored on the gaseous plasma. In large measure, the endurance of these theories can be attributed to 1 the mathematical elegance of the equations for the gaseous state, 2 the apparent success of the mass-luminosity relationship, and 3 the long-lasting influence of leading proponents of these models. Unfortunately, no direct physical finding supports the notion that the solar body is gaseous. Without exception, all observations are most easily explained by recognizing that the Sun is primarily comprised of condensed matter. However, when a physical characteristic points to condensed matter, a postori arguments are invoked to account for the behavior using the gaseous state. In isolation, many of these treatments appear plausible. As a result, the gaseous models continue to be accepted. There seems to be an overarching belief in solar science that the problems with the gaseous models are few and inconsequential. In reality, they are numerous and, while often subtle, they are sometimes daunting. The gaseous equations of state have introduced far more dilemmas than they have solved. Many of the conclusions derived from these approaches are likely to have led solar physics down unproductive avenues, as deductions have been accepted which bear little or no relationship to the actual nature of the Sun. It could be argued that, for more than 100 years, the gaseous models have prevented mankind from making real progress relative to understanding the Sun and the universe. Hence, the Sun is now placed on trial. Forty lines of evidence will be presentedbthat the solar body is comprised of, and surrounded by, condensed matter. These ‘proofs’ can be divided into seven broad categories: 1 Planckian, 2 spectroscopic, 3 structural, 4 dynamic, 5 helioseismic, 6 elemental, and 7 earthly

  5. Solar Neutron Transport in the Earth's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.

    1998-11-01

    We present results of a numerical simulation and analytical solution of small scale neutron multi-scattering and attenuation in the earth atmosphere. A range of initial zenith angles and different atmpspheric depths are considered. We show that the angular distribution of neutrons remains symetrycal only for vertical arrival. For inclined arrival the distribution becomes asymetrical; the asymmetry grows with increasing zenith angle. This effect is caused by the stronger attenuation of neutrons scattered to zenith angles larger than the arrival angle. Our analytical solution shows reasonable coincidence with the numerical simulation results. These solutions are able to reproduce the normalised observed counting rates of neutron monitors for the event of 24 may 1990, the largest Solar Neutron event observed on Earth.

  6. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun III. Insight into Solar Lithium Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The apparent depletion of lithium represents one of the grea test challenges to modern gaseous solar models. As a result, lithium has been hypothes ized to undergo nuclear burning deep within the Sun. Conversely, extremely low lith ium abundances can be easily accounted for within the liquid metallic hydrogen mo del, as lithium has been hypothesized to greatly stabilize the formation of metalli c hydrogen (E. Zurek et al. A little bit of lithium does a lot for hydrogen. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA , 2009, v. 106, no. 42, 17640–17643. Hence, the abundances of lithium on th e solar surface can be explained, not by requiring the nuclear burning of this elem ent, but rather, by suggesting that the Sun is retaining lithium within the solar body in ord er to help stabilize its liquid metallic hydrogen lattice. Unlike lithium, many of t he other elements synthesized within the Sun should experience powerful lattice exclusio nary forces as they are driven out of the intercalate regions between the layered liquid me tallic hydrogen hexagonal planes (Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metalli c Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Th eir Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press. As for lithium, its stabilizing role within t he solar interior helps to account for the lack of this element on the surface of the Sun.

  7. The possibility of forming an inhomogeneous Sun and the solar neutrino effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, E. H.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations confirm that the flux of neutrinos from the interior of the Sun is significantly less than what is expected on the basis of solar models. It has long been known that a low neutrino flux could result from a temperature in the Sun's core lower than the approximately 1.5 x 10(exp 7) K central temperature given by standard solar models. A low central temperature could occur if the solar interior were depleted in the so-called metals -- atomic species heavier than helium -- resulting in lower internal opacity. In this case, chemical abundances measured in the solar convection zone would be unrepresentative of the deep-interior abundances. The possibility of a compositionally inhomogeneous Sun has usually been discarded on the basis of cosmogonical arguments against the formation of such nonhomogeneity. This paper suggests that compositional nonhomogeneity could have arisen through unremarkable physical processes during the formation of the Sun, and that a compositionally inhomogeneous Sun remains a viable possibility for investigation of the solar neutrino problem.

  8. Solar axions as an energy source and modulator of the Earth magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Kudela, K; Mavrodiev, S Cht; Zelentsova, T N; Smolyar, V P; Merkotan, K K

    2010-01-01

    We show existence of strong negative correlation between the temporal variations of magnetic field toroidal component of the solar tachocline (the bottom of convective zone) and the Earth magnetic field (Y-component). The possibility that hypothetical solar axions, which can transform into photons in external electric or magnetic fields (the inverse Primakoff effect), can be the instrument by which the magnetic field of convective zone of the Sun modulates the magnetic field of the Earth is considered. We propose the axion mechanism of "solar dynamo-geodynamo" connection, where an energy of axions, which form in the Sun core, is modulated at first by the magnetic field of the solar tachocline zone (due to the inverse coherent Primakoff effect) and after that is absorbed in the liquid core of the Earth under influence of the terrestrial magnetic field, thereby playing the role of an energy source and a modulator of the Earth magnetic field. Within the framework of this mechanism new estimations of the strength...

  9. The shrinking Sun: a systematic error in local correlation tracking of solar granulation

    CERN Document Server

    Löptien, B; Duvall, T L; Gizon, L; Schou, J

    2016-01-01

    Context. Local correlation tracking of granulation (LCT) is an important method for measuring horizontal flows in the photosphere. This method exhibits a systematic error that looks like a flow converging towards disk center, also known as the shrinking-Sun effect. Aims. We aim at studying the nature of the shrinking-Sun effect for continuum intensity data and at deriving a simple model that can explain its origin. Methods. We derived LCT flow maps by running the local correlation tracking code FLCT on tracked and remapped continuum intensity maps provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We also computed flow maps from synthetic continuum images generated from STAGGER code simulations of solar surface convection. We investigated the origin of the shrinking-Sun effect by generating an average granule from synthetic data from the simulations. Results. The LCT flow maps derived from HMI and from the simulations exhibit a shrinking-Sun effect of comparable mag...

  10. The Effects of Solar Variability on Earth's Climate: A Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Solar irradiance, the flux of the Sun s output directed toward Earth, is Earth s main energy source.1 The Sun itself varies on several timescales over billions of years its luminosity increases as it evolves on the main sequence toward becoming a red giant; about every 11 years its sunspot activity cycles; and within just minutes flares can erupt and release massive amounts of energy. Most of the fluctuations from tens to thousands of years are associated with changes in the solar magnetic field. The focus of the National Research Council's September 2011 workshop on solar variability and Earth's climate, and of this summary report, is mainly magnetically driven variability and its possible connection with Earth's climate variations in the past 10,000 years. Even small variations in the amount or distribution of energy received at Earth can have a major influence on Earth's climate when they persist for decades. However, no satellite measurements have indicated that solar output and variability have contributed in a significant way to the increase in global mean temperature in the last 50 years. Locally, however, correlations between solar activity and variations in average weather may stand out beyond the global trend; such has been argued to be the case for the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, even in the present day. A key area of inquiry deals with establishing a unified record of the solar output and solar-modified particles that extends from the present to the prescientific past. The workshop focused attention on the need for a better understanding of the links between indices of solar activity such as cosmogenic isotopes and solar irradiance. A number of presentations focused on the timescale of the solar cycle and of the satellite record, and on the problem of extending this record back in time. Highlights included a report of progress on pyroheliometer calibration, leading to greater confidence in the time history and future stability of total solar

  11. A Solar Cell That Is Triggered by Sun and Rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qunwei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Peizhi; He, Benlin

    2016-04-18

    All-weather solar cells are promising in solving the energy crisis. A flexible solar cell is presented that is triggered by combining an electron-enriched graphene electrode with a dye-sensitized solar cell. The new solar cell can be excited by incident light on sunny days and raindrops on rainy days, yielding an optimal solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of 6.53 % under AM 1.5 irradiation and current over microamps as well as a voltage of hundreds of microvolts by simulated raindrops. The formation of π-electron|cation electrical double-layer pseudocapacitors at graphene/raindrop interface is contributable to current and voltage outputs at switchable charging-discharging process. The new concept can guide the design of advanced all-weather solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Optimal design of near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengmao; Zhu, Zhengfan; Peng, Chao; Ma, Jian; Zhu, Xiaolong; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    In the 6th edition of the Chinese Space Trajectory Design Competition held in 2014, a near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectory design problem was released, in which the motion of the spacecraft is modeled in multi-body dynamics, considering the gravitational forces of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is proposed that an electric-propulsion spacecraft initially parking in a circular 200-km-altitude low Earth orbit is expected to rendezvous with an asteroid and carry as much sample as possible back to the Earth in a 10-year time frame. The team from the Technology and Engineering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences has reported a solution with an asteroid sample mass of 328 tons, which is ranked first in the competition. In this article, we will present our design and optimization methods, primarily including overall analysis, target selection, escape from and capture by the Earth-Moon system, and optimization of impulsive and low-thrust trajectories that are modeled in multi-body dynamics. The orbital resonance concept and lunar gravity assists are considered key techniques employed for trajectory design. The reported solution, preliminarily revealing the feasibility of returning a hundreds-of-tons asteroid or asteroid sample, envisions future space missions relating to near-Earth asteroid exploration.

  13. 2007 Solar Decathlon: Powered by the Sun (Competition Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-09-01

    The 2007 Solar Decathlon Competition Program is distributed to Solar Decathlon visitors, media, sponsors, and the student competitors. It contains basic facts about the Solar Decathlon: what, where, when, who, and how. It is a guide for visitors to the events and workshops. It describes the 10 contests and the technologies used in the houses. It celebrates the accomplishments of the competitors and provides an opportunity for the major sponsors to describe their roles and relay their commitment to the ideals of the Solar Decathlon.

  14. The chemical composition of the Sun from helioseismic and solar neutrino data

    CERN Document Server

    Villante, F L; Delahaye, F; Pinsonneault, M H

    2013-01-01

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the solar composition problem by using a statistical approach that allows us to combine the information provided by helioseimic and solar neutrino data in an effective way. We include in our analysis the helioseismic determinations of the surface helium abundance and of the depth of the convective envelope, the measurements of the $^7{\\rm Be}$ and $^8{\\rm B}$ neutrino fluxes, the sound speed profile inferred from helioseismic frequencies. We provide all the ingredients to describe how these quantities depend on the solar surface composition and to evaluate the (correlated) uncertainties in solar model predictions. We include errors sources that are not traditionally considered such as those from inversion of helioseismic data. We, then, apply the proposed approach to infer the chemical composition of the Sun. We show that the opacity profile of the Sun is well constrained by the solar observational properties. In the context of a two parameter analysis in which elements a...

  15. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation, or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Given a solar luminosity L_Ar = 0.75 L_0 at the beginning of the Archean 3.8 Gyr ago, where L_0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance r of the Earth was r_Ar = 0.956 r_0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as I_Ar = 0.82 I_0. It would allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3.8 Gyr to 2.5 Gyr ago, a relative recession rate as large as \\dot r/r \\simeq 3.4 x 10^-11 yr^-1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3.8 Gyr ago H_Ar = 1.192 H_0 = 8.2 x 10^-11 yr^-1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth' s recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of ...

  16. Follow the sun - solar tracking; Immer der Sonne nach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Fred

    2013-10-01

    The new personal use solar system MSS of Deger Energie (Horb am Neckar, Germany) allows a wide autonomy in the power supply. For commercial customers too. [German] Das neue Solarsystem MSS (Maximum Solar Speicher) von Deger Energie in Horb am Neckar erlaubt weitgehende Autonomie in der Stromversorgung. Auch fuer Gewerbekunden.

  17. Solar hydrogen: harvesting light and heat from sun (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liejin; Jing, Dengwei

    2015-09-01

    My research group in the State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (SKLMF), Xi'an Jiaotong University has been focusing on renewable energy, especially solar hydrogen, for about 20 years. In this presentation, I will present the most recent progress in our group on solar hydrogen production using light and heat. Firstly, "cheap" photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic water splitting, including both nanostructured materials and pilot-scale demonstration in our group for light-driven solar hydrogen (artificial photosynthesis) will be introduced. Then I will make a deep introduction to the achievements on the thermal-driven solar hydrogen, i.e., biomass/coal gasification in supercritical water for large-scale and low-cost hydrogen production using concentrated solar light.

  18. Solar dynamo as host power pacemaker of the Earth global climate

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, Vitaliy D; Vaschenko, Vladimir N; Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht; Beglaryan, Margarita E; Zelentsova, Tatiana N; Tarasov, Victor A; Litvinov, Dmitriy A; Smolyar, Vladimir P; Vachev, Boyko I

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the so-called problem of solar power pacemaker related to possible existence of some hidden but key mechanism of energy influence of the Sun on fundamental geophysical processes is one of the principal and puzzling problems of modern climatology. The "tracks" of this mechanism have been shown up in different problems of solar-terrestrial physics for a long time and, in particular, in climatology, where the solar-climate variability is stably observed. However, the mechanisms by which small changes in the Sun's energy (solar irradiance or insolation) output during the solar cycle can cause change in the weather and climate are still unknown. We analyze possible causes of the solar-climate variability concentrating one's attention on the physical substantiation of strong correlation between the temporal variations of magnetic flux of the solar tachocline zone and the Earth magnetic field (Y-component). We propose an effective mechanism of solar dynamo-geodynamo connection which plays the role o...

  19. Access to solar energy: who owns the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, J.N.

    If solar advocates should litigate for the free attainment of solar access to encourage solar energy, this would impinge directly on other people's property rights. Passage of such legislation would contradict the United States' historical acceptance of the cujus est solum...doctrine. This proprietary franchise recognizes the individual's right to use privately-owned airspace which has been legally acknowledged as separable and conveyable. A legislative attempt to redefine the property rights in the airspace over another's real estate would be a significant break with the United States legal tradition. Such action could constitute an economically inefficient and inequitable taking of property rights and reductions in property values for certain real estate owners. In Virginia, the Virginia Solar Easements Act, the text of which is appended, provides an explicit mechanism to obtain and register solar easements in those cases where the solar user fears a potential shade problem from a neighbor's real estate and where the solar user employs a market based mechanism to insure his receipt of sunlight from across another's property.

  20. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection and Associated Geo-effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huidong; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui; Möstl, Christian; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-10-01

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations associated with the 2012 July 12 coronal mass ejection (CME), covering the source region on the Sun from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, stereoscopic imaging observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), magnetic field characteristics from Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER), and type II radio burst and in situ measurements from Wind. A triangulation method based on STEREO stereoscopic observations is employed to determine the kinematics of the CME, and the outcome is compared with the results derived from the type II radio burst using a solar wind electron density model. A Grad-Shafranov technique is applied to Wind in situ data to reconstruct the flux-rope structure and compare it with the observations of the solar source region, which helps in understanding the geo-effectiveness associated with the CME structure. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) the CME undergoes an impulsive acceleration, a rapid deceleration before reaching MESSENGER, and then a gradual deceleration out to 1 au, which should be considered in CME kinematics models; (2) the type II radio burst was probably produced from a high-density interaction region between the CME-driven shock and a nearby streamer or from the shock flank with lower heights, which implies uncertainties in the determination of CME kinematics using solely type II radio bursts; (3) the flux-rope orientation and chirality deduced from in situ reconstructions at Wind agree with those obtained from solar source observations; (4) the prolonged southward magnetic field near the Earth is mainly from the axial component of the largely southward inclined flux rope, which indicates the importance of predicting both the flux-rope orientation and magnetic field components in geomagnetic activity forecasting.

  1. Optimal design of near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Moon system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengmao He; Zhengfan Zhu; Chao Peng; Jian Ma; Xiaolong Zhu; Yang Gao

    2016-01-01

    In the 6th edition of the Chinese Space Trajec-tory Design Competition held in 2014, a near-Earth asteroid sample-return trajectory design problem was released, in which the motion of the spacecraft is modeled in multi-body dynamics, considering the gravitational forces of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is proposed that an electric-propulsion spacecraft initially parking in a circular 200-km-altitude low Earth orbit is expected to rendezvous with an asteroid and carry as much sample as possible back to the Earth in a 10-year time frame. The team from the Technology and Engi-neering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences has reported a solution with an asteroid sample mass of 328 tons, which is ranked first in the competition. In this article, we will present our design and optimization methods, primarily including overall analysis, target selec-tion, escape from and capture by the Earth–Moon system, and optimization of impulsive and low-thrust trajectories that are modeled in multi-body dynamics. The orbital res-onance concept and lunar gravity assists are considered key techniques employed for trajectory design. The reported solution, preliminarily revealing the feasibility of returning a hundreds-of-tons asteroid or asteroid sample, envisions future space missions relating to near-Earth asteroid explo-ration.

  2. Early Stage of Origin of Earth (interval after Emergence of Sun, Formation of Liquid Core, Formation of Solid Core)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Sergeev, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational collapse of interstellar molecular cloud fragment has led to the formation of the Sun and its surrounding protoplanetary disk, consisting of 5 × 10^5 dust and gas. The collapse continued (1 years. Age of solar system (about 4.57×10^9 years) determine by age calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI) which are present at samples of some meteorites (chondrites). Subsidence of dust to the central plane of a protoplanetary disk has led to formation of a dust subdisk which as a result of gravitational instability has broken up to condensations. In the process of collisional evolution they turned into dense planetesimals from which the planets formed. The accounting of a role of large bodies in evolution of a protoplanetary swarm in the field of terrestrial planets has allowed to define times of formation of the massive bodies permitting their early differentiation at the expense of short-lived isotopes heating and impacts to the melting temperature of the depths. The total time of Earth's growth is estimated about 10^8 years. Hf geochronometer showed that the core of the Earth has existed for Using W about 3×10^7 Hf geohronometer years since the formation of the CAI. Thus data W point to the formation of the Earth's core during its accretion. The paleomagnetic data indicate the existence of Earth's magnetic field past 3.5×10^9 years. But the age of the solid core, estimated by heat flow at the core-mantle boundary is 1.7×10^9 (0.5 years). Measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron under the conditions that exist in the Earth's core, indicate the absence of the need for a solid core of existence to support the work geodynamo, although electrical resistivity measurements yield the opposite result.

  3. The solar neutrino problem: Mixing of neutrinos and mixing in the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxton, W. C.

    I review the current status of the solar neutrino problem, including the exciting possibility of matter enhanced neutrino oscillations. Neutrino flux measurements, independent of questions of solar dynamics, appear to leave only one competing candidate astrophysical solution, at least in the case of steady-state solar models. That possibility - mixing of the solar core on time scales of 3He equilibration - appears to have some attractive features. A “score card” is presented in which the two alternatives - mixed neutrinos or a mixed sun - are handicapped.

  4. The Sun, Mercury, and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The Messenger mission to Mercury opened a new window into the inner solar system. In 2008, this mission began a number of years of flybys, culminating in an orbital insertion around Mercury and producing unparalleled observations about this mysterious innermost planet. Mercury orbits so close to the Sun, from the point of view of Earth, that seeing it from the Earth against the Sun's glare is a great challenge. At the same time, the huge gravitational force of the Sun makes it a challenge to put a mission on Mercury without losing it into the Sun. Now, with heightened understanding of Mercury,

  5. Ulysses returns to the Sun's south pole and encounters blustery solar weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Conditions are very different from those Ulysses encountered during its first south polar pass in 1994 when solar activity, which is related to the magnetic behaviour of the Sun, was very low. Then, the solar wind at high latitudes was fast, but steady. This latest polar pass gives scientists the opportunity to learn just how different the polar regions of the Sun are at solar maximum compared with minimum. After spending four months above 70o south, Ulysses will swing towards the equator early next year to turn its attention to the northern hemisphere, beginning its passage over the north pole on 3 September 2001. Although it will be travelling the same path it followed six years ago, conditions will be quite different and new discoveries are eagerly awaited. Since launch in October 1990, Ulysses has already proved one of the most successful interplanetary missions ever. A joint ESA/NASA mission, it is the first spacecraft ever to be launched into an orbit outside the ecliptic, the plane in which the planets orbit the Sun. From this unique vantage point, it has changed our view of the heliosphere, the region of space filled by the solar wind and over which our Sun exerts its influence. At solar minimum, instruments on board Ulysses found that the fast solar wind, emanating from the Sun's poles, blows at a steady 750 km/s and fills a large fraction of the heliosphere. The state-of-the-art instruments were also able to show that the boundary between the fast wind and the slower, more variable wind from the equatorial regions, is surprisingly sharp. Another surprise was that the effects of collisions, occurring at low latitudes between fast and slow wind streams, continue to be felt all the way up to the poles. Ulysses discoveries, however, have not been confined to the Sun and heliosphere. Instruments on board the spacecraft also made the first ever measurements of dust particles and neutral helium atoms originating outside the solar system. These findings have

  6. Has the Sun Set on Quantum Dot- Sensitized Solar Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshia L. Wrenn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A reminder, a review and a look toward the future pros‐ pects for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells — a reminder of the highly viable, energy-efficient solar cells achievable; a review of ground-breaking devices and their similarities to the near unity photon-to-electron mechanisms of photosynthesis; a look toward architectures that capitalize on the advances observed in previous work.

  7. Proton activity of the Sun in current solar cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chuan; Fang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of 7 large solar proton events (SPEs) of current solar cycle 24 (from 2009 January up to date). They were recorded by GOES spacecraft with highest proton fluxes over 200 pfu for energies $>$10 MeV. In situ particle measurements show that: (1) The profiles of the proton fluxes are highly dependent of the locations of their solar sources, namely flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs); (2) The solar particle release (SPR) times fall in the decay phase of the flare emission, and are in accordance with the times when the CMEs travel to an average height of 7.9 solar radii; (3) The time differences between the SPR and the flare peak are also dependent of the locations of the solar active regions (ARs). The results tend to support the concept of proton acceleration by the CME-driven shock, even though there exists a possibility of particle acceleration at flare site with subsequent perpendicular diffusion of accelerated particles in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We derive the integral ...

  8. Extension of Earth-Moon libration point orbits with solar sail propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligers, Jeannette; Macdonald, Malcolm; Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents families of libration point orbits in the Earth-Moon system that originate from complementing the classical circular restricted three-body problem with a solar sail. Through the use of a differential correction scheme in combination with a continuation on the solar sail induced acceleration, families of Lyapunov, halo, vertical Lyapunov, Earth-centred, and distant retrograde orbits are created. As the solar sail circular restricted three-body problem is non-autonomous, a constraint defined within the differential correction scheme ensures that all orbits are periodic with the Sun's motion around the Earth-Moon system. The continuation method then starts from a classical libration point orbit with a suitable period and increases the solar sail acceleration magnitude to obtain families of orbits that are parametrised by this acceleration. Furthermore, different solar sail steering laws are considered (both in-plane and out-of-plane, and either fixed in the synodic frame or fixed with respect to the direction of Sunlight), adding to the wealth of families of solar sail enabled libration point orbits presented. Finally, the linear stability properties of the generated orbits are investigated to assess the need for active orbital control. It is shown that the solar sail induced acceleration can have a positive effect on the stability of some orbit families, especially those at the L2 point, but that it most often (further) destabilises the orbit. Active control will therefore be needed to ensure long-term survivability of these orbits.

  9. Properties of an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star: Earth observed by the EPOXI mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Timothy A; Deming, L Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Meadows, Victoria S; Robinson, Tyler D; Seager, Sara; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission observed the disc-integrated Earth and Moon to test techniques for reconnoitering extrasolar terrestrial planets, using the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to observe Earth at the beginning and end of Northern Hemisphere spring, 2008, from a range of ∼1/6 to 1/3 AU. These observations furnish high-precision and high-cadence empirical photometry and spectroscopy of Earth, suitable as "ground truth" for numerically simulating realistic observational scenarios for an Earth-like exoplanet with finite signal-to-noise ratio. Earth was observed at near-equatorial sub-spacecraft latitude on 18-19 March, 28-29 May, and 4-5 June (UT), in the range of 372-4540 nm wavelength with low visible resolving power (λ/Δλ=5-13) and moderate IR resolving power (λ/Δλ=215-730). Spectrophotometry in seven filters yields light curves at ∼372-948 nm filter-averaged wavelength, modulated by Earth's rotation with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤20%. The spatially resolved Sun glint is a minor contributor to disc-integrated reflectance. Spectroscopy at 1100-4540 nm reveals gaseous water and carbon dioxide, with minor features of molecular oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide. One-day changes in global cloud cover resulted in differences between the light curve beginning and end of ≤5%. The light curve of a lunar transit of Earth on 29 May is color-dependent due to the Moon's red spectrum partially occulting Earth's relatively blue spectrum. The "vegetation red edge" spectral contrast observed between two long-wavelength visible/near-IR bands is ambiguous, not clearly distinguishing between the verdant Earth diluted by cloud cover versus the desolate mineral regolith of the Moon. Spectrophotometry in at least one other comparison band at short wavelength is required to distinguish between Earth-like and Moon-like surfaces in reconnaissance observations. However, measurements at 850 nm alone, the high-reflectance side of the red edge, could be sufficient to

  10. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the opposition surge of the icy Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, P.; Barbieri, M.; Monaco, L.; Zaggia, S.; Lovis, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a multiwavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 2014 January 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with high accuracy radial velocity planetary searcher (HARPS) from La Silla, Chile and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit. The expected modulation in radial velocities was of ≈20 cm s-1 but an anomalous drift as large as ≈38 m s-1, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the opposition surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion of the solar surface centred around the crossing Earth which can then be observed as a sort of inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. in fact, a simplified model of this effect can explain in detail most features of the observed radial velocity anomalies, namely the extensions before and after the transit, the small differences between the two observatories and the presence of a secondary peak closer to Earth passage. This phenomenon, observed here for the first time, should be observed every time similar Earth alignments occur with rocky bodies without atmospheres. We predict that it should be observed again during the next conjunction of Earth and Jupiter in 2026.

  11. On the Path to SunShot - Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Financing Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldham, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Financial innovations—independent of technology-cost improvements—could cut the cost of solar energy to customers and businesses by 30%–60% (see Feldman and Bolinger 2016). Financing is critical to solar deployment, because the costs of solar technologies are paid up front, while their benefits are realized over decades. Solar financing has been shaped by the government incentives designed to accelerate solar deployment. This is particularly true for federal tax incentives, which have spawned complex tax-equity structures that monetize tax benefits for project sponsors who otherwise could not use them efficiently. Although these structures have helped expand solar deployment, they are relatively costly and inefficient. This has spurred solar stakeholders to develop lower-cost financing solutions such as securitization of solar project portfolios, solar-specific loan products, and methods for incorporating residential PV’s value into home values. To move solar further toward an unsubsidized SunShot future, additional financial innovation must occur. Development of a larger, more mature U.S. solar industry will likely increase financial transparency and investor confidence, which in turn will enable simpler, lower-cost financing methods. Utility-scale solar might be financed more like conventional generation assets are today, non-residential solar might be financed more like a new roof, and residential solar might be financed more like an expensive appliance. Assuming a constant, SunShot-level installed PV system price, such financing innovations could reduce PV’s LCOE by an estimated 30%–60% (depending on the sector) compared with historical financing approaches.

  12. Insect thin films as sun blocks, not solar collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, D W; Crawford, A B

    2000-05-20

    We measured the visible reflectance spectra of whole wing sections from three species of iridescent butterflies and moths, for normal incidence, integrated over all reflected angles. In this manner, we separated the optics of the thin films causing the iridescence from the optics of the rest of the scale. We found that iridescence reduces solar absorption by the wing in all cases, typically by approximately 20% or less, in contrast to claims by Miaoulis and Heilman [Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 91, 122 (1998)] that the thin-film structures that produce iridescence act as solar collectors.

  13. Destruction of Sun-grazing comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C J; Brown, J C; Battams, K; Saint-Hilaire, P; Liu, W; Hudson, H; Pesnell, W D

    2012-01-20

    Observations of comets in Sun-grazing orbits that survive solar insolation long enough to penetrate into the Sun's inner corona provide information on the solar atmosphere and magnetic field as well as on the makeup of the comet. On 6 July 2011, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the demise of comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona in five wavelength bands in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The comet penetrated to within 0.146 solar radius (~100,000 kilometers) of the solar surface before its EUV signal disappeared. Before that, material released into the coma--at first seen in absorption--formed a variable EUV-bright tail. During the final 10 minutes of observation by SDO's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, ~6 × 10(8) to 6 × 10(10) grams of total mass was lost (corresponding to an effective nucleus diameter of ~10 to 50 meters), as estimated from the tail's deceleration due to interaction with the surrounding coronal material; the EUV absorption by the comet and the brightness of the tail suggest that the mass was at the high end of this range. These observations provide evidence that the nucleus had broken up into a family of fragments, resulting in accelerated sublimation in the Sun's intense radiation field.

  14. SunShot solar power reduces costs and uncertainty in future low-carbon electricity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileva, Ana; Nelson, James H; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel M

    2013-08-20

    The United States Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative has set cost-reduction targets of $1/watt for central-station solar technologies. We use SWITCH, a high-resolution electricity system planning model, to study the implications of achieving these targets for technology deployment and electricity costs in western North America, focusing on scenarios limiting carbon emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. We find that achieving the SunShot target for solar photovoltaics would allow this technology to provide more than a third of electric power in the region, displacing natural gas in the medium term and reducing the need for nuclear and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, which face technological and cost uncertainties, by 2050. We demonstrate that a diverse portfolio of technological options can help integrate high levels of solar generation successfully and cost-effectively. The deployment of GW-scale storage plays a central role in facilitating solar deployment and the availability of flexible loads could increase the solar penetration level further. In the scenarios investigated, achieving the SunShot target can substantially mitigate the cost of implementing a carbon cap, decreasing power costs by up to 14% and saving up to $20 billion ($2010) annually by 2050 relative to scenarios with Reference solar costs.

  15. Robust optimal sun-pointing control of a large solar power satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunan; Zhang, Kaiming; Peng, Haijun; Wu, Zhigang; Radice, Gianmarco

    2016-10-01

    The robust optimal sun-pointing control strategy for a large geostationary solar power satellite (SPS) is addressed in this paper. The SPS is considered as a huge rigid body, and the sun-pointing dynamics are firstly proposed in the state space representation. The perturbation effects caused by gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure and microwave reaction are investigated. To perform sun-pointing maneuvers, a periodically time-varying robust optimal LQR controller is designed to assess the pointing accuracy and the control inputs. It should be noted that, to reduce the pointing errors, the disturbance rejection technique is combined into the proposed LQR controller. A recursive algorithm is then proposed to solve the optimal LQR control gain. Simulation results are finally provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed closed-loop system.

  16. Design and Implementation of PLC-Based Automatic Sun tracking System for Parabolic Trough Solar Concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A sun-tracking system for parabolic trough solar concentrators (PTCs is a control system used to orient the concentrator toward the sun always, so that the maximum energy can be collected. The work presented here is a design and development of PLC based sun tracking control system for PTC. Sun tracking control system consists of a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and a single axis hydraulic drives tracking control system. Hydraulic drives and the necessary tracking angle algorithm have been designed and developed to perform the technical tasks. A PLC unit was employed to control and monitor the mechanical movement of the PTC and to collect and store data related to the tracking angle of PTC. It is found that the tracking error of the system is less than 0.6°. Field experience shows that tracking algorithm act stable and reliable and suit for PTCs.

  17. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude ≳ 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  18. PROCESSING METHOD EFFECT ON SUN DIAMETER MEASUREMENT WITH CCD SOLAR ASTROLABE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafer, Djelloul [Unite de Recherche Appliquee en Energies Renouvelables, BP 88, Ghardaiea (Algeria); Irbah, Abdenour, E-mail: djdjafer@gmail.com, E-mail: abdenour.irbah@latmos.ipsl.fr [Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), CNRS UMR8190, Universite Paris VI, Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines INSU, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2012-05-01

    Photometric Sun diameter measurement is based on the calculation of the inflection point of the solar limb. In ground measurement, this point is located at a position on the solar limb where the signal-to-noise ratio is very high, which necessitates the appropriate filtering techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving its position. In this paper, we compare the filtering method currently in use to process the CCD solar astrolabe data, the FFTD method widely used, with a different method that we propose. Using the acquired data from the CCD astrolabe at Calern, France during 1997, we can obtain a mean difference of 130 mas in the measured radii.

  19. The sun, our star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  20. Development of a heliostat facility for solar-radiation-based calibration of earth observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Michele A.; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Kaptchen, Paul; Good, William; Lin, Tony; To, Raymund; Biggar, Stuart; Thome, Kurtis

    2008-08-01

    A new heliostat facility at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) in Boulder, CO will allow the use of the sun as the source in the calibration of earth observing sensors. The solar spectrum is the basic energy source for such instruments; therefore it is advantageous to perform initial ground radiometric calibrations using the sun. Using this method for preflight radiometric calibration reduces uncertainties caused by the spectral mismatch between the preflight and in-flight calibration, especially in the case in which a solar diffuser is the in-flight calibration method. This method also reduces stray light concerns as the instrument diffuser is measured in situ with the same radiance level it sees on orbit. This paper presents the design of a heliostat test facility which tracks the sun and directs the solar beam into a thermal vacuum chamber, allowing the instrument under test to be kept in a safe, clean and controllable environment. Design considerations that affect the uniformity and transmission of the system are discussed. The opto-mechanical logistics of creating a heliostat that will deliver a 13-inch solar beam into a thermal vacuum chamber are also presented. This facility is currently under construction at BATC and is expected to be operational by the end of 2008.

  1. Performance of an electro-optical solar compass in partially obscured Sun conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollanti, S; De Meis, D; Di Lazzaro, P; Flora, F; Gallerano, G P; Mezi, L; Murra, D; Vicca, D

    2016-04-20

    Solar compasses are designed to accurately find true North on sunny days. However, no data on their performance are available when sunlight is partially blocked, e.g., by a cloud. We have measured, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the performance of one of the most accurate electro-optical solar compasses (accuracy better than 0.01  deg) as a function of the solar disk obscuration during the Sun's eclipse on 20 March 2015. The measurements show that the accuracy level is mainly dependent on the asymmetry of the obscuration with respect to the main axis of the optical detection system and, to a lesser extent, on the percentage of the solar disk covered. In particular, azimuth measurement suffered a maximum deviation of 0.08 deg when 35% of the solar disk was asymmetrically obscured. The deviation was smaller when 46% of the solar disk was more symmetrically obscured. This experiment demonstrates that, even in the case of a partially obscured Sun, the electro-optical solar compass maintains an accuracy better than magnetic and electronic compasses.

  2. Maximizing Output Power of a Solar Panel via Combination of Sun Tracking and Maximum Power Point Tracking by Fuzzy Controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Taherbaneh; A. H. Rezaie; H. Ghafoorifard; Rahimi, K; M. B. Menhaj

    2010-01-01

    In applications with low-energy conversion efficiency, maximizing the output power improves the efficiency. The maximum output power of a solar panel depends on the environmental conditions and load profile. In this paper, a method based on simultaneous use of two fuzzy controllers is developed in order to maximize the generated output power of a solar panel in a photovoltaic system: fuzzy-based sun tracking and maximum power point tracking. The sun tracking is performed by changing the solar...

  3. General formula for on-axis sun-tracking system and its application in improving tracking accuracy of solar collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, K.K.; Wong, C.W. [Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Off Jalan Genting Kelang, Setapak, 53300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2009-03-15

    Azimuth-elevation and tilt-roll tracking mechanism are among the most commonly used sun-tracking methods for aiming the solar collector towards the sun at all times. It has been many decades that each of these two sun-tracking methods has its own specific sun-tracking formula and they are not interrelated. In this paper, the most general form of sun-tracking formula that embraces all the possible on-axis tracking methods is presented. The general sun-tracking formula not only can provide a general mathematical solution, but more significantly it can improve the sun-tracking accuracy by tackling the installation error of the solar collector. (author)

  4. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  5. Modelling the drying kinetics of green peas in a solar dryer and under open sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, BRCM CET Bahal, Haryana–127028 (India); Varun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NIT Hamirpur, (H.P.)–177005 (India); Sharma, Naveen [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, IITR, (U.K.)–247667 (India)

    2013-07-01

    The drying kinetics of green peas was investigated in an indirect solar dryer and under open sun. The entire drying process took place exclusively in falling rate period. The constant rate period was absent from the drying curves. The rehydration capacity was also determined for peas dried in solar dryer and under open sun. The rehydration capacity of solar dried peas was found higher than open sun dried peas. The drying data obtained from experiments were fitted to eight different mathematical models. The performance of these models was examined by comparing the coefficient of correlation (R2), sum of squares error (SSE), mean squared error (MSE) and root mean square error (RMSE) between observed and predicted values of moisture ratios. Among these models, the thin layer drying model developed by Page showed good agreement with the data obtained from experiments for bottom tray. The Midilli et al. model has shown better fit to the experimental data for top tray and open sun than other models.

  6. Modelling the drying kinetics of green peas in a solar dryer and under open sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil, Varun, Naveen Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The drying kinetics of green peas was investigated in an indirect solar dryer and under open sun. The entire drying process took place exclusively in falling rate period. The constant rate period was absent from the drying curves. The rehydration capacity was also determined for peas dried in solar dryer and under open sun. The rehydration capacity of solar dried peas was found higher than open sun dried peas. The drying data obtained from experiments were fitted to eight different mathematical models. The performance of these models was examined by comparing the coefficient of correlation (R2, sum of squares error (SSE, mean squared error (MSE and root mean square error (RMSE between observed and predicted values of moisture ratios. Among these models, the thin layer drying model developed by Page showed good agreement with the data obtained from experiments for bottom tray. The Midilli et al. model has shown better fit to the experimental data for top tray and open sun than other models.

  7. Orbit Determination (OD) Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission and for the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    The Triana spacecraft was designed to be launched by the Space Shuttle. The nominal Triana mission orbit will be a Sun-Earth L1 libration point orbit. Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination (OD) error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana mission from the first correction maneuver through approximately launch plus 6 months. Results are also presented for the science data collection phase of the Fourier Kelvin Stellar Interferometer Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission concept with momentum unloading thrust perturbations during the tracking arc. The Triana analysis includes extensive analysis of an initial short arc orbit determination solution and results using both Deep Space Network (DSN) and commercial Universal Space Network (USN) statistics. These results could be utilized in support of future Sun-Earth libration point missions.

  8. The Solar Solution: Tracking the Sun with Low Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    As neutrinos become a significant background for projected dark matter experiments, the community will become concerned with determining if events counted in a dark matter experiment are good dark matter candidates or low-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. We investigate the feasibility of using neutrino-electron scattering in a terrestrial detector medium as a means to determine the flight direction of the original, low-energy solar neutrino.Using leading-order weak interactions in the Standard Model and constrains from energy and momentum conservation, we developed a simple simulation that suggests that 68% of the time the ejected electron would be within 0.99 radians of the incident neutrino's direction. This suggests that it may be fruitful to pursue low-energy neutrino detection capability that can utilize such ejected electrons.

  9. Analysis of the flight dynamics of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) off-sun scientific pointing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitone, D. S.; Klein, J. R.; Twambly, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Algorithms are presented which were created and implemented by the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) attitude operations team to support large-angle spacecraft pointing at scientific objectives. The mission objective of the post-repair SMM satellite was to study solar phenomena. However, because the scientific instruments, such as the Coronagraph/Polarimeter (CP) and the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS), were able to view objects other than the Sun, attitude operations support for attitude pointing at large angles from the nominal solar-pointing attitudes was required. Subsequently, attitude support for SMM was provided for scientific objectives such as Comet Halley, Supernova 1987A, Cygnus X-1, and the Crab Nebula. In addition, the analysis was extended to include the reverse problem, computing the right ascension and declination of a body given the off-Sun angles. This analysis led to the computation of the orbits of seven new solar comets seen in the field-of-view (FOV) of the CP. The activities necessary to meet these large-angle attitude-pointing sequences, such as slew sequence planning, viewing-period prediction, and tracking-bias computation are described. Analysis is presented for the computation of maneuvers and pointing parameters relative to the SMM-unique, Sun-centered reference frame. Finally, science data and independent attitude solutions are used to evaluate the larg-angle pointing performance.

  10. Analysis of the flight dynamics of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) off-sun scientific pointing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitone, D. S.; Klein, J. R.; Twambly, B. J.

    Algorithms are presented which were created and implemented by the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) attitude operations team to support large-angle spacecraft pointing at scientific objectives. The mission objective of the post-repair SMM satellite was to study solar phenomena. However, because the scientific instruments, such as the Coronagraph/Polarimeter (CP) and the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS), were able to view objects other than the Sun, attitude operations support for attitude pointing at large angles from the nominal solar-pointing attitudes was required. Subsequently, attitude support for SMM was provided for scientific objectives such as Comet Halley, Supernova 1987A, Cygnus X-1, and the Crab Nebula. In addition, the analysis was extended to include the reverse problem, computing the right ascension and declination of a body given the off-Sun angles. This analysis led to the computation of the orbits of seven new solar comets seen in the field-of-view (FOV) of the CP. The activities necessary to meet these large-angle attitude-pointing sequences, such as slew sequence planning, viewing-period prediction, and tracking-bias computation are described. Analysis is presented for the computation of maneuvers and pointing parameters relative to the SMM-unique, Sun-centered reference frame. Finally, science data and independent attitude solutions are used to evaluate the larg-angle pointing performance.

  11. A Look into the Hellish Cradles of Suns and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    New images released today by ESO delve into the heart of a cosmic cloud, called RCW 38, crowded with budding stars and planetary systems. There, young stars bombard fledgling suns and planets with powerful winds and blazing light, helped in their task by short-lived, massive stars that explode as supernovae. In some cases, this onslaught cooks away the matter that may eventually form new solar systems. Scientists think that our own Solar System emerged from such an environment. The dense star cluster RCW 38 glistens about 5500 light years away in the direction of the constellation Vela (the Sails). Like the Orion Nebula Cluster, RCW 38 is an "embedded cluster", in that the nascent cloud of dust and gas still envelops its stars. Astronomers have determined that most stars, including the low mass, reddish ones that outnumber all others in the Universe, originate in these matter-rich locations. Accordingly, embedded clusters provide scientists with a living laboratory in which to explore the mechanisms of star and planetary formation. "By looking at star clusters like RCW 38, we can learn a great deal about the origins of our Solar System and others, as well as those stars and planets that have yet to come", says Kim DeRose, first author of the new study that appears in the Astronomical Journal. DeRose did her work on RCW 38 as an undergraduate student at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA. Using the NACO adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope [1], astronomers have obtained the sharpest image yet of RCW 38. They focused on a small area in the centre of the cluster that surrounds the massive star IRS2, which glows in the searing, white-blue range, the hottest surface colour and temperatures possible for stars. These dramatic observations revealed that IRS2 is actually not one, but two stars - a binary system consisting of twin scorching stars, separated by about 500 times the Earth-Sun distance. In the NACO image, the astronomers

  12. Release History and Transport Parameters of Relativistic Solar Electrons Inferred From Near-the-Sun In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueda, N.; Lario, D.

    2016-10-01

    We study four consecutive 300-800 keV electron events observed on 1980 May 28 by Helios-1, when the spacecraft was located at 0.31 au from the Sun. We use two different techniques to extract the release time history of electrons at the Sun: (1) a data-driven method based on the assumption that particles conserve their magnetic moment as they propagate between the Sun and the spacecraft and (2) an inversion method that utilizes particle transport simulation results. Both methods make use of the particle angular distributions measured relative to the local direction of the magnetic field. The general characteristics of the release time profiles obtained by these two techniques are similar, especially during their rising phases. We find indications that the strength of the interplanetary scattering varies with the size of the solar parent event, suggesting that scattering processes are not necessarily an inherent property of the medium but are related to the amount of released particles at the Sun. We use the inferred release profiles to compute the expected intensities at 1 au. In contrast to simultaneous near-Earth observations by the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP-8), our simulations predict the observation of four separate events at 1 au. Processes that could contribute to the observation of one single time-extended event at 1 au include (1) distinct magnetic connections of the spacecraft to the particle sources, (2) the spatio-temporal evolution of the particle sources, and (3) different particle transport conditions, including a variation of {λ }r with radial distance and/or heliolongitude, as well as the possibility that electrons reached IMP-8 by diffusion perpendicular to the interplanetary magnetic field.

  13. Methods on Efficiently Relating Data from the Sun to In-situ Data at L1: An Application to the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Maria; Viall, Nicholeen

    2017-01-01

    Understanding space weather has become increasingly important as scientists and spacecraft extend their reach further into the universe. The solar wind is highly ionized plasma that constantly bombards the earth. It causes compression and relaxation in our magnetosphere, and affects spacecraft and astronauts in outer space. There are two types of solar wind, fast wind and slow wind. The fast wind is considered to be steady in composition and speed, and travels at speeds greater than 500 km/s. The slow solar wind is known for being highly variable in composition and speed, and travels at speeds less than 500 km/s. Fast solar wind originates from coronal hole regions on the sun, while the slow solar wind’s origin is very controversial. There are currently two types of theories for slow solar wind. One theory involves wave heating dynamics, while the other contends that slow solar wind originates from magnetic reconnection that continually opens magnetic field lines. These models are currently under-constrained with both types able to reproduce the long-term, average behavior of the wind. To further constrain these models it was necessary to research small scale structure in the solar wind, however analyzing these structures pushes the limits of the current instrument capabilities. We developed techniques that provide an automated process to quickly generate results from multiple different analysis techniques, allowing the user to compare data from STEREO’s Heliospheric Imager (HI) and from data taken at L1. This increases the efficiency and ability to relate data from the sun in HI and data at Earth at L1. These techniques were applied to a study on the slow solar wind which lead to possible evidence for the S-Web model.

  14. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-04-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using optical spectra taken by the California Planet Search. I found a large range in the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen in this sample, including a handful of carbon-rich stars. I also developed a new technique called SpecMatch for extracting fundamental stellar parameters from optical spectra. SpecMatch is particularly applicable to the relatively faint planet-hosting stars discovered by Kepler.

  15. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore two topics in exoplanet science. The first is the prevalence of Earth-size planets in the Milky Way Galaxy. To determine the occurrence of planets having different sizes, orbital periods, and other properties, I conducted a survey of extrasolar planets using data collected by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This project involved writing new algorithms to analyze Kepler data, finding planets, and conducting follow-up work using ground-based telescopes. I found that most stars have at least one planet at or within Earth's orbit and that 26% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-size planet with an orbital period of 100 days or less. The second topic is the connection between the properties of planets and their host stars. The precise characterization of exoplanet hosts helps to bring planet properties like mass, size, and equilibrium temperature into sharper focus and probes the physical processes that form planets. I studied the abundance of carbon and oxygen in over 1000 nearby stars using ...

  16. Selections from 2016: A Connection Between Solar Explosions and Dimming on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2016, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.The Nature of CME-Flare-Associated Coronal DimmingPublished June2016Main takeaway:The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed a large solar eruption at the end of December 2011. Scientists Jianxia Cheng (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Jiong Qiu (Montana State University) studied this coronal mass ejection and the associated flaring on the Suns surface. They found that this activity was accompanied by dimming in the Suns corona near the ends of the flare ribbons.Why its interesting:The process of coronal dimming isnt fully understood, but Cheng and Qius observations provide a clear link between coronal dimming and eruptions of plasma and energy from the Sun. The locations of the dimming the footpoints of the two flare ribbons and the timing relative to the eruption suggests that coronal dimming is caused by the ejection of hot plasma from the Suns surface.How this process was studied:There are a number of satellites dedicated to observing the Sun, and several of them were used to study this explosion. Data from SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (which images in extreme ultraviolet) and its Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (which measures magnetic fields) were used as well as observations from STEREO, the pair of satellites orbiting the Sun at 90 from SDO.CitationJ. X. Cheng and J. Qiu 2016 ApJ 825 37. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/825/1/37

  17. Global helioseismology (WP4.1): From the Sun to the stars & solar analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Rafael A

    2016-01-01

    Sun-as-a star observations put our star as a reference for stellar observations. Here, I review the activities in which the SPACEINN global seismology team (Working Package WP4.1) has worked during the past 3 years. In particular, we will explain the new deliverables available on the SPACEINN seismic+ portal. Moreover, special attention will be given to surface dynamics (rotation and magnetic fields). After characterizing the rotation and the magnetic properties of around 300 solar-like stars and defining proper metrics for that, we use their seismic properties to characterize 18 solar analogues for which we study their surface magnetic and seismic properties. This allows us to put the Sun into context compared to its siblings.

  18. Transport Phenomena and Light Element Abundances in the Sun and Solar Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vauclair, S

    2000-01-01

    The observations of light elements in the Sun and Solar type stars givespecial clues for understanding the hydrodynamical processes at work in stellarinteriors. In the Sun 7Li is depleted by 140 while 3He has not increased bymore than 10 0n 3 Gyrs. Meanwhile the inversion of helioseismic modes lead toa precision on the sound velocity of about .1The mixing processes below thesolar convection zone are constrained by these observations. Lithium isdepleted in most Pop I solar type stars. In halo stars however, the lithiumabundance seems constant in the "spite plateau" with no observed dispersion,which is difficult to reconcile with the theory of diffusion processes. In thepresent paper, the various relevant observations will be discussed. It will beshown that the mu-gradients induced by element settling may help solving the"lithium paradox".

  19. Polarized Light from the Sun: Unification of the Corona and Analysis of the Second Solar Spectrum — Further Implications of a Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the slight polarization of the continuum towards the limb, propo- nents of the Standard Solar Model (SSM must have recourse to electron or hydrogen- based scattering of light, as no other mechanism is possible in a gaseous Sun. Con- versely, acceptance that the solar body is comprised of condensed matter opens up new avenues in the analysis of this problem, even if the photospheric surface itself is viewed as incapable of emitting polarized light. Thus, the increased disk polarization, from the center to the limb, can be explained by invoking the scattering of light by the at- mosphere above the photosphere. The former is reminiscent of mechanisms which are known to account for the polarization of sunlight in the atmosphere of the Earth. Within the context of the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model (LMHSM, molecules and small particles, not electrons or hydrogen atoms as required by the SSM, would primarily act as scattering agents in regions also partially comprised of condensed hy- drogen structures (CHS. In addition, the well-known polarization which characterizes the K-corona would become a sign of emission polarization from an anisotropic source, without the need for scattering. In the LMHSM, the K, F, and T- coronas can be viewed as emissive and reflective manifestations of a single corona l entity adopting a radially anisotropic structure, while slowly cooling with altitude above the photosphere. The presence of “dust particles”, advanced by proponents of the SSM, would no longer be required to explain the F and T-corona, as a single cooling structure would account for the properties of the K, F, and T coronas. At the same time, the polarized “Second Solar Spectrum”, characterized by the dominance of certain elemental or ionic spectral lines and an abundance of molecular lines, could be explained in the LMHSM, by first invoking interface polarization and coordination of these species with condensed matter

  20. Understanding the Sun-Earth Libration Point Orbit Formation Flying Challenges For WFIRST and Starshade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Cassandra M.; Folta, David C.

    2017-01-01

    In order to fly an occulter in formation with a telescope at the Sun-Earth L2 (SEL2) Libration Point, one must have a detailed understanding of the dy-namics that govern the restricted three body system. For initial purposes, a linear approximation is satisfactory, but operations will require a high-fidelity modeling tool along with strategic targeting methods in order to be successful. This paper focuses on the challenging dynamics of the transfer trajectories to achieve the relative positioning of two spacecraft to fly in formation at SEL2, in our case, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and a proposed Starshade. By modeling the formation transfers using a high fidelity tool, an accurate V approximation can be made to as-sist with the development of the subsystem design required for a WFIRST and Starshade formation flight mission.

  1. SERB, a nano-satellite dedicated to the Earth-Sun relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Bamas, Étienne; Cambournac, Pierre; Cherabier, Philippe; Demarets, Romain; Denis, Gaspard; Dion, Axel; Duroselle, Raphaël.; Duveiller, Florence; Eichner, Laetitia; Lozeve, Dimitri; Mestdagh, Guillaume; Ogier, Antoine; Oliverio, Romane; Receveur, Thibault; Souchet, Camille; Gilbert, Pierre; Poiet, Germain; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The Solar irradiance and Earth Radiation Budget (SERB) mission is an innovative proof-of-concept nano-satellite, with three ambitious scientific objectives. The nano-satellite aims at measuring on the same platform the absolute value of the total solar irradiance (TSI) and its variability, the ultraviolet (UV) solar spectral variability, and the different components of the Earth radiation budget. SERB is a joint project between CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), Ecole polytechnique, and LATMOS (Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales) scheduled for a launch in 2020-2021. It is a three-unit CubeSat (X-CubeSat II), developed by students from ´Ecole polytechnique. Critical components of instrumental payloads of future large missions (coatings, UV filters, etc.) can acquire the technical maturity by flying in a CubeSat. Nano-satellites also represent an excellent alternative for instrumentation testing, allowing for longer flights than rockets. More-over, specific scientific experiments can be performed by nano-satellites. This paper is intended to present the SERB mission and its scientific objectives.

  2. The vectorial photoelectric effect under solar irradiance and its application to sun sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Sun sensors are an integral part of the attitude and orbit control system onboard almost any spacecraft. While the majority of standard analogue sun sensors is based on photo-detectors which produce photo-currents proportional to the cosine of the incidence angle (cosine detectors), we propose an alternative scheme where the vectorial photoelectric effect is exploited to achieve a higher sensitivity of the sensed photo-current to the incidence angle. The vectorial photo-effect is investigated in detail for metal cathode detectors in a space environment. Besides long operational lifetimes without significant degradation, metal cathode detectors are insensitive to earth albedo, which may significantly reduce the errors affecting attitude measurements in low earth orbits. Sensitivity curves are calculated and trade-offs performed with the aim of optimizing the sensitivity whilst also providing currents sufficient for detection. Simple applications and detector configurations are also discussed and compared to ex...

  3. Development of a microprocessor-based Sun-tracking system for solar collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, S. M.; Wilcoxen, J. L.

    1980-04-01

    The development of a prototype Sun-tracking system and the tests performed on it on an east-west trough solar collector array are described. The system includes a controller built around an RCA1802 microprocessor, a digital shaft encoder, and a heat flux sensor. The heat flux sensor consists of a fine resistance wire wrapped around the receiver tube. The wire is used to correct errors in calculated tracking angles arising from reflector imperfections and misalignments.

  4. Development of a microprocessor-based sun-tracking system for solar collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, S.M.; Wilcoxen, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    The development of a prototype sun-tracking system and the tests performed on it on an east-west trough solar collector array are described. The system includes a controller built around an RCA1802 microprocessor (..mu..P), a digital shaft encoder, and a heat flux sensor. The heat flux sensor consists of a fine resistance wire wrapped around the receiver tube. The wire is used to correct errors in calculated tracking angles arising from reflector imperfections and misalignments.

  5. Simplification of Sun Tracking Mode to Gain High Concentration Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Aliman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Power conversion from solar thermal energy to electrical energy is still very cost-intensive. Serious effort has to be given in the development of the concentrator or heliostat structure expenditure which contributing the most expensive component in a central receiver solar power plant. With current development to find alternatives and lower down the capital, a new mode of sun tracking has been developed and feasibility tested. As it applies a single stage collector replacing conventional double stages structure, the new technique has significantly benefits use in high temperature and high concentration solar energy applications. Meanwhile, the stationary or fixed target (receiver offers more convenient working environment for various applications. Large and heavy solar powered Stirling Engine could be placed at the stationary location. On the other advantage offers by the new technique, the optical alignment was reasonably easier and less time consuming.

  6. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wen; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude $\\gtrsim 1.9$ R$_\\odot$ (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by STEREO at 1AU near solar minimum (Wang et al., 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, $f \\sim \\varepsilon^{-\\gamma}$, with an index $\\gamma$ $\\approx$ 2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-tr...

  7. Harnessing Sun's Energy with Quantum Dots Based Next Generation Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Mohammad A

    2012-12-27

    Our energy consumption relies heavily on the three components of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) and nearly 83% of our current energy is consumed from those sources. The use of fossil fuels, however, has been viewed as a major environmental threat because of their substantial contribution to greenhouse gases which are responsible for increasing the global average temperature. Last four decades, scientists have been searching for alternative sources of energy which need to be environmentally clean, efficient, cost-effective, renewable, and sustainable. One of the promising sustainable sources of energy can be achieved by harnessing sun energy through silicon wafer, organic polymer, inorganic dye, and quantum dots based solar cells. Among them, quantum dots have an exceptional property in that they can excite multiple electrons using only one photon. These dots can easily be synthesized, processed in solution, and incorporated into solar cell application. Interestingly, the quantum dots solar cells can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit; however, it is a great challenge for other solar cell materials to exceed the limit. Theoretically, the quantum dots solar cell can boost the power conversion efficiency up to 66% and even higher to 80%. Moreover, in changing the size of the quantum dots one can utilize the Sun's broad spectrum of visible and infrared ranges. This review briefly overviews the present performance of different materials-based solar cells including silicon wafer, dye-sensitized, and organic solar cells. In addition, recent advances of the quantum dots based solar cells which utilize cadmium sulfide/selenide, lead sulfide/selenide, and new carbon dots as light harvesting materials has been reviewed. A future outlook is sketched as to how one could improve the efficiency up to 10% from the current highest efficiency of 6.6%.

  8. Earth regeneration effect in solar neutrino oscillations an analytic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lisi, E; Lisi, Eligio; Montanino, Daniele

    1997-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate method for computing analytically the regeneration probabilities of solar neutrinos in the Earth. We apply this method to the calculation of several solar model independent quantities t= han can be measured by the SuperKamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiments.

  9. How the inclination of Earth's orbit affects incoming solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, L.E.A.; Norton, A; T. Dudok de Wit; Kretzschmar, M; Schmidt, G. A.; Cheung, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; [1] The variability in solar irradiance, the main external energy source of the Earth's system, must be critically studied in order to place the effects of human-driven climate change into perspective and allow plausible predictions of the evolution of climate. Accurate measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability by instruments onboard space platforms during the last three solar cycles indicate changes of approximately 0.1% over the sunspot cycle. Physics-...

  10. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 R(sub E), in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most

  11. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 RE, in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most part, in

  12. SunShot Vision Study: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Potential for U.S. Solar Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    The SunShot Vision Study provides the most comprehensive assessment to date of the potential for solar technologies to meet a significant share of electricity demand in the United States during the next several decades.

  13. The earth’'s electric field sources from sun to mud

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Electric Field provides you with an integrated and comprehensive picture of the generation of the terrestrial electric fields, their dynamics and how they couple/propagate through the medium. The Earth's Electric Field provides basic principles of terrestrial electric field related topics, but also a critical summary of electric field related observations and their significance to the various related phenomena in the atmosphere. For the first time, Kelley brings together information on this topic in a coherent way, making it easy to gain a broad overview of the critical processes in an efficient way. If you conduct research in atmospheric science, physics, atmospheric chemistry, space plasma physics, and solar terrestrial physics, you will find this book to be essential reading. The only book on the physics of terrestrial electric fields and their generation mechanisms, propagation and dynamics-making it essential reading for scientists conducting research in upper atmospheric, ionospheric, magnet...

  14. SUN-LIKE MAGNETIC CYCLES IN THE RAPIDLY ROTATING YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 30495

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Ricky [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Metcalfe, Travis S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut St. Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Hall, Jeffrey C. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Henry, Gregory W., E-mail: egeland@ucar.edu [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial (∼2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, a ∼1 Gyr old G1.5 V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at ∼1.7 years and a long cycle of ∼12 years. We measure three individual long-period cycles and find durations ranging from 9.6 to 15.5 years. We find the short-term variability to be intermittent, but present throughout the majority of the time series, though its occurrence and amplitude are uncorrelated with the longer cycle. These essentially solar-like variations occur in a Sun-like star with more rapid rotation, though surface differential rotation measurements leave open the possibility of a solar equivalence.

  15. Why is the Sun No Longer Accelerating Particles to High Energy in Solar Cycle 24?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M.; Li, G.; Mason, G. M.; Smith, C. W.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Vourlidas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Why is the Sun No Longer Accelerating Particles to High Energy in Solar Cycle 24?Measurements by ACE, STEREO, and GOES show that the number of large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in solar cycle 24 is reduced by a factor of ~2 compared to this point of solar cycle 23, while the fluences of >10 MeV/nuc ions from H to Fe are reduced by factors ranging from ~4 to ~10. Compared to solar Cycle 22 and 23, the fluence of >100 MeV protons is reduced by factors of ~7 to ~10 in the current cycle. A common element of these observations is that the observed Cycle-24 energy spectra have "breaks" that suddenly steepen 2 to 4 times lower in energy/nucleon than in Cycle 23. We investigate the origin of these cycle-to-cycle spectral differences by evaluating possible factors that control the maximum energy of CME-shock-accelerated particles in the two cycles, including seed-particle densities of suprathermal ions, the interplanetary magnetic field strength and turbulence level, and properties of the associated CMEs. The effect of these conditions will be evaluated in the context of existing SEP acceleration models by comparing SEP data with simulations and with analytic evaluations of the maximum kinetic energy to which CME shocks can accelerate solar energetic ions from H to Fe. Understanding the properties that control the maximum kinetic energy of CME-shock accelerated particles has important implications for predicting future solar activity.

  16. The remarkable solar twin HIP 56948: a prime target in the quest for other Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, J.; Bergemann, M.; Cohen, J. G.; Endl, M.; Karakas, A. I.; Ramírez, I.; Cochran, W. D.; Yong, D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Kobayashi, C.; Asplund, M.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The Sun shows abundance anomalies relative to most solar twins. If the abundance peculiarities are due to the formation of inner rocky planets, that would mean that only a small fraction of solar type stars may host terrestrial planets. Aims: In this work we study HIP 56948, the best solar twin known to date, to determine with an unparalleled precision how similar it is to the Sun in its physical properties, chemical composition and planet architecture. We explore whether the abundances anomalies may be due to pollution from stellar ejecta or to terrestrial planet formation. Methods: We perform a differential abundance analysis (both in LTE and NLTE) using high resolution (R ~ 100 000) high S/N (600-650) Keck HIRES spectra of the Sun (as reflected from the asteroid Ceres) and HIP 56948. We use precise radial velocity data from the McDonald and Keck observatories to search for planets around this star. Results: We achieve a precision of σ ≲ 0.003 dex for several elements. Including errors in stellar parameters the total uncertainty is as low as σ ≃ 0.005 dex (1%), which is unprecedented in elemental abundance studies. The similarities between HIP 56948 and the Sun are astonishing. HIP 56948 is only 17 ± 7 K hotter than the Sun, and log g, [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity are only + 0.02 ± 0.02 dex, +0.02 ± 0.01 dex and +0.01 ± 0.01 km s-1 higher than solar, respectively. Our precise stellar parameters and a differential isochrone analysis shows that HIP 56948 has a mass of 1.02 ± 0.02 M⊙ and that it is ~1 Gyr younger than the Sun, as constrained by isochrones, chromospheric activity, Li and rotation. Both stars show a chemical abundance pattern that differs from most solar twins, but the refractory elements (those with condensation temperature Tcond ≳ 1000 K) are slightly (~0.01 dex) more depleted in the Sun than in HIP 56948. The trend with Tcond in differential abundances (twins - HIP 56948) can be reproduced very well by adding ~3 M

  17. The structure of the Sun and the planets of the solar system from the viewpoint of mechanics of the inertless mass I

    CERN Document Server

    Shkurchenko, I Z

    2007-01-01

    In this monograph (written in 1973-1974) the author uses the theory of mechanics of the inertless mass to investigate the structure of heavenly bodies of the solar system. The structure of the Sun and planets is the sole reason of the character of their axial rotation, presence or absence of satellites and atmospheres. This structure is one of the main climatic factors for each planet and Sun. It determines the climate and its possible changes. Understanding these processes is very important for determining perspectives of the evolution of the Sun and the planets, including the Earth. This monograph was divided into two parts by editor in 2007. Since author has developed some theoretical positions of "Mechanics of liquids and gas, or mechanics of the inertless mass" (1971), the first Part contains these changes. The Part II contains the investigation that gives us new results and new meaning of the stored information about the Sun and the planets of the solar system. This monograph is addressed to specialists...

  18. Observing exoplanets from the planet Earth: How our revolution around the Sun affects the detection of 1-year periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, Federico; Poretti, Ennio; Borsa, Francesco; Rainer, Monica

    2017-08-01

    We analysed a selected sample of exoplanets with orbital periods close to 1 year to study the effects of the spectral window on the data, affected by the 1 y-1 aliasing due to the Earth motion around the Sun. We pointed out a few cases where a further observational effort would largely improve the reliability of the orbital solutions.

  19. Sixth-grade Indonesian student explanations of directions on flat maps and globes, of the Earth's rotation to cause night and day, and of the relative positions of the Earth, Moon, and Sun during an eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimyati, Surachman

    The purpose of the study was to elicit and analyze sixth grade students' explanations concerning concepts taught in the national Indonesian sixth grade science curriculum. In this study, students were asked to identify the cardinal directions on flat maps and a globe, to describe what causes night and day on the earth, to identify the direction of the earth's rotation, and to identify the relative positions of the earth, sun, and moon during either a solar or lunar eclipse. The findings in the study can be summarized as follows (1) Eighty out of 88 students (91%) were able to explain what causes night and day. (2) Approximately 50% could identify the direction the earth rotates to cause night and day. (3) Using a solar system model, about 64% of the students could describe the relative position of the earth, sun, and moon during an eclipse. (4) Cultural differences affect student thinking. One student thought that Mecca had to be west of everywhere, not just west of Indonesia. (5) The way teachers teach seems to influence student thinking. It is easy for students to form the misconception that up is north. Most maps in classrooms are hung vertically. (6) Some students were confused by the globe. Teachers need to explain why the globe is tilted. Also, they need to help students understand how to determine the cardinal directions on a globe. More research is needed to determine what is needed to help students truly understand these concepts and to determine whether these concepts are best taught at the elementary level.

  20. A photometric and spectroscopic survey of solar twin stars within 50 parsecs of the Sun: I. Atmospheric parameters and color similarity to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    de Mello, G F Porto; da Silva, L; de Nader, R V

    2013-01-01

    Solar twins and analogs are fundamental in the characterization of the Sun's place in the context of stellar measurements, as they are in understanding how typical the solar properties are in its neighborhood. They are also important for representing sunlight observable in the night sky for diverse photometric and spectroscopic tasks, besides being natural candidates for harboring planetary systems similar to ours and possibly even life-bearing environments. We report a photometric and spectroscopic survey of solar twin stars within 50 pc of the Sun. Hipparcos absolute magnitudes and (B-V)_Tycho colors were used to define a 2 sigma box around the solar values, where 133 stars were considered. Additional stars resembling the solar UBV colors in a broad sense, plus stars present in the lists of Hardorp, were also selected. All objects were ranked by a color-similarity index with respect to the Sun, defined by uvby and BV photometry. Moderately high-resolution, high-S/N spectra were used for a subsample of equat...

  1. The evolution of the Sun's birth cluster and the search for the solar siblings with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Barbosa, C. A.; Brown, A. G. A.; Boekholt, T.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.

    2016-03-01

    We use self-consistent numerical simulations of the evolution and disruption of the Sun's birth cluster in the Milky Way potential to investigate the present-day phase-space distribution of the Sun's siblings. The simulations include the gravitational N-body forces within the cluster and the effects of stellar evolution on the cluster population. In addition, the gravitational forces due to the Milky Way potential are accounted for in a self-consistent manner. Our aim is to understand how the astrometric and radial velocity data from the Gaia mission can be used to pre-select solar sibling candidates. We vary the initial conditions of the Sun's birth cluster, as well as the parameters of the Galactic potential. In particular, we use different configurations and strengths of the bar and spiral arms. We show that the disruption time-scales of the cluster are insensitive to the details of the non-axisymmetric components of the Milky Way model and we make predictions, averaged over the different simulated possibilities, about the number of solar siblings that should appear in surveys such as Gaia or GALAH. We find a large variety of present-day phase-space distributions of solar siblings, which depend on the cluster initial conditions and the Milky Way model parameters. We show that nevertheless robust predictions can be made about the location of the solar siblings in the space of parallaxes (ϖ), proper motions (μ) and radial velocities (Vr). By calculating the ratio of the number of simulated solar siblings to that of the number of stars in a model Galactic disc, we find that this ratio is above 0.5 in the region given by: ϖ ≥ 5 mas, 4 ≤ μ ≤ 6 mas yr-1, and -2 ≤ Vr ≤ 0 km s-1. Selecting stars from this region should increase the probability of success in identifying solar siblings through follow-up observations. However the proposed pre-selection criterion is sensitive to our assumptions, in particular about the Galactic potential. Using a more

  2. Can the Solar Wind be Driven by Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun's Magnetic Carpet?

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    The physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind remain unknown after many years of study. Some have suggested that the wind is driven by waves and turbulence in open magnetic flux tubes, and others have suggested that plasma is injected into the open tubes by magnetic reconnection with closed loops. In order to test the latter idea, we developed Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric "magnetic carpet" and extrapolated the time-varying coronal field. These models were constructed for a range of different magnetic flux imbalance ratios. Completely balanced models represent quiet regions on the Sun and source regions of slow solar wind streams. Highly imbalanced models represent coronal holes and source regions of fast wind streams. The models agree with observed emergence rates, surface flux densities, and number distributions of magnetic elements. Despite having no imposed supergranular motions, a realistic network of magnetic "funnels" appeared spontaneously. We computed t...

  3. Are there nu_mu or nu_tau in the flux of solar neutrinos on earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Giunti, C

    2002-01-01

    Using the model independent method of Villante, Fiorentini, Lisi, Fogli, Palazzo, and the rates measured in the SNO and Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino experiment, we calculate the amount of active nu_mu or nu_tau present in the flux of solar neutrinos on Earth. We show that the probability of nu_e->nu_{mu,tau} transitions is larger than zero at 99.89% CL. We find that the averaged flux of nu_{mu,tau} on Earth is larger than 0.17 times the 8B nu_e flux predicted by the BP2000 Standard Solar Model at 99% CL. We also derive a model-independent lower limit of 0.52 at 99% CL for the ratio of the 8B nu_e flux produced in the Sun and its value in the BP2000 Standard Solar Model.

  4. The evolution of the Sun's birth cluster and the search for the solar siblings with Gaia

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Barbosa, C A; Boekholt, T; Zwart, S Portegies; Antiche, E; Antoja, T

    2016-01-01

    We use self-consistent numerical simulations of the evolution and disruption of the Sun's birth cluster in the Milky Way potential to investigate the present-day phase space distribution of the Sun's siblings. The simulations include the gravitational N-body forces within the cluster and the effects of stellar evolution on the cluster population. In addition the gravitational forces due to the Milky Way potential are accounted for in a self-consistent manner. Our aim is to understand how the astrometric and radial velocity data from the Gaia mission can be used to pre-select solar sibling candidates. We vary the initial conditions of the Sun's birth cluster, as well as the parameters of the Galactic potential. We show that the disruption time-scales of the cluster are insensitive to the details of the non-axisymmetric components of the Milky Way model and we make predictions, averaged over the different simulated possibilities, about the number of solar siblings that should appear in surveys such as Gaia or G...

  5. Solar Sailing Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) Mission for Impacting/Deflecting Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong

    2005-01-01

    A solar sailing mission architecture, which requires a t least ten 160-m, 300-kg solar sail spacecraft with a characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/sqs, is proposed as a realistic near- term option for mitigating the threat posed by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Its mission feasibility is demonstrated for a fictional asteroid mitigation problem created by AIAA. This problem assumes that a 200-m asteroid, designated 2004WR, was detected on July 4, 2004, and that the expected impact will occur on January 14, 2015. The solar sailing phase of the proposed mission for the AIAA asteroid mitigation problem is comprised of the initial cruise phase from 1 AU t o 0.25 AU (1.5 years), the cranking orbit phase (3.5 years), and the retrograde orbit phase (1 year) prior to impacting the target asteroid at its perihelion (0.75 AU from the sun) on January 1, 2012. The proposed mission will require at least ten kinetic energy interceptor (KEI) solar sail spacecraft. Each KEI sailcraft consists of a 160- m, 150-kg solar sail and a 150-kg microsatellite impactor. The impactor is to be separated from a large solar sail prior to impacting the 200-m target asteroid at its perihelion. Each 150-kg microsatellite impactor, with a relative impact velocity of at least 70 km/s, will cause a conservatively estimated AV of 0.3 cm/s in the trajectory of the 200-m target asteroid, due largely to the impulsive effect of material ejected from the newly-formed crater. The deflection caused by a single impactor will increase the Earth-miss-distance by 0.45Re (where Re denotes the Earth radius of 6,378 km). Therefore, at least ten KEI sailcraft will be required for consecutive impacts, but probably without causing fragmentation, to increase the total Earth-miss-distance by 4.5Re. This miss-distance increase of 29,000 km is outside of a typical uncertainty/error of about 10,000 km in predicting the Earth-miss- distance. A conventional Delta I1 2925 launch vehicle is capable of injecting at least two KEI

  6. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere I. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous spectrum of the solar photosphere stands as the paramount observation with regard to the condensed nature of the solar body. Studies relative to Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission (e.g. Robitaille P.-M. Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission: 150 years. Progr. Phys., 2009, v. 4, 3–13. and a detailed analysis of the stellar opacity problem (Robitaille P.M. Stellar opacity: The Achilles’ heel of the gaseous Sun. Progr. Phys., 2011, v. 3, 93–99 have revealed that gaseous models remain unable to properly account for the generation of this spectrum. Therefore, it can be stated with certainty that the photosphere is comprised of condensed matter. Beyond the solar surface, the chromospheric layer of the Sun also generates a weak continuous spectrum in the visible region. This emission exposes the presence of material in the condensed state. As a result, above the level of the photosphere, matter exists in both gaseous and condensed forms, much like within the atmosphere of the Earth. The continuous visible spectrum associated with the chromosphere provides the twenty-sixth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter.

  7. Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

    2013-04-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

  8. Maximizing Output Power of a Solar Panel via Combination of Sun Tracking and Maximum Power Point Tracking by Fuzzy Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Taherbaneh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In applications with low-energy conversion efficiency, maximizing the output power improves the efficiency. The maximum output power of a solar panel depends on the environmental conditions and load profile. In this paper, a method based on simultaneous use of two fuzzy controllers is developed in order to maximize the generated output power of a solar panel in a photovoltaic system: fuzzy-based sun tracking and maximum power point tracking. The sun tracking is performed by changing the solar panel orientation in horizontal and vertical directions by two DC motors properly designed. A DC-DC converter is employed to track the solar panel maximum power point. In addition, the proposed system has the capability of the extraction of solar panel I-V curves. Experimental results present that the proposed fuzzy techniques result in increasing of power delivery from the solar panel, causing a reduction in size, weight, and cost of solar panels in photovoltaic systems.

  9. The undulating spiral motion of celestial bodies in solar system relative to a certain point on the earth (Ⅰ)---the derivation and simulation analysis of spiral motion equation of the sun and the moon relative to a certain point on the earth%太阳系天体相对地球某点的波动式螺线运动(Ⅰ)--太阳、月球相对地球某点螺线运动方程推导及模拟分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉; 李琳; 张勇军; 李钦豪

    2014-01-01

    为研究太阳系天体相对地球某点的运动规律,首先建立了地心黄道坐标系,并将太阳绕地球的圆周运动转换为太阳绕地心的余弦波动,同时将此余弦波动作为标准余弦曲线.将太阳绕地球的运动分解为波动和“自转”,并分双波动坐标轴和波动-螺面坐标轴分析,推导出太阳对地球赤道某点的波动式螺线运动轨迹方程,同时进行计算机模拟与分析,得到了太阳对地球某纬度某点的波动式螺线运动轨迹方程.以此类推,推导出月球对地球某点的波动式螺线运动轨迹方程,并分别进行计算机模拟与分析.结果表明,太阳、月球相对于地球某点的运动轨迹为与幅值与角度相关的波动式螺线,向x轴方向等速传播,并且:①在双波动坐标轴下分析,太阳、月球在z轴上的波动极其细微,可以近似为经典力学中的平面波动;螺线呈周期性变化,且在坐标3个平面上的投影均为周期性波动函数;整体传播呈现薄膜状波动面;月球运动变化方向复杂.②在波动-螺面坐标轴下分析,x轴与z轴数量级可比拟,z轴与x轴最大幅值之比约等于2/5;螺线波动是由起始点沿阿基米德螺线绕余弦波动面的周期性传播,螺线旋转角速度同地球自转角速度,旋转线速度与太阳、月球1年中波动的周期数相关;整体传播呈现薄膜状波动面.③太阳、月球相对于地球上某纬度c某点与赤道某点,在波动-螺面坐标轴下分析,螺线方程不变,在双波动坐标轴下分析,将太阳、月球相对于赤道某点的螺线参数方程的z轴表达式中的cos (0.37π)换为cos (0.37π+c)得到相对于某纬度c某点的螺线参数方程.%In order to study the motion of celestial bodies in solar system relative to a certain point on the Earth, a geocentric ecliptic coordinate axis was built at first , and the sun's circling

  10. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun: Insight Relative to Coronal Holes, Sunspots, and Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While mankind will always remain unable to sample the interior of the Sun, the presence of sunspots and coronal holes can provide clues as to its subsurface structure. Insight relative to the solar body can also be gained by recognizing that the Sun must exist in the condensed state and support a discrete lattice structure, as required for the production of its continuous spectrum. In this regard, the layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice advanced as a condensed model of the Sun (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47; Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press provides the ability to add structure to the solar interior. This constitutes a significant advantage over the gaseous solar models. In fact, a layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice and the associated intercalation of non-hydrogen elements can help to account for the position of sunspots and coronal holes. At the same time, this model provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms which drive solar winds and activity.

  11. STUDY OF CALIBRATION OF SOLAR RADIO SPECTROMETERS AND THE QUIET-SUN RADIO EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Chengming; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Xu, Guirong [Hubei Key Laboratory for Heavy Rain Monitoring and Warning Research, Institute of Heavy Rain, China Meteorological Administration, Wuhan 430205 (China)

    2015-07-20

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness, and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0–2.0 GHz, 2.6–3.8 GHz, and 5.2–7.6 GHz) during 1997–2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about 10%–20% at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  12. Study of Calibration of Solar Radio Spectrometers and the quiet-Sun Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Chengming; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying; Xu, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0-2.0 GHz, 2.6-3.8 GHz, and 5.2-7.6 GHz) during 1997-2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about $10\\%-20\\%$ at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet-Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  13. Conversion of commercial si solar cells to keep their efficient performance at 15 suns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coello, J. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Energias Renovables, Poligono Industrial de Granadilla, Tenerife (Spain); Castro, M.; Anton, I.; Sala, G. [Ciudad Univ., Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Energia Solar; Vazquez, M.A. [Isofoton, S.A., Poligono Industrial Santa Cruz, Malaga (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The screen-printing method is an economical metallization technique used by most manufacturers of conventional silicon solar cells. This method limits the cells' use under concentrated light owing to high series resistance losses caused, among other reasons, by low metal density in the fingers. This paper describes increasing the finger metal density by electrolytic deposition. The electrolytic deposition of silver is an economical, controllable and readily commercializable deposition method to reduce the front and back metallization series resistance contributions. With an optimized grid design, compatible with 1 sun silicon cell technology, and later electrolytic silver deposition we have obtained cells that maintain their efficiency up to 15 suns. In addition, an analysis of the performance of these cells under uniform and non-uniform illumination were carried out on n{sup +}p and n{sup +}pn{sup +} structures. (author)

  14. The Effects of Solar Variability on Earth's Climate: A Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Solar irradiance, the flux of the Sun s output directed toward Earth, is Earth s main energy source.1 The Sun itself varies on several timescales over billions of years its luminosity increases as it evolves on the main sequence toward becoming a red giant; about every 11 years its sunspot activity cycles; and within just minutes flares can erupt and release massive amounts of energy. Most of the fluctuations from tens to thousands of years are associated with changes in the solar magnetic field. The focus of the National Research Council's September 2011 workshop on solar variability and Earth's climate, and of this summary report, is mainly magnetically driven variability and its possible connection with Earth's climate variations in the past 10,000 years. Even small variations in the amount or distribution of energy received at Earth can have a major influence on Earth's climate when they persist for decades. However, no satellite measurements have indicated that solar output and variability have contributed in a significant way to the increase in global mean temperature in the last 50 years. Locally, however, correlations between solar activity and variations in average weather may stand out beyond the global trend; such has been argued to be the case for the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, even in the present day. A key area of inquiry deals with establishing a unified record of the solar output and solar-modified particles that extends from the present to the prescientific past. The workshop focused attention on the need for a better understanding of the links between indices of solar activity such as cosmogenic isotopes and solar irradiance. A number of presentations focused on the timescale of the solar cycle and of the satellite record, and on the problem of extending this record back in time. Highlights included a report of progress on pyroheliometer calibration, leading to greater confidence in the time history and future stability of total solar

  15. Caught in the Solar Wind: A Study of Space Weather and its Influence on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R.; Chuckran, A.; Erickson, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Space weather is a phenomenon that is becoming more familiar to the general public. As people are increasingly reliant on 21st century technology, the potential for disruption to their daily lives also rises. As the sun approaches its next solar maximum in 2011 or 2012, the peak of Cycle 24 is expected to be the highest of the satellite age, perhaps surpassing that of Cycle 19 in 1957-58. In this teaching unit, we have attempted to create a series of lessons that sheds light on the concept of space weather and the sun's influences on earth's magnetic field and upper atmosphere. Within this unit, we have provided ample opportunities for students to access and interpret real scientific data from a variety of sources. The main location is the web site www.spaceweather.com , which has near real time data from satellites such as SOHO, STEREO, ACE and POES. This data is easily viewed and explained within the site, and with appropriate instruction, students can regularly gather data, make predictions, and draw conclusions based on the current behavior of the sun. Examples include sunspot number and development, speed and density of solar wind, orientation and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, location of coronal holes, planetary K index and X-ray solar flares. Depending on the level of the students, some or all of this data can be compiled over a period of time to better understand the behavior of the sun as well as its influence on Earth. The goal of this unit is to provide a vehicle for students to understand how data is used by scientists. Once they have the base knowledge, students may be able to construct their own questions and follow through with research. An inquiry-based approach is incorporated whenever possible. With the onset of a potentially active solar cycle in the near future, teachers have the opportunity to make a dramatic connection between the natural world and their daily lives. Solar storms can cause disruption to telephone communication

  16. Solar and terrestrial physics. [effects of solar activities on earth environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation on the near space and biomental earth, the upper atmosphere, and the magnetosphere are discussed. Data obtained from the OSO satellites pertaining to the solar cycle variation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation are analyzed. The effects of solar cycle variation of the characteristics of the solar wind are examined. The fluid mechanics of shock waves and the specific relationship to the characteristics of solar shock waves are investigated. The solar and corpuscular heating of the upper atmosphere is reported based on the findings of the AEROS and NATE experiments. Seasonal variations of the upper atmosphere composition are plotted based on OGO-6 mass spectrometer data.

  17. Chromospheric activity and evolutionary age of the Sun and four solar twins

    CERN Document Server

    Mittag, M; Hempelmann, A; González-Pérez, J N; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    The activity levels of the solar-twin candidates HD 101364 and HD 197027 are measured and compared with the Sun, the known solar twin 18 Sco, and the solar-like star 51 Peg. Furthermore, the absolute ages of these five objects are estimated from their positions in the HR diagram and the evolutionary (relative) age compared with their activity levels. To represent the activity level of these stars, the Mount Wilson S-indices were used. To obtain consistent ages and evolutionary advance on the main sequence, we used evolutionary tracks calculated with the Cambridge Stellar Evolution Code. From our spectroscopic observations of HD 101364 and HD 197027 and based on the established calibration procedures, the respective Mount Wilson S-indices are determined. We find that the chromospheric activity of both stars is comparable with the present activity level of the Sun and that of 18 Sco, at least for the period in consideration. Furthermore, the absolute age of HD 101364, HD 197027, 51 Peg, and 18 Sco are found to ...

  18. Sun-Like Magnetic Cycles in the Rapidly-Rotating Young Solar Analog HD 30495

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Ricky; Hall, Jeffrey C; Henry, Gregory W

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that multiple dynamo mechanisms can drive magnetic variability on different timescales, not only in the Sun but also in other stars. Many solar activity proxies exhibit a quasi-biennial ($\\sim$2 year) variation, which is superimposed upon the dominant 11 year cycle. A well-characterized stellar sample suggests at least two different relationships between rotation period and cycle period, with some stars exhibiting long and short cycles simultaneously. Within this sample, the solar cycle periods are typical of a more rapidly rotating star, implying that the Sun might be in a transitional state or that it has an unusual evolutionary history. In this work, we present new and archival observations of dual magnetic cycles in the young solar analog HD 30495, an $\\sim$1 Gyr-old G1.5V star with a rotation period near 11 days. This star falls squarely on the relationships established by the broader stellar sample, with short-period variations at $\\sim$1.7 years and a long cycle of $...

  19. Particle Acceleration at the Sun and in the Inner Heliosphere: Implications for Solar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Mason, Glenn; Boettcher, Stephan; Blanco, Juan Jose; Martin, Cesar; Kulkarni, Shrinivasrao; Sanchez, Sebastian; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Javier; Prieto, Manuel; Panitzsch, Lauri; Gomez-Herrero, Raul

    The Sun occasionally accelerates particles to high energies and sometimes fills the heliosphere with them. It is thus the best accessible example for this astrophysically important process. Several processes appear to be involved, ranging from magnetic reconnection to shock waves in the corona and inner heliosphere. Particles are somehow distributed across magnetic field lines and are measured at locations which do not appear to be magnetically connected with the source of the particles. Thus the Sun poses a puzzle which is best solved by coordinated observations from many carefully chosen vantage points and using multiple measurement techniques. We will discuss the scientific background of energetic particles in the heliosphere and how to address their origin, injection, acceleration, and transport in the inner heliosphere using upcoming missions such as Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus with a special focus on Solar Orbiter's Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). It consists of a suite of sensors which will measure protons (electrons) from 3 (2) keV up to 100 (20) MeV and ions from few tens of keV/nuc to 200 MeV/nuc.

  20. A generic sun-tracking algorithm for on-axis solar collector in mobile platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, An-Chow; Chong, Kok-Keong; Lim, Boon-Han; Ho, Ming-Cheng; Yap, See-Hao; Heng, Chun-Kit; Lee, Jer-Vui; King, Yeong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel dynamic sun-tracking algorithm which allows accurate tracking of the sun for both non-concentrated and concentrated photovoltaic systems located on mobile platforms to maximize solar energy extraction. The proposed algorithm takes not only the date, time, and geographical information, but also the dynamic changes of coordinates of the mobile platforms into account to calculate the sun position angle relative to ideal azimuth-elevation axes in real time using general sun-tracking formulas derived by Chong and Wong. The algorithm acquires data from open-loop sensors, i.e. global position system (GPS) and digital compass, which are readily available in many off-the-shelf portable gadgets, such as smart phone, to instantly capture the dynamic changes of coordinates of mobile platforms. Our experiments found that a highly accurate GPS is not necessary as the coordinate changes of practical mobile platforms are not fast enough to produce significant differences in the calculation of the incident angle. On the contrary, it is critical to accurately identify the quadrant and angle where the mobile platforms are moving toward in real time, which can be resolved by using digital compass. In our implementation, a noise filtering mechanism is found necessary to remove unexpected spikes in the readings of the digital compass to ensure stability in motor actuations and effectiveness in continuous tracking. Filtering mechanisms being studied include simple moving average and linear regression; the results showed that a compound function of simple moving average and linear regression produces a better outcome. Meanwhile, we found that a sampling interval is useful to avoid excessive motor actuations and power consumption while not sacrificing the accuracy of sun-tracking.

  1. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  2. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — I: The Journey to a Gaseous Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available History has the power to expose the origin and evolution of scientific ideas. How did humanity come to visualize the Sun as a gaseous plasma? Why is its interior thought to contain blackbody radiation? Who were the first people to postulate that the density of the solar body varied greatly with depth? When did mankind first conceive that the solar surface was merely an illusion? What were the foundations of such thoughts? In this regard, a detailed review of the Sun’s thermodynamic history provides both a necessary exposition of the circumstance which accompanied the acceptance of the gaseous mod- els and a sound basis for discussing modern solar theories. It also becomes an invitation to reconsider the phase of the photosphere. As such, in this work, the contributions of Pierre Simon Laplace, Alexander Wilson, William Herschel, Hermann von Helmholtz, Herbert Spencer, Richard Christopher Carrington, John Frederick William Herschel, Father Pietro Angelo Secchi, Herv ́ e August Etienne Albans Faye, Edward Frankland, Joseph Norman Lockyer, Warren de la Rue, Balfour Stewart, Benjamin Loewy, and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, relative to the evolution of modern stellar models, will be discussed. Six great pillars created a gaseous Sun: 1 Laplace’s Nebular Hypothesis, 2 Helmholtz’ contraction theory of energy production, 3 Andrew’s elucidation of crit- ical temperatures, 4 Kirchhoff’s formulation of his law of thermal emission, 5 Pl ̈ ucker and Hittorf’s discovery of pressure broadening in gases, and 6 the evolution of the stel- lar equations of state. As these are reviewed, this work will venture to highlight not only the genesis of these revolutionary ideas, but also the forces which drove great men to advance a gaseous Sun.

  3. Ion acceleration at CME-driven shocks near the Earth and the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Ebert, Robert; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Li, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas, 78238 (United States); University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 (United States); Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, 20724 (United States); Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Al 35899 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We compare the behavior of heavy ion spectra during an Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) event that exhibited clear evidence of wave excitation with that observed during an intense, large gradual Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event in which the associated <0.2 MeV/nucleon ions are delayed >12 hr. We interpret that the ESP event is an example of the first-order Fermi acceleration process where enhancements in the magnetic field power spectral densities around local ion cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub pc} indicate the presence of Alfven waves excited by accelerated protons streaming away from the in-situ interplanetary shock. The softening or unfolding of the CNO energy spectrum below {approx}200 keV/nucleon and the systematic organization of the Fe and O spectral roll-overs with the E/q ratio during the ESP event are likely due to M/Q-dependent trapping and scattering of the heavy ions by the proton-excited waves. Based on striking similarities in the spectral behavior observed upstream of both, the ESP and the SEP event, we suggest that coupling between proton-generated Alfven waves and energetic ions is also operating at the distant CME shock during the large, gradual SEP event, thereby providing us with a new, powerful tool to remotely probe the roles of shock geometries and wave-particle interactions at near-Sun CME-driven shocks.

  4. Phasing Delta-V for transfers from Sun-Earth halo orbits to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongru; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by successful extended missions such as the ISEE-3, an investigation for the extended mission that involves a lunar encounter following a Sun-Earth halo orbit mission is considered valuable. Most previous studies present the orbit-to-orbit transfers where the lunar phase is not considered. Intended for extended missions, the present work aims to solve for the minimum phasing ∆V for various initial lunar phases. Due to the solution multiplicity of the two-point boundary value problem, the general constrained optimization algorithm that does not identify multiple feasible solutions is shown to miss minima. A two-step differential corrector with a two-body Lambert solver is developed for identifying multiple solutions. The minimum ∆V associated with the short-way and long-way approaches can be recovered. It is acquired that the required ∆V to cover all initial lunar phases is around 45 m/s for the halo orbit with out-of-plane amplitude Az greater than 3.5×105 km, and 14 m/s for a small halo orbit with Az=1×105 km. In addition, the paper discusses the phasing planning based on the ∆V result and the shift of lunar phase with halo orbit revolution.

  5. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  6. Solar Flare Five-Day Predictions from Quantum Detectors of Dynamical Space Fractal Flow Turbulence: Gravitational Wave Diminution and Earth Climate Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Space speed fluctuations, which have a 1 / f spectrum, are shown to be the cause of solar flares. The direction and magnitude of the space flow has been detected from numer- ous different experimental techniques, and is close to the normal to the plane of the ecliptic. Zener diode data shows that the fluctuations in the space speed closely match the Sun Solar Cycle 23 flare count, and reveal that major solar flares follow major space speed fluctuations by some 6 days. This implies that a warning period of some 5 days in predicting major solar flares is possible using such detectors. This has significant conse- quences in being able to protect various spacecraft and Earth located electrical systems from the subsequent arrival of ejected plasma from a solar flare. These space speed fluctuations are the actual gravitational waves, and have a significant magnitude. This discovery is a significant application of the dynamical space phenomenon and theory. We also show that space flow turbulence impacts on the Earth’s climate, as such tur- bulence can input energy into systems, which is the basis of the Zener Diode Quantum Detector. Large scale space fluctuations impact on both the sun and the Earth, and as well explain temperature correlations with solar activity, but that the Earth temperatures are not caused by such solar activity. This implies that the Earth climate debate has been missing a key physical process. Observed diminishing gravitational waves imply a cooling epoch for the Earth for the next 30 years.

  7. Spectral analysis of two solar twins and the colors of the Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    High resolution (R~40,000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (>150) spectra of two solar twins, HD146233 and HD195034, are obtained with the Coude Echelle Spectrograph at the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Xinglong, China). Based on the detailed spectrum match, comparisons of chemical composition and chromospheric activity, HD146233 and HD195034 are confirmed that they are similar to the Sun except for lithium abundance, which is higher than the solar value. Moreover, among nine solar twin candidates (including HD146233 and HD195034) found in the previous works, we have picked out six good solar twin candidates based on newly-derived homogenous parameters, and collected their colors in the Johnson/Cousins, Tycho, 2MASS and Strmgren system from the literature. The average color are (B-V)⊙=0.644 mag, (V-Ic)⊙=0.707 mag, (BT-VT)⊙=0.725 mag, (J-H)⊙=0.288 mag, (H-K)⊙=0.066 mag, (v-y)⊙=1.028 mag, (v-b)⊙=0.619 mag, (u-v)⊙=0.954 mag and (b-y)⊙=0.409 mag, which represent the solar colors with higher precision than previous works.

  8. Insolation data for solar energy conversion derived from satellite measurements of earth radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the irradiance of the sun at ground locations is essential for the design and evaluation of solar energy conversion systems. The primary source of such data is the global network of weather stations. Such stations are often too far apart and for most locations the data available are only daily total irradiance or monthly averages. Solar energy conversion programs require insolation data with considerably higher geographical and temporal resolution. Meteorological satellites gather routinely extensive data on the energy reflected and scattered into space by the earth-atmosphere system. A program has been initiated to use such data for deriving ground insolation for energy conversion. Some of the preliminary results of this program will be discussed.

  9. The Earth transiting the Sun as seen from Jupiter's moons: detection of an inverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect produced by the Opposition Surge of the icy Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Paolo; Monaco, Lorenzo; Zaggia, Simone; Lovis, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We report on a multi-wavelength observational campaign which followed the Earth's transit on the Sun as seen from Jupiter on 5 Jan the 2014. Simultaneous observations of Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede obtained with HARPS from La Silla, Chile, and HARPS-N from La Palma, Canary Islands, were performed to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect due to the Earth's passage using the same technique successfully adopted for the 2012 Venus Transit (Molaro et al 2013). The expected modulation in radial velocities was of about 20 cm/s but an anomalous drift as large as 38 m/s, i.e. more than two orders of magnitude higher and opposite in sign, was detected instead. The consistent behaviour of the two spectrographs rules out instrumental origin of the radial velocity drift and BiSON observations rule out the possible dependence on the Sun's magnetic activity. We suggest that this anomaly is produced by the Opposition Surge on Europa's icy surface, which amplifies the intensity of the solar radiation from a portion o...

  10. Until the sun dies. [Book on origin of universe, life and intelligence on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrow, R.

    1977-01-01

    This book gives a popular account of the forces that have shaped human beings into their present form and created the power of human intelligence, and considers the prospects for intelligent life on other planets in the solar system and elsewhere in the universe. The chain of events leading from the big bang to the origin of life on earth is reviewed together with the observations that established the expansion of the universe. Philosophical difficulties with the concept of a universe that has both a beginning and an end are pondered, steady-state cosmology is briefly explained, and the discovery of the relict microwave background is discussed. The formation of the solar system is recounted along with the scientific view of the origin of terrestrial life. Attention is given to the origin of cells and the evolution of oxygen-breathing life, multicelled creatures, armored animals, fishes, amphibians, early reptiles, dinosaurs, and mammals. The development of mammalian intelligence is traced from the early tree dwellers through monkeys, apes, ape men, humanoid tool makers, and primitive members of the genus Homo, to Homo sapiens. Possible evidence for the existence of life on Mars is evaluated together with prospects for communication or other contact with extraterrestrial intelligence.

  11. The Solar Twin Planet Search: IV. The Sun as a typical rotator and evidence for a new rotational braking law for Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Leonardo A dos; Nascimento, José-Dias do; Bedell, Megan; Ramírez, Iván; Bean, Jacob L; Asplund, Martin; Spina, Lorenzo; Dreizler, Stefan; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It is still unclear how common the Sun is when compared to other similar stars in regards to some of its physical properties, such as rotation. Considering that gyrochronology relations are widely used today to estimate ages of stars in the main sequence, and that the Sun is used to calibrate it, it is crucial to assess if these procedures are acceptable. We analyze the rotational velocities -- limited by the unknown rotation axis inclination angle -- of an unprecedented large sample of solar twins in order to study the rotational evolution of Sun-like stars, and assess if the Sun is a typical rotator. We use high-resolution ($R = 115000$) spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph and ESO's 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The projected rotational velocities for 82 solar twins are estimated by line profile fitting with synthetic spectra. Macroturbulence velocities are inferred from a prescription that accurately reflects their dependence with effective temperature and luminosity of the stars. Our s...

  12. From Suns to Life: A Chronological Approach to the History of Life on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert; Reisse, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This review emerged from several interdisciplinary meetings and schools gathering a group of astronomers, geologists, biologists, and chemists, attempting to share their specialized knowledge around a common question: how did life emerge on Earth? Their ultimate goal was to provide some kind of answer as a prerequisite to an even more demanding question: is life universal? The resulting state-of-the-art articles were written by twenty-five scientists telling a not-so linear story, but on the contrary, highlighting problems, gaps, and controversies. Needless to say, this approach yielded no definitive answers to both questions. However, by adopting a chronological approach to the question of the emergence of life on Earth, the only place where we know for sure that life exists; it was possible to break down this question into several sub-topics that can be addressed by the different disciplines. The main chapters of this review present the formation and evolution of the solar system (3); the building of a habi...

  13. Embodying Earth's Place in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Elementary students find it difficult to connect the apparent motion of objects in the sky with how celestial objects actually move in the solar system. As a university astronomy education researcher, the author has been investigating methods to help children learn astronomy through workshops and summer camps at science museums and planetariums.…

  14. Embodying Earth's Place in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Elementary students find it difficult to connect the apparent motion of objects in the sky with how celestial objects actually move in the solar system. As a university astronomy education researcher, the author has been investigating methods to help children learn astronomy through workshops and summer camps at science museums and planetariums.…

  15. Can the Solar Wind be Driven by Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun's Magnetic Carpet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.

    2010-09-01

    The physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind remain unknown after many years of study. Some have suggested that the wind is driven by waves and turbulence in open magnetic flux tubes, and others have suggested that plasma is injected into the open tubes by magnetic reconnection with closed loops. In order to test the latter idea, we developed Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric "magnetic carpet" and extrapolated the time-varying coronal field. These models were constructed for a range of different magnetic flux imbalance ratios. Completely balanced models represent quiet regions on the Sun and source regions of slow solar wind streams. Highly imbalanced models represent coronal holes and source regions of fast wind streams. The models agree with observed emergence rates, surface flux densities, and number distributions of magnetic elements. Despite having no imposed supergranular motions in the models, a realistic network of magnetic "funnels" appeared spontaneously. We computed the rate at which closed field lines open up (i.e., recycling times for open flux), and we estimated the energy flux released in reconnection events involving the opening up of closed flux tubes. For quiet regions and mixed-polarity coronal holes, these energy fluxes were found to be much lower than that which is required to accelerate the solar wind. For the most imbalanced coronal holes, the energy fluxes may be large enough to power the solar wind, but the recycling times are far longer than the time it takes the solar wind to accelerate into the low corona. Thus, it is unlikely that either the slow or fast solar wind is driven by reconnection and loop-opening processes in the magnetic carpet.

  16. QE and Suns-Voc study on the epitaxial CSiTF solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Bin; SHEN Hui; BAN Qun; LIANG Zongcun; CHEN Rulong; SHI Zhengrong; LIAO Xianbo

    2005-01-01

    In order to clarify the major factors having confined the efficiencies of as-prepared crystalline silicon thin film (CSiTF) solar cells on the SSP (silicon sheets from powder) ribbons, QE (quantum efficiency) and Suns-Voc study were performed on the epitaxial CSiTF solar cells fabricated on the SSP ribbons, the SSP ribbons after surface being zone melting recrystallized (ZMR) and single crystalline silicon (sc-Si) substrates.The results show that the epi-layers deposited on the SSP ribbons have rough surfaces,which not only increases the diffusion reflectance on the surfaces but also makes the anti-reflection coatings become structure-loosened, both of which would deteriorate the light trapping effect; in addition, the epi-layers deposited on the SSP ribbons possess poor crystallographic quality, so the heavy grain boundary (GB) recombination limits the diffusion length of the minority carriers in the epi-layers, which makes the as-prepared CSiTF solar cells suffer the worse spectra response at long-wavelength range. Nearly all the dark characteristic parameters of the CSiTF solar cells are far away from the ideal values. The performances of the CSiTF solar cells are especially affected by too high I02 (the dark saturation current of space charge region) values and too low Rsh (parallel resistance) values. The higher I02 values are mainly caused by the heavy GB recombination resulting from the poor crystallographic qualities of the silicon active layers in the space charge regions, while the lower Rsh values are attributed to the electrical leakage at the un-passivated PN junction or solar cell edges after the solar cells are cut by the laser scriber.

  17. The Solar System is According to General Relativity: The Sun's Space Breaking Meets the Asteroid Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the exact solution of Einstein's field equations for a sphere of incompressible liquid without the additional limitation initially introduced in 1916 by Schwarzschild, by which the space-time metric must have no singularities. The obtained exact solution is then applied to the Universe, the Sun, and the planets, by the assumption that these objects can be approximated as spheres of incompressible liquid. It is shown that gravitational collapse of such a sphere is permitted for an object whose characteristics (mass, density, and size are close to the Universe. Meanwhile, there is a spatial break associated with any of the mentioned stellar objects: the~break is determined as the approaching to infinity of one of the spatial components of the metric tensor. In particular, the break of the Sun's space meets the Asteroid strip, while Jupiter's space break meets the Asteroid strip from the outer side. Also, the space breaks of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are located inside the Asteroid strip (inside the Sun's space break.

  18. On the Path to SunShot - Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Technology, Performance, and Dispatchability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehos, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jorgenson, Jennie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ho, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Armijo, Kenneth [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage will help enable CSP compete by adding flexibility value to a high-variable-generation (solar plus wind) power system (see Mehos et al. 2016). Compared with PV, CSP systems are more complex to develop, design, construct, and operate, and they require a much larger minimum effective scale—typically at least 50 MW, compared with PV systems that can be as small as a few kilowatts. In recent years, PV’s greater modularity and lower LCOE have made it more attractive to many solar project developers, and some large projects that were originally planned for CSP have switched to PV. However, the ability of CSP to use thermal energy storage—and thus provide continuous power for long periods when the sun is not shining—could give CSP a vital role in evolving electricity systems. Because CSP with storage can store energy when net demand is low and release that energy when demand is high, it increases the electricity system’s ability to balance supply and demand over multiple time scales. Such flexibility becomes increasingly important as more variable-generation renewable energy is added to the system. For example, one analysis suggests that, under a 40% renewable portfolio standard in California, CSP with storage could provide more than twice as much value to the electricity system as variable-generation PV. For this reason, enhanced thermal energy storage is a critical component of the SunShot Initiative’s 2020 CSP technology-improvement roadmap.

  19. Three-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator to track the sun for concentrated solar power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashith Shyam, R. B.; Ghosal, A.

    2015-07-01

    In concentrated solar power(CSP) generating stations, incident solar energy is reflected from a large number of mirrors or heliostats to a faraway receiver. In typical CSP installations, the mirror needs to be moved about two axes independently using two actuators in series with the mirror effectively mounted at a single point. A three degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator, namely the 3-RPS parallel manipulator, is proposed to track the sun. The proposed 3-RPS parallel manipulator supports the load of the mirror, structure and wind loading at three points resulting in less deflection, and thus a much larger mirror can be moved with the required tracking accuracy and without increasing the weight of the support structure. The kinematics equations to determine motion of the actuated prismatic joints in the 3-RPS parallel manipulator such that the sun's rays are reflected on to a stationary receiver are developed. Using finite element analysis, it is shown that for same sized mirror, wind loading and maximum deflection requirement, the weight of the support structure is between 15% and 60% less with the 3-RPS parallel manipulator when compared to azimuth-elevation or the target-aligned configurations.

  20. Existence and Stability the Lagrangian point $L_4$ for the Earth-Sun system under a relativistic framework

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo, Oscar M

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that, from the Newtonian point of view, the Lagrangian point $L_4$ in the circular restricted three body is stable if $\\mu< \\frac{1}{18}(9-\\sqrt{19})\\approx 0.03852$. In this paper we will provide a formula that allows us to compute the eigenvalues of the matrix that determines the stability of the equilibrium points of a family of ordinary differential equations. As an application we will show that, under the relativistic framework, the Lagrangian point $L_4$ is also stable for the Sun-Earth system. Similar arguments show the stability for $L_4$ not only for the Sun-Earth system but for systems coming from a range of values for $\\mu$ similar to those in the Newtonian restricted three body problem.

  1. A comparative study between control strategies for a solar sailcraft in an Earth-Mars transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti-Lopes, I.; Souza, L. C. Gadelha; De Sousa, Fabiano. L.

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work was a comparative study of solar sail trajectory optimization using different control strategies. Solar sailcraft is propulsion system with great interest in space engineering, since it uses solar radiation to propulsion. So there is no need for propellant to be used, thus it can remains active throughout the entire transfer maneuver. This type of propulsion system opens the possibility to reduce the cost of exploration missions in the solar system. In its simplest configuration, a Flat Solar Sail (FSS) consists of a large and thin structure generally composed by a film fixed to flexible rods. The performance of these vehicles depends largely on the sails attitude relative to the Sun. Using a FSS as propulsion, an Earth-Mars transfer optimization problem was tackled by the algorithms GEOreal1 and GEOreal2 (Generalized Extremal Optimization with real codification). Those algorithms are Evolutionary Algorithms (AE) based on the theory of Self-Organized Criticality. They were used to optimize the FSS attitude angle so it could reach Mars orbit in minimum time. It was considered that the FSS could perform up to ten attitude maneuvers during orbital transfer. Moreover, the time between maneuvers can be different. So, the algorithms had to optimize an objective function with 20 design variables. The results obtained in this work were compared with previously results that considered constant values of time between maneuvers.

  2. Heliophysics: Evolving Solar Activity and the Climates of Space and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2012-01-01

    Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun-like stars Carolus J. Schrijver; 3. Formation and early evolution of stars and proto-planetary disks Lee W. Hartmann; 4. Planetary habitability on astronomical time scales Donald E. Brownlee; 5. Solar internal flows and dynamo action Mark S. Miesch; 6. Modeling solar and stellar dynamos Paul Charbonneau; 7. Planetary fields and dynamos Ulrich R. Christensen; 8. The structure and evolution of the 3D solar wind John T. Gosling; 9. The heliosphere and cosmic rays J. Randy Jokipii; 10. Solar spectral irradiance: measurements and models Judith L. Lean and Thomas N. Woods; 11. Astrophysical influences on planetary climate systems Juerg Beer; 12. Evaluating the drivers of Earth's climate system Thomas J. Crowley; 13. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Stanley C. Solomon; 14. Long-term evolution of the geospace climate Jan J. Sojka; 15. Waves and transport processes in atmospheres and oceans Richard L. Walterscheid; 16. Solar variability, climate, and atmospheric photochemistry Guy P. Brasseur, Daniel Marsch and Hauke Schmidt; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index.

  3. Dynamo model for grand maxima of solar activity: can superflares occur on the Sun?

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L L

    2016-01-01

    Recent data on superflares on sun-like stars and radiocarbon data on solar activity in the past are both indicative of transient epochs of unusually high magnetic activity. We propose an explanation for the grand activity maxima in the framework of a solar dynamo model with fluctuating parameters. Solar-type dynamos are oscillatory because of the combination of the solar-type differential rotation with positive (in the northern hemisphere) alpha-effect. An artificial reversal of the sign in the alpha-effect changes the dynamo to a steady regime with hundreds of times larger magnetic energy compared to the amplitude of the cyclic dynamo. Sufficiently large and durable fluctuations reversing the sign of the alpha-effect during the growth phase of a magnetic cycle can, therefore, cause a transient change to a steady dynamo with considerably increased magnetic energy. This qualitative scenario for grand activity maxima is supported by computations of the dynamo model with a fluctuating alpha-effect. The computed ...

  4. Detection of Small-Scale Granular Structures in the Quiet Sun with the New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Goode, Philip; Kitiashvili, Irina; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Results of a statistical analysis of solar granulation are presented. A data set of 36 images of a quiet Sun area on the solar disk center was used. The data were obtained with the 1.6 m clear aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and with a broad-band filter centered at the TiO (705.7 nm) spectral line. The very high spatial resolution of the data (diffraction limit of 77 km and pixel scale of 0.$"$0375) augmented by the very high image contrast (15.5$\\pm$0.6%) allowed us to detect for the first time a distinct subpopulation of mini-granular structures. These structures are dominant on spatial scales below 600 km. Their size is distributed as a power law with an index of -1.8 (which is close to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law) and no predominant scale. The regular granules display a Gaussian (normal) size distribution with a mean diameter of 1050 km. Mini-granular structures contribute significantly to the total granular area. They are predominantly confined to the wide dark lanes...

  5. Platinum Alloy Tailored All-Weather Solar Cells for Energy Harvesting from Sun and Rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qunwei; Duan, Yanyan; He, Benlin; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-11-07

    Solar cells that can harvest energy in all weathers are promising in solving the energy crisis and environmental problems. The power outputs are nearly zero under dark conditions for state-of-the-art solar cells. To address this issue, we present herein a class of platinum alloy (PtMx , M=Ni, Fe, Co, Cu, Mo) tailored all-weather solar cells that can harvest energy from rain and realize photoelectric conversion under sun illumination. By tuning the stoichiometric Pt/M ratio and M species, the optimized solar cell yields a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 10.38 % under simulated sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2) ) as well as current of 3.90 μA and voltage of 115.52 μV under simulated raindrops. Moreover, the electric signals are highly dependent on the dripping velocity and the concentration of simulated raindrops along with concentrations of cation and anion.

  6. The Earth in space: An essay on the origin of the Solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. BURMAN

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the sun and planets has been reviewed
    from manifold considerations — nuclear, astrophysical, chemical and geophysical.
    Basically, there are two schools of thought: monistic, which
    postulates that the sun and the planets formed from some primordial system
    of gases; and dualistic, which holds that the planets and meteorites had
    genesis in the sun's collision wtili another star. The extreme improbability
    of collision almost discards this hypothesis.
    The present day accepted theories are, hence, the monistic ones, and
    the one particularly favored is the Dust — cloud hypothesis — that the sun
    condensed into a star due to the gravitational collapse of a massive interstellar
    gas-cloud, and subsequently gave birth to planets as further evolution
    of the cloud progressed. Studies of extinct radioactivities, within the
    framework of the above hypothesis, give clue to the early history of the
    solar system and in particular indicate that the time interval between the
    start of condensation and the formation of the meteorite parent-bodies is
    less six million years (Cameron. In this context the origin of stars from
    " globules " or proto-stars has been briefly discussed.
    A somewhat " exotic " theory of the formation of planets from the
    sun which hinged on the concept of secular decrease of the ' constant ' of
    gravitation with the age of the universe (Dirac's hypothesis has been discussed.
    The earth (with expansion of its volume and other celestial
    bodies might provide empirical confirmation of the concept of diminishing
    gravitation — an important problem of general relativity. This new idea
    of physics might revolutionise fundamental concepts in geology and geophysics.

  7. Turbulent Pumping of Magnetic Flux Reduces Solar Cycle Memory and thus Impacts Predictability of the Sun's Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Karak, Bidya Binay

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of the Sun's magnetic activity is important because of its effect on space environmental conditions and climate. However, recent efforts to predict the amplitude of the solar cycle have resulted in diverging forecasts with no consensus. It is understood that the dynamical memory of the solar dynamo mechanism governs predictability and this memory is different for advection- and diffusion-dominated solar convection zones. By utilizing stochastically forced, kinematic dynamo simulations, we demonstrate that the inclusion of downward turbulent pumping of magnetic flux reduces the memory of both advection- and diffusion-dominated solar dynamos to only one cycle; stronger pumping degrades this memory further. We conclude that reliable predictions for the maximum of solar activity can be made only at the preceding minimum and for more accurate predictions, sequential data assimilation would be necessary in forecasting models to account for the Sun's short memory.

  8. The chemical composition of the sun from helioseismic and solar neutrino data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villante, Francesco L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Università dell' Aquila, I-67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Serenelli, Aldo M. [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (CSIC-IEEC), Facultad de Ciencias, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Delahaye, Franck [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, ENS, UPMC, UCP, CNRS, F-92190 Meudon (France); Pinsonneault, Marc H. [Astronomy Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the solar composition problem by using a statistical approach that allows us to combine the information provided by helioseismic and solar neutrino data in an effective way. We include in our analysis the helioseismic determinations of the surface helium abundance and of the depth of the convective envelope, the measurements of the {sup 7}Be and {sup 8}B neutrino fluxes, and the sound speed profile inferred from helioseismic frequencies. We provide all the ingredients to describe how these quantities depend on the solar surface composition, different from the initial and internal composition due to the effects of diffusion and nuclear reactions, and to evaluate the (correlated) uncertainties in solar model predictions. We include error sources that are not traditionally considered such as those from inversion of helioseismic data. We, then, apply the proposed approach to infer the chemical composition of the Sun. Our result is that the opacity profile of the Sun is well constrained by the solar observational properties. In the context of a two-parameter analysis in which elements are grouped as volatiles (i.e., C, N, O, and Ne) and refractories (i.e., Mg, Si, S, and Fe), the optimal surface composition is found by increasing the abundance of volatiles by (45 ± 4)% and that of refractories by (19 ± 3)% with respect to the values provided by Asplund et al. (2009, ARA and A, 47, 481). This corresponds to the abundances ε{sub O} = 8.85 ± 0.01 and ε{sub Fe} = 7.52 ± 0.01, which are consistent at the ∼1σ level with those provided by Grevesse and Sauval (1998, SSRv, 85, 161). As an additional result of our analysis, we show that the best fit to the observational data is obtained with values of input parameters of the standard solar models (radiative opacities, gravitational settling rate, and the astrophysical factors S {sub 34} and S {sub 17}) that differ at the ∼1σ level from those presently adopted.

  9. Science 101: How Does the Motion of the Earth Affect Our View of the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    The question examined in this "Science 101" column was inspired by "Find Your School's Analemma" (in this issue). What causes the Sun's apparent position in the sky to trace a figure-eight pattern throughout one year? The analemma, or figure eight pattern that the Sun makes throughout the year, is due to two major…

  10. Experimental investigation on the comparison of fenugreek drying in an indirect solar dryer and under open sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Vipin; Kumar, Anil

    2016-09-01

    The convective heat transfer coefficient is an essential parameter for designing of any solar drying system. In this paper heat transfer modeling in term of convective heat transfer coefficient is performed and compared with open sun drying. The data obtained from experimentation under open sun and indirect solar drying conditions have been used to find values of the experimental constant `C' and exponent `n' by regression analysis and, consequently, convective heat transfer coefficient. From this study it is concluded that the convective heat transfer coefficient is decreasing with drying time it is due to decrease in moisture content. Results also showed that convective heat transfer coefficients are more in indirect solar dryer system than under open sun drying.

  11. Near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories from the Sun-Earth L2 for Chang'e-2's extended flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    2013-02-01

    Driven by curiosity about possible flight options for the Chang'e-2 spacecraft after it remains at the Sun-Earth L2 point, effective approaches were developed for designing preliminary fuel-optimal near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories. The approaches include the use of modified unstable manifolds, grid search of the manifolds' parameters, and a two-impulse maneuver for orbital phase matching and z-axis bias change, and are demonstrated to be effective in asteroid target screening and trajectory optimization. Asteroid flybys are expected to be within a distance of 2 × 107 km from the Earth owing to the constrained Earth-spacecraft communication range. In this case, the spacecraft's orbital motion is significantly affected by the gravities of both the Sun and the Earth, and therefore, the concept of the "heliocentric oscillating-Kepler orbit" is proposed, because the classical orbital elements of the flyby trajectories referenced in the heliocentric inertial frame oscillate significantly with respect to time. The analysis and results presented in this study show that, among the asteroids whose orbits are the most accurately predicted, "Toutatis", "2005 NZ6", or "2010 CL19" might be encountered by Chang'e-2 in late 2012 or 2013 with total impulses less than 100m/s.

  12. Near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories from the Sun-Earth L2 for Chang'e-2's extended flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Driven by curiosity about possible flight options for the Chang'e-2 spacecraft after it remains at the Sun-Earth L2 point,effective approaches were developed for designing preliminary fuel-optimal near-Earth asteroid flyby trajectories.The approaches include the use of modified unstable manifolds,grid search of the manifolds' parameters,and a two-impulse maneuver for orbital phase matching and z-axis bias change,and are demonstrated to be effective in asteroid target screening and trajectory optimization.Asteroid flybys are expected to be within a distance of 2 × 107 km from the Earth owing to the constrained Earth-spacecraft communication range.In this case,the spacecraft's orbital motion is significantly affected by the gravities of both the Sun and the Earth,and therefore,the concept of the“heliocentric oscillating-Kepler orbit” is proposed,because the classical orbital elements of the flyby trajectories referenced in the heliocentric inertial frame oscillate significantly with respect to time.The analysis and results presented in this study show that,among the asteroids whose orbits are the most accurately predicted,“Toutatis”,“2005 NZ6”,or “2010CL19” might be encountered by Chang'e-2 in late 2012 or 2013 with total impulses less than 100 m/s.

  13. Ulysses COSPIN observations of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun during solar maximum

    OpenAIRE

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Zhang, M.; Anglin, J.D.; Balogh, A.; Dalla, S.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Hofer, M. Y.; Kunow, H.; Posner, A.; Heber, B.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000–2001 Ulysses passed from the south to the north polar regions of the Sun in the inner heliosphere, providing a snapshot of the latitudinal structure of cosmic ray modulation and solar energetic particle populations during a period near solar maximum.  Observations from the COSPIN suite of energetic charged particle telescopes show that latitude variations in the cosmic ray intensity in the inner heliosphere are nearly non-existent near solar maximum, whereas small but ...

  14. PROBING THE SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION REGION WITH THE SUN-GRAZING COMET C/2002 S2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Raymond, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lamy, P. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, 38 rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille cedex 13 (France); Uzzo, M. [Computer Science Corporation, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dobrzycka, D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    Comet C/2002 S2, a member of the Kreutz family of sungrazing comets, was discovered in white-light images of the Large Angle and Spectromeric Coronagraph Experiment coronagraph on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on 2002 September 18 and observed in H I Lyα emission by the SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) instrument at four different heights as it approached the Sun. The H I Lyα line profiles detected by UVCS are analyzed to determine the spectral parameters: line intensity, width, and Doppler shift with respect to the coronal background. Two-dimensional comet images of these parameters are reconstructed at the different heights. A novel aspect of the observations of this sungrazing comet data is that, whereas the emission from most of the tail is blueshifted, that along one edge of the tail is redshifted. We attribute these shifts to a combination of solar wind speed and interaction with the magnetic field. In order to use the comet to probe the density, temperature, and speed of the corona and solar wind through which it passes, as well as to determine the outgassing rate of the comet, we develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the H I Lyα emission of a comet moving through a coronal plasma. From the outgassing rate, we estimate a nucleus diameter of about 9 m. This rate steadily increases as the comet approaches the Sun, while the optical brightness decreases by more than a factor of 10 and suddenly recovers. This indicates that the optical brightness is determined by the lifetimes of the grains, sodium atoms, and molecules produced by the comet.

  15. Roald Amundsen's contributions to our knowledge of the magnetic fields of the Earth and the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Egeland

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Roald Amundsen (1872–1928 was known as one of the premier polar explorers in the golden age of polar exploration. His accomplishments clearly document that he has contributed to knowledge in fields as diverse as ethnography, meteorology and geophysics. In this paper we will concentrate on his studies of the Earth's magnetic field. With his unique observations at the polar station Gjøahavn (geographic coordinates 68°37'10'' N; 95°53'25'' W, Amundsen was first to demonstrate, without doubt, that the north magnetic dip-pole does not have a permanent location, but steadily moves its position in a regular manner. In addition, his carefully calibrated measurements at high latitudes were the first and only observations of the Earth's magnetic field in the polar regions for decades until modern polar observatories were established. After a short review of earlier measurements of the geomagnetic field, we tabulate the facts regarding his measurements at the observatories and the eight field stations associated with the Gjøa expedition. The quality of his magnetic observations may be seen to be equal to that of the late 20th century observations by subjecting them to analytical techniques showing the newly discovered relationship between the diurnal variation of high latitude magnetic observations and the direction of the horizontal component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF By. Indeed, the observations at Gjøahavn offer a glimpse of the character of the solar wind 50 yr before it was known to exist. Our motivation for this paper is to illuminate the contributions of Amundsen as a scientist and to celebrate his attainment of the South Pole as an explorer 100 yr ago.

  16. Total eclipses of the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirker, J B

    1980-12-19

    Total eclipses of the sun offer research opportunities in a variety of sciences. Some of the advances in solar physics resulting from eclipse observations are discussed. Experiments at the total eclipse of 16 February 1980 in India are also described. These included a test of general relativity, studies in coronal physics, investigations of solar prominences, diameter measurements, a search for interplanetary dust, a study of the gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere, and experiments on the biological effects on animals and humans.

  17. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  18. New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

    2009-01-01

    We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56<= Z <= 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  19. Chaos in the solar wind flow near Earth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shollykutty John; P J Kurian

    2009-04-01

    We have done a time series analysis of daily average data of solar wind velocity, density and temperature at 1 AU measured by ACE spacecraft for a period of nine years. We have used the raw data without filtering to give a faithful representation of the nonlinear behaviour of the solar wind flow which is a novel one. The sensitivity of the results on filtering is highlighted. The attractor dimension is estimated for every parameter of the solar wind and it is found that they differ substantially. Hence a chaotic picture for the problem from different angles have been obtained. The calculated Kolmogorov entropies and Lyapunov exponents are positive showing evidences that the complex solar wind near the Earth is most likely a deterministic chaotic system.

  20. Resolving Azimuth Ambiguity Using Vertical Nature of Solar Quiet-Sun Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gosain, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of solar magnetic fields using the Zeeman effect diagnostics has a fundamental 180 degree ambiguity in the determination of the azimuth angle of the transverse field component. There are several methods that are used in the community and each one has its merits and demerits. Here we present a disambiguation idea that is based on the assumption that most of the magnetic field on the sun is predominantly vertical. While the method is not applicable to penumbra or other features harboring predominantly horizontal fields like the sheared neutral lines, it is useful for regions where fields are predominantly vertical like network and plage areas. The method is tested with the full-disk solar vector magnetograms observed by the VSM/SOLIS instrument. We find that statistically about 60-85 % of the pixels in a typical full-disk magnetogram has field inclination in the range of 0-30 degrees with respect to the local solar normal, and thus can be successfully disambiguated by the proposed method. Due to...

  1. Testing the Solar Probe Cup, an Instrument Designed to Touch the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey, Phyllis L.; Case, Anthony W.; Kasper, Justin Christophe; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Alterman, Ben; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Bookbinder, Jay; Korreck, Kelly E.; Stevens, Michael Louis

    2014-01-01

    Solar Probe Plus will be the first, fastest, and closest mission to the sun, providing the first direct sampling of the sub-Alfvenic corona. The Solar Probe Cup (SPC) is a unique re-imagining of the traditional Faraday Cup design and materials for immersion in this high temperature environment. Sending an instrument of this type into a never-seen particle environment requires extensive characterization prior to launch to establish sufficient measurement accuracy and instrument response. To reach this end, a slew of tests for allowing SPC to see ranges of appropriate ions and electrons, as well as a facility that reproduces solar photon spectra and fluxes for this mission. Having already tested the SPC at flight like temperatures with no significant modification of the noise floor, we recently completed a round of particle testing to see if the deviations in Faraday Cup design fundamentally change the operation of the instrument. Results and implications from these tests will be presented, as well as performance comparisons to cousin instruments such as those on the WIND spacecraft.

  2. A super-Earth-sized planet orbiting in or near the habitable zone around Sun-like star

    CERN Document Server

    Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B; Rowe, Jason F; Huber, Daniel; Isaacson, Howard; Jenkins, Jon M; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Quintana, Elisa V; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D; Bryson, Stephen T; Borucki, William J; Caldwell, Douglas A; Ciardi, David; Clarke, Bruce D; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Fischer, Debra A; Li, Jie; Haas, Michael R; Hunter, Roger; Lissauer, Jack J; Mullally, Fergal; Sabale, Anima; Seader, Shawn E; Smith, Jeffrey C; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, AKM Kamal; Thompson, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a super-earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the three-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.1%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24+/-0.4 Rearth and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-size object with a radius of 1.7+/-0.3 Rearth and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 +/- 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth ...

  3. The effects of the Reimers η on the solar rotational period when our Sun evolves to the RGB tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianpo; Lin, Ling; Bai, Chunyan; Liu, Jinzhong

    2017-01-01

    Our Sun will expand enormously and lose substantial mass via a stellar wind during the red giant branch (RGB) phase; the rotational period will be prolonged by several orders of magnitude. It is difficult to predict how much mass the Sun will lose before it reaches the RGB tip. Therefore, the solar rotational period at the RGB tip is also quite indeterminate. In this work, the Sun is considered as a two-component system comprised of a core and a convective envelope, each being allowed to rotate freely. The angular momentum transfer from the inner planets to the solar envelope is taken into consideration. Using Eggleton's stellar evolution code, we study how the solar rotational period at the RGB tip depends on the value of Reimers η chosen. The solar envelope's rotational period at the RGB tip varies from 1 792 to 736 934 years, as the Reimers η is changed from 0.00 to 0.75. Recent observations show that the average Reimers η of Sun-like stars is 0.477. Adopting this average value of the Reimers η, the solar envelope's rotational period at the RGB tip will be 24 868 years. We also show how the envelope's rotational evolves with age and luminosity. Other Sun-like stars, with different planetary configurations, may prematurely eject mass and lead to planetary nebulae, if they engulf a brown-dwarf companion at the RGB tip. Swallowing a planet with 13 Jupiter masses and a 3-day orbit, a Sun-like star can become a rapidly rotating giant star.

  4. An overview of the Earth system science of solar geoengineering: Overview of the earth system science of solar geoengineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, Peter J. [Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Potsdam Germany; John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), University of Harvard, Cambridge MA USA; Kravitz, Ben [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Lawrence, Mark G. [Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), Potsdam Germany; Muri, Helene [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway

    2016-07-14

    Solar geoengineering has been proposed as a means to cool the planet by increasing the reflection of sunlight back to space, for example by injecting reflective aerosol particles into the middle atmosphere. Such proposals are not able to physically substitute for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions as a response to the risks of climate change, but might eventually be applied as a complementary approach to reduce climate risks. Thus, the Earth system consequences of solar geoengineering are central to understanding its potentials and risks. Here we review the state-of-the-art knowledge about geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosol injection. We examine the common responses found in studies of an idealized form of solar geoengineering, in which the intensity of incoming sunlight is directly reduced in models. The studies reviewed are consistent in suggesting that solar geoengineering would generally reduce the differences in climate in comparison to future scenarios with elevated greenhouse gas concentrations and no solar geoengineering. However, it is clear that a solar geoengineered climate would be novel in some respects, for example a notable reduction in the intensity of the hydrological cycle. We provide an overview of the unique aspects of the response to stratospheric aerosol injection and the uncertainties around its consequences. We also consider the issues raised by the partial control over the climate that solar geoengineering would allow. Finally, this overview also highlights the key research gaps that will need to be resolved in order to effectively guide future decisions on the potential use of solar geoengineering.

  5. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interactive Data Language (IDL) is a standard tool used by many researchers in observational fields. Present day Sun-Earch Connection missions like RHESSI or...

  6. Near Earth Asteroid Scout Solar Sail Thrust and Torque Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Andy; Ahmad, Naeem; Miller, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout is a solar sail mission whose objective is to scout at least one Near Earth Asteroid to help prepare for human missions to Near Earth Asteroids. NEA Scout will launch as a secondary payload on the first SLS-Orion mission. NEA Scout will perform a small trim maneuver shortly after deploy from the spent SLS upper stage using a cold gas propulsion system, but from that point on will depend entirely on the solar sail for thrust. As such, it is important to accurately characterize the thrust of the sail in order to achieve mission success. Additionally, the solar sail creates a relatively large solar disturbance torque that must be mitigated. For early mission design studies a flat plate model of the solar sail with a fixed center of pressure was adequate, but as mission concepts and the sail design matured, greater fidelity was required. Here we discuss the progress to a three-dimensional sail model that includes the effects of tension and thermal deformation that has been derived from a large structural Finite Element Model (FEM) developed by the Langley Research Center. We have found that the deformed sail membrane affects torque relatively much more than thrust; a flat plate model could potentially model thrust well enough to close mission design studies, but a three-dimensional solar sail is essential to control system design. The three-dimensional solar sail model revealed that thermal deformations of unshielded booms would create unacceptably large solar disturbance torques. The original large FEM model was used in control and mission simulations, but was resulted in simulations with prohibitive run times. This led us to adapt the Generalized Sail Model (GSM) of Rios-Reyes. A design reference sail model has been baselined for NEA Scout and has been used to design the mission and control system for the sailcraft. Additionally, since NEA Scout uses reaction wheels for attitude pointing and control, the solar torque model is

  7. Solar energy system case study: Telex Communications, Blue Earth, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, M.G.

    1984-09-01

    A study is made of a solar energy system for space heating a 97,000-square-foot office, factory, and warehouse building owned by Telex Communications, Inc. in Blue Earth, Minnesota. The solar system has 11,520 square feet of ground-oriented flat-plate collectors and a 20,000-gallon storage tank inside the building. Freeze protection is by drainback. Solar heated water from the storage tank circulates around the clock throughout the heating season to heating coils in the ducts. The system achieves its design solar fraction, is efficient, and generally reliable, but not cost-effective. Performance data for the solar system was collected by the National Solar Data Network for three heating seasons from 1978 to 1981. Because of a freeze-up of the collector array in December 1978, the solar system was only partially operational in the 1978 to 1979 heating season. The data in this report were collected in the 1979 to 1980 and 1980 to 1981 heating seasons.

  8. Solar storms; Tormentas solares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: Pereira Cuesta, S.; Pereira Pagan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Solar storms begin with an explosion, or solar flare, on the surface of the sun. The X-rays and extreme ultraviolet radiation from the flare reach the Earths orbit minutes later-travelling at light speed. The ionization of upper layers of our atmosphere could cause radio blackouts and satellite navigation errors (GPS). Soon after, a wave of energetic particles, electrons and protons accelerated by the explosion crosses the orbit of the Earth, and can cause real and significant damage. (Author)

  9. Near Earth Asteroid Solar Sail Engineering Development Unit Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Tiffany Russell; Few, Alexander; Wilson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout project is a 30x20x10cm (6U) cubesat reconnaissance mission to investigate a near Earth asteroid utilizing an 86m2 solar sail as the primary propulsion system. This will be the largest solar sail NASA will launch to date. NEA Scout is a secondary payload currently manifested on the maiden voyage of the Space Launch System in 2018. In development of the solar sail subsystem, design challenges were identified and investigated for packaging within a 6U form factor and deployment in cis-lunar space. Analysis furthered understanding of thermal, stress, and dynamics of the stowed system and matured an integrated sail membrane model for deployed flight dynamics. This paper will address design, fabrication, and lessons learned from the NEA Scout solar sail subsystem engineering development unit. From optical properties of the sail material to folding and spooling the single 86m2 sail, the team has developed a robust deployment system for the solar sail. This paper will also address expected and received test results from ascent vent, random vibration, and deployment tests.

  10. ITM-Related Data and Model Services at the Sun Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, R.; Bilitza, D.; Kovalick, T.; Papitashvili, N.; Candey, R.; Han, D.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's Sun Earth Connection Active Archive (SECAA) provides access to a large volume of data and models that are of relevance to Ionospheric, Thermospheric and Mesospheric (ITM) physics. SECAA has developed a number of web systems to facilitate user access to this important data source and is making these services available through Web Services (or Application Programming Interfaces, API) directly to applications such as VxOs. The Coordinated Data Analysis web (CDAWeb) lets user plot data using a wide range of parameter display options including mapped images and movies. Capabilities also include parameter listings and data downloads in CDF and ASCII format. CDAWeb provides access to data from most of NASA's currently operating space science satellites and many of the earlier missions; of special ITM interest are DE-2, ISIS, FAST, Equator-S, and TIMED. SECAA maintains and supports the Common Data Format (CDF) including software to read and write CDF files. Most recently translator services have been added for CDF translations to/from netCDF, FITS, CDFXML, and ASCII. The SSCWeb interface enables users to plot orbits for the majority of space physics satellites (including TIMED, UARS, DMSP, NOAA, LANL etc.) and to query for magnetic field line conjunctions between multiple spacecraft and ground stations and for magnetic region occupancy. Recently an Interactive 3-D orbit viewer was added to SSCWeb. Access to legacy data from older ITM satellite missions is provided through the ATMOWeb system with the ability to generate plots and download data subsets in ASCII format. Recently added capabilities include the option to filter the data using an upper and lower boundary for any one of the data set parameters. We will also present the newest version of the web portal to SECAA's models catalog, ftp archive, and web interfaces. The web interfaces (Fortran, C, Java) let users compute, list, plot, and download model parameters for selected models (IRI, IGRF, MSIS/CIRA, AE

  11. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The data analysis tool of choice for many Sun-Earth Connection missions is the Interactive Data Language (IDL) by ITT VIS. The increasing amount of data produced by these missions and the increasing complexity of image processing algorithms requires access to higher computing power. Parallel computing is a cost-effective way to increase the speed of computation, but algorithms oftentimes have to be modified to take advantage of parallel systems. Enhancing IDL to work on clusters gives scientists access to increased performance in a familiar programming environment. The goal of this project was to enable IDL applications to benefit from both computing clusters as well as graphics processing units (GPUs) for accelerating data analysis tasks. The tool suite developed in this project enables scientists now to solve demanding data analysis problems in IDL that previously required specialized software, and it allows them to be solved orders of magnitude faster than on conventional PCs. The tool suite consists of three components: (1) TaskDL, a software tool that simplifies the creation and management of task farms, collections of tasks that can be processed independently and require only small amounts of data communication; (2) mpiDL, a tool that allows IDL developers to use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) inside IDL for problems that require large amounts of data to be exchanged among multiple processors; and (3) GPULib, a tool that simplifies the use of GPUs as mathematical coprocessors from within IDL. mpiDL is unique in its support for the full MPI standard and its support of a broad range of MPI implementations. GPULib is unique in enabling users to take advantage of an inexpensive piece of hardware, possibly already installed in their computer, and achieve orders of magnitude faster execution time for numerically complex algorithms. TaskDL enables the simple setup and management of task farms on compute clusters. The products developed in this project have the

  12. Exploring the faint young Sun problem and the possible climates of the Archean Earth with a 3-D GCM

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Wordsworth, Robin; Leconte, Jérémy; Millour, Ehouarn; Codron, Francis; Spiga, Aymeric

    2013-01-01

    Different solutions have been proposed to solve the "faint young Sun problem", defined by the fact that the Earth was not fully frozen during the Archean despite the fainter Sun. Most previous studies were performed with simple 1-D radiative convective models and did not account well for the clouds and ice-albedo feedback or the atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy. We apply a global climate model (GCM) to test the different solutions to the faint young Sun problem. We explore the effect of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), atmospheric pressure, cloud droplet size, land distribution, and Earth's rotation rate. We show that neglecting organic haze, 100 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 3.8 Ga and 10 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 2.5 Ga allow a temperate climate (mean surface temperature between 10{\\deg}C and 20{\\deg}C). Such amounts of greenhouse gases remain consistent with the geological data. Removing continents produces a warming lower than +4{\\deg}C. The effect of rotation rate is even more limit...

  13. Harnessing the sun. The economics of solar photovoltaic electricity in East Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondraczek, Janosch

    2014-08-29

    could not do in my own work. The focus of this thesis is on solar energy technologies, as these have progressed most rapidly in recent years and as the (physical) potential to use the sun's energy is especially large in (East) Africa (Mandelli et al., 2014). Furthermore, solar energy technologies (particularly solar photovoltaics, or solar PV) have already been adopted on a larger scale in many developing countries in Africa and elsewhere (as well as developed countries, where they are being used to an even larger scale). For my research, this means that there were at least some data, history of market development, technology policies and evidence from previous research to work with. The overall contribution of my work is two-fold: First, I address specific research questions of relevance to both researchers and policymakers; and second, I do this in the context of a continent that is in many ways under-researched. According to Das et al. (2013) only around 3% of peer-reviewed papers in leading economics journals deal with sub-Saharan Africa, despite the fact that it accounts for some 12% of the global population (World Bank, 2010). In this context, the potential and future role of solar energy technologies for African development is one important aspect that is not yet fully understood. Helping to address this knowledge gap and advancing the knowledge frontier consequently seems of great relevance for informed policy decisions on both sustainable development and climate change mitigation.

  14. Transverse and Longitudinal Doppler Effects of the Sunbeam Spectra and Earth-Self Rotation and Orbital Velocities, the Mass of the Sun and Others

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Sang Boo

    2009-01-01

    The transverse and longitudinal Doppler effects of the sunbeam spectra are shown to result in the earth parameters such as the earth-self rotation and revolution velocities, the earth orbit semi-major axis, the earth orbital angular momentum, the earth axial tilt, the earth orbit eccentricity, the local latitude and the mass of the sun. The sunbeam global positioning scheme is realized, including the earth orbital position. PACS numbers: 91.10.Fc, 95.10.Km, 91.10.Da, 91.10.Jf.

  15. HIGH PRECISION ABUNDANCES OF THE OLD SOLAR TWIN HIP 102152: INSIGHTS ON Li DEPLETION FROM THE OLDEST SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Melendez, Jorge; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabricio C. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ramirez, Ivan [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bergemann, Maria [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lind, Karin [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Castro, Matthieu; Do Nascimento, Jose-Dias [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Bazot, Michael, E-mail: tmonroe@usp.br [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-09-10

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the old 8.2 Gyr solar twin, HIP 102152. We derive differential abundances of 21 elements relative to the Sun with precisions as high as 0.004 dex ({approx}<1%), using ultra high-resolution (R = 110,000), high S/N UVES spectra obtained on the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope. Our determined metallicity of HIP 102152 is [Fe/H] = -0.013 {+-} 0.004. The atmospheric parameters of the star were determined to be 54 K cooler than the Sun, 0.09 dex lower in surface gravity, and a microturbulence identical to our derived solar value. Elemental abundance ratios examined versus dust condensation temperature reveal a solar abundance pattern for this star, in contrast to most solar twins. The abundance pattern of HIP 102152 appears to be the most similar to solar of any known solar twin. Abundances of the younger, 2.9 Gyr solar twin, 18 Sco, were also determined from UVES spectra to serve as a comparison for HIP 102152. The solar chemical pattern of HIP 102152 makes it a potential candidate to host terrestrial planets, which is reinforced by the lack of giant planets in its terrestrial planet region. The following non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Li abundances were obtained for HIP 102152, 18 Sco, and the Sun: log {epsilon} (Li) = 0.48 {+-} 0.07, 1.62 {+-} 0.02, and 1.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively. The Li abundance of HIP 102152 is the lowest reported to date for a solar twin, and allows us to consider an emerging, tightly constrained Li-age trend for solar twin stars.

  16. THE PRECAMBRIAN HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM AND EARTH. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kuz’min

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a review of early stages of development the Solar System and the geological history of Earth with reference to the latest data on the origin of the Solar System and the formation of the first continental rocks and results of studies of zircon, the oldest mineral so far dated on Earth. The formation of the Solar System from a gas-and-dust nebula is estimated to have begun 4.568 billion years ago. Ice was formed 1.5 million years later; it concentrated at the periphery of the system and served as the material for the largest planets, Jupiter and Saturn. In the central areas of the system, asteroids with diameters of about 10 km were formed. Their small bodies were composed of the basic material of the solar nebula, as evidenced by carbonaceous chondrite, CI, which composition is similar to the composition of the Sun, with the exception of hydrogen, helium, and volatile components that served as the main material for peripheral planets of the Solar System. Due to collision and partial merger of such small bodies, the formation of embryos of the terrestrial planets was initiated. Gravity made such embryos to cluster into larger bodies. After 7 million years, large asteroids and planet Mars were formed. It took 11 million years to form Planet Earth with a mass of 63 %, and 30 million years to form 93 % of its mass. Almost from the beginning of the formation of the Earth, short-lived radionuclides, 26Al and 60Fe, caused warming up of the small planetary bodies which led to the formation of their cores. During the initial stages, small magma reservoirs were formed, and molten iron particles gathered in the centres of the planetary bodies. As suggested by the ratio of 182W/184W, the major part of the core was formed within 20 million years, while its full mass accumulated completely within the next 50 million years. In 30–40 million years after the creation of the Solar System, the Earth collided with a cosmic body which mass was

  17. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  18. Temporal Variation of Ca–K Line Profile of the Sun during the Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Sindhuja; Jagdev Singh

    2015-03-01

    We obtained the Ca–K line profile of the Sun as a star since 1969 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (KO) and analysis of the data showed the need to delineate the role of different chromospheric features to the variations of solar irradiance. We, therefore, initiated a new methodology to make observations of Ca–K line profiles of the Sun as a function of latitude and integrated over the longitude on a daily basis since 1986. We have collected the data for about thousand days, spread over two solar cycles. Earlier data (before 1997) were recorded on the photographic film and later data using the CCD detector. The photographic film data were digitized and analysed along with the data obtained from CCD camera. From these data, we computed K1 and K2 widths for the Sun as a star, using all the observed line profiles as a function of latitude. In addition, we have analyzed the spectra of the whole Sun as a star obtained on some days and compared it with the results obtained from latitude spectra of the same day. The K1 and K2 widths of the Sun as a star derived from the KO data are compared with values determined from the observations made at other observatories to compare results from the new methodology of observations adopted by us and the earlier techniques. The average values of K1 width during the minimum period. of solar cycle 23 are smaller than those during the minimum period of cycle 22. Day-to-day variations in the K1 and K2 widths and plage areas may imply that irradiance variations occur not only due to large-scale solar activity, but also because of variations in some of the three types of network in quiet regions of the Sun. The variation in intensity of the plages can also cause day-to-day variations in widths.

  19. The SunShot Initiative’s 2030 Goal: 3¢ per Kilowatt Hour for Solar Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-12-01

    In 2011, when solar power comprised less than 0.1% of the U.S. electricity supply, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) launched the SunShot Initiative with the goal of making solar electricity cost-competitive with traditionally generated electricity by 2020 without subsidies. At the time, this meant reducing photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) prices by approximately 75% across the residential, commercial, and utility-scale sectors. For utility-scale solar, this target is a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 6¢ per kilowatt hour (kWh)1. Rapid progress has been made in accelerating achievement of these cost reductions, and DOE’s Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) sees clear pathways to meeting the SunShot 2020 cost targets on schedule.2 Enabled by the cost reductions to date, solar-generated electricity has become mainstream. In 2014 and 2015, solar represented about one-third of new electrical generating capacity installed in the United States Halfway through 2016, solar was supplying 1% of U.S. electricity demand and growing with an installed capacity of 30 gigawatts.

  20. Global Structure of Solar Wind Plasma Flux Output Near the Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏奉思; 蔡红昌

    1994-01-01

    Based on the observational data for K-corona brightness,interplanetary scintillations (IPS) and the photosphere’s magnetic fields in the ten Carrington rotations,1733-1742,in 1983,the average global structures of solar wind mass,momentum and energy flux outputs,Fm,Fp and Fe,on the source surface (10Rs) near the sun have been discussed and compared with those of the magnetic fields on the photosphere New discoveries are:(i) there are the global structures similar to wave-like structures with bi-peak in Fm,Fp and Fe; (ii) global structures of Fm,Fp and Fe are closely associated with those of the magnetic fields on the photosphere:most large flux outputs concentrate near the magneto-neutral line (MN) regions,less in the polar corona (PC) regions and middle in the strong magnetic fields (SM) regions; (iii) frequency spectra of Fm,Fn and Fe are evidently different for MN,PC and SM regions which are located in the high,low and middle,respectively; (iv) the total output rates of solar wind mass,momentum and en

  1. Three-degree-of-freedom Parallel Manipulator to Track the Sun for Concentrated Solar Power Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ASHITHSHYAM R B; GHOSAL A

    2015-01-01

    In concentrated solar power(CSP) generating stations, incident solar energy is reflected from a large number of mirrors or heliostats to a faraway receiver. In typical CSP installations, the mirror needs to be moved about two axes independently using two actuators in series with the mirror effectively mounted at a single point. A three degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator, namely the 3-RPS parallel manipulator, is proposed to track the sun. The proposed 3-RPS parallel manipulator supports the load of the mirror, structure and wind loading at three points resulting in less deflection, and thus a much larger mirror can be moved with the required tracking accuracy and without increasing the weight of the support structure. The kinematics equations to determine motion of the actuated prismatic joints in the 3-RPS parallel manipulator such that the sun’s rays are reflected on to a stationary receiver are developed. Using finite element analysis, it is shown that for same sized mirror, wind loading and maximum deflection requirement, the weight of the support structure is between 15% and 60% less with the 3-RPS parallel manipulator when compared to azimuth-elevation or the target-aligned configurations.

  2. Physical Limits of Solar Energy Conversion in the Earth System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, Axel; Miller, Lee; Gans, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy provides by far the greatest potential for energy generation among all forms of renewable energy. Yet, just as for any form of energy conversion, it is subject to physical limits. Here we review the physical limits that determine how much energy can potentially be generated out of sunlight using a combination of thermodynamics and observed climatic variables. We first explain how the first and second law of thermodynamics constrain energy conversions and thereby the generation of renewable energy, and how this applies to the conversions of solar radiation within the Earth system. These limits are applied to the conversion of direct and diffuse solar radiation - which relates to concentrated solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV) technologies as well as biomass production or any other photochemical conversion - as well as solar radiative heating, which generates atmospheric motion and thus relates to wind power technologies. When these conversion limits are applied to observed data sets of solar radiation at the land surface, it is estimated that direct concentrated solar power has a potential on land of up to 11.6 PW (1 PW=10(15) W), whereas photovoltaic power has a potential of up to 16.3 PW. Both biomass and wind power operate at much lower efficiencies, so their potentials of about 0.3 and 0.1 PW are much lower. These estimates are considerably lower than the incoming flux of solar radiation of 175 PW. When compared to a 2012 primary energy demand of 17 TW, the most direct uses of solar radiation, e.g., by CSP or PV, have thus by far the greatest potential to yield renewable energy requiring the least space to satisfy the human energy demand. Further conversions into solar-based fuels would be reduced by further losses which would lower these potentials. The substantially greater potential of solar-based renewable energy compared to other forms of renewable energy simply reflects much fewer and lower unavoidable conversion losses when solar

  3. Seguidor Solar de Dos Ejes para un Horno Solar Two-Axis Sun Tracking System for a Solar Furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Villeda; Alejandro Castañeda; José T Vega; Jorge Pineda

    2011-01-01

    Se presenta el diseño y fabricación de un seguidor solar de dos ejes (rotación-elevación), el cual controla un helióstato de un horno solar para la cocción de tabiques de arcilla. El sistema trabaja con motores controlados desde una computadora personal. El algoritmo para el seguidor solar se desarrolló en un lenguaje de programación visual, calcula los ángulos de seguimiento primario y secundario del helióstato y los despliega en una pantalla. El microcontrolador está programado para control...

  4. Study of very low energy neutrinos from the Sun and from the Earth with the Borexino detector.

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Borexino is a liquid scintillator unsegmented detector, running at the Gran Sasso underground Laboratories (LNGS). Thanks to its unprecedented low level of radioactive contamination, Borexino currently is the only experiment able to perform a real time measurement of solar neutrino interactions below few MeV. In solar neutrinos Borexino measured the neutrino flux from 7Be (862 keV) with total uncertainty smaller than 5%, the flux from 8B with a lower threshold down to 3 MeV, the day/night asymmetry of the 7Be neutrino flux with a total experimental uncertainty of 1%. These measurements introduce strong constraints also on the solar neutrino flux from the pp and CNO reactions. The impact of these Borexino results are extremely relevant both in solar physics, in connection with the understanding of Sun-like stars, and in neutrino physics. In particular, the precision measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux allows a real time investigation of neutrino oscillations below few MeV and provides a unique opportuni...

  5. Early Mission Maneuver Operations for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sara; Reagoso, John; Webster, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory mission launched on February 11, 2015, and inserted onto a transfer trajectory toward a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. This paper presents an overview of the baseline transfer orbit and early mission maneuver operations leading up to the start of nominal science orbit operations. In particular, the analysis and performance of the spacecraft insertion, mid-course correction maneuvers, and the deep-space Lissajous orbit insertion maneuvers are discussed, com-paring the baseline orbit with actual mission results and highlighting mission and operations constraints..

  6. Capturing the Sun: A Roadmap for Navigating Data-Access Challenges and Auto-Populating Solar Home Sales Listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stukel, Laura [Elevate Energy, Chicago, IL (United States); Hoen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Adomatis, Sandra [Adomatis Appraisal Services, Punta Gorda, FL (United States); Foley, Craig [Sustainable Real Estate Consulting Services, Somerville, MA (United States); Parsons, Laura [Center for Sustainable Energy, San Diego, CA (United States); James, Mark [Vermont Law School, South Royalton, VT (United States). Inst. for Energy and Environment; Mastor, Roxana-Andreea [Vermont Law School, South Royalton, VT (United States). Inst. for Energy and Environment; Wedewer, Lindsey [Colorado Energy Office, Denver, CO (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Capturing the Sun: A Roadmap for Navigating Data-Access Challenges and Auto-Populating Solar Home Sales Listings supports a vision of solar photovoltaic (PV) advocates and real estate advocates evolving together to make information about solar homes more accessible to home buyers and sellers and to simplify the process when these homes are resold. The Roadmap is based on a concept in the real estate industry known as automatic population of fields. Auto-population (also called auto-pop in the industry) is the technology that allows data aggregated by an outside industry to be matched automatically with home sale listings in a multiple listing service (MLS).

  7. Solar system a visual exploration of the planets, moons, and other heavenly bodies that orbit our sun

    CERN Document Server

    Chown, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Based on the latest ebook sensation developed by Theodore Gray and his company Touch Press, this beautiful print book presents a new and fascinating way to experience the wonders of the solar system Following the stunning success of both the print edition and the app of The Elements, Black Dog & Leventhal and Touch Press have teamed up again. Solar System is something completely new under the sun. Never before have the wonders of our solar system—all its planets, dwarf planets, the sun, moons, rocky Asteroid Belt, and icy Kuiper Belt—been so immediately accessible to readers of all ages. Beginning with a fascinating overview and then organized by planet, in order of its distance from the sun, Solar System takes us on a trip across time and space that includes a front-row seat to the explosive birth of the solar system, a journey to (and then deep inside) each of its eight planets, and even an in-depth exploration of asteroids and comets. With hundreds of gorgeous images produced especially for this...

  8. Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

  9. Ocular surface changes and tear film alterations associated with sun gazing during a solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepp, Johannes; Dorner, Guido T; Jandrasits, Kerstin; Maar, Noemi; Schild, Gebtraud; Wedrich, Andreas

    2003-01-31

    A solar eclipse occurred in central Europe on August 11th, 1999. Following the eclipse, patients with ocular symptoms were investigated. Gazing at the sun without protection is liable to damage the retina. Our attention was focused on changes of the ocular surface and the tear film. Forty-three patients were investigated within one week after the solar eclipse as baseline. 33 of them were followed up one year later. Visual acuity and the central visual-field were measured, and the ocular surface and the fundus were examined using a slit lamp. The quality of the lacrimal tear film was examined using Schirmer's test for the aqueous layer, break-up time for the mucous layer and interference observation for the lipid layer, measured by a slit lamp and a tearoscope. At the baseline 19 patients had non-specific visual problems. Pathological alterations of the tear film were seen in all three tear-film layers: Schirmer's test was pathological in 87%, break-up time decreased in 85%, the interference pattern of the lipid layer changed in 67% and there were changes in 87% using the tearoscope. One year later the non specific visual disorders had disappeared. Schirmer's test did not reveal much change from the baseline: 51% pathological, 24% remained pathological in break-up-time and the lipid layer was normalized except in 9%. Using the tearoscope, lipids were better than grade 3 in all patients. After gazing at a solar eclipse the ocular surface and tear film changed. While the aqueous layer remained pathological in many patients, the lipid layer and the mucous layer recovered spontaneously.

  10. Evolution of the 2012 July 12 CME from the Sun to the Earth: Data-Constrained Three-Dimensional MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jie; Hess, Phillip; Wang, Yuming; Feng, Xueshang; Cheng, Hongze; Yang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the heliosphere provides us the key information for evaluating CMEs' geo-effectiveness and improving the accurate prediction of CME induced Shock Arrival Time (SAT) at the Earth. We present a data constrained three dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the evolution of the CME in a realistic ambient solar wind for the July 12-16, 2012 event by using the 3D COIN-TVD MHD code. A detailed comparison of the kinematic evolution of the CME between the observations and the simulation is carried out, including the usage of the time-elongation maps from the perspectives of both Stereo A and Stereo B. In this case study, we find that our 3D COIN-TVD MHD model, with the magnetized plasma blob as the driver, is able to re-produce relatively well the real 3D nature of the CME in morphology and their evolution from the Sun to Earth. The simulation also provides a relatively satisfactory comparison with the in-situ plasma data from the Wind spacecraf...

  11. The stability of tightly-packed, evenly-spaced systems of Earth-mass planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertas, Alysa; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Tamayo, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Many of the multi-planet systems discovered to date have been notable for their compactness, with neighbouring planets closer together than any in the Solar System. Interestingly, planet-hosting stars have a wide range of ages, suggesting that such compact systems can survive for extended periods of time. We have used numerical simulations to investigate how quickly systems go unstable in relation to the spacing between planets, focusing on hypothetical systems of Earth-mass planets on evenly-spaced orbits (in mutual Hill radii). In general, the further apart the planets are initially, the longer it takes for a pair of planets to undergo a close encounter. We recover the results of previous studies, showing a linear trend in the initial planet spacing between 3 and 8 mutual Hill radii and the logarithm of the stability time. Investigating thousands of simulations with spacings up to 13 mutual Hill radii reveals distinct modulations superimposed on this relationship in the vicinity of first and second-order mean motion resonances of adjacent and next-adjacent planets. We discuss the impact of this structure and the implications on the stability of compact multi-planet systems. Applying the outcomes of our simulations, we show that isolated systems of up to five Earth-mass planets can fit in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star without close encounters for at least 109 orbits.

  12. Estimation of residual microaccelerations on board an artificial earth satellite in the monoaxial solar orientation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, A. I.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    The mode of monoaxial solar orientation of a designed artificial Earth satellite (AES), intended for microgravitational investigations, is studied. In this mode the normal line to the plane of satellite’s solar batteries is permanently directed at the Sun, the absolute angular velocity of a satellite is virtually equal to zero. The mode is implemented by means of an electromechanical system of powered flywheels or gyrodynes. The calculation of the level of microaccelerations arising on board in such a mode, was carried out by mathematical modeling of satellite motion with respect to the center of masses under an effect of gravitational and restoring aerodynamic moments, as well as of the moment produced by the gyrosystem. Two versions of a law for controlling the characteristic angular momentum of a gyrosystem are considered. The first version provides only attenuation of satellite’s perturbed motion in the vicinity of the position of rest with the required velocity. The second version restricts, in addition, the increase in the accumulated angular momentum of a gyrosystem by controlling the angle of rotation of the satellite around the normal to the light-sensitive side of the solar batteries. Both control law versions are shown to maintain the monoaxial orientation mode to a required accuracy and provide a very low level of quasistatic microaccelerations on board the satellite.

  13. The Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles as Observed by the Stereo Spacecraft and Near Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Over 200 Solar Energetic Particle Events (SEPs) with protons > 25 MeV have been identified using data from the IMPACT HET telescopes on the STEREO A and B spacecraft and similar data from SoHO near Earth. The properties of these events are tabulated in a recent publication in Solar Physics (Richardson, et al., 2014). One of the goals of the Stereo Mission is to better understand the propagation of SEPs. The properties of events observed by multiple spacecraft on average are well-organized by the distance of the footpoints of the nominal Parker Spiral magnetic field lines passing the observing spacecraft from the parent active regions. However, some events deviate significantly from this pattern. For example, in events observed by three spacecraft, the spacecraft with the best nominal connection does not necessarily observe the highest intensity or earliest particle arrival time. We will search for such events and try to relate their behavior to non-nominal magnetic field patterns. We will look, for example, for the effects of the interplanetary current sheet, the influence of magnetic clouds which are thought to contain large magnetic loops with both ends connected to the sun (a large departure from the Parker spiral), and also whether particle propagation can be disrupted by the presence of interplanetary shocks. Reference: Richardson et al., Solar Phys. 289, 3059, 2014

  14. SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop Solar: A Competition To Spur Low-Cost Rooftop Solar Installations Across The Nation (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    The SunShot Prize encourages novel public-private partnerships, original business models, and innovative approaches to installing clean, renewable solar energy. The sustainable business strategies developed by participants will provide transferable lessons that can be applied nationwide to hasten America's transition to affordable clean energy in a post-subsidy market.

  15. On the Path to SunShot. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Technology, Performance, and Dispatchability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehos, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jorgenson, Jennie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ho, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Armijo, Kenneth [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report examines the remaining challenges to achieving the competitive concentrating solar power (CSP) costs and large-scale deployment envisioned under the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative. Although CSP costs continue to decline toward SunShot targets, CSP acceptance and deployment have been hindered by inexpensive photovoltaics (PV). However, a recent analysis found that thermal energy storage (TES) could increase CSP's value--based on combined operational and capacity benefits--by up to 6 cents/kWh compared to variable-generation PV, under a 40% renewable portfolio standard in California. Thus, the high grid value of CSP-TES must be considered when evaluating renewable energy options. An assessment of net system cost accounts for the difference between the costs of adding new generation and the avoided cost from displacing other resources providing the same level of energy and reliability. The net system costs of several CSP configurations are compared with the net system costs of conventional natural-gas-fired combustion-turbine (CT) and combined-cycle plants. At today's low natural gas prices and carbon emission costs, the economics suggest a peaking configuration for CSP. However, with high natural gas prices and emission costs, each of the CSP configurations compares favorably against the conventional alternatives, and systems with intermediate to high capacity factors become the preferred alternatives. Another analysis compares net system costs for three configurations of CSP versus PV with batteries and PV with CTs. Under current technology costs, the least-expensive option is a combination of PV and CTs. However, under future cost assumptions, the optimal configuration of CSP becomes the most cost-effective option.

  16. Sun-genesis 21: Empowering the global village in the digital age and the solar century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamasaki, Les [Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Sun-Genesis 21 is a global economic development plan for creating an environmentally sustainable future in the developing world. Its premise is that the solution to the survival of civil stability and democracy in developing countries in the Information Age is to slow the migration of the rural poor into the urban centers as well as dispersing some of the residents of the already impacted cities into new agro-communities. This strategy envisions empowering the 25 million coffee farmers located in the poorest countries in the world to control their own economic destiny by marketing their products directly to the international marketplace over the World Wide Web (Coffee Belt Plan 2020). The plan also envisions creating a network of new agricultural communities called World Farm Solar Telecommunities that utilizes telecommunications and environmental technologies to disperse the impacted urban population. Proven profitable commodities such as industrial hemp, aloe vera, and aquacultural farming will be the economic foundation of these agro-communities. The goal is to empower rural agro-entrepreneurs to become an economic engine for job creation and be able to afford the Coffee Solar Televillages that include distant learning centers, telemedicine clinics, food processing centers, e-commerce centers, and solar crop-drying centers. The Genesis 21 program includes creative financing strategies to deal with these massive problems of poverty and hunger through the concept of trade, not aid, including the use of barter in a proposed Green Technology for Green Coffee program. [Spanish] Sun-Genesis 21 es un plan global de desarrollo economico para crear un futuro ambiental sustentable en el mundo en desarrollo. La premisa del plan es que la solucion para la supervivencia de la estabilidad civil y la democracia en paises en desarrollo dentro de la Era de la Informacion es desacelerar la migracion de la gente pobre de las areas rurales hacia los centros urbanos, asi como

  17. Small Solar Electric Propulsion Spacecraft Concept for Near Earth Object and Inner Solar System Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jared J.; Randolph, Thomas M.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Baker, John D.; Strange, Nathan J.; Landau, Damon; Wallace, Mark S.; Snyder, J. Steve; Piacentine, Jamie S.; Malone, Shane; Bury, Kristen M.; Tracy, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other primitive bodies are exciting targets for exploration. Not only do they provide clues to the early formation of the universe, but they also are potential resources for manned exploration as well as provide information about potential Earth hazards. As a step toward exploration outside Earth's sphere of influence, NASA is considering manned exploration to Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), however hazard characterization of a target is important before embarking on such an undertaking. A small Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) spacecraft would be ideally suited for this type of mission due to the high delta-V requirements, variety of potential targets and locations, and the solar energy available in the inner solar system.Spacecraft and mission trades have been performed to develop a robust spacecraft design that utilizes low cost, off-the-shelf components that could accommodate a suite of different scientific payloads for NEO characterization. Mission concepts such as multiple spacecraft each rendezvousing with different NEOs, single spacecraft rendezvousing with separate NEOs, NEO landers, as well as other inner solar system applications (Mars telecom orbiter) have been evaluated. Secondary launch opportunities using the Expendable Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) Grande launch adapter with unconstrained launch dates have also been examined.

  18. Advanced nanostructured materials and their application for improvement of sun-light harvesting and efficiency of solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova-Malinovska, D.

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the application of different nanostructured materials in solar cells technology for improvement of sun-light harvesting and their efficiency. Several approaches have recently been proposed to increase the efficiency of solar cells above the theoretical limit which are based on a “photon management” concept that employs such phenomena as: (i) down-conversion, and (ii) surface plasmon resonance effect (iii) decreasing of the loss due to the reflection of the radiation, (iv) increasing of the reflection from the back contact, v) increasing of the effective solar cells surface, etc. The results demonstrate the possibility for to increasing of light harvesting, short circuit current and efficiency by application of nanomaterials in thin film and hetero-junction (HJ) solar cells. The first promising results allow an expectation for application of advanced nanomaterials in the 3d generation solar cells.

  19. Totality eclipses of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Littmann, Mark; Willcox, Ken

    2008-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. - ;A total eclipse of the Sun is the most awesome sight in the heavens. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun takes you to eclipses of the past, present, and future, and lets you see - and feel - why people travel to the ends of the Earth to observe them. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is the best guide and reference book on solar eclipses ever written. It explains: how to observe them; how to photograph and videotape them; why they occur; their history and mythology; and future eclipses - when and where to see them. Totality also tells the remarkable story of how eclipses shocked scientists, revealed the workings of the Sun, and made Einstein famous. And the book shares the experiences and advice of many veteran eclipse observers. Totality: Eclipses of the Sun is profusely ill...

  20. Situation of China's solar water heater industry, related national standards, testing and the Golden Sun certification program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; H.Druck; H.Muller-Steinhagen

    2008-01-01

    China is the largest solar water heater producer and market in the world. Despite the fast growth and an installed capacity that accounts for the majority of the global gross, China's per capita solar hot water capacity is still very low, implying a huge margin of market potential; and the recognition of the industry in the global market is handicapped by the scattered scale of production and inconsistent product quality. To ensure continued growth of China's solar water heating (SWH) industry, Chinese Government has established a series of national SWH standards, three national testing centers, and a certification program to lay the foundation for the development of the Golden Sun product labeling system. China General Certification Center (CGC) developed the Golden Sun product certification and labeling system on a pass/fail basis evaluating with established criteria. The system was designed to help manufacturers acclimate to explicit consistent requirements and to identify and fix the deficiencies in the design and execution of the program itself. Timely revision and integration of the national standards are recommended to accommodate the test procedures and requirements to new technologies and the evolving SWH market. Strict implementation of the Golden Sun certification and labeling system are suggested to avail improving the quality control and forging internationally reputable brands of Chinese solar water heating products.

  1. Strength distribution of solar magnetic fields in photospheric quiet Sun regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Vélez, J. C.; López Ariste, A.; Semel, M.

    2008-08-01

    Context: The magnetic topology of the solar photosphere in its quietest regions is hidden by the difficulties to disentangle magnetic flux through the resolution element from the field strength of unresolved structures. The observation of spectral lines with strong coupling with hyperfine structure, like the observed Mn i line at 553.7 nm, allows such differentiation. Aims: To analyse the distribution of field strengths in the network and intranetwork of the solar photosphere through inversion of the Mn i line at 553.7 nm. Methods: An inversion code for the magnetic field using the principal component analysis (PCA) has been developed. Statistical tests are run on the code to validate it. The code has to draw information from the small-amplitude spectral feature appearing in the core of the Stokes V profile of the observed line for field strengths below a certain threshold, coinciding with lower limit of the Paschen-Back effect in the fine structure of the involved atomic levels. Results: The inversion of the observed profiles, using the circular polarisation (V) and the intensity (I), shows the presence of magnetic fields strengths in a range from 0 to 2 kG, with predominant weak strength values. Mixed regions with mean strength field values of 1130 and 435 Gauss are found associated with the network and intranetwork, respectively. Conclusions: The Mn i line at 553 nm probes the field strength distribution in the quiet sun and shows the predominance of weak, hectoGauss fields in the intranetwork, and strong, kiloGauss fields in the network. It also shows that both network and intranetwork are to be understood at our present spatial resolutions as field distributions, of which we hint at the mean properties.

  2. OMNI: A Description of Near-Earth Solar Wind Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papitashvili, Natasha; Bilitza, Dieter; King, Joseph

    OMNI is an hourly resolution multi-source data set of near-Earth solar wind's magnetic field and plasma parameters spanning the period from November 1963 (IMP 1 launch) to today, and it is being updated regularly with new data. OMNI is widely used in the heliospheric community as is documented by the large number of acknowledgements in scientific papers. OMNI provides the IMF (magnitude and vector), flow velocity (magnitude and vector), flow pressure, proton density, alpha particle to proton density ratio, and several additional parameters including sunspot and geomagnetic indices and energetic proton fluxes from IMP and GOES. Spacecraft data used for compiling the OMNI solar wind reference include IMP-8, ACE, Wind, ISEE-3, and Geotail. The data from ISEE-3, Wind, and ACE were time-shifted because they are about an hour upstream of the Earth's magnetosphere. Extensive quality control and cross- comparisons of overlapping data sets were made in creating OMNI. This presentation will describe the OMNI data set and highlight its wide use in the space science community. We will also present some of the many capabilities of the OMNIweb interface (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/ow.html) that provides access to the entire OMNI data set. OMNIWeb allows users to generate plots vs. time, to create scatter plots of any two OMNI parameters, to filter with user-specified parameter range criteria, to list and download OMNI parameters, to generate distributions of OMNI parameter values, and to browse and retrieve a static (but periodically updated) daily-resolution IMF polarity plot covering the entire OMNI time span. The Omni data set represents a thorough description of various characteristics of near-Earth solar wind magnetic field and plasma, which could be used as a basis for that space environment's standard.

  3. First on-sun test of NaK pool-boiler solar receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J. B.; Andraka, C. E.; Moss, T. A.; Cordeiro, P. G.; Dudley, V. E.; Rawlinson, K. S.

    During 1989-1990, a refluxing liquid-metal pool-boiler solar receiver designed for dish/Stirling application at 75 kW(sub t) throughput was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver included (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium, and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Following this first demonstration, a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that brings the concept closer to commercialization has been designed, constructed, and successfully tested. For long life, the new receiver is built from Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, the absorber area and vapor-flow passages have been enlarged. To eliminate the need for trace heating, sodium has been replaced by the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. To reduce manufacturing costs, the receiver has a powdered-metal coating instead of EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it contains a small amount of xenon. In this paper, we present the receiver design and report the results of on-sun tests using a nominal 75 kW(sub t) test-bed concentrator to characterize boiling stability, hot-restart behavior, and thermal efficiency at temperatures up to 750 C. We also report briefly on late results from an advanced-concepts pool-boiler receiver.

  4. The Progress in Study of the Effects of the Solar Variation on the Earth Environment%太阳驱动地球环境变化研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘钊; 于学峰

    2012-01-01

    As the most important energy source of the earth surface system, the sun influences the earth environment intensively. The records of climatic change contain much information about the change of solar radiation and solar activities, but the actual obser vation of solar radiation change is not considered enough to cause the earth's severe climate change directly. Many physical models were developed to explain the mechanism about how the sun drives the earth's environment change. These physical models have good applicability in explaining some climate phenomena! however, there are still some limitations in other aspects. Starting with the geologic records, this article reviewed the geological-biological re cords of effects of the solar variation on the climate change on the different time scale and made comments on some amplification mechanisms. Meanwhile, we consider that the solar variation is the most important factor of the earth's environment change; the earth's environment changes may response the solar changes directly. Ei ther radiation changes caused by solar activities are underestima ted, or there are undiscovered mechanisms. Future research should address these two issues.

  5. The Solar System According to General Relativity: The Sun's Space Breaking Meets the Asteroid Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the exact solution of Einstein’s field equations for a sphere of incompressible liquid without the additional limitation initially introduced in 1916 by Schwarzschild, by which the space-time metric must have no singularities. The ob- tained exact solution is then applied to the Universe, the Sun, and the planets, by the assumption that these objects can be approximated as spheres of incompressible liq- uid. It is shown that gravitational collapse of such a sphere is permitted for an object whose characteristics (mass, density, and size are close to the Universe. Meanwhile, there is a spatial break associated with any of the mentioned stellar objects: the break is determined as the approaching to infinity of one of the spatial components of the metric tensor. In particular, the break of the Sun’s space meets the Asteroid strip, while Jupiter’s space break meets the Asteroid strip from the outer side. Also, the space breaks of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are located inside the Asteroid strip (inside the Sun’s space break.

  6. Midnight sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunger, A.P.; Lambert, S.B.; Gagnon, M.P.

    1990-09-01

    Midnight Sun, the University of Waterloo's solar-electric car, was designed and built by about 30 engineering, kinesiology and physics students for the GM Sunrayce USA held in July 1990. The car measures 2 m by 4.2 m, weighs 224 kg, can collect about 1000 W of solar electricity in full sun, and had a top speed of 79 km/h. The race took 11 days to cover the 1644 miles from the Epcot Center in Lake Buena Vista, Florida to the GM Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. Thirty-two cars, powered only by solar energy, competed in this race. Midnight Sun showed its potential during the race qualifying runs by completing the required qualifying course with the 12th fastest time of 52.83 seconds, and the 6th fastest trap speed of 63 km/h. During the Sunrayce, Midnight Sun came in second on day 1 of the race, tenth on day 6, and eighth on day 7, and was one of only 17 solar cars that were able to make it up the toughest hill in the race on day 8. The most serious problems encountered by the car were a weak rear suspension, power losses, and failure of bypass diodes in the photovoltaic array. Midnight Sun was in 17th place overall at the end of day 9. At about 11:00 am on day 10 in Ohio, the Waterloo car was moving at 60 km/h when it was bumped off the road by an out of control pickup truck. The solar car driver was not hurt. Despite the difficulties, the next day Midnight Sun was repaired and driven across the finish line at the ceremonial finish. After receiving time penalties for not completing the last day and a half of the race, Midnight Sun was awarded 24th place with an official cumulative time of 114 h 37 min 15 s. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Solar Electricity for Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the Earth with millions of times more energy than its people use. The only problem is that energy is spread out over the entire Earth's surface and must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. Solar panels make up the heart of a solar system. They can be…

  8. Correlations Between Variations in Solar EUV and Soft X-Ray Irradiance and Photoelectron Energy Spectra Observed on Mars and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F(10.7) index currently used.

  9. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The E-corona is the site of numerous emission lines associated with high ionization states (i.e. FeXIV-FeXXV. Modern gaseous models of the Sun require that these states are produced by atomic irradiation, requiring the sequential removal of electrons to infinity, without an associated electron acceptor. This can lead to computed temperatures in the corona which are unrealistic (i.e. ∼30–100 MK contrasted to solar core values of ∼16 MK. In order to understand the emission lines of the E-corona, it is vital to recognize that they are superimposed upon the K-corona, which produces a continuous spectrum, devoid of Fraunhofer lines, arising from this same region of the Sun. It has been advanced that the K-corona harbors self-luminous condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L8–L10; Robitaille P.M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere III. Importance of Continuous Emission Spectra from Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, Prominences, and Other Coronal Structures. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L11–L14. Condensed matter can possess elevated electron affinities which may strip nearby atoms of their electrons. Such a scenario accounts for the high ionization states observed in the corona: condensed matter acts to harness electrons, ensuring the electrical neutrality of the Sun, despite the flow of electrons and ions in the solar winds. Elevated ionization states reflect the presence of materials with high electron affinities in the corona, which is likely to be a form of metallic hydrogen, and does not translate into elevated temperatures in this region of the solar atmosphere. As a result, the many mechanisms advanced to account for coronal heating in the gaseous models of the Sun

  10. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  11. Broadband Radio Spectral Observations of Solar Eclipse on 2008-08-01 and Implications on the Quiet Sun Atmospheric Model

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Tan, Chengmin; Huang, Jing; Liu, Yuying; Fu, Qijun; Chen, ZhiJun; Liu, Fei; Chen, Linjie; Ji, Guoshu; 10.1007/s11433-009-0230-y

    2009-01-01

    Based on the joint-observations of the radio broadband spectral emissions of solar eclipse on August 1, 2008 at Jiuquan (total eclipse) and Huairou (partial eclipse) at the frequencies of 2.00 -- 5.60 GHz (Jiuquan), 2.60 -- 3.80 GHZ (Chinese solar broadband radiospectrometer, SBRS/Huairou), and 5.20 -- 7.60 GHz (SBRS/Huairou), the authors assemble a successive series of broadband spectrum with a frequency of 2.60 -- 7.60 GHz to observe the solar eclipse synchronously. This is the first attempt to analyze the solar eclipse radio emission under the two telescopes located at different places with broadband frequencies in the periods of total and partial eclipse. With these analyses, the authors made a new semiempirical model of the coronal plasma density of the quiet Sun and made a comparison with the classic models.

  12. The "Sun-climate" relationship : III. The solar flares, north-south sunspot arrea asymmetry and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Komitov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    In this last Paper III additional evidences that the solar high energetic particles radiation with energies higher as 100 MeV (the solar cosmic rays SCR) is an very important component for the "Sun- climate" relationship are given (see also Paper I and II). The total solar irradiance (TSI) and the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) variations given an integral climate effect of cooling in sunspot minima and warming in the sunspot maxima. Unlike the both ones the powerful solar corpuscular events plays a cooling climate role during the epochs of their heigh levels. By this one subcenturial global and regional temperature quasi- cyclic changes by duration of approximately 60 years could be track during the last 150 years of instrumental climate observations . It has been also evided in the paper that this subcenturial oscilation is very important in the Group sunspot number (GSN) data series since the Maunder minimum up to the end of 20th century. Thus the solar erruptive activity effect make the total "Sun -climate" r...

  13. Graphene oxide-based efficient and scalable solar desalination under one sun with a confined 2D water path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuqiang; Xu, Weichao; Tang, Mingyao; Zhou, Lin; Zhu, Bin; Zhu, Shining; Zhu, Jia

    2016-12-06

    Because it is able to produce desalinated water directly using solar energy with minimum carbon footprint, solar steam generation and desalination is considered one of the most important technologies to address the increasingly pressing global water scarcity. Despite tremendous progress in the past few years, efficient solar steam generation and desalination can only be achieved for rather limited water quantity with the assistance of concentrators and thermal insulation, not feasible for large-scale applications. The fundamental paradox is that the conventional design of direct absorber-bulk water contact ensures efficient energy transfer and water supply but also has intrinsic thermal loss through bulk water. Here, enabled by a confined 2D water path, we report an efficient (80% under one-sun illumination) and effective (four orders salinity decrement) solar desalination device. More strikingly, because of minimized heat loss, high efficiency of solar desalination is independent of the water quantity and can be maintained without thermal insulation of the container. A foldable graphene oxide film, fabricated by a scalable process, serves as efficient solar absorbers (>94%), vapor channels, and thermal insulators. With unique structure designs fabricated by scalable processes and high and stable efficiency achieved under normal solar illumination independent of water quantity without any supporting systems, our device represents a concrete step for solar desalination to emerge as a complementary portable and personalized clean water solution.

  14. The Greatest Shadow on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Wimmer, Jason; Towsey, Michael; Fahmi, Marco; Winslett, Greg; Dubler, Gabriel; Le Prou, Angela; Loose, David

    2014-01-01

    In a total solar eclipse, the Moon completely covers the Sun, casting a shadow several hundred km wide across the face of the Earth. This paper describes observations of the 14 November 2012 total eclipse of the Sun visible from north Queensland, Australia. The edge of the umbra was captured on video during totality, and this video is provided for…

  15. Sun-Relative Pointing for Dual-Axis Solar Trackers Employing Azimuth and Elevation Rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Clifford W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-30

    Dual axis trackers employing azimuth and elevation rotations are common in the field of photovoltaic (PV) energy generation. Accurate sun-tracking algorithms are widely available. However, a steering algorithm has not been available to accurately point the tracker away from the sun such that a vector projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face falls along a desired path relative to the tracker face. We have developed an algorithm which produces the appropriate azimuth and elevation angles for a dual axis tracker when given the sun position, desired angle of incidence, and the desired projection of the sun beam onto the tracker face. Development of this algorithm was inspired by the need to accurately steer a tracker to desired sun-relative positions in order to better characterize the electro-optical properties of PV and CPV modules.

  16. International Symposium on Recent Observations and Simulations of the Sun-Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-10

    Dynamics and the Response of Geospace 14. Chertoprud V., Ioshpa B., Obridko V.: Fractal Properties of Magnetic Fields of Active and Quiet Solar...Andenes, Norway. The project is partly financed by the Bulgarian Ministry of Science and Education. OTHER RELATED TOPICS: POSTER... Fractal

  17. Habitat of early life: Solar X-ray and UV radiation at Earth's surface 4-3.5 billion years ago

    CERN Document Server

    Cnossen, I; Favata, F; Witasse, O; Zegers, T; Arnold, N F

    2007-01-01

    Solar X-ray and UV radiation (0.1-320 nm) received at Earth's surface is an important aspect of the circumstances under which life formed on Earth. The quantity that is received depends on two main variables: the emission of radiation by the young Sun and its extinction through absorption and scattering by the Earth's early atmosphere. The spectrum emitted by the Sun when life formed, between 4 and 3.5 Ga, was modeled here, including the effects of flares and activity cycles, using a solar-like star that has the same age now as the Sun had 4-3.5 Ga. Atmospheric extinction was calculated using the Beer-Lambert law, assuming several density profiles for the atmosphere of the Archean Earth. We found that almost all radiation with a wavelength shorter than 200 nm is attenuated effectively, even by very tenuous atmospheres. Longer-wavelength radiation is progressively less well attenuated, and its extinction is more sensitive to atmospheric composition. Minor atmospheric components, such as methane, ozone, water v...

  18. Plasma depletion layer: its dependence on solar wind conditions and the Earth dipole tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding upstream magnetosheath values. It is believed that the PDL is controlled jointly by conditions in the solar wind plasma and the (IMF. In this study, we extend our former model PDL studies by systematically investigating the dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on solar wind conditions using global MHD simulations. We first point out the difficulties for the depletion factor method and the plasma β method for defining the outer boundary of the plasma depletion layer. We propose to use the N/B ratio to define the PDL outer boundary, which can give the best description of flux tube depletion. We find a strong dependence of the magnetosheath environment on the solar wind magnetosonic Mach number. A difference between the stagnation point and the magnetopause derived from the open-closed magnetic field boundary is found. We also find a strong and complex dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on the IMF Bz. A density structure right inside the subsolar magnetopause for higher IMF Bz;might be responsible for some of this dependence. Both the IMF tilt and clock angles are found to have little influence on the magnetosheath and the PDL structures. However, the IMF geometry has a much stronger influence on the slow mode fronts in the magnetosheath. Finally, the Earth dipole tilt is found to play a minor role for the magnetosheath geometry and the PDL along the Sun-Earth line. A complex slow mode front geometry is found for cases with different Earth dipole tilts. Comparisons between our results with those from some former studies are conducted, and consistencies and inconsistencies are found.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath, solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (numerical

  19. Design, Building and Testing of a Sun Calibration Mechanism for the MSI-VNS Instrument on EarthCARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Erik; de Goeij, Bryan; van Riel, Luud; Meijer, Ellart; van der Knaap, Frits; Doornink, Jan; de Graaf, Harm-Jan

    2013-09-01

    TNO has developed a mechanism to perform sun and dark calibration as a module of the Visible-NIR-SWIR Optical Unit (VNS) in the context of the ESA EarthCARE mission. This paper will address the conceptual and detailed design and modelling approach of the mechanism. Finally the production and testing of the Life Test Model (LTM) will be presented.The rotating part of the mechanism (calibration carousel) is the supporting structure of the instrument calibration diffusers. By rotating the carousel either the instrument nominal, sun calibration or dark calibration/safe modes can be selected. The calibration carousel is suspended in (a.o.) hard preloaded angular contact bearings and driven by a Phytron stepper motor. FE Modelling has been used to derive the bearing- and motor forces and accelerations. These analysis results were used as input to the CABARET analyses performed by ESTL (UK). Using the analysis results the bearing stress, stiffness, gapping and friction torque were predicted.A flight representative Life Test Model (LTM) has been manufactured assembled and was successfully subjected to ground cycles testing, vibration-, thermal vacuum- and life cycle testing.

  20. On the Transfer and Control of Space Probes Around the L1 Point of the Sun-Earth+Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xi-Yun; Liu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    The motion around the collinear libration points in the restricted three body problem is unstable. But there exist conditionally stable periodic orbits around these points. Special-purpose space probes located in the vicinity of these points (e.g., ISEE-3, SOHO) can benefit from this dynamical property, in regard to maintaining the orbit in position and the energy required of placing the probe in position. As an example, we study in this paper the launch and orbital control of a space probe around the L1 libration point in the system consisting of the Sun and the Earth-Moon. We present some theoretical and numerical simulations' results, which may serve as a basis for the realization of such a space probe in future.

  1. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  2. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-05-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  3. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke [University of Vienna, Institute for Astrophysics, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Haghighipour, Nader, E-mail: siegfried.eggl@univie.ac.at [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  4. Charge States and FIP Bias of the Solar Wind from Coronal Holes, Active Regions, and Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, Maria S.; Xia, LiDong; Li, Bo; Huang, ZhengHua; Wangguan, Zhipeng

    2017-02-01

    Connecting in situ measured solar-wind plasma properties with typical regions on the Sun can provide an effective constraint and test to various solar wind models. We examine the statistical characteristics of the solar wind with an origin in different types of source regions. We find that the speed distribution of coronal-hole (CH) wind is bimodal with the slow wind peaking at ∼400 km s‑1 and the fast at ∼600 km s‑1. An anti-correlation between the solar wind speeds and the O7+/O6+ ion ratio remains valid in all three types of solar wind as well during the three studied solar cycle activity phases, i.e., solar maximum, decline, and minimum. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range and its average values all decrease with the increasing solar wind speed in different types of solar wind. The {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} range (0.06–0.40, first ionization potential (FIP) bias range 1–7) for active region wind is wider than for CH wind (0.06–0.20, FIP bias range 1–3), while the minimum value of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} (∼ 0.06) does not change with the variation of speed, and it is similar for all source regions. The two-peak distribution of CH wind and the anti-correlation between the speed and O7+/O6+ in all three types of solar wind can be explained qualitatively by both the wave-turbulence-driven and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, whereas the distribution features of {N}{Fe}/{N}{{O}} in different source regions of solar wind can be explained more reasonably by the RLO models.

  5. Fabrication of large-format holograms in dichromated gelatin films for sun control and solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanoff, Christo G.; Schuette, Hartmut; Schulat, Jochen; Kubiza, Ralf; Froening, Philipp

    1997-05-01

    Dichromated gelatin layers (DCG) facilitate the design and fabrication of large format holographic optical elements (HOE) of high optical quality and diffraction efficiency. The HOEs are used for the fabrication of spectrally selective solar concentrators and as glazing materials for daylighting and passive sun control in buildings. The suitability of HOEs in these applications depends upon the achievable bandwidth, operating central wavelength, dispersion characteristics and low absorption losses. The HOEs are fabricated on glass or plastic film substrata in a DCG-layer of 5 to 30 micrometer thickness. The layer thickness and the gradient ar precisely controlled during the layer deposition and drying (plus or minus 1 micrometer and 0.1 micrometer/cm for standard layer of 10 micrometer thickness). The production process is based on the fabrication of high quality master holograms that are copied by dry copying procedure. The current manufacturing facilities allow the fabrication of 1 m2 HOEs on glass substratum and a continuous production of HOEs on plastic substratum with a width of 20 cm and length of 50 m. This technology is also used to fabricate holograms for instrumentation optics in metrology and for optical interconnects in multichip modules. The fabricated HOEs exhibit the desired operational characteristics: high diffraction efficiency, small Braggshift, large bandwidth and a central wavelength that may be freely selected over a wide spectral range. In this paper, we present the results from the experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of large number of holograms of the transmissive and reflective types. We discuss the attained angular and wavelength spectra, bandwidths, wavelength shifts and the diffraction efficiencies as functions of the holographic parameters. The HOEs are made for technical applications and are designed to operate in the 300 nm - 1500 m spectral range.

  6. Stereoscopic study of the kinematic evolution of a coronal mass ejection and its driven shock from the sun to the earth and the prediction of their arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: phess4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R {sub ☉} and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R {sub ☉} combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  7. Seismology of the Sun : Inference of Thermal, Dynamic and Magnetic Field Structures of the Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Hiremath, K M

    2012-01-01

    Recent overwhelming evidences show that the sun strongly influences the Earth's climate and environment. Moreover existence of life on this Earth mainly depends upon the sun's energy. Hence, understanding of physics of the sun, especially the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of its interior, is very important. Recently, from the ground and space based observations, it is discovered that sun oscillates near 5 min periodicity in millions of modes. This discovery heralded a new era in solar physics and a separate branch called helioseismology or seismology of the sun has started. Before the advent of helioseismology, sun's thermal structure of the interior was understood from the evolutionary solution of stellar structure equations that mimicked the present age, mass and radius of the sun. Whereas solution of MHD equations yielded internal dynamics and magnetic field structure of the sun's interior. In this presentation, I review the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of the sun's inter...

  8. Effectiveness of GeoWall Visualization Technology for Conceptualization of the Sun-Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, N. E.; Gray, C.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many introductory astronomy students face is the lack of a 3-dimensional mental model of the Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause the cycle of lunar phases. The GeoWall is a recently developed and affordable projection mechanism for three-dimensional stereo visualization which is becoming a popular tool in classrooms and research labs. We present results from a study using a 3-D GeoWall with a simulated sunlit Earth-Moon system on undergraduate students' ability to understand the origins of lunar phases. We test students exposed to only in-class instruction, some with a laboratory exercise using the GeoWall Earth-Moon simulation, some students who were exposed to both, and some with an alternate activity involving lunar observations. Students are given pre and post tests using the a diagnostic test called the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI). We discuss the effectiveness of this technology as a teaching tool for lunar phases.

  9. The Jovian period in the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    The 41-year measurements of the Doppler effect of the photosphere performed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, discovered two periods of global oscillations of the Sun: 9600.606(12) s and 9597.929(15) s. Their beat period, 398.4(2.9) d, well agrees with a synodic orbital period of Jupiter, PJ = 398.9 d, raising a new problem for solar physics, cosmogony and cosmology. A hypothesis is advanced that the PJ beating of the Sun is induced by gravitation of Jupiter, revolving in a privileged reference system "the Sun - the Earth".

  10. Solar dynamo as host power pacemaker of the Earth global climate

    OpenAIRE

    Rusov, Vitaliy D.; Linnik, Elena P.; Vladimir N. Vaschenko; Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht.; Margarita E. Beglaryan; Zelentsova, Tatiana N.; Tarasov, Victor A.; Litvinov, Dmitriy A.; Smolyar, Vladimir P.; Vachev, Boyko I.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the so-called problem of solar power pacemaker related to possible existence of some hidden but key mechanism of energy influence of the Sun on fundamental geophysical processes is one of the principal and puzzling problems of modern climatology. The "tracks" of this mechanism have been shown up in different problems of solar-terrestrial physics for a long time and, in particular, in climatology, where the solar-climate variability is stably observed. However, the mechanisms ...

  11. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection and Associated Geo-effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui; Möstl, Christian; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations associated with the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), covering the source region on the Sun from SDO, stereoscopic imaging observations from STEREO, magnetic field characteristics at MESSENGER, and type II radio burst and in situ measurements from Wind. A triangulation method based on STEREO stereoscopic observations is employed to determine the kinematics of the CME, and the outcome is compared with the result derived from the type II radio burst with a solar wind electron density model. A Grad-Shafranov technique is applied to Wind in situ data to reconstruct the flux-rope structure and compare it with the observation of the solar source region, which helps understand the geo-effectiveness associated with the CME structure. Conclusions are as follows: (1) the CME undergoes an impulsive acceleration, a rapid deceleration before reaching MESSENGER, and then a gradual deceleration out to 1 AU, which should be noticed in CME kinematics models; (2) the type II rad...

  12. Complete Solution of Sun Tracking for Heliostat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying-Tian; LIM Boon-Han; LIM Chern-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A general solution of sun tracking for an arbitrarily oriented heliostat towards an arbitrarily located target on the earth is published. With the most general form of solar tracking formulae, it is seen that the used azimuthelevation, spinning-elevation tracking formulae etc. are the special cases of it. The possibilities of utilizing the general solution and its significance in solar energy engineering are discussed.

  13. Complete Solution of Sun Tracking for Heliostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Tian; Lim, Boon-Han; Lim, Chern-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A general solution of sun tracking for an arbitrarily oriented heliostat towards an arbitrarily located target on the earth is published. With the most general form of solar tracking formulae, it is seen that the used azimuth-elevation, spinning-elevation tracking formulae etc. are the special cases of it. The possibilities of utilizing the general solution and its significance in solar energy engineering are discussed.

  14. Controlling a transfer trajectory with realistic impulses assumming perturbations in the Sun-Earth-Moon Quasi-Bicircular Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, A. M.; Briozzo, C. B.

    In a previous work we successfully implemented a control algorithm to stabilize unstable periodic orbits in the Sun-Earth-Moon Quasi-Bicircular Problem (QBCP). Applying the same techniques, in this work we stabilize an unstable trajectory performing fast transfers between the Earth and the Moon in a dynamical system similar to the QBCP but incorporating the gravitational perturbation of the planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, assumed to move on circular coplanar heliocentric orbits. In the control stage we used as a reference trajectory an unstable periodic orbit from the unperturbed QBCP. We performed 400 numerical experiments integrating the trajectories over time spans of ~40 years, taking for each one random values for the initial positions of the planets. In all cases the control impulses applied were larger than 20 cm/s, consistently with realistic implementations. The minimal and maximal yearly mean consumptions were ~10 m/s and ~71 m/s, respectively. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  15. On Flare-CME Characteristics from Sun to Earth Combining Remote-Sensing Image Data with In Situ Measurements Supported by Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the well-observed flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from 1 October 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of effects - from Sun to Earth - to better understand the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere associated with the flare and CME using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based instruments. We also track the CME signature off-limb with combined extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white-light data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). By applying the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) reconstruction method and total mass to stereoscopic STEREO-SOHO ( Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in the interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the magnetic cloud (MC) from in situ measurements from Wind. This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results, as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We find that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are lower in the interplanetary space by ˜ 50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating an erosion process. A CME mass increase of 10% is observed over a range of {˜} 4 - 20 R_{⊙}. The temporal evolution of the CME

  16. The Sun and How to Observe It

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2009-01-01

    Without the Sun, all life on Earth would perish. But what exactly do we know about this star that lights, heats, and powers Earth? Actually, we know quite a lot, thanks mainly to a host of eager solar observers. Looking directly at the Sun is EXTREMELY hazardous. But many astronomers, both professional and amateur, have found ways to view the Sun safely to learn about it. You, too, can view the Sun in all of its glorious detail. Some of the newest, most exciting telescopes on the market are affordable to amateur astronomers or even just curious sky watchers, and with this guide to what the Sun has to offer, including sunspots, prominences, and flares, plus reviews of the latest instruments for seeing and capturing images of the Sun, you can contribute to humankind’s knowledge of this immense ball of glowing gases that gives us all life. For a complete guide to Sun viewing, see also Total Solar Eclipses and How to Observe Them (2007) by Martin Mobberley in this same series.

  17. Statistical Characteristics of the Heliospheric Plasma and Magnetic Field at the Earth's Orbit during Four Solar Cycles 20-23

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A V; Veselovsky, I S

    2013-01-01

    The review presents analysis and physical interpretation of available statistical data about solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) properties as measured in-situ at 1 A.U. by numerous space experiments during time period from 1964 to 2007. The experimental information have been collected in the OMNI Web/NSSDC data set of hourly averaged heliospheric parameters for last four solar cycles from 20th to 23rd. We studied statistical characteristics of such key heliospheric parameters as solar wind proton number density, temperature, bulk velocity, and IMF vector as well as dimensionless parameters. From harmonic analysis of the variations of key parameters we found basic periods of 13.5 days, 27 days, 1 year, and ~11 years, which correspond to rotation of the Sun, Earth and to the solar cycle. We also revealed other periodicities such as specific five-year plasma density and temperature variations, which origin is a subject of discussion. We have found that the distribution of solar wind proton...

  18. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of Two Coronal Mass Ejections Interacting near 1 AU: Formation of a Complex Ejecta and Generation of a Two-Step Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Rui; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-01-01

    On 2012 September 30 - October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs \\citep{liu13}. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux rope-like configuration, with an embedded concave-outward shoc...

  19. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lugaz, Noé, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished.

  20. Investigation of the Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.; Evans, David (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to infer, by statistical means, the most probable mode of entry of solar wind plasma into Earth's magnetotail, using a particular set of archived data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE-1) satellite, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the 1970's and 80's. Despite their considerable age, the Lockheed ISEE-1 data are still, at the time of this report, the only substantial ion composition data in the sub-keV to keV energy range available from the magnetotail beyond 9 R(sub E), because of various technical problems with ion mass spectrometers on later missions, and are therefore a unique source of information about the mixing of solar and terrestrial origin plasmas in the tail, within the ISEE-1 apogee of almost 23 R(sub E). The entire set of archived data used in this study, covering the 4.5 years of operation of the instrument and comprising not only tail measurements but also data from the inner magnetosphere as well as data from outside the magnetopause, is now available to the public via the WorldWideWeb at the address: http://cis.spasci.com/ISEE_ions The fundamental assumption of this and other studies of magnetosphere ion composition is that He++ and O+ ions are virtually certain "tags" of solar and terrestrial origins, respectively. This is an assumption with strong theoretical basis and it is corroborated by observational evidence, including the often substantial differences between the velocity distribution functions of those two species. The H+ ions can have a dual origin, in principle, but the close resemblance in the ISEE-1 data between the dynamics of H+ and He++ ions indicates a predominantly solar origin of the H+ ions in the tail, at least. By the same token, the usually minor He+ ions are probably almost entirely of terrestrial origin, because of their similarity to the O

  1. Investigation of the Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to infer, by statistical means, the most probable mode of entry of solar wind plasma into Earth's magnetotail, using a particular set of archived data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE-1) satellite, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the 1970's and 80's. Despite their considerable age, the Lockheed ISEE-1 data are still, at the time of this report, the only substantial ion composition data in the sub-keV to keV energy range available from the magnetotail beyond 9 RE, because of various technical problems with ion mass spectrometers on later missions, and are therefore a unique source of information about the mixing of solar and terrestrial origin plasmas in the tail, within the ISEE-1 apogee of almost 23 RE. The entire set of archived data used in this study, covering the 4.5 years of operation of the instrument and comprising not only tail measurements but also data from the inner magnetosphere as well as data from outside the magnetopause, is now available to the public via the WorldWideWeb at the address: http://cis.spasci.com/ISEE_ions The fundamental assumption of this and other studies of magnetosphere ion composition is that He++ and O+ ions are virtually certain "tags" of solar and terrestrial origins, respectively. This is an assumption with strong theoretical basis and it is corroborated by observational evidence, including the often substantial differences between the velocity distribution functions of those two species. The H+ ions can have a dual origin, in principle, but the close resemblance in the ISEE-1 data between the dynamics of H+ and He++ ions indicates a predominantly solar origin of the H+ ions in the tail, at least. By the same token, the usually minor He+ ions are probably almost entirely of terrestrial origin, because of their similarity to the O+ ions.

  2. Public Science: From Earth to the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, K. K.; Watzke, M.

    2012-09-01

    This talk will describe how the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) was used to launch a new initiative of science outreach, which the authors describe as "public science." The enormous scope and range of IYA2009 allowed From Earth to the Universe (FETTU) to reach millions of people around the globe by putting large-scale astronomical images into public and community-based settings such as parks, metro stations, libraries, and more. Currently, its derivative project, From Earth to the Solar System (FETTSS), continues the implementation of this public science paradigm. Public science projects, like FETTU and FETTSS, are very much akin to public art, which attempts to gain attention and expose large numbers of people to its content. Can such public science projects be used to increase exposure and awareness for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) topics? This talk will briefly describe some of the measureable outcomes in this area found in FETTU, which have already been published in scholarly journals. We will also share some preliminary findings from new data being collected from FETTSS, as well as discuss other public science projects in development. The presenter will finally explore how this concept of public science may be useful for science communication efforts in the future.

  3. Ra: The Sun for Science and Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    To guide the development of the Ra Strategic Framework, we defined scientific and applications objectives. For our primary areas of scientific interest, we choose the corona, the solar wind, the Sun's effect on the Earth, and solar theory and model development. For secondary areas of scientific interest, we selected sunspots, the solar constant, the Sun's gravitational field, helioseismology and the galactic cosmic rays. We stress the importance of stereoscopic imaging, observations at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions, as well as of long duration measurements. Further exploration of the Sun's polar regions is also important, as shown already by the Ulysses mission. From an applications perspective, we adopted three broad objectives that would derive complementary inputs for the Strategic Framework. These were to identify and investigate: possible application spin-offs from science missions, possible solar-terrestrial missions dedicated to a particular application, and possible future applications that require technology development. The Sun can be viewed as both a source of resources and of threats. Our principal applications focus was that of threat mitigation, by examining ways to improve solar threat monitoring and early warning systems. We compared these objectives to the mission objectives of past, current, and planned international solar missions. Past missions (1962-1980) seem to have been focused on improvement of scientific knowledge, using multiple instrument spacecraft. A ten year gap followed this period, during which the results from previous missions were analyzed and solar study programmes were prepared in international organizations. Current missions (1990-1996) focus on particular topics such as the corona, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections. In planned missions, Sun/Earth interactions and environmental effects of solar activity are becoming more important. The corona is the centre of interest of almost all planned missions

  4. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — II: The Theory of a Gaseous Sun and Jeans' Failed Liquid Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of solar theory is followed from the concept that the Sun was an ethereal nuclear body with a partially condensed photosphere to the creation of a fully gaseous object. An overview will be presented of the liquid Sun. A powerful lineage has brought us the gaseous Sun and two of its main authors were the direct sci- entific descendants of Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Franz Arthur Friedrich Schuster and Arthur Stanley Eddington. It will be discovered that the seminal ideas of Father Secchi and Herv ́ e Faye were not abandoned by astronomy until the beginning of 20th century. The central role of carbon in early solar physics will also be highlighted by revisit- ing George Johnstone Stoney. The evolution of the gaseous models will be outlined, along with the contributions of Johann Karl Friedrich Z ̈ ollner, James Clerk Maxwell, Jonathan Homer Lane, August Ritter, William Thomson, William Huggins, William Edward Wilson, George Francis FitzGerald, Jacob Robert Emden, Frank Washington Very, Karl Schwarzschild, and Edward Arthur Milne. Finally, with the aid of Edward Arthur Milne, the work of James Hopwood Jeans, the last modern advocate of a liquid Sun, will be rediscovered. Jeans was a staunch advocate of the condensed phase, but deprived of a proper building block, he would eventually abandon his non-gaseous stars. For his part, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar would spend nine years of his life studying homogeneous liquid masses. These were precisely the kind of objects which Jeans had considered for his liquid stars.

  5. POlarization Emission of Millimeter Activity at the Sun (POEMAS): New Circular Polarization Solar Telescopes at Two Millimeter Wavelength Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valio, Adriana; Kaufmann, P.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Raulin, J.-P.; Fernandes, L. O. T.; Marun, A.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new system of two circular polarization solar radio telescopes, POEMAS, for observations of the Sun at 45 and 90 GHz. The novel characteristic of these instruments is the capability to measure circular right- and left-hand polarizations at these high frequencies. The two frequencies were chosen so as to bridge the gap at radio frequencies between 20 and 200 GHz of solar flare spectra. The telescopes, installed at CASLEO Observatory (Argentina), observe the full disk of the Sun with a half power beam width of 1.4∘, a time resolution of 10 ms at both frequencies, a sensitivity of 2 - 4 K that corresponds to 4 and 20 solar flux unit (=104 Jy), considering aperture efficiencies of 50±5 % and 75±8 % at 45 and 90 GHz, respectively. The telescope system saw first light in November 2011 and is satisfactorily operating daily since then. A few flares were observed and are presented here. The millimeter spectra of some flares are seen to rise toward higher frequencies, indicating the presence of a new spectral component distinct from the microwave one.

  6. solarFLAG hare and hounds: estimation of p-mode frequencies from Sun-as-star helioseismology data

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Reyes, S J; García, R A; Appourchaux, T; Baudin, F; Boumier, P; Elsworth, Y; Fletcher, S T; Lazrek, M; Leibacher, J W; Lochard, J; New, R; Regulo, C; Salabert, D; Toutain, T; Verner, G A; Wachter, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of the latest solarFLAG hare-and-hounds exercise, which was concerned with testing methods for extraction of frequencies of low-degree solar p modes from data collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. We have used the new solarFLAG simulator, which includes the effects of correlated mode excitation and correlations with background noise, to make artificial timeseries data that mimic Doppler velocity observations of the Sun as a star. The correlations give rise to asymmetry of mode peaks in the frequency power spectrum. Ten members of the group (the hounds) applied their ``peak bagging'' codes to a 3456-day dataset, and the estimated mode frequencies were returned to the hare (who was WJC) for comparison. Analysis of the results reveals a systematic bias in the estimated frequencies of modes above approximately 1.8 mHz. The bias is negative, meaning the estimated frequencies systematically underestimate the input frequencies. We identify two sources that are the dominant contributions t...

  7. Solar Cells from Earth-Abundant Semiconductors with Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwater, Harry

    2012-04-30

    Progress is reported in these areas: Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin Film a-Si Solar Cells; Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin InGaN Quantum Well Solar Cells; and Earth Abundant Cu{sub 2}O and Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} Solar Cells.

  8. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere is the site of weak emission lines characterizing the flash spectrum observed for a few seconds during a total eclipse. This layer of the solar atmosphere is known to possess an opaque Hα emission and a great number of spicules, which can extend well above the photosphere. A stunning variety of hydrogen emission lines have been observed in this region. The production of these lines has provided the seventeenth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A critical assessment of current and primordial helium levels in Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 35–47. Contrary to the gaseous solar models, the simplest mechanism for the production of emission lines is the evaporation of excited atoms from condensed surfaces existing within the chromosphere, as found in spicules. This is reminiscent of the chemiluminescence which occurs during the condensation of silver clusters (Konig L., Rabin I., Schultze W., and Ertl G. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters. Science, v. 274, no. 5291, 1353–1355. The process associated with spicule formation is an exothermic one, requiring the transport of energy away from the site of condensation. As atoms leave localized surfaces, their electrons can occupy any energy level and, hence, a wide variety of emission lines are produced. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the presence of hydrides on the Sun can also facilitate hydrogen condensation in the chromosphere. The associated line emission from main group and transition elements constitutes the thirtieth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter. Condensation processes also help to explain why spicules manifest an apparently constant temperature over their entire length. Since the corona supports magnetic field lines, the random orientations associated with spicule formation suggests that the hydrogen condensates in the chromosphere are not metallic in

  9. Nearest star the surprising science of our sun

    CERN Document Server

    Golub, Leon

    2014-01-01

    How did the Sun evolve, and what will it become? What is the origin of its light and heat? How does solar activity affect the atmospheric conditions that make life on Earth possible? These are the questions at the heart of solar physics, and at the core of this book. The Sun is the only star near enough to study in sufficient detail to provide rigorous tests of our theories and help us understand the more distant and exotic objects throughout the cosmos. Having observed the Sun using both ground-based and spaceborne instruments, the authors bring their extensive personal experience to this sto

  10. Using the EUV to Weigh a Sun-Grazing Comet as it Disappears in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, William Dean; Schrijiver, Carolus J.; Brown, John C.; Battams, Karl; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Hudson Hugh S.; Lui, Wei

    2012-01-01

    On July 6,2011, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AlA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed a comet in most of its EUY passbands. The comet disappeared while moving through the solar corona. The comet penetrated to 0.146 solar radii ($\\simapprox.100,000 km) above the photosphere before its EUY faded. Before then, the comet's coma and a tail were observed in absorption and emission, respectively. The material in the variable tail quickly fell behind the nucleus. An estimate of the comet's mass based on this effect, one derived from insolation, and one using the tail's EUY brightness, all yield $\\sim 50$ giga-grams some 10 minutes prior to the end of its visibility. These unique first observations herald a new era in the study of Sun-grazing comets close to their perihelia and of the conditions in the solar corona and solar wind. We will discuss the observations and interpretation of the comet by SDO as well as the coronagraph observations from SOHO and STEREO. A search of the SOHO comet archive for other comets that could be observed in the SDO; AlA EUY channels will be described

  11. Little Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  12. Little sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2017-01-01

    the ideas of Alfred Gell’s anthropology of art and the indicative framework derived from Argentinian semiotician Juan Pablo Bonta and Jørn Guldberg. The toy-like solar lamp Little Sun by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen is used as case that blends the registers of social design and art......, and as an example of how designers attempt to determine meaning potentials through design in a complex interplay of different strategies. In the final analysis, what characterise objects like Little Sun is seldom that they communicate their meanings in themselves, but instead rely on forceful mediations to gain...

  13. Student Mastery of the Sun-Earth-Moon System in a Flipped Classroom of Pre-service Elementary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    One of the current trends in pedagogy at all levels(K-college) is the so-called ‘flipped classroom’, in which students prepare for a class meeting through self-study of the material. It is based on a rejection of the classic model of the faculty member as the ‘sage on the stage’ instead, responsibility for learning shifts to the individual student. The faculty member takes on the role of learning facilitator or mentor, and focuses the students’ learning by crafting and administering timely formative assessments (in multiple formats and applied multiple times) that aid both students and the faculty member in tracking the students’ mastery of the learning outcomes. In a flipped, freshman-only, section of SCI 111 Elementary Earth-Physical Sciences (a required introductory science course for pre-service elementary school teachers) the students learned through a combination of individual and group hands-on in-class activities, technology (including PowerPoint presentations and short videos viewed prior to attending class), in-class worksheets, and in-class discussions. Students self-differentiated in how they interacted with the available teaching materials, deciding which activities to spend the most time on based on their individual needs (based on an online quiz taken the night before the class period, and their personal self-confidence with the material). Available in-class activities and worksheets were developed by the faculty member based on student scores on the online quiz as well as personal messages submitted through the course management system the night before the class meeting. While this placed a significant burden on the faculty member in terms of course preparation, it allowed for just-in-time teaching to take place. This poster describes the results of student mastery of content centered on the sun-earth-moon system (specifically seasons, moon phases, and eclipses) as compared to traditional classroom sections.

  14. Transport of Solar Wind Across Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Yang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Fu, S.; Canu, P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Hong, J.

    2015-12-01

    Observations have established that about 20% of the solar wind (SW) is reflected and 80% directly transmitted across Earth's bow shock (Skopke et al, Adv. Space Sci., 15, No. 8/9, 269, 1995). The transmitted SW is not immediately thermalized and the magnetosheath plasma distribution can remain non-Maxwellian for a long time. Cluster observations have further established that most of the magnetosheath bulk flow remains super-Alfvenic except in the polar altitudes near the cusp region (Longmore et al., Anna. Geophysicae, 23, 3351-3364, 2005). We have studied SW ion distributions before and after entering the bow shock to examine the details of the solar wind-bow shock interaction. Preliminary findings indicate that a typical SW H+ beam with thermal kT ~10 eV drifting at 400 km/s in front of the bow shock appears as ~12 eV beam drifting at 250 km/s after it penetrates the shock barrier. The small kT increase is possibly due to wave-particle interaction at the boundary. While the He++ ion beam kT behaves similarly as H+ ions, the drift velocities of He++ ions do not always slow down as H+ ions. These observations indicate the physics of SW-bow shock interaction is much more complicated than the models that explain SW slow down as resulting from an electrostatic potential at the shock that decelerates the SW. We have started PIC simulation of SW transport across the bow shock and the results will be presented together with observations.

  15. Research on Control Method of Keeping Flight Formation by Using SDRE on the Sun-Earth Libration Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhenqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Keeping the flying formation of spacecraft is a key problem which needs to be solved in deep space exploration missions. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamic model of formation flying is established and a series of transformations are carried out on this model equation. By using SDRE (State-Dependent Riccati Equation algorithm, the optimal control of flying formation is realized. Compared with the traditional control method based on the average orbit elements and LQR (Linear Quadratic Regulator control method, the SDRE control method has higher control precision and is more suitable for the advantages of continuous control in practical engineering. Finally, the parameter values of the sun-earth libration point L2 are substituted in the equation and simulation is performed. The simulation curves of SDRE controller are compared with LQR controller. The results show that the SDRE controllers time cost is less than the LQR controllers and the former’s fuel consumption is less than the latter’s in the system transition process.

  16. CHANG'E-2 lunar escape maneuvers to the Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Yong; Cao, Jianfeng; Hu, Songjie; Tang, Geshi; Xie, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses lunar escape maneuvers of the first Chinese Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission by the CHANG'E-2 satellite, which is also the world's first satellite to reach the L2 point from a lunar orbit. The lunar escape maneuvers are heavily constrained by the remaining propellant and the condition of telemetry, track and command, among others. First, these constraints are analyzed and summarized to design a target L2 Lissajous orbit and an initial transfer trajectory. Second, the maneuver mathematical models are studied. The multilevel maneuver schemes which consist of phasing maneuvers and a final lunar escape maneuver are designed for actual operations. Based on the scheme analysis and comparison, the 2-maneuver scheme with a 5.3-h-period phasing orbit is ultimately selected. Finally, the mission status based on the scheme is presented and the control operation results are discussed in detail. The methodology in this paper is especially beneficial and applicable to a future multi-mission instance in the deep space exploration.

  17. Spacecraft Formation Flying near Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange Point: Trajectory Generation and Adaptive Full-State Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hong; Kapila, Vikram

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for trajectory generation and adaptive full-state feedback control to facilitate spacecraft formation flying near the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Specifically, the dynamics of a spacecraft in the neighborhood of a Halo orbit reveals that there exist quasi-periodic orbits surrounding the Halo orbit. Thus, a spacecraft formation is created by placing a leader spacecraft on a desired Halo orbit and placing follower spacecraft on desired quasi-periodic orbits. To produce a formation maintenance controller, we first develop the nonlinear dynamics of a follower spacecraft relative to the leader spacecraft. We assume that the leader spacecraft is on a desired Halo orbit trajectory and the follower spacecraft is to track a desired quasi-periodic orbit surrounding the Halo orbit. Then, we design an adaptive, full-state feedback position tracking controller for the follower spacecraft providing an adaptive compensation for the unknown mass of the follower spacecraft. The proposed control law is simulated for the case of the leader and follower spacecraft pair and is shown to yield global, asymptotic convergence of the relative position tracking errors.

  18. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VI. Helium in the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen and hydrides have recently been advanced as vital agents in the generation of emission spectra in the chromosphere. This is a result of the role they play in the formation of condensed hydrogen structures (CHS within the chromosphere (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, 15–21. Next to hydrogen, helium is perhaps the most intriguing component in this region of the Sun. Much like other elements, which combine with hydrogen to produce hydrides, helium can form the well-known helium hydride molecular ion, HeH+, and the excited neutral helium hydride molecule, HeH∗. While HeH+ is hypothesized to be a key cosmologicalmolecule, its possible presence in the Sun, and that of its excited neutral counterpart, has not been considered. Still, these hydrides are likely to play a role in the synthesis of CHS, as the He I and He II emission lines strongly suggest. In this regard, the study of helium emission spectra can provide insight into the condensed nature of the Sun, especially when considering the 10830 Å line associated with the 23P→2 3S triplet state transition. This line is strong in solar prominences and can be seen clearly on the disk. The excessive population of helium triplet states cannot be adequately explained using the gaseous models, since these states should be depopulated by collisional processes. Conversely, when He-based molecules are used to build CHS in a liquid metallic hydrogen model, an ever increasing population of the 23S and 23P states might be expected. The overpopulation of these triplet states leads to the conclusion that these emission lines are unlikely to be produced through random collisional or photon excitation, as required by the gaseous models. This provides a significant hurdle for these models. Thus, the strong 23P→2 3S lines and the overpopulation of the helium triplet

  19. Radioactive Probes of the Supernova-Contaminated Solar Nebula: Evidence that the Sun was Born in a Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Looney, L W; Fields, B D; Looney, Leslie W.; Tobin, John J.; Fields, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    We construct a simple model for radioisotopic enrichment of the protosolar nebula by injection from a nearby supernova, based on the inverse square law for ejecta dispersion. We find that the presolar radioisotopes abundances (i.e., in solar masses) demand a nearby supernova: its distance can be no larger than 66 times the size of the protosolar nebula, at a 90% confidence level, assuming 1 solar mass of protosolar material. The relevant size of the nebula depends on its state of evolution at the time of radioactivity injection. In one scenario, a collection of low-mass stars, including our sun, formed in a group or cluster with an intermediate- to high-mass star that ended its life as a supernova while our sun was still a protostar, a starless core, or perhaps a diffuse cloud. Using recent observations of protostars to estimate the size of the protosolar nebula constrains the distance of the supernova at 0.02 to 1.6 pc. The supernova distance limit is consistent with the scales of low-mass stars formation ar...

  20. Monitoring Holes in the Sun's Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    by low-latitude coronal holes (holes closer to the Suns equator) and sunspot activity. In contrast, the total area of high-latitude coronal holes (those near the Suns poles) peaks around the minimum in each solar cycle and shrinks around each solar maximum.Predicting the Impact of the Solar WindWhy do these observations matter? Coronal holes are the source of the fast solar wind, so if we can better predict the frequency and locations of coronal holes in the future, we can make better predictions about how the solar wind might impact us here on Earth.Periodicity of high-latitude (orange) and low-latitude (blue) coronal-hole areas, and periodicity of galactic cosmic rays detected at Earth (black). The cosmic rays track the polar coronal-hole area behavior with a 1-year time lag. [Fujiki et al. 2016]In one example of this, Fujiki and collaborators show that theres a distinct correlation between polar coronal-hole area and observed galactic cosmic rays. Cosmic rays from within our galaxy have long been known to exhibit a 22-year periodicity. Fujiki and collaborators show that the periodicity of the galactic cosmic-ray activity tracks that of the polar coronal-hole area, with a ~1-year lag time which is equivalent to the propagation time of the solar wind to the termination shock.Polar coronal holes are therefore a useful observable indicator of the dipole component of the solar magnetic field, which modulates the incoming cosmic rays entering our solar system. This coronal hole database will be a useful tool for understanding the source of solar wind and the many ways the wind influences the Earth and our solar system.CitationK. Fujiki et al 2016 ApJ 827 L41. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/827/2/L41

  1. Grand Challenges in the Physics of the Sun and Sun-like Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The study of stellar structure and evolution is one of the main building blocks of astrophysics, and the Sun has an importance both as the star that is most amenable to detailed study and as the star that has by far the biggest impact on the Earth and near-Earth environment through its radiative and particulate outputs. Over the past decades, studies of stars and of the Sun have become somewhat separate. But in recent years, the rapid advances in asteroseismology, as well as the quest to better understand solar and stellar dynamos, have emphasized once again the synergy between studies of the stars and the Sun. In this article I have selected two "grand challenges" both for their crucial importance and because I thnk that these two problems are tractable to significant progress in the next decade. They are (i) understanding how solar and stellar dynamos generate magnetic field, and (ii) improving the predictability of geo-effective space weather.

  2. Long-term field test of solar PV power generation using one-axis 3-position sun tracker

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2011-09-01

    The 1 axis-3 position (1A-3P) sun tracking PV was built and tested to measure the daily and long-term power generation of the solar PV system. A comparative test using a fixed PV and a 1A-3P tracking PV was carried out with two identical stand-alone solar-powered LED lighting systems. The field test in the particular days shows that the 1A-3P tracking PV can generate 35.8% more electricity than the fixed PV in a partly-cloudy weather with daily-total solar irradiation HT=11.7MJ/m2day, or 35.6% in clear weather with HT=18.5MJ/m2day. This indicates that the present 1A-3P tracking PV can perform very close to a dual-axis continuous tracking PV (Kacira et al., 2004). The long-term outdoor test results have shown that the increase of daily power generation of 1A-3P tracking PV increases with increasing daily-total solar irradiation. The increase of monthly-total power generation for 1A-3P sun tracking PV is between 18.5-28.0%. The total power generation increase in the test period from March 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011, is 23.6% in Taipei (an area of low solar energy resource). The long-term performance of the present 1X-3P tracking PV is shown very close to the 1-axis continuous tracking PV in Taiwan (Chang, 2009). If the 1A-3P tracking PV is used in the area of high solar energy resource with yearly-average HT>17MJ/m2day, the increase of total long-term power generation with respect to fixed PV will be higher than 37.5%. This is very close to that of dual-axis continuous tracking PV. The 1A-3P tracker can be easily mounted on the wall of a building. The cost of the whole tracker is about the same as the regular mounting cost of a conventional rooftop PV system. This means that there is no extra cost for 1A-3P PV mounted on buildings. The 1A-3P PV is quite suitable for building-integrated applications. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A Novel Macroscopic Wave Geometric Effect of the Sunbeam and A Novel Simple Way to show the Earth-Self Rotation and Orbiting around the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, Sang Boo

    2009-01-01

    I present a novel macroscopic wave geometric effect of the sunbeam occurring when the sunbeam directional (shadow by a bar) angle c velocity is observed on the earth surface and a sunbeam global positioning device with a needle at the center of radial angle graph paper. The angle c velocity at sunrise or sunset is found to be same as the rotating rate of swing plane of Foucault pendulum, showing the earth-self rotation. The angle c velocity at noon is found to have an additional term resulted from a novel macroscopic wave geometric effect of the sunbeam. Observing the sunbeam direction same as the earth orbit radial direction, the inclination angle q of the earth rotation axis in relation to the sunbeam front plane is found to be related with the earth orbit angle, describing the earth orbit radial distance. The eccentricity of the earth orbit and a calendar counting days from perihelion are obtained by dq/dt and q measured on the earth surface, showing the earth orbiting around the sun. PACS numbers: 03.65.V...

  4. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyin, Hexi; CHEN Yang; Li, Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small...

  5. 15 million degrees a journey to the centre of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Light takes eight minutes to reach Earth from the surface of the Sun. But its journey within the Sun takes hundreds of thousands of years. What is going on in there? What are light and heat? How does the Sun produce them and how on earth did scientists discover this? In this astonishing and enlightening adventure, you'll travel millions of miles from inside the Sun to its surface and to Earth, where the light at the end of its journey is allowing you to read right now. You'll discover how the Sun works (including what it sounds like), the latest research in solar physics and how a solar storm could threaten everything we know. And you'll meet the groundbreaking scientists, including the author, who pieced this extraordinary story together.

  6. The sun emulator: A means for achieving the widespread acceptance of solar responsive design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, N.M. [Auburn University College of Architecture, Design, and Construction, AL (United States)

    2004-07-01

    It is hard to believe that a rather simple mechanical device could be a such a powerful teaching and design tool. It is also hard to believe that such a device could have a major impact on our energy future, the environment, and especially global warming. My 27 year teaching experience with heliodons makes me believe that ''conceptually clear'' heliodons truly are powerful teaching tools that can greatly convince and motivate people. Also since they never wear out and will never become obsolete, they are a good investment for creating a better future. More information about the Sun Emulator is available from my Auburn University website: www.cadc.auburn.edu/sun-emulator and the manufacturer's website: www.hpd-online.com (orig.)

  7. Paper-Thin Plastic Film Soaks Up Sun to Create Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A non-crystallized silicon known as amorphous silicon is the semiconductor material most frequently chosen for deposition, because it is a strong absorber of light. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, amorphous silicon absorbs solar radiation 40 times more efficiently than single-crystal silicon, and a thin film only about 1-micrometer (one one-millionth of a meter) thick containing amorphous silicon can absorb 90 percent of the usable light energy shining on it. Peak efficiency and significant reduction in the use of semiconductor and thin film materials translate directly into time and money savings for manufacturers. Thanks in part to NASA, thin film solar cells derived from amorphous silicon are gaining more and more attention in a market that has otherwise been dominated by mono- and poly-crystalline silicon cells for years. At Glenn Research Center, the Photovoltaic & Space Environments Branch conducts research focused on developing this type of thin film solar cell for space applications. Placing solar cells on thin film materials provides NASA with an attractively priced solution to fabricating other types of solar cells, given that thin film solar cells require significantly less semiconductor material to generate power. Using the super-lightweight solar materials also affords NASA the opportunity to cut down on payload weight during vehicle launches, as well as the weight of spacecraft being sent into orbit.

  8. Statistical characterization of Strong and Mid Solar Flares and Sun EUV rate monitoring with GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Beniguel, Yannick; Orus-Perez, Raul; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The global network of permanent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers has become an useful and affordable way of monitoring the Solar EUV flux rate, especially -for the time being- in the context of Major and Mid geoeffective intensity Solar Flares (M. Hernandez-Pajares et al., Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000826, 2012). In fact the maturity of this technique (GNSS Solar FLAre Indicator, GSFLAI) has allowed to incorporate it in operational real-time (RT) conditions, thanks to the availability of global GNSS datastreams from the RT International GNSS Network (M. Caissy et al, GPS World, June 1, 2012), and performed in the context of the MONITOR and MONITOR2 ESA-funded projects (Y. Beniguel et al., NAVITEC Proc., 978-1-4673-2011-5 IEEE, 2012). The main goal of this presentation is to summarize a detailed recent study of the statistical properties of Solar Flares (E. Monte and M. Hernandez-Pajares, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2014JA020206, 2014) by considering the GNSS proxy of EUV rate (GSFLAI parameter) computed independently each 30 seconds during the whole last solar cycle. An statistical model has been characterized that explains the empirical results such as (a) the persistence and presence of bursts of solar flares and (b) their long tail peak values of the solar flux variation, which can be characterized by: (1) A fractional Brownian model for the long-term dependence, and (2), a power law distribution for the time series extreme values. Finally, an update of the Solar Flares' occurrence during the recent months of Solar Activity, gathered in RT within MONITOR2 project, will close the paper.

  9. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  10. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  11. The sun and space weather Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    This second edition is a great enhancement of literature which will help the reader get deeper into the specific topics. There are new sections included such as space weather data sources and examples, new satellite missions, and the latest results. At the end a comprehensive index is given which will allow the reader to quickly find his topics of interest. The Sun and Space weather are two rapidly evolving topics. The importance of the Sun for the Earth, life on Earth, climate and weather processes was recognized long ago by the ancients. Now, for the first time there is a continuous surveillance of solar activity at nearly all wavelengths. These data can be used to improve our understanding of the complex Sun-Earth interaction. The first chapters of the book deal with the Sun as a star and its activity phenomena as well as its activity cycle in order to understand the complex physics of the Sun-Earth system. The reader will see that there are many phenomena but still no definite explanations and models exis...

  12. Space Moves: Adding Movement to Solar System Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Deborah Bainer; Heidorn, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Earth and space science figure prominently in the National Science Education Standards for levels 5-8 (NRC 1996). The Earth in the Solar System standard focuses on students' ability to understand (1) the composition of the solar system (Earth, Moon, Sun, planets with their moons, and smaller objects like asteroids and comets) and (2) that…

  13. Space Moves: Adding Movement to Solar System Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Deborah Bainer; Heidorn, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Earth and space science figure prominently in the National Science Education Standards for levels 5-8 (NRC 1996). The Earth in the Solar System standard focuses on students' ability to understand (1) the composition of the solar system (Earth, Moon, Sun, planets with their moons, and smaller objects like asteroids and comets) and (2) that…

  14. Space Science for Children: All about the Sun [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape aims to give children, grades K-4, a broad understanding of the center of our solar system, the sun. It explains how the sun provides us with life-giving light and heat, how it's responsible for our seasons and weather, and why it's the primary source of energy on Earth. A hands-on activity in which children create their…

  15. Solar radiation as a forest management tool: a primer of principles and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard G. Halverson; James L. Smith

    1979-01-01

    Forests are products of solar radiation use. The sun also drives the hydrologic cycle on forested watersheds. Some basic concepts of climatology and solar radiation are summarized in including earth-sun relations, polar tilt, solar energy, terrestrial energy, energy balance, and local energy. An example shows how these principles can be applied in resource management....

  16. The achievements of solar children from the natural created octave whose source is the emanating sun reflected by the Foundation for Solar Achievement with the Arts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petacchi, D.V. [Foundation for Solar Achievement with the Arts, Hobart, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Foundation for Solar Achievement With The Arts is a not-for-profit school training gifted children in the use of their talent in accordance with the philosophy and experience that children in harmony with their natural environment based upon the sun`s position in the course of the day have the greater capacity of attention necessary to enhance learning and creativity. Uncluttered as much as possible by the distractions of technology or the artificial glare of electricity, the learning environment of the Foundation for Solar Achievement With The Arts is conducive to this hands-on action. The Foundation was started by an individual whose life long search for the meaning of his life and whose pondering on the meaning human life on this planet led him to many conclusions modern science is just beginning to reach. With the help of dedicated architect John Jehring and likeminded others, Mr. Petacchi is utilizing natural sunlight in an environment conducive to the psyche of children. A building is planned that will expand into indoor form the natural lighting and free space of the out-of-doors.

  17. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  18. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  19. The acoustic cut-off frequency of the Sun and the solar magnetic activity cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, A; Palle, P L

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic cut-off frequency -the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes- is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but traveling waves. Interference amongst them give rise to higher-frequency peaks -the pseudomodes- in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p modes making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cut-off frequency. Using data from GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the SOHO spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cut-off frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 till the present), a variation in the acoustic cut-off frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  20. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M; Spence, Harlan E; Schwadron, Nathan A

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  1. CORONAL HEATING BY THE INTERACTION BETWEEN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE QUIET SUN OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, Feng; Peter, Hardi, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: lepingli@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: chen@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: peter@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS), D-37077, Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    The question of what heats the solar corona remains one of the most important puzzles in solar physics and astrophysics. Here we report Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of coronal heating by the interaction between emerging active regions (EARs) and the surrounding quiet Sun (QS). The EARs continuously interact with the surrounding QS, resulting in dark ribbons which appear at the boundary of the EARs and the QS. The dark ribbons visible in extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths propagate away from the EARs with speeds of a few km s{sup −1}. The regions swept by the dark ribbons are brightening afterward, with the mean temperature increasing by one quarter. The observational findings demonstrate that uninterrupted magnetic reconnection between EARs and the QS occurs. When the EARs develop, the reconnection continues. The dark ribbons may be the track of the interface between the reconnected magnetic fields and the undisturbed QS’s fields. The propagating speed of the dark ribbons reflects the reconnection rate and is consistent with our numerical simulation. A long-term coronal heating which occurs in turn from nearby the EARs to far away from the EARs is proposed.

  2. Can the Solar Wind be Driven by Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun's Magnetic Carpet?

    OpenAIRE

    Cranmer, Steven R.; van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.

    2010-01-01

    The physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind remain unknown after many years of study. Some have suggested that the wind is driven by waves and turbulence in open magnetic flux tubes, and others have suggested that plasma is injected into the open tubes by magnetic reconnection with closed loops. In order to test the latter idea, we developed Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric "magnetic carpet" and extrapolated the time-varying coronal field. These ...

  3. The State of Self-Organized Criticality of the Sun During the Last 3 Solar Cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the occurrence frequency distributions of peak fluxes $P$, total fluxes $E$, and durations $T$ of solar flares over the last three solar cycles (during 1980-2010) from hard X-ray data of HXRBS/SMM, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. From the synthesized data we find powerlaw slopes with mean values of $\\alpha_P=1.75\\pm0.05$ for the peak flux, $\\alpha_E=1.61\\pm0.04$ for the total flux, and $\\alpha_T=2.08\\pm0.10$ for flare durations. We find no evidence that these frequency distributions have significantly different slopes during the minima of the solar cycles, including the current anomalously extended solar minimum. The powerlaw distributions can be interpreted in terms of a nonlinear dissipative system in the state of self-organized criticality (SOC). The invariance of the powerlaw slopes during the solar cycles, despite of the nonstationarity of the flare rate by orders of magnitude, implies a universal behavior in the nonlinear growth evolution of magnetic instabilities in solar flares, independent of a sl...

  4. Precise nuclear physics for the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemmerer, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    For many centuries, the study of the Sun has been an important testbed for understanding stars that are further away. One of the first astronomical observations Galileo Galilei made in 1612 with the newly invented telescope concerned the sunspots, and in 1814, Joseph von Fraunhofer employed his new spectroscope to discover the absorption lines in the solar spectrum that are now named after him. Even though more refined and new modes of observation are now available than in the days of Galileo and Fraunhofer, the study of the Sun is still high on the agenda of contemporary science, due to three guiding interests. The first is connected to the ages-old human striving to understand the structure of the larger world surrounding us. Modern telescopes, some of them even based outside the Earth's atmosphere in space, have succeeded in observing astronomical objects that are billions of light-years away. However, for practical reasons precision data that are important for understanding stars can still only be gained from the Sun. In a sense, the observations of far-away astronomical objects thus call for a more precise study of the closeby, of the Sun, for their interpretation. The second interest stems from the human desire to understand the essence of the world, in particular the elementary particles of which it consists. Large accelerators have been constructed to produce and collide these particles. However, man-made machines can never be as luminous as the Sun when it comes to producing particles. Solar neutrinos have thus served not only as an astronomical tool to understand the Sun's inner workings, but their behavior on the way from the Sun to the Earth is also being studied with the aim to understand their nature and interactions. The third interest is strictly connected to life on Earth. A multitude of research has shown that even relatively slight changes in the Earth's climate may strongly affect the living conditions in a number of densely

  5. NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-10-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique - sequential cation mutation - to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment.

  6. The ancient Chinese solar eclipse records and the secular changes in the rotation of the earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiyu

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses and analyses the ancient Chinese solar eclipse records (before the end of Ming Dynasty) in the literature. The author selects thirteen total (annular) solare eclipse records with explicit places of observation from these data and probes into the tendency of secular changes in the rotation of the earth.

  7. Using the Solar Eclipse to Estimate Earth's Distance from the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Mikolaj

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the reasoning behind the determination of the distance from Earth to the Moon by the Greek philosopher Aristarchus upon observing a lunar eclipse. Presents calculations for estimating Earth's distance from the Moon using simple observations made during a solar eclipse. (JRH)

  8. Using the Solar Eclipse to Estimate Earth's Distance from the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Mikolaj

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the reasoning behind the determination of the distance from Earth to the Moon by the Greek philosopher Aristarchus upon observing a lunar eclipse. Presents calculations for estimating Earth's distance from the Moon using simple observations made during a solar eclipse. (JRH)

  9. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  10. On the Path to SunShot. The Environmental and Public Health Benefits of Achieving High Solar Penetrations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Millstein, Dev [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carpenter, Alberta [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cohen, Stuart [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Frew, Bethany [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Compared with fossil fuel generators, photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) produce far lower lifecycle levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and harmful pollutants including fine particular matter (PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). In this report, we monetize the emission reductions from achieving the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot deployment goals: 14% of U.S. electricity demand met by solar in 2030 and 27% in 2050. We estimate that achieving these goals could reduce cumulative power-sector GHG emissions by 10% between 2015 and 2050, resulting in savings of $238-$252 billion. This is equivalent to 2.0-2.2 cents per kilowatt-hour of solar installed (cents/kWh-solar). Similarly, realizing these levels of solar deployment could reduce cumulative power-sector emissions of PM2.5 by 8%, SO2 by 9%, and NOx by 11% between 2015 and 2050. This could produce $167 billion in savings from lower future health and environmental damages, or 1.4 cents/kWh-solar--while also preventing 25,000-59,000 premature deaths. To put this in perspective, this estimated combined benefit of 3.5 cents/kWh-solar due to SunShot-level solar deployment is approximately equal to the additional levelized cost of electricity reduction needed to make unsubsidized utility-scale solar competitive with conventional generators today. In addition, the analysis shows that achieving the SunShot goals could save 4% of total power-sector water withdrawals and 9% of total power-sector water consumption over the 2015-2050 period--a particularly important consideration for arid states where substantial solar will be deployed. These results have potential implications for policy innovation and the economic competitiveness of solar and other generation technologies.

  11. Sidebands alongside the diurnal frequencies of radon time series in a simulation experiment -- an indication for a direct association with the earth-sun system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Gideon; Sturrock, Peter A.; Piatibratova, Oksana; Kotlarsky, Peter

    2015-04-01

    -linear interaction. The observed patterns of diurnal periodicities together with the associated Sb and their multiples can be demonstrated by statistical simulation using polynomial combinations of these sinusoidal waveforms. Notwithstanding, at this stage the identification of the underlying physical and geophysical processes remains open. The observation of sidebands around S1 at the specific periodicities indicates that the periodic signals in the radon time series of the experiment are directly related to the cyclic rotational relations in the earth-sun system. This in turn is an independent confirmation of the notion that these signals are influenced by a component in solar radiation [1, 2]. 1. Steinitz, G., Piatibratova, O., Kotlarsky, P., 2011. Possible effect of solar tides on radon signals. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 102, 749-765. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2011.04.002. 2. Sturrock, P.A., Steinitz, G., Fischbach, E., Javorsek, D. and Jenkins, J.H., 2012. Analysis of Gamma Radiation from a Radon Source: Indications of a Solar Influence. Astroparticle Physics, 36/1, 18-26.

  12. [Multifocal electroretinogram for assessing sun damage following the solar eclipse of 11 August 1999].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, G; Uzel, J L; Sahel, J; Flament, J

    2002-04-01

    Following the eclipse of 11 August 1999, the ophthalmological clinic of Strasbourg cared for 4 patients who suffered from sun damage. The multifocal electroretinogram (ERG) carried out on our first patient enabled us to not only confirm the existence of a residual maculopathy as shown by the static visual field, but also, and above all to quantify the foveolar deficit. Moreover, with the other 3 patients, the multifocal ERG enabled us to detect a foveolar deficit completely overlooked by the other usual tests. In light of our clinical study, we can assert that the multifocal ERG has yet to be equaled by any other test for analysis of macular function.

  13. Alterations in fruit and vegetable β-carotene and vitamin C content caused by open-sun drying, visqueen-covered and polyethylene-covered solar-dryers

    OpenAIRE

    Ndawula, J; Kabasa, JD; Byaruhanga, YB

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three drying methods (open sun drying, visqueen-covered solar dryer and polyethylene-covered solar dryer) on b-carotene and vitamin C content of edible portions of mango fruit (Mangifera indica) and cowpea leaves (Vigna unguiculata). Commercial samples were analysed for vitamin C by titrimetry and b-carotene by spectrophotometery at 450nm. Differences in vitamin retention and loss associated with the three drying methods were assessed by analysis of vari...

  14. The Structure and Properties of Solar Active Regions and Quiet Sun Areas Observed With SERTS and YOHKOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, J. W.; Davila, J. M.; Thomas, R. J.; Hara, H.

    1996-05-01

    We observed solar active regions, quiet sun areas, and a coronal hole simultaneously with Goddard Space Flight Center's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS), and with the Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) on 1993 August 17. SERTS provided spatially resolved active region and quiet sun spectra in the 280 to 420 Angstroms wavelength range, and images in the lines of He II 304 Angstroms, Mg IX 368 Angstroms, Fe XV 284 Angstroms, and Fe XVI 335 Angstroms and 360 Angstroms. The SERTS waveband is accessible to CDS, SUMER, and EIT on SOHO. SXT provided images through multiple broadband filters. The SERTS images in Fe XV (T=2 MK) and XVI (T=2.5 MK) exhibit remarkable morphological similarity to the SXT images. Whereas the Fe XV and XVI images outline the loop structures seen with SXT, the cooler He II (T=0.1 MK) and Mg IX (T=1 MK) images seem to outline loop footpoints. From the spatially resolved spectra, we obtained emission line profiles for lines of Fe X (1 MK) through Fe XVI, and Mg IX and Ni XVIII (3.2 MK) for each spatial position. Based upon the spatial variations of the line intensities, the active region systematically narrows as it is viewed with successively hotter lines. The active region appears narrowest in the X-ray emission, which is consistent with our understanding that Yohkoh is most sensitive to the hottest plasma in its line of sight. EUV emission from Fe XVII (T=5 MK) is weak but detectable in the active region core. The most intense, central core straddles the magnetic neutral line. Temperature maps obtained with SERTS image ratios and with SXT filter ratios are compared. Line intensity ratios indicate that the active region temperature is greatest in the central core, but that the density varies very little across the region. Significant Doppler shifts are not detected in the EUV lines.

  15. Impacts to Electric Power Grid Infrastructures From the Violent Sun-Earth Connection Events of October-November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappenman, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    The solar flare activity of October-November 2003 reached historic intensity levels and produced several large Earth-directed CME's that had the potential to cause historically large geomagnetic storms as well. These CME's did cause various geomagnetic storm indices, particularly the regional K and Planetary Kp index, to reach maximum levels for many hours. However, the resulting geomagnetic storms, while causing isolated and important disruptions to power grids, were not of historically large size when considering the rate-of-change of regional geomagnetic fields in many locations. Impacts to power grids are caused by large dB/dt variations in regional geomagnetic fields, in most cases the peak geomagnetic disturbance intensities (in nT/min) were only a fraction of what has occurred during historically large geomagnetic storm events. A review will be provided of the CME passages and features of the passage that drove resulting geomagnetic storm events and impacts to electric power grid infrastructures on October 29-30, 2003. A brief overview of the geomagnetic storm disturbance morphologies and intensities relative to other noteworthy storms will also be provided.

  16. The Sun among stars. IV - Albedos of Uranus and Neptune and the solar color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardorp, J.

    1981-01-01

    Geometric albedos in 48 adjacent 50 A bands from 3250 to 5600 A have been derived from observations of Uranus and Neptune. The solar analog found in earlier papers (Hardorp 1978, 1980) was chosen for these reductions, so these albedos are more reliable systematically than earlier ones and allow a choice among the scattering models of Savage et al. (1980). Green methane bands are stronger on Neptune. Strong solar absorption lines are found to be partially filled in by Raman-scattering. Neglect of this effect caused Croft et al. (1972) to find a solar color that is too blue. It probably also affected the classification of G-type stars in the Michigan Spectral Catalogue as well as Garrison's (1979) interpretation of IUE observations.

  17. Slow twists of solar magnetic flux tubes and the polar magnetic field of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Lee, Martin A.

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind model of Weber and Davis (1967) is generalized to compute the heliospheric magnetic field resulting from solar rotation or a steady axisymmetric twist including a geometrical expansion which is more rapid than spherical. The calculated increase in the ratio of the toroidal to poloidal field components with heliocentric radial distance r clarifies an expression derived recently by Jokipii and Kota (1989). Magnetic-field components transverse to r do not in general grow to dominate the radial component at large r. The analysis also yields expressions for the Poynting flux associated with the steady twists.

  18. Modeling solar radiation at the Earth's surface recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data is important for a wide range of applications, e.g. in engineering, agriculture, health sector, and in many fields of the natural sciences. A few examples showing the diversity of applications may include: architecture and building design e.g. air conditioning and cooling systems; solar heating system design and use; solar power generation; weather and climate prediction models; evaporation and irrigation; calculation of water requirements for crops; monitoring plant growth and disease control; skin cancer research. Solar radiation data must be provided in a variety of f

  19. Storing Solar Energy Performance on Rare Earth Windowpane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Baojun; Zhou Yao; Fu Li; Yang Tao; Li Tiansi; Li Ying

    2004-01-01

    The windowpane as the enclosure and decorative component of buildings is main part of energy consumption and the heat loss through window is almost 4% of the heating consumption in buildings. Using rare earth element,the glass can possess the performance of absorbing sunlight, storing heat, increasing the temperate of itself, and decreasing the inner heat load so as to play the double functions of saving energy and environmental protection. The experiment method of the rare earth windowpane, and analyses sunlight absorbing process of the rare earth element on photoelectric principle, and gives the changing curve with environment temperate -time of the rare earth windowpane surface were introduced.

  20. The SPICE Spectral Imager on Solar Orbiter: Linking the Sun to the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, Andrzej; Haberreiter, Margit; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Harrison, Richard; Parenti, Susanna; Innes, Davina; Schmutz, Werner; Buchlin, Eric; Chamberlin, Phillip; Thompson, William; Gabriel, Alan; Morris, Nigel; Caldwell, Martin; Auchere, Frederic; Curdt, Werner; Teriaca, Luca; Hassler, Donald M.; DeForest, Craig; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats; Philippon, Anne; Janvier, Miho; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Griffin, Douglas; Davila, Joseph; Giunta, Alessandra; Waltham, Nick; Eccleston, Paul; Gottwald, Alexander; Klein, Roman; Hanley, John; Walls, Buddy; Howe, Chris; Schuehle, Udo

    2016-07-01

    The SPICE (Spectral Imaging of the Coronal Environment) instrument is one of the key remote sensing instruments onboard the upcoming Solar Orbiter Mission. SPICE has been designed to contribute to the science goals of the mission by investigating the source regions of outflows and ejection processes which link the solar surface and corona to the heliosphere. In particular, SPICE will provide quantitative information on the physical state and composition of the solar atmosphere plasma. For example, SPICE will access relative abundances of ions to study the origin and the spatial/temporal variations of the 'First Ionization Potential effect', which are key signatures to trace the solar wind and plasma ejections paths within the heliosphere. Here we will present the instrument and its performance capability to attain the scientific requirements. We will also discuss how different observation modes can be chosen to obtain the best science results during the different orbits of the mission. To maximize the scientific return of the instrument, the SPICE team is working to optimize the instrument operations, and to facilitate the data access and their exploitation.

  1. Solar Current Output as a Function of Sun Elevation: Students as Toolmakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, D. P.; Parisi, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Solar current is an increasingly important aspect of modern life and will be even more so crucial in the students' future. Encouraging students to be the "toolmakers" allows students to take ownership of scientific investigations, as well as forcing them to refine their research questions and hypothesis, including the design and…

  2. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope: High-resolution observing of the dynamic Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritschler, A.; Rimmele, T. R.; Berukoff, S.; Casini, R.; Kuhn, J. R.; Lin, H.; Rast, M. P.; McMullin, J. P.; Schmidt, W.; Wöger, F.; DKIST Team

    2016-11-01

    The 4-m aperture Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) formerly known as the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is currently under construction on Haleakalā (Maui, Hawai'i) projected to start operations in 2019. At the time of completion, DKIST will be the largest ground-based solar telescope providing unprecedented resolution and photon collecting power. The DKIST will be equipped with a set of first-light facility-class instruments offering unique imaging, spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observing opportunities covering the visible to infrared wavelength range. This first-light instrumentation suite will include: a Visible Broadband Imager (VBI) for high-spatial and -temporal resolution imaging of the solar atmosphere; a Visible Spectro-Polarimeter (ViSP) for sensitive and accurate multi-line spectropolarimetry; a Fabry-Pérot based Visible Tunable Filter (VTF) for high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetry; a fiber-fed Diffraction-Limited Near Infra-Red Spectro-Polarimeter (DL-NIRSP) for two-dimensional high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetry (simultaneous spatial and spectral information); and a Cryogenic Near Infra-Red Spectro-Polarimeter (Cryo-NIRSP) for coronal magnetic field measurements and on-disk observations of, e.g., the CO lines at 4.7 μm. We will provide an overview of the DKIST's unique capabilities with strong focus on the first-light instrumentation suite, highlight some of the additional properties supporting observations of transient and dynamic solar phenomena, and touch on some operational strategies and the DKIST critical science plan.

  3. Extraterrestrial Solar Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2010-01-01

    We examine the scope of extraterrestrial solar neutrino physics, i.e. solar neutrino physics that could be carried out outside the Earth. We find that, among others, the reactions induced by the ^8B solar neutrinos, in view of the sole high energy nature (E_nu^max=14.03MeV), are most interesting in the solar environment. Two types of experiments are considered - the chemical compositions of the geology type and the matter-enhanced oscillations when the Sun-Venus-Earth eclipse, or the Sun-Mercury-Earth eclipse, occurs or the Satellite experiments (likely to be different from the "day-night" effect on the Earth). These experiments are not beyond current technology limits. In view of the weak-interaction nature, they are likely to be the precision experiments of the next generation or even beyond.

  4. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J.; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values hours on 17 January 2013. Simultaneous measurements by more than ten spacecraft in the near-Earth environment reveal the evanescence of the bow shock, the sunward motion of the magnetopause and the extremely rapid and intense loss of electrons in the outer radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  5. Momentum Management for the NASA Near Earth Asteroid Scout Solar Sail Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Andrew; Diedrich, Benjamin L.; Orphee, Juan; Stiltner, Brandon; Becker, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    The Momentum Management (MM) system is described for the NASA Near Earth Asteroid Scout (NEA Scout) cubesat solar sail mission. Unlike many solar sail mission proposals that used solar torque as the primary or only attitude control system, NEA Scout uses small reaction wheels (RW) and a reaction control system (RCS) with cold gas thrusters, as described in the abstract "Solar Sail Attitude Control System for Near Earth Asteroid Scout Cubesat Mission." The reaction wheels allow fine pointing and higher rates with low mass actuators to meet the science, communication, and trajectory guidance requirements. The MM system keeps the speed of the wheels within their operating margins using a combination of solar torque and the RCS.

  6. Comparison of selected metals content in Cambodian striped snakehead fish (Channa striata) using solar drying system and open sun drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Abu Bakar, Nur Faizah; Fudholi, Ahmad; Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz; Saroeun, Im

    2015-01-01

    The content of 12 elements in Cambodian dried striped snakehead fish was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The present study compares the level of the trace toxic metals and nutritional trace elements in the fish processed using solar drying system (SDS) and open sun drying (OSD). The skin of SDS fish has lower level of As, Pb, and Cd compared to the OSD sample. As such, the flesh of the fish accumulated higher amount of toxic metals during OSD compared to SDS. However, arsenic was detected in both samples within the safe limit. The nutritional elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, Se, Mo, Cu, Ni, and Cr) were higher in the skin sample SDS fish compared to OSD fish. These beneficial metals were not accumulated in the flesh sample SDS fish demonstrating lower level compared to drying under conventional system. The reddish coloration of the SDS fish was due to the presence of high Cu content in both the skin and flesh samples which possibly account for no mold formation 5 days after packaging. As conclusion, drying of Cambodian C. striata using solar-assisted system has proven higher content of the nutritious elements compared to using the conventional system despite only slight difference in the toxic metals level between the two systems.

  7. Comparison of Selected Metals Content in Cambodian Striped Snakehead Fish (Channa striata Using Solar Drying System and Open Sun Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayang Fredalina Basri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of 12 elements in Cambodian dried striped snakehead fish was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The present study compares the level of the trace toxic metals and nutritional trace elements in the fish processed using solar drying system (SDS and open sun drying (OSD. The skin of SDS fish has lower level of As, Pb, and Cd compared to the OSD sample. As such, the flesh of the fish accumulated higher amount of toxic metals during OSD compared to SDS. However, arsenic was detected in both samples within the safe limit. The nutritional elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, Se, Mo, Cu, Ni, and Cr were higher in the skin sample SDS fish compared to OSD fish. These beneficial metals were not accumulated in the flesh sample SDS fish demonstrating lower level compared to drying under conventional system. The reddish coloration of the SDS fish was due to the presence of high Cu content in both the skin and flesh samples which possibly account for no mold formation 5 days after packaging. As conclusion, drying of Cambodian C. striata using solar-assisted system has proven higher content of the nutritious elements compared to using the conventional system despite only slight difference in the toxic metals level between the two systems.

  8. Multifocal electroretinogram for assessing sun damage following the solar eclipse of 29 March 2006: multifocal electroretinography in solar maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Hatice; Oner, Ayse; Mutlu, Sait; Köse, Ziya; Gumus, Koray; Karakucuk, Sarper; Mirza, Ertugrul

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical findings and multifocal electroretinography results of cases with solar maculopathy due to eclipse watching. Eight eyes of six patients (ages ranged 12-42) who presented to our clinic after the solar eclipse of 29 March 2006 were evaluated in the study. All patients underwent a full ophthalmologic examination and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Visual acuities at the initial examination were between 20/32 and 20/20; and at final examination between 20/25 and 20/20 respectively. Fundoscopic examination disclosed macular pigmentary changes in almost all patients. Fundus Fluorescein Angiography revealed a window defect in six eyes. The initial findings of the mfERG at the first visit showed a decrease in the P1 and N1 amplitudes of the central responses. The following mfERG recordings showed a recovery in central P1 and N1 amplitudes. Decrease in P1 and N1 amplitudes of central macular region can be detected by mfERG in patients with solar maculopathy. Follow-up mfERG test results may recover with the increase of visual acuity.

  9. Energetic Phenomena on the Sun: The Solar Maximum Mission Flare Workshop. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, M.; Woodgate, B.

    1986-12-01

    The general objectives of the conference were as follows: (1) Synthesize flare studies after three years of Solar Maximum Mission (SSM) data analysis. Encourage a broader participation in the SMM data analysis and combine this more fully with theory and other data sources-data obtained with other spacecraft such as the HINOTORI, p78-1, and ISEE-3 spacecrafts, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) and many other ground-based instruments. Many coordinated data sets, unprecedented in their breadth of coverage and multiplicity of sources, had been obtained within the structure of the Solar Maximum Year (SMY). (2) Stimulate joint studies, and publication in the general scientific literature. The intended primary benefit was for informal collaborations to be started or broadened at the Workshops with subsequent publications. (3) Provide a special publication resulting from the Workshop.

  10. France uses the sun to cool its wine: the Banyuls winery solar cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-12-01

    The engineering consultancy Tecsol was asked to design a cooling system for a winery that would limit the variations in temperature during the year. Tecsol proposed a solar system. The total investment cost amounted to nearly two million French Francs (300,000 euros), almost double the cost of a conventional air-conditioning system. However, because the solar system reduced the conventional energy needs of the warehouse by about 40%, the French Agency for Environment and Energy Management (ADEME) provided a 37% subsidy for its rational use of energy. The 'Solarclim' solar installation has three functions: it produces hot water via 693 vacuum tube collectors with a useful surface of 130 m{sup 2}. The collectors are fixed to the roof of the wine cellar, which has an angle of 15 deg. Heat from the collectors is transferred to a 1000-litre hot water storage tank; it produces chilled water using a lithium bromide absorption plant with a nominal cooling capacity of 52 kW. This is housed in the technical premises on the lowest level and is used in conjunction with a 180 kW open-circuit cooling tower on the north facade; and the third function combines air-conditioning and, when necessary, space heating. The installation has been operating for 12 years with no particular problems. The equipment is environmentally friendly. The solar heat source avoids CO{sub 2} emissions, the absorption machine does not use CFCs or HCFCs, and the system is totally silent. (UK)

  11. Solar activity and earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, J.

    1979-02-26

    Prolonged astronomical observations have discovered that the Sun, which is the nearest star to the Earth, is not calm and serene. On the solar surface, there are often windstorms, electrical lights, and sometimes large flame eruptions; and there are regularly black spots in patches which are also active. The Sun not only disperses light and heat, but also throws out large quantities of currents of charged particles to be scattered in space and to reach the Earth, sometimes, which are called by some solar winds. These activities in the Sun can induce many physical phenomena on earth, including magnetic storms, polar light, sudden disruption or attenuation of medium- and short-wave radio, and many atmospheric changes. Some scientists believe they are perhaps also related to the occurrence of earthquakes. This paper explains these solar activities and their possible relationship to earthquakes.

  12. Ray Structure of the Coronal Streamer Belt and Its Manifestation as Sharp Large Peaks of Solar Wind Plasma Density at the Earth's Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. V. Eselevich; V. G. Eselevich; Z. Q. Zang

    2005-01-01

    The white-light corona calibrated data with processing level L1 from the LASCO-C2/SOHO instrument, and data from the Wind spacecraft with one-hour and one-minute time resolution on quasi-stationary slow (v between 300-450 km/s at the Earth's orbit) the Solar Wind (SW) parameters in the absence of sporadic SW streams are examined. Within distances from the Sun's center less than R in the range of 20-30 Rs,(Rs, the solar radius), slow wind is known as the streamer belt, and at larger distances it is called the Heliospheric Plasma Sheet (HPS). It is shown that the streamer belt comprises a sequence of pairs of rays. In general, ray brightnesses in each pair can differ, and the magnetic field is oppositely directed in them. The neutral line of the radial magnetic field of the Sun runs along the belt between the rays of each of the pairs.The area in which the streamer belt intersects the ecliptic plane and which lies at the central meridian, will be recorded at the earth's orbit with a time delay of 5-6 days, in the form of one or several peaks with Nmax > 10 cm-3. Furthermore, the simplest density profile of the portion of the HCS has the form of two peaks of a different or identical amplitude . The such a profile is observed in cases where the angle of intersection of the streamer belt with the ecliptic plane near the Sun is sufficiently large, i.e. close to 90°. The two-ray structure of the cross-section of the streamer-belt moves from the Sun to the Earth, it retains not only the angular size of the peaks but also the relative density variations, and the position of the neutral line(sector boundary) in between. At the Earth's orbit the ray structure of the streamer belt provides the source for sharp (i.e. with steep fronts of a duration of a few minutes or shorter) solar wind plasma density peaks (of a duration of several hours) with maximum values Nmax > 10 cm-3.

  13. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  14. Using Realistic MHD Simulations for Modeling and Interpretation of Quiet-Sun Observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, Irina N; Lagg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The solar atmosphere is extremely dynamic, and many important phenomena develop on small scales that are unresolved in observations with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). For correct calibration and interpretation, it is very important to investigate the effects of small-scale structures and dynamics on the HMI observables, such as Doppler shift, continuum intensity, spectral line depth, and width. We use 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and the atmosphere of the Sun, and a spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code to study observational characteristics of the Fe I 6173A line observed by HMI in quiet-Sun regions. We use the modeling results to investigate the sensitivity of the line Doppler shift to plasma velocity, and also sensitivities of the line parameters to plasma temperature and density, and determine effective line formation heights for observations of solar regions located at different dista...

  15. Analysis of a coronal mass ejection and corotating interaction region as they travel from the Sun passing Venus, Earth, Mars, and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prise, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Arridge, C. S.; Achilleos, N.

    2015-03-01

    During June 2010 a good alignment in the solar system between Venus, STEREO-B, Mars, and Saturn provided an excellent opportunity to study the propagation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and closely occurring corotating interaction region (CIR) from the Sun to Saturn. The CME erupted from the Sun at 01:30 UT on 20 June 2010,with v≈ 600 km s-1, as observed by STEREO-B, Solar Dynamics Observatory, and SOHO/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. It arrived at Venus over 2 days later, some 3.5 days after a CIR is also detected here. The CIR was also observed at STEREO-B and Mars, prior to the arrival of the CME. The CME is not directed earthward, but the CIR is detected here less than 2 days after its arrival at Mars. Around a month later, a strong compression of the Saturn magnetosphere is observed by Cassini, consistent with the scenario that the CME and CIR have merged into a single solar transient. The arrival times of both the CME and the CIR at different locations were predicted using the ENLIL solar wind model. The arrival time of the CME at Venus, STEREO-B, and Mars is predicted to within 20 h of its actual detection, but the predictions for the CIR showed greater differences from observations, all over 1.5 days early. More accurate predictions for the CIR were found by extrapolating the travel time between different locations using the arrival times and speeds detected by STEREO-B and ACE. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the propagation of solar transients.

  16. Alterations in fruit and vegetable beta-carotene and vitamin C content caused by open-sun drying, visqueen-covered and polyethylene-covered solar-dryers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndawula, J; Kabasa, J D; Byaruhanga, Y B

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of three drying methods (open sun drying, visqueen-covered solar dryer and polyethylene-covered solar dryer) on b-carotene and vitamin C content of edible portions of mango fruit (Mangifera indica) and cowpea leaves (Vigna unguiculata). Commercial samples were analysed for vitamin C by titrimetry and b-carotene by spectrophotometry at 450 nm. Differences in vitamin retention and loss associated with the three drying methods were assessed by analysis of variance and least significant difference (LSD) at (pdrying. Open sun drying method caused the greatest b-carotene and vitamin C loss (58% and 84% respectively), while the visqueen-covered solar dryer caused the least loss (34.5% and 71% respectively). Blanching cowpea leaves improved b-carotene and vitamin C retention by 15% and 7.5% respectively. The b-carotene and vitamin C content of fresh ripe mango fruit was 5.9 and 164.3 mg/100g DM respectively. Similar to effects on cowpea leaves, the mango micronutrient content decreased (pdrying. The open sun drying method caused the greatest b-carotene (94.2%) and vitamin C (84.5%) loss, while the visqueen-covered solar dryer caused the least (73 and 53% respectively). These results show that the three solar drying methods cause significant loss of pro-vitamin A and vitamin C in dried fruits and vegetables. However, open sun drying causes the most loss and the visqueen-covered solar dryer the least, making the later a probable better drying technology for fruit and vegetable preservation. The drying technologies should be improved to enhance vitamin retention.

  17. Rotation of the Earth, solar activity and cosmic ray intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlyaeva, T.; Bard, E. [Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS, IRD, Aix-en-Provence (France). CEREGE, College de France; Abarca-del-Rio, R. [Universidad de Concepcion (UDEC) (Chile). Dept. de Geofisica (DGEO)

    2014-10-01

    We analyse phase lags between the 11-year variations of three records: the semi-annual oscillation of the length of day (LOD), the solar activity (SA) and the cosmic ray intensity (CRI). The analysis was done for solar cycles 20-23. Observed relationships between LOD, CRI and SA are discussed separately for even and odd solar cycles. Phase lags were calculated using different methods (comparison of maximal points of cycles, maximal correlation coefficient, line of synchronization of cross-recurrence plots). We have found different phase lags between SA and CRI for even and odd solar cycles, confirming previous studies. The evolution of phase lags between SA and LOD as well as between CRI and LOD shows a positive trend with additional variations of phase lag values. For solar cycle 20, phase lags between SA and CRI, between SA and LOD, and between CRI and LOD were found to be negative. Overall, our study suggests that, if anything, the length of day could be influenced by solar irradiance rather than by cosmic rays.

  18. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Maksimovic, Milan; Alibay, Farah; Amiri, Nikta; Bastian, Tim; Cohen, Christina; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward; Reinard, Alysha; Schwadron, Nathan; Cecconi, Baptiste; Hallinan, Gregg; Hegedus, Alex; Krupar, Vratislav; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a direct tracer of particle acceleration in the inner heliosphere and potential magnetic connections from the lower solar corona to the larger heliosphere. Energized electrons excite Langmuir waves, which then convert into intense radio emission at the local plasma frequency, with the most intense acceleration thought to occur within 20 RS. The radio emission from CMEs is quite strong such that only a relatively small number of antennas is required to detect and map it, but many aspects of this particle acceleration and transport remain poorly constrained. Ground-based arrays would be quite capable of tracking the radio emission associated with CMEs, but absorption by the Earth's ionosphere limits the frequency coverage of ground-based arrays (ν ≳ 15 MHz), which in turn limits the range of solar distances over which they can track the radio emission (≲ 3RS). The state-of-the-art for tracking such emission from space is defined by single antennas (Wind/WAVES, Stereo/SWAVES), in which the tracking is accomplished by assuming a frequency-to-density mapping; there has been some success in triangulating the emission between the spacecraft, but considerable uncertainties remain. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept: A constellation of small spacecraft in a geostationary graveyard orbit designed to localize and track radio emissions in the inner heliosphere. Each spacecraft would carry a receiving system for observations below 25 MHz, and SunRISE would produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Strength distribution of solar magnetic fields in photospheric quiet Sun regions

    CERN Document Server

    Velez, J C Ramirez; Semel, M

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic topology of the solar photosphere in its quietest regions is hidden by the difficulties to disentangle magnetic flux through the resolution element from the field strength of unresolved structures. The observation of spectral lines with strong coupling with hyperfine structure, like the observed MnI line at 553.7 nm, allows such differentiation. The main aim is to analyse the distribution of field strengths in the network and intranetwork of the solar photosphere through inversion of the MnI line at 553.7 nm. An inversion code for the magnetic field using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been developed. Statistical tests are run on the code to validate it. The code has to draw information from the small-amplitude spectral feature oppearing in the core of the Stokes V profile of the observed line for field strengths below a certain threshold, coinciding with lower limit of the Paschen-Back effect in the fine structure of the involved atomic levels. The inversion of the observed profiles,...

  20. Cosmic Ray Sun Shadow in Soudan 2 Underground Muon Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, W W M; Ayres, D S; Barrett, W L; Bode, C; Border, P M; Brooks, C B; Cobb, J H; Cotton, R J; Courant, H; Demuth, D M; Fields, T H; Gallagher, H R; García-García, C; Goodman, M C; Gran, R; Joffe-Minor, T M; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M; Leeson, W; Lichtfield, P J; Longley, N P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Milburn, R H; Miller, W H; Mualem, L M; Napier, A; Olive