WorldWideScience

Sample records for sulphoxide redox chemistry

  1. Small intestinal sulphoxidation of albendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, C; Alvarez, A I; Redondo, P; Voces, J; Del Estal, J L; Prieto, J G

    1995-05-01

    1. The in vitro sulphoxidation of Albendazole (ABZ) by rat intestinal microsomes has been examined. The results revealed intestinal sulphoxidation of ABZ by intestinal microsomes in a NADPH-dependent enzymatic system. The kinetic constants for sulphoxidase activity were Vmax = 46 pmol/min/mg protein and Michaelis constant Km = 6.8 microM. 2. The possible effect of inducers (Arochlor 1254 and ABZ pretreatment) and inhibitors (erythromycin, methimazole, carbon monoxide and fenbendazole), was also studied. In rat pretreated with Arochlor 1254, Vmax was 52 pmol/min/mg protein, whereas oral administration of ABZ increased the intestinal sulphoxidation of the drug, Vmax being 103 pmol/min/mg protein. 3. Erythromycin did not change the enzymatic bioconversion of ABZ, but methimazole and carbon monoxide inhibited the enzyme activity by approximately 60 and 30% respectively. Fenbendazole (a structural analogue of ABZ) was a competitive inhibitor of the sulphoxidation process, characterized by a Ki or 69 microM. 4. These data demonstrate that the intestinal enzymes contributing to the initial sulphoxidation of ABZ may be similar to the hepatic enzymes involved in the biotransformation process by the P450 and FMO systems, a conclusion that needs to be further established.

  2. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  3. Fenton Redox Chemistry : Arsenite Oxidation by Metallic Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borges Freitas, S.C.; Van Halem, D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Van der Meer, W.G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-oxidation of As(III) is necessary in arsenic removal processes in order to increase its efficiency. Therefore, the Fenton Redox Chemistry is defined by catalytic activation of H2O2 and currently common used for its redox oxidative properties. In this study the effect of H2O2 production catalysed

  4. Synergistic extraction of trivalent lanthanoids with 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone and various sulphoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Chakravortty, V.; Reddy, M.L.P.; Ramamohan, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of trivalent lanthanoids Nd, Tb and Tm with mixtures of 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone (HPBI) and dioctyl sulphoxide (DOSO), bis-2-ethylhexyl sulphoxide (B2EHSO) or diphenyl sulphoxide (DPhSO) in xylene from perchlorate solution was investigated. Lanthanoids were found to be extracted as Ln(PBI) 3 with HPBI alone. In the presence of sulphoxides, Nd(III) was found to be extracted as Nd(PBI) 3 . S and Nd(PBI) 3 . 2 S (where S = sulphoxide). On the other hand, Tb(III) and Tm(III) were extracted as Tb(PBI) 3 . S and Tm(PBI) 3 . S respectively. The equilibrium constants of the synergistic species were found to increase monotonically with decreasing ionic radii of these metal ions. The addition of a sulphoxide to the metal chelate system not only enhances the extraction efficiency but also improves the selectivities among these trivalent lanthanoids. (orig.)

  5. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed.

  6. Novel bi-metallic uranyl complexes - Redox chemistry in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yardeni, A.; Mizrahi, E.; Maimon, I.; Zilbermann, G.; Meyerstein, D.; Zehavi-cohen, A.Z.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of organic ligands which can accommodate two uranium atoms at different oxidation states, mixed valency being then achieved by redox chemistry at room temperature is definitely a challenge in coordination chemistry. The following complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, MS, IR and UV-vis

  7. Redox reactivity and coordination chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocton, G.

    2009-09-01

    The study and the understanding of actinides chemistry have important implications in the nuclear field both for the development of new actinides materials and the retreatment of the nuclear wastes. One of the major issues in that chemistry is that the actinides elements are known to undergo redox reaction and to form assemblies of different size and different topologies. In that context uranium can be a good model of the heavier radioelement because it is much less radioactive. So, this work concerns the synthesis and the study of the spectroscopy and the magnetic properties of several uranium based polymetallic assemblies synthesized by taking advantage of the redox properties and the coordination chemistry of uranium. The hydrolysis reactivity of trivalent uranium has been studied in absence of sterically hindered ligands and led to the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium assemblies with different sizes by changing the starting complex or the reaction conditions. By following the same strategy, the controlled oxidation of trivalent uranium complexes led to an original azido/nitrido uranium complex. The coordination chemistry of the pentavalent uranyl polymer {[UO 2 py 5 ][KI 2 py 3 ]} n has also been studied with different ligand and in different conditions and led to several cation-cation complexes for which the stability is sufficient for studying there dismutation by proton NMR. By changing the ancillary ligands stable monomeric complexes of pentavalent uranyl complexes were also obtained. The magnetic properties of all the complexes, monomers and polymetallic complexes were studied and an antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for the cation-cation pentavalent uranyl dimer [UO 2 (dbm) 2 (K 18 C 6 )] 2 . (author)

  8. Penetration of albendazole sulphoxide into hydatid cysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, D L; Chinnery, J B; Georgiou, G; Stamatakis, G; Golematis, B

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of albendazole sulphoxide, the principal metabolite of albendazole into hydatid cysts (E granulosus) was measured by means of in vitro animal and clinical studies. The drug freely diffuses across the parasitic membranes. Cyst/serum concentrations of 22% were achieved in patients, longer pre-operative therapy produced higher concentrations.

  9. Anionic Redox Chemistry in Polysulfide Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayfer, Ekaterina D; Pazhetnov, Egor M; Kozlova, Mariia N; Artemkina, Sofya B; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2017-12-22

    Classical Li-ion battery technology is based on the insertion of lithium ions into cathode materials involving metal (cationic) redox reactions. However, this vision is now being reconsidered, as many new-generation electrode materials with enhanced reversible capacities operate through combined cationic and anionic (non-metal) reversible redox processes or even exclusively through anionic redox transformations. Anionic participation in the redox reactions is observed in materials with more pronounced covalency, which is less typical for oxides, but quite common for phosphides or chalcogenides. In this Concept, we would like to draw the reader's attention to this new idea, especially, as it applies to transition-metal polychalcogenides, such as FeS 2 , VS 4 , TiS 3 , NbS 3 , TiS 4 , MoS 3 , etc., in which the key role is played by the (S-S) 2- /2 S 2- redox reaction. The exploration and better understanding of the anion-driven chemistry is important for designing advanced materials for battery and other energy-related applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Problems in Teaching the Topic of Redox Reactions: Actions and Conceptions of Chemistry Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Onno; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of problems that can occur when teaching the topic of redox reactions to grade-11 students. Concludes that the teachers' scientific expertise is an important source of difficulties when teaching redox reactions. Discusses implications for improvement of current chemistry classroom practice and content-related teacher…

  11. Methionine sulphoxide reductases revisited: free methionine as a primary target of H2O2 stress in auxotrophic fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    García Santamarina, Sarela, 1978-; Boronat i Llop, Susanna, 1965-; Ayté del Olmo, José; Hidalgo Hernando, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid methionine can suffer reversible oxidation to sulphoxide and further irreversible over-oxidation to methionine sulphone. As part of the cellular antioxidant scavenging activities are the methionine sulphoxide reductases (Msrs), with a reported role in methionine sulphoxide reduction, both free and in proteins. Three families of Msrs have been described, but the fission yeast genome only includes one representative for two of these families: MsrA/Mxr1 and MsrB/Mxr2. We have investig...

  12. Stimulus Responsive Poly(ferrocenylsilanes): Redox Chemistry of Iron in the Main Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannotti, M.I.; Lv, H.; Ma, Y.; Steenvoorden, M.P.; Overweg, A.R.; Roerdink, M.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    Redox chemistry of organometallic poly(ferrocenylsilane) polymers (soluble in organic or aqueous environment) is discussed. Poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (PFDMS) was oxidized in CH2Cl2 solution with different oxidants. Oxidation was accomplished with stepwise increasing amounts of ferric chloride

  13. Chemistry of the redox sensitive elements. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, D.

    1991-10-01

    As a part of the safety assessment for a nuclear waste repository, the migration of the radioactive elements from the waste matrix to the biosphere has to be modelled. The geosphere is an important barrier and a consideration of the retention of the radioactive isotopes needs knowledge of sorption coefficients and solubilities. Important long-lived isotopes in the high level radioactive waste are the fission products selenium, technetium, palladium and tin, and the actinide neptunium, which are all redox sensitive elements. A transport model using conservative sorption values predicts mainly doses from these five elements. Since the individual oxidation states of the redox sensitive elements have different and largely unknown sorption properties and solubilities, the realistic doses might be far less. The relevant literature about the chemistry of the five elements is summarized and is planned to serve as the basis for an experimental programme. For every element, the literature about the general chemistry, selected sorption studies, geochemistry, and analytical methods is reviewed. It was found that the knowledge about some of these points is very limited. Even the general chemistry of some of the elements is not well known, because they have only limited applications and research concentrates only on certain aspects. Most of the sorption studies in the context of nuclear waste concentrate on a few of the relevant elements and others have been neglected up to now. The simulation of a realistic system in the laboratory poses some problems, which have to be solved as well. The literature about this subject is also critically reviewed. The elements which are most mobile under realistic far-field conditions are identified and it is recommended to concentrate research on these at the beginning. (author)

  14. Chemistry of the redox sensitive elements. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, D.

    1991-10-01

    As a part of the safety assessment for a nuclear waste repository, the migration of the radioactive elements from the waste matrix to the biosphere has to be modelled. The geosphere is an important barrier and a consideration of the retention of the radioactive isotopes needs knowledge of sorption coefficients and solubilities. Important long-lived isotopes in the high level radioactive waste are the fission products selenium, technetium, palladium and tin, and the actinide neptunium, which are all redox sensitive elements. A transport model using conservative sorption values predicts mainly doses from these five elements. Since the individual oxidation states of the redox sensitive elements have different and largely unknown sorption properties and solubilities, the realistic doses might be far less. The relevant literature about the chemistry of the five elements is summarized and is planned to serve as the basis for an experimental programme. For every element, the literature about the general chemistry, selected sorption studies, geochemistry, and analytical methods is reviewed. It was found that the knowledge about some of these points is very limited. Even the general chemistry of some of the elements in not well known, because they have only limited applications and research concentrates only on certain aspects. Most of the sorption studies in the context of nuclear waste concentrate on a few of the relevant elements and others have been neglected up to now. The simulation of a realistic system in the laboratory poses some problems, which have to be solved as well. The literature about this subject is also critically reviewed. The elements which are most mobile under realistic far-field conditions are identified and it is recommended to concentrate research on these at the beginning. (author) 9 figs., 192 refs

  15. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-02-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field.

  16. The redox chemistry of neptunium in gamma-irradiated aqueous nitric acid in the presence of an organic phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mincher, B.J.; Přeček, Martin; Paulenova, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 308, č. 3 (2016), s. 1005-1009 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neptunium * redox chemistry * radiation chemistry * solvent extraction Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  17. Redox Models in Chemistry Textbooks for the Upper Secondary School: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlund, Lise-Lotte; Berg, Anders; Ekborg, Margareta

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated how chemistry textbooks use models of redox reactions in different subject areas, how they change models between and within the topics, and how they deal with specific learning difficulties identified in the literature. The textbooks examined were published for use in the natural science programme in Swedish upper secondary…

  18. Problems in Teaching the Topic of Redox Reactions: Actions and Conceptions of Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Onno; Acampo, Jeannine; Verdonk, Adri

    Although there is growing interest in studies of teachers' actions and conceptions, little is known about content-related teaching problems arising in science classrooms. This article presents a case study of problems which can occur when teaching the topic of redox reactions to Grade 11 students. Two chemistry teachers, a senior and a junior teacher, were involved in the study. Their reflective comments on the teaching problems were also investigated. Research data were obtained from classroom observations and audiotaped recordings of classroom practice. After the lessons, we conducted semistructured interviews with the teachers. The teaching problems are reported in terms of teaching activities causing difficulties for students in considering new conceptions to be necessary, intelligible, plausible, or fruitful. Analyses of the teachers' comments on these teaching activities clarifies a number of reasons why they acted as they did. It can be concluded that teachers' scientific expertise is an important source of difficulties when teaching redox reactions. Implications for an improvement of current chemistry classroom practice and content-related teacher training are offered.Received: 11 April 1994; Revised: 5 June 1995;

  19. Redox fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.; McKinley, I.; Shea, M.; Smellie, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the investigations of redox fronts performed at the Osamu Utsumi mine. Results obtained by modelling groups on the rate of movement of the redox fronts and on the chemical reactions involved are discussed. Some of the most important rockwater interactions which occur at redox fronts can be modelled reasonably well but the complex redox chemistry of elements like sulphur is poorly simulated. The observed enrichment of many trace elements close to the redox fronts could be of significance for high-level waste repositories, but cannot be quantified by existing models. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab

  20. A rechargeable iodine-carbon battery that exploits ion intercalation and iodine redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ke; Hu, Ziyu; Ma, Jizhen; Ma, Houyi; Dai, Liming; Zhang, Jintao

    2017-09-13

    Graphitic carbons have been used as conductive supports for developing rechargeable batteries. However, the classic ion intercalation in graphitic carbon has yet to be coupled with extrinsic redox reactions to develop rechargeable batteries. Herein, we demonstrate the preparation of a free-standing, flexible nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped hierarchically porous graphitic carbon for iodine loading by pyrolysis of polyaniline coated cellulose wiper. We find that heteroatoms could provide additional defect sites for encapsulating iodine while the porous carbon skeleton facilitates redox reactions of iodine and ion intercalation. The combination of ion intercalation with redox reactions of iodine allows for developing rechargeable iodine-carbon batteries free from the unsafe lithium/sodium metals, and hence eliminates the long-standing safety issue. The unique architecture of the hierarchically porous graphitic carbon with heteroatom doping not only provides suitable spaces for both iodine encapsulation and cation intercalation but also generates efficient electronic and ionic transport pathways, thus leading to enhanced performance.Carbon-based electrodes able to intercalate Li + and Na + ions have been exploited for high performing energy storage devices. Here, the authors combine the ion intercalation properties of porous graphitic carbons with the redox chemistry of iodine to produce iodine-carbon batteries with high reversible capacities.

  1. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys 135 Cys 140 , catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 140 ), Cys 14 (Cys 135 Ala 140 ), or both (Ala 135 Ala 140 ). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 140 ) or Cys 140 (Cys 135 Cys 139 Ala 140 ) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly 139 with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH 2 redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 14 mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala 135 Cys 140 protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys 135 and Cys 140 thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate

  2. Mercury Redox Chemistry in Waters of the Eastern Asian Seas: From Polluted Coast to Clean Open Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Zhijia; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Yin, Yongguang; Chen, Jinsheng; Wang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    We performed incubation experiments using seawaters from representative marine environments of the eastern Asian seas to determine the mercury (Hg) available for photoreduction (Hgr(II)), to investigate the Hg redox reaction kinetics, and to explore the effect of environmental factors and water chemistry on the Hg redox chemistry. Results show that Hgr(II) accounted for a considerable fraction of total Hg (THg) (%Hgr(II)/THg: 24.90 ± 10.55%, n = 27) and positively correlated with THg. Filtration decreased the Hgr(II) pool of waters with high suspended particulate matter (SPM). The positive linear relationships were found between pseudo-first order rate constants of gross Hg(II) photoreduction (kr) and gross Hg(0) photo-oxidation (ko) with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Under the condition of PAR of 1 m mol m(-2) s(-1), the kr were significantly (p < 0.05) lower than ko (kr/ko: 0.86 ± 0.22). The Hg(0) dark oxidation were significantly higher than the Hg(II) dark reduction. The Hg(II) dark reduction was positively correlated to THg, and the anaerobic condition favored the Hg(II) dark reduction. Filtration significantly influenced the Hg photoredox chemistry of waters with high SPM. UVB radiation was important for both Hg(II) photoreduction and Hg(0) photo-oxidation, and the role of other wavebands in photoinduced transformations of Hg varied with the water chemistry.

  3. Reply to 'Comment on kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry' by J. Griffioen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K. S.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2000-01-01

    Our paper, 'Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry' (Hunter et al., 1998), presents a theoretical exploration of biogeochemical reaction networks and their importance to the biogeochemistry of groundwater systems. As with any other model, the kinetic reaction-transport model developed in our paper includes only a subset of all physically, biologically and chemically relevant processes in subsurface environments. It considers aquifer systems where the primary energy source driving microbial activity is the degradation of organic matter. In addition to the primary biodegradation pathways of organic matter (i.e. respiration and fermentation), the redox chemistry of groundwaters is also affected by reactions not directly involving organic matter oxidation. We refer to the latter as secondary reactions. By including secondary redox reactions which consume reduced reaction products (e.g., Mn2+, FeS, H2S), and in the process compete with microbial heterotrophic populations for available oxidants (i.e. O2, NO3-, Mn(IV), Fe(III), SO42-), we predict spatio-temporal distributions of microbial activity which differ significantly from those of models which consider only the biodegradation reactions. That is, the secondary reactions have a significant impact on the distributions of the rates of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic metabolic pathways. We further show that secondary redox reactions, as well as non-redox reactions, significantly influence the acid-base chemistry of groundwaters. The distributions of dissolved inorganic redox species along flowpaths, however, are similar in simulations with and without secondary reactions (see Figs. 3(b) and 7(b) in Hunter et al., 1998), indicating that very different biogeochemical reaction dynamics may lead to essentially the same chemical redox zonation of a groundwater system.

  4. Enhancing Capacity Performance by Utilizing the Redox Chemistry of the Electrolyte in a Dual-Electrolyte Sodium-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Sirugaloor Thangavel; Bae, Hyuntae; Han, Jinhyup; Kim, Youngsik

    2018-05-04

    A strategy is described to increase charge storage in a dual electrolyte Na-ion battery (DESIB) by combining the redox chemistry of the electrolyte with a Na + ion de-insertion/insertion cathode. Conventional electrolytes do not contribute to charge storage in battery systems, but redox-active electrolytes augment this property via charge transfer reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface. The capacity of the cathode combined with that provided by the electrolyte redox reaction thus increases overall charge storage. An aqueous sodium hexacyanoferrate (Na 4 Fe(CN) 6 ) solution is employed as the redox-active electrolyte (Na-FC) and sodium nickel Prussian blue (Na x -NiBP) as the Na + ion insertion/de-insertion cathode. The capacity of DESIB with Na-FC electrolyte is twice that of a battery using a conventional (Na 2 SO 4 ) electrolyte. The use of redox-active electrolytes in batteries of any kind is an efficient and scalable approach to develop advanced high-energy-density storage systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Subcellular Redox Targeting: Bridging in Vitro and in Vivo Chemical Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marcus J C; Poganik, Jesse R; Ghosh, Souradyuti; Aye, Yimon

    2017-03-17

    Networks of redox sensor proteins within discrete microdomains regulate the flow of redox signaling. Yet, the inherent reactivity of redox signals complicates the study of specific redox events and pathways by traditional methods. Herein, we review designer chemistries capable of measuring flux and/or mimicking subcellular redox signaling at the cellular and organismal level. Such efforts have begun to decipher the logic underlying organelle-, site-, and target-specific redox signaling in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight chemical biology as a perfect gateway to interrogate how nature choreographs subcellular redox chemistry to drive precision redox biology.

  6. Surface Redox Chemistry of Immobilized Nanodiamond: Effects of Particle Size and Electrochemical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; McDonald, B.; Carrizosa, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    The size of the diamond particle is tailored to nanoscale (nanodiamond, ND), and the ND surface is engineered targeting specific (electrochemical and biological) applications. In this work, we investigated the complex surface redox chemistry of immobilized ND layer on conductive boron-doped diamond electrode with a broad experimental parameter space such as particle size (nano versus micron), scan rate, pH (cationic/acidic versus anionic/basic), electrolyte KCl concentration (four orders of magnitude), and redox agents (neutral and ionic). We reported on the significant enhancement of ionic currents while recording reversible oxidation of neutral ferrocene methanol (FcMeOH) by almost one order of magnitude than traditional potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) redox agent. The current enhancement is inversely related to ND particle diameter in the following order: 1 μm << 1000 nm < 100 nm < 10 nm ≤ 5 nm < 2 nm. We attribute the current enhancement to concurrent electrocatalytic processes, i.e. the electron transfer between redox probes and electroactive surface functional (e.g. hydroxyl, carboxyl, epoxy) moieties and the electron transfer mediated by adsorbed FcMeOH+ (or Fe(CN) 6 3+ ) ions onto ND surface. The first process is pH dependent since it depends upon ND surface functionalities for which the electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The adsorption mediated process is observed most apparently at slower scan rates owing to self-exchange between adsorbed FcMeOH+ ions and FcMeOH redox agent molecules in diffusion-limited bulk electrolyte solution. Alternatively, it is hypothesized that the surface functionality and defect sites ( sp 2-bonded C shell and unsaturated bonds) give rise to surface electronic states with energies within the band gap (midgap states) in undoped ND. These surface states serve as electron donors (and acceptors) depending upon their bonding (and antibonding) character and, therefore, they can support electrocatalytic redox

  7. Effects of iron on arsenic speciation and redox chemistry in acid mine water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Concern about arsenic is increasing throughout the world, including areas of the United States. Elevated levels of arsenic above current drinking-water regulations in ground and surface water can be the result of purely natural phenomena, but often are due to anthropogenic activities, such as mining and agriculture. The current study correlates arsenic speciation in acid mine drainage and mining-influenced water with the important water-chemistry properties Eh, pH, and iron(III) concentration. The results show that arsenic speciation is generally in equilibrium with iron chemistry in low pH AMD, which is often not the case in other natural-water matrices. High pH mine waters and groundwater do not always hold to the redox predictions as well as low pH AMD samples. The oxidation and precipitation of oxyhydroxides deplete iron from some systems, and also affect arsenite and arsenate concentrations through sorption processes. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Redox chemistry of americium in nitric acid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Jobelin, I.; Armengol, G.; Adnet, JM

    2004-07-01

    The redox properties of the actinides are very important parameters for speciation studies and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing based on liquid-liquid extraction of actinides at different oxidation states (as in the Purex or Sesame process). They are also very useful for developing analytical tools including coulometry and redox titration. This study addressed the americium(IV)/americium(III) and americium(VI)/americium(V) redox couples, focusing on exhaustive acquisition of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of americium oxidation at an electrode in a complexing nitric acid medium. (authors)

  9. Redox chemistry of americium in nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picart, S.; Jobelin, I.; Armengol, G.; Adnet, JM.

    2004-01-01

    The redox properties of the actinides are very important parameters for speciation studies and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing based on liquid-liquid extraction of actinides at different oxidation states (as in the Purex or Sesame process). They are also very useful for developing analytical tools including coulometry and redox titration. This study addressed the americium(IV)/americium(III) and americium(VI)/americium(V) redox couples, focusing on exhaustive acquisition of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of americium oxidation at an electrode in a complexing nitric acid medium. (authors)

  10. The enzymatic activities of brain catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and methionine sulphoxide reductase are correlated in a COMT Val/Met allele-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Jackob; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Cruz, Dianne A; Thompson, Peter M; Hairston, Jenaqua; Bortolato, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays a primary role in the metabolism of catecholamine neurotransmitters and is implicated in the modulation of cognitive and emotional responses. The best characterized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the COMT gene consists of a valine (Val)-to-methionine (Met) substitution at codon 108/158. The Met-containing variant confers a marked reduction in COMT catalytic activity. We recently showed that the activity of recombinant COMT is positively regulated by the enzyme Met sulphoxide reductase (MSR), which counters the oxidation of Met residues of proteins. The current study was designed to assess whether brain COMT activity may be correlated to MSR in an allele-dependent fashion. COMT and MSR activities were measured from post-mortem samples of prefrontal cortices, striata and cerebella of 32 subjects by using catechol and dabsyl-Met sulphoxide as substrates, respectively. Allelic discrimination of COMT Val(108/185) Met SNP was performed using the Taqman 5'nuclease assay. Our studies revealed that, in homozygous carriers of Met, but not Val alleles, the activity of COMT and MSR was significantly correlated throughout all tested brain regions. These results suggest that the reduced enzymatic activity of Met-containing COMT may be secondary to Met sulphoxidation and point to MSR as a key molecular determinant for the modulation of COMT activity. © 2015 British Neuropathological Society.

  11. Reversible Redox Chemistry of Azo Compounds for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Xu, Gui-Liang; Ji, Xiao; Hou, Singyuk; Chen, Long; Wang, Fei; Jiang, Jianjun; Chen, Zonghai; Ren, Yang; Amine, Khalil; Wang, Chunsheng

    2018-03-05

    Sustainable sodium-ion batteries (SSIBs) using renewable organic electrodes are promising alternatives to lithium-ion batteries for the large-scale renewable energy storage. However, the lack of high-performance anode material impedes the development of SSIBs. Herein, we report a new type of organic anode material based on azo group for SSIBs. Azobenzene-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid sodium salt is used as a model to investigate the electrochemical behaviors and reaction mechanism of azo compound. It exhibits a reversible capacity of 170 mAh g -1 at 0.2C. When current density is increased to 20C, the reversible capacities of 98 mAh g -1 can be retained for 2000 cycles, demonstrating excellent cycling stability and high rate capability. The detailed characterizations reveal that azo group acts as an electrochemical active site to reversibly bond with Na + . The reversible redox chemistry between azo compound and Na ions offer opportunities for developing long-cycle-life and high-rate SSIBs. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Managing the cellular redox hub in photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2012-02-01

    Light-driven redox chemistry is a powerful source of redox signals that has a decisive input into transcriptional control within the cell nucleus. Like photosynthetic electron transport pathways, the respiratory electron transport chain exerts a profound control over gene function, in order to balance energy (reductant and ATP) supply with demand, while preventing excessive over-reduction or over-oxidation that would be adversely affect metabolism. Photosynthetic and respiratory redox chemistries are not merely housekeeping processes but they exert a controlling influence over every aspect of plant biology, participating in the control of gene transcription and translation, post-translational modifications and the regulation of assimilatory reactions, assimilate partitioning and export. The number of processes influenced by redox controls and signals continues to increase as do the components that are recognized participants in the associated signalling pathways. A step change in our understanding of the overall importance of the cellular redox hub to plant cells has occurred in recent years as the complexity of the management of the cellular redox hub in relation to metabolic triggers and environmental cues has been elucidated. This special issue describes aspects of redox regulation and signalling at the cutting edge of current research in this dynamic and rapidly expanding field. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Oxygen redox chemistry without excess alkali-metal ions in Na2/3[Mg0.28Mn0.72]O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Urmimala; House, Robert A; Somerville, James W; Tapia-Ruiz, Nuria; Lozano, Juan G; Guerrini, Niccoló; Hao, Rong; Luo, Kun; Jin, Liyu; Pérez-Osorio, Miguel A; Massel, Felix; Pickup, David M; Ramos, Silvia; Lu, Xingye; McNally, Daniel E; Chadwick, Alan V; Giustino, Feliciano; Schmitt, Thorsten; Duda, Laurent C; Roberts, Matthew R; Bruce, Peter G

    2018-03-01

    The search for improved energy-storage materials has revealed Li- and Na-rich intercalation compounds as promising high-capacity cathodes. They exhibit capacities in excess of what would be expected from alkali-ion removal/reinsertion and charge compensation by transition-metal (TM) ions. The additional capacity is provided through charge compensation by oxygen redox chemistry and some oxygen loss. It has been reported previously that oxygen redox occurs in O 2p orbitals that interact with alkali ions in the TM and alkali-ion layers (that is, oxygen redox occurs in compounds containing Li + -O(2p)-Li + interactions). Na 2/3 [Mg 0.28 Mn 0.72 ]O 2 exhibits an excess capacity and here we show that this is caused by oxygen redox, even though Mg 2+ resides in the TM layers rather than alkali-metal (AM) ions, which demonstrates that excess AM ions are not required to activate oxygen redox. We also show that, unlike the alkali-rich compounds, Na 2/3 [Mg 0.28 Mn 0.72 ]O 2 does not lose oxygen. The extraction of alkali ions from the alkali and TM layers in the alkali-rich compounds results in severely underbonded oxygen, which promotes oxygen loss, whereas Mg 2+ remains in Na 2/3 [Mg 0.28 Mn 0.72 ]O 2 , which stabilizes oxygen.

  14. Applied radiation chemistry - the present status in the Institute for Nuclear Research Academia Sinica (INRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian-yun, L.

    1981-01-01

    The department of radiation chemistry in INRAS is one of the research centers of radiation chemistry in China. Since its establishment in 1958, basic theoretical and applied radiation chemistry have been extensively studied and promoted. In the field of applied radiation chemistry of polymers, radiation modification of polymeric systems is an important and active branch. Materials such as permselective membranes based on different polymer films have been prepared by means of radiation crosslinking and grafting. Superfine powdered wax, which may be used for the preparation of special lubricating grease of high quality, has been obtained via radiation degradation of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene). As for applied organic radiation chemistry, the main technological conditions of preparation of alkane sulfonic acid by radiation sulphoxidation of n-paraffin were optimized and the radiation sensitization effects of halogenated alkane and acetic anhydride on the indicated system were studied. The radiation stability of linear conjugated molecules and the related effects of intra- and intermolecular radiation protection were particularly investigated. These studies are described. (author)

  15. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide and central redox theory for aerobic life: A tribute to Helmut Sies: Scout, trailblazer, and redox pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2016-04-01

    When Rafael Radi and I wrote about Helmut Sies for the Redox Pioneer series, I was disappointed that the Editor restricted us to the use of "Pioneer" in the title. My view is that Helmut was always ahead of the pioneers: He was a scout discovering paths for exploration and a trailblazer developing strategies and methods for discovery. I have known him for nearly 40 years and greatly enjoyed his collegiality as well as brilliance in scientific scholarship. He made monumental contributions to 20th century physiological chemistry beginning with his first measurement of H2O2 in rat liver. While continuous H2O2 production is dogma today, the concept of H2O2 production in mammalian tissues was largely buried for half a century. He continued this leadership in research on oxidative stress, GSH, selenium, and singlet oxygen, during the timeframe when physiological chemistry and biochemistry transitioned to contemporary 21st century systems biology. His impact has been extensive in medical and health sciences, especially in nutrition, aging, toxicology and cancer. I briefly summarize my interactions with Helmut, stressing our work together on the redox code, a set of principles to link mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics, H2O2 metabolism, redox signaling and redox proteomics into central redox theory. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of High Temperature Chemistry Measurement System for Establishment of On-Line Water Chemistry Surveillance Network in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jei Won; Kim, Won Ho; Song, Kyu Seok; Joo, Ki Soo; Choi, Ke Chon; Ha, Yeong Keong; Ahn, Hong Joo; Im, Hee Jung; Maeng, Wan Young

    2010-07-01

    An integrated high-temperature water chemistry sensor (pH, E redox ) was developed for the establishment of the on-line water chemistry surveillance system in nuclear power plants. The basic performance of the integrated sensor was confirmed in high-temperature (280 .deg. C, 150kg/m 2 ) lithium borate solutions by using the relationship between the concentration of lithium ion and pH-E redox values. Especially, the effects of various environmental factors such as temperature, pressure, and flow rate on YSZ-based pH electrode were evaluated for ensuring the accuracy of high-temperature pH measurement. And the relationships between each water chemistry factor (pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity) were induced for enhancing the credibility of water chemistry measurement. In addition, on the basis of the evaluation of a nuclear plant design company, we suggested potential installation positions of the measurement system in a nuclear power plant

  18. Interaction of La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+ and Sm3+ with DL-aspartic acid in dimethyl sulphoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, M.C.; Saxena, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Sm(III) form 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with DL-aspartic acid in 20% aq. dimethyl sulphoxide at μ = 0.1M (NaClO 4 ) as revealed by pH-metric and conductometric titrations. Stabilities of the complexes follow the order: La 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ . The overall changes in ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for the metal-ligand interaction have also been reported at 30deg C. (auth.)

  19. Plasmonic tunnel junctions for single-molecule redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Bart; Benz, Felix; Barrow, Steven J; Sigle, Daniel O; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Palma, Aniello; Carnegie, Cloudy; Kamp, Marlous; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Scherman, Oren A; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2017-10-20

    Nanoparticles attached just above a flat metallic surface can trap optical fields in the nanoscale gap. This enables local spectroscopy of a few molecules within each coupled plasmonic hotspot, with near thousand-fold enhancement of the incident fields. As a result of non-radiative relaxation pathways, the plasmons in such sub-nanometre cavities generate hot charge carriers, which can catalyse chemical reactions or induce redox processes in molecules located within the plasmonic hotspots. Here, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows us to track these hot-electron-induced chemical reduction processes in a series of different aromatic molecules. We demonstrate that by increasing the tunnelling barrier height and the dephasing strength, a transition from coherent to hopping electron transport occurs, enabling observation of redox processes in real time at the single-molecule level.

  20. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yifeng; Papenguth, Hans W.

    2000-01-01

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation

  1. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANG,YIFENG; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.

    2000-05-04

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.

  2. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Chemistry and Redox Biology of Mycothiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Aníbal M; Pedre, Brandán; De Armas, María Inés; Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Radi, Rafael; Messens, Joris; Trujillo, Madia

    2018-02-20

    Mycothiol (MSH, AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the main low-molecular weight (LMW) thiol of most Actinomycetes, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis that affects millions of people worldwide. Strains with decreased MSH content show increased susceptibilities to hydroperoxides and electrophilic compounds. In M. tuberculosis, MSH modulates the response to several antituberculosis drugs. Enzymatic routes involving MSH could provide clues for specific drug design. Recent Advances: Physicochemical data argue against a rapid, nonenzymatic reaction of MSH with oxidants, disulfides, or electrophiles. Moreover, exposure of the bacteria to high concentrations of two-electron oxidants resulted in protein mycothiolation. The recently described glutaredoxin-like protein mycoredoxin-1 (Mrx-1) provides a route for catalytic reduction of mycothiolated proteins, protecting critical cysteines from irreversible oxidation. The description of MSH/Mrx-1-dependent activities of peroxidases helped to explain the higher susceptibility to oxidants observed in Actinomycetes lacking MSH. Moreover, the first mycothiol-S-transferase, member of the DinB superfamily of proteins, was described. In Corynebacterium, both the MSH/Mrx-1 and the thioredoxin pathways reduce methionine sulfoxide reductase A. A novel tool for in vivo imaging of the MSH/mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) status allows following changes in the mycothiol redox state during macrophage infection and its relationship with antibiotic sensitivity. Redundancy of MSH with other LMW thiols is starting to be unraveled and could help to rationalize the differences in the reported importance of MSH synthesis observed in vitro versus in animal infection models. Future work should be directed to establish the structural bases of the specificity of MSH-dependent enzymes, thus facilitating drug developments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 487-504.

  4. The influence of extracellular superoxide on iron redox chemistry and bioavailability to aquatic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eRose

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide, the one-electron reduced form of dioxygen, is produced in the extracellular milieu of aquatic microbes through a range of abiotic chemical processes and also by microbes themselves. Due to its ability to promote both oxidative and reductive reactions, superoxide may have a profound impact on the redox state of iron, potentially influencing iron solubility, complex speciation and bioavailability. The interplay between iron, superoxide and oxygen may also produce a cascade of other highly reactive transients in oxygenated natural waters. For microbes, the overall effect of reactions between superoxide and iron may be deleterious or beneficial, depending on the organism and its chemical environment. Here I critically discuss recent advances in understanding: (i sources of extracellular superoxide in natural waters, with a particular emphasis on microbial generation; (ii the chemistry of reactions between superoxide and iron; and (iii the influence of these processes on iron bioavailability and microbial iron nutrition.

  5. Radiation chemistry and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Effects of radiation to human body have been seriously discussed nowadays. These are important issues for the realization of sustainable society. It should be emphasized that various reactive intermediates generated by radiation play important roles in each cases. Radiation chemical studies will provide various reaction-mechanistic aspects on these important issues. Our research group has continuously carried out reaction-mechanistic studies using radiation chemical methods. From these studies, we have obtained a variety of results on basic molecular systems, reactions, materials that are close to practical application, biological systems and so on. Reactive species are generated from the radiation reactions in solution, and can be used as one-electron oxidative and reductive reagent to give selectively radical cation and anion of solute molecules such as various organic and inorganic molecules. Therefore, the radiation chemistry has contributed significantly to chemistry in which one-electron oxidation and reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reactions can be studied in real time with the transition absorption measurement by the pulse radiolysis technique. Even though the target compounds cannot be oxidized and reduced in chemical or electrochemical oxidation and reduction, their one-electron redox can be performed by the electron beam radiation. Therefore, radiation chemistry is very useful technique for basic science. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects

  6. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  7. Iron oxide redox chemistry and nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, D.J.; Lemire, R.J.; Taylor, P.

    1997-04-01

    Solubility and stability data for iron (III) oxides and aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) species are reviewed, and selected values are used to calculate potential-pH diagrams for the iron system at temperatures of 25 and 100 deg C, chloride activities {C1 - } = 10 -2 and 1 mol/kg, total carbonate activity {C T } = 10 -3 mol/kg, and iron(III) oxide/oxyhydroxide solubility products (25 deg C values) K sp = {Fe 3+ }{OH - } 3 = 10 -38.5 , 10 -40 and 10 -42 . The temperatures and anion concentrations bracket the range of conditions expected in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. The three solubility products represent a conservative upper limit, a most probable value, and a minimum credible value, respectively, for the iron oxides likely to be important in controlling redox conditions in a disposal vault for CANDU nuclear reactor fuel. Only in the first of these three cases do the calculated redox potentials significantly exceed values under which oxidative dissolution of the fuel may occur. (author)

  8. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L; Lubner, Carolyn E; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W; Peters, John W; Beratan, David N

    2017-09-19

    processes of their own. We dissect the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron bifurcation in Nfn and find that the key features of electron bifurcation are (1) spatially separated transfer pathways that diverge from a two-electron donor, (2) one thermodynamically uphill and one downhill redox pathway, with a large negative shift in the donor's reduction potential after departure of the first electron, and (3) electron tunneling and activation factors that enable bifurcation, producing a 1:1 partitioning of electrons onto the two pathways. Electron bifurcation is found in the CO 2 reducing pathways of methanogenic archaea, in the hydrogen pathways of hydrogenases, in the nitrogen fixing pathway of Fix, and in the mitochondrial charge transfer chain of complex III, cytochrome bc 1 . While crossed potentials may offer the biological advantage of producing tightly regulated high energy reactive species, neither kinetic nor thermodynamic considerations mandate crossed potentials to generate successful electron bifurcation. Taken together, the theoretical framework established here, focusing on the underpinning electron tunneling barriers and activation free energies, explains the logic of electron bifurcation that enables energy conversion and conservation in Nfn, points toward bioinspired schemes to execute multielectron redox chemistry, and establishes a roadmap for examining novel electron bifurcation networks in nature.

  9. Modelling non-redox enzymes: Anaerobic and aerobic acetylene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Modelling non-redox enzymes: Anaerobic and aerobic acetylene hydratase. SABYASACHI SARKAR. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016,. India. Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite produced during acetylene degradation by bacteria either aerobically or anaerobically. Conversion of ...

  10. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Aqueous liquid redox desulfurisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reicher, M.; Niemiec, B.; Katona, T.

    1999-12-01

    The LO-CAT II process is an aqueous liquid redox process which uses ferric and ferrous iron catalysts to oxidise hydrogen sulfide (from sour gas) to elemental sulfur: the relevant chemical equations are given. Chelating agents keep the iron in solution. The system is described under the headings of (i) LO-CAT chemistry, (ii) design parameters, (iii) startup challenges, (iv) present situation and (v) anticipated future conditions. Further improvements to the system are anticipated.

  12. Boosting lithium storage in covalent organic framework via activation of 14-electron redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhendong; Yang, Qinsi; Xu, Yi; Guo, Siyu; Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Hao; Lv, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yong

    2018-02-08

    Conjugated polymeric molecules have been heralded as promising electrode materials for the next-generation energy-storage technologies owing to their chemical flexibility at the molecular level, environmental benefit, and cost advantage. However, before any practical implementation takes place, the low capacity, poor structural stability, and sluggish ion/electron diffusion kinetics remain the obstacles that have to be overcome. Here, we report the synthesis of a few-layered two-dimensional covalent organic framework trapped by carbon nanotubes as the anode of lithium-ion batteries. Remarkably, upon activation, this organic electrode delivers a large reversible capacity of 1536 mAh g -1 and can sustain 500 cycles at 100 mA g -1 . Aided by theoretical calculations and electrochemical probing of the electrochemical behavior at different stages of cycling, the storage mechanism is revealed to be governed by 14-electron redox chemistry for a covalent organic framework monomer with one lithium ion per C=N group and six lithium ions per benzene ring. This work may pave the way to the development of high-capacity electrodes for organic rechargeable batteries.

  13. Redox Equilibria in SO2 Oxidation Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Boghosian, Soghomon

    1999-01-01

    been carried out regarding the complex and compound formation of V(V) and the formation of V(IV) and V(III) compounds with low solubility causing catalyst deactivation. However, the redox chemistry of vanadium and the complex formation of V(IV) is much less investigated and further information...... on these subjects in pyrosulfate melts is needed to obtain a deeper understanding of the reaction mechanism. The present paper describes our efforts so far to study the V(IV) chemistry using especially spectroscopic and electrochemical methods....

  14. Redox-responsive theranostic nanoplatforms based on inorganic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Yu-Long; Li, Xi; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Min; Hu, Kun; Li, Lu-Hai; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-10

    Spurred on by advances in materials chemistry and nanotechnology, scientists have developed many novel nanopreparations for cancer diagnosis and therapy. To treat complex malignant tumors effectively, multifunctional nanomedicines with targeting ability, imaging properties and controlled drug release behavior should be designed and exploited. The therapeutic efficiency of loaded drugs can be dramatically improved using redox-responsive nanoplatforms which can sense the differences in the redox status of tumor tissues and healthy ones. Redox-sensitive nanocarriers can be constructed from both organic and inorganic nanomaterials; however, at present, drug delivery nanovectors progressively lean towards inorganic nanomaterials because of their facile synthesis/modification and their unique physicochemical properties. In this review, we focus specifically on the preparation and application of redox-sensitive nanosystems based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanomaterials and other inorganic nanomaterials. We discuss relevant examples of redox-sensitive nanosystems in each category. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future strategies from the aspect of material design and practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signalling and their interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nathan Cobley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1 redox signalling and (2 macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signalling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signalling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signalling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signalling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation.

  16. A Multistep Equilibria-Redox-Complexation Demonstration to Illustrate Le Chatelier's Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Tomas G.; Mellon, Edward K.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a process that can be used to illustrate a number of chemical principles including Le Chatelier's principle, redox chemistry, equilibria versus steady state situations, and solubility of species. (JRH)

  17. Reversible anionic redox chemistry in high-capacity layered-oxide electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiya, M.; Rousse, G.; Ramesha, K.; Laisa, C. P.; Vezin, H.; Sougrati, M. T.; Doublet, M.-L.; Foix, D.; Gonbeau, D.; Walker, W.; Prakash, A. S.; Ben Hassine, M.; Dupont, L.; Tarascon, J.-M.

    2013-09-01

    Li-ion batteries have contributed to the commercial success of portable electronics and may soon dominate the electric transportation market provided that major scientific advances including new materials and concepts are developed. Classical positive electrodes for Li-ion technology operate mainly through an insertion-deinsertion redox process involving cationic species. However, this mechanism is insufficient to account for the high capacities exhibited by the new generation of Li-rich (Li1+xNiyCozMn(1-x-y-z)O2) layered oxides that present unusual Li reactivity. In an attempt to overcome both the inherent composition and the structural complexity of this class of oxides, we have designed structurally related Li2Ru1-ySnyO3 materials that have a single redox cation and exhibit sustainable reversible capacities as high as 230 mA h g-1. Moreover, they present good cycling behaviour with no signs of voltage decay and a small irreversible capacity. We also unambiguously show, on the basis of an arsenal of characterization techniques, that the reactivity of these high-capacity materials towards Li entails cumulative cationic (Mn+→M(n+1)+) and anionic (O2-→O22-) reversible redox processes, owing to the d-sp hybridization associated with a reductive coupling mechanism. Because Li2MO3 is a large family of compounds, this study opens the door to the exploration of a vast number of high-capacity materials.

  18. Chemical Principles Revisited. Redox Reactions and the Electropotential Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper suggests a nontraditional pedagogic approach to the subject of redox reactions and electrode potentials suitable for freshman chemistry. Presented is a method for the representation of galvanic cells without the introduction of the symbology and notation of conventional cell diagrams. (CW)

  19. Adsorption behavior of redox-active suppressor additives: Combined electrochemical and STM studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, N.T.M.; Huynh, T.M.T.; Fluegel, A.; Mayer, D.; Broekmann, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Janus Green B and safranine are prototypical redox-active leveler additives for copper electroplating. → Their redox-transitions lie within the copper potential window. → Reduced additives are identified as active species for the leveling effect. → Electro-reduction affects in particular the central aromatic cores of the additives. - Abstract: The redox chemistry and the related surface phase behavior of Safranine (SAF) and Janus Green B (JGB) have been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry in combination with in situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy using HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) and single crystalline Cu(1 0 0) as model substrates, both revealing different widths of the accessible potential windows. JGB and SAF serve as prototypical heterocyclic suppressor/leveler additives that are used for the metallization of 3D-TSVs (3D Through Silicon Vias) following a classical 'leveling' concept. SAF can be considered as the reductive decomposition product of JGB that is formed at the copper/electrolyte interface upon electroplating. Both additives reveal a pronounced pH-dependent redox-chemistry with redox-transitions lying close to or even beyond the anodic limit of the copper potential window. Affected by these redox-processes are in particular the aromatic cores of those heterocycles that can be (quasi)reversibly reduced by a two electron transfer process within the potential window of copper. Therefore we identify the reduced form of those dyes as the active components for the suppressing/leveling effect in copper plating. STM data clearly shows a dye surface phase behavior that is crucially determined by its potential-dependent redox-chemistry. This will be exemplarily discussed for the SAF dye. On chloride-modified Cu(1 0 0) mono-reduced SAF forms a structurally well-defined monolayer of cationic stacking polymers. However, this coupled anion/cation layer reveals only minor suppressing capabilities with respect to the copper

  20. Studies of the chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium at the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, supported by the US Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretrukhin, V.F.

    1995-04-01

    Studies at Hanford in the 1980s revealed the potential for actinides to form stable soluble complexes in alkaline media, simulating radioactive tank waste. Pu(IV) hydrous oxide and Pu(VI) solubility increased with hydroxide concentration, ionic strength, and aluminate/carbonate concentrations. Subsequent contacts between US and Russian researchers in 1993 led to a technical literature review of the chemistry of TRU and Tc in alkaline media; this review addresses oxidation states, solubility, speciation, redox reactions, electrochemistry, radiation chemistry, and separations in alkaline media. As an outgrowth, a program of fundamental and applied chemistry studies of TRU and Tc is being conducted at IPC/RAS with US DOE support: solubility, redox reagents, coprecipitation, and radiation chemistry. This overview provides information on the Hanford Site tank waste system, US DOE technological needs, and IPC/RAS developments

  1. TWO IDEAS OF THE REDOX REACTION: MISCONCEPTIONS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    1), or with the reaction of iron and a copper sulfate solution (see Fig. 2). ... Since neither the young people know the historical approach to the explanation of ... everyday life the concept of electron transfer in redox reactions, a good instruction on ..... Improving teaching and learning through chemistry education research: A.

  2. Investigation of the Redox Chemistry of Anthraquinone Derivatives Using Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, Jonathan E.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Assary, Rajeev S.

    2014-09-25

    Application of density functional calculations to compute electrochemical properties such as redox windows, effect of substitution by electron donating and electron withdrawing groups on redox windows, and solvation free energies for ~50 anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives are presented because of their potential as anolytes in all-organic redox flow batteries. Computations suggest that lithium ions can increase (by ~0.4 V) the reduction potential of anthraquinone due to the lithium ion pairing by forming a Lewis base-Lewis acid complex. To design new redox active species, the substitution by electron donating groups are essential to improve the reduction window of AQ with adequate oxidative stability. For instance, a complete methylation of AQ can improve its reduction window by ~0.4 V. The quantum chemical studies of the ~50 AQ derivatives are used to derive a relationship that connects the computed LUMO energy and the reduction potential that can be applied as a descriptor for screening thousands of AQ derivatives. Our computations also suggest that incorporating oxy-methyl dioxolane substituents in the AQ framework can increase its interaction with non-aqueous solvent and improve its solubility. Thermochemical calculations for likely bond breaking decomposition reactions of un-substituted AQ anions suggest that the dianions are relatively stable in the solution. These studies provide ideal platform to perform further combined experimental and theoretical studies to understand the electrochemical reversibility and solubility of new quinone molecules as energy storage materials.

  3. A high-energy-density redox flow battery based on zinc/polyhalide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liqun; Lai, Qinzhi; Zhang, Jianlu; Zhang, Huamin

    2012-05-01

    Zn and the Art of Battery Development: A zinc/polyhalide redox flow battery employs Br(-) /ClBr(2-) and Zn/Zn(2+) redox couples in its positive and negative half-cells, respectively. The performance of the battery is evaluated by charge-discharge cycling tests and reveals a high energy efficiency of 81%, based on a Coulombic efficiency of 96% and voltage efficiency of 84%. The new battery technology can provide high performance and energy density at an acceptable cost. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Redox zonation for different groundwater flow paths during bank filtration: a case study at Liao River, Shenyang, northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaosi; Lu, Shuai; Yuan, Wenzhen; Woo, Nam Chil; Dai, Zhenxue; Dong, Weihong; Du, Shanghai; Zhang, Xinyue

    2018-03-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of redox zones in an aquifer is important when designing groundwater supply systems. Redox zonation can have direct or indirect control of the biological and chemical reactions and mobility of pollutants. In this study, redox conditions are characterized by interpreting the hydrogeological conditions and water chemistry in groundwater during bank infiltration at a site in Shenyang, northeast China. The relevant redox processes and zonal differences in a shallow flow path and deeper flow path at the field scale were revealed by monitoring the redox parameters and chemistry of groundwater near the Liao River. The results show obvious horizontal and vertical components of redox zones during bank filtration. Variations in the horizontal extent of the redox zone were controlled by the different permeabilities of the riverbed sediments and aquifer with depth. Horizontally, the redox zone was situated within 17 m of the riverbank for the shallow flow path and within 200 m for the deep flow path. The vertical extent of the redox zone was affected by precipitation and seasonal river floods and extended to 10 m below the surface. During bank filtration, iron and manganese oxides or hydroxides were reductively dissolved, and arsenic that was adsorbed onto the medium surface or coprecipitated is released into the groundwater. This leads to increased arsenic content in groundwater, which poses a serious threat to water supply security.

  5. Synthesis, spectral characterization and redox properties of iron (II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Arylazoheterocycles and their chemistry of transition and non-transition metals have been explored for more than two decades.1 Owing to their pH-response, photoactivity, light electron communication, stabilization of low valent metal oxidation state, exhibition of serial redox states of complexes, isolation of anion radicals, ...

  6. A kinetic study of the redox reactions of complex cyanides of iron, molybdenum and tungsten with compounds of the group VI A elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetic study arises out of the fact that few is known about redox kinetics of complex cyanides of molybdenum and tungsten. The redox kinetics of the complex cyanides of iron with organic and inorganic compounds are well known in organic chemistry. This comparitive study is done to obtain more information on redox reactions of complex cyanides of molybdenum and tungsten considering its greater applicability in organic and inorganic chemistry because of the propitious reduction potential of this complex cyanide in acidic and alkaline mediums. Various redox systems are kinetically investigated regarding the influence of the oxidising agent, reducing agent hydrogen ions and alkaline-metal ions on the reaction rate. A reaction mechanism is proposed for every system

  7. Molecular Orbital Principles of Oxygen-Redox Battery Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Masashi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2017-10-25

    Lithium-ion batteries are key energy-storage devices for a sustainable society. The most widely used positive electrode materials are LiMO 2 (M: transition metal), in which a redox reaction of M occurs in association with Li + (de)intercalation. Recent developments of Li-excess transition-metal oxides, which deliver a large capacity of more than 200 mAh/g using an extra redox reaction of oxygen, introduce new possibilities for designing higher energy density lithium-ion batteries. For better engineering using this fascinating new chemistry, it is necessary to achieve a full understanding of the reaction mechanism by gaining knowledge on the chemical state of oxygen. In this review, a summary of the recent advances in oxygen-redox battery electrodes is provided, followed by a systematic demonstration of the overall electronic structures based on molecular orbitals with a focus on the local coordination environment around oxygen. We show that a π-type molecular orbital plays an important role in stabilizing the oxidized oxygen that emerges upon the charging process. Molecular orbital principles are convenient for an atomic-level understanding of how reversible oxygen-redox reactions occur in bulk, providing a solid foundation toward improved oxygen-redox positive electrode materials for high energy-density batteries.

  8. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  9. Metathetical Redox Reaction of (Diacetoxyiodo)arenes and Iodoarenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin-Des Lauriers, Antoine; Legault, Claude Y

    2015-12-17

    The oxidation of iodoarenes is central to the field of hypervalent iodine chemistry. It was found that the metathetical redox reaction between (diacetoxyiodo)arenes and iodoarenes is possible in the presence of a catalytic amount of Lewis acid. This discovery opens a new strategy to access (diacetoxyiodo)arenes. A computational study is provided to rationalize the results observed.

  10. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, J.M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state (Pu) coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state (Pu) depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO 2+x formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI)

  11. Crystal chemistry of iron in low-temperature chlorites, implications for geo-thermometry and the determination of redox paleo-conditions in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigault, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    In contexts of uranium deposits, redox conditions constitute the main factor controlling the uranium deposition. Often observed in these deposits, chlorites are the unique clay mineral which can be able to record in their structure the redox conditions through their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio. However, the common presence of several populations of chlorites makes difficult to understand the message carried out by these minerals. Thanks to μ-XANES spectroscopy, we are now able to measure on thin sections the Fe"3"+/SFe ratio in chlorites with an accuracy of 5 %. Measurements show that it can reach 60 % in di-tri-octahedral chlorites and 5 % to more than 40 % for tri-octahedral chlorites. In hydrothermal contexts where chlorites crystallize through a dissolution-recrystallization process, their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio decreases with the increase of the global Fe content. Diagenetic chlorites observed resulting from the polymorphic transformation of berthierine have a different behavior because there is no link between their total iron content and their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio: their chemistry is directly inherited from the one of the precursor mineral because this transformation does not allow a reorganization of cations in the structure. This transformation explains that thermodynamic models cannot work for these phases. For the use of chlorites as makers of redox paleo-conditions in contexts of uranium deposits where diagenetic and hydrothermal chlorites can be present, it is decisive to determine their origin, for example analyzing their polytype: Ib (b=90 degrees) for chlorites crystallized from solid-state transformation and IIb for chlorites crystallized through dissolution-recrystallization process. (author)

  12. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume, Grindsted, Denmark: 2. Deduction of anaerobic (methanogenic, sulfate-, and Fe (III)-reducing) redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-JøRgen; Bjerg, Poul L.; Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Rügge, Kirsten; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1999-04-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15-60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment was carried out. Furthermore, the stability of the redox conditions spatially and over time were investigated, and different approaches to deduce the redox conditions were evaluated. The redox conditions were evaluated in a set of 20 sediment and groundwater samples taken from locations adjacent to the sediment samples. Samples were investigated with respect to groundwater chemistry, including hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and sediment geochemistry, and bioassays were performed. The groundwater chemistry, including redox sensitive species for a large number of samples, varied over time during the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe(II), hydrogen, and VFA groundwater chemistry parameters strongly indicated a Fe(III)-reducing environment. This was further supported by the bioassays, although methane production and sulfate-reduction were also observed in a few samples close to the landfill. On the basis of the calculated carbon conversion, Fe(III) was the dominant electron acceptor in the region of the aquifer, which was investigated. Because of the complexity of a landfill leachate plume, several redox processes may occur simultaneously, and an array of methods must be applied for redox characterization in such multicomponent systems.

  13. Extracellular redox state: refining the definition of oxidative stress in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress in aging can result from an imbalance of prooxidants and antioxidants with excessive, destructive free radical chemistry. Thiol systems are important in the control of these processes, both by protecting against damage and serving in redox signaling mechanisms to sense danger and repair the damage. Studies by a number of research groups in collaboration with the Emory Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory show that the redox state of the central tissue antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), can be measured in human plasma and provides a quantitative systemic indicator of oxidative stress. Plasma GSH/GSSG redox in humans becomes oxidized with age, in response to chemotherapy, as a consequence of cigarette smoking, and in association with common age-related diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease). However, the GSH/GSSG redox is not equilibrated with the larger plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) pool, and the Cys/CySS redox varies with age in a pattern that is distinct from that of GSH/GSSG redox. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that variation in Cys/CySS redox over the range found in vivo affects signaling pathways, which control cell proliferation and oxidant-induced apoptosis. The results point to the conclusion that free radical scavenging antioxidants are of increased importance when thiol/disulfide redox states are oxidized. Because thiol/disulfide redox states, per se, function in redox signaling and control as well as antioxidant protection, GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS redox states may provide central parameters to link environmental influences and progression of changes associated with aging.

  14. Redox electrodes comprised of polymer-modified carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mark; Emmett, Robert; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Physics Team; Clemson Chemical Engineering Team

    2013-03-01

    A shift in how we generate and use electricity requires new energy storage materials and systems compatible with hybrid electric transportation and the integration of renewable energy sources. Supercapacitors provide a solution to these needs by combining the high power, rapid switching, and exceptional cycle life of a capacitor with the high energy density of a battery. Our research brings together nanotechnology and materials chemistry to address the limitations of electrode materials. Paper electrodes fabricated with various forms of carbon nanomaterials, such as nanotubes, are modified with redox-polymers to increase the electrode's energy density while maintaining rapid discharge rates. In these systems, the carbon nanomaterials provide the high surface area, electrical conductivity, nanoscale and porosity, while the redox polymers provide a mechanism for charge storage through Faradaic charge transfer. The design of redox polymers and their incorporation into nanomaterial electrodes will be discussed with a focus on enabling high power and high energy density electrodes.

  15. NCAW feed chemistry: Effect of starting chemistry on melter offgas and iron redox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.A.; Vienna, J.D.; Merz, M.D.

    1995-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) program has been established to develop technology to support immobilization of selected Hanford wastes. The effort of the PVTD program is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report is part of the effort and focuses on the effect of starting waste chemistry on the vitrification process. The objective of the investigation was the evaluation of the effect of starting chemistry on the cold cap behavior in the vitrification of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). In addition this investigation provides an initial laboratory investigation of the cold cap and method for evaluation of alternate reductants

  16. Thiol Redox Transitions in Cell Signaling: a Lesson from N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Parasassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The functional status of cells is under the control of external stimuli affecting the function of critical proteins and eventually gene expression. Signal sensing and transduction by messengers to specific effectors operate by post-translational modification of proteins, among which thiol redox switches play a fundamental role that is just beginning to be understood. The maintenance of the redox status is, indeed, crucial for cellular homeostasis and its dysregulation towards a more oxidized intracellular environment is associated with aberrant proliferation, ultimately related to diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Redox transitions occur in sensitive cysteine residues of regulatory proteins relevant to signaling, their evolution to metastable disulfides accounting for the functional redox switch. N-acetylcysteine (NAC is a thiol-containing compound that is able to interfere with redox transitions of thiols and, thus, in principle, able to modulate redox signaling. We here review the redox chemistry of NAC, then screen possible mechanisms to explain the effects observed in NAC-treated normal and cancer cells; such effects involve a modification of global gene expression, thus of functions and morphology, with a leitmotif of a switch from proliferation to terminal differentiation. The regulation of thiol redox transitions in cell signaling is, therefore, proposed as a new tool, holding promise not only for a deeper explanation of mechanisms, but indeed for innovative pharmacological interventions.

  17. Some redox chemistry of HPO2-. and .PO32- radicals. A pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, J.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The HO . radical oxidises hypophosphite and phosphite anions to HPO 2 -. and . PO 3 2- respectively, but Br 2 -. and N 3 . do not. The rates of oxidation of HPO 2 -. by a series of oxidising agents of known one electron redox potentials decrease with decreasing potential while the corresponding rates for oxidation of . PO 3 2- remain close to the diffusion controlled limit. . PO 3 2- will oxidise cysteine but HPO 2 -. does not. . PO 3 2- did not oxidise ABTS, ascorbate, or the anion of the vitamin E analogue, trolox. It reduced traces of TMPD +. in TMPD rather than oxidising the substrate. The one electron redox potentials for oxidation and reduction of . PO 3 2- are calculated in light of recently published redox data on penicillamine. (author)

  18. Intermediate honeycomb ordering to trigger oxygen redox chemistry in layered battery electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortemard de Boisse, Benoit; Liu, Guandong; Ma, Jiangtao; Nishimura, Shin-ichi; Chung, Sai-Cheong; Kiuchi, Hisao; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kikkawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okubo, Masashi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-04-18

    Sodium-ion batteries are attractive energy storage media owing to the abundance of sodium, but the low capacities of available cathode materials make them impractical. Sodium-excess metal oxides Na2MO3 (M: transition metal) are appealing cathode materials that may realize large capacities through additional oxygen redox reaction. However, the general strategies for enhancing the capacity of Na2MO3 are poorly established. Here using two polymorphs of Na2RuO3, we demonstrate the critical role of honeycomb-type cation ordering in Na2MO3. Ordered Na2RuO3 with honeycomb-ordered [Na(1/3)Ru(2/3)]O2 slabs delivers a capacity of 180 mAh g(-1) (1.3-electron reaction), whereas disordered Na2RuO3 only delivers 135 mAh g(-1) (1.0-electron reaction). We clarify that the large extra capacity of ordered Na2RuO3 is enabled by a spontaneously ordered intermediate Na1RuO3 phase with ilmenite O1 structure, which induces frontier orbital reorganization to trigger the oxygen redox reaction, unveiling a general requisite for the stable oxygen redox reaction in high-capacity Na2MO3 cathodes.

  19. Hydrologic influence on redox dynamics in estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Kim, K. H.; Guimond, J. A.; Heiss, J.; Ullman, W. J.; Seyfferth, A.

    2017-12-01

    Redox conditions in coastal aquifers control reactions that impact nutrient cycling, contaminant release, and carbon budgets, with implications for water resources and ecosystem health. Hydrologic changes can shift redox boundaries and inputs of reactants, especially in dynamic coastal systems subject to fluctuations on tidal, lunar, and longer timescales. We present two examples of redox shifts in estuarine systems in Delaware, USA: a beach aquifer and a saltmarsh. Beach aquifers are biogeochemical hot spots due to mixing between fresh groundwater and infiltrating seawater. At Cape Henlopen, DE, geochemical measurements identified reactions in the intertidal aquifer that include cycling of carbon, nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Measurements and modeling illustrate that redox potential as well as the locations of redox reactions shift on tidal to seasonal timescales and in response to changing beach and aquifer properties, impacting overall rates of reactions such as denitrification that reduces N loads to coastal waters. In the St. Jones National Estuarine Research Reserve, tidal fluctuations in channels cause periodic groundwater-surface water exchange, water table movement, and intermittent flooding that varies spatially across the saltmarsh. These changes create shifts in redox potential that are greatest near channels and in the top 20 cm of sediments. The magnitude of redox change depends on hydrologic setting (near channels or in marsh interior), hydrologic conditions (tidal stage, seasonal shifts), as well as prevalence of macropores created by crab burrows that change seasonally with crab activity. These shifts correspond to changes in porewater chemistry that have implications for nutrient cycling and carbon export to the ocean. Understanding hydrologic influence on redox geochemistry is critical for predicting how these systems and their ecosystem services may change in the future in response to anthropogenic and climate change.

  20. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, UniEnergy,improved a vanadium redox flow battery to double the energy density, have a broader operating temperature range, a smaller footprint, reduced chemical usage, and very little capacity degradation.

  1. Recent developments in organic redox flow batteries: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, P.; Shah, A. A.; Sanz, L.; Flox, C.; Morante, J. R.; Xu, Q.; Mohamed, M. R.; Ponce de León, C.; Walsh, F. C.

    2017-08-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) have emerged as prime candidates for energy storage on the medium and large scales, particularly at the grid scale. The demand for versatile energy storage continues to increase as more electrical energy is generated from intermittent renewable sources. A major barrier in the way of broad deployment and deep market penetration is the use of expensive metals as the active species in the electrolytes. The use of organic redox couples in aqueous or non-aqueous electrolytes is a promising approach to reducing the overall cost in long-term, since these materials can be low-cost and abundant. The performance of such redox couples can be tuned by modifying their chemical structure. In recent years, significant developments in organic redox flow batteries has taken place, with the introduction of new groups of highly soluble organic molecules, capable of providing a cell voltage and charge capacity comparable to conventional metal-based systems. This review summarises the fundamental developments and characterization of organic redox flow batteries from both the chemistry and materials perspectives. The latest advances, future challenges and opportunities for further development are discussed.

  2. Computational assignment of redox states to Coulomb blockade diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Stine T; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Hansen, Thorsten; Kongsted, Jacob; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2014-09-07

    With the advent of molecular transistors, electrochemistry can now be studied at the single-molecule level. Experimentally, the redox chemistry of the molecule manifests itself as features in the observed Coulomb blockade diamonds. We present a simple theoretical method for explicit construction of the Coulomb blockade diamonds of a molecule. A combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method is invoked to calculate redox energies and polarizabilities of the molecules, including the screening effect of the metal leads. This direct approach circumvents the need for explicit modelling of the gate electrode. From the calculated parameters the Coulomb blockade diamonds are constructed using simple theory. We offer a theoretical tool for assignment of Coulomb blockade diamonds to specific redox states in particular, and a study of chemical details in the diamonds in general. With the ongoing experimental developments in molecular transistor experiments, our tool could find use in molecular electronics, electrochemistry, and electrocatalysis.

  3. Chemistry Cube Game - Exploring Basic Principles of Chemistry by Turning Cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus T

    2018-02-01

    The Chemistry Cube Game invites students at secondary school level 1 and 2 to explore basic concepts of chemistry in a playful way, either as individuals or in teams. It consists of 15 different cubes, 9 cubes for different acids, their corresponding bases and precursors, and 6 cubes for different reducing and oxidising agents. The cubes can be rotated in those directions indicated. Each 'allowed' vertical or horizontal rotation of 90° stands for a chemical reaction or a physical transition. Two different games and playing modes are presented here: First, redox chemistry is introduced for the formation of salts from elementary metals and non-metals. Second, the speciation of acids and bases at different pH-values is shown. The cubes can be also used for games about environmental chemistry such as the carbon and sulphur cycle, covering the topic of acid rain, or the nitrogen cycle including ammoniac synthesis, nitrification and de-nitrification.

  4. Enhanced reversibility and durability of a solid oxide Fe-air redox battery by carbothermic reaction derived energy storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Huang, Kevin

    2014-01-18

    The recently developed solid oxide metal-air redox battery is a new technology capable of high-rate chemistry. Here we report that the performance, reversibility and stability of a solid oxide iron-air redox battery can be significantly improved by nanostructuring energy storage materials from a carbothermic reaction.

  5. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  6. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  7. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Pan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  8. A Protocol for Electrochemical Evaluations and State of Charge Diagnostics of a Symmetric Organic Redox Flow Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Wentao; Vemuri, Rama S.; Hu, Dehong; Yang, Zheng; Wei, Xiaoliang

    2017-01-01

    Redox flow batteries have been considered as one of the most promising stationary energy storage solutions for improving the reliability of the power grid and deployment of renewable energy technologies. Among the many flow battery chemistries, nonaqueous flow batteries have the potential to achieve high energy density because of the broad voltage windows of nonaqueous electrolytes. However, significant technical hurdles exist currently limiting nonaqueous flow batteries to demonstrate their full potential, such as low redox concentrations, low operating currents, under-explored battery status monitoring, etc. In an attempt to address these limitations, we report a nonaqueous flow battery based on a highly soluble, redox-active organic nitronyl nitroxide radical compound, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO). This redox materials exhibits an ambipolar electrochemical property with two reversible redox pairs that are moderately separated by a voltage gap of ~1.7 V. Therefore, PTIO can serve as both anolyte and catholyte redox materials to form a symmetric flow battery chemistry, which affords the advantages such as high effective redox concentrations and low irreversible redox material crossover. The PTIO flow battery shows decent electrochemical cyclability under cyclic voltammetry and flow cell conditions; an improved redox concentration of 0.5 M PTIO and operational current density of 20 mA cm-2 were achieved in flow cell tests. Moreover, we show that Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could measure the PTIO concentrations during the PTIO flow battery cycling and offer reasonably accurate detection of the battery state of charge (SOC) as cross-validated by electron spin resonance measurements. This study suggests FTIR can be used as a reliable online SOC sensor to monitor flow battery status and ensure battery operations stringently in a safe SOC range.

  9. Electrochemical redox processes involving soluble cerium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, L.F.; Ponce de León, C.; Walsh, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The relevance of cerium in laboratory and industrial electrochemistry is considered. • The history of fundamental electrochemical studies and applications is considered. • The chemistry, redox thermodynamics and electrode kinetics of cerium are summarised. • The uses of cerium ions in synthesis, energy storage, analysis and environmental treatment are illustrated. • Research needs and development perspectives are discussed. - Abstract: Anodic oxidation of cerous ions and cathodic reduction of ceric ions, in aqueous acidic solutions, play an important role in electrochemical processes at laboratory and industrial scale. Ceric ions, which have been used for oxidation of organic wastes and off-gases in environmental treatment, are a well-established oxidant for indirect organic synthesis and specialised cleaning processes, including oxide film removal from tanks and process pipework in nuclear decontamination. They also provide a classical reagent for chemical analysis in the laboratory. The reversible oxidation of cerous ions is an important reaction in the positive compartment of various redox flow batteries during charge and discharge cycling. A knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the redox reaction is critical to an understanding of the role of cerium redox species in these applications. Suitable choices of electrode material (metal or ceramic; coated or uncoated), geometry/structure (2-or 3-dimensional) and electrolyte flow conditions (hence an acceptable mass transport rate) are critical to achieving effective electrocatalysis, a high performance and a long lifetime. This review considers the electrochemistry of soluble cerium species and their diverse uses in electrochemical technology, especially for redox flow batteries and mediated electrochemical oxidation.

  10. Nuclear chemistry research for the safe disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanghaenel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is of key importance for the future sustainable development of nuclear energy. Concepts foresee the isolation of the nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste is dominated by plutonium and the minor actinides. Hence it is essential for the performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal to understand the chemical behaviour of actinides in a repository system. The aqueous chemistry and thermodynamics of actinides is rather complex in particular due to their very rich redox chemistry. Recent results of our detailed study of the Plutonium and Neptunium redox - and complexation behaviour are presented and discussed. (author)

  11. Covalent immobilization of redox protein within the mesopores of transparent conducting electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, V.; Rathouský, Jiří; Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 116, JAN 2014 (2014), s. 1-8 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/08/0435 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Covalent immobilization * Porous electrodes * Redox proteins Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  12. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  13. Computational Redox Potential Predictions: Applications to Inorganic and Organic Aqueous Complexes, and Complexes Adsorbed to Mineral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Arumugam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of redox processes range over a number of scientific fields. This review article summarizes the theory behind the calculation of redox potentials in solution for species such as organic compounds, inorganic complexes, actinides, battery materials, and mineral surface-bound-species. Different computational approaches to predict and determine redox potentials of electron transitions are discussed along with their respective pros and cons for the prediction of redox potentials. Subsequently, recommendations are made for certain necessary computational settings required for accurate calculation of redox potentials. This article reviews the importance of computational parameters, such as basis sets, density functional theory (DFT functionals, and relativistic approaches and the role that physicochemical processes play on the shift of redox potentials, such as hydration or spin orbit coupling, and will aid in finding suitable combinations of approaches for different chemical and geochemical applications. Identifying cost-effective and credible computational approaches is essential to benchmark redox potential calculations against experiments. Once a good theoretical approach is found to model the chemistry and thermodynamics of the redox and electron transfer process, this knowledge can be incorporated into models of more complex reaction mechanisms that include diffusion in the solute, surface diffusion, and dehydration, to name a few. This knowledge is important to fully understand the nature of redox processes be it a geochemical process that dictates natural redox reactions or one that is being used for the optimization of a chemical process in industry. In addition, it will help identify materials that will be useful to design catalytic redox agents, to come up with materials to be used for batteries and photovoltaic processes, and to identify new and improved remediation strategies in environmental engineering, for example the

  14. Flowable Conducting Particle Networks in Redox-Active Electrolytes for Grid Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributions (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Furthermore, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.

  15. Anionic and cationic redox and interfaces in batteries: Advances from soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to resonant inelastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2018-06-01

    Recent advances in battery science and technology have triggered both the challenges and opportunities on studying the materials and interfaces in batteries. Here, we review the recent demonstrations of soft X-ray spectroscopy for studying the interfaces and electrode materials. The focus of this review is on the recently developed mapping of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (mRIXS) as a powerful probe of battery chemistry with superior sensitivity. Six different channels of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS) are introduced for different experimental purposes. Although conventional sXAS channels remain effective tools for quantitative analysis of the transition-metal states and surface chemistry, we elaborate the limitations of sXAS in both cationic and anionic redox studies. Particularly, based on experimental findings in various electrodes, we show that sXAS is unreliable for studying oxygen redox. We then demonstrate the mRIXS as a reliable technique for fingerprinting oxygen redox and summarize several crucial observations. We conclude that mRIXS is the tool-of-choice to study both the practical issue on reversibility of oxygen redox and the fundamental nature of bulk oxygen states. We hope this review clarifies the popular misunderstanding on oxygen sXAS results of oxide electrodes, and establishes a reliable technique for detecting oxygen redox through mRIXS.

  16. U3Si2 behavior in H2O environments: Part II, pressurized water with controlled redox chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; Migdisov, A.; Wood, E. Sooby; Grote, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Recent interest in U3Si2 as an advanced light water reactor fuel has driven assessment of numerous properties, but characterization of its response to H2O environments is sparse in available literature. The behavior of U3Si2 in H2O containing atmospheres is investigated and presented in a two-part series of articles. This work examines the behavior of U3Si2 following exposure to pressurized H2O at temperatures from 300 to 350 °C. Testing was performed using two autoclave configurations and multiple redox conditions. Use of solid state buffers to attain a controlled water chemistry is also presented as a means to test actinide-bearing systems. Buffers were used to vary the hydrogen concentration between 1 and 30 parts per million H2. Testing included UN, U3Si5, and UO2. Both UN and U3Si5 were found to rapidly pulverize in less than 50 h at 300 °C. Uranium dioxide was included as a control for the autoclave system, and was found to be minimally impacted by exposure to pressurized water at the conditions tested for extended time periods. Testing of U3Si2 at 300 °C found reasonable stability through 30 days in 1-5 ppm H2. However, pulverization was observed following 35 days. The redox condition of testing strongly affected pulverization. Characterization of the resulting microstructures suggests that the mechanism responsible for pulverization under more strongly reducing conditions differs from that previously identified. Hydride formation is hypothesized to drive this transition. Testing performed at 350 °C resulted in rapid pulverization of U3Si2 in under 50 h.

  17. A Protocol for Electrochemical Evaluations and State of Charge Diagnostics of a Symmetric Organic Redox Flow Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wentao; Vemuri, Rama S; Hu, Dehong; Yang, Zheng; Wei, Xiaoliang

    2017-02-13

    Redox flow batteries have been considered as one of the most promising stationary energy storage solutions for improving the reliability of the power grid and deployment of renewable energy technologies. Among the many flow battery chemistries, non-aqueous flow batteries have the potential to achieve high energy density because of the broad voltage windows of non-aqueous electrolytes. However, significant technical hurdles exist currently limiting non-aqueous flow batteries to demonstrate their full potential, such as low redox concentrations, low operating currents, under-explored battery status monitoring, etc. In an attempt to address these limitations, we recently reported a non-aqueous flow battery based on a highly soluble, redox-active organic nitronyl nitroxide radical compound, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO). This redox material exhibits an ambipolar electrochemical property, and therefore can serve as both anolyte and catholyte redox materials to form a symmetric flow battery chemistry. Moreover, we demonstrated that Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could measure the PTIO concentrations during the PTIO flow battery cycling and offer reasonably accurate detection of the battery state of charge (SOC), as cross-validated by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Herein we present a video protocol for the electrochemical evaluation and SOC diagnosis of the PTIO symmetric flow battery. With a detailed description, we experimentally demonstrated the route to achieve such purposes. This protocol aims to spark more interests and insights on the safety and reliability in the field of non-aqueous redox flow batteries.

  18. Redox conditions effect on flow accelerated corrosion: Influence of hydrazine and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvier, O. de [EDF, R and D Div., Moret sur Loing (France); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF, Engineering and Service Div., Villeurbanne (France); Fruzzetti, K. [EPRI, Science and Technology Div., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steels has been studied world-wide for more than twenty years and is now fairly well understood. The influence of several parameters like water chemistry (i.e. pH and oxygen content), temperature, hydrodynamic or mass transfer conditions (i.e. flow velocity, geometry, steam quality..) and steel composition on the corrosion kinetics has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. However, the effect of a reducing environment and variable redox conditions have not yet been fully explored. It's well known that a reducing environment is effective in increasing the resistance of steam generator tubing to intergranular attack / stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) and pitting. In that way, secondary water chemistry specifications have been modified from low hydrazine to high hydrazine chemistry in the steam-water circuit. Nevertheless, increasing hydrazine levels up to 200 {mu}g/kg could have a detrimental effect by potentially enhancing the FAC process. Moreover, in order to have a complete understanding of the possible impact of the water chemistry environment it is also important to consider the impact of redox conditions during shutdowns (cold and/or hot shutdowns) and start up periods when aerated water injections are made to maintain a constant water level in the Steam Generators from the auxiliary feedwater circuit. Therefore, a common EDF and EPRI R and D effort has been recently carried out to study the effects of hydrazine and oxygen on FAC. The results are presented as follows. (authors)

  19. Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

  20. Flavin-catalyzed redox tailoring reactions in natural product biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Robin

    2017-10-15

    Natural products are distinct and often highly complex organic molecules that constitute not only an important drug source, but have also pushed the field of organic chemistry by providing intricate targets for total synthesis. How the astonishing structural diversity of natural products is enzymatically generated in biosynthetic pathways remains a challenging research area, which requires detailed and sophisticated approaches to elucidate the underlying catalytic mechanisms. Commonly, the diversification of precursor molecules into distinct natural products relies on the action of pathway-specific tailoring enzymes that catalyze, e.g., acylations, glycosylations, or redox reactions. This review highlights a selection of tailoring enzymes that employ riboflavin (vitamin B2)-derived cofactors (FAD and FMN) to facilitate unusual redox catalysis and steer the formation of complex natural product pharmacophores. Remarkably, several such recently reported flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes expand the classical paradigms of flavin biochemistry leading, e.g., to the discovery of the flavin-N5-oxide - a novel flavin redox state and oxygenating species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  2. A universal fluorogenic switch for Fe(ii) ion based on N-oxide chemistry permits the visualization of intracellular redox equilibrium shift towards labile iron in hypoxic tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Tasuku; Tsuboi, Hitomi; Niwa, Masato; Miki, Ayaji; Kadota, Satoki; Ikeshita, Yukie; Okuda, Kensuke; Nagasawa, Hideko

    2017-07-01

    Iron (Fe) species play a number of biologically and pathologically important roles. In particular, iron is a key element in oxygen sensing in living tissue where its metabolism is intimately linked with oxygen metabolism. Regulation of redox balance of labile iron species to prevent the generation of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical to survival. However, studies on the redox homeostasis of iron species are challenging because of a lack of a redox-state-specific detection method for iron, in particular, labile Fe 2+ . In this study, a universal fluorogenic switching system is established, which is responsive to Fe 2+ ion based on a unique N-oxide chemistry in which dialkylarylamine N-oxide is selectively deoxygenized by Fe 2+ to generate various fluorescent probes of Fe 2+ -CoNox-1 (blue), FluNox-1 (green), and SiRhoNox-1 (red). All the probes exhibited fluorescence enhancement against Fe 2+ with high selectivity both in cuvette and in living cells. Among the probes, SiRhoNox-1 showed an excellent fluorescence response with respect to both reaction rate and off/on signal contrast. Imaging studies were performed showing the intracellular redox equilibrium shift towards labile iron in response to reduced oxygen tension in living cells and 3D tumor spheroids using SiRhoNox-1, and it was found that the hypoxia induction of labile Fe 2+ is independent of iron uptake, hypoxia-induced signaling, and hypoxia-activated enzymes. The present studies demonstrate the feasibility of developing sensitive and specific fluorescent probes for Fe 2+ with refined photophysical characteristics that enable their broad application in the study of iron in various physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  4. Redox behavior of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) in the presence of nitrilotriacetic acid: a surrogate study for An(IV)/An(III) redox behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nankawa, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Using cyclic voltammetry, we investigated the redox behavior of Ce(IV)/Ce(III), which is a surrogate for An(IV)/An(III) (An = actinides), in a solution of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) at 25 C. The cyclic voltammogram of Ce in a 0.1 M NTA solution at pH 6 showed a reversible one-electron redox reaction for Ce(IV)/Ce(III) at 0.51 V vs. Ag/AgCl. This redox potential was much lower than that obtained in 1 M nitric acid, indicating that Ce(IV) was preferentially stabilized by complexation with NTA. The redox potential in the NTA solution was independent of the Ce concentration from 2 to 20 mM, NTA concentration from 5 to 200 mM and pH between 3 and 7. These results indicated that no polymerization and no additional coordination of NTA and OH to the Ce(III)-NTA complex took place during the redox reaction. As the speciation calculation of Ce(III) in the NTA solution showed that the predominant species was Ce III (nta) 2 3 (H 3 nta = NTA), the redox reaction of the Ce-NTA complex was expressed by the following: Ce IV (nta) 2 2- + e - ↔ Ce III (nta) 2 3 . The logarithm of the stability constant of Ce IV (nta) 2 2- was calculated to be 38.6 ± 0.8 for I = 0 from the redox potential shift of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) in the NTA solution. The value was in good accordance with the stability constant of the Np IV (nta) 2 2- complex, demonstrating that the aqueous coordination chemistry of Ce(IV) with NTA is quite similar to that of An(IV). These results strongly suggest that a negative shift of the Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox potential in the NTA solution should make Pu(IV) more stable than Pu(III) even in a reducing environment. (orig.)

  5. Protein Redox Dynamics During Light-to-Dark Transitions in Cyanobacteria and Impacts Due to Nutrient Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified 300 putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations, including carbon and nitrogen limitations, contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to a high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and suggest potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  6. Actinide chemistry in the far field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livens, F.R.; Morris, K.; Parkman, R.; Moyes, L.

    1996-01-01

    The environmental chemistry of the actinides is complicated due both to the extensive redox and coordination chemistry of the elements and also to the complexity of the reactive phases encountered in natural environments. In the far field, interactions with reactive surfaces, coatings and colloidal particles will play a crucial role in controlling actinide mobility. By virtue of both their abundance and reactivity; clays and other layer aluminosilicate minerals, hydrous oxides and organic matter (humic substances) are all identified as having the potential to react with actinide ions and some possible modes of interaction are described, together with experimental evidence for their occurrence. (author)

  7. Redox Paths in Heated TiO–Fe2O3 and TiO-Fe3O4 Mixtures – Implication of TiO as a Novel Reducing Compound.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Josef; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Bezdička, Petr; Jakubec, Ivo; Pokorná, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2017), s. 104-109 ISSN 2156-7573 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04020860 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : redox solid state chemistry * titanium monoxide * ferric oxide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Inorganic and nuclear chemistry (UACH-T)

  8. The Redox Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P; Sies, Helmut

    2015-09-20

    The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O₂ and H₂O₂ contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine.

  9. Topic-Specific Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TSPCK) in Redox and Electrochemistry of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephanie

    Topic specific pedagogical content knowledge (TSPCK) is the basis by which knowledge of subject matter of a particular topic is conveyed to students. This includes students' prior knowledge, curricular saliency, what makes a topic easy or difficult to teach, representations, and teaching strategies. The goal of this study is to assess the pedagogical content knowledge of chemistry teachers in a professional learning community in the areas of redox and electrochemistry, as this has been regarded in previous literature as conceptually challenging for students to learn. By acquiring information regarding the PCK development of experienced chemistry teachers, the education and practice of all science teachers can be advanced. This study builds upon previous research that developed validated instruments to evaluate TSPCK. The research questions sought to determine which components of TSPCK were evidenced by the instructional design decisions teachers made, what shared patterns and trends were evident, and how TSPCK related to student learning outcomes. To answer the research questions subjects completed a background questionnaire, a TSPCK assessment, and interview tasks to elicit information about pedagogical decision making and processes that influenced student learning in their classrooms. The TSPCK exam and interview responses were coded to align with thematic constructs. To determine the effect of TSPCK on student learning gains, pre/post-assessment data on redox and electrochemistry were compared to teachers' TSPCK. The chemistry teachers displayed varying levels of TSPCK in redox and electrochemistry, as evidenced by their knowledge of student learning obstacles, curricular saliency, and teaching methodologies. There was evidence of experienced teachers lacking in certain areas of TSPCK, such as the ability to identify student misconceptions, suggesting the need for programmatic improvements in pre-service and in-service training to address the needs of current

  10. Preservation of organic matter in nontronite against iron redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally believed that clay minerals can protect organic matter from degradation in redox active environments, but both biotic and abiotic factors can influence the redox process and thus potentially change the clay-organic associations. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain poorly understood. In this study, a model organic compound, 12-Aminolauric acid (ALA) was selected to intercalate into the structural interlayer of nontronite (an iron-rich smectite, NAu-2) to form an ALA-intercalated NAu-2 composite (ALA-NAu-2). Shawanella putrefaciens CN32 and sodium dithionite were used to reduce structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) in NAu-2 and ALA-NAu-2. The bioreduced ALA-NAu-2 was subsequently re-oxidized by air. The rates and extents of bioreduction and air re-oxidation were determined with wet chemistry methods. ALA release from ALA-NAu-2 via redox process was monitored. Mineralogical changes after iron redox cycle were investigated with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At the beginning stage of bioreduction, S. putrefaciens CN32 reduced Fe(III) from the edges of nontronite and preferentially reduced and dissolved small and poorly crystalline particles, and released ALA, resulting a positive correlation between ALA release and iron reduction extent (80%). Because bacteria are the principal agent for mediating redox process in natural environments, our results demonstrated that the structural interlayer of smectite can serve as a potential shelter to protect organic matter from oxidation.

  11. Topotactic redox chemistry of NaFeAs in water and air and superconducting behavior with stoichiometry change.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, I.; Chung, D. Y.; Claus, H.; Malliakas, C. D.; Douvalis, A. P.; Bakas, T.; He, J.; Dravid, V. P.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of Ioannina

    2010-07-13

    We report experimental evidence that shows superconductivity in NaFeAs occurs when it is Na deficient. The oxidation of NaFeAs progresses differently in water and in air. In water the material oxidizes slowly and slightly retaining the original anti-PbFCl structure. In air NaFeAs oxidizes topotactically quickly and extensively transforming to the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type. Water acts as a mild oxidizing agent on the FeAs layer by extracting electrons and Na{sup +} cations from the structure, while oxidation in air is more extensive and leads to change in structure type from NaFeAs to NaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The superconducting transition temperature moves dramatically during the oxidation process. Exposed to water for an extended time period NaFeAs shows a substantial increase in T{sub c} up to 25 K with contraction of unit cell volume. NaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, the air oxidized product, shows T{sub c} of 12 K. We report detailed characterization of the redox chemistry and transformation of NaFeAs in water and air using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, magnetization studies, transmission electron microscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, pOH and elemental analysis.

  12. Driving Curie temperature towards room temperature in the half-metallic ferromagnet K2Cr8O16 by soft redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrotta, I; Fernández-Sanjulián, J; Moran, E; Alario-Franco, M A; Gonzalo, E; Kuhn, A; García-Alvarado, F

    2012-02-14

    The half-metallic ferromagnet K(2)Cr(8)O(16) with the hollandite structure has been chemically modified using soft chemistry methods to increase the average oxidation state of chromium. The synthesis of the parent material has been performed under high pressure/high temperature conditions. Following this, different redox reactions have been carried out on K(2)Cr(8)O(16). Oxidation to obtain potassium-de-inserted derivatives, K(2-x)Cr(8)O(16) (0 ≤x≤ 1), has been investigated with electrochemical methods, while the synthesis of sizeable amounts was achieved chemically by using nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate as a highly oxidizing agent. The maximum amount of extracted K ions corresponds to x = 0.8. Upon oxidation the hollandite structure is maintained and the products keep high crystallinity. The de-insertion of potassium changes the Cr(3+)/Cr(4+) ratio, and therefore the magnetic properties. Interestingly, the Curie temperature increases from ca. 175 K to 250 K, getting therefore closer to room temperature.

  13. Nucleobase modification as redox DNA labelling for electrochemical detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2011), s. 5802-5814 ISSN 0306-0012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA ČR GA203/09/0317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleotides * oligonucleotides * DNA * electrochemistry * redox labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 28.760, year: 2011

  14. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Radiation chemistry: basic, strategic or tactical science?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The work of Weiss in the 1930s, particularly with Haber, has only recently been recognized to have implications in biology and medicine. Similarly, research in radiation chemistry and the application of the pulse radiolysis technique, for example, have implications far beyond traditional radiation chemistry. Some examples of such research are discussed against a background of categorization into 'basic', 'strategic' or 'tactical' science. Examples discussed include redox properties of free radicals, and the identification and characterization of nitro radicals as intermediates in drug metabolism. Radical reactions often take place in multicomponent systems, and the techniques of radiation chemistry can be used to probe, for example, events occurring at interfaces in micelles. Industrial processes involving radiation are attracting investment, particularly in Japan. (author)

  16. Genetic and biochemical investigations of the role of MamP in redox control of iron biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie R; Wilson, Tiffany D; Brown, Margaret E; Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Yu, Yi; Fredriksen, Laura L; Ozyamak, Ertan; Komeili, Arash; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2015-03-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria have evolved complex subcellular machinery to construct linear chains of magnetite nanocrystals that allow the host cell to sense direction. Each mixed-valent iron nanoparticle is mineralized from soluble iron within a membrane-encapsulated vesicle termed the magnetosome, which serves as a specialized compartment that regulates the iron, redox, and pH environment of the growing mineral. To dissect the biological components that control this process, we have carried out a genetic and biochemical study of proteins proposed to function in iron mineralization. In this study, we show that the redox sites of c-type cytochromes of the Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 magnetosome island, MamP and MamT, are essential to their physiological function and that ablation of one or both heme motifs leads to loss of function, suggesting that their ability to carry out redox chemistry in vivo is important. We also develop a method to heterologously express fully heme-loaded MamP from AMB-1 for in vitro biochemical studies, which show that its Fe(III)-Fe(II) redox couple is set at an unusual potential (-89 ± 11 mV) compared with other related cytochromes involved in iron reduction or oxidation. Despite its low reduction potential, it remains competent to oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and mineralize iron to produce mixed-valent iron oxides. Finally, in vitro mineralization experiments suggest that Mms mineral-templating peptides from AMB-1 can modulate the iron redox chemistry of MamP.

  17. Redox behaviors of iron by absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong

    2010-02-01

    This work is performed to study the redox (reduction/oxidation) behaviors of iron in aqueous system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements. There are many doubts on redox potential measurements generally showing low accuracies and high uncertainties. In the present study, redox potentials are measured by utilizing various redox electrodes such as Pt, Au, Ag, and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Measured redox potentials are compared with calculated redox potentials based on the chemical oxidation speciation of iron and thermodynamic data by absorption spectroscopy, which provides one of the sensitive and selective spectroscopic methods for the chemical speciation of Fe(II/III). From the comparison analyses, redox potential values measured by the Ag redox electrode are fairly consistent with those calculated by the chemical aqueous speciation of iron in the whole system. In summary, the uncertainties of measured redox potentials are closely related with the total Fe concentration and affected by the formation of mixed potentials due to Fe(III) precipitates in the pH range of 6 ∼ 9 beyond the solubility of Fe(III), whilst being independent of the initially prepared concentration ratios between Fe(II) and Fe(III)

  18. Development tendencies in cycle chemistry of fossil fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daucik, K [Skaerbaekvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The development of cycle chemistry during the past 50 years is described and the main tendencies are pointed out. Improvement of cycle purity is the most dominant evolution, which introduces more freedom with respect to pH and redox potential control. Units with once-through boilers have profited most from this development. The development of boiler water chemistry in drum boilers also tends towards higher purity and less chemicals, which raises possibilities for oxygenated treatment. (au)

  19. Theoretical aspects of several successive two-step redox mechanisms in protein-film cyclic staircase voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulaboski, Rubin; Kokoškarova, Pavlinka; Mitrev, Saša

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Theoretical models for 2e− successive mechanisms are considered. ► The models are compatible for various metal-containing redox proteins. ► Diagnostic criteria are provided to recognize the particular redox mechanism. - Abstract: Protein-film voltammetry (PFV) is a versatile tool designed to provide insight into the enzymes physiological functions by studying the redox properties of various oxido-reductases with suitable voltammetric technique. The determination of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters relevant to protein's physiological properties is achieved via methodologies established from theoretical considerations of various mechanisms in PFV. So far, the majority of the mathematical models in PFV have been developed for redox proteins undergoing a single-step electron transfer reactions. However, there are many oxido-reductases containing quinone moieties or polyvalent ions of transition metals like Mo, Mn, W, Fe or Co as redox centers, whose redox chemistry can be described only via mathematical models considering successive two-step electron transformation. In this work we consider theoretically the protein-film redox mechanisms of the EE (Electrochemical–Electrochemical), ECE (Electrochemical–Chemical–Electrochemical), and EECat (Electrochemical–Electrochemical–Catalytic) systems under conditions of cyclic staircase voltammetry. We also propose methodologies to determine the kinetics of electron transfer steps by all considered mechanisms. The experimentalists working with PFV can get large benefits from the simulated voltammograms given in this work.

  20. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs......In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  1. A high-resolution record of Holocene millennial-scale oscillations of surface water, foraminiferal paleoecology and sediment redox chemistry in the SE Brazilian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, B. B.; Barbosa, C. F.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    . The 8.2kyr climatic event is reported here for the first time in South American coastal sediment records as high productivity conditions and a rapid change in porewater redox chemistry.

  2. Redox regulation of mitochondrial function with emphasis on cysteine oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria have a myriad of essential functions including metabolism and apoptosis. These chief functions are reliant on electron transfer reactions and the production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production of ATP and ROS are intimately linked to the electron transport chain (ETC). Electrons from nutrients are passed through the ETC via a series of acceptor and donor molecules to the terminal electron acceptor molecular oxygen (O2) which ultimately drives the synthesis of ATP. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain and nutrient oxidation also produces ROS. At high enough concentrations ROS can activate mitochondrial apoptotic machinery which ultimately leads to cell death. However, if maintained at low enough concentrations ROS can serve as important signaling molecules. Various regulatory mechanisms converge upon mitochondria to modulate ATP synthesis and ROS production. Given that mitochondrial function depends on redox reactions, it is important to consider how redox signals modulate mitochondrial processes. Here, we provide the first comprehensive review on how redox signals mediated through cysteine oxidation, namely S-oxidation (sulfenylation, sulfinylation), S-glutathionylation, and S-nitrosylation, regulate key mitochondrial functions including nutrient oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), apoptosis, and mitochondrial fission and fusion. We also consider the chemistry behind these reactions and how they are modulated in mitochondria. In addition, we also discuss emerging knowledge on disorders and disease states that are associated with deregulated redox signaling in mitochondria and how mitochondria-targeted medicines can be utilized to restore mitochondrial redox signaling.

  3. Zn and Fe complexes containing a redox active macrocyclic biquinazoline ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priyabrata; Company, Anna; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Bill, Eckhard; Hess, Corinna R

    2009-04-06

    A series of iron and zinc complexes has been synthesized, coordinated by the macrocyclic biquinazoline ligand, 2-4:6-8-bis(3,3,4,4-tetramethyldihydropyrrolo)-10-15-(2,2'-biquinazolino)-[15]-1,3,5,8,10,14-hexaene-1,3,7,9,11,14-N(6) (Mabiq). The Mabiq ligand consists of a bipyrimidine moiety and two dihydropyrrole units. The electronic structures of the metal-Mabiq complexes have been characterized using spectroscopic and density-functional theory (DFT) computational methods. The parent zinc complex exhibits a ligand-centered reduction to generate the metal-coordinated Mabiq radical dianion, establishing the redox non-innocence of this ligand. Iron-Mabiq complexes have been isolated in three oxidation states. This redox series includes low-spin ferric and low-spin ferrous species, as well as an intermediate-spin Fe(II) compound. In the latter complex, the iron ion is antiferromagnetically coupled to a Mabiq-centered pi-radical. The results demonstrate the rich redox chemistry and electronic properties of metal complexes coordinated by the Mabiq ligand.

  4. Chemistry of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium. Hydrolysis, solubility, colloid formation and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye-Ryun

    2006-01-01

    The chemical properties of plutonium and zirconium are important in order to assess nuclear waste disposals with respect to isolation and immobilization of radionuclides. In this study, the hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium are investigated in 0.5 M HCl/NaCl solution using several complementary methods and the redox behavior of plutonium is investigated in acidic conditions as well. The solubilities of Pu(IV) and Zr(IV) are determined from the onset of colloid formation as a function of pH and metal concentration using LIBD (laser-induced breakdown detection). The investigation of the solubility of Zr(IV) is carried out at different concentrations (log [Zr] = -3 ∝ -7.6) and in a wide pH range (pH = 3 - 9) yielding log K sp (Zr(IV)) = -53.1 ± 0.5 based on the assumption that only mononuclear hydrolysis species exist in solution. Comparing the present results with literature data, the solubilities of Zr can be split in two groups, a crystalline phase with lower solubility and an amorphous phase (Zr(OH) 4 (am)) with higher solubility. The data obtained in the present work set an upper limit for the solubility of freshly formed Zr(OH) 4 (am). To understand this difference of solubilities, the geometrical structure of the dominant solution species is investigated as a function of pH using XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure). The samples at pH >2, still below the solubility limit determined by LIBD, contain the polynuclear Zr(IV) species probably due to the high concentration ([Zr] = 1 mM) and their structure do not resemble any reported simple ZrO 2 structure. The Zr(IV) colloid species in oversaturated solution under this experimental condition resembles amorphous Zr(IV) hydroxide rather than crystalline ZrO 2 . The solubility of Pu(IV) is investigated in acidic solution below pH 2. Considering only mononuclear hydrolysis species, log K sp (Pu(IV)) = -58.3 ± 0.4 is obtained. Since Pu(IV) is not redox stable even

  5. 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl as a model organic redox active compound for nonaqueous flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Barton, John L.; Darling, Robert M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) that utilize redox active organic molecules are an emerging energy storage concept with the possibility of meeting grid storage requirements. Sporadic and uneven advances in molecular discovery and development, however, have stymied efforts to quantify the performance characteristics of nonaqueous redox electrolytes and flow cells. A need exists for archetypal redox couples, with well-defined electrochemical properties, high solubility in relevant electrolytes, and broad availability, to serve as probe molecules. This work investigates the 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (AcNH-TEMPO) redox pair for such an application. We report the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the reduced and oxidized compounds at dilute concentrations for electroanalysis, as well as moderate-to-high concentrations for RFB applications. Changes in conductivity, viscosity, and UV-vis absorbance as a function of state-of-charge are quantified. Cyclic voltammetry investigates the redox potential, reversibility, and diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions, while symmetric flow cell cycling determines the stability of the AcNH-TEMPO redox pair over long experiment times. Finally, single electrolyte flow cell studies demonstrate the utility of this redox couple as a platform chemistry for benchmarking NAqRFB performance.

  6. Systems and methods for rebalancing redox flow battery electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Chang, On Kok

    2015-03-17

    Various methods of rebalancing electrolytes in a redox flow battery system include various systems using a catalyzed hydrogen rebalance cell configured to minimize the risk of dissolved catalyst negatively affecting flow battery performance. Some systems described herein reduce the chance of catalyst contamination of RFB electrolytes by employing a mediator solution to eliminate direct contact between the catalyzed membrane and the RFB electrolyte. Other methods use a rebalance cell chemistry that maintains the catalyzed electrode at a potential low enough to prevent the catalyst from dissolving.

  7. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V. PMID:27966605

  8. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  9. Redox Behavior of 2,3-Diamino-1,4-naphthoquinone and its N-Alkylated Derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dron, P. I.; Ramešová, Šárka; Holloran, N. P.; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Michl, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 11 (2016), s. 2855-2860 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19143S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03085S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Redox reactions * Heterocycles Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 2.851, year: 2016

  10. A High-Current, Stable Nonaqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Duan, Wentao; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Bin; Reed, David; Xu, Wu; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-14

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries are promising in pursuit of high-energy storage systems owing to the broad voltage window, but currently are facing key challenges such as poor cycling stability and lack of suitable membranes. Here we report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow chemistry that demonstrates an outstanding cell cycling stability primarily because of high chemical persistency of the organic radical redox species and their good compatibility with the supporting electrolyte. A feasibility study shows that Daramic® and Celgard® porous separators can lead to high cell conductivity in flow cells thus producing remarkable cell efficiency and material utilization even at high current operations. This result suggests that the thickness and pore size are the key performance-determining factors for porous separators. With the greatly improved flow cell performance, this new flow system largely addresses the above mentioned challenges and the findings may greatly expedite the development of durable nonaqueous flow batteries.

  11. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina Wedege; Emil Dražević; Denes Konya; Anders Bentien

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined ...

  12. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  13. Redox regulation of mitochondrial function with emphasis on cysteine oxidation reactions☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria have a myriad of essential functions including metabolism and apoptosis. These chief functions are reliant on electron transfer reactions and the production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The production of ATP and ROS are intimately linked to the electron transport chain (ETC). Electrons from nutrients are passed through the ETC via a series of acceptor and donor molecules to the terminal electron acceptor molecular oxygen (O2) which ultimately drives the synthesis of ATP. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain and nutrient oxidation also produces ROS. At high enough concentrations ROS can activate mitochondrial apoptotic machinery which ultimately leads to cell death. However, if maintained at low enough concentrations ROS can serve as important signaling molecules. Various regulatory mechanisms converge upon mitochondria to modulate ATP synthesis and ROS production. Given that mitochondrial function depends on redox reactions, it is important to consider how redox signals modulate mitochondrial processes. Here, we provide the first comprehensive review on how redox signals mediated through cysteine oxidation, namely S-oxidation (sulfenylation, sulfinylation), S-glutathionylation, and S-nitrosylation, regulate key mitochondrial functions including nutrient oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), apoptosis, and mitochondrial fission and fusion. We also consider the chemistry behind these reactions and how they are modulated in mitochondria. In addition, we also discuss emerging knowledge on disorders and disease states that are associated with deregulated redox signaling in mitochondria and how mitochondria-targeted medicines can be utilized to restore mitochondrial redox signaling. PMID:24455476

  14. Solid Silica-based Sulphonic Acid as an Efficient Green Catalyst for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Solid Silica-based Sulphonic Acid as an Efficient Green. Catalyst for the Selective Oxidation of Sulphides to. Sulphoxides using NaCIO in Aqueous Media. Ali Amoozadeh* and Firouzeh Nemati. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Semnan University, Semnan, Iran. Received 21 October 2008, revised 6 December ...

  15. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  16. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H

    2012-12-19

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability.

  17. Synthesis, structural characterisation and bonding in an anionic hexavanadate bearing redox-active ferrocenyl groups at the periphery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schulz, J.; Gyepes, Robert; Císařová, I.; Štěpnička, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2010), s. 2749-2756 ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : synthesis * redox-active ferrocenyl groups * ferrocene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  18. A redox-based mechanism for the neuroprotective and neurodestructive effects of nitric oxide and related nitroso-compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, S A; Choi, Y B; Pan, Z H; Lei, S Z; Chen, H S; Sucher, N J; Loscalzo, J; Singel, D J; Stamler, J S

    1993-08-12

    Congeners of nitrogen monoxide (NO) are neuroprotective and neurodestructive. To address this apparent paradox, we considered the effects on neurons of compounds characterized by alternative redox states of NO: nitric oxide (NO.) and nitrosonium ion (NO+). Nitric oxide, generated from NO. donors or synthesized endogenously after NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor activation, can lead to neurotoxicity. Here, we report that NO.- mediated neurotoxicity is engendered, at least in part, by reaction with superoxide anion (O2.-), apparently leading to formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-), and not by NO. alone. In contrast, the neuroprotective effects of NO result from downregulation of NMDA-receptor activity by reaction with thiol group(s) of the receptor's redox modulatory site. This reaction is not mediated by NO. itself, but occurs under conditions supporting S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptor thiol (reaction or transfer of NO+). Moreover, the redox versatility of NO allows for its interconversion from neuroprotective to neurotoxic species by a change in the ambient redox milieu. The details of this complex redox chemistry of NO may provide a mechanism for harnessing neuroprotective effects and avoiding neurotoxicity in the central nervous system.

  19. The Redox Proteome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation, and signaling during the life cycle and has a central role in the tolerance and adaptability to diet and environmental challenges. PMID:23861437

  20. Vanadium Electrolyte Studies for the Vanadium Redox Battery-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Cao, Liuyue; Kazacos, Michael; Kausar, Nadeem; Mousa, Asem

    2016-07-07

    The electrolyte is one of the most important components of the vanadium redox flow battery and its properties will affect cell performance and behavior in addition to the overall battery cost. Vanadium exists in several oxidation states with significantly different half-cell potentials that can produce practical cell voltages. It is thus possible to use the same element in both half-cells and thereby eliminate problems of cross-contamination inherent in all other flow battery chemistries. Electrolyte properties vary with supporting electrolyte composition, state-of-charge, and temperature and this will impact on the characteristics, behavior, and performance of the vanadium battery in practical applications. This Review provides a broad overview of the physical properties and characteristics of the vanadium battery electrolyte under different conditions, together with a description of some of the processing methods that have been developed to produce vanadium electrolytes for vanadium redox flow battery applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator......The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  2. Contribution of radiation chemistry to cluster science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoclusters are small objects made of a few atoms, with a size of a few nanometers at most, which constitute a state of matter, named mesoscopic, intermediary between the atom and the bulk metal. In the 70's, radiation chemistry experiments have demonstrated that metal clusters exhibited indeed, due to their very small size, specific properties distinct from the bulk metal. The properties, physical and chemical, change with the number of atoms they contain. Their optical absorption spectrum, for example, as well as their redox potential, depends on the nuclearity, and also on the environment. Radiation chemistry methods have been proven to be of high potentiality to induce small and size-monodispersed metal clusters, as nanocolloids or supported on various materials. Pulse radiolysis provides the means to study the dynamics of nucleation and growth of clusters, monoand bi-metallic, from the monomers to the stable nanoparticle and to observe directly their reactivity, especially to determine during the growth their nuclearity-dependent properties, such as the redox potential. These are of crucial importance for the understanding of the mechanism of the cluster growth itself, in the radiation-induced as well as in the chemical or photochemical reduction processes, and also of the mechanism of certain catalytic reactions. (authors)

  3. Microbiology, Redox and Contaminat Fate in the Grindsted Landfill Leachate Plume - A Summary of 25 Years of work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, T. H.

    2001-05-01

    The contamination by leachate of the upper aquifer at the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark) stretches about 300 m downgradient from the landfill. The plume has been described with respect to water chemistry, sediment chemistry, pollutant distribution, microbial counts, PLFA and redox rates determined by unamended bioassays. This presentation summaries the findings and discusses unanswered questions. The landfill was active from 1930 to the mid 1970 and has no engineered leachate collection system. Leachate from municipal as well as from industrial waste has entered the aquifer for more than thirty years. The redox conditions change from strongly anaerobic (methanogenic, sulfate reducing, iron reducing) close to the landfill over manganese reduction and denitrification to aerobic conditions in the outskirts of the plume The redox conditions were determined from groundwater sample composition, hydrogen concentrations and sediment chemistry. The plume showed strong attenuation of aromatic compounds within the first 100 m downgradient of the landfill. Degradation experiments (batch, in-situ testers, long term field injection experiments) could not fully document degradation of all the compounds. MPN-measurements of methanogens, sulfate-reducers, iron-reducers, manganese-reducers and denitrifiers showed abundance of all groups with a slight trend with the redox conditions. PLFA measurements did not provide much insight into the microbial populations of the plume, but confirmed some previous observations. Bioassays gave estimates of the rates of the various redox processes, but showed for some samples more simultaneous redox processes. More than 25 years of work has been put into the Grindsted Landfill leachate plume. References Bjerg, P.L., Rugge, K., Cortsen, J., Nielsen, P.H. & Christensen, T.H. (1999): Degradation of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in the anaerobic part of the Grindsted Landfill leachate plume: In situ microcosm and laboratory batch

  4. Iron chemistry of Hawaiian rainforest soil solution: Biogeochemical implications of multiple Fe redox cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.; Chorover, J.; Chadwick, O.

    2003-12-01

    Iron (Fe)-oxides are important sorbents for nutrients, pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM). When flucutations in soil oxygen status exist, Fe can cycle through reduced and oxidized forms and thus greatly affect the aqueous conc. of nutrients and metals. We are examining the influence of oscillating oxic/anoxic conditions on Fe-oxide formation and biogeochemical processes (microbial community composition, and carbon, nutrient and trace metal availability). Our work makes use of a natural rainfall gradient ranging from 2.2 to 4.2 m mean annual precipitation (MAP) on the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA. All sites developed on a 400ky basaltic lava flow and comprise soils under similar vegetation. Solid phase Fe concentration and oxidation state vary systematically across this rainfall gradient with a sharp decrease in pedogenic Fe between 2.8 m and 3.5 m MAP that corresponds with an Eh of 330 mV (1-yr ave.). Fe isotopic composition and Fe-oxide associated rare earth elements (REE) also suggest a shift from ligand-promoted to redutive Fe dissolution with increasing rainfall. To examine the effects of multiple Fe oxidation/reduction cycles, we constructed a set of redox-stat reactors that maintain Eh values within a set range by small Eh-triggered additions of oxygen. Triplicate soil slurry reactors are subjected to redox (Eh) oscillations such that Fe is repeatedly cycled from oxidized to reduced forms. During our current experiment, we measure pH and Eh dynamics and monitor the distribution of Fe(II) and Fe(III), major ion and anion concentrations, a range of trace metals including the REE, and total organic carbon (TOC) in three Stokes-effective particle size fractions (DNA fingerprinting is used to track changes in the microbial community. Prior to implementing the rigorous sampling procedure above, we completed two preliminary reactor experiments focusing only on Fe distribution between aqueous, HCl, and oxalate extractions. These experiments illustrated (1) a

  5. Composition and redox control of waste glasses: Recommendation for process control limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrochemical series of redox couples, originally developed for Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 131 (SRL-131) as a reference composition, has been extended to two other alkali borosilicate compositions that are candidate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization. Since no dramatic differences were ascertained in the redox chemistry of selected multivalent elements in SRL-131 versus that in Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 165 (SRL-165) and in West Valley glass number-sign 205 (WV-205), the comprehensive electrochemical series can readily be applied to a range of nuclear waste glass compositions. In order to alleviate potential problems with foaming and precipitation of insolubles during the processing of the nuclear waste in these glass melts, the [Fe 2+ ]/[Fe 3+ ] ratio of the melt should be between 0.1 and 0.5. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. HOW AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY CAN CONTRIBUTE TO DEALING WITH PROBLEMS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Emanuele Gessa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil is a complex heterogeneous system whose physical, chemical and biological properties regulate interactions with the chemical species which reach its surface. Soil chemistry is an essential tool for understanding and predicting these interactions. Soil is able to immobilize and transform organic and inorganic molecules by different mechanisms, such as complexing and redox reactions. This behaviour gives soil detoxifying capacities towards pollutants which accumulate in the environment. Pollution by heavy metals is regulated by their solubility in soil solution which in turn depends on soil pH and redox properties and metal speciation. Organic and inorganic colloidal soil fractions can promote the immobilisation, degradation, and diffusion of organic molecules such as agrochemicals, solvents, hydrocarbons and other chemicals which reach the soil by anthropic activities. Predicting the fate of xenobiotics in soil, water, air, and plant ecosystems, the recycling of biomass and the decontamination of polluted soils are of major concern to soil chemistry.

  7. Redox Behavior of Fe2+/Fe3+ Redox Couple by Absorption Spectroscopy and Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J. Y.; Park, S.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Redox behavior has influences on speciation and other geochemical reactions of radionuclides such as sorption, solubility, and colloid formation, etc. It is one of the factors for evaluation of long-term safety assessment under high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal conditions. Accordingly, redox potential (Eh) measurement in aquatic system is important to investigate the redox conditions. Eh is usually measured with redox active electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon, etc.). Nevertheless, Eh measurements by general methods using electrodes provide low accuracy and high uncertainty problem. Therefore, Eh calculated from the concentration of redox active elements with a proper complexing reagent by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is progressed. Iron exists mostly as spent nuclear waste container material and in hydro-geologic minerals. In this system, iron controls the redox condition in near-field area and influences chemical behavior and speciation of radionuclides including redox sensitive actinides such as U, Np, and Pu. In the present work, we present the investigation on redox phenomena of iron in aquatic system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements

  8. Celebrating Professor Britton Chance (1913-2010), a founding father of redox sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tomoko; Zweier, Jay L

    2011-12-01

    Renowned great scientist and redox pioneer, Dr. Britton Chance, closed his 97 years of legendary life on November 16, 2010. He was the Eldridge Reeves Johnson emeritus professor of biophysics, physical chemistry, and radiologic physics at the University of Pennsylvania. He achieved fame as a prominent biophysicist and developer of highly innovative biomedical instrumentation. His scientific career stretched over almost one century and he achieved many scientific and engineering breakthroughs throughout his long prolific career. The advances that he and his colleagues achieved led to great strides in our understanding of biology and disease. He was among the first scientists to recognize the importance of free radicals and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial metabolism and cells as well as to map pathways of redox biology and signaling. Dr. Chance served as a pioneer and inspiration to generations of researchers in the fields of redox biochemistry, metabolism, and disease. He will be missed by all of us in the research community but will live on through his monumental scientific accomplishments, the novel instrumentation he developed, as well as the many scientists whom he trained and influenced.

  9. Redox regulation of cell proliferation: Bioinformatics and redox proteomics approaches to identify redox-sensitive cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Wilson, Michael H; Wright, Megan H

    2018-03-29

    Plant stem cells are the foundation of plant growth and development. The balance of quiescence and division is highly regulated, while ensuring that proliferating cells are protected from the adverse effects of environment fluctuations that may damage the genome. Redox regulation is important in both the activation of proliferation and arrest of the cell cycle upon perception of environmental stress. Within this context, reactive oxygen species serve as 'pro-life' signals with positive roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and survival. However, very little is known about the metabolic mechanisms and redox-sensitive proteins that influence cell cycle progression. We have identified cysteine residues on known cell cycle regulators in Arabidopsis that are potentially accessible, and could play a role in redox regulation, based on secondary structure and solvent accessibility likelihoods for each protein. We propose that redox regulation may function alongside other known posttranslational modifications to control the functions of core cell cycle regulators such as the retinoblastoma protein. Since our current understanding of how redox regulation is involved in cell cycle control is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding both which residues are important and how modification of those residues alters protein function, we discuss how critical redox modifications can be mapped at the molecular level. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The complex reaction kinetics of neptunium including redox and extraction process in 30% TBP-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhang; Zhan-yuan Liu; Xian-ming Zhou; Li Li

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the complex and dynamic neptunium process chemistry in the TBP-HNO_3 system, the kinetics involved reversible redox reaction and extraction mass transfer was investigated. The results indicates that the mass transfer rate of Np(VI) is much faster than the redox reaction in aqueous solution. The concentrations of nitric acid and nitrous acid not only can change the Np(V) oxidation reaction and Np(VI) reduction reaction rate, but also can ultimately determine the distribution of neptunium extraction equilibrium. The variety of temperature can only influence the extraction equilibrium time, but cannot alter the equilibrium state of neptunium. (author)

  11. Redox sensor proteins for highly sensitive direct imaging of intracellular redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kazunori; Nagai, Takeharu; Nakano, Masahiro; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-02-13

    Intracellular redox state is a critical factor for fundamental cellular functions, including regulation of the activities of various metabolic enzymes as well as ROS production and elimination. Genetically-encoded fluorescent redox sensors, such as roGFP (Hanson, G. T., et al. (2004)) and Redoxfluor (Yano, T., et al. (2010)), have been developed to investigate the redox state of living cells. However, these sensors are not useful in cells that contain, for example, other colored pigments. We therefore intended to obtain simpler redox sensor proteins, and have developed oxidation-sensitive fluorescent proteins called Oba-Q (oxidation balance sensed quenching) proteins. Our sensor proteins derived from CFP and Sirius can be used to monitor the intracellular redox state as their fluorescence is drastically quenched upon oxidation. These blue-shifted spectra of the Oba-Q proteins enable us to monitor various redox states in conjunction with other sensor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  13. The chemistry of copper chalcogenides in waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, H.D.; Lambert, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The solubilities of copper chalcogenides (CuS, CuSe, CuTe) were measured in a glass melt which is representative of those proposed for nuclear waste immobilization and circuit board vitrification. CuTe is more soluble than CuS and CuSe in the glass melt under relatively oxidizing conditions. However, the solubilities of all the copper chalcogenides in the glass melt are virtually identical at reducing conditions, probably a result of the redox-controlled solubility of copper metal in all cases. The redox chemistry of a glass melt coexisting with an immiscible copper chalcogenide depends primarily on the prevailing oxygen fugacity, not on the identity of the chalcogenide. The target concentration of less than 0.3 to 0.5 wt% copper in the waste glass should eliminate the precipitation of copper chalcogenides during processing

  14. Harnessing redox activity for the formation of uranium tris(imido) compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nickolas H.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Yao, Yiyi; Williams, Ursula J.; Schaefer, Brian A.; Kiernicki, John J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Goshert, Mitchell D.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schelter, Eric J.; Walensky, Justin R.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bart, Suzanne C.

    2014-10-01

    Classically, late transition-metal organometallic compounds promote multielectron processes solely through the change in oxidation state of the metal centre. In contrast, uranium typically undergoes single-electron chemistry. However, using redox-active ligands can engage multielectron reactivity at this metal in analogy to transition metals. Here we show that a redox-flexible pyridine(diimine) ligand can stabilize a series of highly reduced uranium coordination complexes by storing one, two or three electrons in the ligand. These species reduce organoazides easily to form uranium-nitrogen multiple bonds with the release of dinitrogen. The extent of ligand reduction dictates the formation of uranium mono-, bis- and tris(imido) products. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of these compounds supports the idea that electrons are stored in the ligand framework and used in subsequent reactivity. Computational analyses of the uranium imido products probed their molecular and electronic structures, which facilitated a comparison between the bonding in the tris(imido) structure and its tris(oxo) analogue.

  15. Geochemistry of Natural Redox Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1999-05-01

    Redox fronts are important geochemical boundaries which need to be considered in safety assessment of deep repositories for radioactive waste. In most cases, selected host-rock formations will be reducing due to the presence of ferrous minerals, sulphides, etc. During construction and operation of the repository, air will be introduced into the formation. After repository closure, oxidising conditions may persist locally until all oxygen is consumed. In the case of high-level waste, radiolysis of water may provide an additional source of oxidants. Oxidising conditions within a repository are thus possible and potentially have a strong influence on the mobility of many elements. The rate of movement of redox fronts, the boundary between oxidising and reducing environments, and their influence on migrating radionuclides are thus important factors influencing repository performance. The present report is a review of elemental behaviour at natural redox fronts, based on published information and work of the author. Redox fronts are geochemically and geometrically variable manifestations of a global interface between generally oxidising geochemical milieux in contact with the atmosphere and generally reducing milieux in contact with rocks containing ferrous iron, sulphide and/or organic carbon. A classification of redox fronts based on a subdivision into continental near-surface, marine near-surface, and deep environments is proposed. The global redox interface is often located close to the surface of rocks and sediments and, sometimes, within bodies of water. Temperature conditions are close to ambient. A deeper penetration of the global redox front to depths of several kilometres is found in basins containing oxidised sediments (red beds) and in some hydrothermal circulation systems. Temperatures at such deep redox fronts may reach 200 o C. Both near-surface and deep redox fronts are sites of formation of economic deposits of redox-sensitive elements, particularly of

  16. Redox signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  17. Pyrazolates advance cerium chemistry: a CeIII/CeIV redox equilibrium with benzoquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Daniel; Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Anwander, Reiner

    2017-05-16

    Two stable cerium(iv) 3,5-dialkylpyrazolate complexes are presented, namely dimeric [Ce(Me 2 pz) 4 ] 2 (Me 2 pz = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolate) and monomeric Ce(tBu 2 pz) 4 (tBu 2 pz = 3,5-di-tert-butylpyrazolate) along with their trivalent counterparts [Ce(Me 2 pz) 3 ] and [Ce(tBu 2 pz) 3 ] 2 . All complexes were obtained from protonolysis reactions employing the silylamide precursors Ce[N(SiHMe 2 ) 2 ] 4 and Ce[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 . Treatment of homoleptic Ce IV and Ce III Me 2 pz complexes with 1,4-hydroquinone (H 2 hq) or 1,4-benzoquinone (bq), respectively, ultimately gave the same trimetallic Ce III species via a cerium redox equilibrium. The Ce III complex Ce 3 (Me 2 pz) 5 (pchd) 2 (L) (pchd = 1,4-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)cyclohex-2,5-diene-1,4-diolato; L = Me 2 pzH or (thf) 2 ) results from a di-1,4-pyrazolyl attack on pre-coordinated bq. The reduction of bq by [Ce(Me 2 pz) 3 (thf)] 2 , and re-oxidation by the resulting Ce IV species was supported by UV-vis spectroscopic investigations. Comparisons with the redox-innocent complexes [Ln(Me 2 pz) 3 (thf)] 2 (Ln = La and Pr) revealed far less selective reactions with bq, giving hexametallic and octametallic rare-earth metal side products containing 2-Me 2 pz substituted hq ligands.

  18. Improving chemistry performance in CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.; Guzonas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There is a strong interplay between coolant chemistry and materials selection in any nuclear power plant system. To achieve the design life of reactor components it is necessary to monitor and control relevant chemistry parameters, such as ionic conductivity, pH, concentrations of dissolved ions and redox species (e.g., hydrogen, hydrazine, oxygen) and the concentrations of suspended corrosion products. Chemistry specifications are set to achieve a balance between the sometimes conflicting requirements to minimize corrosion and radiological dose and to minimize operating and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the plant. For the past decade, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has taken a rigorous and disciplined approach to reviewing and updating all aspects of chemistry control in the CANDU® nuclear power plant (NPP). This approach has included proactively reviewing chemistry operating experience from existing CANDU® and other water-cooled NPPs worldwide to identify and address emerging issues, updating all of our chemistry control documentation to ensure that each chemistry parameter is linked to a specific requirement (e.g., reduce activity transport, monitor for condenser leak) and incorporating the latest results from our Research and Development (R and D) programs to ensure that all chemistry specifications are supported by a sound rationale. The results of this review and update have been incorporated into updated chemistry specifications and, in some cases, modified operating procedures for new and existing plants. In addition, recommendations have been made for design modifications to improve chemistry control in new build plants, especially during periods of shutdown and startup when chemistry control has traditionally been more challenging. Chemistry control in new-build CANDU® plants will rely increasingly on the use of on-line instrumentation interfaced directly to AECL's state-of-the-art chemistry monitoring, diagnostics and analysis

  19. Uranium chemistry: significant advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, M.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews recent progress in uranium chemistry achieved in CEA laboratories. Like its neighbors in the Mendeleev chart uranium undergoes hydrolysis, oxidation and disproportionation reactions which make the chemistry of these species in water highly complex. The study of the chemistry of uranium in an anhydrous medium has led to correlate the structural and electronic differences observed in the interaction of uranium(III) and the lanthanides(III) with nitrogen or sulfur molecules and the effectiveness of these molecules in An(III)/Ln(III) separation via liquid-liquid extraction. Recent work on the redox reactivity of trivalent uranium U(III) in an organic medium with molecules such as water or an azide ion (N 3 - ) in stoichiometric quantities, led to extremely interesting uranium aggregates particular those involved in actinide migration in the environment or in aggregation problems in the fuel processing cycle. Another significant advance was the discovery of a compound containing the uranyl ion with a degree of oxidation (V) UO 2 + , obtained by oxidation of uranium(III). Recently chemists have succeeded in blocking the disproportionation reaction of uranyl(V) and in stabilizing polymetallic complexes of uranyl(V), opening the way to to a systematic study of the reactivity and the electronic and magnetic properties of uranyl(V) compounds. (A.C.)

  20. Oxygen chemistry in biology: Vibrational spectroscopy, stable isotopes, and future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, G.T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Dioxygen is an ideally suited substrate for enzymatic manipulation in oxidation-reduction chemistry and in substrate transformation. It is a powerful oxidant with a midpoint potential of 0.815 at neutral pH; at the same time, however, it exists in a triplet state in its most stable electronic configuration. This latter property confers kinetic inertness as a result of spin-conservation restrictions on reaction chemistry. If these restrictions can be overcome and controlled, dioxygen`s high redox potential can be used to maximize efficiency in free-energy conversion processes and to effect activation of relatively inert substrates.

  1. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L., E-mail: tait@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  2. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Bobek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  3. Recyclable surfaces for amine conjugation chemistry via redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon Seok [Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Se Won [Green Materials and Process Group, Research Institute of Sustainable Manufacturing System, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we extended this strategy to present a switchable surface that allows surface functionalization and removal of functional groups repeatedly. The substrate presenting a benzoquinone acid group is first used to immobilize with an amine-containing (bio)molecule using well-known conjugation chemistry. The benzoquinone group is then converted to the corresponding hydroquinone by treating with a reducing agent. We have described a strategy for the dynamic control of surface properties with recyclability via a simple reduction/ oxidation reaction. A stimuli-responsive quinone derivative was harnessed for the repeated immobilization and release of (bio)molecules, and thus, for the repeated dynamic change of the surface properties according to the characteristics of the immobilized (bio)molecules.

  4. Disentangling the record of diagenesis, local redox conditions, and global seawater chemistry during the latest Ordovician glaciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Anne-Sofie Crüger; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2017-01-01

    as pyrite in core samples, while outcrop samples have been significantly altered as pyrite has been oxidized and remobilized by modern weathering processes. Fe speciation in the more pristine core samples indicates persistent deep water anoxia, at least locally through the Late Ordovician, in contrast...... to the prevailing interpretation of increased Hirnantian water column oxygenation in shallower environments. Deep water redox conditions were likely decoupled from shallower environments by a basinal shift in organic matter export driven by decreasing rates of organic matter degradation and decreasing shelf areas......The Late Ordovician stratigraphic record integrates glacio-eustatic processes, water-column redox conditions and carbon cycle dynamics. This complex stratigraphic record, however, is dominated by deposits from epeiric seas that are susceptible to local physical and chemical processes decoupled from...

  5. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: Arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Christopher T.; Couture, Raoul-Marie; Omoregie, Enoma O.; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Charlet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH) 3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. Highlights: •Oscillating redox conditions and heterotrophic metabolism are implemented in PHREEQC. •Depletion of labile organic matter limits iron reduction and arsenic release. •Amorphous FeAsO 4 ∙2H 2 O precipitation potentially limits arsenic mobility during redox cycling. •Water fluctuating zones may naturally attenuate arsenic liberation during flooding. -- We demonstrate through batch experiments, spectroscopy and modelling that repetitive cycles of oxidation and reduction decrease arsenic mobility in soils during subsequent reducing conditions

  6. Sediment phosphorus speciation and mobility under dynamic redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Chris T.; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; O'Connell, David W.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment has caused phosphorus (P) accumulation in many freshwater sediments, raising concerns that internal loading from legacy P may delay the recovery of aquatic ecosystems suffering from eutrophication. Benthic recycling of P strongly depends on the redox regime within surficial sediment. In many shallow environments, redox conditions tend to be highly dynamic as a result of, among others, bioturbation by macrofauna, root activity, sediment resuspension and seasonal variations in bottom-water oxygen (O2) concentrations. To gain insight into the mobility and biogeochemistry of P under fluctuating redox conditions, a suspension of sediment from a hypereutrophic freshwater marsh was exposed to alternating 7-day periods of purging with air and nitrogen gas (N2), for a total duration of 74 days, in a bioreactor system. We present comprehensive data time series of bulk aqueous- and solid-phase chemistry, solid-phase phosphorus speciation and hydrolytic enzyme activities demonstrating the mass balanced redistribution of P in sediment during redox cycling. Aqueous phosphate concentrations remained low ( ˜ 2.5 µM) under oxic conditions due to sorption to iron(III) oxyhydroxides. During anoxic periods, once nitrate was depleted, the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides released P. However, only 4.5 % of the released P accumulated in solution while the rest was redistributed between the MgCl2 and NaHCO3 extractable fractions of the solid phase. Thus, under the short redox fluctuations imposed in the experiments, P remobilization to the aqueous phase remained relatively limited. Orthophosphate predominated at all times during the experiment in both the solid and aqueous phase. Combined P monoesters and diesters accounted for between 9 and 16 % of sediment particulate P. Phosphatase activities up to 2.4 mmol h-1 kg-1 indicated the potential for rapid mineralization of organic P (Po), in particular during periods of aeration when the

  7. Seventh BES [Basic Energy Sciences] catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  8. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  9. Organic chemical degradation by remote study of the redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, P. M.; Revil, A.; Binley, A. M.; Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the natural (and enhanced) degradation of organic contaminants is essential for managing groundwater quality in many parts of the world. Contaminated sites often have limited access, hence non-intrusive methods for studying redox processes, which drive the degradation of organic compounds, are required. One example is the degradation of de-icing chemicals (glycols and organic salts) released to the soil near airport runways during winter. This issue has been broadly studied at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway using intrusive and non-intrusive methods. Here, we report on laboratory experiments that aim to study the potential of using a self-potential, DCresistivity, and time-domain induced polarization for geochemical characterization of the degradation of Propylene Glycol (PG). PG is completely miscible in water, does not adsorb to soil particles and does not contribute to the electrical conductivity of the soil water. When the contaminant is in the unsaturated zone near the water table, the oxygen is quickly consumed and the gas exchange with the surface is insufficient to ensure aerobic degradation, which is faster than anaerobic degradation. Since biodegradation of PG is highly oxygen demanding, anaerobic pockets can exist causing iron and manganese reduction. It is hypothesised that nitrate would boost the degradation rate under such conditions. In our experiment, we study PG degradation in a sand tank. We provide the system with an electron highway to bridge zones with different redox potential. This geo-battery system is characterized by self-potential, resistivity and induced polarization anomalies. An example of preliminary results with self-potential at two different times of the experiment can be seen in the illustration. These will be supplemented with more direct information on the redox chemistry: in-situ water sampling, pH, redox potential and electrical conductivity measurements. In parallel, a series of batch experiments have been

  10. Uranium fixation by mineralization at the redox front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of actinide elements including uranium in geomedia is controlled by redox conditions. Under the oxidized conditions, uranium forms uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) and its complexes, and dissolves in ground water. Under the reduced conditions, U(IV) has much lower solubility than uranyl ion. In the Koongarra uranium deposit, Australia, lead-bearing uraninite, uranyl lead oxide and uranyl silicate minerals occur in the unweathered, primary ore zone, and uranyl phosphate minerals occur in the weathered, secondary ore zone. Between unweathered and weathered zones, the transition zone exists as a redox front. In the transition zone, graphite and sulfide minerals react as reducing agents for species dissolved in ground water. By SEM, spherical grains of uraninite were observed in veins with graphite. Pyrite had coffinite rim with crystals of uraninite. Calculation based on the ground water chemistry and hydrology at Koongarra shows that the uranium in the transition zone may be fixed from the ground water. In the Koongarra transition zone, recent mineralization of uranium by reduction takes place. Mineralization is much stronger fixation mechanism than adsorption on clay minerals. Pyrite in the buffer materials of possible radioactive waste repositories can fix radionuclides in oxidized ground water by mineralization with reducing reactions. (author)

  11. Reversible multi-electron redox chemistry of π-conjugated N-containing heteroaromatic molecule-based organic cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chengxin; Ning, Guo-Hong; Su, Jie; Zhong, Guiming; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Su, Chenliang; Yu, Dingyi; Zu, Lianhai; Yang, Jinhu; Ng, Man-Fai; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Yong; Armand, Michel; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-07-01

    Even though organic molecules with well-designed functional groups can be programmed to have high electron density per unit mass, their poor electrical conductivity and low cycle stability limit their applications in batteries. Here we report a facile synthesis of π-conjugated quinoxaline-based heteroaromatic molecules (3Q) by condensation of cyclic carbonyl molecules with o-phenylenediamine. 3Q features a number of electron-deficient pyrazine sites, where multiple redox reactions take place. When hybridized with graphene and coupled with an ether-based electrolyte, an organic cathode based on 3Q molecules displays a discharge capacity of 395 mAh g-1 at 400 mA g-1 (1C) in the voltage range of 1.2-3.9 V and a nearly 70% capacity retention after 10,000 cycles at 8 A g-1. It also exhibits a capacity of 222 mAh g-1 at 20C, which corresponds to 60% of the initial specific capacity. Our results offer evidence that heteroaromatic molecules with multiple redox sites are promising in developing high-energy-density, long-cycle-life organic rechargeable batteries.

  12. Effect of long-term fertilization on humic redox mediators in multiple microbial redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, Yi; Yu, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongdong

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of different long-term fertilizations on humic substances (HSs), humic acids (HAs) and humins, functioning as redox mediators for various microbial redox biotransformations, including 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153 ) dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, and their electron-mediating natures. The redox activity of HSs for various microbial redox metabolisms was substantially enhanced by long-term application of organic fertilizer (pig manure). As a redox mediator, only humin extracted from soils with organic fertilizer amendment (OF-HM) maintained microbial PCB 153 dechlorination activity (1.03 μM PCB 153 removal), and corresponding HA (OF-HA) most effectively enhanced iron reduction and nitrate reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens. Electrochemical analysis confirmed the enhancement of their electron transfer capacity and redox properties. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that C=C and C=O bonds, and carboxylic or phenolic groups in HSs might be the redox functional groups affected by fertilization. This research enhances our understanding of the influence of anthropogenic fertility on the biogeochemical cycling of elements and in situ remediation ability in agroecosystems through microorganisms' metabolisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. REDOX IMAGING OF THE p53-DEPENDENT MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE IN COLON CANCER EX VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, HE N.; FENG, MIN; MOON, LILY; DOLLOFF, NATHAN; EL-DEIRY, WAFIK; LI, LIN Z.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity of colon cancer at tissue level have not been previously reported. Nor has how p53 regulates mitochondrial respiration been measured at (deep) tissue level, presumably due to the unavailability of the technology that has sufficient spatial resolution and tissue penetration depth. Our prior work demonstrated that the mitochondrial redox state and its intratumor heterogeneity is associated with cancer aggressiveness in human melanoma and breast cancer in mouse models, with the more metastatic tumors exhibiting localized regions of more oxidized redox state. Using the Chance redox scanner with an in-plane spatial resolution of 200 μm, we imaged the mitochondrial redox state of the wild-type p53 colon tumors (HCT116 p53 wt) and the p53-deleted colon tumors (HCT116 p53−/−) by collecting the fluorescence signals of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins [Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)] from the mouse xenografts snap-frozen at low temperature. Our results show that: (1) both tumor lines have significant degree of intratumor heterogeneity of the redox state, typically exhibiting a distinct bi-modal distribution that either correlates with the spatial core–rim pattern or the “hot/cold” oxidation-reduction patches; (2) the p53−/− group is significantly more heterogeneous in the mitochondrial redox state and has a more oxidized tumor core compared to the p53 wt group when the tumor sizes of the two groups are matched; (3) the tumor size dependence of the redox indices (such as Fp and Fp redox ratio) is significant in the p53−/− group with the larger ones being more oxidized and more heterogeneous in their redox state, particularly more oxidized in the tumor central regions; (4) the H&E staining images of tumor sections grossly correlate with the redox images. The present work is the first to reveal at the submillimeter scale the intratumor heterogeneity pattern

  14. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on electrografted 4-ethynylphenyl film via click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Qin; Peng Ru; Liang Cong; Ye Siqiu; Xian Yuezhong; Zhang Wenjing; Jin Litong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was developed based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and click chemistry. Highlights: → A simple, versatile two-step approach, which is based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed for covalent redox proteins immobilization and biosensing for the first time. In this work, azido group modified HRP was covalently grafted on 4-ethylnylphenyl diazonium compound via CuAAC reaction and a novel electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor was successfully fabricated. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple two-step approach for redox protein immobilization was introduced. Firstly, alkynyl-terminated film was formed on electrode surface by electrochemical reduction of 4-ethylnylphenyl (4-EP) diazonium compound. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified with azido group was covalently immobilized onto the electrografted film via click reaction. Reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the modification process. The results indicate that HRP retains its native structure and shows fast direct electron transfer. Moreover, the immobilized HRP shows excellent electrocatalytic reduction activity toward H 2 O 2 with a linear range of 5.0 x 10 -6 to 9.3 x 10 -4 mol L -1 .

  15. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on electrografted 4-ethynylphenyl film via click chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Qin; Peng Ru; Liang Cong; Ye Siqiu [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xian Yuezhong, E-mail: yzxian@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zhang Wenjing; Jin Litong [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was developed based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and click chemistry. Highlights: > A simple, versatile two-step approach, which is based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed for covalent redox proteins immobilization and biosensing for the first time. In this work, azido group modified HRP was covalently grafted on 4-ethylnylphenyl diazonium compound via CuAAC reaction and a novel electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor was successfully fabricated. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple two-step approach for redox protein immobilization was introduced. Firstly, alkynyl-terminated film was formed on electrode surface by electrochemical reduction of 4-ethylnylphenyl (4-EP) diazonium compound. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified with azido group was covalently immobilized onto the electrografted film via click reaction. Reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the modification process. The results indicate that HRP retains its native structure and shows fast direct electron transfer. Moreover, the immobilized HRP shows excellent electrocatalytic reduction activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a linear range of 5.0 x 10{sup -6} to 9.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}.

  16. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9.

  17. Some redox chemistry of HPO sub 2 sup -. and sup. PO sub 3 sup 2- radicals. A pulse radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, J.E. (Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry); Anderson, R.F. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK). Gray Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The HO{sup .} radical oxidises hypophosphite and phosphite anions to HPO{sub 2}{sup -.} and {sup .}PO{sub 3}{sup 2-} respectively, but Br{sub 2}{sup -.} and N{sub 3}{sup .} do not. The rates of oxidation of HPO{sub 2}{sup -.} by a series of oxidising agents of known one electron redox potentials decrease with decreasing potential while the corresponding rates for oxidation of {sup .}PO{sub 3}{sup 2-} remain close to the diffusion controlled limit. {sup .}PO{sub 3}{sup 2-} will oxidise cysteine but HPO{sub 2}{sup -.} does not. {sup .}PO{sub 3}{sup 2-} did not oxidise ABTS, ascorbate, or the anion of the vitamin E analogue, trolox. It reduced traces of TMPD{sup +.} in TMPD rather than oxidising the substrate. The one electron redox potentials for oxidation and reduction of {sup .}PO{sub 3}{sup 2-} are calculated in light of recently published redox data on penicillamine. (author).

  18. Room Temperature, Hybrid Sodium-Based Flow Batteries with Multi-Electron Transfer Redox Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamie, Jack S.; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new concept of hybrid Na-based flow batteries (HNFBs) with a molten Na alloy anode in conjunction with a flowing catholyte separated by a solid Na-ion exchange membrane for grid-scale energy storage. Such HNFBs can operate at ambient temperature, allow catholytes to have multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, offer wide selection of catholyte chemistries with multiple active ions to couple with the highly negative Na alloy anode, and enable the use of both aqueous and non-aqueous catholytes. Further, the molten Na alloy anode permits the decoupled design of power and energy since a large volume of the molten Na alloy can be used with a limited ion-exchange membrane size. In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility of multi-electron transfer redox reactions per active ion and multiple active ions for catholytes has been demonstrated. The critical barriers to mature this new HNFBs have also been explored. PMID:26063629

  19. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Scott Perrin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web portal (www.charmming.org. The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis.

  20. Versatile Organic Chemistry on Vanadium-Based Multi-Electron Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtigall, Olaf; Spandl, Johann

    2018-02-21

    We report the synthesis, post-functionalization, and redox behavior of two organically functionalized aggregates, [V 6 O 7 (OMe) 9 {(OCH 2 ) 3 C-CH 2 N 3 }] and [V 6 O 7 (OMe) 9 {(OCH 2 ) 3 C-NH 2 }]. All twelve μ 2 -oxo groups on the edges of the Lindqvist-type {V 6 O 19 } core were replaced by alkoxo ligands. The absence of a negative charge and the closed organic shell make these neutral mixed-valence compounds very stable towards hydrolysis and well soluble in almost all common organic solvents. These are important advantages over classical POMs. By post-functionalization through copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition or imine formation, various organic moieties could be introduced. Even a well-soluble trimer composed of three hexanuclear vanadium units connected through an aromatic triimino core was synthesized and studied. The diverse redox behavior, the versatile reactivity, the good stability, and the excellent solubility make our vanadium compounds highly interesting for applications as building blocks in macromolecular chemistry as well as redox labels in biochemistry. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2007-10-12

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term disposal of high-level nuclear waste posed by this element. The primary issues examined during the course of this project were the behavior of technetium and its surrogate rhenium during waste vitrification and glass corrosion. Since the redox behavior of technetium can play a large role in determining its volatility, one goal of this research was to better understand the behavior of technetium in glass as a function of the redox potential of the glass melt. In addition, the behavior of rhenium was examined, since rhenium is commonly used as a surrogate for technetium in waste vitrification studies. A number of glasses similar to Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glasses were prepared under controlled atmospheres. The redox state of the glass was determined from the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio in the cooled glass, and the speciation of technetium and rhenium was determined by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The behavior of rhenium and technetium during glass alteration was also examined using the vapor hydration test (VHT).

  2. Simulation with Phast of the pore water chemistry experiment results (Mont Terri Url, Switzerland), including transport, thermodynamics, kinetics, and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.; Pearson, F.J.; Mettler, S.; Wersin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Pore water Chemistry (PC-)experiment was initially designed to determine the processes that control the redox properties of pore water in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri URL. However, changes in isotopic data and chemical parameters such as pH, alkalinity, dissolved methane, acetate and sulphate concentrations indicated unexpected microbial activity. The origin of the bacteria is not clear. In the light of published data, an indigenous origin cannot be ruled out. A combined biological and reactive transport model has been developed with the parallel PHAST software to simulate the processes that determine pore water chemistry. The influence of bacterial activity on the system is successfully modelled by considering different reaction pathways scenarios including aceto-genesis, methano-genesis, and methane/acetate oxidation coupled to sulphate reduction. Several conclusions can be clearly stated in the light of the simulation results: - The measured redox potentials (redox electrode) are in line with the S(-II)/S(+VI) redox system. - In the undisturbed pore water, S(-II) and S(+VI) activities are controlled by a mineral assemblage containing pyrite and a Fe carbonate (siderite or ankerite). pH is buffered by mineral phases and SO 4 2- concentration is inherited from the marine sedimentary rock. - Some local redox potentials in the sedimentary rock do not correspond to the measured redox potential; for instance, organic matter/HCO 3 - and CH 4 /HCO 3 - systems are not at equilibrium with the measured redox potential. - Redox disequilibrium can be exploited by micro-organisms as a source of energy for their metabolism. In this experiment CH 4 , acetate and other organic acids were produced and SO 4 2- was reduced to HS - . The redox properties of the system are then governed by kinetics rather than by thermodynamic equilibrium. The unexpected persistence of acetate in the borehole water is one of the consequences of these

  3. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso-redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jillian N; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso-redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Click-PEGylation - A mobility shift approach to assess the redox state of cysteines in candidate proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Lucie A G; Hinchy, Elizabeth C; Murphy, Michael P; Robb, Ellen L; Cochemé, Helena M

    2017-07-01

    The redox state of cysteine thiols is critical for protein function. Whereas cysteines play an important role in the maintenance of protein structure through the formation of internal disulfides, their nucleophilic thiol groups can become oxidatively modified in response to diverse redox challenges and thereby function in signalling and antioxidant defences. These oxidative modifications occur in response to a range of agents and stimuli, and can lead to the existence of multiple redox states for a given protein. To assess the role(s) of a protein in redox signalling and antioxidant defence, it is thus vital to be able to assess which of the multiple thiol redox states are present and to investigate how these alter under different conditions. While this can be done by a range of mass spectrometric-based methods, these are time-consuming, costly, and best suited to study abundant proteins or to perform an unbiased proteomic screen. One approach that can facilitate a targeted assessment of candidate proteins, as well as proteins that are low in abundance or proteomically challenging, is by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Redox-modified cysteine residues are selectively tagged with a large group, such as a polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer, and then the proteins are separated by electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting, which allows the inference of redox changes based on band shifts. However, the applicability of this method has been impaired by the difficulty of cleanly modifying protein thiols by large PEG reagents. To establish a more robust method for redox-selective PEGylation, we have utilised a Click chemistry approach, where free thiol groups are first labelled with a reagent modified to contain an alkyne moiety, which is subsequently Click-reacted with a PEG molecule containing a complementary azide function. This strategy can be adapted to study reversibly reduced or oxidised cysteines. Separation of the thiol labelling step from the PEG

  6. Redox Chemistry of Molybdenum Trioxide for Ultrafast Hydrogen-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfu; Xie, Yiming; Tang, Kai; Wang, Chao; Yan, Chenglin

    2018-05-11

    Hydrogen ions are ideal charge carriers for rechargeable batteries due to their small ionic radius and wide availability. However, little attention has been paid to hydrogen-ion storage devices because they generally deliver relatively low Coulombic efficiency as a result of the hydrogen evolution reaction that occurs in an aqueous electrolyte. Herein, we successfully demonstrate that hydrogen ions can be electrochemically stored in an inorganic molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3 ) electrode with high Coulombic efficiency and stability. The as-obtained electrode exhibits ultrafast hydrogen-ion storage properties with a specific capacity of 88 mA hg -1 at an ultrahigh rate of 100 C. The redox reaction mechanism of the MoO 3 electrode in the hydrogen-ion cell was investigated in detail. The results reveal a conversion reaction of the MoO 3 electrode into H 0.88 MoO 3 during the first hydrogen-ion insertion process and reversible intercalation/deintercalation of hydrogen ions between H 0.88 MoO 3 and H 0.12 MoO 3 during the following cycles. This study reveals new opportunities for the development of high-power energy storage devices with lightweight elements. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Voltammetric Study of dsDNA Modified by Multi-redox Label Based on N-methyl-4-hydrazino-7-nitrobenzofurazan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Raindlová, Veronika; Havran, Luděk; Barek, J.; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 129, May 20 (2014), s. 348-357 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0019 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA * redox labeling * N-methyl-4-hydrazino-7-nitrobenzofurazan * silver solid amalgam electrode * voltammetry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; BO - Biophysics (BFU-R) Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  8. Dissecting Redox Biology Using Fluorescent Protein Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Meyer, Andreas J; Morgan, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent protein sensors have revitalized the field of redox biology by revolutionizing the study of redox processes in living cells and organisms. Within one decade, a set of fundamental new insights has been gained, driven by the rapid technical development of in vivo redox sensing. Redox-sensitive yellow and green fluorescent protein variants (rxYFP and roGFPs) have been the central players. Although widely used as an established standard tool, important questions remain surrounding their meaningful use in vivo. We review the growing range of thiol redox sensor variants and their application in different cells, tissues, and organisms. We highlight five key findings where in vivo sensing has been instrumental in changing our understanding of redox biology, critically assess the interpretation of in vivo redox data, and discuss technical and biological limitations of current redox sensors and sensing approaches. We explore how novel sensor variants may further add to the current momentum toward a novel mechanistic and integrated understanding of redox biology in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 680-712.

  9. Investigation of Varied Strontium-Transuranic Precipitation Chemistries for Crossflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Precipitation chemistries for strontium and transuranic (TRU) removal have been tested for crossflow filterability and lanthanide removal with simulants of Hanford tank 241-AN-107 supernate. This is the initial work indicating the usefulness of a strontium and permanganate precipitation process as applied to the Hanford River Protection Project. Precipitations with both ferric and ferrous iron were shown to be at least two orders of magnitude less filterable than a 0.1 gpm/ft target average flux that was desired at the time. A precipitate from a strontium nitrate strike alone was found to filter easily and to make the desired average flux. Other chemistries tested included precipitant of lanthanum(III), nickel (II), calcium (II), and a redox chemistry using sodium permanganate. Of these chemistries a strontium and permanganate strike including calcium provided the highest filter flux compared to the other chemistries. It showed the most promise in lanthanide removal as well. This work provides a promising direction for further work to achieve both acceptable filterability and decontamination for Envelope C wastes to be treated by the Hanford River Protection Project. The work reported here was originally intended to satisfy needs for crossflow filter testing of a strontium and ferric precipitation method for treating Envelope C using a 241-AN-107 simulant

  10. Investigation of Varied Strontium-Transuranic Precipitation Chemistries for Crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-07-27

    Precipitation chemistries for strontium and transuranic (TRU) removal have been tested for crossflow filterability and lanthanide removal with simulants of Hanford tank 241-AN-107 supernate. This is the initial work indicating the usefulness of a strontium and permanganate precipitation process as applied to the Hanford River Protection Project. Precipitations with both ferric and ferrous iron were shown to be at least two orders of magnitude less filterable than a 0.1 gpm/ft target average flux that was desired at the time. A precipitate from a strontium nitrate strike alone was found to filter easily and to make the desired average flux. Other chemistries tested included precipitant of lanthanum(III), nickel (II), calcium (II), and a redox chemistry using sodium permanganate. Of these chemistries a strontium and permanganate strike including calcium provided the highest filter flux compared to the other chemistries. It showed the most promise in lanthanide removal as well. This work provides a promising direction for further work to achieve both acceptable filterability and decontamination for Envelope C wastes to be treated by the Hanford River Protection Project. The work reported here was originally intended to satisfy needs for crossflow filter testing of a strontium and ferric precipitation method for treating Envelope C using a 241-AN-107 simulant.

  11. Redox Buffer Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  12. Investigation of potential analytical methods for redox control of the vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate several analytical techniques to measure ferrous/ferric ratios in simulated and radioactive nuclear waste glasses for eventual redox control of the vitrification process. Redox control will minimize the melt foaming that occurs under highly oxidizing conditions and the metal precipitation that occurs under highly reducing conditions. The analytical method selected must have a rapid response for production problems with minimal complexity and analyst involvement. The wet-chemistry, Moessbauer spectroscopy, glass color analysis, and ion chromatography techniques were explored, with particular emphasis being placed on the Moessbauer technique. In general, all of these methods can be used for nonradioactive samples. The Moessbauer method can readily analyze glasses containing uranium and thorium. A shielded container was designed and built to analyze fully radioactive glasses with the Moessbauer spectrometer in a hot cell environment. However, analyses conducted with radioactive waste glasses containing 90 Sr and 137 Cs were unsuccessful, presumably due to background radiation problems caused by the samples. The color of glass powder can be used to analyze the ferrous/ferric ratio for low chromium glasses, but this method may not be as precise as the others. Ion chromatography was only tested on nonradioactive glasses, but this technique appears to have the required precision due to its analysis of both Fe +2 and Fe +3 and its anticipated adaptability for radioactivity samples. This development would be similar to procedures already in use for shielded inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP) spectrometry. Development of the ion chromatography method is therefore recommended; conventional wet-chemistry is recommended as a backup procedure

  13. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L.; Lubner, Carolyn E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Mulder, David W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; King, Paul W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Peters, John W. [Institute; Beratan, David N. [Department

    2017-08-23

    How can proteins drive two electrons from a redox active donor onto two acceptors at very different potentials and distances? And how can this transaction be conducted without dissipating very much energy or violating the laws of thermodynamics? Nature appears to have addressed these challenges by coupling thermodynamically uphill and downhill electron transfer reactions, using two-electron donor cofactors that have very different potentials for the removal of the first and second electron. Although electron bifurcation is carried out with near perfection from the standpoint of energy conservation and electron delivery yields, it is a biological energy transduction paradigm that has only come into focus recently. This Account provides an exegesis of the biophysical principles that underpin electron bifurcation.

  14. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  15. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.; Ross, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation and reduction of metal ions and complexes can yield species in unusual oxidation states, and ligand-radicals coordinated to the central metal. These often unstable species can be mechanistically important intermediates in thermal, photochemical, and electrochemical reactions involving metal-containing substances. Their generation via radiolysis provides an alternate means of characterizing them using kinetic and spectroscopic techniques. We hope these bibliographies on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes, presented according to periodic groups, will prove useful to researchers in metallo-redox chemistry. These bibliographies contain only primary literature sources; reviews are not included. However, a list of general review articles on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes is presented here in the first section which covers cobalt, rhodium and iridium, Group 9 in the new IUPAC notation. Additional parts of the bibliography are planned, covering other periodic groups. Part A of the bibliography was prepared by a search of the Radiation Chemistry Data Center Bibliographic Data Base (RCDCbib) through January 1986 for papers on rhodium, iridium and cobalt compounds, and radiolysis (both continuous and pulsed). Papers in which the use of metal compounds was incidental to the primary objective of the study were excluded. Excluded also were publications in unrefereed and obscure sources such as meeting proceedings, internal reports, dissertations, and patents. The majority of the studies in the resultant compilation deal with experiments performed on solutions, mainly aqueous, although a substantial fraction is devoted to solid-state esr measurements. The references are listed in separate sections for each of the metals, and are presented in approximate chronological order. (author)

  16. CTD and Water Chemistry data of the Eastern Pacific Redox Experiment of May - June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Eastern Pacific Redox Experiment (EPREX) took place 24 May to 28 June 2000 on the R/V Roger Revelle. The first station was at the Hawaii Ocean Time Series...

  17. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-01-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power...

  18. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei

    2014-01-28

    Cellular redox status plays a key role in mediating various physiological and developmental processes often through modulating activities of redox-sensitive proteins. Various stresses trigger over-production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species which lead to oxidative modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Identification and characterization of redox-sensitive proteins are important steps toward understanding molecular mechanisms of stress responses. Here, we report a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential labeling of reduced and oxidized thiols. The biotin-tagged peptides are affinity purified, labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and analyzed using a paralleled HCD-CID fragmentation mode in an LTQ-Orbitrap. With this approach, we identified 195 cysteine-containing peptides from 179 proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells following the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A majority of those redox-sensitive proteins, including several transcription factors, were not identified by previous redox proteomics studies. This approach allows identification of the specific redox-regulated cysteine residues, and offers an effective tool for elucidation of redox proteomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Iron Hydroxide Minerals Drive Organic and Phosphorus Chemistry in Subsurface Redox / pH Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E.; Barge, L. M.; VanderVelde, D.; Baum, M.

    2017-12-01

    Iron minerals, particularly iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, are prevalent on Mars and may exist in mixed valence or even reduced states beneath the oxidized surface. Iron (II,III) hydroxides, including green rust, are reactive and potentially catalytic minerals that can absorb and concentrate charged species, while also driving chemical reactions. These minerals are highly redox-sensitive and the presence of organics and/or phosphorus species could affect their mineralogy and/or stability. Conversely, the minerals might be able to drive chemical processes such as amino acid formation, phosphorus oxyanion reactions, or could simply selectively preserve organic species via surface adsorption. In an open aqueous sediment column, soluble products of mineral-driven reactions could also diffuse to sites of different chemical conditions to react even further. We synthesized Fe-hydroxide minerals under various conditions relevant to early Earth and ancient Mars (>3.0 Gyr), anoxically and in the presence of salts likely to have been present in surface or ground waters. Using these minerals we conducted experiments to test whether iron hydroxides could promote amino acid formation, and how the reaction is affected by subsurface gradients of redox, pH, and temperature. We also tested the adsorption of organic and phosphorus species onto Fe-hydroxide minerals at different conditions within the gradients. The suite of organic or phosphorus signatures that may be found in a particular mineral system is a combination of what is synthesized there, what is preferentially concentrated / retained there, and what is preserved against degradation. Further work is needed to determine how these processes could have proceeded on Mars and what mineral-organic signatures, abiotic or otherwise, would be produced from such processes.

  20. SITE 94. Modelling of groundwater chemistry at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emren, A.T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    of the groundwater appears to be mostly a consequence of chemical reactions between water and fracture filling minerals. This has been studied in simulations where rain has been allowed to enter a fracture. Although there are some differences, the results found in this modelling generally are similar to the observed values. The deviations suggest that the fracture filling minerals alone are not enough to explain the observed groundwater chemistry. This should not be expected, since the old waters found hundreds of meters below the surface have been able to react with other mineral sets as well. In the CRACKER simulations it has been found that the simulated waters are similar to observations with respect to redox properties. The Aespoe groundwaters have iron concentrations which are low compared to those found in other deep Swedish groundwaters. By inhibiting reactions in the simulations, it has been found unlikely that the Fe(II) - Fe(III) redox couple is the main controller of the redox properties in Aespoe groundwaters. Rather, it appears that the redox properties can be maintained even if reactions with this couple are inhibited. According to the simulation results, reactions in which dissolved hydrogen, carbonates and methane are participating are important. This does not mean that iron species and minerals are not involved in redox processes. The simulation methods have been applied to possible future events and processes. As examples of such, the effects of elevated temperature on the groundwater properties have been investigated as well as a prediction on possible effects of Baltic Sea water intrusion 58 refs, figs

  1. SITE 94. Modelling of groundwater chemistry at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emren, A.T.

    1999-02-01

    of the groundwater appears to be mostly a consequence of chemical reactions between water and fracture filling minerals. This has been studied in simulations where rain has been allowed to enter a fracture. Although there are some differences, the results found in this modelling generally are similar to the observed values. The deviations suggest that the fracture filling minerals alone are not enough to explain the observed groundwater chemistry. This should not be expected, since the old waters found hundreds of meters below the surface have been able to react with other mineral sets as well. In the CRACKER simulations it has been found that the simulated waters are similar to observations with respect to redox properties. The Aespoe groundwaters have iron concentrations which are low compared to those found in other deep Swedish groundwaters. By inhibiting reactions in the simulations, it has been found unlikely that the Fe(II) - Fe(III) redox couple is the main controller of the redox properties in Aespoe groundwaters. Rather, it appears that the redox properties can be maintained even if reactions with this couple are inhibited. According to the simulation results, reactions in which dissolved hydrogen, carbonates and methane are participating are important. This does not mean that iron species and minerals are not involved in redox processes. The simulation methods have been applied to possible future events and processes. As examples of such, the effects of elevated temperature on the groundwater properties have been investigated as well as a prediction on possible effects of Baltic Sea water intrusion

  2. Redox reaction studies by nanosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthy, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as intermediates in many chemical and biochemical reactions. An important type of reaction which they can undergo is a one electron or redox process. The direction and rate of such electron transfer reactions is governed by the relative redox potentials of the participating species. Because of the generally short lived nature of free radicals, evaluation of their redox potentials poses a number of problems. Two techniques are described for the experimental determination of the redox potentials of short lived species generated by either a nanosecond electron pulse or laser flash. In the first method, redox titration of the short lived species with stable molecules of known redox potential is carried out, employing the technique of fast kinetic spectrophotometry. Conversely, by the same method it is also possible to evaluate the one electron redox potentials of stable molecules by redox titration with free radicals of known redox potential produced as above. In the second method, electrochemical reduction or oxidation of the short lived species at an appropriate electrode (generally a mercury drop) is carried out at different fixed potentials, and the redox potential evaluated from the current-potential curves (polarograms). Full description of the experimental set up and theoretical considerations for interpretation of the raw data are given. The relative merits of the two methods and their practical applicability are discussed. (auth.)

  3. The Azomethine Ylide Route to Amine C–H Functionalization: Redox-Versions of Classic Reactions and a Pathway to New Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    processes, have been identified as common intermediates. Extension of this chemistry to amine α,β-difunctionalization has been shown to be possible by way of converting the intermediate azomethine ylides into transient enamines. This Account details the evolution of this general strategy and the progress made to date. Further included is a discussion of related decarboxylative reactions and transformations that result in the redox-neutral aromatization of (partially) saturated cyclic amines. These processes also involve azomethine ylides, reactive intermediates that appear to be far more prevalent in condensation chemistry of amines and carbonyl compounds than previously considered. In contrast, as exemplified by some redox transformations that have been studied in greater detail, iminium ions are not necessarily involved in all amine/aldehyde condensation reactions. PMID:25560649

  4. The azomethine ylide route to amine C-H functionalization: redox-versions of classic reactions and a pathway to new transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel

    2015-02-17

    identified as common intermediates. Extension of this chemistry to amine α,β-difunctionalization has been shown to be possible by way of converting the intermediate azomethine ylides into transient enamines. This Account details the evolution of this general strategy and the progress made to date. Further included is a discussion of related decarboxylative reactions and transformations that result in the redox-neutral aromatization of (partially) saturated cyclic amines. These processes also involve azomethine ylides, reactive intermediates that appear to be far more prevalent in condensation chemistry of amines and carbonyl compounds than previously considered. In contrast, as exemplified by some redox transformations that have been studied in greater detail, iminium ions are not necessarily involved in all amine/aldehyde condensation reactions.

  5. Identification of Non-Pertechnetate Species In Hanford Tank Waste, Their Synthesis, Characterization, And Fundamental Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth R. Ashely; Norman Schroeder; Jose A. Olivares; Brian Scott

    2004-12-10

    This proposal had three major goals: (1) develop capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry as a characterization technique, (2) separate a non-pertechnetate fraction from a waste sample and identify the non-pertechnetate species in it by CEMS, and (3) synthesize and characterize bulk quantities of the identified non-pertechnetate species and study their ligand substitution and redox chemistry.

  6. Identification of Non-Pertechnetate Species In Hanford Tank Waste, Their Synthesis, Characterization, And Fundamental Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashely, Kenneth R.; Schroeder, Norman; Olivares, Jose A.; Scott, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This proposal had three major goals: (1) develop capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry as a characterization technique, (2) separate a non-pertechnetate fraction from a waste sample and identify the non-pertechnetate species in it by CEMS, and (3) synthesize and characterize bulk quantities of the identified non-pertechnetate species and study their ligand substitution and redox chemistry

  7. The developments and challenges of cerium half-cell in zinc–cerium redox flow battery for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Zhipeng; Liu, Qingchao; Chang, Zhiwen; Zhang, Xinbo

    2013-01-01

    Zinc–cerium redox flow batteries (ZCBs) are emerging as a very promising new technology with the potential to store a large amount of energy economically and efficiently, thanking to its highest thermodynamic open-circuit cell voltage among all the currently studied aqueous redox flow batteries. However, there are numerous scientific and technical challenges that must be overcome if this alluring promise is to turn into reality, from designing the battery structure, to optimizing the electrolyte compositions and elucidating the complex chemical reactions that occur during charge and discharge. This review article is the first summary of the most significant developments and challenges of cerium half-cell and the current understanding of their chemistry. We are certain that this review will be of great interest to audience over a broad range, especially in fields of energy storage, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering

  8. In Situ Synthesis of Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles within Antifouling Zwitterionic Hydrogels by Catecholic Redox Chemistry for Wound Healing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GhavamiNejad, Amin; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-03-14

    A multifunctional hydrogel that combines the dual functionality of both antifouling and antimicrobial capacities holds great potential for many bioapplications. Many approaches and different materials have been employed to synthesize such a material. However, a systematic study, including in vitro and in vivo evaluation, on such a material as wound dressings is highly scarce at present. Herein, we report on a new strategy that uses catecholic chemistry to synthesize antimicrobial silver nanoparticles impregnated into antifouling zwitterionic hydrogels. For this purpose, hydrophobic dopamine methacrylamide monomer (DMA) was mixed in an aqueous solution of sodium tetraborate decahydrate and DMA monomer became soluble after increasing pH to 9 due to the complexation between catechol groups and boron. Then, cross-linking polymerization of zwitterionic monomer was carried out with the solution of the protected dopamine monomer to produce a new hydrogel. When this new hydrogel comes in contact with a silver nitrate solution, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are formed in its structure as a result of the redox property of the catechol groups and in the absence of any other external reducing agent. The results obtained from TEM and XRD measurements indicate that AgNPs with diameters of around 20 nm had formed within the networks. FESEM images confirmed that the silver nanoparticles were homogeneously incorporated throughout the hydrogel network, and FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated that the catechol moiety in the polymeric backbone of the hydrogel is responsible for the reduction of silver ions into the AgNPs. Finally, the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that these mussel-inspired, antifouling, antibacterial hydrogels have great potential for use in wound healing applications.

  9. Imaging dynamic redox processes with genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeriņa, Daria; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P

    2014-08-01

    Redox signalling plays an important role in many aspects of physiology, including that of the cardiovascular system. Perturbed redox regulation has been associated with numerous pathological conditions; nevertheless, the causal relationships between redox changes and pathology often remain unclear. Redox signalling involves the production of specific redox species at specific times in specific locations. However, until recently, the study of these processes has been impeded by a lack of appropriate tools and methodologies that afford the necessary redox species specificity and spatiotemporal resolution. Recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes now allow dynamic real-time measurements, of defined redox species, with subcellular compartment resolution, in intact living cells. Here we discuss the available genetically encoded redox probes in terms of their sensitivity and specificity and highlight where uncertainties or controversies currently exist. Furthermore, we outline major goals for future probe development and describe how progress in imaging methodologies will improve our ability to employ genetically encoded redox probes in a wide range of situations. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Redox control of molecular motion in switchable artificial nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credi, Alberto; Semeraro, Monica; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita

    2011-03-15

    The design, synthesis, and operation of molecular-scale systems that exhibit controllable motions of their component parts is a topic of great interest in nanoscience and a fascinating challenge of nanotechnology. The development of this kind of species constitutes the premise to the construction of molecular machines and motors, which in a not-too-distant future could find applications in fields such as materials science, information technology, energy conversion, diagnostics, and medicine. In the past 25 years the development of supramolecular chemistry has enabled the construction of an interesting variety of artificial molecular machines. These devices operate via electronic and molecular rearrangements and, like the macroscopic counterparts, they need energy to work as well as signals to communicate with the operator. Here we outline the design principles at the basis of redox switching of molecular motion in artificial nanodevices. Redox processes, chemically, electrically, or photochemically induced, can indeed supply the energy to bring about molecular motions. Moreover, in the case of electrically and photochemically induced processes, electrochemical and photochemical techniques can be used to read the state of the system, and thus to control and monitor the operation of the device. Some selected examples are also reported to describe the most representative achievements in this research area.

  11. A Membrane‐Free Redox Flow Battery with Two Immiscible Redox Electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Navalpotro, Paula; Palma, Jesus; Anderson, Marc; Marcilla, Rebeca

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Flexible and scalable energy storage solutions are necessary for mitigating fluctuations of renewable energy sources. The main advantage of redox flow batteries is their ability to decouple power and energy. However, they present some limitations including poor performance, short‐lifetimes, and expensive ion‐selective membranes as well as high price, toxicity, and scarcity of vanadium compounds. We report a membrane‐free battery that relies on the immiscibility of redox electrolytes ...

  12. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Taylor, André D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. However, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. Here, we show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme's oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. This study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage. PMID:27759005

  13. Regulatory redox state in tree seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Ratajczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prx are important regulators of the redox status of tree seeds during maturation and long-term storage. Thioredoxins (Trx are redox transmitters and thereby regulate Prx activity. Current research is focused on the association of Trx with Prx in tree seeds differing in the tolerance to desiccation. The results will allow for better understanding the regulation of the redox status in orthodox, recalcitrant, and intermediate seeds. The findings will also elucidate the role of the redox status during the loss of viability of sensitive seeds during drying and long-term storage.

  14. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  15. Research Program to Determine Redox Reactions and Their Effects on Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium in DOE Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Rai, D.

    2000-01-01

    Plutonium in geologic matrices undergoes a variety of complex reactions which complicate its environmental behavior. These complexities in plutonium chemistry whereby a large variety of precipitation, dissolution, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions control plutonium speciation and concentrations, result in the need for a rather large amount of reliable, fundamental data to predict Pu behavior in geologic media. These data are also needed for evaluation of remediation strategies that involve removing most of the contaminants by selective methods, followed by in situ immobilization of residual contaminants. Two areas were studied during this project: (1) thermodynamic data for Th(IV) and Pu(IV) complexes of EDTA and for Pu(V) interactions with chloride; (2) kinetic data for redox reactions of Pu in the presence of common redox agents (e.g., H 2 O 2 , MnO 2 , and NaOCl) encountered under waste disposal conditions. These studies are relevant to understanding Pu behavior in wastes disposed of in diverse geologic conditions (e.g., at the WIPP and YUCCA Mountain repositories and in contaminated sediments at many different DOE sites) and also for developing effective remediation strategies (e.g., processing of high level waste tanks). These studies have yielded data to address redox reactions of plutonium in the presence of environmentally important agents (e.g. organic and inorganic oxidants/reductants)

  16. Research Program to Determine Redox Reactions and Their Effects on Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium in DOE Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppin, G.R.; Rai, D.

    2000-10-01

    Plutonium in geologic matrices undergoes a variety of complex reactions which complicate its environmental behavior. These complexities in plutonium chemistry whereby a large variety of precipitation, dissolution, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions control plutonium speciation and concentrations, result in the need for a rather large amount of reliable, fundamental data to predict Pu behavior in geologic media. These data are also needed for evaluation of remediation strategies that involve removing most of the contaminants by selective methods, followed by in situ immobilization of residual contaminants. Two areas were studied during this project: (1) thermodynamic data for Th(IV) and Pu(IV) complexes of EDTA and for Pu(V) interactions with chloride; (2) kinetic data for redox reactions of Pu in the presence of common redox agents (e.g., H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, MnO{sub 2}, and NaOCl) encountered under waste disposal conditions. These studies are relevant to understanding Pu behavior in wastes disposed of in diverse geologic conditions (e.g., at the WIPP and YUCCA Mountain repositories and in contaminated sediments at many different DOE sites) and also for developing effective remediation strategies (e.g., processing of high level waste tanks). These studies have yielded data to address redox reactions of plutonium in the presence of environmentally important agents (e.g. organic and inorganic oxidants/reductants).

  17. Tc Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy S.; Conradsen, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    Tc complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that long-term consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges we are conducting a research program to study to develop thermodynamic data on Tc-organic complexation over a wide range of chemical conditions. We will attempt to characterize Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques to validate our model. On the basis of such studies we will develop credible model of Tc chemistry in HLW that will allow prediction of Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  18. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  19. Redox Regulation of Endothelial Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are present throughout blood vessels and have variable roles in both physiological and pathological settings. EC fate is altered and regulated by several key factors in physiological or pathological conditions. Reactive nitrogen species and reactive oxygen species derived from NAD(P)H oxidases, mitochondria, or nitric oxide-producing enzymes are not only cytotoxic but also compose a signaling network in the redox system. The formation, actions, key molecular interactions, and physiological and pathological relevance of redox signals in ECs remain unclear. We review the identities, sources, and biological actions of oxidants and reductants produced during EC function or dysfunction. Further, we discuss how ECs shape key redox sensors and examine the biological functions, transcriptional responses, and post-translational modifications evoked by the redox system in ECs. We summarize recent findings regarding the mechanisms by which redox signals regulate the fate of ECs and address the outcome of altered EC fate in health and disease. Future studies will examine if the redox biology of ECs can be targeted in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24633153

  20. Redox Biology in Neurological Function, Dysfunction, and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rodrigo; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2018-04-23

    Reduction oxidation (redox) reactions are central to life and when altered, they can promote disease progression. In the brain, redox homeostasis is recognized to be involved in all aspects of central nervous system (CNS) development, function, aging, and disease. Recent studies have uncovered the diverse nature by which redox reactions and homeostasis contribute to brain physiology, and when dysregulated to pathological consequences. Redox reactions go beyond what is commonly described as oxidative stress and involve redox mechanisms linked to signaling and metabolism. In contrast to the nonspecific nature of oxidative damage, redox signaling involves specific oxidation/reduction reactions that regulate a myriad of neurological processes such as neurotransmission, homeostasis, and degeneration. This Forum is focused on the role of redox metabolism and signaling in the brain. Six review articles from leading scientists in the field that appraise the role of redox metabolism and signaling in different aspects of brain biology including neurodevelopment, neurotransmission, aging, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and neurotoxicity are included. An original research article exemplifying these concepts uncovers a novel link between oxidative modifications, redox signaling, and neurodegeneration. This Forum highlights the recent advances in the field and we hope it encourages future research aimed to understand the mechanisms by which redox metabolism and signaling regulate CNS physiology and pathophysiology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  1. Exercise redox biochemistry: Conceptual, methodological and technical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Cobley

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Exercise redox biochemistry is of considerable interest owing to its translational value in health and disease. However, unaddressed conceptual, methodological and technical issues complicate attempts to unravel how exercise alters redox homeostasis in health and disease. Conceptual issues relate to misunderstandings that arise when the chemical heterogeneity of redox biology is disregarded: which often complicates attempts to use redox-active compounds and assess redox signalling. Further, that oxidised macromolecule adduct levels reflect formation and repair is seldom considered. Methodological and technical issues relate to the use of out-dated assays and/or inappropriate sample preparation techniques that confound biochemical redox analysis. After considering each of the aforementioned issues, we outline how each issue can be resolved and provide a unifying set of recommendations. We specifically recommend that investigators: consider chemical heterogeneity, use redox-active compounds judiciously, abandon flawed assays, carefully prepare samples and assay buffers, consider repair/metabolism, use multiple biomarkers to assess oxidative damage and redox signalling. Keywords: Exercise, Oxidative stress, Free radical, Antioxidants, Redox signalling

  2. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp 2 MX 2 . Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U → L π-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs

  3. Analytical redox reactions and redox potentials of tungsten and its concomitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, G.; Mintrop, L.; Tracht, U.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that tungsten can be more effectively determined by redox titrimetry than by gravimetry. In addition to its inherent greater simplicity the volumetric approach offers to determine several components of the sample from consecutive redox titrations. To provide the necessary information the conditional redox potentials of W, Mo, Fe, V, Ti, Sn, Cu, Cr in HCl, HCl + HF and HCl + H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ have been determined. Use of HF and/or H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ allows sample preparations without any precipitation of tungstic acid. The influence of these auxiliary complexing agents on the potentials and kinetics is discussed. The titrations can be performed reductimetrically or more conveniently oxidimetrically using potentiometric or amperometric indication. The use of strongly reducing agents restricts the tolerance interval to +-0.6%, so that the gravimetric determination of tungsten remains superior for high precision analyses.

  4. Analytical redox reactions and redox potentials of tungsten and its concomitants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuensch, G.; Mintrop, L.; Tracht, U.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that tungsten can be more effectively determined by redox titrimetry than by gravimetry. In addition to its inherent greater simplicity the volumetric approach offers to determine several components of the sample from consecutive redox titrations. To provide the necessary information the conditional redox potentials of W, Mo, Fe, V, Ti, Sn, Cu, Cr in HCl, HCl + HF and HCl + H 3 PO 4 have been determined. Use of HF and/or H 3 PO 4 allows sample preparations without any precipitation of tungstic acid. The influence of these auxiliary complexing agents on the potentials and kinetics is discussed. The titrations can be performed reductimetrically or more conveniently oxidimetrically using potentiometric or amperometric indication. The use of strongly reducing agents restricts the tolerance interval to +-0.6%, so that the gravimetric determination of tungsten remains superior for high precision analyses. (orig.) [de

  5. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  6. Radii of Redox Components from Absolute Redox Potentials Compared with Covalent and Aqueous Ionic Radii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2010), s. 903-907 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Absolute redox potentials * Radii of redox components Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  7. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  8. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  9. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  10. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  11. Efficiency improvement of an all-vanadium redox flow battery by harvesting low-grade heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, Danick; Dennison, C. R.; Battistel, Alberto; Girault, Hubert H.

    2018-06-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are rugged systems, which can withstand several thousand cycles and last many years. However, they suffer from low energy density, low power density, and low efficiency. Integrating a Thermally Regenerative Electrochemical Cycle (TREC) into the RFB, it is possible to mitigate some of these drawbacks. The TREC takes advantage of the temperature dependence of the cell voltage to convert heat directly into electrical energy. Here, the performance increase of a TREC-RFB is investigated using two kinds of all-vanadium electrolyte chemistries: one containing a typical concentration of sulfuric acid and one containing a large excess of hydrochloric acid. The results show that the energy density of the system was increased by 1.3Wh L-1 and 0.8Wh L-1, respectively and the overall energy efficiency also increased by 9 and 5 percentage points, respectively. The integration of the heat exchangers necessary to change the battery temperature is readily facilitated by the design of the redox flow battery, which already utilizes fluid circulation loops.

  12. Dual redox catalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions: towards a redox flow Li-O2 battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Jia, Chuankun; Yang, Jing; Pan, Feng; Huang, Qizhao; Wang, Qing

    2015-06-11

    A redox flow lithium-oxygen battery (RFLOB) by using soluble redox catalysts with good performance was demonstrated for large-scale energy storage. The new device enables the reversible formation and decomposition of Li2O2 via redox targeting reactions in a gas diffusion tank, spatially separated from the electrode, which obviates the passivation and pore clogging of the cathode.

  13. Redox-assisted Li+-storage in lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qizhao; Wang Qing

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial charge transfer is the key kinetic process dictating the operation of lithium-ion battery. Redox-mediated charge propagations of the electronic (e − and h + ) and ionic species (Li + ) at the electrode–electrolyte interface have recently gained increasing attention for better exploitation of battery materials. This article briefly summarises the energetic and kinetic aspects of lithium-ion batteries, and reviews the recent progress on various redox-assisted Li + storage approaches. From molecular wiring to polymer wiring and from redox targeting to redox flow lithium battery, the role of redox mediators and the way of the redox species functioning in lithium-ion batteries are discussed. (topical review)

  14. Mass transport enhancement in redox flow batteries with corrugated fluidic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Kleber Marques; Marschewski, Julian; Ebejer, Neil; Ruch, Patrick; Cotta, Renato Machado; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-08-01

    We propose a facile, novel concept of mass transfer enhancement in flow batteries based on electrolyte guidance in rationally designed corrugated channel systems. The proposed fluidic networks employ periodic throttling of the flow to optimally deflect the electrolytes into the porous electrode, targeting enhancement of the electrolyte-electrode interaction. Theoretical analysis is conducted with channels in the form of trapezoidal waves, confirming and detailing the mass transport enhancement mechanism. In dilute concentration experiments with an alkaline quinone redox chemistry, a scaling of the limiting current with Re0.74 is identified, which compares favourably against the Re0.33 scaling typical of diffusion-limited laminar processes. Experimental IR-corrected polarization curves are presented for high concentration conditions, and a significant performance improvement is observed with the narrowing of the nozzles. The adverse effects of periodic throttling on the pumping power are compared with the benefits in terms of power density, and an improvement of up to 102% in net power density is obtained in comparison with the flow-by case employing straight parallel channels. The proposed novel concept of corrugated fluidic networks comes with facile fabrication and contributes to the improvement of the transport characteristics and overall performance of redox flow battery systems.

  15. Exercise-intensity dependent alterations in plasma redox status do not reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Trewin, Adam; Levinger, Itamar; Shaw, Christopher S; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-04-01

    Redox homeostasis and redox-sensitive protein signaling play a role in exercise-induced adaptation. The effects of sprint-interval exercise (SIE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE), on post-exercise plasma redox status are unclear. Furthermore, whether post-exercise plasma redox status reflects skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling is unknown. In a randomized crossover design, eight healthy adults performed a cycling session of HIIE (5×4min at 75% W max ), SIE (4×30s Wingate's), and CMIE work-matched to HIIE (30min at 50% of W max ). Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and catalase activity were measured immediately post, 1h, 2h and 3h post-exercise. Plasma redox status biomarkers were correlated with phosphorylation of skeletal muscle p38-MAPK, JNK, NF-κB, and IκBα protein content immediately and 3h post-exercise. Plasma catalase activity was greater with SIE (56.6±3.8Uml -1 ) compared to CMIE (42.7±3.2, pexercise plasma TBARS and SOD activity significantly (pexercise protocol. A significant positive correlation was detected between plasma catalase activity and skeletal muscle p38-MAPK phosphorylation 3h post-exercise (r=0.40, p=0.04). No other correlations were detected (all p>0.05). Low-volume SIE elicited greater post-exercise plasma catalase activity compared to HIIE and CMIE, and greater H 2 O 2 compared to CMIE. Plasma redox status did not, however, adequately reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  17. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Ursini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles

  18. Exercise redox biochemistry: Conceptual, methodological and technical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, James N; Close, Graeme L; Bailey, Damian M; Davison, Gareth W

    2017-08-01

    Exercise redox biochemistry is of considerable interest owing to its translational value in health and disease. However, unaddressed conceptual, methodological and technical issues complicate attempts to unravel how exercise alters redox homeostasis in health and disease. Conceptual issues relate to misunderstandings that arise when the chemical heterogeneity of redox biology is disregarded: which often complicates attempts to use redox-active compounds and assess redox signalling. Further, that oxidised macromolecule adduct levels reflect formation and repair is seldom considered. Methodological and technical issues relate to the use of out-dated assays and/or inappropriate sample preparation techniques that confound biochemical redox analysis. After considering each of the aforementioned issues, we outline how each issue can be resolved and provide a unifying set of recommendations. We specifically recommend that investigators: consider chemical heterogeneity, use redox-active compounds judiciously, abandon flawed assays, carefully prepare samples and assay buffers, consider repair/metabolism, use multiple biomarkers to assess oxidative damage and redox signalling. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. STUDENT MISCONCEPTION ON REDOX TITRATION (A CHALLENGE ON THE COURSE IMPLEMENTATION THROUGH COGNITIVE DISSONANCE BASED ON THE MULTIPLE REPRESENTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R. Widarti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The misconception is one of the obstacles in the concept mastery that needed to be minimalized. This descriptive study was conducted to find the patterns of misconceptions which have occurred on college students who participating in the redox titration course subject. Efforts to minimize misconceptions have been conducted through lectures using the multiple representations with the cognitive dissonance strategies on the 30 students who joined the Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry course. The research instrument used in this study was 6 multiple-choice tests with reasons. In order to detect the misconception, Certainty of Response Index technique was performed. The preliminary study results showed that 34.30% of students experiencing the misconceptions on redox titration. After treatments, the misconceptions reduced to 28.17%. A misconception that cannot be eliminated was related to the concepts involving in the microscopic and symbolic appearances.

  20. Redox active polymers and colloidal particles for flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Cheng, Kevin; Shen, Mei; Lichtenstein, Timothy

    2018-05-29

    The invention provides a redox flow battery comprising a microporous or nanoporous size-exclusion membrane, wherein one cell of the battery contains a redox-active polymer dissolved in the non-aqueous solvent or a redox-active colloidal particle dispersed in the non-aqueous solvent. The redox flow battery provides enhanced ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator and reduced redox-active species crossover, thereby improving the performance and enabling widespread utilization. Redox active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) and redox active colloidal particles (RACs) were prepared and were found to be highly effective redox species. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The high concentration attainable (>2.0 M) for RAPs in common non-aqueous battery solvents, their electrochemical and chemical reversibility, and their hindered transport across porous separators make them attractive materials for non-aqueous redox flow batteries based on size-selectivity.

  1. Base voltammetric characterization of phenylazide modified deoxycytidine - the potential DNA redox label enabling its post-synthetic modifications by "click-reactions"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Trošanová, Zuzana; Balintová, Jana; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 140-141 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /65./. 09.09.2013-13.09.2013, Tatranské Matliare] R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0019 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA redox label * click-reaction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  2. Redox potentials and kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction and solubility of cerium sulfates in sulfuric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulenova, A.; Creager, S. E.; Navratil, J. D.; Wei, Y.

    Experimental work was performed with the aim of evaluating the Ce 4+/Ce 3+ redox couple in sulfuric acid electrolyte for use in redox flow battery (RFB) technology. The solubility of cerium sulfates in 0.1-4.0 M sulfuric acid at 20-60 °C was studied. A synergistic effect of both sulfuric acid concentration and temperature on the solubility of cerous sulfate was observed. The solubility of cerous sulfate significantly decreased with rising concentration of sulfuric acid and rising temperature, while the solubility of ceric sulfate goes through a significant maximum at 40 °C. Redox potentials and the kinetics of the cerous/ceric redox reaction were also studied under the same temperature-concentration conditions. The redox potentials were measured using the combined redox electrode (Pt-Ag/AgCl) in equimolar Ce 4+/Ce 3+ solutions (i.e.[Ce 3+]=[Ce 4+]) in sulfuric acid electrolyte. The Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox potentials significantly decrease (i.e. shift to more negative values) with rising sulfuric acid concentration; a small maximum is observed at 40 °C. Cyclic voltammetric experiments confirmed slow electrochemical kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on carbon glassy electrodes (CGEs) in sulfuric acid solutions. The observed dependencies of solubilities, the redox potentials and the kinetics of Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on sulfuric acid concentration are thought to be the result of inequivalent complexation of the two redox species by sulfate anions: the ceric ion is much more strongly bound to sulfate than is the cerous ion. The best temperature-concentration conditions for the RFB electrolytes appear to be 40 °C and 1 M sulfuric acid, where the relatively good solubility of both cerium species, the maximum of redox potentials, and the more or less satisfying stability of CGE s were found. Even so, the relatively low solubility of cerium salts in sulfuric acid media and slow redox kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction at carbon indicate that the Ce 3+/Ce

  3. Polyoxometalate active charge-transfer material for mediated redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Hudak, Nicholas; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2017-01-17

    Redox flow batteries including a half-cell electrode chamber coupled to a current collecting electrode are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a separator is coupled to the half-cell electrode chamber. The half-cell electrode chamber comprises a first redox-active mediator and a second redox-active mediator. The first redox-active mediator and the second redox-active mediator are circulated through the half-cell electrode chamber into an external container. The container includes an active charge-transfer material. The active charge-transfer material has a redox potential between a redox potential of the first redox-active mediator and a redox potential of the second redox-active mediator. The active charge-transfer material is a polyoxometalate or derivative thereof. The redox flow battery may be particularly useful in energy storage solutions for renewable energy sources and for providing sustained power to an electrical grid.

  4. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  5. I. Redox chemistry of bimetallic fulvalene complexes II. Oligocyclopentadienyl complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David Stephen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1993-11-01

    The electrochemistry of the heterobimetallic complexes (fulvalene)WFe(CO)5 (30) and (fulvalene)WRu(CO)5 (31) has been investigated. Compound 30 is reduced in two one-electron processes, and this behavior was exploited synthetically to prepare a tetranuclear dimer by selective metal reduction. Complex 31 displayed a distinction between the metals upon reoxidation of the dianion, allowing the formation of a dimer by selective metal anion oxidation. The redox behavior of 30 led to an investigation of the use of electrocatalysis to effect metal-specific ligand substitution. It was found that reduction of 30 with a catalytic amount of CpFe(C6Me6) (97) in the presence of excess P(OMe)3 or PMe5 led to the formation of the zwitterions (fulvalene)[W(CO)3-][Fe(CO)PR3+] (107, R = P(OMe)3; 108, R = PMe3). Compound 31 also displayed unique behavior with different reducing agents, as the monosubstituted zwitterion (fulvalene)[W(CO)3-][Ru(CO)2(PMe3+] was obtained when 97 was used while the disubstituted complex (fulvalene) [W(CO)3-] [Ru(CO)(PMe3)2+] was produced when Cp*Fe(C6Me6) was the catalyst. Potential synthetic routes to quatercyclopentadienyl complexes were also explored. Various attempts to couple heterobimetallic fulvalene compounds proved to be unsuccessful. 138 refs.

  6. Pyridine nucleotides in regulation of cell death and survival by redox and non-redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak Kujundžić, Renata; Žarković, Neven; Gall Trošelj, Koraljka

    2014-01-01

    Changes of the level and ratios of pyridine nucleotides determine metabolism- dependent cellular redox status and the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and sirtuins, thereby influencing several processes closely related to cell survival and death. Pyridine nucleotides participate in numerous metabolic reactions whereby their net cellular level remains constant, but the ratios of NAD+/NADP+ and NADH/NADPH oscillate according to metabolic changes in response to diverse stress signals. In non-redox reactions, NAD+ is degraded and quickly, afterward, resynthesized in the NAD+ salvage pathway, unless overwhelming activation of PARP-1 consumes NAD+ to the point of no return, when the cell can no longer generate enough ATP to accommodate NAD+ resynthesis. The activity of PARP-1 is mandatory for the onset of cytoprotective autophagy on sublethal stress signals. It has become increasingly clear that redox status, largely influenced by the metabolism-dependent composition of the pyridine nucleotides pool, plays an important role in the synthesis of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic sphingolipids. Awareness of the involvement of the prosurvival sphingolipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, in transition from inflammation to malignant transformation has recently emerged. Here, the participation of pyridine nucleotides in redox and non-redox reactions, sphingolipid metabolism, and their role in cell fate decisions is reviewed.

  7. Synthesis of tritium-labelled isopenicillin N, penicillin N and 6-aminopenicillanic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.J.; Loder, B.; Abraham, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    1. Phenoxymethylpenicillin sulphoxide 4-methoxybenzyl ester was labelled with 3 H in its 2-β-methyl group. Its specific radioactivity was 362mCi/mmol. 2. Removal of the side chain of this compound yielded the corresponding ester of 6-aminopenicillanic acid sulphoxide and coupling of the latter with the appropriate protected α-aminoadipic acid gave 4-methoxybenzyloxycarbonylisopenicillin N sulphoxide di-4-methoxybenzyl ester or the corresponding derivative of penicillin N. 3. Removal of the protective groups by hydrogenolysis and reduction of the sulphoxide group yielded 3 H-labelled isopenicillin N or penicillin N. 4. 3 H-labelled phenoxymethylpenicillin sulphoxide was obtained by hydrogenolysis from its 4-methoxybenzyl ester. Reducton of its sulphoxide group and subsequent removal of the side chain gave 3 H-labelled 6-aminopenicillanic acid. (author)

  8. Glutathione redox potential in the mitochondrial intermembrane space is linked to the cytosol and impacts the Mia40 redox state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojer, Kerstin; Bien, Melanie; Gangel, Heike; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione is an important mediator and regulator of cellular redox processes. Detailed knowledge of local glutathione redox potential (EGSH) dynamics is critical to understand the network of redox processes and their influence on cellular function. Using dynamic oxidant recovery assays together with EGSH-specific fluorescent reporters, we investigate the glutathione pools of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space (IMS). We demonstrate that the glutathione pools of IMS and cytosol are dynamically interconnected via porins. In contrast, no appreciable communication was observed between the glutathione pools of the IMS and matrix. By modulating redox pathways in the cytosol and IMS, we find that the cytosolic glutathione reductase system is the major determinant of EGSH in the IMS, thus explaining a steady-state EGSH in the IMS which is similar to the cytosol. Moreover, we show that the local EGSH contributes to the partially reduced redox state of the IMS oxidoreductase Mia40 in vivo. Taken together, we provide a comprehensive mechanistic picture of the IMS redox milieu and define the redox influences on Mia40 in living cells. PMID:22705944

  9. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas H.; Bjerg, Poul L.; Banwart, Steven A.; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2000-10-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial tools, such as MPN counts, PLFA biomarkers and redox bioassays. This paper reviews the principles behind the different approaches, summarizes methods used and evaluates the approaches based on the experience from the reported applications.

  10. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  11. Redox Chemistry of Bis(pyrrolyl)pyridine Chromium and Molybdenum Complexes: An Experimental and Density Functional Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Anitha S; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Milsmann, Carsten

    2018-02-19

    The three- and four-membered redox series [Cr( Me PDP) 2 ] z (z = 1-, 2-, 3-) and [Mo( Me PDP) 2 ] z (z = 0, 1-, 2-, 3-) were synthesized to study the redox properties of the pincer ligand Me PDP 2- (H 2 Me PDP = 2,6-bis(5-methyl-3-phenyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)pyridine). The monoanionic complexes were characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Experimental and density functional theory (DFT) studies are consistent with closed-shell Me PDP 2- ligands and +III oxidation states (d 3 , S = 3/2) for the central metal ions. Cyclic voltammetry established multiple reversible redox processes for [M( Me PDP) 2 ] 1- (M = Cr, Mo), which were further investigated via chemical oxidation and reduction. For molybdenum, one-electron oxidation yielded Mo( Me PDP) 2 which was characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV/vis/NIR, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The experimental and computational data indicate metal-centered oxidation to a Mo IV complex (d 2 , S = 1) with two Me PDP 2- ligands. In contrast, one- and two-electron reductions were found to be ligand centered resulting in the formation of Me PDP •3- radicals, in which the unpaired electron is predominantly located on the central pyridine ring of the ligand. The presence of ligand radicals was established experimentally by observation of ligand-to-ligand intervalence charge transfer (LLIVCT) bands in the UV/vis/NIR spectra of the dianionic and trianionic complexes and further supported by broken-symmetry DFT calculations. X-ray crystallographic analyses of the one-electron-reduced species [M( Me PDP) 2 ] 2- (S = 1, M = Cr, Mo) established structural indicators for pincer reduction and showed localization of the radical on one of the two pincer ligands. The two-electron-reduced, trianionic complexes (S = 1/2) were characterized by UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and EPR spectroscopy. The electronic structures of the reduced

  12. Evaluation of factors influencing the groundwater chemistry in a small tropical island of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Nura Umar; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Sulaiman, Wan Nur Azmin; Ibrahim, Shaharin; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Mustapha, Adamu

    2013-05-06

    Groundwater chemistry of small tropical islands is influenced by many factors, such as recharge, weathering and seawater intrusion, among others, which interact with each other in a very complex way. In this work, multivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the factors controlling the groundwater chemistry of Kapas Island (Malaysia). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to 17 hydrochemical parameters from 108 groundwater samples obtained from 18 sampling sites. PCA extracted four PCs, namely seawater intrusion, redox reaction, anthropogenic pollution and weather factors, which collectively were responsible for more than 87% of the total variance of the island's hydrochemistry. The cluster analysis indicated that three factors (weather, redox reaction and seawater intrusion) controlled the hydrochemistry of the area, and the variables were allocated to three groups based on similarity. A Piper diagram classified the island's water types into Ca-HCO3 water type, Na-HCO3 water type, Na-SO4-Cl water type and Na-Cl water type, indicating recharge, mixed, weathering and leached from sewage and seawater intrusion, respectively. This work will provide policy makers and land managers with knowledge of the precise water quality problems affecting the island and can also serve as a guide for hydrochemistry assessments of other islands that share similar characteristics with the island in question.

  13. Redox-flow battery of actinide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Np battery and U battery were developed. We suggested that Np redox-flow battery should be (-)|Np 3+ ,Np 4+ ||NpO 2 + ,NpO 2 2+ |(+), and U battery (-)|[U III T 2 ] - ,[U IV T 2 ] 0 ||[U V O 2 T] - ,[U VI O 2 T] 0 |(+). The electromotive force at 50 % charge of Np and U battery is 1.10 V and 1.04 V, respectively. The energy efficiency of 70 mA/cm 2 of Np and U battery shows 99 % and 98 %, respectively. V redox-flow battery, electrode reactions of An battery, Np battery, U battery and future of U battery are described. The concept of V redox-flow battery, comparison of energy efficiency of Np, U and V battery, oxidation state and ionic species of 3d transition metals and main An, Purbe diagram of Np and U aqueous solution, shift of redox potential of β-diketones by pKa, and specifications of three redox-flow batteries are reported. (S.Y.)

  14. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  15. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-08-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve "reactive oxygen species" rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  16. Prevention of redox shuttle using electropolymerized polypyrrole film in a lithium-oxygen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togasaki, Norihiro; Shibamura, Ryuji; Naruse, Takuya; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2018-04-01

    Among the recent advancements in lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) chemistries, redox mediators (RMs) have been revealed to play a significant role in decreasing overpotential on charging and in improving cycling performance. However, an intrinsic problem is redox shuttle of RMs, which leads to degraded RM utilization and induces the accumulation of discharge products on the cathode surface; this remains a significant issue in the current battery cell configuration (Li anode/separator/cathode). To address this detrimental problem, herein we propose a novel Li-O2 cell incorporating a freestanding electropolymerized polypyrrole (PPy) film for the restriction of the redox-shuttle phenomenon of lithium iodide (Li anode/separator/PPy film/cathode). In this study, a PPy film, which is prepared through oxidative electropolymerization using an ionic liquid of 1-methyl-1-butylpyrrolidinium mixed with pyrrole and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, is introduced between the cathode and the separator. From the charge-discharge voltage profile, it is confirmed that the PPy film suppresses the diffusion of the oxidized I3- to the Li anode, while allowing Li ion transport. Secondary scanning electron microscope measurements confirm that the chemical reactions between I3- and Li2O2 are facilitated by the presence of the PPy film because I3- remains near the cathode surface during the charging process. As a result, the cycling performance in the Li-O2 cells with PPy film exhibits a cycling life four times as long as that of the Li-O2 cells without PPy film.

  17. Prevention of redox shuttle using electropolymerized polypyrrole film in a lithium–oxygen battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Togasaki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the recent advancements in lithium–oxygen (Li–O2 chemistries, redox mediators (RMs have been revealed to play a significant role in decreasing overpotential on charging and in improving cycling performance. However, an intrinsic problem is redox shuttle of RMs, which leads to degraded RM utilization and induces the accumulation of discharge products on the cathode surface; this remains a significant issue in the current battery cell configuration (Li anode/separator/cathode. To address this detrimental problem, herein we propose a novel Li–O2 cell incorporating a freestanding electropolymerized polypyrrole (PPy film for the restriction of the redox-shuttle phenomenon of lithium iodide (Li anode/separator/PPy film/cathode. In this study, a PPy film, which is prepared through oxidative electropolymerization using an ionic liquid of 1-methyl-1-butylpyrrolidinium mixed with pyrrole and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonylimide, is introduced between the cathode and the separator. From the charge–discharge voltage profile, it is confirmed that the PPy film suppresses the diffusion of the oxidized I3− to the Li anode, while allowing Li ion transport. Secondary scanning electron microscope measurements confirm that the chemical reactions between I3− and Li2O2 are facilitated by the presence of the PPy film because I3− remains near the cathode surface during the charging process. As a result, the cycling performance in the Li–O2 cells with PPy film exhibits a cycling life four times as long as that of the Li–O2 cells without PPy film.

  18. A new class of solid oxide metal-air redox batteries for advanced stationary energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan

    Cost-effective and large-scale energy storage technologies are a key enabler of grid modernization. Among energy storage technologies currently being researched, developed and deployed, rechargeable batteries are unique and important that can offer a myriad of advantages over the conventional large scale siting- and geography- constrained pumped-hydro and compressed-air energy storage systems. However, current rechargeable batteries still need many breakthroughs in material optimization and system design to become commercially viable for stationary energy storage. This PhD research project investigates the energy storage characteristics of a new class of rechargeable solid oxide metal-air redox batteries (SOMARBs) that combines a regenerative solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) and hydrogen chemical-looping component. The RSOFC serves as the "electrical functioning unit", alternating between the fuel cell and electrolysis mode to realize discharge and charge cycles, respectively, while the hydrogen chemical-looping component functions as an energy storage unit (ESU), performing electrical-chemical energy conversion in situ via a H2/H2O-mediated metal/metal oxide redox reaction. One of the distinctive features of the new battery from conventional storage batteries is the ESU that is physically separated from the electrodes of RSOFC, allowing it to freely expand and contract without impacting the mechanical integrity of the entire battery structure. This feature also allows an easy switch in the chemistry of this battery. The materials selection for ESU is critical to energy capacity, round-trip efficiency and cost effectiveness of the new battery. Me-MeOx redox couples with favorable thermodynamics and kinetics are highly preferable. The preliminary theoretical analysis suggests that Fe-based redox couples can be a promising candidate for operating at both high and low temperatures. Therefore, the Fe-based redox-couple systems have been selected as the baseline for this

  19. Unleashing the Power and Energy of LiFePO4-Based Redox Flow Lithium Battery with a Bifunctional Redox Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun Guang; Du, Yonghua; Jia, Chuankun; Zhou, Mingyue; Fan, Li; Wang, Xingzhu; Wang, Qing

    2017-05-10

    Redox flow batteries, despite great operation flexibility and scalability for large-scale energy storage, suffer from low energy density and relatively high cost as compared to the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries. Here we report a redox flow lithium battery, which operates via the redox targeting reactions of LiFePO 4 with a bifunctional redox mediator, 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, and presents superb energy density as the Li-ion battery and system flexibility as the redox flow battery. The battery has achieved a tank energy density as high as 1023 Wh/L, power density of 61 mW/cm 2 , and voltage efficiency of 91%. Operando X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements were conducted to monitor the evolution of LiFePO 4 , which provides insightful information on the redox targeting process, critical to the device operation and optimization.

  20. Fundamental chemistry, characterization, and separation of technetium complexes in Hanford waste. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, K.R.; Blanchard, D.L. Jr.; Schroeder, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    'The ultimate goal of this proposal is to separate technetium from Hanford tank waste. The recent work has shown that a large portion of the technetium is not pertechnetate (TcO 4 - ) and is not easily oxidized. This has serious repercussions for technetium partitioning schemes because they are designed to separate this chemical form. Rational attempts to oxidize these species to TcO 4 - for processing or to separate the non-pertechnetate species themselves would be facilitated by knowing the identity of these complexes and understanding their fundamental chemistry. Tank characterization work has not yet identified any of the non-pertechnetate species. However, based on the types of ligands available and the redox conditions in the tank, a reasonable speculation can be made about the types of species that may be present. Thus, this proposal will synthesize and characterize the relevant model complexes of Tc(III), Tc(IV), and Tc(V) that may have formed under tank waste conditions. Once synthesized, these complexes will be used as standards for developing and characterizing the non-pertechnetate species in actual waste using instrumental techniques such as capillary electrophoresis electrospray mass spectrometry (CE-MS), x-ray absorbance spectroscopy (EXAFS and XANES), and multi-nuclear NMR (including 99 Tc NMR). The authors study the redox chemistry of the technetium complexes so that more efficient and selective oxidative methods can be used to bring these species to TcO 4 - for processing purposes. They will also study their ligand substitution chemistry which could be used to develop separation methods for non-pertechnetate species. Understanding the fundamental chemistry of these technetium complexes will enable technetium to be efficiently removed from the Hanford tank waste and help DOE to fulfill its remediation mission. This report summarizes the first 8 months of a 3-year project.'

  1. Electrochemical behaviour of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazi(o)ne as multi-redox centre DNA label at mercury meniscus modified silver solid amalgam electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňhel, Aleš; Raindlová, Veronika; Havran, Luděk; Pivoňková, Hana; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, SI (2014), s. 122-131 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0019; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA * Redox labeling * 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  2. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic cytoplasm has long been regarded as a cellular compartment in which the reduced state of protein cysteines is largely favored. Under normal conditions, the cytosolic low-molecular weight redox buffer, comprising primarily of glutathione, is highly reducing and reactive oxygen species...... (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...... organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the combination of genetic and biochemical approaches has brought us furthest in understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular redox regulation. It has been shown in yeast that, in addition to the enzyme glutathione reductase, other mechanisms may exist...

  3. Redox reaction rates in shallow aquifers: Implications for nitrate transport in groundwater and streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoriero, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater age and water chemistry data along flow paths from recharge areas to streams were used to evaluate the trends and transformations of agricultural chemicals. Results from this analysis indicate that median nitrate recharge concentrations in these agricultural areas have increased markedly over the last 50 years from 4 mg N/L in samples collected prior to 1983 to 7.5 mg N/L in samples collected since 1983. The effect that nitrate accumulation in shallow aquifers will have on drinking water quality and stream ecosystems is dependent on the rate of redox reactions along flow paths and on the age distribution of nitrate discharging to supply wells and streams.

  4. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  5. Intense Chiroptical Switching in a Dicationic Helicene-Like Derivative: Exploration of a Viologen-Type Redox Manifold of a Non-Racemic Helquat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, Lubomír; Bednárová, Lucie; Štěpánek, Petr; Slavíček, P.; Vávra, Jan; Hromadová, Magdaléna; Dlouhá, Helena; Tarábek, Ján; Teplý, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 31 (2014), s. 10826-10829 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19213S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-34168S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : helicenoids * helquats * helical cations * ECD spectra * redox switching * chiroptical properties * helicene-viologen hybrids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 12.113, year: 2014

  6. Energy storage device including a redox-enhanced electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Galen; Evanko, Brian; Parker, Nicholas; Vonlanthen, David; Auston, David; Boettcher, Shannon; Chun, Sang-Eun; Ji, Xiulei; Wang, Bao; Wang, Xingfeng; Chandrabose, Raghu Subash

    2017-08-08

    An electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) energy storage device is provided that includes at least two electrodes and a redox-enhanced electrolyte including two redox couples such that there is a different one of the redox couples for each of the electrodes. When charged, the charge is stored in Faradaic reactions with the at least two redox couples in the electrolyte and in a double-layer capacitance of a porous carbon material that comprises at least one of the electrodes, and a self-discharge of the energy storage device is mitigated by at least one of electrostatic attraction, adsorption, physisorption, and chemisorption of a redox couple onto the porous carbon material.

  7. Anion Redox Chemistry in the Cobalt Free 3d Transition Metal Oxide Intercalation Electrode Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Roberts, Matthew R; Guerrini, Niccoló; Tapia-Ruiz, Nuria; Hao, Rong; Massel, Felix; Pickup, David M; Ramos, Silvia; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Chadwick, Alan V; Duda, Laurent C; Bruce, Peter G

    2016-09-07

    Conventional intercalation cathodes for lithium batteries store charge in redox reactions associated with the transition metal cations, e.g., Mn(3+/4+) in LiMn2O4, and this limits the energy storage of Li-ion batteries. Compounds such as Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 exhibit a capacity to store charge in excess of the transition metal redox reactions. The additional capacity occurs at and above 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li. The capacity at 4.5 V is dominated by oxidation of the O(2-) anions accounting for ∼0.43 e(-)/formula unit, with an additional 0.06 e(-)/formula unit being associated with O loss from the lattice. In contrast, the capacity above 4.5 V is mainly O loss, ∼0.08 e(-)/formula. The O redox reaction involves the formation of localized hole states on O during charge, which are located on O coordinated by (Mn(4+)/Li(+)). The results have been obtained by combining operando electrochemical mass spec on (18)O labeled Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 with XANES, soft X-ray spectroscopy, resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Finally the general features of O redox are described with discussion about the role of comparatively ionic (less covalent) 3d metal-oxygen interaction on anion redox in lithium rich cathode materials.

  8. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  9. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  10. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  11. Radical chemistry of epigallocatechin gallate and its relevance to protein damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagerman, Ann E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The radical chemistry of the plant polyphenolics epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epigallocatechin (EGC) were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Radical species formed spontaneously in aqueous solutions at low pH without external oxidant and were spin stabilized...... redox potentials of EGCG and EGC varied from 1000 mV at pH 3 to 400 mV at pH 8. The polyphenolics did not produce hydroxyl radicals unless reduced metal ions such as iron(II) were added to the system. Zinc(II)-stabilized EGCG radicals were more effective protein-precipitating agents than unoxidized EGCG...

  12. Redox regulation of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-09-20

    We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context.

  13. Combination of Lewis Basic Selenium Catalysis and Redox Selenium Chemistry: Synthesis of Trifluoromethylthiolated Tertiary Alcohols with Alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zechen; Luo, Jie; Zhao, Xiaodan

    2017-09-15

    A new and efficient method for diaryl selenide catalyzed vicinal CF 3 S hydroxylation of 1,1-multisubstitued alkenes has been developed. Various trifluoromethylthiolated tertiary alcohols could be readily synthesized under mild conditions. This method is also effective for the intramolecular cyclization of alkenes tethered by carboxylic acid, hydroxy, sulfamide, or ester groups and is associated with the introduction of a CF 3 S group. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the pathway involves a redox cycle between Se(II) and Se(IV) and Lewis basic selenium catalysis.

  14. Technetium Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Blanchard, David L. Jr.; Campbell, James A.; Cho, Herman M.; Rai, Dhanpat Rai; Xia, Yuanxian; Conradson, Steven D.

    2002-01-01

    Technetium complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that longterm consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists, and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges, we present a research program to study Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques. On the basis of such studies, we will acquire thermodynamic data for the identified Tc-organic complexes over a wide range of chemical conditions in order to develop credible models to predict Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  15. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Aaltonen, P [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hickling, J [CML GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ``on-line`` and ``in-situ`` characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Monitoring thioredoxin redox with a genetically encoded red fluorescent biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yichong; Makar, Merna; Wang, Michael X; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2017-09-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is one of the two major thiol antioxidants, playing essential roles in redox homeostasis and signaling. Despite its importance, there is a lack of methods for monitoring Trx redox dynamics in live cells, hindering a better understanding of physiological and pathological roles of the Trx redox system. In this work, we developed the first genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for Trx redox by engineering a redox relay between the active-site cysteines of human Trx1 and rxRFP1, a redox-sensitive red fluorescent protein. We used the resultant biosensor-TrxRFP1-to selectively monitor perturbations of Trx redox in various mammalian cell lines. We subcellularly localized TrxRFP1 to image compartmentalized Trx redox changes. We further combined TrxRFP1 with a green fluorescent Grx1-roGFP2 biosensor to simultaneously monitor Trx and glutathione redox dynamics in live cells in response to chemical and physiologically relevant stimuli.

  17. ETL 1 kW redox flow cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    A 1 kW scale redox flow cell system was set up in the laboratory (ETL), while three different types of batteries were also assembled by private companies in early 1983. In this article, this cell system is described. The concept of a modern type redox flow cell is based on a couple of fully soluble redox ions and a highly selective ion-exchange membrane. In the cell, the redox ion stored in a tank is flowed to and reduced on the electrode, while the other ion is also flowed to and oxidized on the other electrode. This electrochemical reaction produces electronic current in the external circuit and ionic current through the membrane sandwiched as a separator between the two electrodes. The reverse reaction proceeds in the charging process. In ETL, the concept was preliminarily tested, and conceptual design and cost estimation of the redox flow cells were carried out to confirm the feasibility; the R and D started on these bases in 1975

  18. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  19. Influence of radiolytic products on the chemistry of uranium VI in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchini, J-F.; Reed, D.T.; Borkowski, M.; Rafalski, A.; Conca, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the near field of a salt repository of nuclear waste, ionizing radiations can strongly affect the chemistry of concentrated saline solutions. Radiolysis can locally modify the redox conditions, speciation, solubility and mobility of the actinide compounds. In the case of uranium VI, radiolytic products can not only reduce U(VI), but also react with uranium species. The net effect on the speciation of uranyl depends on the relative kinetics of the reactions and the buildup of molecular products in brine solutions. The most important molecular products in brines are expected to be hypochlorite ion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Although U(VI) is expected not to be significantly affected by radiolysis, the combined effects of the major molecular radiolytic products on the chemistry of U(VI) in brines have not been experimentally established previously. (authors)

  20. General Dialdehyde Click Chemistry for Amine Bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahipanah, Sina; O'Brien, Paul J; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-17

    The development of methods for conjugating a range of molecules to primary amine functional groups has revolutionized the fields of chemistry, biology, and material science. The primary amine is a key functional group and one of the most important nucleophiles and bases used in all of synthetic chemistry. Therefore, tremendous interest in the synthesis of molecules containing primary amines and strategies to devise chemical reactions to react with primary amines has been at the core of chemical research. In particular, primary amines are a ubiquitous functional group found in biological systems as free amino acids, as key side chain lysines in proteins, and in signaling molecules and metabolites and are also present in many natural product classes. Due to its abundance, the primary amine is the most convenient functional group handle in molecules for ligation to other molecules for a broad range of applications that impact all scientific fields. Because of the primary amine's central importance in synthetic chemistry, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and biology, many methods have been developed to efficiently react with primary amines, including activated carboxylic acids, isothiocyanates, Michael addition type systems, and reaction with ketones or aldehydes followed by in situ reductive amination. Herein, we introduce a new traceless, high-yield, fast click-chemistry method based on the rapid and efficient trapping of amine groups via a functionalized dialdehyde group. The click reaction occurs in mild conditions in organic solvents or aqueous media and proceeds in high yield, and the starting dialdehyde reagent and resulting dialdehyde click conjugates are stable. Moreover, no catalyst or dialdehyde-activating group is required, and the only byproduct is water. The initial dialdehyde and the resulting conjugate are both straightforward to characterize, and the reaction proceeds with high atom economy. To demonstrate the broad scope of this new click

  1. Neutral Red and Ferroin as Reversible and Rapid Redox Materials for Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeehoon; Kim, Ketack

    2018-04-17

    Neutral red and ferroin are used as redox indicators (RINs) in potentiometric titrations. The rapid response and reversibility that are prerequisites for RINs are also desirable properties for the active materials in redox flow batteries (RFBs). This study describes the electrochemical properties of ferroin and neutral red as a redox pair. The rapid reaction rates of the RINs allow a cell to run at a rate of 4 C with 89 % capacity retention after the 100 th  cycle. The diffusion coefficients, electrode reaction rates, and solubilities of the RINs were determined. The electron-transfer rate constants of ferroin and neutral red are 0.11 and 0.027 cm s -1 , respectively, which are greater than those of the components of all-vanadium and Zn/Br 2 cells. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Redox shuttles for safer lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zonghai; Qin, Yan; Amine, Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Overcharge protection is not only critical for preventing the thermal runaway of lithium-ion batteries during operation, but also important for automatic capacity balancing during battery manufacturing and repair. A redox shuttle is an electrolyte additive that can be used as intrinsic overcharge protection mechanism to enhance the safety characteristics of lithium-ion batteries. The advances on stable redox shuttles are briefly reviewed. Fundamental studies for designing stable redox shuttles are also discussed.

  3. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  4. Unusual thiol-based redox metabolism of parasitic flukes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Timir; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-08-01

    Parasitic flukes are exposed to free radicals and, to a greater extent, reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their life cycle. Despite being relentlessly exposed to ROS released by activated immune cells, these parasites can survive for many years in the host. Cellular thiol-based redox metabolism plays a crucial role in parasite survival within their hosts. Evidence shows that oxidative stress and redox homeostasis maintenance are important clinical and pathobiochemical as well as effective therapeutic principles in various diseases. The characterization of redox and antioxidant enzymes is likely to yield good target candidates for novel drugs and vaccines. The absence of active catalase in fluke parasites offers great potential for the development of chemotherapeutic agents that act by perturbing the redox equilibrium of the cell. One of the redox-sensitive enzymes, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), has been accepted as a drug target against blood fluke infections, and related clinical trials are in progress. TGR is the sole enzyme responsible for Trx and GSH reduction in parasitic flukes. The availability of helminth genomes has accelerated the research on redox metabolism of flukes; however, significant achievements have yet to be attained. The present review summarizes current knowledge on the redox and antioxidant system of the parasitic flukes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Aaltonen, P.; Hickling, J.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ''on-line'' and ''in-situ'' characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. For confirmation, a complete set of sensors

  6. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A. Fraunberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Measuring intracellular redox conditions using GFP-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Ostergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of methods for analyzing the redox conditions in specific compartments in living cells. These methods are based on genetically encoded sensors comprising variants of Green Fluorescent Protein in which vicinal cysteine residues have been introduced at solvent......-exposed positions. Several mutant forms have been identified in which formation of a disulfide bond between these cysteine residues results in changes of their fluorescence properties. The redox sensors have been characterized biochemically and found to behave differently, both spectroscopically and in terms...... of redox properties. As genetically encoded sensors they can be expressed in living cells and used for analysis of intracellular redox conditions; however, which parameters are measured depends on how the sensors interact with various cellular redox components. Results of both biochemical and cell...

  8. Photoabsorption and photodissociation studies of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) in the 35,000-80,000 cm-1 region using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anuvab; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Sunanda, K.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    Photoabsorption and photodissociation studies of dimethyl sulphoxide and its deuterated isotopologue (DMSO-h6 and DMSO-d6) are performed using synchrotron radiation in the 35,000-80,000 cm-1 region. In the photoabsorption spectrum, Rydberg series converging to the first three ionization potentials of DMSO at 9.1, 10.1 and 12.3 eV corresponding to removal of an electron from the highest three occupied molecular orbitals (14a‧, 7a″ and 13a‧) are observed. Based on a quantum defect analysis, Rydberg series assignments are extended to higher members as compared to earlier works and a few ambiguities in earlier assignments are clarified. Analysis is aided by quantum chemical calculations using the DFT and TDDFT methodologies. Vibronic structures observed in the spectrum of DMSO-h6 in the regions 7.7-8.1 eV and 8.1-8.8 eV are attributed to the transitions 7a″→4p at 7.862 eV and 14a‧→6s/4d at 8.182 eV, respectively. Photoabsorption spectra of DMSO-h6 and -d6 recorded using a broad band incident radiation show prominent peaks, which are identified and assigned to electronic and vibronic transitions of the SO radical. This provides a direct confirmation of the fact that DMSO preferentially dissociates into CH3 and SO upon UV-VUV excitation, as proposed in earlier photodissociation studies. An extended vibronic band system associated with the e1Π-X3Σ- transition of the SO radical is identified and assigned. The complete VUV photoabsorption spectrum of DMSO-d6 is also reported here for the first time.

  9. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain information about the kinetics of electron transfer between proteins and about the dynamic behaviour of redox cofactors in proteins. This thesis describes the results of a study, initiated to get a ...

  10. Evaluation of Factors Influencing the Groundwater Chemistry in a Small Tropical Island of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Umar Kura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater chemistry of small tropical islands is influenced by many factors, such as recharge, weathering and seawater intrusion, among others, which interact with each other in a very complex way. In this work, multivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the factors controlling the groundwater chemistry of Kapas Island (Malaysia. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to 17 hydrochemical parameters from 108 groundwater samples obtained from 18 sampling sites. PCA extracted four PCs, namely seawater intrusion, redox reaction, anthropogenic pollution and weather factors, which collectively were responsible for more than 87% of the total variance of the island’s hydrochemistry. The cluster analysis indicated that three factors (weather, redox reaction and seawater intrusion controlled the hydrochemistry of the area, and the variables were allocated to three groups based on similarity. A Piper diagram classified the island’s water types into Ca-HCO3 water type, Na-HCO3 water type, Na-SO4-Cl water type and Na-Cl water type, indicating recharge, mixed, weathering and leached from sewage and seawater intrusion, respectively. This work will provide policy makers and land managers with knowledge of the precise water quality problems affecting the island and can also serve as a guide for hydrochemistry assessments of other islands that share similar characteristics with the island in question.

  11. Microscale Synthesis, Reactions, and (Super 1)H NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Square Planar Macrocyclic, Tetramido-N Co(III) Complexes Relevant to Green Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tanya T.; Uffelman, Erich S.; Lee, Daniel W., III; Doherty, Jonathan R.; Schulze, Carl; Burke, Amy L.; Bonnema, Kristen, R.

    2004-01-01

    The microscale preparation, characterization, and reactivity of a square planar Co(III) complex that has grown out of a program to introduce experiments of relevance to green chemistry into the undergraduate curriculum is presented. The given experiments illustrate the remarkable redox and aqueous acid-base stability that make the macrocycles very…

  12. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaughn, Anthony E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  13. Dihydroxybenzene/benzoquinone-containing polymers: organic redox polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulay, S. [Universite de Blida, Lab. de Chimie-Physique Macromoleculaire, Institut de Chimie Industrielle (Algeria)

    2000-08-01

    Polymers containing hydroquinone, catechol or their corresponding benzoquinones are a special class of redox polymers. Three pathways of their syntheses are possible: condensation polymerization of suitable monomers, addition polymerization of vinyl monomers containing redox moiety, and chemical attachment of redox unit onto pre-made polymeric matrix. A range of functionalized matrices have been employed such as polyethers, polyesters, polycarbonates, polyurethanes, polyamides and others. Protection of their phenolic functionality has conducted to chemically interesting redox polymer precursors. The presence of a redox moiety coupled with the extant functionalization of the polymer matrix makes the materials very valuable, of wide properties and consequently of vast applicability. For instance, in the oil field, some polymers such as carboxy-methyl-cellulose (CMC) are often applied as to bring about a viscosity improvement and therefore to facilitate the oil drilling. In this regard, Patel evaluated sulfo-alkylated polymeric catechol, namely sulfo-methylated and sulfo-ethylated resins. Indeed, polymeric catechol chemically modified as such exhibited a marked ability to control the viscosity, the gel strength, as well as the filtrate loss of aqueous oil drilling fluids.

  14. Coordination Chemistry of Linear Oligopyrrolic Fragments Inspired by Heme Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritika

    Linear oligopyrroles are degradation products of heme, which is converted in the presence of heme oxygenase to bile pigments, such as biliverdin and bilirubin. These tetrapyrrolic oligopyrroles are ubiquitously present in biological systems and find applications in the fields of catalysis and sensing. These linear tetrapyrrolic scaffolds are further degraded into linear tripyrrolic and dipyrrolic fragments. Although these lower oligopyrroles are abundantly present, their coordination chemistry requires further characterization. This dissertation focuses mainly on two classes of bioinspired linear oligopyrroles, propentdyopent and tripyrrindione, and their transition metal complexes, which present a rich ligand-based redox chemistry. Chapter 1 offers an overview of heme degradation to different classes of linear oligopyrroles and properties of their transition metal complexes. Chapter 2 is focused on the tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of the urinary pigment uroerythrin, which coordinates divalent transition metals palladium and copper with square planar geometry. Specifically, the tripyrrin-1, 14-dione ligand binds Cu(II) and Pd(II) as a dianionic organic radical under ambient conditions. The electrochemical study confirms the presence of ligand based redox chemistry, and one electron oxidation or reduction reactions do not alter the planar geometry around the metal center. The X-Ray analysis and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of the complexes in the solid and solution phase reveals intermolecular interactions between the ligand based unpaired electrons and therefore formation of neutral pi-pi dimers. In Chapter 3, the antioxidant activity and the fluorescence sensor properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand in the presence of superoxide are described. We found that the tripyrrindione ligand undergoes one-electron reduction in the presence of the superoxide radical anion (O2•- ) to form highly fluorescent H3TD1•- radical anion, which emits

  15. Mesoporous tungsten oxynitride as electrocatalyst for promoting redox reactions of vanadium redox couple and performance of vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmi; Jo, Changshin; Youk, Sol; Shin, Hun Yong; Lee, Jinwoo; Chung, Yongjin; Kwon, Yongchai

    2018-01-01

    For enhancing the performance of vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB), a sluggish reaction rate issue of V2+/V3+ redox couple evaluated as the rate determining reaction should be addressed. For doing that, mesoporous tungsten oxide (m-WO3) and oxyniride (m-WON) structures are proposed as the novel catalysts, while m-WON is gained by NH3 heat treatment of m-WO3. Their specific surface area, crystal structure, surface morphology and component analysis are measured using BET, XRD, TEM and XPS, while their catalytic activity for V2+/V3+ redox reaction is electrochemically examined. As a result, the m-WON shows higher peak current, smaller peak potential difference, higher electron transfer rate constant and lower charge transfer resistance than other catalysts, like the m-WO3, WO3 nanoparticle and mesoporous carbon, proving that it is superior catalyst. Regarding the charge-discharge curve tests, the VRFB single cell employing the m-WON demonstrates high voltage and energy efficiencies, high specific capacity and low capacity loss rate. The excellent results of m-WON are due to the reasons like (i) reduced energy band gap, (ii) reaction familiar surface functional groups and (ii) greater electronegativity.

  16. Ab Initio Metadynamics Study of the VO2+/VO2+ Redox Reaction Mechanism at the Graphite Edge/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen; Klyukin, Konstantin; Alexandrov, Vitaly

    2018-06-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are promising electrochemical energy storage systems, for which development is impeded by a poor understanding of redox reactions occurring at electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Even for the conventional all-vanadium RFB chemistry employing V 2+ /V 3+ and VO 2 + /VO 2+ couples, there is still no consensus about the reaction mechanism, electrode active sites, and rate-determining step. Herein, we perform Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics-based metadynamics simulations to unravel the mechanism of the VO 2 + /VO 2+ redox reaction in water at the oxygen-functionalized graphite (112̅0) edge surface serving as a representative carbon-based electrode. Our results suggest that during the battery discharge aqueous VO 2 + /VO 2+ species adsorb at the surface C-O groups as inner-sphere complexes, exhibiting faster adsorption/desorption kinetics than V 2+ /V 3+ , at least at low vanadium concentrations considered in our study. We find that this is because (i) VO 2 + /VO 2+ conversion does not involve the slow transfer of an oxygen atom, (ii) protonation of VO 2 + is spontaneous and coupled to interfacial electron transfer in acidic conditions to enable VO 2+ formation, and (iii) V 3+ found to be strongly bound to oxygen groups of the graphite surface features unfavorable desorption kinetics. In contrast, the reverse process taking place upon charging is expected to be more sluggish for the VO 2 + /VO 2+ redox couple because of both unfavorable deprotonation of the VO 2+ water ligands and adsorption/desorption kinetics.

  17. Vascular remodeling: A redox-modulated mechanism of vessel caliber regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2017-08-01

    Vascular remodeling, i.e. whole-vessel structural reshaping, determines lumen caliber in (patho)physiology. Here we review mechanisms underlying vessel remodeling, with emphasis in redox regulation. First, we discuss confusing terminology and focus on strictu sensu remodeling. Second, we propose a mechanobiological remodeling paradigm based on the concept of tensional homeostasis as a setpoint regulator. We first focus on shear-mediated models as prototypes of remodeling closely dominated by highly redox-sensitive endothelial function. More detailed discussions focus on mechanosensors, integrins, extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton and inflammatory pathways as potential of mechanisms potentially coupling tensional homeostasis to redox regulation. Further discussion of remodeling associated with atherosclerosis and injury repair highlights important aspects of redox vascular responses. While neointima formation has not shown consistent responsiveness to antioxidants, vessel remodeling has been more clearly responsive, indicating that despite the multilevel redox signaling pathways, there is a coordinated response of the whole vessel. Among mechanisms that may orchestrate redox pathways, we discuss roles of superoxide dismutase activity and extracellular protein disulfide isomerase. We then discuss redox modulation of aneurysms, a special case of expansive remodeling. We propose that the redox modulation of vascular remodeling may reflect (1) remodeling pathophysiology is dominated by a particularly redox-sensitive cell type, e.g., endothelial cells (2) redox pathways are temporospatially coordinated at an organ level across distinct cellular and acellular structures or (3) the tensional homeostasis setpoint is closely connected to redox signaling. The mechanobiological/redox model discussed here can be a basis for improved understanding of remodeling and helps clarifying mechanisms underlying prevalent hard-to-treat diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Redox-Based Regulation of Bacterial Development and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Abigail J; Kahl, Lisa J; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2017-06-20

    Severe changes in the environmental redox potential, and resulting alterations in the oxidation states of intracellular metabolites and enzymes, have historically been considered negative stressors, requiring responses that are strictly defensive. However, recent work in diverse organisms has revealed that more subtle changes in the intracellular redox state can act as signals, eliciting responses with benefits beyond defense and detoxification. Changes in redox state have been shown to influence or trigger chromosome segregation, sporulation, aerotaxis, and social behaviors, including luminescence as well as biofilm establishment and dispersal. Connections between redox state and complex behavior allow bacteria to link developmental choices with metabolic state and coordinate appropriate responses. Promising future directions for this area of study include metabolomic analysis of species- and condition-dependent changes in metabolite oxidation states and elucidation of the mechanisms whereby the redox state influences circadian regulation.

  19. Redox flow batteries having multiple electroactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Nie, Zimin

    2018-05-01

    Introducing multiple redox reactions with a suitable voltage range can improve the energy density of redox flow battery (RFB) systems. One example includes RFB systems utilizing multiple redox pairs in the positive half cell, the negative half cell, or in both. Such RFB systems can have a negative electrolyte, a positive electrolyte, and a membrane between the negative electrolyte and the positive electrolyte, in which at least two electrochemically active elements exist in the negative electrolyte, the positive electrolyte, or both.

  20. Lignin decomposition and microbial community in paddy soils: effects of alternating redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerli, Chiara; Liu, Qin; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils are characterised by interchanging cycles of anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Such fluctuations cause continuous changes in soil solution chemistry as well as in the composition and physiological responses of the microbial community. Temporary deficiency in oxygen creates conditions favourable to facultative or obligates anaerobic bacteria, while aerobic communities can thrive in the period of water absence. These alterations can strongly affect soil processes, in particular organic matter (OM) accumulation and mineralization. In submerged soils, lignin generally constitutes a major portion of the total OM because of hampered degradation under anoxic conditions. The alternating redox cycles resulting from paddy soil management might promote both degradation and preservation of lignin, affecting the overall composition and reactivity of total and dissolved OM. We sampled soils subjected to cycles of anoxic (rice growing period) and oxic (harvest and growth of other crops) conditions since 700 and 2000 years. We incubated suspended Ap material, sampled from the two paddy plus two corresponding non-paddy control soils under oxic and anoxic condition, for 3 months, interrupted by a short period of three weeks (from day 21 to day 43) with reversed redox conditions. At each sampling time (day 2, 21, 42, 63, 84), we determined lignin-derived phenols (by CuO oxidation) as well as phospholipids fatty acids contents and composition. We aimed to highlight changes in lignin decomposition as related to the potential rapid changes in microbial community composition. Since the studied paddy soils had a long history of wet rice cultivation, the microbial community should be well adapted to interchanging oxic and anoxic cycles, therefore fully expressing its activity at both conditions. In non-paddy soil changes in redox conditions caused modification of quantity and composition of the microbial community. On the contrary, in well-established paddy soils the microbial

  1. Redox Cycling Realized in Paper-Based Biochemical Sensor for Selective Detection of Reversible Redox Molecules Without Micro/Nano Fabrication Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, So; Uno, Shigeyasu

    2018-02-28

    This paper describes a paper-based biochemical sensor that realizes redox cycling with close interelectrode distance. Two electrodes, the generator and collector electrodes, can detect steady-state oxidation and reduction currents when suitable potential is held at each electrode. The sensor has two gold plates on both sides of a piece of chromatography paper and defines the interelectrode distance by the thickness of the paper (180 μm) without any micro-fabrication processes. Our proposed sensor geometry has successfully exhibited signatures of redox cycling. As a result, the concentration of ferrocyanide as reversible redox molecules was successfully quantified under the interference by ascorbic acid as a strong irreversible reducing agent. This was possible because the ascorbic acids are completely consumed by the irreversible reaction, while maintaining redox cycling of reversible ferrocyanide. This suggests that a sensor based on the redox cycling method will be suitable for detecting target molecules at low concentration.

  2. Redox front penetration in the fractured Toki Granite, central Japan: An analogue for redox reactions and redox buffering in fractured crystalline host rocks for repositories of long-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koshi; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Akagawa, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Shoji; Metcalfe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep redox front developed in orogenic granitic rock have been studied. • The process was controlled by the buffering capacity of minerals. • This is an analogue of redox front penetration into HLW repositories in Japan. - Abstract: Redox buffering is one important factor to be considered when assessing the barrier function of potential host rocks for a deep geological repository for long-lived radioactive waste. If such a repository is to be sited in fractured crystalline host rock it must be demonstrated that waste will be emplaced deeper than the maximum depth to which oxidizing waters can penetrate from the earth’s surface via fractures, during the assessment timeframe (typically 1 Ma). An analogue for penetration of such oxidizing water occurs in the Cretaceous Toki Granite of central Japan. Here, a deep redox front is developed along water-conducting fractures at a depth of 210 m below the ground surface. Detailed petrographical studies and geochemical analyses were carried out on drill core specimens of this redox front. The aim was to determine the buffering processes and behavior of major and minor elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), during redox front development. The results are compared with analytical data from an oxidized zone found along shallow fractures (up to 20 m from the surface) in the same granitic rock, in order to understand differences in elemental migration according to the depth below the ground surface of redox-front formation. Geochemical analyses by XRF and ICP-MS of the oxidized zone at 210 m depth reveal clear changes in Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratios and Ca depletion across the front, while Fe concentrations vary little. In contrast, the redox front identified along shallow fractures shows strong enrichments of Fe, Mn and trace elements in the oxidized zone compared with the fresh rock matrix. The difference can be ascribed to the changing Eh and pH of groundwater as it flows downwards in the granite, due to

  3. Redox speciation of final repository relevant elements using separation methods in combination with ICP mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graser, Carl-Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The long-term safety assessment for nuclear waste repositories requires a detailed understanding of the chemistry of actinide elements in the geosphere. The development of advanced analytical tools is required to gain detailed insights into actinide redox speciation in a given system. The mobility of radionuclides is mostly determined by the geochemical conditions which control the redox state of radionuclides. Besides the longlived radionuclides plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np), which are key elements in high level nuclear waste, iron (Fe) represents a main component in natural systems controlling redox related geochemical processes. Analytical techniques for determining oxidation state distribution for redox sensitive radionuclides and other metal ions often have a lack of sensitivity. The detection limits of these methods (i.e. UV/vis, TRLFS, XANES) are in general in the range of ≥ 10 -6 mol.L -1 . As a consequence ultrasensitive new analytical techniques are required. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) are powerful separation methods for metal ions. In the course of this thesis different speciation method for iron, neptunium and plutonium were optimized. With the optimized setup redox speciation analysis of these elements in different samples were done. Furthermore CE hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (CE - ICP - SF - MS) was used to measure the redox speciation of Pu (III, IV, V, VI), Np (IV, V, VI) and Fe (II, III) at concentrations lower than 10 -7 mol.L -1 . CE coupling and separation parameters such as sample gas pressure, make up flow rate, capillary position, auxiliary gas flow, as well as the electrolyte system were optimized to obtain the maximum sensitivity. The methodes detection limits are 10 -12 mol.L -1 for Np and Pu. The various oxidation state species of Pu and Np in different samples were separated by application of an acetate based electrolyte system. The separation of Fe (II

  4. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  5. Crystal chemistry, properties and synthesis of microporous silicates containing transition elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukanov, Nikita V; Pekov, Igor V; Rastsvetaeva, Ramiza K

    2004-01-01

    The review surveys and generalises recent data on synthesis methods, physicochemical properties and crystal chemistry of silicate microporous materials containing transition elements (amphoterosilicates). The frameworks of these materials, unlike those of usual aluminosilicate zeolites, are built from tetrahedrally coordinated atoms along with atoms of various elements (Ti, Nb, Zr, Ta, Sn, W, Fe, Mn, Zn, etc.) with coordination numbers of 6 or 5. Many amphoterosilicates possess ion-exchange properties and can serve as catalysts for redox reactions, sorbents, etc. The structural diversity of synthetic and natural amphoterosilicates provides the basis for the preparation of microporous materials with different properties.

  6. Single-molecule conductivity of non-redox and redox molecules at pure and gold-mined Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Ulstrup, Jens

    The structure, two-dimensional organization, and function of molecules immobilized on solid surfaces can be addressed in a degree of detail that has reached the level of the single-molecule. In this context redox molecules are “smart” molecules adding sophisticated electronic function. Redox meta...

  7. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kehr

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Bioelectrochemical probing of intracellular redox processes in living yeast cells—application of redox polymer wiring in a microfluidic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Coman, Vasile; Kostesha, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    utilizing a new double mediator system to map redox metabolism and screen for genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The function of this new double mediator system based on menadione and osmium redox polymer (PVI-Os) is demonstrated. “Wiring” of S. cerevisiae cells using PVI-Os shows...... that microfluidic bioelectrochemical assays employing the menadione–PVI-Os double mediator system provides an effective means to conduct automated microbial assays. FigureMicrofluidic platform for bioelectrochemical assays using osmium redox polymer “wired” living yeast cells...

  9. Redox properties of small semiconductor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver, N.; Nitzan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The size dependence of electrical and thermodynamic quantities of intermediate-sized semiconductor particles in an electrolyte solution with a given redox pair are studied. The equilibrium constant for this system is then derived based on the relationship of the electrolytic redox components to the size, charges, and concentration of the semiconductor particles. 25 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  10. How do glycerol and dimethyl sulphoxide affect local tetrahedral structure of water around a nonpolar solute at low temperature? Importance of preferential interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis

    2018-04-01

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) have vital roles in cryoprotection of living cells, tissues, etc. The above action has been directly linked with disruption of hydrogen (H-) bond structure and dynamics of water by these cosolvents at bulk region and around various complex units, such as peptide, amino acid, protein, and lipid membrane. However, the disruption of the local structure of the water solvent around a purely hydrophobic solute is still not studied extensively. The latter is also important in the context of stabilization of protein from cold denaturation. Through all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, we have investigated the comparative effect of glycerol and DMSO on the orientational order of water around a nonpolar solute at -5 °C. A steady reduction of the tetrahedral order of water is observed at bulk (>10 Å distance from the solute) and solute interface (structure of the interfacial water more than that of the bulk water, glycerol affects the water structure almost uniformly at all regions around the solute. Furthermore, while glycerol helps to retain water molecules at the interface, DMSO significantly reduces the water content in that region. We have put forward a plausible mechanism for these contrasting roles of these cosolvents. The solute-cosolvent hydrophobic-interaction-induced orientational alignment of an interfacial cosolvent molecule determines whether the involvement of the cosolvent molecules in H-bonding with solvent water in the interface is akin to the bulk region or not.

  11. New tools for redox biology: From imaging to manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, Dmitry S; Belousov, Vsevolod V

    2017-08-01

    Redox reactions play a key role in maintaining essential biological processes. Deviations in redox pathways result in the development of various pathologies at cellular and organismal levels. Until recently, studies on transformations in the intracellular redox state have been significantly hampered in living systems. The genetically encoded indicators, based on fluorescent proteins, have provided new opportunities in biomedical research. The existing indicators already enable monitoring of cellular redox parameters in different processes including embryogenesis, aging, inflammation, tissue regeneration, and pathogenesis of various diseases. In this review, we summarize information about all genetically encoded redox indicators developed to date. We provide the description of each indicator and discuss its advantages and limitations, as well as points that need to be considered when choosing an indicator for a particular experiment. One chapter is devoted to the important discoveries that have been made by using genetically encoded redox indicators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  13. Intracellular Diagnostics: Hunting for the Mode of Action of Redox-Modulating Selenium Compounds in Selected Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Mániková

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Redox-modulating compounds derived from natural sources, such as redox active secondary metabolites, are currently of considerable interest in the field of chemoprevention, drug and phytoprotectant development. Unfortunately, the exact and occasionally even selective activity of such products, and the underlying (bio-chemical causes thereof, are often only poorly understood. A combination of the nematode- and yeast-based assays provides a powerful platform to investigate a possible biological activity of a new compound and also to explore the “redox link” which may exist between its activity on the one side and its chemistry on the other. Here, we will demonstrate the usefulness of this platform for screening several selenium and tellurium compounds for their activity and action. We will also show how the nematode-based assay can be used to obtain information on compound uptake and distribution inside a multicellular organism, whilst the yeast-based system can be employed to explore possible intracellular mechanisms via chemogenetic screening and intracellular diagnostics. Whilst none of these simple and easy-to-use assays can ultimately substitute for in-depth studies in human cells and animals, these methods nonetheless provide a first glimpse on the possible biological activities of new compounds and offer direction for more complicated future investigations. They may also uncover some rather unpleasant biochemical actions of certain compounds, such as the ability of the trace element supplement selenite to induce DNA strand breaks.

  14. Recent Advances of Metallocenes for Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Miguel M; Bastos, Pedro; Catela, Isabelle; Zalewska, Karolina; Branco, Luis C

    2017-01-01

    The recent advances for the synthesis and application of different metallocenes for Medicinal Chemistry is reviewed. This manuscript presents the different metallocene scaffolds, with special emphasis on ferrocene derivatives, and their potential pharmaceutical application. Over the last years, the synthesis of new metallocene compounds and their biological and medicinal effects against some types of diseases (e.g. anti-tumoral, antibiotics, anti-viral) have been reported. From the medicinal point of view, the attractive properties of metallocene derivatives, such as their high stability, low toxicity and appealing redox behaviors are particularly relevant. This area has attracted many researchers as well as the pharmaceutical industry due to the promising results of some metallocenes, in particular ferrocene compounds, in breast cancer and malaria. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Evaluation of porewater chemistry in the buffer material for the second progress report H12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Chie; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    1999-09-01

    In the safety assessment for geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), porewater chemistry in buffer materials is used to estimate migration of radionuclides and corrosion of overpack materials. For the reference case in the second progress report on research and development for HLW disposal in Japan, entitled H12, porewater chemistry was evaluated by using a chemical model based on an experimental work by Oda and Shibata (1999) under the assumption of a thermodynamic system of groundwater with bentonite and corrosion products of carbon-steel overpack. This report provides the scientific information basis for the porewater chemistry evaluation, and describes the possible variations in porewater composition affected by following factors: - variations in groundwater composition relevant to the alternative geological environments cases and the perturbation scenario, and supplementary variations in groundwater composition. - model/data uncertainties associated with insufficient understanding of important processes with respect to the time-dependent behavior of a geological disposal system: in particular, how the surface reaction of smectite changes with time, how the impurities of bentonite affect porewater, and how the reactions like redox equilibria, kinetics of dissolution of accessory minerals in bentonite and precipitation of secondary minerals (including corrosion products of overpack materials) should be handled in the porewater calculations. - uncertainties of thermodynamic data of the geochemical elements. The results of calculation indicated that porewaters in the buffer material, as far as calcite is not exhausted, may vary within the range of pH from 6 to 11. It was found that important factors on the variations in porewater composition were the change of surface reactions of smectite with time, the degree of soluble impurities dissolution/dispersion and the amount of iron being supplied into the buffer region by corrosion of the overpack

  16. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J.; Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED); (Icahn)

    2017-09-07

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a ‘redox switch’ centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the ‘OFF’ state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins.

  17. Redox proteomics of tomato in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmant, Kelly Mayrink; Parker, Jennifer; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mammals with adaptive immunity, plants rely on their innate immunity based on pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) for pathogen defense. Reactive oxygen species, known to play crucial roles in PTI and ETI, can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to changes of redox-sensitive proteins through modification of cysteine sulfhydryl groups. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, little is known about redox proteins and how they function in PTI and ETI. In this study, cysTMT proteomics technology was used to identify similarities and differences of protein redox modifications in tomato resistant (PtoR) and susceptible (prf3) genotypes in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) infection. In addition, the results of the redox changes were compared and corrected with the protein level changes. A total of 90 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, biosynthesis of cysteine, sucrose and brassinosteroid, cell wall biogenesis, polysaccharide/starch biosynthesis, cuticle development, lipid metabolism, proteolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, protein targeting to vacuole, and oxidation–reduction. This inventory of previously unknown protein redox switches in tomato pathogen defense lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the biological significance of protein redox modifications in plant defense responses. PMID:26504582

  18. Redox-active labile iron in fortified flours from the Brazilian market Ferro lábil redox-ativo em farinhas fortificadas do mercado brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Pannia Espósito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the fraction of redox-active labile iron in iron-fortified flours acquired on the Brazilian market. METHODS: Samples of wheat flour, maize flour and breadcrumbs were extracted with buffers that mimic gastric juice, saliva and intestinal juice. Redox-active labile iron levels were assessed through the reaction of autoxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed by iron in the presence of a fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Redox-active labile iron represents 1% to 9% of the total iron in the flour and breadcrumb samples, with the lowest values found under gastric juice conditions and the highest in the more alkaline media. Redox-active labile iron possibly arises from the decomposition of an iron-phytic acid complex. A positive correlation between redox-active labile iron and total iron was found in saline biomimetic fluids. CONCLUSION: Redox-active labile iron may be a risk factor for people with impaired antioxidant defenses, such as those who are atransferrinemic or iron overloaded (e.g. thalassemic. Total iron can be used to predict redox-active labile iron absorption at each stage of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of iron-fortified flours.OBJETIVO: Quantificar a porcentagem de ferro lábil redox ativo em farinhas fortificadas adquiridas no comércio popular. MÉTODOS: Amostras de farinha de trigo, fubá e rosca foram extraídas com tampões miméticos de suco gástrico, saliva e suco intestinal. Os níveis de ferro lábil redox ativo foram determinados por meio da reação de auto-oxidação do ácido ascórbico catalisada pelo ferro, em presença de uma sonda fluorimétrica. RESULTADOS: A fração de ferro lábil redox ativo representa entre 1% e 9% do ferro total nas farinhas estudadas, sendo os menores valores encontrados em condições miméticas do suco gástrico e os maiores nos meios mais alcalinos. Há indícios de que o ferro lábil redox ativo origina-se da decomposição de um complexo entre ferro e ácido f

  19. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized

  20. Symproportionation versus Disproportionation in Bromine Redox Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toporek, Marcin; Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M.; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • The disproportionation and symproportionation of bromine in different media is presented. • All the redox systems are elaborated according to the principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic redox systems (GATES/GEB). • All physicochemical knowledge is involved in the algorithm applied for this purpose. • The graphical representation of the systems is the basis of gaining the detailed physicochemical knowledge on the systems in question. -- Abstract: The paper refers to dynamic (titration) redox systems where symproportionation or disproportionation of bromine species occur. The related systems are modeled according to principles assumed in the Generalized Approach to Electrolytic Redox Systems (GATES), with Generalized Electron Balance (GEB) concept involved in the GATES/GEB software. The results obtained from calculations made with use of iterative computer programs prepared according to MATLAB computational software, are presented graphically, as 2D and 3D graphs

  1. Mid-year report: IPC liaison and chemistry of thermal reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-05-01

    A program of investigation into the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste is being conducted. The investigations have two main subtasks: liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and further laboratory testing of the chemistry of thermal reconstitution of Hanford Site tank waste. Progress to date includes: (1) a technical dialogue has been established with the Institute scientists; (2) editing of a technical literature review on the chemistry of the transuranic elements and technetium in alkaline media written by researchers at the Institute is complete; (3) four tasks from the Institute have been selected for support by the US Department of Energy; (4) technical information has been supplied to the Institute describing the composition of Hanford Site tank waste; (5) tests, using genuine waste from tank 104-S (a REDOX Process sludge), comparing the performance of thermal reconstitution with enhanced sludge washing show markedly improved dissolution of aluminum achieved by the thermal treatment; (6) a reduction/coprecipitation method was tested and shown to remove plutonium, solubilized by thermal treatment, rapidly and efficiently from solution; (7) technical chemistry support was provided to calciner kinetics tests at the University of Idaho; (8) tests to determine the speciation of plutonium and neptunium solubilized by thermal treatment show dissolved Pu(V) and Np(V) hydroxide complexes are produced, a Np(V) peroxide complex also was identified; (9) recently published data on Pu(IV) carbonate complexation in moderately alkaline (pH 12 to 13) solution led to reexamination of previous investigations of plutonium complexation in highly alkaline (3 to 5 molar NaOH) solutions

  2. A multi-electron redox mediator for redox-targeting lithium-sulfur flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guochun; Yang, Liuqing; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tianran; Lin, Haibin; Yao, Qiaofeng; Lee, Jim Yang

    2018-02-01

    The lithium-sulfur flow battery (LSFB) is a new addition to the rechargeable lithium flow batteries (LFBs) where sulfur or a sulfur compound is used as the cathode material against the lithium anode. We report here our evaluation of an organic sulfide - dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), as 1) a catholyte of a LFB and 2) a multi-electron redox mediator for discharging and charging a solid sulfur cathode without any conductive additives. The latter configuration is also known as the redox-targeting lithium-sulfur flow battery (RTLSFB). The LFB provides an initial discharge capacity of 131.5 mAh g-1DMTS (1.66 A h L-1), which decreases to 59 mAh g-1DMTS (0.75 A h L-1) after 40 cycles. The RTLSFB delivers a significantly higher application performance - initial discharge capacity of 1225.3 mAh g-1sulfur (3.83 A h L-1), for which 1030.9 mAh g-1sulfur (3.23 A h L-1) is still available after 40 cycles. The significant increase in the discharge and charge duration of the LFB after sulfur addition indicates that DMTS is better used as a redox mediator in a RTLSFB than as a catholyte in a LFB.

  3. An Excel Workbook for Identifying Redox Processes in Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) condition of ground water affects the concentration, transport, and fate of many anthropogenic and natural contaminants. The redox state of a ground-water sample is defined by the dominant type of reduction/oxidation reaction, or redox process, occurring in the sample, as inferred from water-quality data. However, because of the difficulty in defining and applying a systematic redox framework to samples from diverse hydrogeologic settings, many regional water-quality investigations do not attempt to determine the predominant redox process in ground water. Recently, McMahon and Chapelle (2008) devised a redox framework that was applied to a large number of samples from 15 principal aquifer systems in the United States to examine the effect of redox processes on water quality. This framework was expanded by Chapelle and others (in press) to use measured sulfide data to differentiate between iron(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions. These investigations showed that a systematic approach to characterize redox conditions in ground water could be applied to datasets from diverse hydrogeologic settings using water-quality data routinely collected in regional water-quality investigations. This report describes the Microsoft Excel workbook, RedoxAssignment_McMahon&Chapelle.xls, that assigns the predominant redox process to samples using the framework created by McMahon and Chapelle (2008) and expanded by Chapelle and others (in press). Assignment of redox conditions is based on concentrations of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-), manganese (Mn2+), iron (Fe2+), sulfate (SO42-), and sulfide (sum of dihydrogen sulfide [aqueous H2S], hydrogen sulfide [HS-], and sulfide [S2-]). The logical arguments for assigning the predominant redox process to each sample are performed by a program written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The program is called from buttons on the main worksheet. The number of samples that can be analyzed

  4. Redox phenomena controlling systems - a 7. framework programme collaborative project (2008-2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this EURATOM collaborative project is to understand Redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides (ReCosy programme) in nuclear waste disposal and to provide tools to apply the results to safety assessment. The project has been organized into 6 task forces: 1) implications of Redox for safety, 2) development of Redox determination methods, 3) Redox response of defined and near-natural systems, 4) Redox reactions of radionuclides, 5) Redox processes in radionuclide transport, and 6) Redox reactions affecting the spent fuel source-term

  5. Electronically Induced Redox Barriers for Treatment of Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sale, Tom; Gilbert, David

    2006-01-01

    ...) and Colorado State University (CSU). The focus is an innovative electrolytic approach for managing redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater, referred to as electrically induced redox barrier (e-barriers...

  6. Impact on the Fe redox cycling of organic ligands released by Synechococcus PCC 7002, under different iron fertilization scenarios. Modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samperio-Ramos, Guillermo; González-Dávila, Melchor; Santana-Casiano, J. Magdalena

    2018-06-01

    The kinetics of Fe redox transformations are of crucial importance in determining the bioavailability of iron, due to inorganic Fe(II) and Fe weakly organic complexes being the most easily assimilated species by phytoplankton. The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the cyanobacteria Synecococcus PCC 7002 on the iron redox chemistry was studied at different stages of growth, considering changes in the organic exudation of the cyanobacteria, associated with growth under two different scenarios of iron availability. The oxidation/reduction processes of iron were studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2- 8.2), temperature (5- 35 °C) and salinity (10- 37). The presence of natural organic exudates of Synechococcus affected the redox behavior of iron. A pH-dependent and photo-induced Fe(III) reduction process was detected in the presence of exudates produced under Fe-Low conditions. Photolytic reactions also modified the reactivity of those exudates with respect to Fe(II), increasing its lifetime in seawater. Without light mediated processes, organic ligands excreted under iron deficient conditions intensified the Fe(II) oxidation at pH redox constants between iron and the major ligands present in solution. Two organic type ligands for the exudates of Synechococcus PCC 7002, with different iron-chelation properties were included in the model. The Fe(II) speciation was radically affected when organic ligands were considered. The individual contributions to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate demonstrated that these organic ligands played a key role in the oxidation process, although their contributions were dependent on the prescribed iron conditions. The study, therefore, suggests that the variability in the composition and nature of organic exudates released, due to iron availability conditions, might determine the redox behaviour of iron in seawater.

  7. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  8. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  9. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain

  10. Chloroplasts as source and target of cellular redox regulation: a discussion on chloroplast redox signals in the context of plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Margarete; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2005-06-01

    During the evolution of plants, chloroplasts have lost the exclusive genetic control over redox regulation and antioxidant gene expression. Together with many other genes, all genes encoding antioxidant enzymes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants were transferred to the nucleus. On the other hand, photosynthesis bears a high risk for photo-oxidative damage. Concomitantly, an intricate network for mutual regulation by anthero- and retrograde signals has emerged to co-ordinate the activities of the different genetic and metabolic compartments. A major focus of recent research in chloroplast regulation addressed the mechanisms of redox sensing and signal transmission, the identification of regulatory targets, and the understanding of adaptation mechanisms. In addition to redox signals communicated through signalling cascades also used in pathogen and wounding responses, specific chloroplast signals control nuclear gene expression. Signalling pathways are triggered by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, the thioredoxin system, and the acceptor availability at photosystem I, in addition to control by oxolipins, tetrapyrroles, carbohydrates, and abscisic acid. The signalling function is discussed in the context of regulatory circuitries that control the expression of antioxidant enzymes and redox modulators, demonstrating the principal role of chloroplasts as the source and target of redox regulation.

  11. Albumin-bound fatty acids but not albumin itself alter redox balance in tubular epithelial cells and induce a peroxide-mediated redox-sensitive apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Christine; Elks, Carrie M.; Kruger, Claudia; Cleland, Ellen; Addison, Kaity; Noland, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is associated with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. It correlates with the progression of chronic kidney disease, particularly with tubular atrophy. The fatty acid load on albumin significantly increases in obesity, presenting a proinflammatory environment to the proximal tubules. However, little is known about changes in the redox milieu during fatty acid overload and how redox-sensitive mechanisms mediate cell death. Here, we show that albumin with fatty acid impurities or conjugated with palmitate but not albumin itself compromised mitochondrial and cell viability, membrane potential and respiration. Fatty acid overload led to a redox imbalance which deactivated the antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin 2 and caused a peroxide-mediated apoptosis through the redox-sensitive pJNK/caspase-3 pathway. Transfection of tubular cells with peroxiredoxin 2 was protective and mitigated apoptosis. Mitochondrial fatty acid entry and ceramide synthesis modulators suggested that mitochondrial β oxidation but not ceramide synthesis may modulate lipotoxic effects on tubular cell survival. These results suggest that albumin overloaded with fatty acids but not albumin itself changes the redox environment in the tubules, inducing a peroxide-mediated redox-sensitive apoptosis. Thus, mitigating circulating fatty acid levels may be an important factor in both preserving redox balance and preventing tubular cell damage in proteinuric diseases. PMID:24500687

  12. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on redox polymer/carbon nanotube modified electrodes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsan, Madalina M; Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2015-06-30

    The aim of this review is to present the contributions to the development of electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on polyphenazine or polytriphenylmethane redox polymers together with carbon nanotubes (CNT) during recent years. Phenazine polymers have been widely used in analytical applications due to their inherent charge transport properties and electrocatalytic effects. At the same time, since the first report on a CNT-based sensor, their application in the electroanalytical chemistry field has demonstrated that the unique structure and properties of CNT are ideal for the design of electrochemical (bio)sensors. We describe here that the specific combination of phenazine/triphenylmethane polymers with CNT leads to an improved performance of the resulting sensing devices, because of their complementary electrical, electrochemical and mechanical properties, and also due to synergistic effects. The preparation of polymer/CNT modified electrodes will be presented together with their electrochemical and surface characterization, with emphasis on the contribution of each component on the overall properties of the modified electrodes. Their importance in analytical chemistry is demonstrated by the numerous applications based on polymer/CNT-driven electrocatalytic effects, and their analytical performance as (bio) sensors is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Architecture for improved mass transport and system performance in redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Jacob; Pezeshki, Alan; Clement, Jason T.; Aaron, Douglas; Mench, Matthew M.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, electrochemical performance and parasitic losses are combined in an overall system-level efficiency metric for a high performance, all-vanadium redox flow battery. It was found that pressure drop and parasitic pumping losses are relatively negligible for high performance cells, i.e., those capable of operating at a high current density while at a low flow rate. Through this finding, the Equal Path Length (EPL) flow field architecture was proposed and evaluated. This design has superior mass transport characteristics in comparison with the standard serpentine and interdigitated designs at the expense of increased pressure drop. An Aspect Ratio (AR) design is discussed and evaluated, which demonstrates decreased pressure drop compared to the EPL design, while maintaining similar electrochemical performance under most conditions. This AR design is capable of leading to improved system energy efficiency for flow batteries of all chemistries.

  14. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J; Rudenko, Gabby

    2017-11-02

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a 'redox switch' centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the 'OFF' state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Fluid-mediated redox transfer in subduction zones: Measuring the intrinsic fO2 of slab fluids in the lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovino, K.; Till, C. B.

    2017-12-01

    It is widely observed that arc magmas are the most oxidized magmas on Earth. One frequently cited explanation calls on the flux of aqueous fluid from the highly oxidized down-going slab to catalyze sub-arc mantle melting and impose a highly oxidized redox signature on the mantle wedge. Fluid inclusions from sub-arc mantle xenoliths provide evidence that "slab fluids" may be highly oxidizing (fO2 QFM+1.5; Brandon & Draper, 1996; Frost and Ballhaus, 1998), but for decades, determination of the precise reactive mechanism potentially responsible for the transfer of O2 from slab to mantle has been elusive. Pure H2O has been shown to have insufficient oxidizing capacity to affect mantle redox, but H2O-rich fluids may facilitate the mobilization of Fe3+ or other multivalent cations and/or O2 transfer via the reduction of sulfate, particularly if such fluids are hypersaline. Here we present the first results from experiments designed to investigate fluid-mediated element transfer, including redox reactions, at the slab-mantle interface. These data include the first direct measurements of the intrinsic oxygen fugacity of fluids released during slab dehydration using sliding binary alloy redox sensors. Experiments were performed on natural Fe3+-bearing antigorite serpentinite at 1-2 GPa and 800°C in a piston cylinder at Arizona State University, analogous to conditions in a subducting slab and sufficient to cause the breakdown of starting material into forsteritic olivine, Mg-rich clinopyroxene, magnetite, and aqueous fluid. Experimental time series allow for the detection of (and correction for) any buffering effect on the sample by the experimental assembly. Initial results indicate that the dehydration of sulfur-free antigorite serpentinite can generate fluids with fO2 several orders of magnitude above that of MORB mantle and similar to those observed in natural sub-arc fluid inclusions. Careful measurements of the chemistry of fluid and solid run products will elucidate

  16. Redox-active and Redox-silent Compounds: Synergistic Therapeutics in Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2015), s. 552-568 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Apoptosis * autophagy * redox-active agents Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.455, year: 2015

  17. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances. PMID:26917470

  18. Titanium nitride as an electrocatalyst for V(II)/V(III) redox couples in all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chunmei; Wang, Haining; Lu, Shanfu; Wu, Chunxiao; Liu, Yiyang; Tan, Qinglong; Liang, Dawei; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NPs) are proposed as a novel catalyst towards the V(II)/V(III) redox pair for the negative electrode in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB). Electrochemical properties of TiN NPs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that TiN NPs demonstrate better electrochemical activity and reversibility for the processes of V(II)/V(III) redox couples as compared with the graphite NPs. TiN NPs facilitate the charge transfer in the V(II)/V(III) redox reaction. Performance of a VRFB using a TiN NPs coated carbon paper as a negative electrode is much higher than that of a VRFB with a raw carbon paper electrode. The columbic efficiency (CE), the voltage efficiency (VE) and the energy efficiency (EE) of the VRFB single cell at charge-discharge current density of 30 mA/cm 2 are 91.74%, 89.11% and 81.74%, respectively. During a 50 charge-discharge cycles test, the CE values of VRFB with TiN NPs consistently remain higher than 90%.

  19. Redox-Flow Batteries: From Metals to Organic Redox-Active Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsberg, Jan; Hagemann, Tino; Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2017-01-16

    Research on redox-flow batteries (RFBs) is currently experiencing a significant upturn, stimulated by the growing need to store increasing quantities of sustainably generated electrical energy. RFBs are promising candidates for the creation of smart grids, particularly when combined with photovoltaics and wind farms. To achieve the goal of "green", safe, and cost-efficient energy storage, research has shifted from metal-based materials to organic active materials in recent years. This Review presents an overview of various flow-battery systems. Relevant studies concerning their history are discussed as well as their development over the last few years from the classical inorganic, to organic/inorganic, to RFBs with organic redox-active cathode and anode materials. Available technologies are analyzed in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental aspects; the advantages and limitations of these systems are also discussed. Further technological challenges and prospective research possibilities are highlighted. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Kynurenine pathway metabolites and enzymes involved in redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Esquivel, D; Ramírez-Ortega, D; Pineda, B; Castro, N; Ríos, C; Pérez de la Cruz, V

    2017-01-01

    Oxido-reduction reactions are a fundamental part of the life due to support many vital biological processes as cellular respiration and glucose oxidation. In the redox reactions, one substance transfers one or more electrons to another substance. An important electron carrier is the coenzyme NAD + , which is involved in many metabolic pathways. De novo biosynthesis of NAD + is through the kynurenine pathway, the major route of tryptophan catabolism, which is sensitive to redox environment and produces metabolites with redox capacity, able to alter biological functions that are controlled by redox-responsive signaling pathways. Kynurenine pathway metabolites have been implicated in the physiology process and in the physiopathology of many diseases; processes that also share others factors as dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death, which impact the redox environment. This review examines in detail the available evidence in which kynurenine pathway metabolites participate in redox reactions and their effect on cellular redox homeostasis, since the knowledge of the main factors and mechanisms that lead to cell death in many neurodegenative disorders and other pathologies, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and kynurenines imbalance, will allow to develop therapies using them as targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Accelerated redox reaction between chromate and phenolic pollutants during freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Jinjung; Kim, Jaesung [Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252 (Korea, Republic of); Vetráková, Ľubica [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Seo, Jiwon [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Heger, Dominik [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Lee, Changha [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho-Il [Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kitae, E-mail: ktkim@kopri.re.kr [Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungwon, E-mail: jwk@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was significantly accelerated during freezing. • Accelerated redox conversion in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect. • 4-CP, Cr(VI), and protons are concentrated in the liquid brine by freezing. • Redox conversions of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) were significant in ice. • Freezing-accelerated redox conversion was observed in real polluted water. - Abstract: The redox reaction between 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and chromate (Cr(VI)) (i.e., the simultaneous oxidation of 4-CP by Cr(VI) and reduction of Cr(VI) by 4-CP) in ice (i.e., at −20 °C) was compared with the corresponding reaction in water (i.e., at 25 °C). The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI), which was negligible in water, was significantly accelerated in ice. This accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect occurring during freezing, which excludes solutes (i.e., 4-CP and Cr(VI)) and protons from the ice crystals and subsequently concentrates them in the liquid brine. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and protons in the liquid brine were confirmed by measuring the optical image and the UV–vis absorption spectra of cresol red (CR) as a pH indicator of frozen solution. The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was observed in water when the concentrations of 4-CP/protons or Cr(VI)/protons increased by 100/1000-fold. These results corroborate the freeze concentration effect as the reason for the accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice. The redox conversion of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) and 4-CP/Cr(VI) in real wastewater was successfully achieved in ice, which verifies the environmental relevance and importance of freezing-accelerated redox conversion of phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) in cold regions.

  2. Accelerated redox reaction between chromate and phenolic pollutants during freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Jinjung; Kim, Jaesung; Vetráková, Ľubica; Seo, Jiwon; Heger, Dominik; Lee, Changha; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was significantly accelerated during freezing. • Accelerated redox conversion in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect. • 4-CP, Cr(VI), and protons are concentrated in the liquid brine by freezing. • Redox conversions of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) were significant in ice. • Freezing-accelerated redox conversion was observed in real polluted water. - Abstract: The redox reaction between 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and chromate (Cr(VI)) (i.e., the simultaneous oxidation of 4-CP by Cr(VI) and reduction of Cr(VI) by 4-CP) in ice (i.e., at −20 °C) was compared with the corresponding reaction in water (i.e., at 25 °C). The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI), which was negligible in water, was significantly accelerated in ice. This accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect occurring during freezing, which excludes solutes (i.e., 4-CP and Cr(VI)) and protons from the ice crystals and subsequently concentrates them in the liquid brine. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and protons in the liquid brine were confirmed by measuring the optical image and the UV–vis absorption spectra of cresol red (CR) as a pH indicator of frozen solution. The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was observed in water when the concentrations of 4-CP/protons or Cr(VI)/protons increased by 100/1000-fold. These results corroborate the freeze concentration effect as the reason for the accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice. The redox conversion of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) and 4-CP/Cr(VI) in real wastewater was successfully achieved in ice, which verifies the environmental relevance and importance of freezing-accelerated redox conversion of phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) in cold regions.

  3. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Huang, Jinhua; Burrell, Anthony

    2018-05-08

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte comprises a tetrafluorohydroquinone ether compound or a tetrafluorocatechol ether compound.

  4. Redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Chen, Zonghai; Wang, Qingzheng

    2010-12-14

    The present invention is generally related to electrolytes containing novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. The redox shuttles are capable of thousands hours of overcharge tolerance and have a redox potential at about 3-5.5 V vs. Li and particularly about 4.4-4.8 V vs. Li. Accordingly, in one aspect the invention provides electrolytes comprising an alkali metal salt; a polar aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive that is an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring with four or more electronegative substituents, two or more oxygen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring, and no hydrogen atoms bonded to the aromatic ring; and wherein the electrolyte solution is substantially non-aqueous. Further there are provided electrochemical devices employing the electrolyte and methods of making the electrolyte.

  5. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Technical basis for hydrogen-water chemistry: Laboratory studies of water chemistry effects on SCC [stress-corrosion-cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Soppet, W.K.

    1986-10-01

    The influence of different impurities, viz., oxyacids and several chloride salts, on the stress-corrosion-cracking (SCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel (SS) was investigated in constant-extension-rate-tensile (CERT) tests in 289 0 C water at a low dissolved-oxygen concentration ( 0 C in low-oxygen environments with and without sulfate at low concentrations. In these experiments, the crack growth behavior of the materials was correlated with the type and concentration of the impurities and the electrochemical potentials of Type 304 SS and platinum electrodes in the simulated hydrogen-water chemistry environments. The information suggests that better characterization of water quality, through measurement of the concentrations of individual species (SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , Cu 2+ , etc.) coupled with measurements of the corrosion and redox potentials at high temperatures will provide a viable means to monitor and ultimately improve the performance of BWR system materials

  7. Dimensional behavior of Ni-YSZ composites during redox cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihlatie, Mikko; Kaiser, Andreas; Larsen, Peter Halvor

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional behavior of Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermets during redox cycling was tested in dilatometry within the temperature range 600-1000 degrees C. The effect Of humidity oil redox stability was investigated at intermediate and low temperatures. We show that both the sintering...... of nickel depending on temperature of the initial reduction and the operating conditions, and the temperature of reoxidation are very important for the size of the dimensional change. Cumulative redox strain (CRS) is shown to be correlated with temperature. Measured maximum CRS after three redox cycles...... varies within 0.25-3.2% dL/L in dry gas and respective temperature range of 600-1000 degrees C. A high degree of redox reversibility was reached at low temperature. however. reversibility is lost at elevated temperatures. We found that at 850 degrees C, 6% steam and a very high p(H2O)/p(H2) ratio...

  8. NAD(H) and NADP(H) Redox Couples and Cellular Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wusheng; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2018-01-20

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )/reduced NAD + (NADH) and NADP + /reduced NADP + (NADPH) redox couples are essential for maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and for modulating numerous biological events, including cellular metabolism. Deficiency or imbalance of these two redox couples has been associated with many pathological disorders. Recent Advances: Newly identified biosynthetic enzymes and newly developed genetically encoded biosensors enable us to understand better how cells maintain compartmentalized NAD(H) and NADP(H) pools. The concept of redox stress (oxidative and reductive stress) reflected by changes in NAD(H)/NADP(H) has increasingly gained attention. The emerging roles of NAD + -consuming proteins in regulating cellular redox and metabolic homeostasis are active research topics. The biosynthesis and distribution of cellular NAD(H) and NADP(H) are highly compartmentalized. It is critical to understand how cells maintain the steady levels of these redox couple pools to ensure their normal functions and simultaneously avoid inducing redox stress. In addition, it is essential to understand how NAD(H)- and NADP(H)-utilizing enzymes interact with other signaling pathways, such as those regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism. Additional studies are needed to investigate the inter-relationships among compartmentalized NAD(H)/NADP(H) pools and how these two dinucleotide redox couples collaboratively regulate cellular redox states and cellular metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, recent studies suggest the utility of using pharmacological interventions or nutrient-based bioactive NAD + precursors as therapeutic interventions for metabolic diseases. Thus, a better understanding of the cellular functions of NAD(H) and NADP(H) may facilitate efforts to address a host of pathological disorders effectively. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 251-272.

  9. Pattern-oriented Agent-based Monte Carlo simulation of Cellular Redox Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiaowei; Holcombe, Mike; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    /CYSS) and mitochondrial redox couples. Evidence suggests that both intracellular and extracellular redox can affect overall cell redox state. How redox is communicated between extracellular and intracellular environments is still a matter of debate. Some researchers conclude based on experimental data...... cells. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta-General Subjects, 2008. 1780(11): p. 1271-1290. 5. Jones, D.P., Redox sensing: orthogonal control in cell cycle and apoptosis signalling. J Intern Med, 2010. 268(5): p. 432-48. 6. Pogson, M., et al., Formal agent-based modelling of intracellular chemical interactions...

  10. Breast Cancer Redox Heterogeneity Detectable with Chemical Exchange Satruation Transfer (CEST) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kejia; Xu, He N.; Singh, Anup; Moon, Lily; Haris, Mohammad; Reddy, Ravinder; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tissue redox state is an important mediator of various biological processes in health and diseases such as cancer. Previously, we discovered that the mitochondrial redox state of ex vivo tissues detected by redox scanning (an optical imaging method) revealed interesting tumor redox state heterogeneity that could differentiate tumor aggressiveness. Because the noninvasive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI can probe the proton transfer and generate contrasts from endogenous metabolites, we aim to investigate if the in vivo CEST contrast is sensitive to proton transfer of the redox reactions so as to reveal the tissue redox states in breast cancer animal models. Procedures CEST MRI has been employed to characterize tumor metabolic heterogeneity and correlated with the redox states measured by the redox scanning in two human breast cancer mouse xenograft models, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The possible biological mechanism on the correlation between the two imaging modalities was further investigated by phantom studies where the reductants and the oxidants of the representative redox reactions were measured. Results The CEST contrast is found linearly correlated with NADH concentration and the NADH redox ratio with high statistical significance, where NADH is the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The phantom studies showed that the reductants of the redox reactions have more CEST contrast than the corresponding oxidants, indicating that higher CEST effect corresponds to the more reduced redox state. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that CEST MRI, once calibrated, might provide a novel noninvasive imaging surrogate for the tissue redox state and a possible diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer in the clinic. PMID:24811957

  11. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  12. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  13. Arteriovenous oscillations of the redox potential: Is the redox state influencing blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Mazurek, Tomasz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Gajewski, Zdzislaw; Paczek, Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Studies on the regulation of human blood flow revealed several modes of oscillations with frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 1 Hz. Several mechanisms were proposed that might influence these oscillations, such as the activity of vascular endothelium, the neurogenic activity of vessel wall, the intrinsic activity of vascular smooth muscle, respiration, and heartbeat. These studies relied typically on non-invasive techniques, for example, laser Doppler flowmetry. Oscillations of biochemical markers were rarely coupled to blood flow. The redox potential difference between the artery and the vein was measured by platinum electrodes placed in the parallel homonymous femoral artery and the femoral vein of ventilated anesthetized pigs. Continuous measurement at 5 Hz sampling rate using a digital nanovoltmeter revealed fluctuating signals with three basic modes of oscillations: ∼ 1, ∼ 0.1 and ∼ 0.01 Hz. These signals clearly overlap with reported modes of oscillations in blood flow, suggesting coupling of the redox potential and blood flow. The amplitude of the oscillations associated with heart action was significantly smaller than for the other two modes, despite the fact that heart action has the greatest influence on blood flow. This finding suggests that redox potential in blood might be not a derivative but either a mediator or an effector of the blood flow control system.

  14. Intra-cystic concentrations of albendazole-sulphoxide in human cystic echinococcosis: a systematic review and analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Felix; Naderer, Judith; Skuhala, Tomislava; Groger, Mirjam; Auer, Herbert; Kaczirek, Klaus; Waneck, Fredrik; Ramharter, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widespread zoonosis caused by the species complex Echinococcus granulosus. Albendazole (ABZ)-the first-line anthelminthic drug for medical treatment of CE-is metabolized in vivo to the active derivative ABZ-sulphoxide (ABZ-SO). Target-site ABZ-SO concentrations in the hydatid cyst mediate the anthelminthic effect in CE. Primary outcome of this systematic review of individual patient data was the intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentration stratified by cyst size, location, calcification status and use of praziquantel. Studies reporting intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations in humans were identified by a systematic search. A pooled analysis of individual patient data was performed to assess intra-cystic concentrations. Pharmacokinetic data of 121 individual cysts were analysed. There was no correlation between plasma and intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations (rho = -0.03, p = 0.76). Intra-cystic drug concentrations were also not associated with sex and treatment duration. Use of praziquantel in combination with ABZ was associated with higher plasma (median 540 vs. 240 μg/L; p = 0.04) but not intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations (median 220 vs. 199 μg/L; p = 0.36). Relative drug concentrations in hepatic cysts were higher than in other cysts (0.8 vs. 0.4; p = 0.05). Intra-cystic concentrations were higher in calcified than non-calcified cysts (median 897 vs. 245 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was a trend towards higher intra-cystic concentrations in smaller sized cysts (β = -17.2 μg/L/cm; 95th CI, -35.9 to 1.6; p = 0.07). This study demonstrates that mean intra-cystic drug concentrations are similar to plasma concentrations on a population level. However, in individual patients plasma concentrations are not directly predictive for intra-cystic concentrations. The use of booster drugs was not associated with higher intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations in this analysis.

  15. Biogeochemical Barriers: Redox Behavior of Metals and Metalloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redox conditions and pH are arguably the most important geochemical parameters that control contaminant transport and fate in groundwater systems. Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions mediate the chemical behavior of both inorganic and organic chemical constituents by affecting...

  16. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  17. Engineering redox homeostasis to develop efficient alcohol-producing microbial cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunhua; Zhao, Qiuwei; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2017-06-24

    The biosynthetic pathways of most alcohols are linked to intracellular redox homeostasis, which is crucial for life. This crucial balance is primarily controlled by the generation of reducing equivalents, as well as the (reduction)-oxidation metabolic cycle and the thiol redox homeostasis system. As a main oxidation pathway of reducing equivalents, the biosynthesis of most alcohols includes redox reactions, which are dependent on cofactors such as NADH or NADPH. Thus, when engineering alcohol-producing strains, the availability of cofactors and redox homeostasis must be considered. In this review, recent advances on the engineering of cellular redox homeostasis systems to accelerate alcohol biosynthesis are summarized. Recent approaches include improving cofactor availability, manipulating the affinity of redox enzymes to specific cofactors, as well as globally controlling redox reactions, indicating the power of these approaches, and opening a path towards improving the production of a number of different industrially-relevant alcohols in the near future.

  18. Redox Stable Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang eXiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs can convert chemical energy from the fuel directly to electrical energy with high efficiency and fuel flexibility. Ni-based cermets have been the most widely adopted anode for SOFCs. However, the conventional Ni-based anode has low tolerance to sulfur-contamination, is vulnerable to deactivation by carbon build-up (coking from direct oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels, and suffers volume instability upon redox cycling. Among these limitations, the redox instability of the anode is particularly important and has been intensively studied since the SOFC anode may experience redox cycling during fuel cell operations even with the ideal pure hydrogen as the fuel. This review aims to highlight recent progresses on improving redox stability of the conventional Ni-based anode through microstructure optimization and exploration of alternative ceramic-based anode materials.

  19. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  20. Redox processes in radiation biology and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Free-radical intermediates, particularly the activated oxygen species OH, O - 2 , and 1 O 2 , are implicated in many types of radiation damage to biological systems. In addition, these same species may be formed, either directly or indirectly through biochemical redox reactions, in both essential and aberrant metabolic processes. Cell survival and adaptation to an environment containing ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical carcinogens ultimately depend upon the cell's ability to maintain optimal function in response to free-radical damage at the chemical level. Many of these feedback control mechanisms are redox controlled. Radiation chemical techniques using selective radical scavengers, such as product analysis and pulse radiolysis, enable us to generate, observe, and characterize individually the nature and reactivity of potentially damaging free radicals. From an analysis of the chemical kinetics of free-radical involvement in biological damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, its protection and sensitization, and the role of free radicals in radiation and chemical carcinogenesis

  1. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylati......Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S......-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here...... is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original...

  2. Development of redox stable, multifunctional substrates for anode supported SOFCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Ramos, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Redox stable solid oxide fuel cells are beneficial in many aspects such as tolerance against system failures e.g fuel cut off and emergency shut down, but also allow for higher fuel utilization, which increases efficiency. State-ofthe-art Ni-cermet based anodes suffer from microstructural changes...... with a multifunctional anode support, the development of a two layer fuel electrode based on a redox stable strontium titanate layer for the electrochemically active layer and a redox stable Ni-YSZ support was pursued. Half-cells with well adhearing strontium titante anode layers on stateof-the-art Ni-YSZ cermet...... supports have been achieved. Redox tolerance of the half-cell depends could be increased by optimizing the redox stability of the cermet support....

  3. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  4. Battery Relevant Electrochemistry of Ag7Fe3(P2O7)4 : Contrasting Contributions from the Redox Chemistries of Ag+ and Fe3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yiman; Marschilok, Amy C.; Stony Brook University, NY; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    2016-01-01

    Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 is an example of an electrochemical displacement material which contains two different electrochemically active metal cations, where one cation (Ag + ) forms metallic silver nanoparticles external to the crystals of Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 via an electrochemical reduction displacement reaction, while the other cation (Fe +3 ) is electrochemically reduced with the retention of iron cations within the anion structural framework concomitant with lithium insertion. These contrasting redox chemistries within one pure cathode material enable high rate capability and reversibility when Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 is employed as cathode material in a lithium ion battery (LIB). Further, pyrophosphate materials are thermally and electrically stable, desirable attributes for cathode materials in LIBs. In this article, a bimetallic pyrophosphate material Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 is synthesized and confirmed to be a single phase by Rietveld refinement. Electrochemistry of Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 is reported for the first time in the context of lithium based batteries using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic discharge–charge cycling. The reduction displacement reaction and the lithium (de)insertion processes are investigated using ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of electrochemically reduced and oxidized Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 . Ag 7 Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 4 exhibits good reversibility at the iron centers indicated by ~80% capacity retention over 100 cycles following the initial formation cycle and excellent rate capability exhibited by ~70% capacity retention upon a 4-fold increase in current.

  5. Quantitative redox imaging biomarkers for studying tissue metabolic state and its heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He N. Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available NAD+/NADH redox state has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer and diabetes as well as in the regulation of embryonic development and aging. To fluorimetrically assess the mitochondrial redox state, Dr. Chance and co-workers measured the fluorescence of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including flavin–adenine–dinucleotide (FAD and demonstrated their ratio (i.e. the redox ratio is a sensitive indicator of the mitochondrial redox states. The Chance redox scanner was built to simultaneously measure NADH and Fp in tissue at submillimeter scale in 3D using the freeze-trap protocol. This paper summarizes our recent research experience, development and new applications of the redox scanning technique in collaboration with Dr. Chance beginning in 2005. Dr. Chance initiated or actively involved in many of the projects during the last several years of his life. We advanced the redox scanning technique by measuring the nominal concentrations (in reference to the frozen solution standards of the endogenous fluorescent analytes, i.e., [NADH] and [Fp] to quantify the redox ratios in various biological tissues. The advancement has enabled us to identify an array of the redox indices as quantitative imaging biomarkers (including [NADH], [Fp], [Fp]/([NADH]+[Fp], [NADH]/[Fp], and their standard deviations for studying some important biological questions on cancer and normal tissue metabolism. We found that the redox indices were associated or changed with (1 tumorigenesis (cancer versus non-cancer of human breast tissue biopsies; (2 tumor metastatic potential; (3 tumor glucose uptake; (4 tumor p53 status; (5 PI3K pathway activation in pre-malignant tissue; (6 therapeutic effects on tumors; (7 embryonic stem cell differentiation; (8 the heart under fasting. Together, our work demonstrated that the tissue redox indices obtained from the redox scanning technique may provide useful information about tissue metabolism and physiology status in normal

  6. Characterization of Redox properties of humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of humic materials is the presence of stable free radicals as shown by the width of 1 H-NMR lines of humic acid in solution as well as ESR spectra of solid samples. Presumably, these are due to quinohdrone functional groups in the humic structure. These free radicals are assumed to be a source of the redox effects of humics in metal cations. Phenolic groups have also been proposed as a source of reduction potential in these substances. The reduction potential of humic material is 0.5-0.7 V (vs. the normal hydrogen electrode). In addition to this inherent redox property, humics undergo photolysis by sunlight in surface waters which results in the production of hydrogen peroxide. The latter can also result in redox reactions with metal cations. Such direct and indirect redox capability can have significant effects on the migration of reducible cations. Studies of the reduction of hexavalent actinide cations by humic acid showed the reactions Np O 2 2+ -> Np O 2 + (E 1/2 0 = 1.47 V) and Pu O 2 2+ -> Pu +4 (E 1/2 0 = 1.04 V) while U O 2 2+ was not reduced. The reduction of plutonium in sea water by humics is discussed. Evidence of the effects of redox by humic material on metal cations in natural waters and sediments are also reviewed. (authors). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Cost-driven materials selection criteria for redox flow battery electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmello, Rylan; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Smith, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Redox flow batteries show promise for grid-scale energy storage applications but are presently too expensive for widespread adoption. Electrolyte material costs constitute a sizeable fraction of the redox flow battery price. As such, this work develops a techno-economic model for redox flow batteries that accounts for redox-active material, salt, and solvent contributions to the electrolyte cost. Benchmark values for electrolyte constituent costs guide identification of design constraints. Nonaqueous battery design is sensitive to all electrolyte component costs, cell voltage, and area-specific resistance. Design challenges for nonaqueous batteries include minimizing salt content and dropping redox-active species concentration requirements. Aqueous battery design is sensitive to only redox-active material cost and cell voltage, due to low area-specific resistance and supporting electrolyte costs. Increasing cell voltage and decreasing redox-active material cost present major materials selection challenges for aqueous batteries. This work minimizes cost-constraining variables by mapping the battery design space with the techno-economic model, through which we highlight pathways towards low price and moderate concentration. Furthermore, the techno-economic model calculates quantitative iterations of battery designs to achieve the Department of Energy battery price target of 100 per kWh and highlights cost cutting strategies to drive battery prices down further.

  8. Solar chemistry / hydrogen - Summary report on the research programme 2002; Forschungsprogramm Solarchemie / Wasserstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This summary report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) on the solar chemistry / hydrogen research programme presents an overview of work done in these fields in Switzerland in 2002. It includes an overview of work done on 12 research and development projects and 9 pilot and demonstration projects. The volume is completed with a selection of 13 annual reports on particular topics, including transformation and storage of energy by photo-chemical, photo-electrochemical and photovoltaic means, generation of hydrogen using water splitting, solar production of zinc and calcium, catalytic synthesis, redox processes for the production of hydrogen and compressed air as a means of storing energy. Also covered are the topics of how solar chemistry can help reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and the management of the International Energy Agency's hydrogen annex 14. Further reports look at the destabilisation of metal hydride compounds, materials for sustainable energy technologies and diffusion barriers for high-pressure hydrogen tanks.

  9. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Metcalfe, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Murakami, Y.; Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure

  10. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, H. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: dora@num.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Metcalfe, R. [Quintessa Japan, Queen' s Tower A7-707, Minatomirai, Yokohama 220-6007 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Murakami, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tono Geoscience Centre (Japan); Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T. [Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-4-4 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Asahi University, Department of Dental Pharmacology, Hozumi, Gifu (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure.

  11. Redox-induced reversible luminescence switching of cerium-doped upconversion nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanan [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xiao, Qingbo, E-mail: qbxiao2011@sinano.ac.cn [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jian [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xi, Yonglan [Laboratory for Agricultural Wastes Treatment and Recycling Institute of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Science, Nanjing 210014 (China); Li, Fujin [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Feng, Yamin [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Shi, Liyi [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lin, Hongzhen, E-mail: hzlin2010@sinano.ac.cn [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Smart upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) that can be reversibly switched between two or more luminescent states by certain external stimuli have attracted considerable attention due to their great potential in biological applications. Here we report for the first time a type of redox-switchable UCNPs by codoping NaGdF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanorods with the redox-active Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ion pairs. A reversible switching of their UC luminescence intensity was observed upon the variation of the surrounding redox environments. We show solid proof that the luminescence switching is caused by the tailoring of the NaGdF{sub 4} host crystal structure in response to changing redox state of the codoped cerium ions. A proof-of-concept example is further demonstrated by using these UCNPs for probing the dynamical variation of redox environments in biological tissues. - Highlights: • Synthesis of upconversion nanoparticles doped with Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ions. • The precise and reversible modification of crystal structure by redox reactions. • Tuning the upconversion luminescence by tailoring the crystal structure.

  12. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, V.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  13. The effects of surface modification on carbon felt electrodes for use in vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Young-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Min-Sik

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We observed the physical and chemical changes on the surface of carbon felts after various surface modifications. ► The surface area and chemistry of functional groups formed on the surface of carbon felt are critical to determine the kinetics of the redox reactions of vanadium ions. ► By incorporation of the surface modifications into the electrode preparation, the electrochemical activity of carbon felts could be notably enhanced. - Abstract: The surface of carbon felt electrodes has been modified for improving energy efficiency of vanadium redox flow batteries. For comparative purposes, the effects of various surface modifications such as mild oxidation, plasma treatment, and gamma-ray irradiation on the electrochemical properties of carbon felt electrodes were investigated at optimized conditions. The cell energy efficiency was improved from 68 to 75% after the mild oxidation of the carbon felt at 500 °C for 5 h. This efficiency improvement could be attributed to the increased surface area of the carbon felt electrode and the formation of functional groups on its surface as a result of the modification. On the basis of various structural and electrochemical characterizations, a relationship between the surface nature and electrochemical activity of the carbon felt electrodes is discussed.

  14. Le reazioni redox: un pasticcio concettuale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ghibaudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Le reazioni di ossidoriduzione costituiscono un argomento centrale di qualsiasi corso di base di chimica, sia a livello scolastico che universitario. Il loro apprendimento comporta il superamento di svariati ostacoli concettuali, la cui difficoltà può risultare amplificata da prassi didattiche inadeguate. Gli errori più ricorrenti nel presentare l’argomento sono di due tipi: i fare implicitamente riferimento a modelli esplicativi distinti (es. il numero di ossidazione e il trasferimento elettronico, senza esplicitarli e senza evidenziarne la differente natura e il campo di validità; ii confondere il livello della spiegazione formale con quello della realtà fisica. I fenomeni redox sono normalmente interpretati sulla base di tre distinti modelli empirici, che fanno riferimento al trasferimento di atomi di ossigeno, di atomi di idrogeno, di elettroni; e di un quarto modello, formale, fondato sul cambiamento del numero di ossidazione. La confusione tra questi modelli può generare considerevoli problemi di apprendimento. Il presente lavoro riporta un’analisi critica delle implicazioni concettuali della didattica dei processi redox. L’analisi è articolata in tre sezioni: i disamina della evoluzione storica del concetto di ossidoriduzione; ii analisi dei modelli redox e del loro campo di validità; iii discussione di alcuni aspetti epistemologici inerenti i processi redox che sono rilevanti per la didattica della chimica.

  15. Generalized kinetic model of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to kinetics of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox. Constructed generalized kinetic model of redox process in the system solid redox - reagent solution allows to perform the general theoretical approach to research and to obtain new results on kinetics and mechanism of interaction of redox with oxidants.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of redox-active ferric nontronite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, A. G.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Dunphy, D. R.; Artyushkova, K.; Cerrato, J. M.; Kruichak, J. N.; Janish, M. T.; Sun, C. J.; Argo, J. M.; Washington, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous redox reactions on clay mineral surfaces control mobility and bioavailability of redox-sensitive nutrients and contaminants. Iron (Fe) residing in clay mineral structures can either catalyze or directly participate in redox reactions; however, chemical controls over its reactivity are not fully understood. In our previous work we demonstrated that converting a minor portion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) (partial reduction) in the octahedral sheet of natural Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite (NAu-1) activates its surface, making it redox-active. In this study we produced and characterized synthetic ferric nontronite (SIP), highlighting structural and chemical similarities and differences between this synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart NAu-1, and probed whether mineral surface is redox-active by reacting it with arsenic As(III) under oxic and anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that synthetic nontronite SIP undergoes the same activation as natural nontronite NAu-1 following the partial reduction treatment. Similar to NAu-1, SIP oxidized As(III) to As(V) under both oxic (catalytic pathway) and anoxic (direct oxidation) conditions. The similar reactivity trends observed for synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart make SIP an appropriate analog for laboratory studies. The development of chemically pure analogs for ubiquitous soil minerals will allow for systematic research of the fundamental properties of these minerals.

  17. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  18. The Development of the Redox Concept Inventory as a Measure of Students' Symbolic and Particulate Redox Understandings and Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandriet, Alexandra R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Redox Concept Inventory (ROXCI) as a measure of students' understandings and confidence of both the symbolic and particulate domains of oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions. The ROXCI was created using a mixed-methods design in which the items were developed based upon themes that emerged from…

  19. Effect of reducing groundwater on the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose TP

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laboratory batch sorption experiments were used to investigate variations in the retardation behavior of redox-sensitive radionuclides. Water-rock compositions were designed to simulate subsurface conditions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS, where a suite of radionuclides were deposited as a result of underground nuclear testing. Experimental redox conditions were controlled by varying the oxygen content inside an enclosed glove box and by adding reductants into the testing solutions. Under atmospheric (oxidizing conditions, radionuclide distribution coefficients varied with the mineralogic composition of the sorbent and the water chemistry. Under reducing conditions, distribution coefficients showed marked increases for 99Tc (from 1.22 at oxidizing to 378 mL/g at mildly reducing conditions and 237Np (an increase from 4.6 to 930 mL/g in devitrified tuff, but much smaller variations in alluvium, carbonate rock, and zeolitic tuff. This effect was particularly important for 99Tc, which tends to be mobile under oxidizing conditions. A review of the literature suggests that iodine sorption should decrease under reducing conditions when I- is the predominant species; this was not consistently observed in batch tests. Overall, sorption of U to alluvium, devitrified tuff, and zeolitic tuff under atmospheric conditions was less than in the glove-box tests. However, the mildly reducing conditions achieved here were not likely to result in substantial U(VI reduction to U(IV. Sorption of Pu was not affected by the decreasing Eh conditions achieved in this study, as the predominant sorbed Pu species in all conditions was expected to be the low-solubility and strongly sorbing Pu(OH4. Depending on the aquifer lithology, the occurrence of reducing conditions along a groundwater flowpath could potentially contribute to the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides 99Tc and 237Np, which are commonly identified as long-term dose contributors in the risk

  20. Redox homeostasis: the linchpin in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Qiang; Nice, Edouard Collins; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-03-14

    Stem cells are characterized by their unique ability of self-renewal to maintain the so-called stem cell pool. Over the past decades, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as toxic aerobic metabolism byproducts that are harmful to stem cells, leading to DNA damage, senescence or cell death. Recently, a growing body of literature has shown that stem cells reside in redox niches with low ROS levels. The balance of Redox homeostasis facilitates stem cell self-renewal by an intricate network. Thus, to fully decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of stem cell self-renewal, it is critical to address the important role of redox homeostasis in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In this regard, we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in the subtly orchestrated balance of redox status in stem cells by scavenger antioxidant enzyme systems that are well monitored by the hypoxia niches and crucial redox regulators including forkhead homeobox type O family (FoxOs), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1), nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We will also introduce several pivotal ROS-sensitive molecules, such as hypoxia-inducible factors, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and p53, involved in the redox-regulated stem cell self-renewal. Specifically, all the aforementioned molecules can act as 'redox sensors' by virtue of redox modifications of their cysteine residues, which are critically important in the control of protein function. Given the importance of redox homeostasis in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved will provide important new insights into stem cell biology.

  1. Are bioassays useful tools to assess redox processes and biodegradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Ludvigsen, L.

    2002-01-01

    sensitive hydrochemical or geochemical parameters, levels of hydrogen, and redox potential. However, all these approaches have to be evaluated against TEAP-bioassays as the most direct measure. We assessed successfully ongoing microbial-mediated redox processes by TEAP-bioassays in degradation studies...... of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic compounds in landfill leachate plumes, and of pesticides in aquifers with various redox conditions....

  2. Quantitative HPLC-ICP-MS analysis of antimony redox speciation in complex sample matrices: new insights into the Sb-chemistry causing poor chromatographic recoveries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus; Schmidt, Bjørn; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2011-01-01

    In solution antimony exists either in the pentavalent or trivalent oxidation state. As Sb(III) is more toxic than Sb(V), it is important to be able to perform a quantitative speciation analysis of Sb’s oxidation state. The most commonly applied chromatographic methods used for this redox speciation...

  3. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  4. Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation using quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation via quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status Chandler KJ,Hansen JM, Knudsen T,and Hunter ES 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  5. Redox processes at a nanostructured interface under strong electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Wolfram; Surnev, Svetlozar; Netzer, Falko P; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R; Barcaro, Giovanni; Durante, Nicola; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2014-09-21

    Manipulation of chemistry and film growth via external electric fields is a longstanding goal in surface science. Numerous systems have been predicted to show such effects but experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate in a custom-designed UHV apparatus that the application of spatially extended, homogeneous, very high (>1 V nm(-1)) DC-fields not only changes the system energetics but triggers dynamic processes which become important much before static contributions appreciably modify the potential energy landscape. We take a well characterized ultrathin NiO film on a Ag(100) support as a proof-of-principle test case, and show how it gets reduced to supported Ni clusters under fields exceeding the threshold of +0.9 V nm(-1). Using an effective model, we trace the observed interfacial redox process down to a dissociative electron attachment resonant mechanism. The proposed approach can be easily implemented and generally applied to a wide range of interfacial systems, thus opening new opportunities for the manipulation of film growth and reaction processes at solid surfaces under strong external fields.

  6. Reduction of Tc(VII) and Np(V) in solution by ferrous iron. A laboratory study of homogeneous and heterogeneous redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.E.

    1996-03-01

    The redox chemistry of Technetium and Neptunium in deep groundwater systems has been studied under well controlled conditions in laboratory experiments. The measured redox potentials in anoxic deep groundwater systems are consistent with redox reactions between Fe(II) in solution and hydrous Fe(III)-oxide phases. The fracture filling material and groundwater in transmissive fractures in bedrock constitute two different compartments in the groundwater system and experiments were therefore carried out in homogeneous Fe(II) containing solutions and in heterogeneous mixtures of solution with Fe(II) containing solid mineral phases. Reduction of the strongly sorbing neptunyl cation (NpO 2 + ) and the slightly sorbing pertechnetate anion (TcO 4 - ) by Fe(II) in solution was found to proceed very slowly, if at all, in reaction vessels with hydrophobic inner surfaces. However, in the heterogeneous systems we observed surface mediated reduction to the slightly soluble ( -8 mol*dm -3 ) tetravalent (hydr)oxides TcO 2 *nH 2 O (=Tc(OH) 4 ) and NpO 2 *nH 2 O (=Np(OH) 4 ) by Fe(II) sorbed on quartz,precipitated Fe(OH) 2 (s), Fe(II)CO 3 (s) and Fe(II) bearing minerals such as magnetite, hornblende and Fe(II)-chlorite. It is concluded that surface mediated redox-reactions will be the most effective pathway for the reduction of Tc(VII) and Np(V) in deep groundwater systems. On exposure of the surface-precipitated tetravalent (hydr)oxides to air saturated groundwater solutions the oxidative dissolution was found to be a very slow process and high concentration of hydrogen peroxide was required for oxidative dissolution. The slow rate of oxidative dissolution is most probably due to kinetic suppression of the reactions between dissolved oxygen and the precipitated (hydr)oxides. The kinetic suppression is caused by competing redox reactions at the surface of the Fe(II)-bearing minerals which consumes the dissolved oxygen. 30 refs, 22 figs

  7. Reduction of Tc(VII) and Np(V) in solution by ferrous iron. A laboratory study of homogeneous and heterogeneous redox processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.E. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-03-01

    The redox chemistry of Technetium and Neptunium in deep groundwater systems has been studied under well controlled conditions in laboratory experiments. The measured redox potentials in anoxic deep groundwater systems are consistent with redox reactions between Fe(II) in solution and hydrous Fe(III)-oxide phases. The fracture filling material and groundwater in transmissive fractures in bedrock constitute two different compartments in the groundwater system and experiments were therefore carried out in homogeneous Fe(II) containing solutions and in heterogeneous mixtures of solution with Fe(II) containing solid mineral phases. Reduction of the strongly sorbing neptunyl cation (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) and the slightly sorbing pertechnetate anion (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) by Fe(II) in solution was found to proceed very slowly, if at all, in reaction vessels with hydrophobic inner surfaces. However, in the heterogeneous systems we observed surface mediated reduction to the slightly soluble (<10{sub -8} mol*dm{sup -3}) tetravalent (hydr)oxides TcO{sub 2}*nH{sub 2}O (=Tc(OH){sub 4}) and NpO{sub 2}*nH{sub 2}O (=Np(OH){sub 4}) by Fe(II) sorbed on quartz,precipitated Fe(OH){sub 2}(s), Fe(II)CO{sub 3}(s) and Fe(II) bearing minerals such as magnetite, hornblende and Fe(II)-chlorite. It is concluded that surface mediated redox-reactions will be the most effective pathway for the reduction of Tc(VII) and Np(V) in deep groundwater systems. On exposure of the surface-precipitated tetravalent (hydr)oxides to air saturated groundwater solutions the oxidative dissolution was found to be a very slow process and high concentration of hydrogen peroxide was required for oxidative dissolution. The slow rate of oxidative dissolution is most probably due to kinetic suppression of the reactions between dissolved oxygen and the precipitated (hydr)oxides. The kinetic suppression is caused by competing redox reactions at the surface of the Fe(II)-bearing minerals which consumes the dissolved oxygen.

  8. Superposed Redox Chemistry of Fused Carbon Rings in Cyclooctatetraene-Based Organic Molecules for High-Voltage and High-Capacity Cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaolin; Qiu, Wujie; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Yingqin; Wang, Kaixue; Zhang, Wenqing; Kang, Litao; Liu, Jianjun

    2018-01-24

    Even though many organic cathodes have been developed and have made a significant improvement in energy density and reversibility, some organic materials always generate relatively low voltage and limited discharge capacity because their energy storage mechanism is solely based on redox reactions of limited functional groups [N-O, C═X (X = O, N, S)] linking to aromatic rings. Here, a series of cyclooctatetraene-based (C 8 H 8 ) organic molecules were demonstrated to have electrochemical activity of high-capacity and high-voltage from carbon rings by means of first-principles calculations and electronic structure analysis. Fused molecules of C 8 -C 4 -C 8 (C 16 H 12 ) and C 8 -C 4 -C 8 -C 4 -C 8 (C 24 H 16 ) contain, respectively, four and eight electron-deficient carbons, generating high-capacity by their multiple redox reactions. Our sodiation calculations predict that C 16 H 12 and C 24 H 16 exhibit discharge capacities of 525.3 and 357.2 mA h g -1 at the voltage change from 3.5 to 1.0 V and 3.7 to 1.3 V versus Na + /Na, respectively. Electronic structure analysis reveals that the high voltages are attributed to superposed electron stabilization mechanisms, including double-bond reformation and aromatization from carbon rings. High thermodynamic stability of these C 24 H 16 -based systems strongly suggests feasibility of experimental realization. The present work provides evidence that cyclooctatetraene-based organic molecules fused with the C 4 ring are promising in designing high-capacity and high-voltage organic rechargeable cathodes.

  9. High-energy redox-flow batteries with hybrid metal foam electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Sik; Lee, Nam-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wook; Kim, Ki Jae; Oh, Duk-Jin; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-07-09

    A nonaqueous redox-flow battery employing [Co(bpy)3](+/2+) and [Fe(bpy)3](2+/3+) redox couples is proposed for use in large-scale energy-storage applications. We successfully demonstrate a redox-flow battery with a practical operating voltage of over 2.1 V and an energy efficiency of 85% through a rational cell design. By utilizing carbon-coated Ni-FeCrAl and Cu metal foam electrodes, the electrochemical reactivity and stability of the nonaqueous redox-flow battery can be considerably enhanced. Our approach intoduces a more efficient conversion of chemical energy into electrical energy and enhances long-term cell durability. The cell exhibits an outstanding cyclic performance of more than 300 cycles without any significant loss of energy efficiency. Considering the increasing demands for efficient energy storage, our achievement provides insight into a possible development pathway for nonaqueous redox-flow batteries with high energy densities.

  10. Redox non-innocent ligands: versatile new tools to control catalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyaskovskyy, V.; de Bruin, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this (tutorial overview) perspective we highlight the use of "redox non-innocent" ligands in catalysis. Two main types of reactivity in which the redox non-innocent ligand is involved can be specified: (A) The redox active ligand participates in the catalytic cycle only by accepting/donating

  11. Investigating the Intercalation Chemistry of Alkali Ions in Fluoride Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Tanghong; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Lei; Bayliss, Ryan D.; Lin, Feng; Plews, Michael R.; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M.; Persson, Kristin A.; Cabana, Jordi (LBNL); (SLAC); (UIC); (UCB)

    2017-02-07

    Reversible intercalation reactions provide the basis for modern battery electrodes. Despite decades of exploration of electrode materials, the potential for materials in the nonoxide chemical space with regards to intercalation chemistry is vast and rather untested. Transition metal fluorides stand out as an obvious target. To this end, we report herein a new family of iron fluoride-based perovskite cathode materials AxK1–xFeF3 (A = Li, Na). By starting with KFeF3, approximately 75% of K+ ions were subsequently replaced by Li+ and Na+ through electrochemical means. X-ray diffraction and Fe X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the existence of intercalation of alkali metal ions in the perovskite structure, which is associated with the Fe2+/3+ redox couple. A computational study by density functional theory showed agreement with the structural and electrochemical data obtained experimentally, which suggested the possibility of fluoride-based materials as potential intercalation electrodes. This study increases our understanding of the intercalation chemistry of ternary fluorides, which could inform efforts toward the exploration of new electrode materials.

  12. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  13. Hourly and daily variation of sediment redox potential in tidal wetland sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, W. James

    1999-01-01

    Variation of electrochemical oxidation-reduction (redox) potential was examined in surface salt march sediments under conditions of flooding and tidal simulation in mesocosms and field sites. Time series were generated of redox potential measured in sediment profiles at 2-10 cm depth using combination Pt-Ag/AgCl (ORP) electrodes. Redox potential data were acquired at rapid rates (1-55 samples/h) over extended periods (3-104 days) along with similar times series of temperature (water, air, soil) and pH. It was found that redox potential vaired as a result of water level changes and was unrelated to diurnal changes in temperature or pH, the latter of which changed by 370 mV redox potential decrease in under 48 hours). Attenuatoin of microbial activity by [gamma] y-radiation and toxic chemicals elimintated this response. In tidal salt marsh mesocosms where the sediment-plant assemblages were exposed to a simulated diurnal tide, redox potenial oscillations of 40-300 mV amplitude were recoded that has the same periodicity as the flood-drain cycle. Periodic redoc potential time series were observed repeatedly in sediments receiving tidal pulsing but not in those sediments exposed to static hydrological conditions. Data collected over 12 days from a coastal marsh site experiencing diurnal tides showed similar fluctuations in redox potential. Data from the experimentents indicated that (a) redox potential can be a dynamic, nonlinear variable in coastal and estuarine wetland sediments over hourly and daily scales, and the designs of biogeochemical experiments should reflect this, (b) redox potential can change rapidly and signigicantly in coastal wetland sediments in response of flooding and draining, (c) microbial community processes are primarily determinants of the time course of redox potential in wetland sediments, and elimination of inhibition of microbial activity (e.g. by pollutants) can significantly alter that behavior, and (d) fast redox potential dynamics appear

  14. Magnetic susceptibility of Variscan granite-types of the Spanish Central System and the redox state of magma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaseca, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, V.C.; Pérez-Soba, C.

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) has been measured in Variscan granites from central Spain. They yield values in the order of 15 to 180μSI units for S- and I-type granites, indicating that both types belong to the ilmenite series. Only samples from magnetite-bearing leucogranites from the I-type La Pedriza massif show high MS values, in the order of 500-1400μSI, reflecting the presence of this ferromagnetic mineral. Mineral chemistry of magmatic Fe-rich minerals (mainly biotite) suggests similar oxidation values for both granite types. MS values change in highly fractionated granites accordingly either with the presence of rare new Fe-oxide phases (some I-type leucogranites) or with the marked modal amount decrease of Fe-rich minerals (I- and S-type leucogranites). The redox state in highly fractionated granite melts is mostly controlled by magmatic processes that modify redox conditions inherited from the source region. Thus, the occurrence of magnetite or ilmenite in granites is primarily controlled by the oxidation state of the source material but also by the differentiation degree of the granite melt. The presence of magnetite in some Variscan I-type leucogranites might be a consequence of crystal fractionation processes in a more limited mafic mineral assemblage than in S-type granite melts.

  15. On-line water chemistry monitoring for corrosion prevention in ageing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Jaernstroem, R.; Kvarnstroem, R.; Chanfreau, E.

    1991-01-01

    General corrosion and consequently radiation buildup in nuclear power plants are controlled by the selection of material and the chemical environment. In power plants useful information concerning the kinetics of chemical reactions can be obtained by using high temperature, high pressure measurements for pH, conductivity and electrochemical potentials (ECP) of construction materials or redox-potential. The rates of general or uniform corrosion of materials in contact with the primary coolant are quite low and do not compromise the integrity of the primary circuit. Chemistry control should be applied in the first hand to minimize the dissolution and the transport and subsequent deposition of activated corrosion products to out-of-core regions. A computerized monitoring system for high temperature high pressure pH and electrochemical potential (ECP) has been in continuous use at the Loviisa power plant since 1988. Special emphasis has been put on learning the effect of pH and ECP control during cooldown process in order to further reduce background radiation buildup. During the shutdown for refueling outage in summer 1989 the high temperature water chemistry parameters were monitored. In addition to the high temperature water chemistry parameters concentrations of dissolved corrosion products as well as the activities of the corrosion products were measured. In this paper the results obtained through simultaneous monitoring of water chemistry parameters and concentrations of dissolved corrosion products as well as the activity measurements are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Optical imaging the redox status change during cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ting; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Luo, Qingming

    2007-02-01

    Many cellular events involve the alteration in redox equilibrium, globally or locally. In many cases, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is the underlying cause. Several green fluoresecence protein based indicators are constructed to measure redox status in cells, e.g, rxYFP and roGFPs, which allow real time detection. reduction and oxidization-sensitive GFP (RoGFPs) are more useful due to ratiometric variation by excitation, making the measurement more accurate. Utilizing one of those roGFPs called roGFP1, we establish a mitochondrial redox state probing platform in HeLa cells with laser scan confocal microscopy (LSCM) as detection system. Control experiments confirmed that our platform could produce stable ratiometric values, which made the data more accurately reflect the real environmental changes of redox status that roGFP1 probed. Using exogenous H IIO II and DTT, we evaluated the reactivity and reversibility of roGFP1. The minimal hydrogen peroxide concentration that roGFP1 could show detectable ratiometric changes in our system was about 200μM. Preliminarily applying our platform to exploring the redox status during apoptosis, we observed an increase in ratiometric, suggesting an excessive ROS production.

  17. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Yamato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity.

  18. Electron Transfer Reactivity Patterns at Chemically Modified Electrodes: Fundamentals and Application to the Optimization of Redox Recycling Amplification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergren, Adam Johan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Electroanalytical chemistry is often utilized in chemical analysis and Fundamental studies. Important advances have been made in these areas since the advent of chemically modified electrodes: the coating of an electrode with a chemical film in order to impart desirable, and ideally, predictable properties. These procedures enable the exploitation of unique reactivity patterns. This dissertation presents studies that investigate novel reaction mechanisms at self-assembled monolayers on gold. In particular, a unique electrochemical current amplification scheme is detailed that relies on a selective electrode to enable a reactivity pattern that results in regeneration of the analyte (redox recycling). This regenerating reaction can occur up to 250 times for each analyte molecule, leading to a notable enhancement in the observed current. The requirements of electrode selectivity and the resulting amplification and detection limit improvements are described with respect to the heterogeneous and homogeneous electron transfer rates that characterize the system. These studies revealed that the heterogeneous electrolysis of the analyte should ideally be electrochemically reversible, while that for the regenerating agent should be held to a low level. Moreover, the homogeneous reaction that recycles the analyte should occur at a rapid rate. The physical selectivity mechanism is also detailed with respect to the properties of the electrode and redox probes utilized. It is shown that partitioning of the analyte into/onto the adlayer leads to the extraordinary selectivity of the alkanethiolate monolayer modified electrode. Collectively, these studies enable a thorough understanding of the complex electrode mechanism required for successful redox recycling amplification systems, Finally, in a separate (but related) study, the effect of the akyl chain length on the heterogeneous electron transfer behavior of solution-based redox probes is reported, where an odd-even oscillation

  19. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  20. Techno-Economic Modeling and Analysis of Redox Flow Battery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Noack

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A techno-economic model was developed to investigate the influence of components on the system costs of redox flow batteries. Sensitivity analyses were carried out based on an example of a 10 kW/120 kWh vanadium redox flow battery system, and the costs of the individual components were analyzed. Particular consideration was given to the influence of the material costs and resistances of bipolar plates and energy storage media as well as voltages and electric currents. Based on the developed model, it was possible to formulate statements about the targeted optimization of a developed non-commercial vanadium redox flow battery system and general aspects for future developments of redox flow batteries.

  1. Evaluation of electrolytes for redox flow battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, M.H.; Dryfe, R.A.W.; Roberts, E.P.L.

    2007-01-01

    A number of redox systems have been investigated in this work with the aim of identifying electrolytes suitable for testing redox flow battery cell designs. The criteria for the selection of suitable systems were fast electrochemical kinetics and minimal cross-contamination of active electrolytes. Possible electrolyte systems were initially selected based on cyclic voltammetry data. Selected systems were then compared by charge/discharge experiments using a simple H-type cell. The all-vanadium electrolyte system has been developed as a commercial system and was used as the starting point in this study. The performance of the all-vanadium system was significantly better than an all-chromium system which has recently been reported. Some metal-organic and organic redox systems have been reported as possible systems for redox flow batteries, with cyclic voltammetry data suggesting that they could offer near reversible kinetics. However, Ru(acac) 3 in acetonitrile could only be charged efficiently to 9.5% of theoretical charge, after which irreversible side reactions occurred and [Fe(bpy) 3 ](ClO 4 ) 2 in acetonitrile was found to exhibit poor charge/discharge performance

  2. A Membrane‐Free Redox Flow Battery with Two Immiscible Redox Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalpotro, Paula; Palma, Jesus; Anderson, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Flexible and scalable energy storage solutions are necessary for mitigating fluctuations of renewable energy sources. The main advantage of redox flow batteries is their ability to decouple power and energy. However, they present some limitations including poor performance, short‐lifetimes, and expensive ion‐selective membranes as well as high price, toxicity, and scarcity of vanadium compounds. We report a membrane‐free battery that relies on the immiscibility of redox electrolytes and where vanadium is replaced by organic molecules. We show that the biphasic system formed by one acidic solution and one ionic liquid, both containing quinoyl species, behaves as a reversible battery without any membrane. This proof‐of‐concept of a membrane‐free battery has an open circuit voltage of 1.4 V with a high theoretical energy density of 22.5 Wh L−1, and is able to deliver 90 % of its theoretical capacity while showing excellent long‐term performance (coulombic efficiency of 100 % and energy efficiency of 70 %). PMID:28658538

  3. A Membrane-Free Redox Flow Battery with Two Immiscible Redox Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalpotro, Paula; Palma, Jesus; Anderson, Marc; Marcilla, Rebeca

    2017-10-02

    Flexible and scalable energy storage solutions are necessary for mitigating fluctuations of renewable energy sources. The main advantage of redox flow batteries is their ability to decouple power and energy. However, they present some limitations including poor performance, short-lifetimes, and expensive ion-selective membranes as well as high price, toxicity, and scarcity of vanadium compounds. We report a membrane-free battery that relies on the immiscibility of redox electrolytes and where vanadium is replaced by organic molecules. We show that the biphasic system formed by one acidic solution and one ionic liquid, both containing quinoyl species, behaves as a reversible battery without any membrane. This proof-of-concept of a membrane-free battery has an open circuit voltage of 1.4 V with a high theoretical energy density of 22.5 Wh L -1 , and is able to deliver 90 % of its theoretical capacity while showing excellent long-term performance (coulombic efficiency of 100 % and energy efficiency of 70 %). © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Investigation of some biologically relevant redox reactions using electrochemical mass spectrometry interfaced by desorption electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mei; Wolff, Chloe; Cui, Weidong; Chen, Hao

    2012-04-01

    Recently we have shown that, as a versatile ionization technique, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) can serve as a useful interface to combine electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, the EC/DESI-MS method has been further applied to investigate some aqueous phase redox reactions of biological significance, including the reduction of peptide disulfide bonds and nitroaromatics as well as the oxidation of phenothiazines. It was found that knotted/enclosed disulfide bonds in the peptides apamin and endothelin could be electrochemically cleaved. Subsequent tandem MS analysis of the resulting reduced peptide ions using collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-capture dissociation (ECD) gave rise to extensive fragment ions, providing a fast protocol for sequencing peptides with complicated disulfide bond linkages. Flunitrazepam and clonazepam, a class of nitroaromatic drugs, are known to undergo reduction into amines which was proposed to involve nitroso and N-hydroxyl intermediates. Now in this study, these corresponding intermediate ions were successfully intercepted and their structures were confirmed by CID. This provides mass spectrometric evidence for the mechanism of the nitro to amine conversion process during nitroreduction, an important redox reaction involved in carcinogenesis. In addition, the well-known oxidation reaction of chlorpromazine was also examined. The putative transient one-electron transfer product, the chlorpromazine radical cation (m/z 318), was captured by MS, for the first time, and its structure was also verified by CID. In addition to these observations, some features of the DESI-interfaced electrochemical mass spectrometry were discussed, such as simple instrumentation and the lack of background signal. These results further demonstrate the feasibility of EC/DESI-MS for the study of the biology-relevant redox chemistry and would find applications in proteomics and drug development research.

  5. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M.; Halloran, Mark A.; Soo, Kai Y.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS. PMID:23533690

  6. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, Sudeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. ► But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. ► Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. ► Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. ► Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding – (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b 5 in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  7. Accelerated redox reaction between chromate and phenolic pollutants during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jinjung; Kim, Jaesung; Vetráková, Ľubica; Seo, Jiwon; Heger, Dominik; Lee, Changha; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-05-05

    The redox reaction between 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and chromate (Cr(VI)) (i.e., the simultaneous oxidation of 4-CP by Cr(VI) and reduction of Cr(VI) by 4-CP) in ice (i.e., at -20°C) was compared with the corresponding reaction in water (i.e., at 25°C). The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI), which was negligible in water, was significantly accelerated in ice. This accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect occurring during freezing, which excludes solutes (i.e., 4-CP and Cr(VI)) and protons from the ice crystals and subsequently concentrates them in the liquid brine. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and protons in the liquid brine were confirmed by measuring the optical image and the UV-vis absorption spectra of cresol red (CR) as a pH indicator of frozen solution. The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was observed in water when the concentrations of 4-CP/protons or Cr(VI)/protons increased by 100/1000-fold. These results corroborate the freeze concentration effect as the reason for the accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice. The redox conversion of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) and 4-CP/Cr(VI) in real wastewater was successfully achieved in ice, which verifies the environmental relevance and importance of freezing-accelerated redox conversion of phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) in cold regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential redox behaviour on industrial wastes treatment; Evolucion del potencial redox en tratamiento y depuracion industrial de aguas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Galvin, R.; rodriguez Mellado, J. M.; Ruiz Montoya, M.; Jimenez Gamero, C. [Departamento Quimica Fisica y Termodinamica aplicada, Facultad de ciencias, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    A study over the behaviour of redox potential in waters and wastewaters under industrial treatment processes has been carried out. In both cases, the potential-time curves obtained were in a logarithmical shape being more strongly distorted when the waters contained more dissolved and suspended compounds. Oxygen fundamentally leads the redox state in wastewaters, although ozone and chlorine almost oxygen lead the redox potential in raw waters intended to drinking water production. In this way, by increasing 210 m V the E{sub H} value of water or maintaining the rH>21.8 it can be industrially sterilized the drinking water. On the other hand, increases of 350 mV in the EH values from wastewaters influent to plant to the treated waters, allowed discarding 450 mg/l of DQO and 9 mg/l of NH{sub 3} from the former. Finally, the exploitation of the Wastewaters Treatment Plant by regulation of the E{sub H} values can suppose a good practice. (Author) 14 refs.

  9. Redox pioneer:Professor Christine Helen Foyer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Luis A

    2011-10-15

    Dr. Christine Foyer (B.Sc. 1974; Ph.D. 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because she has published an article on redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times, 4 other articles that have been cited more than 500 times, and a further 32 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. During her Ph.D. at the Kings College, University of London, United Kingdom, Dr. Foyer discovered that ascorbate and glutathione and enzymes linking NADPH, glutathione, and ascorbate are localized in isolated chloroplast preparations. These observations pioneered the discovery of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, now known as Foyer-Halliwell-Asada pathway after the names of the three major contributors, a crucial mechanism for H(2)O(2) metabolism in both animals and plants. Dr. Foyer has made a very significant contribution to our current understanding of the crucial roles of ascorbate and glutathione in redox biology, particularly in relation to photosynthesis, respiration, and chloroplast and mitochondrial redox signaling networks. "My view is that science…is compulsive and you have to keep with it all the time and not get despondent when things do not work well. Being passionate about science is what carries you through the hard times so that it isn't so much work, as a hobby that you do for a living. It is the thrill of achieving a better understanding and finding real pleasure in putting new ideas together, explaining data and passing on knowledge that keeps you going no matter what!" --Prof. Christine Helen Foyer.

  10. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (pcancerous tissues than in the normal ones (pcancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  11. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Roede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys, cystine (CySS, glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (Eh to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  12. Third Chemistry Conference on Recent Trends in Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.M.; Wheed, S.

    2011-01-01

    The third chemistry conference 2011 on recent trends in chemistry was held from October 17-19, 2001 at Islamabad, Pakistan. More than 65 papers and oral presentation. The scope of the conference was wide open and provides and opportunity for participation of broad spectrum of chemists. This forum provided a platform for the dissemination of the latest research followed by discussion pertaining to new trends in chemistry. This con fence covered different aspects of subjects including analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, industrial chemistry, biochemistry and nano chemistry etc. (A.B.)

  13. A novel iron-lead redox flow battery for large-scale energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhou, X. L.; Wei, L.; Ren, Y. X.

    2017-04-01

    The redox flow battery (RFB) is one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies for the massive utilization of intermittent renewables especially wind and solar energy. This work presents a novel redox flow battery that utilizes inexpensive and abundant Fe(II)/Fe(III) and Pb/Pb(II) redox couples as redox materials. Experimental results show that both the Fe(II)/Fe(III) and Pb/Pb(II) redox couples have fast electrochemical kinetics in methanesulfonic acid, and that the coulombic efficiency and energy efficiency of the battery are, respectively, as high as 96.2% and 86.2% at 40 mA cm-2. Furthermore, the battery exhibits stable performance in terms of efficiencies and discharge capacities during the cycle test. The inexpensive redox materials, fast electrochemical kinetics and stable cycle performance make the present battery a promising candidate for large-scale energy storage applications.

  14. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  15. High-energy-density, aqueous, metal-polyiodide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2017-08-29

    Improved metal-based redox flow batteries (RFBs) can utilize a metal and a divalent cation of the metal (M.sup.2+) as an active redox couple for a first electrode and electrolyte, respectively, in a first half-cell. For example, the metal can be Zn. The RFBs can also utilize a second electrolyte having I.sup.-, anions of I.sub.x (for x.gtoreq.3), or both in an aqueous solution, wherein the I.sup.- and the anions of I.sub.x (for x.gtoreq.3) compose an active redox couple in a second half-cell.

  16. The Analgesic Acetaminophen and the Antipsychotic Clozapine Can Each Redox-Cycle with Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temoçin, Zülfikar; Kim, Eunkyoung; Li, Jinyang; Panzella, Lucia; Alfieri, Maria Laura; Napolitano, Alessandra; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-20

    Melanins are ubiquitous but their complexity and insolubility has hindered characterization of their structures and functions. We are developing electrochemical reverse engineering methodologies that focus on properties and especially on redox properties. Previous studies have shown that melanins (i) are redox-active and can rapidly and repeatedly exchange electrons with diffusible oxidants and reductants, and (ii) have redox potentials in midregion of the physiological range. These properties suggest the functional activities of melanins will depend on their redox context. The brain has a complex redox context with steep local gradients in O 2 that can promote redox-cycling between melanin and diffusible redox-active chemical species. Here, we performed in vitro reverse engineering studies and report that melanins can redox-cycle with two common redox-active drugs. Experimentally, we used two melanin models: a convenient natural melanin derived from cuttlefish (Sepia melanin) and a synthetic cysteinyldopamine-dopamine core-shell model of neuromelanin. One drug, acetaminophen (APAP), has been used clinically for over a century, and recent studies suggest that low doses of APAP can protect the brain from oxidative-stress-induced toxicity and neurodegeneration, while higher doses can have toxic effects in the brain. The second drug, clozapine (CLZ), is a second generation antipsychotic with polypharmacological activities that remain incompletely understood. These in vitro observations suggest that the redox activities of drugs may be relevant to their modes-of-action, and that melanins may interact with drugs in ways that affect their activities, metabolism, and toxicities.

  17. Redox regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle: something old, something new

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure eMichelet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reversible redox post-translational modifications such as oxido-reduction of disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylation and S-glutathionylation, play a prominent role in the regulation of cell metabolism and signaling in all organisms. These modifications are mainly controlled by members of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin families. Early studies in photosynthetic organisms have identified the Calvin-Benson cycle, the photosynthetic pathway responsible for carbon assimilation, as a redox regulated process. Indeed, 4 out of 11 enzymes of the cycle were shown to have a low activity in the dark and to be activated in the light through thioredoxin-dependent reduction of regulatory disulfide bonds. The underlying molecular mechanisms were extensively studied at the biochemical and structural level. Unexpectedly, recent biochemical and proteomic studies have suggested that all enzymes of the cycle and several associated regulatory proteins may undergo redox regulation through multiple redox post-translational modifications including glutathionylation and nitrosylation. The aim of this review is to detail the well-established mechanisms of redox regulation of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes as well as the most recent reports indicating that this pathway is tightly controlled by multiple interconnected redox post-translational modifications. This redox control is likely allowing fine tuning of the Calvin-Benson cycle required for adaptation to varying environmental conditions, especially during responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  18. TEMPO/viologen electrochemical heterojunction for diffusion-controlled redox mediation: a highly rectifying bilayer-sandwiched device based on cross-reaction at the interface between dissimilar redox polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokue, Hiroshi; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Sukegawa, Takashi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-26

    A couple of totally reversible redox-active molecules, which are different in redox potentials, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and viologen (V(2+)), were employed to give rise to a rectified redox conduction effect. Single-layer and bilayer devices were fabricated using polymers containing these sites as pendant groups per repeating unit. The devices were obtained by sandwiching the redox polymer layer(s) with indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass and Pt foil electrodes. Electrochemical measurements of the single-layer device composed of polynorbornene-bearing TEMPO (PTNB) exhibited a diffusion-limited current-voltage response based on the TEMPO(+)/TEMPO exchange reaction, which was almost equivalent to a redox gradient through the PTNB layer depending upon the thickness. The bilayer device gave rise to the current rectification because of the thermodynamically favored cross-reaction between TEMPO(+) and V(+) at the polymer/polymer interface. A current-voltage response obtained for the bilayer device demonstrated a two-step diffusion-limited current behavior as a result of the concurrent V(2+)/V(+) and V(+)/V(0) exchange reactions according to the voltage and suggested that the charge transport process through the device was most likely to be rate-determined by a redox gradient in the polymer layer. Current collection experiments revealed a charge transport balance throughout the device, as a result of the electrochemical stability and robustness of the polymers in both redox states.

  19. Performance evaluation of thermally treated graphite felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow battery and their four-point single cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazúr, P.; Mrlík, J.; Beneš, J.; Pocedič, J.; Vrána, J.; Dundálek, J.; Kosek, J.

    2018-03-01

    In our contribution we study the electrocatalytic effect of oxygen functionalization of thermally treated graphite felt on kinetics of electrode reactions of vanadium redox flow battery. Chemical and morphological changes of the felts are analysed by standard physico-chemical characterization techniques. A complex method four-point method is developed and employed for characterization of the felts in a laboratory single-cell. The method is based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and load curves measurements of positive and negative half-cells using platinum wire pseudo-reference electrodes. The distribution of ohmic and faradaic losses within a single-cell is evaluated for both symmetric and asymmetric electrode set-up with respect to the treatment conditions. Positive effect of oxygen functionalization is observed only for negative electrode, whereas kinetics of positive electrode reaction is almost unaffected by the treatment. This is in a contradiction to the results of typically employed cyclovoltammetric characterization which indicate that both electrodes are enhanced by the treatment to a similar extent. The developed four-point characterization method can be further used e.g., for the component screening and in-situ durability studies on single-cell scale redox flow batteries of various chemistries.

  20. Redox Signaling in Diabetic Wound Healing Regulates Extracellular Matrix Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkemoeller, Britta; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-10-20

    Impaired wound healing is a major complication of diabetes, and can lead to development of chronic foot ulcers in a significant number of patients. Despite the danger posed by poor healing, very few specific therapies exist, leaving patients at risk of hospitalization, amputation, and further decline in overall health. Recent Advances: Redox signaling is a key regulator of wound healing, especially through its influence on the extracellular matrix (ECM). Normal redox signaling is disrupted in diabetes leading to several pathological mechanisms that alter the balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenging. Importantly, pathological oxidative stress can alter ECM structure and function. There is limited understanding of the specific role of altered redox signaling in the diabetic wound, although there is evidence that ROS are involved in the underlying pathology. Preclinical studies of antioxidant-based therapies for diabetic wound healing have yielded promising results. Redox-based therapeutics constitute a novel approach for the treatment of wounds in diabetes patients that deserve further investigation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 823-838.

  1. A redox-flow battery with an alloxazine-based organic electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaixiang; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Beh, Eugene S.; Tong, Liuchuan; Chen, Qing; Valle, Alvaro; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Aziz, Michael J.; Gordon, Roy G.

    2016-09-01

    Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) can store large amounts of electrical energy from variable sources, such as solar and wind. Recently, redox-active organic molecules in aqueous RFBs have drawn substantial attention due to their rapid kinetics and low membrane crossover rates. Drawing inspiration from nature, here we report a high-performance aqueous RFB utilizing an organic redox compound, alloxazine, which is a tautomer of the isoalloxazine backbone of vitamin B2. It can be synthesized in high yield at room temperature by single-step coupling of inexpensive o-phenylenediamine derivatives and alloxan. The highly alkaline-soluble alloxazine 7/8-carboxylic acid produces a RFB exhibiting open-circuit voltage approaching 1.2 V and current efficiency and capacity retention exceeding 99.7% and 99.98% per cycle, respectively. Theoretical studies indicate that structural modification of alloxazine with electron-donating groups should allow further increases in battery voltage. As an aza-aromatic molecule that undergoes reversible redox cycling in aqueous electrolyte, alloxazine represents a class of radical-free redox-active organics for use in large-scale energy storage.

  2. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  3. Mechanisms of redox metabolism and cancer cell survival during extracellular matrix detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mark A; Schafer, Zachary T

    2018-01-16

    Non-transformed cells that become detached from the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergo dysregulation of redox homeostasis and cell death. In contrast, cancer cells often acquire the ability to mitigate programmed cell death pathways and recalibrate the redox balance to survive after ECM detachment, facilitating metastatic dissemination. Accordingly, recent studies of the mechanisms by which cancer cells overcome ECM detachment-induced metabolic alterations have focused on mechanisms in redox homeostasis. The insights into these mechanisms may inform the development of therapeutics that manipulate redox homeostasis to eliminate ECM-detached cancer cells. Here, we review how ECM-detached cancer cells balance redox metabolism for survival. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Performance and cost characteristics of multi-electron transfer, common ion exchange non-aqueous redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramie, Sydney M.; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Breault, Tanya M.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Thompson, Levi T.

    2016-09-01

    Non-aqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) have recently received considerable attention as promising high energy density, low cost grid-level energy storage technologies. Despite these attractive features, NAqRFBs are still at an early stage of development and innovative design techniques are necessary to improve performance and decrease costs. In this work, we investigate multi-electron transfer, common ion exchange NAqRFBs. Common ion systems decrease the supporting electrolyte requirement, which subsequently improves active material solubility and decreases electrolyte cost. Voltammetric and electrolytic techniques are used to study the electrochemical performance and chemical compatibility of model redox active materials, iron (II) tris(2,2‧-bipyridine) tetrafluoroborate (Fe(bpy)3(BF4)2) and ferrocenylmethyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (Fc1N112-BF4). These results help disentangle complex cycling behavior observed in flow cell experiments. Further, a simple techno-economic model demonstrates the cost benefits of employing common ion exchange NAqRFBs, afforded by decreasing the salt and solvent contributions to total chemical cost. This study highlights two new concepts, common ion exchange and multi-electron transfer, for NAqRFBs through a demonstration flow cell employing model active species. In addition, the compatibility analysis developed for asymmetric chemistries can apply to other promising species, including organics, metal coordination complexes (MCCs) and mixed MCC/organic systems, enabling the design of low cost NAqRFBs.

  5. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Graphite-graphite oxide composite electrode for vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new composite electrode is designed for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). → The graphite oxide (GO) is used as electrode reactions catalyst. → The excellent electrode activity is attributed to the oxygen-containing groups attached on the GO surface. → A catalytic mechanism of the GO towards the redox reactions is presumed. - Abstract: A graphite/graphite oxide (GO) composite electrode for vanadium redox battery (VRB) was prepared successfully in this paper. The materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area was measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The redox reactions of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ were studied with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that the electrochemical performances of the electrode were improved greatly when 3 wt% GO was added into graphite electrode. The redox peak currents of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ couples on the composite electrode were increased nearly twice as large as that on the graphite electrode, and the charge transfer resistances of the redox pairs on the composite electrode are also reduced. The enhanced electrochemical activity could be ascribed to the presence of plentiful oxygen functional groups on the basal planes and sheet edges of the GO and large specific surface areas introduced by the GO.

  7. The self-assembly of redox active peptides: Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Julia P; Santos, Adriano; Santos-Filho, Norival A; Lorenzón, Esteban N; Cilli, Eduardo M; Bueno, Paulo R

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports on the synthesis of a redox-tagged peptide with self-assembling capability aiming applications in electrochemically active capacitive surfaces (associated with the presence of the redox centers) generally useful in electroanalytical applications. Peptide containing ferrocene (fc) molecular (redox) group (Ac-Cys-Ile-Ile-Lys(fc)-Ile-Ile-COOH) was thus synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). To obtain the electrochemically active capacitive interface, the side chain of the cysteine was covalently bound to the gold electrode (sulfur group) and the side chain of Lys was used to attach the ferrocene in the peptide chain. After obtaining the purified redox-tagged peptide, the self-assembly and redox capability was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance-based capacitance spectroscopy techniques. The obtained results confirmed that the redox-tagged peptide was successfully attached by forming an electroactive self-assembled monolayer onto gold electrode. The design of redox active self-assembly ferrocene-tagged peptide is predictably useful in the development of biosensor devices precisely to detect, in a label-free platform, those biomarkers of clinical relevance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 357-367, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Satoshi [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Tatenaka, Yuki; Ohuchi, Yuya [Dojindo Laboratories, 2025-5 Tabaru, Mashiki-machi, Kumamoto 861-2202 (Japan); Hisabori, Toru, E-mail: thisabor@res.titech.ac.jp [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell.

  9. Intramolecular Redox-Mannich Reactions: Facile Access to the Tetrahydroprotoberberine Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Longle; Seidel, Daniel

    2015-09-07

    Cyclic amines such as pyrrolidine undergo redox-annulations with 2-formylaryl malonates. Concurrent oxidative amine α-CH bond functionalization and reductive N-alkylation render this transformation redox-neutral. This redox-Mannich process provides regioisomers of classic Reinhoudt reaction products as an entry to the tetrahydroprotoberberine core, enabling the synthesis of (±)-thalictricavine and its epimer. An unusually mild amine-promoted dealkoxycarbonylation was discovered in the course of these studies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Actin filaments – a target for redox regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carlos; Terman, Jonathan R.; González-Billault, Christian; Ahmed, Giasuddin

    2016-01-01

    Actin and its ability to polymerize into dynamic filaments is critical for the form and function of cells throughout the body. While multiple proteins have been characterized as affecting actin dynamics through non-covalent means, actin and its protein regulators are also susceptible to covalent modifications of their amino acid residues. In this regard, oxidation-reduction (Redox) intermediates have emerged as key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton with multiple different effects on cellular form and function. Here, we review work implicating Redox intermediates in post-translationally altering actin and discuss what is known regarding how these alterations affect the properties of actin. We also focus on two of the best characterized enzymatic sources of these Redox intermediates – the NADPH oxidase NOX and the flavoprotein monooxygenase MICAL – and detail how they have both been identified as altering actin, but share little similarity and employ different means to regulate actin dynamics. Finally, we discuss the role of these enzymes and redox signaling in regulating the actin cytoskeleton in vivo and highlight their importance for neuronal form and function in health and disease. PMID:27309342

  11. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  12. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  13. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  14. Effect of organic additives on positive electrolyte for vanadium redox battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sha; Huang Kelong; Liu Suqin; Fang Dong; Wu Xiongwei; Lu Dan; Wu Tao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Four organics as electrolyte additives of vanadium redox battery. → Changes are examined in the electrochemical properties of vanadium redox battery. → D-sorbitol is a suitable additive to the electrolyte for the vanadium redox battery. → The mechanism of improvement is discussed in detail. - Abstract: Fructose, mannitol, glucose, D-sorbitol are explored as additives in electrolyte for vanadium redox battery (VRB), respectively. The effects of additives on electrolyte are studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge technique, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that the vanadium redox cell using the electrolyte with the additive of D-sorbitol exhibits the best electrochemical performance (the energy efficiency 81.8%). The EIS results indicate that the electrochemical activity of the electrolyte is improved by adding D-sorbitol, which can be interpreted as the increase of available (-OH) groups providing active sites for electron transfer. The Raman spectra show that VO 2+ ions take part in forming a complex with the D-sorbitol, which not only improve solubility of V(V) electrolyte, but also provide more activity sites for the V(IV)/V(V) redox reaction.

  15. Effect of organic additives on positive electrolyte for vanadium redox battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Sha [Department of Functional Materials and Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Huang Kelong, E-mail: lisha_csu@163.com [Department of Functional Materials and Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu Suqin; Fang Dong; Wu Xiongwei; Lu Dan; Wu Tao [Department of Functional Materials and Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2011-06-30

    Highlights: > Four organics as electrolyte additives of vanadium redox battery. > Changes are examined in the electrochemical properties of vanadium redox battery. > D-sorbitol is a suitable additive to the electrolyte for the vanadium redox battery. > The mechanism of improvement is discussed in detail. - Abstract: Fructose, mannitol, glucose, D-sorbitol are explored as additives in electrolyte for vanadium redox battery (VRB), respectively. The effects of additives on electrolyte are studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge technique, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that the vanadium redox cell using the electrolyte with the additive of D-sorbitol exhibits the best electrochemical performance (the energy efficiency 81.8%). The EIS results indicate that the electrochemical activity of the electrolyte is improved by adding D-sorbitol, which can be interpreted as the increase of available (-OH) groups providing active sites for electron transfer. The Raman spectra show that VO{sup 2+} ions take part in forming a complex with the D-sorbitol, which not only improve solubility of V(V) electrolyte, but also provide more activity sites for the V(IV)/V(V) redox reaction.

  16. An application of actinide elements for a redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Yamana, Hajimu; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2000-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of U, Np, Pu and Am were discussed from the viewpoint of cell active materials. From the thermodynamic properties and the kinetics of electrode reactions, it is found that neptunium in the aqueous system can be utilized as an active material of the redox flow battery for the electric power storage. A new neptunium redox battery is proposed in the present article: the galvanic cell is expressed by (-)|Np 3+ , Np 4+ |NpO 2 + , NpO 2 2+ |(+). The neptunium battery is expected to have more excellent charge and discharge performance than the current vanadium battery, whereas the thermodynamic one of the former is comparable to the latter. For the development of a uranium redox battery, the application of the redox reactions in the non-aqueous solvents is essential. (author)

  17. The fairytale of the GSSG/GSH redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, Leopold

    2013-05-01

    The term GSSG/GSH redox potential is frequently used to explain redox regulation and other biological processes. The relevance of the GSSG/GSH redox potential as driving force of biological processes is critically discussed. It is recalled that the concentration ratio of GSSG and GSH reflects little else than a steady state, which overwhelmingly results from fast enzymatic processes utilizing, degrading or regenerating GSH. A biological GSSG/GSH redox potential, as calculated by the Nernst equation, is a deduced electrochemical parameter based on direct measurements of GSH and GSSG that are often complicated by poorly substantiated assumptions. It is considered irrelevant to the steering of any biological process. GSH-utilizing enzymes depend on the concentration of GSH, not on [GSH](2), as is predicted by the Nernst equation, and are typically not affected by GSSG. Regulatory processes involving oxidants and GSH are considered to make use of mechanistic principles known for thiol peroxidases which catalyze the oxidation of hydroperoxides by GSH by means of an enzyme substitution mechanism involving only bimolecular reaction steps. The negligibly small rate constants of related spontaneous reactions as compared with enzyme-catalyzed ones underscore the superiority of kinetic parameters over electrochemical or thermodynamic ones for an in-depth understanding of GSH-dependent biological phenomena. At best, the GSSG/GSH potential might be useful as an analytical tool to disclose disturbances in redox metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Cellular Functions of Glutathione. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Redox-Dependent Inflammation in Islet Transplantation Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie M. Barra

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in the progressive destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells inside the islets of Langerhans. The loss of this vital population leaves patients with a lifelong dependency on exogenous insulin and puts them at risk for life-threatening complications. One method being investigated to help restore insulin independence in these patients is islet cell transplantation. However, challenges associated with transplant rejection and islet viability have prevented long-term β-cell function. Redox signaling and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by recipient immune cells and transplanted islets themselves are key players in graft rejection. Therefore, dissipation of ROS generation is a viable intervention that can protect transplanted islets from immune-mediated destruction. Here, we will discuss the newly appreciated role of redox signaling and ROS synthesis during graft rejection as well as new strategies being tested for their efficacy in redox modulation during islet cell transplantation.

  19. Redox-Dependent Inflammation in Islet Transplantation Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Jessie M.; Tse, Hubert M.

    2018-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in the progressive destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells inside the islets of Langerhans. The loss of this vital population leaves patients with a lifelong dependency on exogenous insulin and puts them at risk for life-threatening complications. One method being investigated to help restore insulin independence in these patients is islet cell transplantation. However, challenges associated with transplant rejection and islet viability have prevented long-term β-cell function. Redox signaling and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by recipient immune cells and transplanted islets themselves are key players in graft rejection. Therefore, dissipation of ROS generation is a viable intervention that can protect transplanted islets from immune-mediated destruction. Here, we will discuss the newly appreciated role of redox signaling and ROS synthesis during graft rejection as well as new strategies being tested for their efficacy in redox modulation during islet cell transplantation. PMID:29740396

  20. Construction of Context-Based Module: How OLED can be used as a Context in High School Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugrah, I. R.; Mudzakir, A.; Sumarna, O.

    2017-09-01

    Teaching materials used in Indonesia generally just emphasize remembering skill so that the students’ science literacy is low. Innovation is needed to transform traditional teaching materials so that it can stimulate students’ science literacy, one of which is by context-based approach. This study focused on the construction of context-based module for high school using Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) topics. OLED was chosen because it is an up-to-date topic and relevant to real life. This study used Model of Educational Reconstruction (MER) to reconstruct science content structure about OLED through combining scientist’s perspectives with student’s preconceptions and national curriculum. Literature review of OLED includes its definition, components, characteristics and working principle. Student’s preconceptions about OLED are obtained through interviews. The result shows that student’s preconceptions have not been fully similar with the scientist’s perspective. One of the reasons is that some of the related Chemistry concepts are too complicated. Through curriculum analysis, Chemistry about OLED that are appropriate for high school are Bohr’s atomic theory, redox and organic chemistry including polymers and aromatics. The OLED context and its Chemistry concept were developed into context-based module by adapting science literacy-based learning. This module is expected to increase students’ science literacy performance.

  1. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gade, Sudeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Subarna [Heme and Flavo Proteins Laboratory, 204, Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [Heme and Flavo Proteins Laboratory, 204, Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding - (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b{sub 5} in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  2. "JCE" Classroom Activity #111: Redox Reactions in Three Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Edgardo L. Ortiz; Barreto, Reizelie; Medina, Zuleika

    2012-01-01

    This activity introduces students to the concept of reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. To help students obtain a thorough understanding of redox reactions, the concept is explored at three levels: macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. In this activity, students perform hands-on investigations of the three levels as they work at different…

  3. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, L.

    1992-05-01

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional K D concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  4. A contribution from fundamental and applied technetium chemistry to the nuclear waste disposal safety case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totskiy, Yury; Yalcintas, Ezgi; Huber, Florian; Gaona, Xavier; Schaefer, Thorsten; Altmaier, Marcus; Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal; Kalmykov, Stepan [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear waste disposal in deep geological formations such as crystalline (granite), sedimentary (claystone) or rock salt, is the favored option of the international nuclear waste disposal community. For the long-term safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories, a reliable prediction of radionuclide migration behavior is required. A potentially relevant mobilization and migration mechanism is caused by water intrusion into the repository, leading to radionuclide release via transport pathways. In this case, detailed knowledge of key parameters controlling the retention and mobilization of radionuclides in solution, i.e. redox processes, solubility limits and sorption properties, is essential. Dedicated research is required in order to derive process understanding and develop accurate site-independent chemical and thermodynamic models, applicable for all considered host rock formations and scenarios. Technetium-99 is a β-emitting fission product highly relevant for the safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories due to its significant content in radioactive waste (fission yield >6%), long half-life (t{sub 1/2} ∼ 2.1.10{sup 5} a) and redox sensitivity. The mobility of Tc in the environment strongly depends on its oxidation state. Tc(VII) exists as highly soluble and mobile TcO{sub 4-} pertechnetate anion under sub-oxic and oxidizing conditions, whereas Tc(IV) forms sparingly soluble hydrous oxide (TcO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O) solid phases under reducing conditions. In the first part of this study focusing on fundamental Tc chemistry, the redox behavior of Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) was investigated in dilute to concentrated solutions. The results are systematized according to Pourbaix diagrams calculated with the NEA.TDB data selection for Tc to assess the effect of homogeneous and heterogeneous reducing systems and ionic strength on Tc redox behaviour. Investigations focusing on the solubility and speciation of TcO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O(s) were performed in dilute to

  5. Carbon-free Solid Dispersion LiCoO2 Redox Couple Characterization and Electrochemical Evaluation for All Solid Dispersion Redox Flow Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Aaron L.; Koenig, Gary M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • LiCoO 2 particles can be cycled in carbon-free and binder-free coin cells. • A carbon-free LiCoO 2 suspension is electrochemically oxidized and reduced. • Comparable size LiCoO 2 and Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 suspensions have similar rheological properties. • First demonstration of redox couples with solid suspensions for both electrodes. - Abstract: Semi-solid flow batteries have been reported to have among the highest energy densities for redox flow batteries, however, they rely on percolated carbon networks which increase the electrolyte viscosity significantly. We report the first demonstration of carbon-free redox flow couples comprised of dispersed lithium-ion battery active material suspensions, with sub-micrometer LiCoO 2 (LCO) particles at the cathode and Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 (LTO) particles at the anode. Both electrochemical and rheological properties of the LCO suspensions are reported and compared to previous reports for LTO dispersed electrochemical redox couples. An LTO anode and LCO cathode full cell was constructed and reversible electrochemical redox reaction of the dispersed particles was successfully demonstrated. This carbon-free dispersed lithium-ion active material full cell provides a proof-of-concept for a system that lies between the relatively high viscosity semi-solid flow cells with percolated carbon networks and the relatively low energy density conventional flow cells comprised of dissolved transition metals, providing a system for future study of the trade-off between energy density and viscosity for electrochemical flow cells that rely on solid active materials.

  6. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  7. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions as an archive of redox heterogeneity in magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Margaret E.; Shorttle, Oliver; Maclennan, John; Moussallam, Yves; Edmonds, Marie

    2017-12-01

    -equilibration of fO2 between inclusions and carrier melts occurs on timescales of hours to days, causing a drop in the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) and driving the exsolution of immiscible sulfide globules in the inclusions. Our data demonstrate the roles of magma mixing, progressive re-equilibration, and degassing in redox evolution within magmatic systems, and the open-system nature of melt inclusions to fO2 during these processes. Redox heterogeneity present at the time of inclusion trapping may be overprinted by rapid re-equilibration of melt inclusion fO2 with the external environment, both in the magma chamber and during slow cooling in lava at the surface. This can decouple the melt inclusion archives of fO2, major and trace element chemistry, and mask associations between fO2, magmatic differentiation and mantle source heterogeneity unless the assembly of diverse magmas is rapidly followed by eruption. Our tools for understanding the redox conditions of magmas are thus limited; however, careful reconstruction of pre- and post-eruptive magmatic history has enabled us to confirm the relatively oxidised nature of ocean island-type mantle compared to that of mid-ocean ridge mantle.

  8. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  9. Influence of the redox state on the neptunium sorption under alkaline conditions. Batch sorption studies on titanium dioxide and calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tits, Jan; Laube, Andreas; Wieland, Erich; Gaona, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Wet chemistry experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the redox state and aqueous speciation on the uptake of neptunium by titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) and by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) under alkaline conditions. TiO 2 was chosen as a reference sorbent to determine the surface complexation behaviour of neptunium under alkaline conditions. C-S-H phases are important constituents of cement and concrete. They may contribute significantly to radionuclide retention due to their high recrystallization rates making incorporation the dominating sorption mechanism for many radionuclides (e.g. the actinides) on these materials. The sorption of neptunium on both solids was found to depend strongly on the degree of hydrolysis. On TiO 2 R d values for Np(IV), Np(V) and Np(VI) are identical at pH = 10 and decrease with progressing hydrolysis in case of Np(V) and Np(VI). On C-S-H phases, R d values for the three redox states are also identical at pH = 10. While the R d values for Np(VI) sorption on C-S-H phases decrease with progressing hydrolysis, the R d values for Np(IV) and Np(V) sorption are not affected by the pH. In addition to the effect of hydrolysis, the presence of Ca is found to promote Np(V) and Np(VI) sorption on TiO 2 whereas on C-S-H phases, the present wet chemistry data do not give unambiguous evidence. Thus, the aqueous speciation appears to have a similar influence on the sorption of the actinides on both types of solids despite the different sorption mechanism. The similar R d values for Np(IV,V,VI) sorption at pH = 10 can be explained qualitatively by invoking inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion between OH groups in the coordination sphere of Np(V) and Np(VI). This mechanism was proposed earlier in the literature for the prediction of actinide complexation constants with inorganic ligands. A limiting coordination number for each Np redox state, resulting from the inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion, allows the weaker sorption of the

  10. Redox Fluctuations Increase the Contribution of Lignin to Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.; Timokhin, V.; Hammel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin mineralization represents a critical flux in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, yet little is known about mechanisms and environmental factors controlling lignin breakdown in mineral soils. Hypoxia has long been thought to suppress lignin decomposition, yet variation in oxygen (O2) availability in surface soils accompanying moisture fluctuations could potentially stimulate this process by generating reactive oxygen species via coupled biotic and abiotic iron (Fe) redox cycling. Here, we tested the impact of redox fluctuations on lignin breakdown in humid tropical forest soils during ten-week laboratory incubations. We used synthetic lignins labeled with 13C in either of two positions (aromatic methoxyl and propyl Cβ) to provide highly sensitive and specific measures of lignin mineralization not previously employed in soils. Four-day redox fluctuations increased the percent contribution of methoxyl C to soil respiration, and cumulative methoxyl C mineralization was equivalent under static aerobic and fluctuating redox conditions despite lower total C mineralization in the latter treatment. Contributions of the highly stable Cβ to mineralization were also equivalent in static aerobic and fluctuating redox treatments during periods of O2 exposure, and nearly doubled in the fluctuating treatment after normalizing to cumulative O2 exposure. Oxygen fluctuations drove substantial net Fe reduction and oxidation, implying that reactive oxygen species generated during abiotic Fe oxidation likely contributed to the elevated contribution of lignin to C mineralization. Iron redox cycling provides a mechanism for lignin breakdown in soils that experience conditions unfavorable for canonical lignin-degrading organisms, and provides a potential mechanism for lignin depletion in soil organic matter during late-stage decomposition. Thus, close couplings between soil moisture, redox fluctuations, and lignin breakdown provide potential a link between climate variability and

  11. Redox environment in stem and differentiated cells: A quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Lyublinskaya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are believed to maintain a specific intracellular redox status through a combination of enhanced removal capacity and limited production of ROS. In the present study, we challenge this assumption by developing a quantitative approach for the analysis of the pro- and antioxidant ability of human embryonic stem cells in comparison with their differentiated descendants, as well as adult stem and non-stem cells. Our measurements showed that embryonic stem cells are characterized by low ROS level, low rate of extracellular hydrogen peroxide removal and low threshold for peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. However, biochemical normalization of these parameters to cell volume/protein leads to matching of normalized values in stem and differentiated cells and shows that tested in the present study cells (human embryonic stem cells and their fibroblast-like progenies, adult mesenchymal stem cells, lymphocytes, HeLa maintain similar intracellular redox status. Based on these observations, we propose to use ROS concentration averaged over the cell volume instead of ROS level as a measure of intracellular redox balance. We show that attempts to use ROS level for comparative analysis of redox status of morphologically different cells could lead to false conclusions. Methods for the assessment of ROS concentration based on flow cytometry analysis with the use of H2DCFDA dye and HyPer, genetically encoded probe for hydrogen peroxide, are discussed. Keywords: Embryonic stem cells, Differentiated cells, ROS, Redox status, H2DCFDA, HyPer, Flow cytometry, Quantitative redox biology

  12. Probing Fe (III)/Fe (II) redox potential in a clayey material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Chainet, Fabien; Betelu, Stephanie; Hadi, Jebril; Gaucher, Eric C.; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Charlet, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Redox is one of the main factors affecting the migration of redox-sensitive radionuclides. As a consequence reducing conditions are considered of strategic importance for the confinement properties of a clayey formation towards nuclear waste. A representative redox potential of clay formation such as Callovian- Oxfordian (COx) can be derived from thermodynamic calculations considering equilibrium between observed redox phases such as pyrite and siderite. However, there is little information on the reactivity of the different reservoirs of redox constituents in this type of complex material. The present study aims at investigating the reactivity of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple in the structure of clay minerals using different investigation methods: electrochemistry and O 2 reduction kinetic experiments. Clay modified electrodes were specifically designed to probe Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox potential in the structure of clay minerals. The clay fraction of a Callovian-Oxfordian argillite sample originating from the same level than ANDRA underground research laboratory was used after pre-treatment to remove organic matter and accessory minerals such as pyrite that could influence redox potential measurements. These electrodes were used to verify the validity of the model of Favre et al. (2006) that links the redox potential (E clay ) to the the Fe(II)/Fe tot ratio in the structure (m rel ), the pH and the sodium concentration in solution: equation 1. The good agreement between direct potential measurements and model prediction provides a strong evidence of the relevance of this model in our experimental conditions although the clay composition and its too low Fe content do not a priori fulfil the conditions set by Drits and Manceau (2000) for the calculation of K 0 parameter. Following the verification of the model, we tried to apply it to the specific case of a Callovian-Oxfordian sample that had been very well preserved

  13. Effect of the Linker in Terephthalate-Functionalized Conducting Redox Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Li; Huang, Xiao; Gogoll, Adolf; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The combination of high capacity redox active pendent groups and conducting polymers, realized in conducting redox polymers (CRPs), provides materials with high charge storage capacity that are electronically conducting which makes CRPs attractive for electrical energy storage applications. In this report, six polythiophene and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT)-based CRPs with a diethyl terephthalate unit covalently bound to the polymer chain by various linkers have been synthesized and characterized electrochemically. The effects of the choice of polymer backbone and of the nature of the link on the electrochemistry, and in particular the cycling stability of these polymers, are discussed. All CRPs show both the doping of the polymer backbone as well as the redox behavior of the pendent groups and the redox potential of the pendent groups in the CRPs is close to that of corresponding monomer, indicating insignificant interaction between the pendant and the polymer backbone. While all CRPs show various degrees of charge decay upon electrochemical redox conversion, the PEDOT-based CRPs show significantly improved stability compared to the polythiophene counterparts. Moreover, we show that by the right choice of link the cycling stability of diethyl terephthalate substituted PEDOT-based CRPs can be significantly improved.

  14. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism's metabolic activities. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant's redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism.

  15. Organic cofactors participated more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions of primitive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Fang; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2008-08-01

    Protein redox reactions are one of the most basic and important biochemical actions. As amino acids are weak redox mediators, most protein redox functions are undertaken by protein cofactors, which include organic ligands and transition metal ions. Since both kinds of redox cofactors were available in the pre-protein RNA world, it is challenging to explore which one was more involved in redox processes of primitive proteins? In this paper, using an examination of the redox cofactor usage of putative ancient proteins, we infer that organic ligands participated more frequently than transition metals in redox reactions of primitive proteins, at least as protein cofactors. This is further supported by the relative abundance of amino acids in the primordial world. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the BioEssays website. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Study to establish cost projections for production of Redox chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. F.; Greco, C. C.; Rusinko, R. N.; Wadsworth, A. L., III

    1982-01-01

    A cost study of four proposed manufacturing processes for redox chemicals for the NASA REDOX Energy Storage System yielded favorable selling prices in the range $0.99 to $1.91/kg of chromic chloride, anhydrous basis, including ferrous chloride. The prices corresponded to specific energy storage costs from under $9 to $17/kWh. A refined and expanded cost analysis of the most favored process yielded a price estimate corresponding to a storage cost of $11/kWh. The findings supported the potential economic viability of the NASA REDOX system.

  17. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin; Leech, Donal

    2009-01-01

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl) 2 (4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF 6 , to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E 0 '' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  18. Assessment of the development of a battery charging infrastructure for a redox flow battery based electromobility concept; Bewertung des Aufbaus einer Ladeinfrastruktur fuer eine Redox-Flow-Batteriebasierte Elektromobilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpad Funke, Simon; Wietschel, Martin [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany). Competence Center Energietechnologien und Energiesysteme

    2012-07-01

    Apart from the high acquisition cost, the major obstacles to widespread use of electric-powered vehicles today are long battery charging times and limited mileage. Rechargeable batteries might be a solution. The publication investigates a potential infrastructure for electric-powered vehicles based on so-called redox flow batteries. Redox flow batteries are characterized in that active materials are dissolved in liquid electrolyte and are stored outside the cell. Batteries are recharged by exchanging charged electrolyte for discharged electrolyte, which can be done in fuel stations. Redox flow batteries have the drawback of low energy and power density and were hardly ever considered for mobile applications so far. A technical analysis of RFB technology identified the vanadium oxygen redox flow fuel cell (VOFC) as a promising version. It provides higher energy density than conventional redox flow batteries, but development is still in an early stage. Assuming a 'best case' scenario, a refuelling infrastructure for VOFC vehicles was developed and compared with battery-powered vehicles (BEV) and fuel cell vehicles (FVEV). It was found that electromobility based on VOFC may be a promising alternative to current electromobility concepts. (orig./AKB) [German] Neben den Anschaffungsausgaben stehen lange Ladezeiten und eine beschraenkte Reichweite dem heutigen Einsatz von Elektrofahrzeugen oft entgegen. Eine moegliche Abhilfe koennten betankbare Batterien leisten. In der vorliegenden Arbeit soll ein moeglicher Infrastrukturaufbau fuer Elektrofahrzeuge mit sogenannten Redox-Flow-Batterien untersucht werden. Redox-Flow-Batterien besitzen die Eigenschaft, dass aktive Materialien geloest in Fluessigelektrolyten ausserhalb der Zelle gespeichert werden. Dieser Aufbau ermoeglicht das Aufladen der Batterie, indem der entladene Elektrolyt durch geladenen ausgetauscht wird. Dieser Tausch kann an einer Tankstelle durchgefuehrt werden. Ein wesentlicher Nachteil von Redox

  19. Mitochondrial Energy and Redox Signaling in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzländer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: For a plant to grow and develop, energy and appropriate building blocks are a fundamental requirement. Mitochondrial respiration is a vital source for both. The delicate redox processes that make up respiration are affected by the plant's changing environment. Therefore, mitochondrial regulation is critically important to maintain cellular homeostasis. This involves sensing signals from changes in mitochondrial physiology, transducing this information, and mounting tailored responses, by either adjusting mitochondrial and cellular functions directly or reprogramming gene expression. Recent Advances: Retrograde (RTG) signaling, by which mitochondrial signals control nuclear gene expression, has been a field of very active research in recent years. Nevertheless, no mitochondrial RTG-signaling pathway is yet understood in plants. This review summarizes recent advances toward elucidating redox processes and other bioenergetic factors as a part of RTG signaling of plant mitochondria. Critical Issues: Novel insights into mitochondrial physiology and redox-regulation provide a framework of upstream signaling. On the other end, downstream responses to modified mitochondrial function have become available, including transcriptomic data and mitochondrial phenotypes, revealing processes in the plant that are under mitochondrial control. Future Directions: Drawing parallels to chloroplast signaling and mitochondrial signaling in animal systems allows to bridge gaps in the current understanding and to deduce promising directions for future research. It is proposed that targeted usage of new technical approaches, such as quantitative in vivo imaging, will provide novel leverage to the dissection of plant mitochondrial signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2122–2144. PMID:23234467

  20. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausse, Bruno; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Sanchez, Angélica B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR) and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  1. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chausse

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting (IF is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  2. Redox imbalance and mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Although the lung is one of the least studied organs in diabetes, increasing evidence indicates that it is an inevitable target of diabetic complications. Nevertheless, the underlying biochemical mechanisms of lung injury in diabetes remain largely unexplored. Given that redox imbalance, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic tissue injury, we set out to investigate mechanisms of lung injury in diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate NADH/NAD + redox status, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung. Using STZ induced diabetes in rat as a model, we measured redox-imbalance related parameters including aldose reductase activity, level of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PAPR-1), NAD + content, NADPH content, reduced form of glutathione (GSH), and glucose 6-phophate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. For assessment of mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung, we measured the activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I to IV and complex V as well as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) content and activity. We also measured the protein content of NAD + dependent enzymes such as sirtuin3 (sirt3) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Our results demonstrate that NADH/NAD + redox imbalance occurs in the diabetic lung. This redox imbalance upregulates the activities of complexes I to IV, but not complex V; and this upregulation is likely the source of increased mitochondrial ROS production, oxidative stress, and cell death in the diabetic lung. These results, together with the findings that the protein contents of DLDH, sirt3, and NQO1 all are decreased in the diabetic lung, demonstrate that redox imbalance, mitochondrial abnormality, and oxidative stress contribute to lung injury in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Silver nanoparticle catalysed redox reaction: An electron relay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, Kaushik; Witcomb, Mike; Scurrell, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A silver cluster shows efficient catalytic activity in a redox reaction because the cluster acts as the electron relay centre behaving alternatively as an acceptor and as a donor of electrons. An effective transfer of electrons is possible when the redox potential of the cluster is intermediate between the electron donor and electron acceptor system

  4. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  5. Double-membrane triple-electrolyte redox flow battery design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushan, Yan; Gu, Shuang; Gong, Ke

    2018-03-13

    A redox flow battery is provided having a double-membrane (one cation exchange membrane and one anion exchange membrane), triple-electrolyte (one electrolyte in contact with the negative electrode, one electrolyte in contact with the positive electrode, and one electrolyte positioned between and in contact with the two membranes). The cation exchange membrane is used to separate the negative or positive electrolyte and the middle electrolyte, and the anion exchange membrane is used to separate the middle electrolyte and the positive or negative electrolyte. This design physically isolates, but ionically connects, the negative electrolyte and positive electrolyte. The physical isolation offers great freedom in choosing redox pairs in the negative electrolyte and positive electrolyte, making high voltage of redox flow batteries possible. The ionic conduction drastically reduces the overall ionic crossover between negative electrolyte and positive one, leading to high columbic efficiency.

  6. Changes in redox properties of humic acids upon sorption to alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdiaga, Edisson; Orsetti, Silvia; Jindal, Sharmishta; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction A prominent role of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in biogeochemical processes is its ability to act as an electron shuttle, accelerating rates between a bulk electron donor and an acceptor. The underlying processes are reversible redox reactions of quinone moieties.1 This shuttling effect has been studied in two major areas: transformation of redox active pollutants and microbial respiration.2-3 Previous studies primarily compared effects in the presence or absence of NOM without addressing the redox properties of NOM nor its speciation. The interaction between humic acids (HA) and minerals might change properties and reactivity of organic matter. Specifically, we investigate whether changes in the redox properties of a HA occur upon sorption to redox inactive minerals. Since fractionation and conformational rearrangements of NOM moieties upon sorption are likely to happen, the redox properties of the NOM fractions upon sorption might differ as well. 2. Materials and methods Elliot Soil Humic Acid (ESHA), Pahokee Peat Humic Acid (PPHA) and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) were used as received from IHSS. Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was suspended in 0.1M KCl. Sorption was studied at pH 7.0 in duplicate batch experiments for several HA/Al2O3 ratios. For the suspension (mineral + sorbed HA, plus dissolved HA), the filtrate (0.45μm) and the HA stock solution, the electron donating and accepting capacities (EDC and EAC) were determined following established procedures.4 3. Results All studied HA-Al2O3 systems showed similar behavior with regard to changes in redox properties. There was a significant increase in the EDC of the whole suspension compared to the stock solutions and the non-sorbed HA in the filtrate (up to 300% for PPHA). This effect was more pronounced with increasing amounts of sorbed HA in the suspension. Although ESHA had the highest sorption capacity on Al2O3 (~ 6 times higher than PPHA & SRHA), it showed the smallest changes in redox

  7. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry can greatly improve the selectivity of biomolecule-ligand binding on account of recognition-directed interactions. In addition, functional structures and the actuation of supramolecular assemblies in molecular systems can be controlled efficiently through various host-guest chemistry. Together, these highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited as an alternative methodology for applications in the field of programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular soft materials through the reversible binding between complementary components. Many processes in living systems such as biotransformation, transportation of matter, and energy transduction begin with interfacial molecular recognition, which is greatly influenced by various external stimuli at biointerfaces. Detailed investigations about the molecular recognition at interfaces can result in a better understanding of life science, and further guide us in developing new biomaterials and medicines. In order to mimic complicated molecular-recognition systems observed in nature that adapt to changes in their environment, combining host-guest chemistry and surface science is critical for fabricating the next generation of multifunctional biointerfaces with efficient stimuli-responsiveness and good biocompatibility. In this Account, we will summarize some recent progress on multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces and biosurfaces fabricated by cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and highlight their potential applications including drug delivery, bioelectrocatalysis, and reversible adsorption and resistance of peptides, proteins, and cells. In addition, these biointerfaces and biosurfaces demonstrate efficient response toward various external stimuli, such as UV light, pH, redox chemistry, and competitive guests. All of these external stimuli can aid in mimicking the biological stimuli evident in complex biological environments

  8. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    studied as a function of tunnel oxide thickness, dielectric permittivity and energy barrier, and modified Butler-Volmer expressions were postulated to describe the redox kinetics. The speed vs. retention performance of the devices was improved via asymmetric layered tunnel barriers. The properties of molecules can be tailored by molecular design and synthetic chemistry. In this work, it was demonstrated that an alternate route to tune/enhance the properties of the hybrid device is to engineer the substrate (silicon) component. The molecules were attached to diode surfaces to tune redox voltages and improve charge-retention characteristics. N+ pockets embedded in P-Si well were utilized to obtain multiple states from a two-state molecule. The structure was also employed as a characterization tool in investigating the intrinsic properties of the molecules such as lateral conductivity within the monolayer. Redox molecules were also incorporated on an ultra thin gate-oxide of Si MOSFETs with the intent of studying the interaction of redox states with Si MOSFETs. The discrete molecular states were manifested in the drain current and threshold voltage characteristics of the device. This work demonstrates the multi-state modulation of Si-MOSFETs' drain current via redox-active molecular monolayers. Polymeric films of redox-active molecules were incorporated to improve the charge-density (ON/OFF ratio) and these structures may be employed for multi-state, low-voltage Flash memory applications. The most critical aspect of this research effort is to build a reliable and high density solid state memory technology. To this end, efforts were directed towards replacement of the electrolytic gate, which forms an extremely thin insulating double layer (˜10 nm) at the electrolyte-molecule interface, with a combination of an ultra-thin high-K dielectric layer and a metal gate. Several interesting observations were made in the research approaches towards integration and provided valuable

  9. New Supercapacitors Based on the Synergetic Redox Effect between Electrode and Electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Redox electrolytes can provide significant enhancement of capacitance for supercapacitors. However, more important promotion comes from the synergetic effect and matching between the electrode and electrolyte. Herein, we report a novel electrochemical system consisted of a polyanilline/carbon nanotube composite redox electrode and a hydroquinone (HQ redox electrolyte, which exhibits a specific capacitance of 7926 F/g in a three-electrode system when the concentration of HQ in H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte is 2 mol/L, and the maximum energy density of 114 Wh/kg in two-electrode symmetric configuration. Moreover, the specific capacitance retention of 96% after 1000 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles proves an excellent cyclic stability. These ultrahigh performances of the supercapacitor are attributed to the synergistic effect both in redox polyanilline-based electrolyte and the redox hydroquinone electrode.

  10. Catechol-chitosan redox capacitor for added amplification in electrochemical immunoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Liu, Yi; Guan, Yongguang; Bhokisham, Narendranath; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Kim, Eunkyoung; Shi, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Qin; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2018-05-22

    Antibodies are common recognition elements for molecular detection but often the signals generated by their stoichiometric binding must be amplified to enhance sensitivity. Here, we report that an electrode coated with a catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify the electrochemical signal generated from an alkaline phosphatase (AP) linked immunoassay. Specifically, the AP product p-aminophenol (PAP) undergoes redox-cycling in the redox capacitor to generate amplified oxidation currents. We estimate an 8-fold amplification associated with this redox-cycling in the capacitor (compared to detection by a bare electrode). Importantly, this capacitor-based amplification is generic and can be coupled to existing amplification approaches based on enzyme-linked catalysis or magnetic nanoparticle-based collection/concentration. Thus, the capacitor should enhance sensitivities in conventional immunoassays and also provide chemical to electrical signal transduction for emerging applications in molecular communication. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent aspects of self-oscillating polymeric materials: designing self-oscillating polymers coupled with supramolecular chemistry and ionic liquid science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2014-06-14

    Herein, we summarise the recent developments in self-oscillating polymeric materials based on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry, where aggregates of molecular building blocks with non-covalent bonds evolve the temporal or spatiotemporal structure. By utilising the rhythmic oscillation of the association/dissociation of molecular aggregates coupled with the redox oscillation by the BZ reaction, novel soft materials that express similar functions as those of living matter will be achieved. Further, from the viewpoint of materials science, our recent approach to prepare self-oscillating materials that operate long-term under mild conditions will be introduced.

  12. New insights into redox regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fenglian; Wang, Kui; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Jingwen; Nice, Edouard Collins; Huang, Canhua

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), the natural byproducts of aerobic metabolism, are precisely orchestrated to evoke diverse signaling pathways. To date, studies have focused mainly on the detrimental effects of ROS in stem cells. Recently, accumulating evidence has suggested that ROS also function as second messengers that modulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by regulating intricate signaling networks. Although many efforts have been made to clarify the general effects of ROS on signal transduction in stem cells, less is known about the initial and direct executors of ROS signaling, which are known as 'redox sensors'. Modifications of cysteine residues in redox sensors are of significant importance in the modulation of protein function in response to different redox conditions. Intriguingly, most key molecules in ROS signaling and cell cycle regulation (including transcriptional factors and kinases) that are crucial in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation have the potential to be redox sensors. We highlight herein the importance of redox regulation of these key regulators in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms of redox regulation in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation will open exciting new perspectives for stem cell biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. T-REX on-demand redox targeting in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Saba; Long, Marcus J C; Lin, Hong-Yu; Zhao, Yi; Haegele, Joseph A; Pham, Vanha N; Lee, Dustin K; Aye, Yimon

    2016-12-01

    This protocol describes targetable reactive electrophiles and oxidants (T-REX)-a live-cell-based tool designed to (i) interrogate the consequences of specific and time-resolved redox events, and (ii) screen for bona fide redox-sensor targets. A small-molecule toolset comprising photocaged precursors to specific reactive redox signals is constructed such that these inert precursors specifically and irreversibly tag any HaloTag-fused protein of interest (POI) in mammalian and Escherichia coli cells. Syntheses of the alkyne-functionalized endogenous reactive signal 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE(alkyne)) and the HaloTag-targetable photocaged precursor to HNE(alkyne) (also known as Ht-PreHNE or HtPHA) are described. Low-energy light prompts photo-uncaging (t 1/2 <1-2 min) and target-specific modification. The targeted modification of the POI enables precisely timed and spatially controlled redox events with no off-target modification. Two independent pathways are described, along with a simple setup to functionally validate known targets or discover novel sensors. T-REX sidesteps mixed responses caused by uncontrolled whole-cell swamping with reactive signals. Modification and downstream response can be analyzed by in-gel fluorescence, proteomics, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and dual-luciferase reporters, or flow cytometry assays. T-REX targeting takes 4 h from initial probe treatment. Analysis of targeted redox responses takes an additional 4-24 h, depending on the nature of the pathway and the type of readouts used.

  14. SUPECA kinetics for scaling redox reactions in networks of mixed substrates and consumers and an example application to aerobic soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin-Yun; Riley, William J.

    2017-09-01

    Several land biogeochemical models used for studying carbon-climate feedbacks have begun explicitly representing microbial dynamics. However, to our knowledge, there has been no theoretical work on how to achieve a consistent scaling of the complex biogeochemical reactions from microbial individuals to populations, communities, and interactions with plants and mineral soils. We focus here on developing a mathematical formulation of the substrate-consumer relationships for consumer-mediated redox reactions of the form A + BE→ products, where products could be, e.g., microbial biomass or bioproducts. Under the quasi-steady-state approximation, these substrate-consumer relationships can be formulated as the computationally difficult full equilibrium chemistry problem or approximated analytically with the dual Monod (DM) or synthesizing unit (SU) kinetics. We find that DM kinetics is scaling inconsistently for reaction networks because (1) substrate limitations are not considered, (2) contradictory assumptions are made regarding the substrate processing rate when transitioning from single- to multi-substrate redox reactions, and (3) the product generation rate cannot be scaled from one to multiple substrates. In contrast, SU kinetics consistently scales the product generation rate from one to multiple substrates but predicts unrealistic results as consumer abundances reach large values with respect to their substrates. We attribute this deficit to SU's failure to incorporate substrate limitation in its derivation. To address these issues, we propose SUPECA (SU plus the equilibrium chemistry approximation - ECA) kinetics, which consistently imposes substrate and consumer mass balance constraints. We show that SUPECA kinetics satisfies the partition principle, i.e., scaling invariance across a network of an arbitrary number of reactions (e.g., as in Newton's law of motion and Dalton's law of partial pressures). We tested SUPECA kinetics with the equilibrium chemistry

  15. Analysis of redox additive-based overcharge protection for rechargeable lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Surampudi, S.; Attia, A. I.; Bankston, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    The overcharge condition in secondary lithium batteries employing redox additives for overcharge protection, has been theoretically analyzed in terms of a finite linear diffusion model. The analysis leads to expressions relating the steady-state overcharge current density and cell voltage to the concentration, diffusion coefficient, standard reduction potential of the redox couple, and interelectrode distance. The model permits the estimation of the maximum permissible overcharge rate for any chosen set of system conditions. Digital simulation of the overcharge experiment leads to numerical representation of the potential transients, and estimate of the influence of diffusion coefficient and interelectrode distance on the transient attainment of the steady state during overcharge. The model has been experimentally verified using 1,1-prime-dimethyl ferrocene as a redox additive. The analysis of the experimental results in terms of the theory allows the calculation of the diffusion coefficient and the formal potential of the redox couple. The model and the theoretical results may be exploited in the design and optimization of overcharge protection by the redox additive approach.

  16. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  17. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina P. Poulianiti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD.

  18. Molecular Controls of the Oxygenation and Redox Reactions of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I.; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The broad classes of O2-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O2-binding functions. Recent Advances: The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. Critical Issues: An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. Future Directions: This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2298–2313. PMID:23198874

  19. Redox regulation in photosynthetic organisms: signaling, acclimation, and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2009-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have multifaceted roles in the orchestration of plant gene expression and gene-product regulation. Cellular redox homeostasis is considered to be an "integrator" of information from metabolism and the environment controlling plant growth and acclimation responses, as well as cell suicide events. The different ROS forms influence gene expression in specific and sometimes antagonistic ways. Low molecular antioxidants (e.g., ascorbate, glutathione) serve not only to limit the lifetime of the ROS signals but also to participate in an extensive range of other redox signaling and regulatory functions. In contrast to the low molecular weight antioxidants, the "redox" states of components involved in photosynthesis such as plastoquinone show rapid and often transient shifts in response to changes in light and other environmental signals. Whereas both types of "redox regulation" are intimately linked through the thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, and pyridine nucleotide pools, they also act independently of each other to achieve overall energy balance between energy-producing and energy-utilizing pathways. This review focuses on current knowledge of the pathways of redox regulation, with discussion of the somewhat juxtaposed hypotheses of "oxidative damage" versus "oxidative signaling," within the wider context of physiological function, from plant cell biology to potential applications.

  20. Chemistry and electrochemistry in trifluoroacetic acid. Comparison with acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Gerard

    1972-01-01

    As the trifluoroacetic acid is, with the acetic acid, one of most often used carboxylic acids as solvent, notably in organic chemistry, this research thesis addresses some relatively simple complexing and redox reactions to highlight the peculiar feature of this acid, and to explain its very much different behaviour with respect to acetic acid. The author develops the notion of acidity level in solvents of low dielectric constant. The second part addresses a specific solvent: BF 3 (CH 3 COOH) 2 . The boron trifluoride strengthens the acidity of acetic acid and modifies its chemical and physical-chemical properties. In the third part, the author compares solvent properties of CF 3 COOH and CH 3 COOH. Noticed differences explain why the trifluoroacetic acid is a more interesting reaction environment than acetic acid for reactions such as electrophilic substitutions or protein solubilisation [fr

  1. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Rakhi, R. B.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2013-05-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles).We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, supporting figures including SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, CV and CD curves and a summary table of capacitance. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00773a

  2. The Deep Thioredoxome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: New Insights into Redox Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Mauriès, Adeline; Maes, Alexandre; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Hamon, Marion; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Marchand, Christophe H

    2017-08-07

    Thiol-based redox post-translational modifications have emerged as important mechanisms of signaling and regulation in all organisms, and thioredoxin plays a key role by controlling the thiol-disulfide status of target proteins. Recent redox proteomic studies revealed hundreds of proteins regulated by glutathionylation and nitrosylation in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, while much less is known about the thioredoxin interactome in this organism. By combining qualitative and quantitative proteomic analyses, we have comprehensively investigated the Chlamydomonas thioredoxome and 1188 targets have been identified. They participate in a wide range of metabolic pathways and cellular processes. This study broadens not only the redox regulation to new enzymes involved in well-known thioredoxin-regulated metabolic pathways but also sheds light on cellular processes for which data supporting redox regulation are scarce (aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, nuclear transport, etc). Moreover, we characterized 1052 thioredoxin-dependent regulatory sites and showed that these data constitute a valuable resource for future functional studies in Chlamydomonas. By comparing this thioredoxome with proteomic data for glutathionylation and nitrosylation at the protein and cysteine levels, this work confirms the existence of a complex redox regulation network in Chlamydomonas and provides evidence of a tremendous selectivity of redox post-translational modifications for specific cysteine residues. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naudet

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potential method (SP and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have been applied to the contaminant plume associated with the Entressen landfill in south-east France. The self-potential depends on groundwater flow (electrokinetic contribution and redox conditions ('electro-redox' contribution. Using the variation of the piezometric head in the aquifer, the electrokinetic contribution is removed from the SP signals. A good linear correlation (R2=0.85 is obtained between the residual SP data and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. This relationship is used to draw a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. The electrical conductivity of the subsoil is obtained from 3D-ERT analysis. A good linear correlation (R2=0.91 is observed between the electrical conductivity of the aquifer determined from the 3D-ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. This indicates that the formation factor is nearly homogeneous in the shallow aquifer at the scale of the ERT. From this correlation, a map of the pore water conductivity of the aquifer is obtained. Keywords: self-potential, redox potential, electrical resistivity tomography, fluid conductivity, contaminant plume

  4. Investigation of the chemistry of the dielectric/FeCoTb interface by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stickle, W.F.; Coulman, D.

    1987-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of magneto-optic structures of sputter deposited SiO, SiO 2 , Si 3 N 4 /FeCoTb/SiO, SiO 2 , and Si 3 N 4 was studied in detail by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). XPS and AES depth profiles have revealed a substantial amount of redox chemistry at the dielectric/rare-earth transition metal interfaces. The chemical reactions occur preferentially with the terbium as revealed in the XPS portion of the study by the formation of terbium oxide and terbium silicide. In the case of Si 3 N 4 evidence of TbN/sub x/ has also been observed. ''As deposited'' and annealed samples of the magneto-optic structures are compared and contrasted. It is concluded that Si 3 N 4 is a superior dielectric for magneto-optic media

  5. A redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and application in immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ru-Jia; Ma, Wei; Peng, Mao-Pan; Bai, Zhi-Shan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-31

    A novel redox-mediated chromogenic reaction was demonstrated based on the reaction between HAuCl4 and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), which generate various color responses from red to green in the resulting solutions. Various redox substance could be used to mediate the reaction and trigger a distinct color response. We established a sensitive hydrogen peroxide colorimetric sensor based on the redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and depicted the application both in detection of enzyme and in an immunoassay. Combining the traditional chromogenic reagent with gold nanoparticles, our assay has the advantage in short response time (within three minutes), high sensitivity (10(-12) g mL(-1) for HBsAg) and stability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Linking mitochondrial bioenergetics to insulin resistance via redox biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Chronic overnutrition and physical inactivity are major risk factors for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Recent research indicates that overnutrition generates an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) emission from mitochondria, serving as a release valve to relieve the reducing pressure created by fuel overload, as well as a primary signal to ultimately decrease insulin sensitivity. H2O2 is a major input to cellular redox circuits that link to cysteine residues throughout the entire proteome to regulate cell function. Here we review the principles of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox systems biology and offer new insight as to how H2O2 emission may be linked via redox biology to the etiology of insulin resistance. PMID:22305519

  7. Electrically Reversible Redox-Switchable Polydopamine Films for Regulating Cell Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Guoxin; Liu, Yan; Wu, Yuxuan; Ouyang, Kongyou; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Liao, Jinwen; Ning, Chengyun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The phenolic/quinone groups on polydopamine can redox-switchable reversible under electrical stimulation. • The quinone groups on PDA (oxidized PDA) enhanced cell spreading and proliferation. • The phenolic groups on PDA (reduced PDA) induced cell differentiation. - Abstract: Switchable surfaces that respond to external stimuli are important for regulating cell behavior. The results herein suggest that the redox process of polydopamine (PDA) is a switching reaction between oxidized polydopamine and reduced polydopamine, involving an interconversion of coupled two-proton (2H + ) and two-electron (2e − ) processes. The redox-switchable reversible surface potential arising from the potential-tunable redox reaction of the phenolic and quinone groups on PDA on titanium induced both cell adhesion and spreading. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the quinone groups on PDA greatly enhanced pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 cell spreading and proliferation. Phenolic groups enhanced the induction of differentiation. The proposed methodology may allow further investigation of switchable surfaces for biological and medical applications.

  8. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B. [División de Geociencias Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene, E-mail: rene@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO{sub 3} to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents.

  9. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E.; Celis, Lourdes B.; Cervantes, Francisco J.; Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO 3 to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents

  10. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Teshima, Norio; Maqsood, Syed Raashid; Akhoon, Showket Ahmad; Peerzada, Ghulam Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III) redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated...

  11. Tc(VII) and Cr(VI) Interaction with Naturally Reduced Ferruginous Smectite from a Redox Transition Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Pearce, Carolyn I; Neumann, Anke; Kovarik, Libor; Zhu, Mengqiang; Ilton, Eugene S; Bowden, Mark E; Resch, Charles T; Arey, Bruce W; Arenholz, Elke; Felmy, Andrew R; Rosso, Kevin M

    2017-08-15

    Fe(II)-rich clay minerals found in subsurface redox transition zones (RTZs) can serve as important sources of electron equivalents limiting the transport of redox-active contaminants. While most laboratory reactivity studies are based on reduced model clays, the reactivity of naturally reduced field samples remains poorly explored. Characterization of the clay size fraction of a fine-grained unit from the RTZ interface at the Hanford site, Washington, including mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and Fe(II)/(III) content, indicates that ferruginous montmorillonite is the dominant mineralogical component. Oxic and anoxic fractions differ significantly in Fe(II) natural content, but Fe TOTAL remains constant, demonstrating no Fe loss during its reduction-oxidation cyclings. At native pH of 8.6, the anoxic fraction, despite its significant Fe(II), ∼23% of Fe TOTAL , exhibits minimal reactivity with TcO 4 - and CrO 4 2- and much slower reaction kinetics than those measured in studies with biologically/chemically reduced model clays. Reduction capacity is enhanced by added/sorbed Fe(II) (if Fe(II) SORBED > 8% clay Fe(II) LABILE ); however, the kinetics of this conceptually surface-mediated reaction remain sluggish. Surface-sensitive Fe L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that Fe(II) SORBED and the resulting reducing equivalents are not available in the outermost few nanometers of clay surfaces. Slow kinetics thus appear related to diffusion-limited access to electron equivalents retained within the clay mineral structure.